WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer treatments radiotherapy

  1. The place of radiotherapy in the treatment of vulva cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss the therapeutic aspects of the treatment of vulva cancers. This analytic retrospective study is based on a set of 15 patients who have been treated between 1996 and 2010, for an epidermoid cancer for 14 of them. Eleven of them have been irradiated. This rare cancer has a negative prognosis, mainly because of early ganglionary metastases. Radiotherapy (external or interstitial curie-therapy) is a prevailing therapeutic tool. Chemotherapy is emerging, notably concomitantly with radiotherapy. Short communication

  2. Mammography findings following electron intraoperative radiotherapy or external radiotherapy for breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, B.P.S.A., E-mail: pacebarbara@hotmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Radiologia, Av. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar 255, 3o andar, Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05403 001 (Brazil); Frasson, A.L., E-mail: alfrasson@hotmail.com [Servico de Mastologia, Hospital Sao Lucas da PUC do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga, 6690, conjunto 714, Jardim Botanico, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande Sul 90 610 000 (Brazil); Santos, M.M., E-mail: gringa2009@hotmail.com [Hospital Sao Lucas da PUC do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga, 6690, conjunto 714, Jardim Botanico, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande Sul 90 610 000 (Brazil); Barros, N. de, E-mail: nestor.barros@hotmail.com [Departamento de Radiologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Radiologia, Av. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar 255, 3o andar, Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05403 001 (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Radiotherapy following breast cancer conserving surgery decreases the risks of local recurrence. Because 85% of breast cancers relapse in or around the surgical bed there has been some debate on the need for irradiating the whole breast. Electron intraoperative radiotherapy (ELIOT) has been used as a viable alternative for conventional external radiotherapy (RT). While the former requires a single dose of 21 Gy in the tumoral bed, the latter requires 5-6 weeks of irradiation with a total dose of 50 Gy and a boost of 10 Gy that irradiates the surgical bed. Herein, we investigated whether any significant differences exist between the mammography findings obtained from patients submitted to one of the two techniques. Two groups of 30 patients each were included in this study. All patients had mammographies taken at 12 and 24 months after finishing treatment. The mammography findings evaluated were: cutaneous thickening (>2 mm), architectural distortion secondary to fibrosis, edema, calcifications (both benign and malignant), and fat necrosis. For all variables studied, there was no statistical difference between the two groups. This indicates that the mammography findings obtained in either 12- or 24-month follow-up periods after breast cancer conserving surgery are similar, regardless of which of the two radiotherapy techniques (ELIOT or RT) is employed as a treatment for breast cancer.

  3. Changes in sexual function after radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckendorf, V. [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Vandoeuvre-les Nancy (France); Hay, M. [Centre Val d`Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Rozan, R. [Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Lagrange, J.L. [Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); N`Guyen, T. [Centre Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Giraud, B. [CCMI Commission de Cooperation Medicale Intercentres, Centre Hospitalier Univ. et Centre Jean Perrin, Clement-Ferrand (France)

    1996-01-01

    The objective was to assess sexual function before and after definitive irradiation for the treatment of cancer of the prostate. The study comprised 67 patients (mean age 68 years) treated in five radiotherapy departments and assessed with repeated questionnaires about their libido, arousal, frequency and quality of intercourse, and sexual satisfaction. Interviews were obtained before radiotherapy and at the end of the first year after treatment. Sixty-three patients were married and 50 had a sexually effective partner. Forty-six patients presented with another pathology or medical treatment capable of inducing sexual dysfunction. Before radiotherapy, 40 patients were sexually active, with good to acceptable intercourse. Between 10 and 24 months after the end of radiotherapy, no disease progression was observed and prostate-specific antigen levels remained high in only two patients. Sexual function was preserved in 67% of patients but only 50% observed no change. The functional prognosis seemed to be related to the initial frequency and quality of intercourse; more than three times per month, the prognosis remained good, under three per month, it was poor. The patient`s age was a predictive factor for the frequency of intercourse. (author).

  4. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  5. Combined Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is used to treat approximately 50% of all cancer patients, with varying success. Radiation therapy has become an integral part of modern treatment strategies for many types of cancer in recent decades, but is associated with a risk of long-term adverse effects. Of these side effects, cardiac complications are particularly relevant since they not only adversely affect quality of life but can also be potentially life-threatening. The dose of ionizing radiation that can be given to the tumor is determined by the sensitivity of the surrounding normal tissues. Strategies to improve radiotherapy therefore aim to increase the effect on the tumor or to decrease the effects on normal tissues, which must be achieved without sensitizing the normal tissues in the first approach and without protecting the tumor in the second approach. Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR), which can be attributed to the fact that heat is a pleiotropic damaging agent, affecting multiple cell components to varying degrees by altering protein structures, thus influencing the DNA damage response. Hyperthermia induces heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; HSPA1A) synthesis and enhances telomerase activity. HSPA1A expression is associated with radioresistance. Inactivation of HSPA1A and telomerase increases residual DNA DSBs post IR exposure, which correlates with increased cell killing, supporting the role of HSPA1A and telomerase in IR-induced DNA damage repair. Thus, hyperthermia influences several molecular parameters involved in sensitizing tumor cells to radiation and can enhance the potential of targeted radiotherapy. Therapy-inducible vectors are useful for conditional expression of therapeutic genes in gene therapy, which is based on the control of gene expression by conventional treatment modalities. The understanding of the molecular response of cells and tissues to ionizing radiation has lead to a new appreciation of the exploitable genetic

  6. Combined Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Punit [Department of Pathology, Scott & White Hospital and the Texas A& M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX 76504 (United States); Hurwitz, Mark D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Medical Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Asea, Alexzander, E-mail: asea@medicine.tamhsc.edu [Department of Pathology, Scott & White Hospital and the Texas A& M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX 76504 (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Radiotherapy is used to treat approximately 50% of all cancer patients, with varying success. Radiation therapy has become an integral part of modern treatment strategies for many types of cancer in recent decades, but is associated with a risk of long-term adverse effects. Of these side effects, cardiac complications are particularly relevant since they not only adversely affect quality of life but can also be potentially life-threatening. The dose of ionizing radiation that can be given to the tumor is determined by the sensitivity of the surrounding normal tissues. Strategies to improve radiotherapy therefore aim to increase the effect on the tumor or to decrease the effects on normal tissues, which must be achieved without sensitizing the normal tissues in the first approach and without protecting the tumor in the second approach. Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR), which can be attributed to the fact that heat is a pleiotropic damaging agent, affecting multiple cell components to varying degrees by altering protein structures, thus influencing the DNA damage response. Hyperthermia induces heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; HSPA1A) synthesis and enhances telomerase activity. HSPA1A expression is associated with radioresistance. Inactivation of HSPA1A and telomerase increases residual DNA DSBs post IR exposure, which correlates with increased cell killing, supporting the role of HSPA1A and telomerase in IR-induced DNA damage repair. Thus, hyperthermia influences several molecular parameters involved in sensitizing tumor cells to radiation and can enhance the potential of targeted radiotherapy. Therapy-inducible vectors are useful for conditional expression of therapeutic genes in gene therapy, which is based on the control of gene expression by conventional treatment modalities. The understanding of the molecular response of cells and tissues to ionizing radiation has lead to a new appreciation of the exploitable genetic

  7. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  8. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  9. Radiotherapy for cancer treatment: A growing priority for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , there was a deplorable accident with one of the cobalt units. In 1996, 115 patients were seriously over-irradiated. This sad event made cancer a very important political and medical issue in Costa Rica. As a consequence of this accident, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) made a comprehensive assessment that revealed deficiencies in quality assurance practices. The assessment also established that a) the radiotherapy equipment had exceeded its useful life, estimated at 15 years; b) the country lacked adequate treatment standards; c) there was a shortage of trained personnel; and d) some brachytherapy equipment had expired 10 years previously. Because of this situation, the Costa Rican Institute Against Cancer (known by the acronym ICCC in Spanish) was created in 1998. Its mission is to support and promote cancer prevention and control. An important fact is that the legislation creating the ICCC states as a priority the construction of a specialized hospital. Planning for the new facility was based on the estimated 7,000 new cancer cases every year in Costa Rica, of which 40% (2,800 patients) involve radio-sensitive tumors Of these, about 30% (840 patients) must receive linear accelerator therapy. Given that each linear accelerator may treat 400 patients a year, and taking into consideration that the construction of a specialized hospital must be through public contract (a very complicated and slow process in Costa Rica), the Costa Rican Social Security Fund (Spanish acronym CCSS) decided to purchase three new cobalt units (THERATON 780-E Model 2000), new brachytherapy equipment, two linear accelerators, and X-ray equipment for superficial therapy. Likewise, an early detection program was implemented for cancer of the uterine cervix, which now covers 96% of its target population. A pilot plan for breast cancer detection was started. There are also plans to implement a nationwide gastric cancer detection program, currently sponsored by the Japanese Government

  10. The place of radiotherapy in the treatment of vulva cancer; Place de la radiotherapie dans le traitement du cancer de la vulve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belajouza, S.; Said, N.; Yahiaoui, S.; Bouauoina, N. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital Farhat-Hached, Sousse (Tunisia)

    2011-10-15

    The authors discuss the therapeutic aspects of the treatment of vulva cancers. This analytic retrospective study is based on a set of 15 patients who have been treated between 1996 and 2010, for an epidermoid cancer for 14 of them. Eleven of them have been irradiated. This rare cancer has a negative prognosis, mainly because of early ganglionary metastases. Radiotherapy (external or interstitial curie-therapy) is a prevailing therapeutic tool. Chemotherapy is emerging, notably concomitantly with radiotherapy. Short communication

  11. Impact of Radiotherapy Treatment on Jordanian Cancer Patients’ Quality of Life and Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholoud Abu Obead

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The distressing treatment of cancer whether chemotherapy or radiotherapy is associated with fatigue and has negative impact on patient quality of life (QOL. Objectives: The purposes of this study were to examine the impact of radiotherapy treatment on Jordanian cancer patients’ QOL and fatigue, and to explore the relationship between fatigue and QOL. Methods: One group quasi-experimental correlational design was used with 82 patients who had been diagnosed with cancer and required radiotherapy treatment. QOL was measured using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G. Fatigue was measured using Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS. Data were collected over a period of three months, and analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation, descriptive statistics and paired-sample t-test. Results: Significant differences were found between pre- and post- radiotherapy QOL mean total scores (t=19.3, df=79, P<0.05, as well as physical, emotional, sexual, and functional wellbeing dimensions. Statistically significant differences were found between pre- and post- radiotherapy fatigue mean total scores (t=-8.95, df=79, P<0.05, as well as on behavioral, affective, sensory, and cognitive dimensions of PFS. Quality of life total scores correlated significantly and negatively with total fatigue scores (P<0.01. Conclusions: Exposure of cancer patient to radiotherapy treatment increased their fatigue level and decreased their QOL.  Nurses should assess cancer patients before, during, and after their treatment to design proper interventions to reduce fatigue and enhance QOL.

  12. Unilateral Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Tonsil Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chronowski, Gregory M., E-mail: gchronowski@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Long Island Jewish Hospital (United States); Shah, Shalin J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kupferman, Michael E. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, Kian K.; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess, through a retrospective review, clinical outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with unilateral radiotherapy techniques that irradiate the involved tonsil region and ipsilateral neck only. Methods and Materials: Of 901 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated with radiotherapy at our institution, we identified 102 that were treated using unilateral radiotherapy techniques. All patients had their primary site of disease restricted to the tonsillar fossa or anterior pillar, with <1 cm involvement of the soft palate. Patients had TX (n = 17 patients), T1 (n = 52), or T2 (n = 33) disease, with Nx (n = 3), N0 (n = 33), N1 (n = 23), N2a (n = 21), or N2b (n = 22) neck disease. Results: Sixty-one patients (60%) underwent diagnostic tonsillectomy before radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (26%) underwent excision of a cervical lymph node or neck dissection before radiotherapy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 38 months. Locoregional control at the primary site and ipsilateral neck was 100%. Two patients experienced contralateral nodal recurrence (2%). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95% and 96%, respectively. The 5-year freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence rate was 96%. Nine patients required feeding tubes during therapy. Of the 2 patients with contralateral recurrence, 1 experienced an isolated neck recurrence and was salvaged with contralateral neck dissection only and remains alive and free of disease. The other patient presented with a contralateral base of tongue tumor and involved cervical lymph node, which may have represented a second primary tumor, and died of disease. Conclusions: Unilateral radiotherapy for patients with TX-T2, N0-N2b primary tonsil carcinoma results in high rates of disease control, with low rates of contralateral nodal failure and a low incidence of acute toxicity

  13. MODERN TECHNOLOGIES IN SQUAMOUS-CELL ANAL CANCER RADIOTHERAPY PLANNING AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Tkachev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous-cell anal cancer is a rare disease that requires a comprehensive approach in treatment and skilled professionals. Modern diagnostics is important for rational choice of treatment tactics. Radiotherapy is the cornerstone of sphincter-sparing anal cancer treatment. Radiotherapy dose, volume and duration are the key factors affecting treatment efficacy and toxicity.3D-conformal radiotherapy is a priority treatment allowing exact reproduction of treatment conditions, controlled by OBI (on-board imager and kV X-Ray and cone-beam CT analysis. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is a next-generation treatment with improved technologies, allowing better protection of normal tissues.Our experience with 21 squamous-cell anal cancer patients treated with IMRT during Nov 2011 – March 2013 is presented in this article.

  14. Cryotherapy and radiotherapy combination in extensive and recurrent types of head and neck skin cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of infiltrative skin cancer treatment based on different variants of radiotherapy and cryotherapy combination is described. During the period of 1988-2006 the Department of head and neck neoplasms of N. N. Blohin Russian Cancer Research Center provided radiation and cryogenic treatment of 94 patients with locally advanced head and neck epidermoid and basal cell cancer. For this purpose before every radiotherapy session the tumor was exposed to cryo cooling till freezing temperature (-5 degrees C). The total involution of tumors was observed at 91 patients. Residual tumors were removed surgically. The follow-up showed good functional and aesthetic results, retention of local tissues.

  15. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tiefenbacher Uta; Hüsing Johannes; Sohn Christof; Heil Joerg; Sterzing Florian; Fetzner Leonie; Häfner Matthias F; Jensen Alexandra D; Askoxylakis Vasileios; Wenz Frederik; Debus Jürgen; Hof Holger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost s...

  16. Oesophagus side effects related to the treatment of oesophageal cancer or radiotherapy of other thoracic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebahr, Sonja; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Nestle, Ursula; Brunner, Thomas B

    2016-08-01

    The oesophagus as a serial organ located in the central chest is frequent subject to "incidental" dose application in radiotherapy for several thoracic malignancies including oesophageal cancer itself. Especially due to the radiosensitive mucosa severe radiotherapy induced sequelae can occur, acute oesophagitis and strictures as late toxicity being the most frequent side-effects. In this review we focus on oesophageal side effects derived from treatment of gastrointestinal cancer and secondly provide an overview on oesophageal toxicity from conventional and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy to the thoracic area in general. Available data on pathogenesis, frequency, onset, and severity of oesophageal side effects are summarized. Whereas for conventional radiotherapy the associations of applied doses to certain volumes of the oesophagus are well described, the tolerance dose to the mediastinal structures for hypofractionated therapy is unknown. The review provides available attempts to predict the risk of oesophageal side effects from dosimetric parameters of SBRT. PMID:27644905

  17. Standards, options and recommendations (SOR) for the place of radiotherapy in treatment of renal cancer patients; Standards, options et recommandations pour la radiotherapie du cancer du rein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckendorf, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Bladou, F. [Hopital Salvador, 13 - Marseille (France); Farsi, F.; Kaemmerlen, P.; Negrier, S.; Philip, T. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Terrier-Lacombe, M.J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2000-06-01

    The 'Standards, Options and Recommendations' (SOR), initiated in 1993, is a collaborative project between the Federation of the French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), the 20 French Cancer Centres and specialists from French Public Universities, General Hospitals and Private Clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and outcome for cancer patients. The methodology is based on literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary expert group, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. To develop clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, management and treatment of patients with renal cancer. This review is part of previously published complete guidelines and focuses on the place of radiotherapy inthis disease. The data was identified by literature search using Medline (up to June 1999) and personal reference lists. The main endpoints considered were survival, risk factors for late effects of radiotherapy, safety and quality of life. The key recommendations are: in localised renal cancer, adjuvant radiotherapy has a limited role: it is not indicated for T1 and T2 tumours and there is no proof of a survival benefit for T3 N1-N2 tumours. Postoperative radiotherapy can be considered in young patients without risk factors for the development of post-radiotherapy complications and without loco-regional invasion (renal capsule, renal pelvis, vena cava, regional lymph nodes); for metastatic tumours, the multidisciplinary team must decide whether palliative radiotherapy is appropriate after consideration of the prognostic factors. An isolated metastasis can be treated by radiosurgery and stereotaxic radiosurgery may be of benefit in the case of one or two cerebral metastasis. The optimal dose for palliative treatment is not known. Radiotherapy followed by immunotherapy can also be considered if the patient has no contraindication to such treatments. (authors)

  18. Short treatment time and excellent treatment outcome in accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Hieda, Yoko; Yoshida, Rika; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Fuchiwaki, Takafumi; Aoi, Noriaki; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryohei; Inomata, Taisuke

    2015-11-01

    Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed as treatment for patients with T1 glottic cancer, and its utility was evaluated based on treatment outcomes and adverse effects. Fifty-eight men who had undergone radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor classification was Tis in 4 patients, T1a in 38, and T1b in 16. Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 55 patients. Travel time from home to hospital was 0-1 hour for 24 patients, 1-2 hours for 9, and >2 hours for 25. Laser vaporization was performed prior to radiotherapy in 38 patients, and 19 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with an agent such as S-1. Patients were irradiated twice daily using an irradiation container. Most patients received a dose of 1.5 Gy/fraction up to a total of 60 Gy. The median overall treatment time was 30 days, with a median observation period of 59.6 months. A complete response was observed in all patients. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 97.2%, 93.2%, and 97.8%, respectively. Although grade 3 pharyngeal mucositis was observed in 2 patients, there were no other grade 3 or higher acute adverse events. As late toxicity, grade 2 laryngeal edema and grade 1 laryngeal hemorrhage were observed in 1 patient each, but no serious events such as laryngeal necrosis or laryngeal stenosis were observed. In conclusion, this treatment method brings excellent outcome and will substantially reduce the treatment duration among patients who need to stay at nearby hotels while undergoing treatment at hospitals in rural areas. PMID:26663937

  19. Auger Emitter Based Radiotherapy- A Possible New Treatment for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredericia, Pil; Groesser, Torsten; Severin, Gregory;

    2014-01-01

    damage produced by Low-LET radiation used in current radiotherapy (2-3) Considerable efforts have been made in the past twenty years to develop Auger emitter-based radiotherapy However, previous studies lack precise measurement of RBE, which is the fundamental factor defining the relationship between...

  20. Preliminary Treatment Results of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kang-Hsing Fan; Yen-Chao Chen; Cheng-Keng Chuang; Min-Li Hsieh; Ji-Hong Hong

    2006-01-01

    Background: To review the initial treatment results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) for prostate cancer.Methods: Ninety-two patients treated with IMRT before July 2003 were included inthis study. The median follow-up was 32 months. The indications for IMRTincluded primary, adjuvant, and salvage treatment. Combined treatment withandrogen suppression therapy was variable. The primary study endpointswere chronic adverse events which were subjectively reported. Only patientswith an aden...

  1. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before radiotherapy can be initiated, the patient must be examined thoroughly according to specific protocol to determine the extent of the tumor. Surgical resection accompanied by radiotherapy may be necessary in instances of persistent carcinoma. The radiation response of the tumor must be evaluated, and the optimal tumor dose must be determined to ensure maximum destruction of the tumor and minimum damage to normal tissues. Follow-up examinations should emphasize good oral hygiene to prevent further disease. (U.S.)

  2. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  3. Second primary cancer after treatment for cervical cancer. Late effects after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, H.H.

    1988-02-15

    Using data from the population-based Danish Cancer Registry, the relative risk (RR) of second primary cancer was assessed among 24,970 women with invasive cervical cancer (1943-1982) and 19,470 women with carcinoma in situ of the cervix. The analysis was stratified according to treatment with (+) and without (-) radiation. For all second primaries combined, a RR+ = 1.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.18) and a RR- = 1.3 (95% CI = 1.13-1.40) was observed after invasive cervical cancers and a RR+ = 3.5 (95% CI = 1.4-7.2) and RR- = 1.1 (95% CI = 0.7-1.6) following in situ cancer. The small overall excess of second primary cancer is accounted for by an increase of some cancers such as lung, bladder, and a concurrent decrease in others such as breast. Although not statistically different from nonirradiated, the RR increased with time since treatment among irradiated invasive cervical cancer patients in organs close to and at intermediate distance from the cervix, reaching a maximum after 30 or more years of follow-up (RR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.4-2.5). Altogether, for these sites an excess of 64 cases per 10,000 women per year were attributable to radiation among survivors of 30+ years. The highest risks among long-term survivors were observed for the following: other genital organs (RR = 5.8; 95% CI = 1.8-13.0) bladder (RR = 5.5; 95% CI = 2.8-9.5), connective tissue (RR = 3.3; 95% CI = 0.4-12.0), stomach (RR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.1-4.7) and rectum (RR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.1-4.6). A significant deficit of risk for breast cancer (RR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6-0.8) was observed for 10+ years, may be attributable to the effect of ovarian ablation by radiotherapy.

  4. Role of curative radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1963 to 1974, 141 patients with lung cancer were treated with curative intent in the A. Maxwell Evans Clinic in Vancouver. The clinical presentation, age and sex distribution, histology, and reasons for surgery not being carried out are examined. The results of this treatment are presented. An attempt has been made to isolate a group of patients who have a better prognosis so that treatment selection can be improved. Hemoptysis, cough, dyspnea, and incidental finding on routine chest x-ray were the most common manner of presentation. Thirty-four percent of the patients were over 70 years of age and 13% were women. The crude overall three- and five-year survival rates were 18 and 10% (19 and 9% in the men, 17 and 14% in the women). Patients presenting with dyspnea had a better survival than those presenting with cough and hemoptysis. Patients with lesions less than 3 cm in diameter had a 28% three-year survival, compared with 14% for lesions greater than 5 cm in diameter. The three- and five-year survival rates in patients over 70 years of age were 23 and 17% respectively. The response to treatment and the survival were better in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-two percent were alive at three years and 12% at five years as compared with 9 and 5% for other histologies. Fifty-four percent of the 35 patients with a complete response and with squamous cell carcinoma were alive at three years, compared with only 8% of the 12 patients with other histologies who showed a complete response

  5. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  6. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in the treatment of early breast cancer: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Ismaili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT in early breast cancer was investigated by few authors and remains controversial. This treatment is more commonly used for locally advanced breast cancer and showed high rate of complete pathological response. A search of articles published in English literature, between 1980 and November 2012, was conducted on Medline using the following terms: "breast cancer", "chemotherapy", "concurrent radiotherapy", and "Trastuzumab". We identified five phase I/II trials and three randomized phase three trials evaluating concurrent chemoradiotherapy in the adjuvant of breast cancer. In patients with early breast cancer having positive lymph nodes, phases III clinical trials showed that CCRT improved local control after conservative breast surgery. However, these randomized trials used non-standard regimen: Cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF or fluorouracil, mitoxantrone and cyclophosphamide (FNC. In addition, in phases II clinical trials, concurrent use of taxanes and anthracycline with standard whole-breast irradiation showed high rate of toxicity: Pulmonary toxicity with taxane; and cardiac and skin toxicity with anthracycline. Consequentely, CCRT is not be used in practice because of concerns of toxicity with the standard drugs (anthracyclines and taxanes and radiation. Anthracyclines with partial breast irradiation (PBI was feasible according to one phase I clinical trial, and should be investigated in randomized clinical trials. Concurrent Trastuzumab plus radiotherapy is safe and can be used in HER2-positive breast cancer; in this case, cardiac volume sparing and patient selections for internal mammary chain irradiation are highly recommended. The present paper aimed to review the current data evaluating the efficacy and safety of CCRT in early breast cancer.

  7. Quantitative MR imaging in planning and assessing novel cancer treatments Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Baustert, I C

    2001-01-01

    Novel treatments in cancer, like conformal radiotherapy and anticancer drugs, require new MRI techniques to assess their benefits and potential. In conformal radiotherapy, MRI can be used to measure the shape and dose of the conformed radiation field in dose sensitive gel test-objects thus validating the predicted dose computed by complex programs. In antiangiogenic drug treatment, the vascular dysfunction of the tumour can be assessed by MRI prior to treatment. Response to treatment may also be monitored by measuring the changes in vascular function. In this thesis, MRI of polyacrylamide gels is investigated as a 3D dosimeter for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Quantitative MRI sequences capable of measuring the wide range of T2 values typically expected in gel dosimetry, are identified. Different T2 measurement methods are compared in terms of accuracy, signal to noise ratio and acquisition time. Examples of a complex dose distribution in 2D and 3D are presented and compared to the planned dose p...

  8. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Medical School

    2003-02-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  9. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  10. Particle radiotherapy emerging technology for treatment of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Narayan

    2016-01-01

    The results of decades of research and development are providing compelling evidence about the efficacy of radiation therapy with proton and carbon ion beams to achieve superior complication free tumor control leading to a world-wide rapid growth in their clinical use. This book contains comprehensive reviews of the state of the art of the technology and physics of heavy charge particle therapy by the experts from the leading cancer centers of world that will be valuable as a practical guide for radiation therapy professionals interested in these modalities.

  11. Radiotherapy for oncologic emergencies on weekends: examining reasons for treatment and patterns of practice at a Canadian cancer centre

    OpenAIRE

    Mitera, G.; Swaminath, A.; Wong, S.; Goh, P.; Robson, S.; Sinclair, E.; Danjoux, C.; Chow, E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy for oncologic emergencies is an important aspect of the management of cancer patients. These emergencies—which include malignant spinal cord compression, brain metastases, superior vena cava obstruction, and uncontrolled tumour hemorrhage —may require treatment outside of hospital hours, particularly on weekends and hospital holidays. To date, there remains no consensus among radiation oncologists regarding the indications and appropriateness of radiotherapy treatment on ...

  12. Clinical effect observation of VEGF expression interfered by Thalidomide combined with radiotherapy in esophageal cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prospectively study the dynamic variation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the short-term efficiency and the tolerability of the esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy combined with thalidomide. Methods: The serum samples of 86 esophageal cancer patients were collected before, during and after the radiotherapy. The VEGF levels were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 3 patients interrupted the treatment because of intolerance radiotherapy. Based on the changes of VEGF level, 32 esophageal cancer cases whose VEGF levels increased or remained were assigned to the group to which thalidomide was given during the whole course of radiotherapy. The rest 51 patients whose VEGF level decreased received radiotherapy without thalidomide during the whole course.In addition,30 healthy cases were included in control group. Then the efficiency and safety of the introduction of thalidomide in radiotherapy were investigated. Results: The VEGF levels of 86 esophageal cancer cases were significantly higher than the 30 healthy control cases (t=5.07, P<0.01), which were also correlated with the primary tumor size (t=4.55, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (t=7.50, P<0.01), histological type (F=3.40, P<0.01) and clinical stage (t=2.52, P<0.01). However, it was irrelevant to the lesion site,distant metastasis, X-ray pathologic type, gender or age (P>0.05). For the thalidomide involved group, the VEGF level after radiotherapy was significantly lower than during radiotherapy (t=2.37, P<0.05) with an effective rate of 71.88%. For the rest 51 cases without using thalidomide, the effective rate was 78.43% yet there was no significant difference between the VEGF levels during and after radiotherapy (t=0.18, P>0.05). 62.50% patients reported symptoms of dizzy and burnout after using thalidomide, while this incidence was 15.69% for the rest patients (χ2=19.28, P=0.000). For the groups with or without thalidomide combination, the sleepiness

  13. Postoperative radiotherapy in a shorter overall treatment time for patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical data suggests that irradiation given in a shorter overall treatment time with 2.25 and 2.5 Gy dose per fraction is equivalent to conventional treatment with 2 Gy per fraction. This change from conventional fractionation to a short term schedule has been introduced as the basis of a prospective, population based (phase IV) trial. A vast majority of radiotherapy departments (16) in Poland have entered the study. Patients with breast cancer following mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT) who require postoperative radiotherapy will enter this study. The conventional fractionation regimen (2 Gy per fraction /5 weeks) has been replaced by two schedules given in a shorter overall treatment time. Patients undergoing BCT will now receive 42.5 Gy in 2.5 Gy per fraction over 3.5 weeks while postmastectomy patients will receive 45 Gy in 2.25 Gy per fraction over 4 weeks. The study has been designed for 2000 patients and the anticipated accrual time is 1.5 year. Early and late complications will be evaluated at 1, 3, 5, 10 and 15 years. The principal aim of the study is to assess immediate and late post-irradiation complications. Cardiotoxicity will be assessed by comparison of events (myocardial infarction and/or cardiovascular deaths) between patients with tumours of the left breast and of the right breast. Additional evaluation covers local control, recurrence-free survival, overall survival and the aesthetic effects. Implementation of the short term radiotherapy schedule will reduce the waiting list for radiotherapy and thus allow for the treatment of more patients. We hope to reduce the cost of the treatment by approximately 25% and improve the quality of irradiation through its standardization. (author)

  14. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  15. [Current status and perspectives of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S X; Wang, L H

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in China. More than 80% of esophageal cancer patients are diagnosed at a late stage and are not eligible for surgery. Radiotherapy is one of the most important modalities in esophageal cancer treatment. Here we reviewed the advances in esophageal cancer radiotherapy and radiotherapy-based combined-modality therapy, such as optimization of radiation dose and target volume, application of precise radiotherapy technique and the integration of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  16. The situation of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion of gynecological cancers. La place de la radiotherapie dans le traitement de l'envahissement ganglionnaire des cancers gynecologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J.B. (Centre de Recherche de Lutte contre le Cancer Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France)); Gerbaulet, A. (Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France))

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors explain the role and possibilities of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion in gynecological cancers as uterine cervix carcinoma, uterus carcinoma, ovary carcinoma and vulva carcinoma.

  17. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet B. Eldredge-Hindy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT.

  18. Improved internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers. Methods: A total of 70 patients with stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancer, who were admitted to the authors' hospital (Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Oncology) during the period from May 2005 to August 2009, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy was carried out in 32 patients (study group), and simple radiotherapy was adopted in 38 patients (control group). For patients in study group, puncturing of right femoral artery using Seldinger's technique was performed, which was followed by right uterine artery chemoembolization and subsequent super-selective left iliac artery chemotherapy, which lasted for three days. The chemotherapeutic drugs included cisplatin and fluorouracil. Distance external beam linear accelerator was used for radiotherapy together with 192 Ir high dose rate brachytherapy. For patients in control group, only distance external beam linear accelerator radiotherapy with 192 Ir high dose rate brachytherapy was employed, with the radioactive dose being a little bit smaller than that used in the study group. Results: The one-year survival rate for the study group and the control group was 78.1% and 55.3%, respectively (P0.05). The difference in the occurrence of radiotherapy-related complications was not significant between the two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: For the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers, modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than that of simple radiotherapy for a short-term period. The living quality of the patients can be markedly improved. Nevertheless, the five-year survival rate of chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is not statistically difference from that of simple radiotherapy. (authors)

  19. Efficiency of radiotherapy during local hyperthermia in the treatment of laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Choinzonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the larynx and laryngopharynx, which is accessible to visual and instrumental examination, remains the most relevant and complicated problem among head and neck malignances as before. Investigations show that the incidence of cancer at these sites in Russia in the last decade has risen from 4.5 to 9.67 %. This is a severe and poor prognostic form of cancer, which is characterized by its nonspecific early clinical manifestations, complex anatomic and topographic structure, and a high rate of regional metastases. The mainstay of treatment for head and neck cancer involves 3 components: surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy (RT, which are performed alone or in combination. The most commonly used technique is combined, frequently crippling due to organ-removing operations. The clinical introduction of current radio modifiers, local and deep hyperthermia systems, is a promising approach to improving the results of treatment, to enhancing the radiation damage of RT, and to achieving the tumor regression sufficient for surgical intervention without augmenting the early and late toxicity inherent in chemoradiation treatment. The results of the performed study of 35 patients with T2–3N0–2M0 laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer proved the high efficiency of local hyperthermia in treating malignancies in this region during both preoperative (grades III– IV therapeutic pathomorphism and radical beam RT.

  20. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  1. Similar Treatment Outcomes for Radical Cystectomy and Radical Radiotherapy in Invasive Bladder Cancer Treated at a United Kingdom Specialist Treatment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To conduct a retrospective analysis within a large university teaching hospital, comparing outcomes between patients receiving either radical surgery or radiotherapy as curative treatment for bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: Between March 1996 and December 2000, 169 patients were treated radically for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Data were collected from patient notes. Statistical analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compare radiotherapy and surgical outcome data. Results: There was no difference in overall, cause-specific, and distant recurrence-free survival at 5 years between the two groups, despite the radiotherapy group being older (median age, 75.3 years vs. 68.2 years). There were 31 local bladder recurrences in the radiotherapy group (24 solitary), but there was no significant difference in distant recurrence-free survival. In a more recent (2002-2006) cohort, the median age of radiotherapy patients but not the cystectomy patients was higher than in the 1996-2000 cohort (78.4 years vs. 75.3 years for radiotherapy and 67.9 years vs. 68.2 years for surgery). Conclusions: Although the patients undergoing radical cystectomy were significantly younger than the radiotherapy patients, treatment modality did not influence survival. Bladder cancer patients are an increasingly elderly group. Radical radiotherapy is a viable treatment option for these patients, with the advantage of organ preservation

  2. Concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional treatment of localized breast cancer involves the use of both systemic therapy and loco-regional radiation after surgery. The ideal sequence of these two treatments is still undefined. This paper focus on our experience of concomitant chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT), and discusses information from the literature about this issue. Between Jan,1989 and Jan, 1999 a retrospective analysis of 103 patients with ductal carcinoma of the breast who received concomitant CT with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5 flurouracil (CMF) and RT was made. Radiation did not included mammary chain or axilla and total dose was of 50 Gy. End points were tolerance and oxicity leading changes to doses. Mean age was 44y; median follow up time of 33 mo; 62 patients had breast conserving surgery and 41 had mastectomy. All patients received both treatments without a break or dose modification. There was no change or interruption of RT. Ten out of 103 patients had the prescribed dose of CT decreased of 10%-20%. There was no evident changes in cosmetic results. Most of the knowledge regarding the delay of CT or RT comes from retrospective studies, and results are conflicting. It is well accepted that high risk patients need both CT and RT. However, there are data suggesting that giving RT first and CT after may increase the rate of distant metastases. There are also studies showing worse impact in the local control with the delay of radiotherapy. The use of concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy has apparent advantages, but no randomized trial has addressed this issue yet. Our experience has shown that is possible to give concomitant CT with CMF and RT without irradiation of IMC and axilla without major changes in scheduling or dose of both therapies. (author)

  3. Deriving margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy treatment: comparison of neural network and fuzzy logic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mzenda, Bongile; Gegov, Alexander; Brown, David J; Petrov, Nedyalko

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and fuzzy logic based techniques to select treatment margins for dynamically moving targets in the radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer. The use of data from 15 patients relating error effects to the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) radiobiological indices was contrasted against the use of data based on the prostate volume receiving 99% of the prescribed dose (V99%) and the rectum volume receiving more than 60Gy (V60). For the same input data, the results of the ANN were compared to results obtained using a fuzzy system, a fuzzy network and current clinically used statistical techniques. Compared to fuzzy and statistical methods, the ANN derived margins were found to be up to 2 mm larger at small and high input errors and up to 3.5 mm larger at medium input error magnitudes.

  4. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost significantly. To what extent this might be possible without impairing treatment outcome and cosmetic results remains to be clarified. The IMRT-MC2 study is a prospective, two armed, multicenter, randomized phase-III-trial comparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with integrated boost to conventional radiotherapy with consecutive boost in patients with breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. 502 patients will be recruited and randomized into two arms: patients in arm A will receive IMRT in 28 fractions delivering 50.4 Gy to the breast and 64.4 Gy to the tumor bed by integrated boost, while patients in arm B will receive conventional radiotherapy of the breast in 28 fractions to a dose of 50.4 Gy and consecutive boost in 8 fractions to a total dose of 66.4 Gy. Primary objectives of the study are the evaluation of the cosmetic results 6 weeks and 2 years post treatment and the 2- and 5-year local recurrence rates for the two different radiotherapy strategies. Secondary objectives are long term overall survival, disease free survival and quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol ID: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01322854

  5. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefenbacher Uta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost significantly. To what extent this might be possible without impairing treatment outcome and cosmetic results remains to be clarified. Methods/Design The IMRT-MC2 study is a prospective, two armed, multicenter, randomized phase-III-trial comparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with integrated boost to conventional radiotherapy with consecutive boost in patients with breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. 502 patients will be recruited and randomized into two arms: patients in arm A will receive IMRT in 28 fractions delivering 50.4 Gy to the breast and 64.4 Gy to the tumor bed by integrated boost, while patients in arm B will receive conventional radiotherapy of the breast in 28 fractions to a dose of 50.4 Gy and consecutive boost in 8 fractions to a total dose of 66.4 Gy. Discussion Primary objectives of the study are the evaluation of the cosmetic results 6 weeks and 2 years post treatment and the 2- and 5-year local recurrence rates for the two different radiotherapy strategies. Secondary objectives are long term overall survival, disease free survival and quality of life. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol ID: NCT01322854.

  6. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaert, S.L.; Troost, E.G.C.; Schuurbiers, O.C.J.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Termeer, A.; Span, P.N.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS AND MATERIAL

  7. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies tha...

  8. Pulmonary function following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer and the issue of three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The frequency and grade of pulmonary complications following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer are still debated. This study focuses on loss of pulmonary function. Materials and methods: We have measured the reduction of pulmonary function 5 months following radiotherapy in 144 node-positive stage II breast cancer patients by using pulmonary function tests. Results: No deterioration of pulmonary function was detected among the patients who were treated with local radiotherapy. On the contrary, there was a mean increase in diffusion capacity by 7% (P=0.004) following radiotherapy, which most likely was explained by the adjuvant chemotherapy administered prior to the baseline pulmonary function tests. Patients undergoing loco-regional radiotherapy showed a mean reduction in diffusion capacity by 5% (P<0.001) and in vital capacity by 3% (P=0.001). The subset of patients (9%) who were diagnosed with severe pulmonary complications needing cortisone treatment had significantly larger mean paired differences in vital capacity (-0.446 L, -15% (equivalent to 15 years of normal ageing or the loss of 3/4 of a lung lobe)) compared to the patients who were asymptomatic (-0.084 L) (P<0.05). When the effects of potential confounding factors and different radiotherapy techniques were tested on the reduction of pulmonary function by stepwise multiple regression analysis, a significant correlation was found only to loco-regional radiotherapy including the lower internal mammary lymph nodes. Conclusions: We conclude that a clinically important reduction of pulmonary function is seen in the subset of patients who are diagnosed with severe pulmonary complication following loco-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer. The results of this study warrant further studies based on individual lung dose volume histograms. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Contribution of customised dosimetry for small animal to the treatments of cancers by metabolic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis first reports a bibliographical study which addressed the use of ionizing radiations in cancer therapy (evolution from ionizing radiation to metabolic radiotherapy, biological and physical parameters, and absorbed dose in metabolic radiotherapy) and the role imagery has in customised dosimetry (absorbed dose calculation methods, determination of cumulative activity, dosimetric models for S factor calculation). Then, the author presents a software which has been specifically developed for the creation of dosimetric models, and reports its validation. He reports the comparison between different dosimetric models in the case of mice. He highlights two applications of the developed tool: radio-immunotherapy and metabolic radiotherapy. He finally proposes a general discussion on the impact of small animal dosimetry on metabolic radiotherapy

  10. Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  11. Radiotherapy of bronco-pulmonary cancer; Radiotherapie des cancers brochopulmonaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourry, N.; Millardet, C.; Lapeyre, M.; Verrelle, P.; Gross, E.; Champeaux-Orange, E.; Lahbabi, K.; Galland, S.; Chomy, F.; Lagarde, P.; Blanchard, P

    2007-11-15

    Six oral communications as follow: tomography by positron emission with {sup 18}F-FDG and target volume determination in the non at small cells bronchi cancers: interest and limit; adjuvant radiotherapy in the non at small cells pulmonary cancers; pulmonary stereotaxic radiotherapy; the chemoradiotherapy of locally evolved bronco-pulmonary cancers; the mesothelioma: place of radiotherapy; predictive factors of the toxicity and the care of complications of thorax irradiation. (N.C.)

  12. Physical and clinical implications of radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer using a full bladder protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambria, Raffaella; Cattani, Federica; Luraschi, Rosa; Pedroli, Guido [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Medical Physics; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Orecchia, Roberto [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. degli Studi of Milano, Milan (Italy); Zerini, Dario [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Serafini, Flavia [Unita operativa di radioterapia, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant' Anna, Como (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    To assess the dosimetric and clinical implication when applying the full bladder protocol for the treatment of the localized prostate cancer (PCA). A total of 26 consecutive patients were selected for the present study. Patients underwent two series of CT scans: the day of the simulation and after 40 Gy. Each series consisted of two consecutive scans: (1) full bladder (FB) and (2) empty bladder (EB). The contouring of clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs at risk (OAR) were compared to evaluate organ motion. Treatment plans were compared by dose distribution and dose-volume histograms (DVH). CTV shifts were negligible in the laterolateral and superior-inferior directions (the maximum shift was 1.85 mm). Larger shifts were recorded in the anterior-posterior direction (95% CI, 0.83-4.41 mm). From the dosimetric point of view, shifts are negligible: the minimum dose to the CTV was 98.5% (median; 95%CI, 95-99%). The potential advantage for GU toxicity in applying the FB treatment protocol was measured: the ratio between full and empty bladder dose-volume points (selected from our protocol) is below 0.61, excluding the higher dose region where DVHs converge. Having a FB during radiotherapy does not affect treatment effectiveness, on the contrary it helps achieve a more favorable DVH and lower GU toxicities.

  13. Palliative treatment of Erdheim-Chester disease with radiotherapy: A Rare Cancer Network study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of the use of palliative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in nine patients with Erdheim-Chester disease was conducted through the Rare Cancer Network. Patients received EBRT for bone pain, brain infiltration, or retro-orbital involvement. EBRT typically provided short-term palliation, with later recurrence of symptoms in most cases

  14. Clinical study on radiotherapy combined with surgical treatment of 162 patients with cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaopeng Zhong; Xukun Tong; Lingfang Yang; Donglin Yuan; Huigao Cai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the 5-year survival rates and complications of internal and external irradiation therapy combined with operation in patients with Ⅱ-Ⅲ period of cervical cancer.Methods: 162 cervical cancer patients after the whole palace resection pelvic lymphadenectomy were divided into three groups, and then accepted radiotherapy.The first group with 91 cases was accepted internal and external irradiation therapy before operation; the second group with 37 cases was given internal irradiation therapy before operation; the third group with 34 cases was given routine postoperative radiotherapy.External irradiation used 60Co irradiation or a linear accelerator, to the whole basin, and the irradiation dose of "B" point in preoperative radiotherapy was 26-30 Gy, in postoperative radiotherapy was 46-50 Gy; intraluminal brachytherapy used 192lr,the dose of "A" point was 5-15 Gy.Results: The 5-year survival rate of preoperative combined radiotherapy group was 78.0%(71/91), preoperative intracavitary radiotherapy group 64.9% (24/37), and postoperative radiotherapy group 35.3% (12/34).Comparing the 5-year survival rates of the preoperative combined and postoperative irradiation groups, there was significant difference (P<0.05).The major complications were radioactive proctitis and cystitis, the complication incidences of three groups were 35.2% (32/91), 32.4% (12/37), 38.2% (13/34), respectively, and the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05).Conclusion: The intraluminal brachytherapy plus external irradiation can significantly increase the 5-year survival rate of patients with Ⅱa-Ⅲa stages, and the incidence of complications was not significant difference.

  15. Targeting EGFR and COX-2 as a potential treatment improvement strategy in cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular targeting, i.e. use of agents that counteract molecular processes that are dysregulated in cancer cells, which may be responsible for tumor radio-or chemoresistance, is a recently extensively investigated approach to further improve radiotherapy, chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Many potential targets for augmentation of radio (or chemo) response have been identified including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, mutated ras and angiogenic molecules. Agents that selectively inhibit these molecules are becoming available at a rapid rate, and many of them have been shown in preclinical testing to be highly effective in improving tumor radioresponse or chemoresponse, without significantly affecting normal tissues. The interaction of EGFR and COX-2 inhibitors with radiation has attracted a flare of investigational interest, and is over-viewed here. EGFR is frequently overexpressed or mutated in many types of cancer, which is associated with more aggressive tumor behavior and poorer tumor response to cytotoxic agents, including radiation. Blockade of EGFR or interference with its downstream signaling processes can improve tumor treatment. Our own studies, using human tumor xenografts, demonstrated that blocking EGFR with C225 anti-EGFR antibody produces a dramatic enhancement of tumor radioresponse, and even more dramatic response when radiation is combined with chemotherapeutic agents. C225 acts by a number of mechanisms including inhibition of DNA repair from radiation damage, enhancement of apoptosis and tumor necrosis, and by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activation by small molecule agents, such as Iressa or Tarceva, is another approach in interfering with EGFR-signaling, which also showed potent enhancing effect on tumor radioresponse. There are two COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. While COX-1 is a ubiquitous constitutive enzyme having housekeeping physiological function, COX-2 is an

  16. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT

  17. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  18. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, αspread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  19. [Cryotherapy, combined drug therapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cavity cancer: 3 years' experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellino, V; Goia, F; Gandolfo, S; Camoletto, D

    1980-01-01

    The medium-term (three years) result of a multidisciplinary association treatment of carcinoma of the oral cavity has been reviewed. Treatment was Cryosurgery-polychemotherapy-ratiotherapy and the technique has been described along with the times of association in an introduction that has already been published in this review (see bibliography). Thirty patients were treated with the association because they refused or could not be submitted to surgery at the intital therapeutic action. All these patients present fairly extensive lesions and a three-year follow-up. Results were positive: 56.6% of patients showed disappearance of any objective or subjective sign of cancer and, in all cases, appreciable remission in terms of both extent and duration. The easiness of the technique is confirmed as well as the excellent conversation of the anatomical structures involved. However, a critical review of cases presenting partial failure suggest a classifications of oral carcinomatous lesions (for therapeutic purposes only) on the basis of which the condition can be treated with cryo-polychemo-radiotherapy alone or with a variation of this which provides for the addition of local exersis. PMID:6935521

  20. Conservative treatment for invasive bladder cancer: neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy; Traitement conservateur des cancers infiltrants de la vessie: chimiotherapie neoadjuvante et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prie, L.; Gaston, R.; Richaud, P.; Brui, B.N. [Institut Bergonie, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Ferriere, J.M.; Le Guillou, M. [Hopital Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    1998-04-01

    Retrospective evaluation of tolerance and efficiency of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in non metastatic invasive cancer of the bladder. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy leads to CR in 44 % of patients and CR is observed in 64 % of the patients after radiation therapy. However, the survival rate at 5 years is insufficient, even if the rate of bladder conservation is high. (author)

  1. Predictive Modelling of Toxicity Resulting from Radiotherapy Treatments of Head and Neck Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Dean, Jamie A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    In radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, the radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa (mucosal lining of the throat) is thought to be a major contributing factor to dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction), the most commonly reported severe toxicity. There is a variation in the severity of dysphagia experienced by patients. Understanding the role of the dose distribution in dysphagia would allow improvements in the radiotherapy technique to be explored. The 3D dose distributions delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa of 249 patients treated as part of clinical trials were reconstructed. Pydicom was used to extract DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) data (the standard file formats for medical imaging and radiotherapy data). NumPy and SciPy were used to manipulate the data to generate 3D maps of the dose distribution delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa and calculate metrics describing the dose distribution. Multivariate predictive modelling of severe dysphagia, including descriptions of the d...

  2. Technical progress, the concept of individualized cancer treatment and the innovation of computer-assisted radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a first step of cancerogenesis, the further development of the tumor is an individual process. At the end of this process the tumor is formed as an individual in the individual. The individuality of cancer exists on the level of organs, tissues and cells and includes an individual tumor-host relationship. Today, optimized cancer treatment requires a most precise biological characterization possible of the tumor and of the tumor-host relationship, which will provide objective information about the individual character of every tumor. Routine analysis and strict therapeutic consideration of the clinical and biological individuality of human cancer can offer real chances for the improvement of cancer treatment. A routine acquisition of individual tumor characteristics will be possible only if methods and equipment are available for the registration of suitable parameters. In this context technical innovations have an essential influence on the realization of the concept of individualized cancer treatment. With the method of flow cytophotometry and other techniques examples are given in how far the ideas of individual cancer management can be realized by introduction of new technical solutions into medical research and clinical practice. Unfortunately there is still a lack of methodology in individualizing cancer treatment. The individualization of radiotherapy is connected to an extremely high degree of technical innovations. Particularly this refers to the topometrical description of the target volume in relation to the adjacent anatomical structures and the body contour as well as the fitting of isodoses to the shape and size of the target volume. As an example of innovation of a technical solution for individual radiotherapy planning the computer-assisted radiotherapy planning system DOPSY is described. (author)

  3. The Therapeutic Effects of the Radiotherapy Plus TCM Treatment Observed in Senile Non-Parvicellular Lung Cancer Patients at the Late Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝孝筑; 姜玉华

    2003-01-01

    @@ 47 senile non-parvicellular lung cancer patients at stage Ⅲ or Ⅳ were randomly divided into a treatment group (26 cases) treated by radiotherapy plus traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and a control group (21 cases) treated only by radiotherapy for observation of the therapeutic effects.

  4. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  5. Is photodynamic therapy a good alternative to surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Nyst; I.B. Tan; F.A. Stewart; A.J.M. Balm

    2009-01-01

    The mainstay treatments for head and neck carcinomas are surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These treatment options may be associated with considerable complications. Radical radiotherapy and chemotherapy can generally be employed only once, which presents difficulties in cases of recurrent dis

  6. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Postmastectomy radiotherapy, irradiation of regional lymphatics, and treatment of locally advanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe (Germany); Souchon, R. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hagen (Germany); Budach, W. [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Univ. Hospital, Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Haase, W. [St.-Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dunst, J. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Wenz, F. [Univ. Hospital Mannheim (Germany); Sauer, R. [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Background and purpose: the aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (DEGRO). These recommendations were complementing the S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society (DKG) elaborated in 2004. The present DEGRO recommendations are based on a revision of the DKG guidelines provided by an interdisciplinary panel and published in February 2008. Methods: the DEGRO expert panel (authors of the present manuscript) performed a comprehensive survey of the literature. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2006, provided the basis for defining recommendations referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG, this paper emphasizes specific radiooncologic issues relating to radiotherapy after mastectomy (PMRT), locally advanced disease, irradiation of the lymphatic pathways, and sequencing of local and systemic treatment. Technique, targeting, and dose are described in detail. Results: PMRT significantly reduces local recurrence rates in patients with T3/T4 tumors and/or positive axillary lymph nodes (12.9% with and 40.6% without PMRT in patients with four or more positive nodes). The more local control is improved, the more substantially it translates into increased survival. In node-positive women the absolute reduction in 15-year breast cancer mortality is 5.4%. Data referring to the benefit of lymphatic irradiation are conflicting. However, radiotherapy of the supraclavicular area is recommended when four or more nodes are positive and otherwise considered individually. Evidence concerning timing and sequencing of local and systemic treatment is sparse; therefore, treatment decisions should depend on the dominating risk of recurrence. Conclusion: there

  7. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy method for lung cancer: imaging, treatment planning and delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasti, H.; Cho, Y. B.; Vandermeer, A. D.; Abbas, A.; Norrlinger, B.; Shubbar, S.; Bezjak, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present treatment planning methods based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) to incorporate tumour motion using (1) a static field and (2) a dynamic field. Static 4D fields are determined to include the target in all breathing phases, whereas dynamic 4D fields are determined to follow the shape of the tumour assessed from 4D-CT images with a dynamic weighting factor. The weighting factor selection depends on the reliability of patient breathing and limitations of the delivery system. The static 4D method is compared with our standard protocol for gross tumour volume (GTV) coverage, mean lung dose and V20. It was found that the GTV delineated on helical CT without incorporating breathing motion does not adequately represent the target compared to the GTV delineated from 4D-CT. Dosimetric analysis indicates that the static 4D-CT based technique results in a reduction of the mean lung dose compared with the standard protocol. Measurements on a moving phantom and simulations indicated that 4D radiotherapy (4D-RT) synchronized with respiration-induced motion further reduces mean lung dose and V20, and may allow safe application of dose escalation and CRT/IMRT. The motions of the chest cavity, tumour and thoracic structures of 24 lung cancer patients are also analysed.

  8. Spacers in radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer: Is reduction of toxicity cost-effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of treating prostate cancer patients with intensity-modulated radiation therapy and a spacer (IMRT+S) versus IMRT-only without a spacer (IMRT-O). Materials and methods: A decision-analytic Markov model was constructed to examine the effect of late rectal toxicity and compare the costs and quality-adjusted Life Years (QALYs) of IMRT-O and IMRT+S. The main assumption of this modeling study was that disease progression, genito-urinary toxicity and survival were equal for both comparators. Results: For all patients, IMRT+S revealed a lower toxicity than IMRT-O. Treatment follow-up and toxicity costs for IMRT-O and IMRT+S amounted to €1604 and €1444, respectively, thus saving €160 on the complication costs at an extra charge of €1700 for the spacer in IMRT+S. The QALYs yielded for IMRT-O and IMRT+S were 3.542 and 3.570, respectively. This results in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €55,880 per QALY gained. For a ceiling ratio of €80,000, IMRT+S had a 77% probability of being cost-effective. Conclusion: IMRT+S is cost-effective compared to IMRT-O based on its potential to reduce radiotherapy-related toxicity

  9. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia for treatment of primary locally advanced cervix cancer: results in 378 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franckena, M.; Lutgens, L.C.; Koper, P.C.; Kleynen, C.E.; Steen-Banasik, E.M. van der; Jobsen, J.J.; Leer, J.W.H.; Creutzberg, C.L.; Dielwart, M.F.; Norden, Y. Van; Canters, R.A.; Rhoon, G.C. van; Zee, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report response rate, pelvic tumor control, survival, and late toxicity after treatment with combined radiotherapy and hyperthermia (RHT) for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and compare the results with other published series. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1996 to

  10. Treatment complications among long-term survivors of cervical cancer: treated by surgery or radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal A. Elghamrawi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the morbidity and complications of treatment among long-term survivors of cervical cancer. Ninety-eight female patients who were diagnosed and treated from invasive carcinoma of the cervix uteri 5 years or more are included in this study. All the cases were free of disease and had survived up to December 2010. Forty-one cases were treated with radical hysterectomy with removal of the lymph nodes (Wertheim’s surgery (42%. Radical radiation therapy was given to 57 cases (58% according to our treatment protocol; weekly cisplatin was given concomitantly with radiation. Although urinary adverse effects were more prevalent among the radiation group, the difference was not statistically significant. Bowel dysfunction was more prevalent and statistically significant (p\\0.001 among the radiotherapy arm. Dysfunctions recorded included change in bowel habit, diarrhea, constipation, tenesmus, soiling of clothes and or flatulence. However, their severity was grade 1–2 only. The frequency of small intestinal obstruction was comparable in both arms. Pelvic vein thromboses had a tendency to occur among the surgical group especially in obese females (p value 0.005. The frequency of sexual dysfunction was comparable in both groups with no statistical difference. It was age related. The younger the patients’ ages, the more was the sexual complaint irrespective to the treatment modality. Sexual problems included dyspareunia from vaginal stenosis shortening or dryness, vulval soreness from itching and dryness. Bearing in mind that many patients had more than one health complaint. The remaining cases denied the presence of any complications and stated that they had a normal life style.

  11. Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose ≥25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving ≥25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity

  12. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  13. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to

  14. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saika, Kazumi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-05-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  15. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  16. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  17. The impact of overall radiotherapy treatment time and delay in initiation of radiotherapy on local control and distant metastases in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the impact of time factors on local and distant metastases in stomach cancer. 67 patients with gastric cancer who received adjuvant treatment were reviewed for the time to initiation of radiotherapy, overall duration of RT and the events of first local recurrence or distant metastasis. The risk probability of local recurrence is increased by 10% (HR = 1.1, p = 0.0009) in association with each additional day of radiotherapy and by 3.8% (HR = 1.038, p = 0.13) per increased day of waiting time before the initiation of RT. The risk probability of distant recurrence was associated with an increase of 7.4% (HR = 1.074 p = 0.0031) with each additional day of RT time and by 2.3% (HR = 1.023, p = 0.0598) following the increase of a day of waiting time. Each day of prolongation of RT beyond 36 days was associated with an increased risk of local recurrence by 10% (OR = 1.1, p = 0.015). Prolongation of waiting time prior to initiation of irradiation retained significance in multivariate analysis. There is an association between total treatment time and, to some extent, the time between the surgery and the initiation of radiation on local control and distant metastases

  18. Treatment modalities of oral mucositis after radiation of head and neck cancers; Prise en charge des mucites apres radiotherapie des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapeyre, M.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Kaminsky, M.C.; Geoffrois, L.; Dolivet, G.; Pourel, N.; Marchal, C.; Bey, P.; Maire, F.; Simon, M. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Toussaint, B. [Hopital Central, Service de Chirurgie ORL, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2001-11-01

    Acute mucositis is common after radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. During the past 3 decades, there was a gradual evolution in the treatment modalities for locally advanced carcinomas (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy). These new strategies are accompanied by an increase in early mucosal reactions. At the present time, there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. Many traditional remedies or new agents seem ineffective (Sucralfate, Chlorhexidine, GM-CSF, Silver nitrate, Prostaglandin, anti-oxidants, Benzydamine hydrochloride), while others seem promising (Povidone-iodine, nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges and anti-fungal, local GM-CSF, Glutamide, Low-energy laser, corticosteroids). Radioprotectors are controversial and should be only used in experimental protocols and not in routine practice. However, some recommendations can be proposed: general prevention and global care before cancer therapy should be systematic (oral hygiene, dental and periodontal treatment, advice to avoid the use of tobacco and alcohol); frequent oral rinsing with a bland mouthwash (Povidone-iodine or others) should be used at the start of treatment because there are significant modifications of the oral microflora increased by a disturbed salivary flow; these mouthwashes could be associated with nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges or anti-fungal topical (bicarbonates, Amphotericine B); Systematic percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy should be decided before any aggressive treatments (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy); pain should be controlled; finally, the radiation technique should be optimized (mucosal sparing block, conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy). (authors)

  19. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devpura, S.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chen, D.; Liu, D.; Li, H.; Kumar, S.; Gordon, J.; Ajlouni, M.; Movsas, B.; Chetty, I. J.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for "lung-island" tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ~10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type), a Monte

  20. Hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for the treatment of the patients with esophageal cancer invading the neighboring organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety two cases of a3 esophageal cancer invading the neighboring organs diagnosed by histopathology post operation were described. They underwent no treatment before operation; radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy before operation; or hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy (HCR) before operation. For chemotherapy, bleomycin or CDDP was used. Radiation dose was 30 Gy in total at 1.5-2.0 Gy x 5/wk. For hyperthermotherapy, radiofrequency wave was generated by the intracavitary hyperthermia system, Endoradiotherm 100A (Olympus Kohgaku Ltd.) and the treatment was carried out at 42-45 degC for 30 min x 2/wk x 6. The HCR case exhibited significantly (p<0.05) higher survival rates of 3 years of 21.2% and 5 years of 12.7% than other two cases where no one survived after 3 years. In particular, some of patients of grade 3 who were judged to have markedly responded to the HCR survived for a long period. HCR might be thus useful for a3 esophageal cancer. (K.H.)

  1. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in cancer treatment during pregnancy: a literature review; Radioterapia e quimioterapia no tratamento do cancer durante a gestacao - revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuenemann Junior, Eduardo; Urban, Cicero de Andrade; Lima, Rubens Silveira de [Hospital Nossa Senhora das Gracas, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Oncologia; Rabinovich, Iris; Spautz, Cleverton C. [Hospital Nossa Senhora das Gracas, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Ginecologia e Obstetricia

    2007-01-15

    The coexistence of pregnancy and cancer is a challenging situation for the physician. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are often necessary, depending on the type and stage of cancer at diagnosis. When applying such treatment, several key points concerning the health of the fetus must be carefully monitored. Meanwhile, if the appropriate treatment is delayed until postpartum, the mother's life may be at risk. Historically, the mother's health was placed above that of the fetus. This concept has changed, and harmonization of maternal and fetal health is now considered ideal. Numerous reports have shown the safe use of chemotherapy especially during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. In 2004 our department treated seven cases of simultaneous cancer and pregnancy, leading us to review the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy during pregnancy and the repercussions on neonatal outcome. (author)

  2. Single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients: comparative effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is an effective treatment for symptomatic bone metastases from a variety of primary malignancies. Previous meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported on the efficacy of EBRT on bone metastases from multiple primaries. This review is focused on the comparative effectiveness of single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients

  3. A case of radiation gastritis required surgical treatment in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagino, Daisuke; Arai, Yuko; Komatsu, Atsushi; Inoue, Kumiko; Takechi, Kimihiro [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Tomobe (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of radiation gastritis in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A 61-year-old woman received irradiation of a metastatic lesion of the second lumbar vertebra. Six months later she complained of fatigue and presented with severe anemia, and her diagnosis was hemorrhagic radiation gastritis. She was treated endoscopically, but that failed to control the bleeding, making it necessary to resect surgically. The incidence of radiation gastritis is very low because the stomach is rarely within the treated field, but it is of importance to be aware that the stomach is by no means more radioresistant than other organs. (author)

  4. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  5. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    König, A

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is...

  6. Radiotherapy for prostate cancer and sexual health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Incrocci (Luca)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSexual dysfunction is very common after treatment of prostate cancer. Radiation therapy together with radical prostatectomy is the most effective treatment for localized disease. Percentages of erectile dysfunction (ED) reported in prospective studies after external-beam radiotherapy (RT

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103Pd or 125I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7% of

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D

  9. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  10. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  11. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment standard for patients with rectal cancer depends on the initial staging and includes surgical resection, radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy. For stage II and III tumors, radiochemotherapy should be performed in addition to surgery, preferentially as preoperative radiochemotherapy or as short-course hypofractionated radiation. Advances in surgical approaches, especially the establishment of the total mesorectal excision (TME in combination with sophisticated radiation and chemotherapy have reduced local recurrence rates to only few percent. However, due to the high incidence of rectal cancer, still a high absolute number of patients present with recurrent rectal carcinomas, and effective treatment is therefore needed. Carbon ions offer physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increase relative biological effectiveness (RBE, which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese data on the treatment of patients with recurrent rectal cancer previously not treated with radiation therapy have shown local control rates of carbon ion treatment superior to those of surgery. Therefore, this treatment concept should also be evaluated for recurrences after radiotherapy, when dose application using conventional photons is limited. Moreover, these patients are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological efficacy of carbon ions. Methods and design In the current Phase I/II-PANDORA-01-Study the recommended dose of carbon ion radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer will be determined in the Phase I part, and feasibilty and progression-free survival will be assessed in the Phase II part of the study. Within the Phase I part, increasing doses from 12 × 3 Gy E to 18

  12. Dosimetric analysis of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Priyusha Bagdare; Om Prakash Gurjar; Garima Shrivastav; Virendra Bhandari; Krishna Lal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the dosimetric parameters of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Methods: Ten patients with inoperable NSCLC were selected for this study. The 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated for all patients following Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. Generated plans were then compared on the basis of planning target ...

  13. Radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison of treatment outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Lee, Kang Hyun; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-kyung; Lee, Se Byeong [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    We retrospectively compared the treatment outcomes of localized prostate cancer between radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We retrospectively analyzed 738 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent either RP (n = 549) or EBRT (n = 189) with curative intent at our institution between March 2001 and December 2011. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml in the RP group and the nadir of + ≥ 2 ng/ml in the EBRT group. The median (range) follow-up duration was 48.8 months (0.7-133.2 months) and 48.7 months (1.0-134.8 months) and the median age was 66 years (45-89 years) and 71 years (51-84 years; p < 0.001) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Overall, 21, 42, and 36 % of patients in the RP group, and 15, 27, and 58 % of patients in the EBRT group were classified as low, intermediate, and high risk, respectively (p < 0.001). Androgen-deprivation therapy was more common in the EBRT group (59 vs. 27 %, respectively; p < 0.001). The 8-year biochemical failure-free survival rates were 44 and 72 % (p < 0.001) and the disease-specific survival rates were 98 % and 97 % (p = 0.543) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Although the EBRT group included more high-risk patients than did the RP group, the outcomes of EBRT were not inferior to those of RP. Our data suggest that EBRT is a viable alternative to RP for treating localized prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Wir vergleichen retrospektiv die Verfahrensergebnisse des lokal begrenzten Prostatakarzinoms zwischen radikaler Prostatektomie (RP) und externer Strahlentherapie (EBRT). Wir analysieren zurueckblickend 738 Patienten mit lokal begrenztem Prostatakarzinom, die zwischen Maerz 2001 und Dezember 2011 in unserem Institut entweder eine RP (n = 549) oder eine EBRT (n = 189) mit kurativer Intention durchliefen. Biochemischer Fehler wurde als prostataspezifisches Antigen (PSA) ≥ 0,2 ng/ml in der RP-Gruppe und ein Nadir +

  14. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, W.; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.; Mellemgaard, A.; Behrens, C. F.

    2014-03-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking. Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result: Geometrical similarities were found between propagated and manually delineated structures, with a slightly favour of FB imaging. Special notice should be taken to registrations where image artefacts or low tissue contrast are present. Conclusion: This study does not support the hypothesis that DIBH images perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer.

  15. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of ...

  16. Radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokdal, Lars; von der Maase, Hans; Høyer, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The exact value of radiotherapy in the treatment of muscle-invasive       bladder cancer is difficult to establish, as most studies exploring this       issue are retrospective with different procedures for selecting patients       for treatment, as well as varying treatment strategies. An estimate...... of the       5-year overall survival rate following radiotherapy is approximately 35%       in consecutive-selected patients and approximately 25% in       negative-selected patients...

  17. Pre-treatment nomogram for biochemical control after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy for clinically localised prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, C C; Norman, A R; Huddart, R A; Horwich, A; Dearnaley, D P

    2002-01-01

    Phase III studies have demonstrated the clinical benefit of adding neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation to radical radiotherapy for clinically localised prostate cancer. We have developed a nomogram to describe the probability of PSA control for patients treated in this way. Five hundred and seventeen men with clinically localised prostate cancer were treated with 3–6 months of neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy (64 Gy in 32#) between 1988 and 1998. Median presenting PSA ...

  18. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  19. Growth Laws in Cancer: Implications for Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Castorina, P; Gabriele, P; Guiot, C

    2006-01-01

    Comparing both, the more conventional Gompertz tumor growth law (GL) and the ``Universal'' law (UL), recently proposed and applied to cancer,we have investigated the growth law's implications on various radiotherapy regimen. According to GL, the surviving tumor cell fraction could be reduced 'ad libidum', independently of the initial tumor mass,simply by increasing the number of treatments. On the contrary, if tumor growth dynamics would indeed follow the Universal scaling law, there is a lower limit of the survival fraction that cannot be reduced any further regardless of the total number of treatments. This finding can explain the so called ``tumor size effect'' and re-emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis as it implies that radiotherapy may be successful provided the tumor mass at treatment onset is rather small. Taken together with our previous works, implications of these findings include revisiting standard radiotherapy regimen and overall treatment protocols.

  20. Treatment of invasive bladder cancer with cisplatin, fluorouracil and concurrent radiotherapy: a pilot study; Traitement des cancers infiltrants de vessie par cisplatine, fluoro-uracile et radiotherapie concomitante: resultats d`une etude pilote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, B.; Felix-Faure, C.; Berger, C.; Vincent, P.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Davin, J.L. [Clinique Rhone-Durance, Avignon (France)

    1998-04-01

    Pilot study to assess treatment feasibility and results of a 2-drug chemotherapy (CT) regimen administered concurrently with radiotherapy (RT) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The median follow-up was 38 months. The feasibility of concurrent CT-RT was excellent: 96 % of the patients completed radiotherapy and 100 % of them received the two courses of P-FU. The acute toxicity was mild: no hematological toxicity or renal toxicity over grade II, 4 cases of bowel or rectal reversible grade III toxicity and 2 cases of reversible grade III cystitis. A complete response was achieved in 30 out of the 42 evaluable patients (65.2 %). Nine patients received an immediate salvage treatment (3TUR, 3 additional radiotherapy and 3 cystectomies). Ten patients had local failure. Projected 3-year locoregional control was 49 % for the 46 patients. Projected overall 3-year survival was 53 %. Functional results were good for disease-free patients with preserved bladder: 1 grade I, 3 grade II, and no grade III cystitis. Concurrent 2-drug chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil is feasible without major toxicity and offers a potentially curative and conservative treatment for patients with localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer. (authors)

  1. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin WANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescription and reporting, arrangement of beams, controlling of dose volume and treatment delivering.

  2. White paper of radiotherapy in France. Twelve objectives to improve one of the major cancer treatments -2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This white paper aims at presenting the status and perspectives of radiotherapy in France, at proposing solutions for the improvement of treatment quality and safety. Along with surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy is one of the major techniques of cancer treatment and the first part gives an overview of increased needs due to population ageing, of the fast technical advances (better definition of target volumes and doses, better taking into account of anatomy variations and movements), of the impact of these advances on treatment results for various types of cancer, and of the current status of equipment (a slow evolution is noticed) and future needs. The second part addresses the various professions and their demography. The third part examines how to correct the unequal access to care with respect to geography, to equipment and treatment quality, or to delay before treatment. It also evokes collaborations between centres, the diffusion of good practices, specialisation, and makes some proposals for an equal access to care. The fourth part highlights quality and security improvements due to quality control practices, recommendations, prevention actions and risk management. The next part addresses the financial aspect and makes some proposals to reduce inequalities and archaisms. It also compares costs in France and in Europe. The report then gives an overview of the administrative and professional environment and of the different involved bodies, and outlines the need of a better coordination. Patient information is discussed (patients are better informed) as well as support cares. The last parts address activities of research and development and the organisation and possibilities offered by education and training

  3. Prostate cancer radiotherapy 2002: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukka, Himu; Pickles, Tom; Morton, Gerard; Catton, Charles; Souhami, Luis; Warde, Padraig

    2005-02-01

    In November 2000, the GU Radiation Oncologists of Canada had their first meeting, "Controversies in prostate cancer radiotherapy: consensus development". The success of this meeting prompted a second meeting, held in December 2002 to discuss "The Way Forward" in prostate radiotherapy. Radiation oncologists from across Canada were brought together and integrated with key opinion leaders in prostate cancer treatment from throughout North America. The group debated current controversies including: intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), external beam hypofractionation, high dose-rate brachytherapy, and hormone therapy in the management of prostate cancer. The meeting also sought to identify and prioritize clinical trial opportunities and to highlight steps required to achieve these research goals. In summary, advances involving IMRT have enabled the use of higher radiation doses without increasing morbidity. With renewed interest in hypofractionated radiation schedules, the value of hypofractionation using IMRT was discussed and initial results from ongoing clinical trials were presented. The emerging role for high dose-rate brachytherapy in higher risk patients was also discussed. Based on existing preliminary evidence the group expressed enthusiasm for further investigation of the role for brachytherapy in intermediate to high-risk patients. Despite significant advances in radiotherapy, hormone therapy continues to play an important role in prostate cancer treatment for patients with intermediate and high-risk disease. Although evidence supports the effectiveness of hormone therapy, the optimal timing, and duration of hormonal treatment are unclear. Results from ongoing clinical trials will provide insight into these questions and will assist in the design of future clinical trials.

  4. Long-term outcome and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer: the importance of boost volume assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yeon Sil; Cheon, Jae Seok; Song, Jin Ho; SON, Seok Hyun; Jang, Ji Sun; Kang, Young Nam; Kang, Jing Hyoung; Jung, So Lyoung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods Between March 2004 and July 2007, 26 patients with locally advanced, medically inoperable head and neck cancer or gross residual tumors in close proximity to critical structures following head and neck surgery were treated with SBRT as a boost treatment. All patients were initially tre...

  5. Long-term outcome and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer: the importance of boost volume assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Dong; Kim Yeon; Cheon Jae; Song Jin; Son Seok; Jang Ji; Kang Young; Kang Jing; Jung So; Yoo Ie; Jang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods Between March 2004 and July 2007, 26 patients with locally advanced, medically inoperable head and neck cancer or gross residual tumors in close proximity to critical structures following head and neck surgery were treated with SBRT as a boost treatment. All patients were init...

  6. Radiotherapy for the vulvar cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen patients who had primary vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy as an initial treatment at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults and Hyogo Cancer Center from January 1971 to December 1990 are presented. Two patients were stage 0, one stage I, three stage II and nine stage III. Nine patients received electron irradiation with or without interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. Five patients received megavoltage X-ray irradiation using AP/PA parallel opposed fields including the pelvic nodes and perineum followed by boost irradiation of electrons, interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. The total dose delivered to the primary tumor ranged from 50 to 100 Gy (73 Gy on average). The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients was 43.6%. Complete regression (CR) was achieved in 60% of the patients. However, CR was not achieved in any of five patients with palpable inguinal nodes. In contrast, all the patients who had tumors of less than 2 cm in diameter achieved CR. Five of nine CR cases relapsed. First sites of failure were vagina, groin and vulvar region. Recurrence occurred more than four years after treatment in three cases. Necrosis occurred in five of nine CR cases. (author)

  7. Radiotherapy for the vulvar cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Motohara, Tomofumi (Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-03-01

    Fifteen patients who had primary vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy as an initial treatment at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults and Hyogo Cancer Center from January 1971 to December 1990 are presented. Two patients were stage 0, one stage I, three stage II and nine stage III. Nine patients received electron irradiation with or without interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. Five patients received megavoltage X-ray irradiation using AP/PA parallel opposed fields including the pelvic nodes and perineum followed by boost irradiation of electrons, interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. The total dose delivered to the primary tumor ranged from 50 to 100 Gy (73 Gy on average). The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients was 43.6%. Complete regression (CR) was achieved in 60% of the patients. However, CR was not achieved in any of five patients with palpable inguinal nodes. In contrast, all the patients who had tumors of less than 2 cm in diameter achieved CR. Five of nine CR cases relapsed. First sites of failure were vagina, groin and vulvar region. Recurrence occurred more than four years after treatment in three cases. Necrosis occurred in five of nine CR cases. (author).

  8. Proposed guide for radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer in the CCSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer has been the most common carcinoma occurred in women. The increase of this type epidemiological neoplasm is worrisome; the application of therapies, the diagnosis and treatment of breast diseases as work perspective, must integrate multidisciplinary oncological principles and therapeutic approaches. The reduction of the impact of breast cancer in Costa Rica has been the mission of breast units of hospitals in the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social. The prevention and treatment of the disease have formed joint and integral part to meet this goal. An attention is offered to fulfill this mission based on the evidence with the help of an essential tool as have been the clinical practice guidelines (CPG). These guidelines have helped to maintain therapeutic equity among patients; as a consequence, the development, implementation and evaluation of results and the guides have been considered suitable to carry out the evidence-based care. Also, the therapeutic discussion with the patient, has been strengthened enabling to reach a shared decision making. The guidelines are submitted which out not intended to substitute at any time the medical criteria, or standardize the management of breast cancer because in each case is due individualizing. The number of survivors has been increasing and this thanks to the planning of care, provided long-term, the patient and communication with health personnel. Thus, the highest attention has been given to breast cancer survivors. The multidisciplinary team of cancer care and treatment have played a key role. Guides have tried to conceptualize and optimize this role

  9. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...

  10. Treatment of primary liver cancer using highly-conformal radiotherapy with kv-image guidance and respiratory control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To implement a reliable, practical and reproducible treatment procedure, based on in-room kV-image guidance and respiratory control, for liver cancer patients treated with high dose conformal radiotherapy using a commercially available treatment system. Materials and methods: CT stimulation was conducted under voluntary breath hold or gating using the Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) System. Treatments were delivered daily under kV image guidance to verify the diaphragmatic or lipiodol-defined tumor position. Results: Thirty-three patients with liver confined hepatocellular carcinoma were treated between May 2006 and Dec 2009. After a median follow-up period of 16.5 months (range: 3.5–40.7), all but 2 patients demonstrated radiological tumor regression. Eight patients (24%) achieved complete remission. The median tumor shrinkage was 42% (27–100%). Subsequent in-field tumor progression was observed in only three patients (10%). For the 23 patients with abnormal alpha fetoprotein level, 22 of them showed biochemical response with a median AFP level drop of 78%. The treatment was well tolerated: Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 5 patients (1 leucopenia, 1 elevated liver enzyme and 3 elevated bilirubin level) but there was no grade 4 toxicity or treatment related death. The 1 year overall survival rate is 71.7% and median survival time is 17.2 months (3.5–40.7 months). Conclusions: Excellent treatment results with minimal toxicities could be achieved in a clinical environment with a commercially available highly sophisticated radiotherapy system.

  11. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level). PMID:25647734

  12. Single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients: comparative effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon F

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Frederick Yoon,1 Gerard C Morton2 1Simcoe Muskoka Regional Cancer Centre, Royal Victoria Regional Health Centre, Barrie, ON, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT is an effective treatment for symptomatic bone metastases from a variety of primary malignancies. Previous meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported on the efficacy of EBRT on bone metastases from multiple primaries. This review is focused on the comparative effectiveness of single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients. Keywords: radiotherapy, bone, metastases, prostate, comparative effectiveness

  13. Radiotherapy for head and neck cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Elderly patients with head and neck cancer may not be treated aggressively with radiotherapy, due to concerns regarding tolerance of treatment and toxicity. A retrospective study was undertaken of patients aged 80 years and over, treated by definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Material and methods: 98 patients aged 80-92 received radiotherapy for carcinoma of the head and neck between 1991 and 1995. All patients received beam directed radiotherapy with radical intent using an immobilisation shell. Results: Cancer specific survival was 59% and overall local control was 70% at 5 years. Both were significantly affected by T stage and site of disease. Cancer specific survival was comparable to that of patients aged below 80 years. Seven patients died within 6 months of the treatment. Three patients developed severe late toxicity. Metastatic disease occurred in eight patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a beneficial and well tolerated treatment in elderly patients with carcinoma of the head and neck

  14. Carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Carbon ion therapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and enhanced biological effects. It has been suggested that carbon ion therapy is effective against radioresistant pancreatic cancer. In April 2000, clinical studies examining the treatment of pancreatic cancer with carbon ions were begun at the HIMAC. As of February 2010, 48 patients treated with preoperative carbon ion radiotherapy and 89 patients treated for locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into the clinical trials. Both protocols are still ongoing. The interim results of these clinical trials suggest that carbon ion radiotherapy provides good local control and offers a survival advantage for patients with otherwise hard to cure pancreatic cancer, without unacceptable morbidity. (author)

  15. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy) or combined with (sequential or concurrent) chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI) after one year and 56% (±14%) after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11%) after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013) with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly) combined with chemotherapy

  16. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs at risk, requiring less than...

  17. The future of breast cancer radiotherapy: From one size fits all to taylor-made treatment; L'avenir de la radiotherapie du cancer du sein: de la taille unique au sur-mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France); Azria, D. [Departement de cancerologie radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Universite de Montpellier I, 5, boulevard Henri-IV, CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier cedex 2 (France); Inserm U896, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Various subgroups of breast tumours have been identified during the last 10 years according to the risk of local relapse. Prognostic factors for local relapse are age, surgical margins, tumour size, Her2 expression and hormonal receptors status. For tumours with a high risk of local relapse, an increased in boost dose or the addition of new drugs (trastuzumab, anti-angiogenics, PARP inhibitors) could be considered. For low risk tumours, hypo-fractionated, accelerated partial breast and intraoperative radiotherapy are being evaluated. The classical schedule (45-50 Gy to the whole gland followed by a boost dose of 16 Gy) is no longer the universal rule. Treatment individualization, according to clinical and biological characteristics of the tumour and - possibly - to the radiobiological profile of the patient, is likely to be the future of breast cancer radiotherapy. (authors)

  18. Alternatives to chemotherapy and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, F A

    1997-06-01

    Because adjuvant chemotherapy has resulted in only modest prolongation of survival for patients with lung cancer, investigators have turned to the evaluation of alternative treatment strategies for this patient population. Immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum, and levamisole has been evaluated in several prospective randomized trials, and no study has shown a statistically significant difference in overall survival. Interferon has been evaluated in three trials of adjuvant therapy after response to chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer. Different interferon preparations were used, but none of the trials showed a significant prolongation of survival. The retinoids have been evaluated as adjuvant treatment after complete resection of stage IN-SCLC. One trial showed a reduction in second primary tumors, and in particular, tumors to tobacco smoking in patients treated with retinyl palmitate. A second trial using 13-cis retinoic acid is ongoing in North America. In the last decade, several inhibitors of angiogenesis have been identified, and they are now beginning to be evaluated in the clinical setting. The National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer have initiated a study of adjuvant marimastat, a metalloproteinase inhibitor, for patients who have responded to induction chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer. This is the first adjuvant antiangiogenesis factor trial to be initiated for any tumor type. Other investigational agents which are currently undergoing Phase I and Phase II testing include monoclonal antibodies which may inhibit tumour cell growth by binding to growth factors, or which may be conjugated to toxins or chemotherapeutic agents which result in tumour cell death. In the last decade, we have witnessed an explosion in our knowledge and understanding of the regulation of normal and neoplastic cell growth at the molecular level. It remains

  19. Radiotherapy forgynecologic cancer innonagenarian patients:a framework fornew paradigms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BenoteMry; AlexisVallard; SophieEspenel; GuillaumeMoriceau; OlivierCollard; ClaireBosacki; JeanPhilippeJacquin; GuydeLaroche; PierreFournel; CyrusChargari; Nicolas Magn; SylvieMengueNdong; JeanBaptisteGuy; AviAssouline; AlexanderTFalk; AnasValeille; JaneChloTrone; RomainRivoirard; PierreAuberdiac

    2016-01-01

    No consensus exists regarding the role of radiotherapy in the management of gynecologic cancer in nonagenar‑ian patients. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 19 consecutive nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer (6 endometrial cancers, 6 cervical cancers, 4 vulvar cancers, and 3 vaginal cancers) who were treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was performed mainly in a palliative setting (n=12; 63.2%), with a median dose of 45Gy (range, 6–76Gy). Infrequent major acute or late toxicities were reported. Among 19 patients, 9 (47.4%) experienced tumor progression, 5 (26.3%) experienced complete response, 2 (10.5%) experienced stable disease and/or partial response. At last follow‑up, 12 patients (63.2%) had died; most deaths (n=9) occurred because of the cancer. These results suggest that radiotherapy is feasible in the treatment of nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer.

  20. The effect of increasing the treatment time beyond three weeks on the control of T2 and T3 laryngeal cancer using radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local control of cancer by radiotherapy may be prejudiced by accelerated tumor clonogen repopulation particularly during protracted treatment schedules. A series of 496 cases of T2 and T3 larynx cancer treated here by radiotherapy has been studied to examine the impact on local control of treatment durations ranging from 9-41 days. Data were analysed using a linear-quadratic formulation describing the fractionation sensitivity, with the incorporation of a parameter relating to treatment time. Using combined T2 and T3 data, the increase in dose required to maintain a constant local control (the time factor) was between 0.5-0.6 Gy/day. These values are similar to those reported for 4 weeks or more in the literature. Also, the calculated dose to control 50% of tumors, given over the standard Christie duration of 21 days, was on the line projected back from literature data over 28-66 days. The present data are consistent with the presence of such a time factor following a lag phase of not more than 3 weeks after starting radio-therapy. Hence, further consideration should be given to using shorter overall treatment times in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. (author). 17 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  1. The effect of increasing the treatment time beyond three weeks on the control of T[sub 2] and T[sub 3] laryngeal cancer using radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slevin, N.J. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (United Kingdom)); Hendry, J.H.; Roberts, S.A.; Agren-Cronqvist, A. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (United Kingdom). Paterson Labs.)

    1992-08-01

    Local control of cancer by radiotherapy may be prejudiced by accelerated tumor clonogen repopulation particularly during protracted treatment schedules. A series of 496 cases of T[sub 2] and T[sub 3] larynx cancer treated here by radiotherapy has been studied to examine the impact on local control of treatment durations ranging from 9-41 days. Data were analysed using a linear-quadratic formulation describing the fractionation sensitivity, with the incorporation of a parameter relating to treatment time. Using combined T[sub 2] and T[sub 3] data, the increase in dose required to maintain a constant local control (the time factor) was between 0.5-0.6 Gy/day. These values are similar to those reported for 4 weeks or more in the literature. Also, the calculated dose to control 50% of tumors, given over the standard Christie duration of 21 days, was on the line projected back from literature data over 28-66 days. The present data are consistent with the presence of such a time factor following a lag phase of not more than 3 weeks after starting radio-therapy. Hence, further consideration should be given to using shorter overall treatment times in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. (author). 17 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs.

  2. Undesirable financial effects of head and neck cancer radiotherapy during the initial treatment period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Egestad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare cost and reforms are at the forefront of international debates. One of the current discussion themes in oncology is whether and how patients’ life changes due to costs of cancer care. In Norway, the main part of the treatment costs is supported by general taxpayer revenues. Objectives: The objective of this study was to clarify whether head and neck cancer patients (n=67 in northern Norway experienced financial health-related quality of life (HRQOL deterioration due to costs associated with treatment. Design: HRQOL was examined by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30 in the beginning and in the end of radiation treatment in patients treated at the University Hospital in Northern Norway. Changes in financial HRQOL were calculated and compared by paired sample T-tests. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine correlations among gender, marital status, age and treatment with or without additional chemotherapy and changes in the HRQOL domain of financial difficulties. Results: The majority of score results at both time points were in the lower range (mean 15–25, indicating limited financial difficulties. We observed no statistically significant differences by gender, marital status and age. Increasing financial difficulties during treatment were reported by male patients and those younger than 65, that is, patients who were younger than retirement age. The largest effect was seen in singles. However, differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: During the initial phase of the disease trajectory, no significant increase in financial difficulties was found. This is in line with the aims of the Norwegian public healthcare model. However, long-term longitudinal studies should be performed, especially with regard to the trends we observed in single, male and younger patients.

  3. Effect of pre-operative neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and surgical treatment on resectable esophageal cancer: a Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei ZHU

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of pre-operative adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and surgical treatment on resectable esophageal cancer.Methods By searching Medline,CENTRAL(the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials,EMBASE,CBM(China Biology Medicine and CNKI(China National Knowledge Infrastructure by computer,the data of randomized controlled trials(RCTs of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgical treatment for resectable esophageal cancer were selected and analyzed using Stata 11.0 statistical software.The study population was patients with resectable early or medium stage esophageal cancer,the intervention was neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy(include sequential chemoradiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed with surgical resection,the outcome indices were 1-and 3-year survival rates and local recurrence rate.The combined odds ratio(OR,relative risk(RR and their 95% confidence interval(CI were calculated to estimate the results.Results Nine articles including a total of 1156 patients were finally analyzed in the Meta-analysis.Among all the patients,579 received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy(study group and 577 received surgical treatment only(control group.Compared the study group and control group,the OR of 1-and 3-year survival rate was 1.06(95%CI=0.94-1.19,Z=0.97,P=0.33 and 1.30(95%CI=1.07.-1.57,Z=2.67,P=0.008,respectively,and the RR of local recurrence rate was 0.75(95%CI=0.50-1.12,Z=1.40,P=0.162.Conclusions Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy could improve the 3-year survival rate of patients with resectable esophageal cancer,but could not decrease the local recurrence rate.

  4. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer: results after five years of a randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: this study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two regimens of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: from 1992 to 1997, 127 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (stage III-IV) were randomized. Sixty-six patients (group a), 42 male and 24 female, with a median age of 48 years (range 40-72) received during radiotherapy two courses (1.-6. week) of chemotherapy with carbo-platin (300 mg/m2 day 1) and etoposide (60 mg/m2 days 1 to 3). Sixty-one patients (group b), 40 male and 21 female, with a median age of 51 years (range 42-69) received two cycles of chemotherapy with 5 FU (750 mg/m2 days 1 to 5) and MIT C ( 10 mg/m2 day 1). The median dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy (range 55-66 Gy) 180 cGy /d 5w. Results: the actuarial five-year survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 38 % for group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) and 25 % for group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.036). Toxicity group a: mucositis G III in 41 patients and G IV in 16; dysphagia G III in 46 patients and IV in 5; leukopenia in 24 patients; 28 patients required nutritional therapy. Toxicity group b: mucositis G III in 38 patients and G IV in 17; dysphagia G III in 48 patients and G IV in 3; leukopenia in 23 patients; 25 patients needed nutritional therapy. Conclusions: the data of the actuarial survival five-year rate suggest that concomitant chemotherapy in group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) is better than the concomitant chemotherapy in group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). (author)

  5. Late treatment-related morbidity in breast cancer patients randomized to postmastectomy radiotherapy and systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejris, I.; Andersen, J.; Overgaard, M.; Overgaard, J. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2000-07-01

    Late treatment-related morbidity after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic treatment with and without postoperative irradiation was assessed in 84 patients randomized in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Trials 82b and c. A structured interview and physical examination, using a standardized assessment sheet, constructed on the basis of the late effects normal tissues (LENT) scoring system, was used. The median length of follow-up from mastectomy was 9 years (range 6-13 years). Lymphedema was measured in 14%, of the irradiated patients versus 3% of the non-irradiated patients (NS). Slightly decreased shoulder morbidity was measured in 45% of the irradiated women versus 15% of the non-irradiated patients, but moderate or more severe impairment was seen in only 5% of the irradiated patients and in none of the non-irradiated patients (p = 0.004). Seventeen percent of the irradiated patients and 2% of the non-irradiated patients found that impairment of shoulder movement caused symptoms (p = 0.001)

  6. Late treatment-related morbidity in breast cancer patients randomized to postmastectomy radiotherapy and systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late treatment-related morbidity after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic treatment with and without postoperative irradiation was assessed in 84 patients randomized in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Trials 82b and c. A structured interview and physical examination, using a standardized assessment sheet, constructed on the basis of the late effects normal tissues (LENT) scoring system, was used. The median length of follow-up from mastectomy was 9 years (range 6-13 years). Lymphedema was measured in 14%, of the irradiated patients versus 3% of the non-irradiated patients (NS). Slightly decreased shoulder morbidity was measured in 45% of the irradiated women versus 15% of the non-irradiated patients, but moderate or more severe impairment was seen in only 5% of the irradiated patients and in none of the non-irradiated patients (p = 0.004). Seventeen percent of the irradiated patients and 2% of the non-irradiated patients found that impairment of shoulder movement caused symptoms (p = 0.001)

  7. Evaluation of the utilization of external radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in Andalusia, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around 27,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year in Spain and 5400 die from this disease. Radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined, has proven to be effective as initial treatment in patients with localized disease. Our objective was to evaluate the use of external beam RT (EBRT) in our region, comparing the indication rate and irradiation rate and examining variability in its application among hospitals. We conducted a review of RT guidelines and indication studies for prostate cancer (% expected irradiation). Data were gathered from all twelve public healthcare centers in Andalusia (Spain) on RT-treated prostate cancer patients during 2013 (% actual irradiation) and from nine of the centers on RT discharge reports. Information was classified according to type of hospital, tumor risk category and RT treatment (technique, dosage, volume, toxicity). The estimated RT rate was 67 % (1289/1917), 43 % were aged > 70 years, 44.7 % had ECOG performance status of 0); 44.7 % had high-risk tumors; 57 % underwent RT associated with hormone therapy; 70 % of patients receiving RT were treated with 3D planning (30 % IGRT); and doses were 70–76 Gy in 70 % of cases and >76 Gy in 10.7 %. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were < grade 2 in 79 and 89 % of patients, respectively. An irradiation rate significantly below the mean for the study was found in four provinces. There was a significant difference among provinces in the distribution of risk groups. Underutilization of EBRT was estimated to be around 30 % in prostate cancer patients, with an elevated variability in irradiation rates among hospitals related to differences in available technology and in the distribution of patients with different risk levels. These data should be a matter of concern to regional health managers, given the negative and measurable impact on the survival of patients

  8. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  9. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramita Saha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthracycline based regiments and/or taxanes and adjuvant radiotherapy; the main modalities of treatment for breast cancers are associated with deterioration of pulmonary functions and progressive pulmonary toxicities. Aim: Assessment of pulmonary toxicities and impact on pulmonary functions mainly in terms of decline of forced vital capacity (FVC and the ratio of forced expiratory volume (FEV in 1 Second and FEV1/FVC ratio with different treatment times and follow ups in carcinoma breast patients receiving anthracycline and/or taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A prospective single institutional cohort study was performed with 58 breast cancer patients between January 2011 to July 2012 who received either anthracycline based (37 patients received 6 cycles FAC= 5 FU, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide regime and radiotherapy or anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy (21 patients received 4cycles AC= Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide; followed by 4 cycles of T=Taxane and radiotherapy. Assessment of pulmonary symptoms and signs, chest x-ray and pulmonary function tests were performed at baseline, midcycle, at end of chemotherapy, at end radiotherapy, at 1 and 6 months follow ups and compared. By means of a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA model, the course of lung parameters across the time points was compared. Results and Conclusion: Analysis of mean forced vital capacities at different points of study times showed definitive declining pattern, which is at statistically significant level at the end of 6th month of follow up (p=0.032 .The FEV1/FVC ratio (in percentage also revealed a definite decreasing pattern over different treatment times and at statistically significant level at 6th month follow up with p value 0.003. Separate analysis of mean FEV1/FVC ratios over time in anthracycline based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group as well as anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group

  10. Radiotherapy without boost in the tumor bed after conserving surgery in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to analyse satisfactory local control and breast preservation with particular emphasis on the importance of the microscopic negative margin in patients who not receiving tumor bed boost therapy. Authors analysed 122 consecutive patients with breast cancer in pathological stages I and II, who were treated with quadrantectomy at full axillary dissection between 1992 and 1997. The median follow up was 34 months. The radiation treatment was started 60 - 80 day in 14 patients (11.5%) with high risk for metastases, because they underwent chemotherapy. The patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy on the entire breast to a mean total dose of 48.8 Gy. A boost to a tumor bed was not delivered. Only patients with follow-up period above 24 months were evaluated for the purpose of analysis of cosmetic results. Analyzed variables were: age, size, lymph node status, two-field versus three-field technique, operating scare. The major goal of breast conserving therapy is the preservation of cosmetically acceptable breast without local relapses in all patients of our study. A 43 years old patient with liver metastases and any regional and local relapses was dead 27 months after the radiotherapy. A single significant factor impairing excellent cosmetic outcome in our study is the surgical scar. The very high percent (51) of excellent cosmetic results and low percent of post radiotherapy injury is due to precise for breast conserving therapy, the prevailing number of young patients and precise CT and dosimetric planning on three level of treatment volume (author)

  11. Quadrantectomy and radiotherapy (QUART) in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred twenty nine patients with T1 N0 M0 breast cancer were selectively treated with QUART. Mean age was 50 years. Ninety-eight patients (76%) were N- and 31 (24%) were N+. N+ cases received chemotherapy or Tamoxifen if R+. Patients evaluated are 95/129 in a 3 years average follow-up (range 2-7 years). Overall actuariall survival rate at 5 years is 88.9%. Three patients died; local relapses were 3/95 and metastases 3/95. Overall treatment tolerance was satisfactory and esthetic results were good

  12. Targeting Radiotherapy to Cancer by Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    R. J. Mairs; Boyd, M.

    2003-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is an alternative method of radiation treatment which uses a tumor-seeking agent carrying a radioactive atom to deposits of tumor, wherever in the body they may be located. Recent experimental data signifies promise for the amalgamation of gene transfer with radionuclide targeting. This review encompasses aspects of the integration of gene manipulation and targeted radiotherapy, highlighting the possibilities of gene transfer to assist the targeting of cancer ...

  13. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable an

  14. Biochemical failure as single abnormality in patients with prostate cancer following radical treatment with external radiotherapy: follow-up without immediate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biochemical failure has been defined as 3 consecutive increases in PSA following curative treatment of prostate cancer. The appropriate management in such cases is controversial. The most usual treatment has been early introduction of hormones. Such patients will live for many years and hormone therapy causes important secondary effects and increases costs. The guideline in our Department of Radiotherapy has been to follow up, with no initial therapy, cases with low PSA and short PSA doubling time. The present study reports this experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 528 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by radical approach between 1992 and 1999, with external radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant hormone therapy. After a median follow-up of 77 months, there were 207 (39% cases with biochemical failure, 78 of which were followed without therapy after the identification of biochemical failure. All of them were asymptomatic patients and had negative radiographic examinations or did not have imaging exams requested since they presented a favorable outcome. The follow-up included at least 2 annual visits with physical examination and PSA. RESULTS: Of the 78 patients with biochemical failure followed without initial therapy, 7 died from other causes than prostate cancer and the remaining 71 cases were alive and asymptomatic in the last follow-up. Prognostic factors previous to radiotherapy such as stage and Gleason score were not considered when deciding for follow-up without initial therapy in these cases. The most significant aspects considered for this decision were low PSA value (median PSA on the last visit for the 78 cases was only 3.9 ng/mL and a slow PSA doubling time (in the present experience the median PSA doubling time was 22.5 months. CONCLUSION: There seems to be space for expectant management, without initial hormone therapy, in patients with prostate cancer who present biochemical failure and are

  15. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  16. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  17. Tangential vs. defined radiotherapy in early breast cancer treatment without axillary lymph node dissection. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Universitaet Kiel, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Kiel (Germany); Temme, Nils; Foerster, Manuela; Reible, Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated low regional recurrence rates in early-stage breast cancer omitting axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in patients who have positive nodes in sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND). This finding has triggered an active discussion about the effect of radiotherapy within this approach. The purpose of this study was to analyze the dose distribution in the axilla in standard tangential radiotherapy (SRT) for breast cancer and the effects on normal tissue exposure when anatomic level I-III axillary lymph node areas are included in the tangential radiotherapy field configuration. We prospectively analyzed the dosimetric treatment plans from 51 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. We compared and analyzed the SRT and the defined radiotherapy (DRT) methods for each patient. The clinical target volume (CTV) of SRT included the breast tissue without specific contouring of lymph node areas, whereas the CTV of DRT included the level I-III lymph node areas. We evaluated the dose given in SRT covering the axillary lymph node areas of level I-III as contoured in DRT. The mean V{sub D95} {sub %} of the entire level I-III lymph node area in SRT was 50.28 % (range, 37.31-63.24 %), V{sub D45} {sub Gy} was 70.1 % (54.8-85.4 %), and V{sub D40} {sub Gy} was 83.5 % (72.3-94.8 %). A significant difference was observed between lung dose and heart toxicity in SRT vs. DRT. The V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and V{sub 30} {sub Gy} of the right and the left lung in DRT were significantly higher in DRT than in SRT (p < 0.001). The mean heart dose in SRT was significantly lower (3.93 vs. 4.72 Gy, p = 0.005). We demonstrated a relevant dose exposure of the axilla in SRT that should substantially reduce local recurrences. Furthermore, we demonstrated a significant increase in lung and heart exposure when including the axillary lymph nodes regions in the tangential radiotherapy field set-up. (orig.) [German] Aktuelle Studien zeigen

  18. Radiotherapy alone in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective analysis was conducted on breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone at The Princess Margaret Hospital and at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. These patients had either operable tumours, but were unfit for general anesthesia, or had inoperable tumors due to local contraindications to surgery. Previous results showed that a radiation dose increase of 15 Gy can decrease the relative risk of tumour or lymph node recurrence twofold. In this third report, the same data were analyzed to determine the treatment-related complication rates and to correlate these to the radiation dose levels. Overall results were analyzed on 453 patients, but detailed analyses on complications were conducted on 372 patients not developing local recurrence in the first 6 months of follow-up. Each complication was graded on a 3-level previously defined scale. Most frequent complications were skin changes of different degrees, which were usually asymptomatic. More disabling complications were arm edema, impaired shoulder mobility, rib fractures and brachial plexopathy. The incidence of disabling complications was low. The only factor significantly increasing the risk of complications was the radiation dose level to the tumour and axilla. Technical factors such as overlapping fields should also be taken into account. As the more effective control of tumour and lymph nodes obtained in patients treated with higher radiation doses is counterbalanced by an increase in the complication rate, the dose to be delivered for each patient should be carefully chosen according to individual risk factors. (author). figs

  19. Risk of cancer formation by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are the difference between exposures to radiation for medical purpose and to environmental radiation at low dose, estimation of carcinogenic risk by medical radiation, and notice for referring the risk at clinical practice. ICRP employs linear non-threshold (LNT) model for risk of cancer formation even at <200 mSv for safety, with a recognition that it is scientifically obscure. The model essentially stands on data of A-bomb survivors (the Gold Standard), where the relationship between 5-10% excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer formation and dose 0.05-2.5 Sv is linear. Analyses of the secondary carcinogenesis after radiotherapy have begun to be reported since around 2005: e.g., the secondary thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients treated with radiotherapy has a peak at 20 Gy, suggesting the actual risk depends both on the linearity of carcinogenic increase and on the exponential probability of cell death increase. On this concept, the risk of cancer formation is not always linear to dose. At the practical radiotherapy, its secondary carcinogenic risk should be estimated not only on the dose but also on other factors such as the individual organ, patient's age and attainable age/time after the treatment. In treated teen-ager patients, ERRs of mortality/Gy are 2.28 for cancers of the skin of non-malignant melanoma, 1.32 of bladder and 1.21 of thyroid and in patients of fifties, 1.15 of bladder and lung. The EER tends to become lower as the treated age is older. Pediatric cancer patients to be treated with radiotherapy should be informed about the secondary cancer that the low dose risk given by ICRP is not always appropriate, a certain cancer risk has a peak dose, and ERR of cancer mortality is not a cancer risk of an organ. Many factors like anticancers and immuno-modifiers, modify the outcome of radiotherapy and should be carefully speculated for evaluating the outcome. (T.T.)

  20. A practical approach on radioprotection in the radiotherapy treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several protocols for the treatment and follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer. All of them gather evidence on the evolution and treatment and try to establish a treatment standard. However, there are few occasions in which this issue is addressed from the standpoint of radiological protection, as the ICRP 94 and TECDOC 1806. The focus of our work is to demonstrate that simple actions in the routine of workers in the Nuclear Medicine Service interfere positively in the radiation protection of all those involved in the patient's care, also optimizing their well being during the procedure. In the current model, the patient participates in an interview with nurses, doctors and physicists, before admission, and receives written and verbal information about the treatment procedures in order to diminish his anxiety and clarify possible doubts. In all the cases under hospital care there were no instances of high exposure (above 1mSv/month or 6 mSv/year) among the staff. With the participation of all involved, there was an escalating improvement in the reduction of complications generated by the patient’s anxiety, waste decrease providing better comfort during hospital care) and minimization of occupational hazard affecting the staff in charge of the patient’s room maintenance after hospital leave. (author)

  1. Hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer is not associated with post-treatment testosterone suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States); Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org; And others

    2013-04-15

    Background: To investigate post-treatment changes in serum testosterone in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between April 2008 and October 2011, 228 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved prospective protocol. Patients received doses ranging from 70 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) to 72.5 CGE at 2.5 CGE per fraction using passively scattered protons. Three patients were excluded for receiving androgen deprivation therapy (n = 2) or testosterone supplementation (n = 1) before radiation. Of the remaining 226 patients, pretreatment serum testosterone levels were available for 217. Of these patients, post-treatment serum testosterone levels were available for 207 in the final week of treatment, 165 at the six-month follow-up, and 116 at the 12-month follow-up. The post-treatment testosterone levels were compared with the pretreatment levels using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for matched pairs. Results: The median pretreatment serum testosterone level was 367.7 ng/dl (12.8 nmol/l). The median changes in post-treatment testosterone value were as follows: +3.0 ng/dl (+0.1 nmol/l) at treatment completion; +6.0 ng/dl (+0.2 nmol/l) at six months after treatment; and +5.0 ng/dl (0.2 nmol/l) at 12 months after treatment. None of these changes were statistically significant. Conclusion: Patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy do not experience testosterone suppression. Our findings are consistent with physical measurements demonstrating that proton radiotherapy is associated with less scatter radiation exposure to tissues beyond the beam paths compared with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy.

  2. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, K-H; Duchesne, G; Turner, S; Kneebone, A; See, A; Gogna, K; Berry, M

    2004-12-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer.

  3. Concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer; Quimioterapia concomitante a radioterapia no tratamento adjuvante do cancer da mama localizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Oliveira Filho, Juvenal A.; Garcia, Alice R.; Amalfi, Christiane; Spirandeli, Julia M.B.; Campos, Eliane C. de [Hospital Mario Gatti, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: avo@correionet.com.br

    2001-06-01

    The conventional treatment of localized breast cancer involves the use of both systemic therapy and loco-regional radiation after surgery. The ideal sequence of these two treatments is still undefined. This paper focus on our experience of concomitant chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT), and discusses information from the literature about this issue. Between Jan,1989 and Jan, 1999 a retrospective analysis of 103 patients with ductal carcinoma of the breast who received concomitant CT with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5 flurouracil (CMF) and RT was made. Radiation did not included mammary chain or axilla and total dose was of 50 Gy. End points were tolerance and oxicity leading changes to doses. Mean age was 44y; median follow up time of 33 mo; 62 patients had breast conserving surgery and 41 had mastectomy. All patients received both treatments without a break or dose modification. There was no change or interruption of RT. Ten out of 103 patients had the prescribed dose of CT decreased of 10%-20%. There was no evident changes in cosmetic results. Most of the knowledge regarding the delay of CT or RT comes from retrospective studies, and results are conflicting. It is well accepted that high risk patients need both CT and RT. However, there are data suggesting that giving RT first and CT after may increase the rate of distant metastases. There are also studies showing worse impact in the local control with the delay of radiotherapy. The use of concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy has apparent advantages, but no randomized trial has addressed this issue yet. Our experience has shown that is possible to give concomitant CT with CMF and RT without irradiation of IMC and axilla without major changes in scheduling or dose of both therapies. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  5. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node–positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m2)/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m2) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  6. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, William C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kim, Janice [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH (United States); Silverman, Paula [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Overmoyer, Beth [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Cooper, Brenda W. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Anthony, Sue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary [Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hanks, Shelli H. [Arizona Institute of Urology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Lyons, Janice A., E-mail: janice.lyons@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  7. Radiotherapy in skin cancer - present day aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin carcinomas (SC) are the leading ones in the structure of oncological morbidity in both genders in Bulgaria, as well as in white populations in the world. Regardless of their high frequency, their treatment is successful and mortality due to SC has been reduced by 20 - 30% during the last decades. In Bulgaria SC in 2003 comprise 9.3% of all oncological diseases in men and women. According to their frequency they occupy the second phase after lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The treatment of SC is realized applying various therapeutic approaches, distinguished as basic (radical) and alternative ones. The first include surgical treatment and radiotherapy (RT) (definitive or adjuvant) and the alternative ones - curettage and electro-coagulation, cryotherapy, local chemotherapy and immunotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, etc. When defining the therapeutic approach, the method affording the best chances of curing with acceptable cosmetic results should be selected. The present review is aimed at considering the contemporary aspects in RT of SC, including used radiotherapy methods and techniques, volumes, doses, fractionation, and achieved therapeutic effects. The indications for implementing definitive and adjuvant RT are given in detail. The applied radiotherapy methods - external beam RT and brachytherapy, are also discussed. The used planned radiotherapy volumes, doses, fractionation schemes, attained therapeutic effects and possible radiation reactions are considered as well. The curability of SC is high, exceeding 90% after adequate treatment. Regardless of the fact that RT has partially ceded its leading role in SC treatment, it still remains to be one of the basic and successful therapeutic approaches

  8. Experience in treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of local control and breast conservation, intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy has been indicated in patients with locally advanced breast cancer both in primary and recurrent cases. The present series, evaluated during the past 4 years, consisted of 15 patients 35-83 years of age, with invasive ductal carcinoma, including 10 with primary breast cancer (stage IIIb: 1, IV: 9) and 5 with postoperative recurrence (stage IIIb: 2, IV: 3). Intraarterial chemotherapy is started, basically infusing ADM 50 mg, MMC 10 mg and CDDP 50 mg into the internal thoracic and/or subclavian artery 1-3 times, followed by reduction surgery (quadrantectomy: 4, wide resection: 2) and radiotherapy to the breast, supraclavicular, parasternal and cervical regions according to tumor extent. Local response after arterial infusion was CR: 2, PR: 10, NC: 3 (response rate: 73% ). The response rate of distant metastases after arterial infusion was 73%. Of 10 patients with primary breast cancer, recurrence was noted in 1. Breast conservation was successful in 8 of 10 patients. One of them, in stage IIIb, has survived for 4.5 years with no evidence of disease and with breast conservation. Five patients with postoperative recurrence showed CR with no recurrence after intraarterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Acute skin reaction occurred in 6 patients, and was especially frequent in patients with postoperative recurrence (4 of 5). According to these results, combined therapy affords breast conservation even in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, and improves patient's QOL in stage IV. (author)

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  10. Efficiency of radiotherapy during local hyperthermia in the treatment of laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Choinzonov; I. O. Spivakova; M. R. Mukhamedov; Zh. A. Startseva; O. V. Cheremisina; I. G. Frolova; D. E. Kulbakin; P. V. Surkova

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the larynx and laryngopharynx, which is accessible to visual and instrumental examination, remains the most relevant and complicated problem among head and neck malignances as before. Investigations show that the incidence of cancer at these sites in Russia in the last decade has risen from 4.5 to 9.67 %. This is a severe and poor prognostic form of cancer, which is characterized by its nonspecific early clinical manifestations, complex anatomic and topographic structure, and a high...

  11. Radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. 20-year experience from a single institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrian, K.; Sauer, T.; Klemm, S.; Bayer, C.; Haller, B.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To report the efficacy and toxicity of radio(chemo)therapy (RCT) in the management of squamous cell anal carcinoma (SQ-AC) and to evaluate the prognostic factors influencing the outcomes. Patients and methods: A consecutive cohort of 138 patients with cT1-4, cN0-3, cM0 SQ-AC were treated with RCT between 1988 and 2011 at our department. Median follow-up time for surviving patients from the start of RCT was 98 months (range, 1-236 months). Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 56 Gy (range, 4-61 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 119 patients (86%). Results: The survival rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 88 {+-} 3, 82 {+-} 4, and 59 {+-} 6%, respectively, with a median overall survival (OS) of 167 months. The cumulative incidence for local recurrence at 2 and 5 years was 8 {+-} 2 and 11 {+-} 3%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) times were 132 and 135 months, respectively. In 19 patients (14%), a distant metastasis was diagnosed after a median time of 19 months. In the multivariate analysis, UICC (International Union Against Cancer) stage I-II, female gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1, and good/moderate histologic differentiation (G1-2) were significantly associated with a better OS, DFS, and CFS. Conformal radiotherapy planning techniques were significantly associated with a lower cumulative incidence of local recurrence (11 {+-} 3% vs. 38 {+-} 19% at 5 years, p = 0.006). A higher radiation dose beyond 54 Gy was not associated with an improvement in outcome, neither for smaller - (T1/T2) nor for larger tumors (T3/T4). Conclusion: RCT leads to excellent outcomes - especially in patients with stage I/II and G1/G2 tumors - with acceptable toxicity. The probable advantages of high-dose radiotherapy should be considered carefully against the risk of a higher rate of toxicity. Future studies are needed to investigate the role of a more

  12. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  13. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  14. Quadrantectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conservative treatment of early breast cancer always requires irradiation of residual mammary tissue. The preliminary results obtained in 45 early breast cancer patients, who received quadrantectomy plus axillary dissection, followed by radiation of residual breast are reported. Radiation was performed by the two opposed field technique. In some cases the residual breast tissue was compressed using a special accessory provided with the Theratron 780. In addition to the tumor dose of 50 GY, 10 GY boots was added to the surgical scar using 7 MeV electrons. The 6 patients with positive axillary nodes received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF) after radiotherapy. All patients are currently alive and free of disease. The 64% (29 patients) were followed up for at least 5 years, and 36% (16 patients) for at least 3 years. Only 2 cases of local recurrence were encountered (4,4%). The esthetic result was satisfactory in all cases. No side effects due to treatment were noted

  15. Prediction of response to radiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer using stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated whether cancer stem cell marker expressing cells can be identified that predict for the response of esophageal cancer (EC) to CRT. Materials and methods: EC cell-lines OE-33 and OE-21 were used to assess in vitro, stem cell activity, proliferative capacity and radiation response. Xenograft tumors were generated using NOD/SCID mice to assess in vivo proliferative capacity and tumor hypoxia. Archival and fresh EC biopsy tissue was used to confirm our in vitro and in vivo results. Results: We showed that the CD44+/CD24− subpopulation of EC cells exerts a higher proliferation rate and sphere forming potential and is more radioresistant in vitro, when compared to unselected or CD44+/CD24+ cells. Moreover, CD44+/CD24− cells formed xenograft tumors faster and were often located in hypoxic tumor areas. In a study of archival pre-neoadjuvant CRT biopsy material from EC adenocarcinoma patients (N = 27), this population could only be identified in 50% (9/18) of reduced-responders to neoadjuvant CRT, but never (0/9) in the complete responders (P = 0.009). Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation into the possible clinical benefit of CD44+/CD24− as a predictive marker in EC patients for the response to chemoradiation

  16. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: Zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly

  17. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  19. Primary radiotherapy of breast cancer; Treatment results in locally advanced breast cancer and in operable patients selected by positive axillay apex biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borger, J.H.; Tienhoven, G. van; Passchier, D.H.; Hart, A.A.M.; Bartelink, H.; Dongen, J.A. van; Rutgers, E.J.T. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1992-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy without surgery, treatment results in patients treated for locally advanced breast cancer (n=209) and those selected by positive axillary apex biopsy (n=289) in the period 1977 -1985 have been analysed retrospectively. Treatment consisted of primary irradiation to the breast and regional lymph nodes followed by a boost to the primary breast tumour and palpable regional disease to a mean normalised dose (NTD) of 64.7 Gy with a range of 33.4-93 Gy (2 Gy fractions, [alpha]/[beta] 5 Gy). Adjuvant systemic treatment was given in 30% of the locally advanced and in 40% of the apex positive patients. Thirty percent of the apex positive patients had an excisional biopsy of the breast tumour. Patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and patients irradiated to a NTD of 60 Gy or more had significantly better local control. For overall survival primary tumour size, clinical nodal size and age are independent prognostic factors. Patients irradiated to a NTD above 60 Gy had significantly better results. (author). 39 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.;

    2014-01-01

    -Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three...... locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking....... Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result...

  1. Cancer risk following radiotherapy of cervical cancer: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women treated for cervical cancer were selected for study because (a) doses to body organs following radiotherapy can be accurately determined and vary sufficiently to permit dose-response evaluations, (b) organs remote from the cervix receive low-dose exposures in the range of current scientific interest, (c) treatment is relatively successful and many patients survive long enough to be at risk of late complications of radiotherapy, and (d) several nonexposed groups of women with cervical cancer are also available for comparison. In addition, population-based cancer registries provide an opportunity to inexpensively study large numbers of individuals over many decades. The careful procedures normally used by cancer registries to record second primary cancers facilitate the study of cancer incidence for which a wider view of radiation risk is expected than can be seen in investigations of mortality. Other special features of studies of cervical cancer patients include the ability to assess the effects of very large partial-body exposures, differences in organ sensitivities to radiation, interactions of radiation with biological factors such as age, and the duration of carcinogenic response

  2. Delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuta, Atsushi; Tatematsu, Masanori; Ishinaga, Hajime; Harada, Teruhiko; Majima, Yuichi [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    Seven cases of delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for early staged head and neck cancers during 1989 and 1999 were evaluated (aged 54-77 yrs, 6 male and a female). The cases included five glottic laryngeal cancers (T1a, T1b, and three T2), a subglottic laryngeal cancer, and an unknown origin, but strongly suspected laryngeal cancer, with neck metastasis. Radio injury was found from 3 months to 47 months after radiotherapy. {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy was used in all seven cases, although {sup 60}Co radionuclide was changed to Liniac in 1997. The total dose was 60 Gy for 3 cases, and 70 Gy for 4 cases. Tracheostomy was performed in 3 cases due to bilateral vocal cord impairment. Background, treatment, and response to radiotherapy were compared to those of 90 patients of a control group with early staged laryngeal cancer who did not fail radiation injury during the same period. As a result, radionuclide ({sup 60}Co), total dose, cervical surgery, antiinflammatory drugs, laryngeal edema during radiotherapy were risk factors. The intensity and the period of mucositis by radiotherapy was important for indicating delayed airway stenosis. (author)

  3. Deformable anatomical templates for brachytherapy treatment planning in radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Chao, K. S. C.; Miller, Michael I.; So, F. B.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a new method to register serial, volumetric x-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets for tracking soft-tissue deformation caused by insertion of intracavity brachytherapy applicators to treat cervical cancer. 3D CT scans collected from the same patient with and without a brachytherapy applicator are registered to aid in computation of the radiation dose to tumor and normal tissue. The 3D CT image volume of pelvic anatomy with the applicator. Initial registration is accomplished by rigid alignment of the pelvic bones and non-rigid alignment of gray scale CT data and hand segmentations of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum. A viscous fluid transformation model is used for non-rigid registration to allow for local, non-linear registration of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum without disturbing the rigid registration of the bony pelvis and adjacent structures. Results are presented in which two 3D CT data sets of the same patient - imaged with and without a brachytherapy applicator - are registered.

  4. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum; Radiotherapie des cancers cutanes au cours du xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, route Majida-Bouleila, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lung cancer: current status and future developments

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, C; Lang, S.; Rowbottom, C; Guckenberger, M.; Faivre-Finn, C

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of lung cancer, with over 50% of patients receiving this modality at some point during their treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique that adds fluence modulation to beam shaping, which improves radiotherapy dose conformity around the tumor and spares surrounding normal structures. Treatment with IMRT is becoming more widely available for the treatment of lung cancer, despite the paucity of high level evidence sup...

  6. Advantage of three-dimensional treatment planning for localized radiotherapy of early stage prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional two-dimensional (2-d) treatment planning was compared to three-dimensional (3-d) treatment planning for patients with prostatic carcinoma. Both types of treatment planning were performed for all ten patients with five fixed fields. In 3-d planning we used irregular shaped fields. For further evaluation we performed conventional planning in rotation technique in two patients. The target volume included prostate prostate, seminal vesicles and a surrounding security margin of 2 cm. Using the MPR-version of the MEVAPLAN planning system, the three-dimensional dose calculations were performed. For the volumes of interest (VOI's) we discussed quality of the dose distribution concerning homogeneity in the target volume and isodose distribution in the organs at risk, which are the rectum and the urinary bladder. We defined the tumor encompassing reference isodose (ca. 95%) for the calculation of the involved rectum- and bladder volume. Using the five-field technique our results show a reduction of the radiation related rectum- and bladder volume concerning the tumor encompassing reference isodose (ca. 95%) for the rectum inbetween 9.5 and 36.6% (median: 19%, n=10) and for the urinary bladder inbetween 15.7 and 47.8% (median 28%, n=10). Calculated for 80% of the reference isodose the difference for the rectum was 15.7 to 31.3% (median: 23%) and for the urinary bladder 24.5% to 56.7% (median: 42%). A significant reduction of radiation related side-effects concerning rectum and urinary bladder can be expected by a reduction of volume involvement and a consecutive dosage limitation. (orig.)

  7. Lung cancer treatment with high cyclophosphamide doses versus high cyclophosphamide doses plus radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty-six evaluable male patients with a histologically proved inoperable lung cancer, with a Karnofsky's score greater than or equal to 30, were considered for study. The mean age was 57.2 (range 20 to 74) years. Tumor cell types were of epidermoid carcinoma 50, adenocarcinoma 6, undifferentiated small cell carcinoma 5, and undifferentiated large cell carcinoma 5. Fifty patients had limited disease and 15 had extensive disease. They were treated with combined modality therapy Cyclophosphamide (CY) 50 mg/kg body weight, administered into the tubing of a freely running intravenous infusion of 5% dextrose every 10 to 12 days, followed by radiation therapy with 60Co, 6000 rad and then, with CY 17 mg/kg body weight every 15 days until progression (Ch-R-Ch group). The control group (Ch) of 31 patients was treated with CY 50 mg/kg body every 10/12 days. Complete response was achieved in 3/35 patients and partial response in 15/35 patients of the Ch-R-Ch group. In the control group, 12/31 patients achieved partial response. Total dose of CY was higher in responders achieving a significantly longer survival (median 12+ months) in comparison to non-responders (median 7 months) and the control group (median 6 months). Less toxic reactions were seen in patients responding to Ch-R-Ch regimen. Bone marrow depletion did not affect the patient's survival, but cystitis and alopecia, it appeared, decreased life expectancy. It is concluded that combined modality therapy is better than chemotherapy alone, with less cytotoxicity in responders

  8. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  9. Salvage radiotherapy after high intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Peter; Sundar, Santhanam

    2012-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a technique that has been used to treat localised prostate cancer. There is no standard treatment for patients who relapse with prostate cancer following primary treatment with HIFU; here we report the case of a patient who was successfully treated with external beam radiotherapy for disease relapse following HIFU. To date, our patient remains disease free with no toxicity from his treatment.

  10. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  11. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  12. Factors associated with refusal of radiotherapy among oral cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agaku IT

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery is commonly favored in the management of oral cancer but radiotherapy may be essential because of the size or location of the tumor. Refusal of radiotherapy by patients is an important issue, which must be taken into consideration during treatment planning. This study assessed prevalence and correlates of radiotherapy refusal among oral cancer patients. Methods: Data was analyzed for 47, 174 oral cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database during 1988–2008. Point estimates were calculated overall and by selected socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A multivariate logistic regression model was fitted to determine predictors of radiotherapy refusal. Results: The overall prevalence of refusal of radiotherapy was 2.31%. Factors associated with increased likelihood of refusal of radiotherapy included age ± 45 years (adjusted odds ratio, aOR=2.48; P=0.031; gingival/floor of mouth tumors (aOR=1.32; P=0.010; receipt of surgery (aOR=1.21; P=0.04. Conversely, protective factors included being married (aOR=0.59; P<0.001; non-Hispanic blacks (aOR=0.53; P=0.001; involvement of paired structures (aOR=0.61; P<0.001 as well as multiple tumors (aOR=0.75; P=0.021. Sex was not a significant predictor on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Prevalence of refusal of radiotherapy among oral cancer patients is relatively low and is significantly associated with age, marital status, as well as location, extent and severity of disease. Clinicians may anticipate patients likely to refuse radiotherapy and develop patient-tailored counseling considering the benefits and risks of proposed treatment. Final treatment decision must however take into consideration the wishes of the fully informed patient.

  13. Breast cancer radiotherapy and cardiac risk

    OpenAIRE

    Anusheel Munshi; Kaustav Talapatra; Debanarayan Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women in the developed world and its incidence in the developing world is on the rise. Management of breast cancer requires a multimodality approach and an integration of the services of surgery, radiation, and medical oncology. Radiotherapy after mastectomy or breast conservation leads to reduction in local recurrence by two-thirds. Recent trials and metaanalyses have also demonstrated overall survival benefit with radiotherapy...

  14. Comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a stomach cancer treatment;Comparacion dosimetrica de radioterapia conformal 3D versus radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT) de un tratamiento de cancer de estomago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernui de V, Maria Giselle; Cardenas, Augusto; Vargas, Carlos [Hospital Nacional Carlos Alberto Seguin Escobedo (ESSALUD), Arequipa (Peru). Servicio de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the dosimetry in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in a treatment of stomach cancer. For this comparison we selected a patient who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and D2 dissection for a T3N3 adenocarcinoma Mx ECIIIB receiving treatment under the scheme Quimio INT 0116 - in adjuvant radiotherapy. In the treatment plan was contouring the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) was generated from the expansion of 1cm of the CTV, the risky organs contouring were: the liver, kidneys and spinal cord, according to the consensus definition of volumes in gastric cancer. The 3D Conformal Radiotherapy planning is carried out using 6 half beams following the Leong Trevol technique; for the IMRT plan was used 8 fields, the delivery technique is step-and-shoot. In both cases the fields were coplanar, isocentric and the energy used was 18 MV. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), in this case has proved to be a good treatment alternative to the technique of 3D Conformal Radiotherapy; the dose distributions with IMRT have better coverage of PTV and positions of the hot spots, as well as the kidneys volume that received higher doses to 2000 cGy is lower, but the decrease in dose to the kidneys is at the expense of increased dose in other organs like the liver. (author)

  15. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is not associated with increased risk of cied implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J. B.; Rehammar, J. C.; Jorgensen, O. D.;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an important treatment in early stage breast cancer but it is claimed that radiotherapy causes damage to the cardiac conduction system and increases the risk implantation of CIED (pacemaker or ICD). However, this paradigm is based on smaller series of case reports. Due...... to the anatomy, radiotherapy will potential mainly affect the conduction system in left sided breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk of implantation of a CIED subsequent to radiotherapy for breast cancer by comparing left- versus right sided radiotherapy in a nationwide cohort. Methods: From...... the database of the Danish Breast Cancer Collaborative Group, we identified women treated with radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark from 1982 to 2005. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on CIED implants subsequent to radiotherapy. The rate...

  16. [Innovation in adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer: new biologic parameters, a perspective for treatment tailoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacémi, Y

    2009-01-01

    In the adjuvant setting, whole breast radiation therapy (RT) delivering 50 Gy in 5 weeks with or without a boost to the tumor bed remains the standard of care. RT indications and volume definition are generally dependant on existing prognostic factors. Except in particular cases, RT technique does not vary according to the patient or tumor biology profiles in terms of total dose, dose per fraction, fractionation, and RT duration. The challenge is to define new parameters or tumor biology profiles that will allow patient selection for more tailored RT than the 5 to 7 week standard schedules. The future issue is to define biological markers able to screen patients and tumors according to their high metastatic potential (in which the primary therapeutic challenge may not be locoregional control) and those patients that have a particular radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation for higher benefit/risk ratio. Thus, it is probable that patient profiles, tumor biology markers and gene expression profiling could provide in future an added value to conventional markers to predict patients at high-risk of local and distant recurrences who need tailored treatment or a particular sequence of adjuvant therapy.

  17. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Byung Chul; Jeung, Kyung Min; Lee, Seong Uk; Bae, Yeong Geol; Na, Hyun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  18. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  19. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.kr [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eui-Don [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3-4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154-0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m{sup 2} chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m{sup 2} regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  20. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB–IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3–4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154–0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m2 chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m2 regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  1. Dosimetric analysis of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyusha Bagdare

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the dosimetric parameters of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases. Methods: Ten patients with inoperable NSCLC were selected for this study. The 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated for all patients following Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG guidelines. Generated plans were then compared on the basis of planning target volume (PTV coverage, dose delivered to organs at risk, homogeneity index (HI, and conformity index (CI for the prescribed dose (PD of 50 Gy in 25 fractions.Results: The mean D95 and D99 (dose to the 95% and 99% volume for the PTV were found better in the 3DCRT plans compared to the ones in the IMRT plans. On an average, the volume receiving 20 Gy (V20 of contralateral lung was 2.91% and 3.03% in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively. The Dmean of contralateral lung was 3.17 Gy (3DCRT versus 4.2 Gy (IMRT, whereas the Dmean of ipsilateral lung was 12.69 Gy (3DCRT and 13.82 Gy (IMRT. The V20 of ipsilateral lung was found to be slightly lower in the 3DCRT (25.67% when compared to the IMRT (30.50%. The dose to the heart was comparable in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans (mean dose: 4.42 Gy versus 4.48 Gy; D33: 3.77 Gy versus and 4.02 Gy. For the spinal cord, the Dmax was found to be lower in the 3DCRT plans (18.40 Gy when compared to the IMRT plans (25.49 Gy. The HI was 1.08 versus 1.41 in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively. The CI was identical (1.67 in both sets of plans.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the PTV coverage was found to be slightly better in the 3DCRT plans when compared to the one in the IMRT plans. On average, the dose to the organs at risk were found to be comparable.

  2. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  3. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Linz Univ. (Austria). Medical Faculty; Roach, Mack III [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Van As, Nicholas (ed.) [The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Chronic fatigue in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and profound symptoms related to both malignancy and anti-neoplastic treatment. It is being reported in 60% to 80% of cancer patients. We review the correlation between the cancer-related fatigue syndrome and radiotherapy. In patients undergoing radiotherapy, fatigue is often cumulative and may reach its peak during the last weeks of treatment. The presence of fatigue prior to therapy initiation is the most important predictive factor of the occurrence of radiotherapy-related cancer fatigue syndrome. Occasionally, fatigue persists for a prolonged period of months and even years beyond radiotherapy. Anemia may be one of major causative factors responsible for the development of the cancer-related fatigue syndrome. Fatigue has an enormous physical, mental, emotional, and economic impact on cancer patients, their families and care-providers. The treatment of radiation-related fatigue remains unknown. The initial approach should cover efforts aimed at the correction of potential etiologies, especially anemia. Education concerning fatigue greatly benefits some patients. It seems that exercise may be beneficial in relieving fatigue, bearing in mind that the exercise program for cancer patients should be initiated gradually and significantly individualized. (author)

  5. Multimodal treatment utilizing intraoperative radiotherapy and high-dose combination chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation for advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 51 cases of pancreatic cancer, intraoperative radiotherapy was given in 9, and pain-relief was noted in 6. Excluding 2 patients who died from hemorrhage from the gastrointestinal tract soon after irradiation, the mean survival period was 2.9 mo. in cases with distant metastatic cases and 7.8 mo. in cases without it. Hemorrhage, necrosis and stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract were observed as complications. ABMT and high-dose chemotherapy were given in combination in 7 cases, of which the mean survival period was 3.9 mo. in cases with distant metastasis and 7.0 mo. in those without it. As side effects of high-dose chemotherapy, symptoms of the digestive system and hair loss were observed in all cases, but marked leukopenia and thrmbopenia recovered rapidly after the 2nd week after ABMT. (Chiba, N.)

  6. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27–91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3–135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia ≥Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  9. A Randomized Study of Accelerated Fractionation Radiotherapy with and Without Mitomycin C in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in thc treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (I) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). The 2-year overall survival (OS) of the whole group was 21 %. The OS according to treatment arm was 23%, 20%. and 28% in CF. AF. and AF+MMC arms respectively (ρ<0. 19). The 2-year loco-regional control (LC) rate was 22% for the whole group of patients. The LC was 10%, 25%. and 30% for the CF, AF, and AF+MMC respectively (ρ=0.27). The only significant parameters for OS and LC were performance status and pre-treatment hemoglobin level. Mucositis grades 3 and 4 occurred in 70% and 90% of the patients in the AF and AF+MMC arm respectively compared to 55% of patients in the CF arm (ρ=0.04). However the addition of MMC did not significantly increase the incidence or severity of mucositis between AF and AF+MMC (ρ=0.13). Hematological toxicity grades 3 and 4 were significantly higher after MMC (occurred in 40% of patients versus 10% and 5% in CF and AF arms respectively, ρ=0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of grade 3 dryness of mouth (ρ=0.06). fibrosis (ρ=0.6). or lymphoedema (ρ=0.39) among the three arms. There was a trend for improvement of LC and OS rates with the use or AF and the addition of MMC to AF compared to CF radiotherapy. although the difference was not statistically significant. The small number of the patients in each treatment arm and the inclusion or multiple tumor sites may contribute to these statistically insignificant results. Accordingly we advise to continue

  10. Conventional four field radiotherapy versus computed tomography-based treatment planning in cancer cervix: A dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Gulia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With advancements in imaging, wide variations in pelvic anatomy have been observed, thus raising doubts about adequate target volume coverage by conventional external radiotherapy fields based on bony landmarks. The present study evaluates the need for integrating computed tomography (CT-based planning in the treatment of carcinoma cervix. Aims: To estimate inadequacies in target volume coverage when using conventional planning based on bony landmarks. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 50 patients. Target volume delineation was done on planning CT scans, according to the guidelines given in literature. The volume of target receiving 95% of prescribed dose (V95 was calculated after superimposing a conventional four field box on digitally reconstructed radiograph. The geographic miss with conventional four field box technique was compared with the CT-based target volume delineation. Results: In 48 out of 50 patients, the conventional four field box failed to encompass the target volume. The areas of miss were at the superior and lateral borders of the anterior-posterior fields, and the anterior border of the lateral fields. The median V95 for conventional fields marked with bony landmarks was only 89.4% as compared to 93% for target delineation based on CT contouring. Conclusions: Our study shows inadequate target volume coverage with conventional four field box technique. We recommend routine use of CT-based planning for treatment with radiotherapy in carcinoma cervix.

  11. A pilot study of preoperative continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, external microwave hyperthermia, and external beam radiotherapy for treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, or recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combining external beam radiotherapy, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and external microwave hyperthermia in patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Methods and Materials: From 7/95 through 2/99, 15 patients were enrolled in the study. The treatment regimen consisted of continuous infusion 5-FU 250 mg/m2/d 7 days/week beginning on day 1, external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis, 4500 cGy, 180 cGy/d 5 days/week using a 3 or 4-field technique, and external microwave hyperthermia on days 3, 8, 15, 22, and 29. Chemotherapy was stopped on the last day of radiotherapy. Surgical resection, if feasible, was scheduled 3-6 weeks after completing thermochemoradiotherapy. For this regimen to be considered feasible, no more than 2 of the 15 patients should fail to complete therapy due to life-threatening toxicity. Toxicity was scored using National Cancer Institute Criteria. Results: All patients completed the chemoradiotherapy portion of the protocol. Eleven of the 15 patients completed all 5 hyperthermia treatments. Of the 4 patients who did not receive the full course of hyperthermia, only 1 patient had treatment stopped due to life-threatening toxicity. The other 3 patients did not complete hyperthermia due to scheduling errors (n = 2) or patient request (n = 1). Five of 15 patients required a treatment interruption due to toxicity no. >=no. Grade 3. Seven patients experienced lesser degrees of toxicity which did not require treatment interruption. Three patients experienced no side effects. The most common toxicities were dermatitis and diarrhea. Of the 14 patients in whom surgery was planned, 11 (79%) were resectable. There was one pathologic complete response. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver thermochemoradiotherapy, as prescribed in this study, to patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or recurrent rectal cancer. The therapy is moderately toxic, with one

  12. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrehaug, Sten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Gordon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics Core, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheng, Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  13. Dosimetric analysis of tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy with and without bone marrow sparing for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuli Zhang; Jianping Chen; Heliang He; Weidong Xu; Huayong Jiang; Yadi Wang ; Junmao Gao; Qingzhi Liu; Na Lu; Diandian Chen; Bo Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare tomotherapy-based bone marrow-sparing intensity-mod-ulated radiotherapy (BMS-IMRT) with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) without entering the pelvic bone marrow as a planning constraint in the treatment of cervical cancer after hysterectomy. Methods BMS-IMRT and IMRT plans were designed for a cohort of nine patients. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions, and 95% of the planned target volume received this dose. The doses were computed using a commercial y available treatment planning system with the convolution/superposi-tion algorithm. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of planning target volume homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as wel as organ at risk dose and volume parameters. Results BMS-IMRT had advantages over IMRT in terms of CI, but was equivalent to the latter in HI. V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of pelvic bone marrow in BMS-IMRT decreased by 0.06%, 17.33%, 22.19%, 13.85%, and 16.46%, respectively, compared with IMRT. Except for V30 of the smal bowel and V30 and V40 of the bladder, no statistical y significant dif erences were found between BMS-IMRT and IMRT in the smal bowel, bladder, and rectum. Conclusion For cervical cancer patients receiving tomotherapy-based radiotherapy after hysterectomy, BMS-IMRT reduced pelvic bone marrow volume receiving low-dose radiation, and it may be conducive to preventing acute hematologic toxicity.

  14. Intraoperative radiotherapy as a protocol for the treatment of initial breast cancer; Radioterapia intraoperatoria como protocolo de tratamento do cancer de mama inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo de Morais, E-mail: sbromberg@terra.com.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2013-07-01

    To report on preliminary outcomes of single-dose intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer based on local recurrence rates and complications. Methods: fifty postmenopausal women with ≤2.5cm breast tumors and clinically normal axillary lymph nodes were submitted to quadrantectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and intraoperative radiotherapy and studied. Mean follow-up time was 52.1 months. Results: mean patient age was 65.5 years; mean tumor diameter was 1.41cm 82% of nodules were hormonal receptor positive and HER-2negative. All patients received a 21 Gy radiation dose for a mean time of 8.97 minutes. Distant metastases were not observed. Local recurrence was documented in three cases, with identical histological diagnosis as the primary tumors. Thirty-five (70%) patients had local fibrosis, with gradual improvement and complete resolution over 18 months. Postoperative infection and seroma formation were not observed. Conclusion: partial radiotherapy is a potentially feasible and promising technique. Careful patient selection is recommended before a longer follow-up period has elapsed to confirm intraoperative radiotherapy safety and efficacy. (author)

  15. Pregnancy and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer in pregnancy is relatively uncommon but breast cancer is one of the most common malignancy occur with pregnancy. Prescribed doses of radiotherapy are significantly higher than those of diagnostic procedures. Fetal exposure and damage can occur during radiotherapy within target area. Because of those risks, radiotherapy during pregnancy is basically has to avoid. Even though, feral damage depends on fetal dose and has some threshold dose. Practically, even in stochastic effect, there are some minimal doses. A most important point is careful estimation of fetal dose before radiation. The physician has to inform the patient about risk and benefit of radiotherapy to fetus and to mother and have an ethical balance to help the mother and family to make a final decision. (author)

  16. Improved Clinical Outcomes With High-Dose Image Guided Radiotherapy Compared With Non-IGRT for the Treatment of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: Zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Fidaleo, Anthony; Sperling, Dahlia; Pei, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Carver, Brett; Coleman, Jonathan [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lovelock, Michael; Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with high-dose image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 2008 and 2009, 186 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IGRT to a dose of 86.4 Gy with daily correction of the target position based on kilovoltage imaging of implanted prostatic fiducial markers. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 190 patients who were treated between 2006 and 2007 with IMRT to the same prescription dose without, however, implanted fiducial markers in place (non-IGRT). The median follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 2-6 years). Results: A significant reduction in late urinary toxicity was observed for IGRT patients compared with the non-IGRT patients. The 3-year likelihood of grade 2 and higher urinary toxicity for the IGRT and non-IGRT cohorts were 10.4% and 20.0%, respectively (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis identifying predictors for grade 2 or higher late urinary toxicity demonstrated that, in addition to the baseline Internatinoal Prostate Symptom Score, IGRT was associated with significantly less late urinary toxicity compared with non-IGRT. The incidence of grade 2 and higher rectal toxicity was low for both treatment groups (1.0% and 1.6%, respectively; p = 0.81). No differences in prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcomes were observed for low- and intermediate-risk patients when treated with IGRT and non-IGRT. For high-risk patients, a significant improvement was observed at 3 years for patients treated with IGRT compared with non-IGRT. Conclusions: IGRT is associated with an improvement in biochemical tumor control among high-risk patients and a lower rate of late urinary toxicity compared with high-dose IMRT. These data suggest that, for definitive radiotherapy, the placement of fiducial markers

  17. Predicting recurrence after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begg, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Radiotherapy is a mainstay of treatment, either alone for early stage tumors or combined with chemotherapy for late stage tumors. An overall 5-year survival rate of around 50% for HNSCC demonstrates that treatme

  18. Waiting time for radiotherapy in women with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel do Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the waiting time for radiotherapy for patients with cervical cancer. METHODS This descriptive study was conducted with 342 cervical cancer cases that were referred to primary radiotherapy, in the Baixada Fluminense region, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, from October 1995 to August 2010. The waiting time was calculated using the recommended 60-day deadline as a parameter to obtaining the first cancer treatment and considering the date at which the diagnosis was confirmed, the date of first oncological consultation and date when the radiotherapy began. Median and proportional comparisons were made using the Kruskal Wallis and Chi-square tests. RESULTS Most of the women (72.2% began their radiotherapy within 60 days from the diagnostic confirmation date. The median of this total waiting time was 41 days. This median worsened over the time period, going from 11 days (1995-1996 to 64 days (2009-2010. The median interval between the diagnostic confirmation and the first oncological consultation was 33 days, and between the first oncological consultation and the first radiotherapy session was four days. The median waiting time differed significantly (p = 0.003 according to different stages of the tumor, reaching 56 days, 35 days and 30 days for women whose cancers were classified up to IIA; from IIB to IIIB, and IVA-IVB, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Despite most of the women having had access to radiotherapy within the recommended 60 days, the implementation of procedures to define the stage of the tumor and to reestablish clinical conditions took a large part of this time, showing that at least one of these intervals needs to be improved. Even though the waiting times were ideal for all patients, the most advanced cases were quickly treated, which suggests that access to radiotherapy by women with cervical cancer has been reached with equity.

  19. Treatment of small cell lung cancer with a combination of VP16-213 and cyclophosphamide with cisplatin or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty five patients with small cell lung cancer were treated with a VP16-213 combination chemotherapy regimen in two consecutive series. The first series included 24 patients; 10 with limited and 14 with extensive disease were treated with VP16-213, 120 mg/m2 p.o. daily for 5 consecutive days, Cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 i.v. and Cisplatin 80 mg/m2 i.v. with hydratation and manitol induced diuresis. The cycle was repeated every 3 weeks. The second series included 31 similar patients, 16 limited, and 15 extensive disease, treated with VP16-213 at the same dose and Cyclophosphamide at 1,200 mg/m2 i.v. also repeated every 3 weeks; after three cycles the patients were treated with radiotherapy to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes with 4,000 rads in a split course of three weeks interval, followed by the same combination chemotherapy. Response rate was 75% for the first series with 6 of 24 (25%) of complete responses in four limited and two extensive disease and a median survival time of 24 weeks. In the second series of patients there were 26 of 31 (83.8%) responses with 10 of 31 (32%) complete responses in nine limited and one extensive disease and a median survival time of 33 weeks for responders. Duration of response for complete responders was 36.8 weeks for the first series and 51 weeks for the second. Toxicity was mild and indludes nausea and vomitting, myelosupression, alopecia in both series, with one toxic death in the second series. Both regimes are active with a low complete response rate, which was increased in the second series by the addition of radiotherapy, which did not increase overall survival. (orig.)

  20. Comparing Cystatin C Changes as a Measure of Renal Function Before and After Radiotherapy in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Ameri; Asadollah Alidoosti; Khosro Mojir Sheybani; Farnaz Taslimi; Morteza Tabatabaiefar; Maryam Mirzaie Moghadam; Hooshang Amir Rasouli; Pedram Fadavi; Shahrzad Aref

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and compare Cystatin C changes before and after radiotherapy in patients with stomach cancer who were candidate for radiotherapy. This study was conducted as a prospective cohort one. Eighteen patients with definite diagnosis of stomach cancer under treatment by radiotherapy who presented to Radiotherapy-Oncology Center of Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran-Iran, and the treatment in all cases was simultaneous chemoradiation with Xeloda were included. I...

  1. Long-term outcome and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer: the importance of boost volume assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods Between March 2004 and July 2007, 26 patients with locally advanced, medically inoperable head and neck cancer or gross residual tumors in close proximity to critical structures following head and neck surgery were treated with SBRT as a boost treatment. All patients were initially treated with standard external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. SBRT boost was prescribed to the median 80% isodose line with a median dose of 21 (range 10–25 Gy in 2–5 (median, 5 fractions. Results The median follow-up after SBRT was 56 (range 27.6 − 80.2 months. The distribution of treatment sites in 26 patients was as follows: the nasopharynx, including the base of the skull in 10 (38.5%; nasal cavity or paranasal sinus in 8 (30.8%; periorbit in 4 (15.4%; tongue in 3 (11.5%; and oropharyngeal wall in 1 (3.8%. The median EBRT dose before SBRT was 50.4 Gy (range 39.6 − 70.2. The major response rate was 100% with 21 (80.8% complete responses (CR. Severe (grade ≥ 3 late toxicities developed in 9 (34.6% patients, and SBRT boost volume was a significant parameter predicting severe late complication. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that a modern SBRT boost is a highly efficient tool for local tumor control. However, we observed a high frequency of serious late complications. More optimized dose fractionation schedule and patient selection are required to achieve excellent local control without significant late morbidities in head and neck boost treatment.

  2. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient

  3. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Di; Liang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  4. Nomograms to predict late urinary toxicity after prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Romain; Arango, Juan David Ospina; Beckendorf, Véronique; Delobel, Jean-Bernard; Messai, Taha; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Le Prisé, Elisabeth; Guerif, Stéphane; Simon, Jean-Marc; Dubray, Bernard; Zhu, Jian; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Pommier, Pascal; Gnep, Khemara

    2013-01-01

    International audience OBJECTIVE: To analyze late urinary toxicity after prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT): symptom description and identification of patient characteristics or treatment parameters allowing for the generation of nomograms. METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty-five patients underwent RT in seventeen French centers for localized prostate cancer. Median total dose was 70 Gy (range, 65-80 Gy), using different fractionations (2 or 2.5 Gy/day) and techniques. Late urinary toxicity an...

  5. Long-term results of ipsilateral radiotherapy for tonsil cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryoolk; Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of ipsilateral radiotherapy for the patient with well lateralized tonsil cancer: not cross midline and <1 cm of tumor invasion into the soft palate or base of tongue. From 2003 to 2011, twenty patients with well lateralized tonsil cancer underwent ipsilateral radiotherapy. Nineteen patients had T1-T2 tumors, and one patient had T3 tumor; twelve patients had N0-N2a disease and eight patients had N2b disease. Primary surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed in fourteen patients: four of these patients received chemotherapy. Four patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The remaining two patients received induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and definitive CCRT, respectively. No patient underwent radiotherapy alone. We analyzed the pattern of failure and complications. The median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 11 to 106 months) for surviving patients. One patient had local failure at tumor bed. There was no regional failure in contralateral neck, even in N2b disease. At five-year, local progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and progression-free survival rates were 95%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. One patient with treatment failure died, and the five-year overall survival rate was 95%. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia was found in one patient at least 6 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Ipsilateral radiotherapy is a reasonable treatment option for well lateralized tonsil cancer. Low rate of chronic xerostomia can be expected by sparing contralateral major salivary glands.

  6. Intraoperative radiotherapy in primary rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the results of several studies intraoperative radiotherapy seems to influence local control for primary rectal cancer in UICC-Stage II / III positively, though recommendations in therapy cannot be given as studies of high evidence level do not exist. As IORT is rarely available and makes patient recruitment difficult, prospective randomised trials have not been carried out yet. This emphasizes the importance of non-randomised trials for an evaluation of IORT. A comparison of 21 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who had been treated with intraoperative radiation therapy and 21 similar cases without an application of IORT could not show any significant improvements in prognosis (recurrences, metastases and disease-specific survival). Nevertheless the employment of intraoperative radiation showed a trend in improvement of local control. This hast been shown by several other studies before. Thus the application of IORT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is considered a useful part in multimodal treatment and should further be evaluated in specialized centres. In case-control studies 1:1-matching leads to a good comparability of groups and renders conclusions of high internal validity possible. To gain a sufficient power, this type of trials should however primarily be carried out by centres with a high number of cases.

  7. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2010-01-01

    at risk, requiring less than 2min of beam-on time per treatment fraction. Materials and methods We report herein our experience from the first 46 patients treated for prostate cancer, clinical stage T1–3 with rotational therapy (“RapidArc®”, Varian Medical systems) (RA). This patient group is compared...... to a group of 50 patients treated with a 5-field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) technique over the same period. The comparison parameters include target coverage, dose to OAR, treatment time and number of monitor units. Daily-IGRT using implanted gold markers is used before and after treatment......Background and purpose Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs...

  8. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet, J. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Alonso, C. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Llanos, M. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lacasta, A. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Fuentes, J. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Mendoza, L.A. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Badia, J.M. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Delgado, E. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Ojeda, B. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    Radiotherapy has been standard therapy for locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is being studied to improve responses and survival. We report a phase II study in locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer (FIGO stages III and IV A) using chemotherapy with bleomycin, methotrexate and cisplatin (BMP) followed by radical radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients, 31 in stage III and 4 in stage IV A, 3 complete responses (CR) and 22 partial responses (PR) were achieved after chemotherapy treatment. Thirty-one patients completed radiotherapy; 19 achieved CR and 4 PR. Five-year actuarial survival for the entire group was 45% (95% confidence interval, 37-53%) with a median survival of 56 months. Patients with CR had a significantly better survival: The 5-year actuarial survival was 74% (95% CI, 59-89%). Recurrence developed at 4 to 19 patients. The most frequent side-effects were nausea and vomiting. Myelosuppression and impaired renal function also occurred. There was no evidence of radiotherapy toxicity enhancement. The stage and Karnofsky index were significant prognostic factors. It is concluded that MBP chemotherapy in advanced cervical cancer is effective and, followed by radiotherapy, allows a good control of this tumor. The group of patients with complete response have a low rate of recurrences and a long survival chance. (orig.).

  9. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penn, I.

    1982-02-01

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Combined with Chemotherapy in Stages III-IV Hypopharynx-Larynx Cancer: Treatment Compliance and Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Franchin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Retrospective review of our experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT combined with chemotherapy as the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancers. Materials and Methods. Between September 2008 and June 2012, 60 patients (26 with larynx and 34 hypopharynx cancers were treated. Our policy was to offer SIB-IMRT plus concurrent cisplatin to patients affected by larynx cancer stage T3N0-N1 and NCT with TPF (docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil followed by SIB-IMRT to patients with larynx cancer stage T2-4N2-3 or hypopharynx cancer T2-4N0-3. SIB-IMRT consisted in a total dose of 70.95 Gy (2.15 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week to the gross primary and nodal disease and differentiated dosages for high risk and low risk nodal regions. Results. Complete remission was achieved in 53/60 (88% of patients. At a median follow up of 31 months (range 9–67, the rate of overall survival and locoregional control with functional larynx at 3 years were 68% and 60%, respectively. T stage (T1–3 versus T4 resulted in being significant for predicting 3-year freedom from relapse (it was 69% and 35%, resp., for T1–T3 and T4 tumors; P=0.04, while site of primary disease (larynx versus hypopharynx was not significant (P=0.35. Conclusion. Our results indicated that combining SIB-IMRT with induction chemotherapy or concurrent chemotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for organ preservation in advanced larynx/hypopharynx cancer.

  11. Accelerated high-dose radiotherapy alone or combined with either concomitant or sequential chemotherapy; treatments of choice in patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieters Bradley R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of high-dose chemo-radiotherapy (CRT, using the treatment schedules of EORTC study 08972/22973 or radiotherapy (RT alone were analyzed among all patients (pts with Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC treated with curative intent in our department from 1995–2004. Material Included are 131 pts with medically inoperable or with irresectable NSCLC (TNM stage I:15 pts, IIB:15 pts, IIIA:57 pts, IIIB:43 pts, X:1 pt. Treatment Group I: Concomitant CRT: 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fractions (fx/33 days combined with daily administration of cisplatin 6 mg/m2: 56 pts (standard. Group II: Sequential CRT: two courses of a 21-day schedule of chemotherapy (gemcitabin 1250 mg/m2 d1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 d2 followed by 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fx/33 days without daily cisplatin: 26 pts. Group III: RT: 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fx/33 days or 60 Gy/3 Gy/20 fx/26 days: 49 pts. Results The 1, 2, and 5 year actuarial overall survival (OS were 46%, 24%, and 15%, respectively. At multivariate analysis the only factor with a significantly positive influence on OS was treatment with chemo-radiation (P = 0.024 (1-, 2-, and 5-yr OS 56%, 30% and 22% respectively. The incidence of local recurrence was 36%, the incidence of distant metastases 46%. Late complications grade 3 were seen in 21 pts and grade 4 in 4 patients. One patient had a lethal complication (oesophageal. For 32 patients insufficient data were available to assess late complications. Conclusion In this study we were able to reproduce the results of EORTC trial 08972/22973 in a non-selected patient population outside of the setting of a randomised trial. Radiotherapy (66 Gy/24 fx/33 days combined with either concomitant daily low dose cisplatin or with two neo-adjuvant courses of gemcitabin and cisplatin are effective treatments for patients with locally advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. The concomitant schedule is also suitable for elderly people with co-morbidity.

  12. A randomized study of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy with and without mitomycin C in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzat, M.; Shouman, T.; Zaza, K.;

    2005-01-01

    in the incidence of grade 3 dryness of mouth (p=0.06), fibrosis (p=0.6), or lymphoedema (p=0.39) among the three arms. Conclusion: There was a trend for improvement of LC and OS rates with the use of AF and the addition of MMC to AF compared to CF radiotherapy, although the difference was not statistically....... Key Words: Head and Neck cancer , Radiotherapy , Altered fractionation , Mitomycin C....

  13. Radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to compare treatment outcomes for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB cervical carcinoma patients receiving radical surgery followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy. Medical records of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients treated between July 2008 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 148 patients underwent radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (surgery-based group). These patients were compared with 290 patients that received radical radiotherapy alone (RT-based group). Recurrence rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), local control rates, and treatment-related complications were compared for these two groups. Similar rates of recurrence (16.89% vs. 12.41%, p = 0.200), PFS (log-rank, p = 0.211), OS (log-rank, p = 0.347), and local control rates (log-rank, p = 0.668) were observed for the surgery-based group and the RT-based group, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of acute grade 3–4 gastrointestinal reactions and late grade 3–4 lower limb lymphedema were significantly higher for the surgery-based group versus the RT-based group. Cox multivariate analyses found no significant difference in survival outcome between the two groups, and tumor diameter and histopathology were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS. Radical radiotherapy was associated with fewer treatment-related complications and achieved comparable survival outcomes for patients with FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer compared to radical hysterectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy

  14. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon

  15. Clinical treatment of lumbodorsal radiotherapy ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize our experience in the treatment of 12 cases of severe lumbodorsal radio-therapy ulcers. Methods: Of the 12 cases, 4 were male and 8 female. The youngest patient was 29 and the oldest was 67 years old. Their injuries were mainly resulted from radiotherapy for costal metastasis of breast cancer, carcinoma of uterus and dorsal skin carcinoma or scar induced by 60Co γ-rays, deep X-rays or superficial accelerator electrons. Their local accumulative dose was 60-120 Gy. Palliative debridement was performed with partial excision of the ribs and spinous process. And then the defects were repaired with local skin flap in 2 cases, parascapular skin flap in 1 case and island musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle in 9 cases. Results: All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted on the wounds of the 12 cases survived (100%). Grade A healing was achieved in 11 cases of ulcer (91.7%) and grade B healing in 1 cases (8.3%). All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted survived and the ulcers never recurred. Conclusion: Severe lumbodorsal radiotherapy injury often results in complications. The authors performed palliative excision and repaired by transferring an axial skin flap or a musculocutaneous flap with good blood circulation selected in accordance with the principles of plastic surgery, which can effectively improve blood circulation and promote wound healing. Reverse musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle is an especially good material for reconstruction. It has axial blood vessel and proper thickness. It is broad and can be rotated with great range and the donor site can be sutured directly

  16. Study of a bio-mechanical model of the movements and deformations of the pelvic organs and integration in the process of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the goals of optimizing treatment planning of prostate cancer radiation therapy is to maintain the margins added to the clinical target volume (CTV) as small as possible to reduce the volumes of normal tissue irradiated. Several methods have been proposed to define these margins: 1) Methods based on the observation of movements obtained by different imaging systems, 2) The predictive methods of the movement of organs, from a model representing the motions of pelvis organs, a calculation of a margin can be made. We have developed and optimized a finite element bio-mechanical model of the prostate, bladder and rectum. This model describes the movement and deformation of the pelvic organs during the filling of certain organs such as the bladder and rectum. An evaluation of this model to predict the movement of the prostate during the various sessions of radiotherapy is shown using a series of CBCT images (Cone Beam Computerized Tomography). (author)

  17. Acute and late toxicity in radical radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josifovski Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although radical radiotherapy has proved to be a successful method in prostate cancer treatment, the conventional (box technique can result in significant adverse events. Objective. The objective of our study was to estimate the frequency, type and severity of acute and late toxicity in radical radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Methods. In a clinical retrospective study, we included 283 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. All our patients received radical, conventional radiotherapy using the four-field technique. The study was performed at the Radiotherapy Department of the Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia between January 1991 and December 2005. During regular follow-up, we analyzed the frequency, type and severity of acute and late toxicity. Results. Two thirds (71% of our patients had acute toxicity of at least one organ within the radiation field. Most frequent complication was radiation dermatitis (10.5%, and enteritis (9%, cystitis (6% and proctitis (2.5%. Acute adverse events were mostly low grade (I and II, 28-61%. Late complications were registered in 20.5% of patients. Skin fibrosis was most frequent (12%. Chronic proctitis was detected in 4% and urethral stricture in 4.5% of our patients. All late complications were low grade. Conclusion. Treatment tolerance of radical radiotherapy is relatively good. Although most patients develop acute toxicity, it is commonly low grade and requires the interruption of radiotherapy treatment in 20% of patients only. Late toxicity is rarer than acute and, in most cases, it does not affect the quality of life.

  18. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhiro Yamada; Koji Okihara; Tsuyoshi Iwata; Koji Masui; Kazumi Kamoi; Kei Yamada; Tsuneharu Miki

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatm...

  19. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, T. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Itami, J. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Kotaka, K. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Toriyama, M. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    1996-08-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Von 1974 bis 1992 wurden 37 zuvor nicht behandelte Patienten mit T3-Larynxkarzinomen (15 supraglottisch, 22 glottisch) primaer kurativ bestrahlt und, wenn erforderlich, einer Salvage-Operation unterzogen. Die Zwei-Jahres-Kontrollrate bei alleiniger Strahlentherapie, die Rate der Stimmerhaltung sowie die unter Einschluss der Operation erreichbare lokale Kontrollrate bei supraglottischen T3-Larynxkarzinomen betrugen 33%, 33% und 60%. Bei glottischen T3-Karzinomen wurden jeweils 32%, 23% und 77% erreicht. Die Fuenf-Jahres-Ueberlebensrate betrug 47% bei supraglottischen T3-Karzinomen und 77% bei den glottischen Karzinomen. Im Fall von supraglottischen Karzinomen erreichte keiner der vier Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung eine lokale Kontrolle durch alleinige Strahlentherapie. Die lokoregionale rezidivfreie Zeit war bei den Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung oder Tracheostomie vor Einleitung der

  20. Breast radiotherapy: an Australasian survey of current treatment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the dissemination of evidence-based quality assurance guidelines, the Australian National Breast Cancer Centre Radiation Oncology Group conducted a process survey of breast radiotherapy treatment delivery throughout Australia. A process survey was conducted in August/September 1998. This survey comprised questions enquiring about treatment positioning, immobilization devices used, planning strategies, simulation and dose computation methods, treatment prescribing and quality assurance. The survey was sent to 123 Australian fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) and to the six directors of New Zealand radiation oncology departments. Fifty-eight questionnaires were returned of which 38 were received from individuals and 20 represented a reply from a department with a routine breast radiotherapy protocol (representing an average of 4.5 radiation oncologists per reply). The study identified great consistency between departments with respect to dose and fractionation for breast tangents. The study also identified some areas of treatment planning and delivery that varied between individuals or departments. These mainly reflected a lack of evidence in some areas of radiotherapy treatment delivery. The circulation of quality assurance guidelines will perhaps improve consistency of radiotherapy techniques in which studies have identified that technique changes improve outcome. This study identified that these areas include the taking of simulation and port films and the use of off-axis dosimetry. Further studies are required for areas of radiotherapy treatment delivery that have little evidence for or against their implementation. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  1. Pre-Radiotherapy dental evaluation criteria and treatment needs of oral side effects after head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this review is to present pre-radiotherapy evaluation criteria and the main needs for treatment of these patients after the radiation therapy. Were revised articles in English, Spanish and Portuguese language between 1995 and 2009 indexed in Pubmed and Scielo. The keywords were oral cancer and radiotherapy, complications in head and neck radiotherapy, oral pre-radiotherapy evaluation.The adverse complications of radiotherapy in head and neck area could be temporary or late. The late effects, such as radiation caries and osteorradionecrosis could be directly associated with the fact that previous dental evaluation was not performed and can severely affect the post-operatory quality of life. The participation of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team and dental evaluation of the patients that will receive radiotherapy in the head and neck area are of vital importance to improve the post-operatory quality of life of these patients

  2. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, 1042 cases where reviewed in School Dentistry - Osaka Univ. Seven hundred and fifteen were male and three hundred and twenty-seven were female. Ora cancer was affected more male than female patients, with mean age of 582 years old. The tongue was the most common anatomic localization of oral cancer. In tongue, the use of external radiotherapy y combined with brachytherapy and brachytherapy isolated presented better results than chemotherapy combined with external radiotherapy. In buccal mucosa, there was not differences in the treatment's results using external radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. In tongue's floor and upper and jaw gingiva the combined treatment with chemotherapy and external radiotherapy presented better results than isolated external radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Morbidity after ipsilateral radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Overgaard, Marie; Grau, Cai

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer often causes severe side effects. If the primary tumour is localized to the tonsillar region, elective irradiation may be limited to the ipsilateral neck, sparring the contralateral normal tissues. We wanted to study the consequences of volume...

  4. Contribution of radiotherapy to the treatment of malignant tumors, 3. Combined drugs and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niibe, Hideo; Takahashi, Iku; Tamaki, Yoshio (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of cytotoxic agent, hormone, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protector combined with radiation therapy in cancer management were analysed. The results were as follows: 1) An increase in response was seen in 25% or more of tumor nodules given radiotherapy combined with misonidazole, anoxic cell sensitizer, compared with radiotherpy alone. But the drug was also found to be neurotoxic and peripheral neuropathy. 2) Evidence has been given that Amifostine may protect the mucosal damage from radiation when Amifostine prior to irradiation was administrated to patients with tumor in the head and neck or in the pelvis. 3) There were no difference between five year survival of radiotherapy alone and with chemotherapy for patients with stage I Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy following radiotherapy for patients with stage II was more effective treatment method than radiotherapy alone. 4) Radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer was performed to control only primary site. The success rates of local control were over 80%. The near future holds extensive promise for a combination of radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormone therapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protectors. All of these when used in the appropriate circumstances may yield significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio and in the long-tern control of tumors.

  5. Study of effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments in prostate cancer; Estudio de los efectos de las protesis metalicas en tratamientos radioterapicos en irradiacion pelvica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, P.; Mateos, J. C.; Herrador, M.; Ortiz, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    In this work it is described the problems related to the radiotherapy treatments of patients with prostate cancer and hip implants Analyze the effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments and present the methods to overcome the problems that arise in these situations. Our patients are student in a TAC Philips with a range of Hounsfield number of-1000 to 4000. The planning and measurement of CT numbers are done in a RTP ADAC Pinnacle that have a maximum of 32767 CT units. The metallic implants more frequently used, titanium, stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, generate CT numbers from 2000 to 3000, and cause saturation effects. This problem may be solved with modern scanners that use the extended CT range. It is an algorithm that expand the usual range by a factor of 10. An alternative solution to this problem can be used if the prostheses are able to scan to select the window parameters that allow an automatic region of interest (roi) definition that match to the dimensions of the implants. Finally it is assigned the electronic/physical densities to the created roi's. The clinical dosimetry of patients with prostheses have been done defining the usual regions of interests (target volume and risk organs) in first place. Finally the prostheses are outlined using the window parameters previously measured and assigned the electronic or physical densities. The attenuation of the implant may then be calculated accurately. The presence of implants in the treatment fields originate artifacts in the TAC images of patients and underdosage of target volume that range between 12% and 30% in function of material an energy used. It is necessary the application of methods that correct the dose behind the implant, if it is not possible to prevent the incidence of the treatment beams over the prostheses. (Author)

  6. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  7. The current role of radiotherapy in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gunderson, L.L. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    During the last two decades, radiotherapy has become an integral part of the multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Currently, radiotherapy is seen mainly as an adjuvant therapy, sometimes in combination with chemotherapy, in a pre- or post-operative setting. Adjuvant radiotherapy alone leads to a significant reduction of local recurrence rates, but an impact on survival is seen only in subset analyses. Combined modality treatment can reduce local recurrence rates even further, and can also reduce the rate of distant relapses and increase survival. The acute toxicity of combined modality is considerably higher. Local radiation can also be used as a component of organ conserving local treatment for selected early lesions. Radiotherapy has been an important palliative treatment modality, diminishing symptoms in cases of inoperable primary rectal cancers or pelvic recurrences. The timing of radiation, surgery and chemotherapy has been under evaluation for years. For patients with locally advanced primary or recurrent malignancies (unresectable due to fixation), the preferred sequence is pre-operative irradiation with or without chemotherapy, followed by surgical resection. For mobile resectable lesions, sequencing issues are being tested in phase III randomised trials. (author).

  8. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT) for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84%) or without (16%) chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings

  9. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M., E-mail: stefanic@cae.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Regional de Referencia con Patrones Secundarios para Dosimetria - CNEA, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon 15, B1802AYA Ezeiza (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  10. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  11. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  12. Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorigan, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Howell, Anthony; Thatcher, Nick

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.

  13. Treatment results of radical radiotherapy of carcinoma uterine cervix using external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the outcome of carcinoma cervix patients treated radically by external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy. Material and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2006, a total of 709 newly diagnosed cases of carcinoma cervix were reported in our department. All cases were staged according to the International Federation of Gynecologist and Oncologist staging system. Out of 709 cases, 342 completed radical radiotherapy and were retrospectively analyzed for the presence of local residual disease, local recurrence, distant metastases, radiation reaction, and disease free survival. Results: There were 11(3.22%, 82(23.98%, 232(67.83%, and 17(4.97% patients in stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The median follow up time for all patients was 36 months (range 3 -54 months. The overall treatment time (OTT ranged from 52 to 69 days (median 58 days. The 3 year disease free survival rate was 81.8%, 70.7%, 40.08%, and 11.76% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 91 (26.6% cases with local residual diseases, 27(7.9% developed distant metastasis, and 18(5.26% pts had local recurrence. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that radical radiotherapy with HDR brachytherapy was appropriate for the treatment of early staged cancer of uterine cervix. For locally advanced cancer of cervix addition of concurrent chemotherapy, higher radiation doses, reduction of overall treatment time to less than 8 weeks, and use of latest radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT is recommended to improve the results.

  14. Radiotherapy for prevention and therapy of gynecomastia due to antiandrogen treatment in prostate cancer patients. A patterns-of-care-study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, Burkhard; Sautter, Verena; Melcher, Ute; Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Momm, Felix [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Gynecomastia is a frequent side effect of antiandrogen therapy for prostate cancer and may compromise quality of life. Although it has been successfully treated with radiotherapy (RT) for decades, the priority of RT as a preferred treatment option has recently been disputed as tamoxifen was also demonstrated to be effective. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of indications, frequency, and technique of RT in daily practice in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. On behalf of the DEGRO-AG GCG-BD (German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy of Benign Diseases) a standardized questionnaire was sent to 294 RT institutions. The questionnaires inquired about patient numbers, indications, RT technique, dose, and - if available - treatment results. Moreover, the participants were asked whether they were interested in participating in a prospective study. From a total of 294 institutions, 146 replies were received, of which 141 offered RT for gynecomastia. Seven of those reported prophylactic RT only, whereas 129 perform both preventive and symptomatic RT. In 110 of 137departments, a maximum of 20 patients were treated per year. Electron beams (76%) were used most often, while 24% of patients received photon beams or orthovolt x-rays. Total doses were up to 20 Gy for prophylactic and up to 40 Gy for therapeutic RT. Results were reported by 19 departments: prevention of gynecomastia was observed in 60-100% of patients. Only 13 institutions observed side effects. Prophylactic and symptomatic RT is widely used in the German-speaking countries, but patient numbers are small. The clinical results indicate that RT is a highly effective and well-tolerated treatment.

  15. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govaert Stephanie LA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemoradiotherapy (IMRT in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods and materials Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy or combined with (sequential or concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI after one year and 56% (±14% after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11% after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013 with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly combined with chemotherapy.

  16. Physical status of human papillomavirus integration in cervical cancer is associated with treatment outcome of the patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV DNA into the host genome is a critical aetiological event in the progression from normal cervix to intraepithelial neoplasm, and finally to invasive cervical cancer. However, there has been little work on how HPV integration status relates to treatment outcome for cervical carcinomas. In the current study, HPV E2 and E6 gene copy numbers were measured in 111 cervical cancer tissues using real-time QPCR. Integration patterns were divided into four groups: single copy-integrated with episomal components (group 1, single copy-integrated without episomal components (group 2, multicopy tandem repetition-integrated (group 3, and low HPV (group 4 groups. A relapse-predicting model was constructed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to classify patients into different risk groups for disease-free survival (DFS. The model was internally validated using bootstrap resampling. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed to evaluate gene expression patterns in relation to the different integration groups. DFS rate was inferior in the order of the patients in group 4, group 2/3, and group 1. Multivariate analysis showed that histologic grade, clinical stage group, and integration pattern were significant prognostic factors for poor DFS. The current prognostic model accurately predicted the risk of relapse, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.74 (bootstrap corrected, 0.71. In conclusion, these data suggest that HPV integration pattern is a potent prognostic factor for tailored treatment of cervical cancer.

  17. Guidance of treatment decisions in risk-adapted primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging: a single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate is considered to be the most precise noninvasive staging modality for localized prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) dynamic sequences have recently been shown to further increase the accuracy of staging relative to morphological imaging alone. Correct radiological staging, particularly the detection of extraprostatic disease extension, is of paramount importance for target volume definition and dose prescription in highly-conformal curative radiotherapy (RT); in addition, it may affect the risk-adapted duration of additional antihormonal therapy. The purpose of our study was to analyze the impact of mpMRI-based tumor staging in patients undergoing primary RT for prostate cancer. A total of 122 patients admitted for primary RT for prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed regarding initial clinical and computed tomography-based staging in comparison with mpMRI staging. Both tumor stage shifts and overall risk group shifts, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and the Gleason score, were assessed. Potential risk factors for upstaging were tested in a multivariate analysis. Finally, the impact of mpMRI-based staging shift on prostate RT and antihormonal therapy was evaluated. Overall, tumor stage shift occurred in 55.7% of patients after mpMRI. Upstaging was most prominent in patients showing high-risk serum PSA levels (73%), but was also substantial in patients presenting with low-risk PSA levels (50%) and low-risk Gleason scores (45.2%). Risk group changes occurred in 28.7% of the patients with consequent treatment adaptations regarding target volume delineation and duration of androgen deprivation therapy. High PSA levels were found to be a significant risk factor for tumor upstaging and newly diagnosed seminal vesicle infiltration assessed using mpMRI. Our findings suggest that mpMRI of the prostate leads to substantial tumor upstaging, and can considerably affect treatment decisions in all

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Strategies for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Selek, Uğur; Bölükbaşı, Yasemin; Welsh, James W.; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care in patients with advanced inoperable stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) has been a trusted method for a long time and has well-known drawbacks, most of which could be improved by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). IMRT is not currently the standard treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, but almost all patients could benefit to a degree in organ at risk sparing, dose coverage confor...

  19. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max;

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  20. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    The aim of radiation therapy is to deliver a radiation dose to the tumour that is high enough for all cancer cells to be killed, while sparing healthy organs to such an extent that the side effects are as low as possible. Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men in Denmark......, and for prostate cancer treatments, the proximity of the bladder and rectum makes radiotherapy treatment of this site a challenging task. Furthermore, the prostate may move during the radiation delivery and treatment margins are necessary to ensure that it is still receiving the intended dose. The main aim...... of this thesis is to manage prostate motion in real-time by aligning the radiation beam to the prostate using the novel dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking method. Specifically, the delivered dose with tracking was compared to the planned dose, and the impact of treatment plan complexity and limitations...

  1. Long-Term Improvement in Treatment Outcome After Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Locoregionally Advanced Cervix Cancer: An Update of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The local failure rate in patients with locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is 41-72% after radiotherapy (RT) alone, whereas local control is a prerequisite for cure. The Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial showed that combining RT with hyperthermia (HT) improved 3-year local control rates of 41-61%, as we reported earlier. In this study, we evaluate long-term results of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial after 12 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1996, a total of 114 women with locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma were randomly assigned to RT or RT + HT. The RT was applied to a median total dose of 68 Gy. The HT was given once weekly. The primary end point was local control. Secondary end points were overall survival and late toxicity. Results: At the 12-year follow-up, local control remained better in the RT + HT group (37% vs. 56%; p = 0.01). Survival was persistently better after 12 years: 20% (RT) and 37% (RT + HT; p = 0.03). World Health Organization (WHO) performance status was a significant prognostic factor for local control. The WHO performance status, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and tumor diameter were significant for survival. The benefit of HT remained significant after correction for these factors. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Grade 3 or higher radiation-induced late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: For locoregionally advanced cervical cancer, the addition of HT to RT resulted in long-term major improvement in local control and survival without increasing late toxicity. This combined treatment should be considered for patients who are unfit to receive chemotherapy. For other patients, the optimal treatment strategy is the subject of ongoing research

  2. Palliative chemotherapy followed by consolidation radiotherapy in patients with advanced and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer not suitable for radical treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hany Eldeeb; Philip Gamileri; Ghoi Mak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This is a retrospective study to assess the effectiveness of consolidation radiotherapy (CRT) following palliative chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are not suitable for radical treatment. Methods: This study involved retrospective analysis of a prospective database of Northampton Oncology Centre from January 2005 to December 2010,63 patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC treated at the oncology centre were enrolled. Patients were either treated with high dose (39/36 Gy /13-12 fractions, group 1) or low dose (20 Gy / 5 fractions, group 2) CRT or those were not offered any CRT (group 3). Results: There was no significant difference between the three groups as regard age, sex, performance status, comorbidities or chemotherapy given. However there was a statistically significant difference as regard the stage P = 0.009 with more stage IV patients at group Ⅱ and Ⅲ compared to group l. The mean survival for the three groups was 27 months, 14 months &15 months, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement of survival in patients treated with high dose palliative CRT compared to the other two groups (P = 0.006). In multivariate analysis only the radiotherapy dose remains as the only statistical significant factor affecting the survival with hazard ratio 0.372 and confidence interval (0.147-0.726). Conclusion: Despite the limitation of our retrospective study, it is worth considering CRT approach for patients with advanced and metastatic NSCLC - not suitable for radical treatment - who have not progressed on chemotherapy.

  3. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  4. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H [IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  5. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. 35,354 women resident in South East England and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1992 and 2001 who received radiotherapy within six months of diagnosis were identified from the Thames Cancer Registry. Time to radiotherapy was measured from either the date of diagnosis or the start of the previous treatment, whichever was shorter. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to examine whether patients received radiotherapy within 60 days of their diagnosis or previous treatment. The adjusted proportions of patients receiving radiotherapy within 60 days varied significantly between different cancer networks (range: 43% to 81%), and decreased from 68% in 1992 to 33% in 2001. After adjustment there was no association between deprivation of area of residence, age or stage and radiotherapy wait. Median time waited to radiotherapy increased over the study period whether measured from the start of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery or the date of diagnosis. This study covered a period of time before the investment following the Cancer Plan of 2000. Results are consistent with other findings suggesting variation between cancer networks and increasing waits over time. Further studies should examine different methods of measuring waiting time, the causes and consequences of waits for radiotherapy and the effect of current initiatives and investments

  6. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin WANG; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescrip...

  7. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of th...... of the treatment chain are explained, including imaging techniques and beam delivery techniques. Clinical studies using different motion management techniques are reviewed, and finally future directions for image guidance and motion management are outlined....

  8. Persistent pain after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) or external breast radiotherapy for breast cancer: A randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Gärtner, Rune; Kroman, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    Persistent pain after breast cancer treatment (PPBCT) affects between 25 and 60% of patients depending on surgical and adjuvant treatment. External breast radiotherapy (EBRT) has been shown to be a riskfactor for PPBCT, raising the question whether intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), with its...

  9. Radiotherapy for asymptomatic brain metastasis in epidermal growth factor receptor mutant non-small cell lung cancer without prior tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment: a retrospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastasis (BM) harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation shows good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This study is to assess the appropriate timing of brain radiotherapy (RT) for asymptomatic BM in EGFR mutant NSCLC patients. There were 628 patients diagnosed with EGFR mutant NSCLC between October 2005 and December 2011. Treatment outcomes had been retrospectively evaluated in 96 patients with asymptomatic BM without prior TKI treatment. 39 patients received first-line brain RT, 23 patients received delayed brain RT, and 34 patients did not receive brain RT. With a median follow-up of 26 months, the 2-year OS was 40.6 %. Univariate analyses revealed that ECOG performance status (p = 0.006), other distant metastases (p = 0.002) and first line systemic treatment (p = 0.032) were significantly associated with overall survival (OS). Multivariate analyses revealed that other sites of distant metastases (p = 0.030) were prognostic factor. The timing of brain RT was not significantly related to OS (p = 0.246). The 2-year BM progression-free survival (PFS) was 26.9 %. Brain RT as first-line therapy failed to demonstrate a significant association with BM PFS (p = 0.643). First-line brain RT failed to improve long-term survival in TKI-naïve EGFR mutant NSCLC patients with asymptomatic BM. Prospective studies are needed to validate these clinical findings

  10. Survey of patient dosimetry for head and neck cancer patients undergoing external radiotherapy treatment: A study from northeastern hospitals of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Arunkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To study dosimetry of patients during the external radiotherapy of head and neck cancers from different hospitals of the northeastern region (NER of India. Materials and Methods : 35 confirmed cases of head and neck cancers reporting to three different hospitals in the NER of India who underwent radiation treatment were the materials for the study. Dosimetry was carried out at 8(eight anatomical points to these patients, namely, target (entrance and exit points, forehead, chest, abdomen, gonad, arm, and leg respectively by thermoluminescence (TL as well as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL dosimeters. Unlike conventional appliances, we used common iodized salt as TL/OSL phosphor. Results : Patient dosimetry was found to vary with an average of 1.17 ± 0.39 Sv at forehead, 1.24 ± 0.39 Sv at chest, 0.52 ± 0.13 Sv at gonad to a minimum of 0.26 ± 0.07 Sv at leg areas when exposed to a cumulative dose of 65 Sv at the target. Conclusion : Maximum dose received from a stray radiation is about 1.5 Sv at forehead/chest and dosimetry of patient among the three centers is not significantly different at the 5% level of probability.

  11. Effects of Treatment Intensification on Acute Local Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Prospective Observational Study Validating CTCAE, Version 3.0, Scoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the incidence and severity of acute local toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy (CHT), using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE v3.0), scoring system. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2006, 149 patients with head and neck cancer treated with RT at our center were prospectively evaluated for local toxicity during treatment. On a weekly basis, patients were monitored and eight toxicity items were recorded according to the CTCAE v3.0 scoring system. Of the 149 patients, 48 (32%) were treated with RT alone (conventional fractionation), 82 (55%) with concomitant CHT and conventional fractionation RT, and 20 (13%) with accelerated-fractionation RT and CHT. Results: Severe (Grade 3-4) adverse events were recorded in 28% (mucositis), 33% (dysphagia), 40% (pain), and 12% (skin) of patients. Multivariate analysis showed CHT to be the most relevant factor independently predicting for worse toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia, weight loss, salivary changes). In contrast, previous surgery, RT acceleration and older age, female gender, and younger age, respectively, predicted for a worse outcome of mucositis, weight loss, pain, and dermatitis. The T-score method confirmed that conventional RT alone is in the 'low-burden' class (T-score = 0.6) and suggests that concurrent CHT and conventional fractionation RT is in the 'high-burden' class (T-score = 1.15). Combined CHT and accelerated-fractionation RT had the highest T-score at 1.9. Conclusions: The CTCAE v3.0 proved to be a reliable tool to quantify acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with various treatment intensities. The effect of CHT and RT acceleration on the acute toxicity burden was clinically relevant

  12. Lymphocyte subpopulations in mammary cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B- and T-lymphocytes, identified by two methods of rosette-formation with sheep erythrocytes, fall to low levels within 1 week of the start of post-operative radiotherapy for cancer of the breast. Fifty-two such patients are compared with 34 age- and disease-matched patients treated by mastectomy alone. The B-lymphopenia reverts to normal levels by 10 months while the T-lymphopenia persists for at least 2 to 4 years

  13. Neoadjuvant vs adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer:Which is superior?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah Popek; Vassiliki Liana Tsikitis

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer including timing and dosage of radiotherapy,degree of sphincter preservation with neoadjuvant radiotherapy,and short and long term effects of radiotherapy are controversial topics.The MEDLINE,Cochrane Library databases,and meeting proceedings from the American Society of Clinical Oncology,were searched for reports of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses comparing neoadjuvant and adjuvant radiotherapy with surgery to surgery alone for rectal cancer.Neoadjuvant radiotherapy shows superior results in terms of local control compared to adjuvant radiotherapy.Neither adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiotherapy impacts overall survival.Short course versus long course neoadjuvant radiotherapy remains controversial.There is insufficient data to conclude that neoadjuvant therapy improves rates of sphincter preserving surgery.Radiation significantly impacts anorectal and sexual function and includes both acute and long term toxicity.Data demonstrate that neoadjuvant radiation causes less toxicity compared to adjuvant radiotherapy,and specifically short course neoadjuvant radiation results in less toxicity than long course neoadjuvant radiation.Neoadjuvant radiotherapy is the preferred modality for administering radiation in locally advanced rectal cancer.There are significant side effects from radiation,including anorectal and sexual dysfunction,which may be less with short course neoadjuvant radiation.

  14. Inhalative steroids as an individual treatment in symptomatic lung cancer patients with radiation pneumonitis grade II after radiotherapy – a single-centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess efficacy of our single-centre experience with inhalative steroids (IS) in lung cancer patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade II. Between 05/09 and 07/10, 24 patients (female, n = 8; male, n = 16) with lung cancer (non-small cell lung carcinoma [NSCLC]: n = 19; small cell lung cancer [SCLC]: n = 3; unknown histology: n = 2) and good performance status (ECOG ≤1) received definitive radiotherapy to the primary tumour site and involved lymph nodes with concurrent chemotherapy (n = 18), sequential chemotherapy (n = 2) or radiation only (n = 4) and developed symptomatic RP grade II during follow-up. No patient presented with oxygen requiring RP grade III. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range: 50–82 years). Nine patients suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before treatment, and 18 patients had a smoking history (median pack years: 48). The mean lung dose was 15.5 Gy (range: 3.0–23.1 Gy). All patients were treated with IS. If a patient’s clinical symptoms did not significantly improve within two weeks of IS therapy initiation, their treatment was switched to oral prednisolone. All 24 patients were initially treated with a high dose IS (budesonide 800 μg 1-0-1) for 14 days. Of the patients, 18 showed a significant improvement of clinical symptoms and 6 patients did not show significant improvement of clinical symptoms and were classified as non-responders to IS. Their treatment was switched to oral steroids after two weeks (starting with oral prednisolone, 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight; at least 50 mg per day). All of these patients responded to the prednisolone. None of non-responders presented with increased symptoms of RP and required oxygen and / or hospitalization (RP grade III). The median follow-up after IS treatment initiation was 18 months (range: 4–66 months). The median duration of IS treatment and prednisolone treatment was 8.2 months (range: 3.0–48.3 months) and 11.4 months (range: 5.0–44

  15. Long-term follow-up after modern radical prostate cancer radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lotte

    radiotherapy is a well established treatment modality for prostate cancer. Accuracy and precision are key words with regard to optimal survival and minimal toxicity in modern radiotherapy and are fundamentals in modern radiotherapy. Modern imaging has improved the ability to define radiotherapy target volumes....... Especially treatment margins have been reduced through the use of more accurate treatment planning and image-guided technology. Increasing doses have lead to increased disease control. Aiming for minimal toxicity after radiotherapy, magnetic resonance imaging delineation could be a possible tool, knowing...... that clinical target volumes are up to 30% smaller on MRI delineation compared to computer tomography delineation. The overall aim of the thesis was to explore the use of MRI target planning and a Nicle-Titanium prostate stent as fiducial marker for both MR-CT co-registration and image guided radiotherapy....

  16. The Relationship between Expression of p70s6k with Radiotherapy Response in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kurnia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many important prognostic factors in advanced stage cervical cancer primary treated with radiotherapy. Besides clinical factors, many biomarkers have been studied in relation with radiotherapy response. The p70s6k is a biomarker which plays a significant role in cell proliferation. Increased levels of p70s6k are also associated with drug resistance in cancer. In the present study, the relationship between the expression level of p70s6k before treatment and the radiotherapy response in cervical cancer was determined. Immunohistochemical staining of p70s6k, MIB-1, and p53 was conducted in microscopic slide from 21 cancer tissue biopsies before treatment with radiotherapy. After the treatment had completed early radiotherapy response was observed by pelvic control method. The results showed that p70s6k is partly highly expressed (61.9%, 13/21 and partly low expressed (38.1%, 8/21 in the cancer cells. They also show that there is no statistically significant differences on AgNOR mean, MIB-1, and p53 indices in the different degrees of p70s6k expression (p≥0.05. Higher expression levels of p70s6k is more strongly associated with good radiotherapy response compared to lower ones (p=0.05. In conclusion, the level of p70s6k expression before treatment has an association with radiotherapy response.

  17. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  18. Radiotherapy, a therapeutic procedure in constant progression in cancer treatment; Radioterapia, un procedimiento terapeutico en progresion constante en el tratamiento oncologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, J. A.; Calin Lorca, A.; Herranz Crespo, R.

    2016-08-01

    Radiation oncology or radiotherapy is an eminently clinical specialty, prevention, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognostic assessment of neoplasms, based on ionizing radiation. Modern technology (advances in diagnostic imaging, evolution of computing, massive improvements and incorporating different systems of tracking and tracing in linear accelerators) allows treatment to be more and more accurate, less harmful to the patient and consequently more effective. (Author)

  19. Intense pulsed light vs. long-pulsed dye laser treatment of telangiectasia after radiotherapy for breast cancer: a randomized split-lesion trial of two different treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymann, P.; Hedelund, L.; Hædersdal, Merete

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic radiodermatitis is a common sequela of treatment for breast cancer and potentially a psychologically distressing factor for the affected women. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of treatments with a long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL) vs. intense pulsed light (IPL...

  20. CyberKnife Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy as an Option of Treatment for Patients With Prostate Cancer Having Oligometastatic Lymph Nodes: Single-Center Study Outcome Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Miszczyk, Leszek; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy on prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Our material consisted of 18 patients with 31 metastatic lymph nodes irradiated between 2011 and 2014 using CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Patients were irradiated using fraction dose varied from 6 to 15 Gy (median 10), to the total dose of 24 to 45 Gy (median 30). Irradiated lymph node size varied from 0.4 to 4.0 cm. In all, 9 patients had single lymph node metastasis and 9 patients had metastases of 2 to 4 lymph nodes. Prostate-specific antigen concentration before radiotherapy varied from 0.01 to 15.58 (mean 6.97; median 4.66). All patients at the time of radiotherapy and follow-up received androgen deprivation therapy. Mann-Whitney U, Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used in statistical analysis. We obtained the following results: after CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, prostate-specific antigen concentration dropped in majority of cases and during the last control varied from 0.00 to 258.00 (median 2.5), and was lower in patients without dissemination to other organs (P = .01). Complete regression was found in 12 lesions, stable disease in 13, and progression in 4. In 7 patients, the dissemination to other organs occurred. Our results allow us to conclude that CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of prostate cancer lymph node oligometastases gives good local control and relatively good prostate-specific antigen response.

  1. Basic study of cancer immunity and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With respect to anti-tumor effect of radiation, antigenicity and involvement of immunity of an individual with cancer were evaluated under both conditions of natural and insufficient immunity. In animal experiments, it is clear that immunity of the host, especially the function of T-cells, has much to do with the curability of cancer by radiotherapy. In some type of human cancer, not only the histological findings in its healing process following x-ray irradiation but a number of clinical and in vitro experimental results strongly suggest the presence of antigenicity of the T-cells, although it is quite little. The experiments made in a combination of human cancer and nude mice showed a possibility of non-T cells being involved in this mechanism irrespective of whether it is specific, non-specific or not having such an important role as T-cells. There are many problems left unsolved. However, radiotherapy of cancer should be undertaken by maintaining or further improving the immunity of the body in order to obtain good results. (Ueda, J.)

  2. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose-response relationship are sparse. METHODS: In a cohort of 22,269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959-1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated...... for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received...... radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend

  3. Quality control in radiotherapy treatment: Radiation induced myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct injury of the spinal cord has been reported many times, particularly in cases of overexposures with radiotherapy of neoplasm that occurred outside the Central Nervous System. Permanent damage to the spinal cord is the most feared complication of radiation therapy treatments and one of the relatively common causes of litigation for medical malpractice in the context of cancer treatment. We have learned from clinical experience, data from randomized trials and animal experimentation, the dose tolerance as well as the interfraction interval for hyperfractionation regimes. We are still lacking precious clinical information, in particular the dose tolerance in combined modality treatments that represent the vast majority of modern treatments. (author)

  4. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  5. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of ≤40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high (≥89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79–95% at 1 year and 43–70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45–86% at 1 year and 31–66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  6. 图像引导放射治疗技术在宫颈癌放射治疗中的应用%Application of Image Guided Radiotherapy with Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林浩; 吴丽丽; 陈泓

    2014-01-01

    图像引导放疗( Image guided radiotherapy,IGRT)是继三维适形放疗和调强放疗之后,又一新的放疗技术,分析宫颈癌放疗中影响靶区精确性的主要因素、IGRT主要技术方式及其在宫颈癌放射治疗中的应用。%Image guided radiotherapy is a new radiotherapy technique to consider the extent and pat erns of organ motion. In this study, we analyze the factors those influence the target treatment accuracy, the IGRT technique and its application on cervix radiotherapy.

  7. External beam radiotherapy plus single-fraction high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) plus high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) as a boost in patients (pts) with intermediate or high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and materials: From 2002 to July 2012, 377 pts with a diagnosis of intermediate or high-risk prostate cancer were treated with EBRT plus HDRB. Median patient age was 66 years (range, 41–86). Most patients (347 pts; 92%) were classified as high-risk (stage T2c–T3, or PSA > 20 ng/mL, or GS ⩾ 8), with 30 patients (8%) considered intermediate risk. All patients underwent EBRT at a prescribed dose of 60.0 Gy (range, 45–70 Gy) to the prostate and seminal vesicles. A total of 120 pts (31%) received a dose of 46 Gy (45–50 Gy) to the true pelvis. All pts received a single-fraction 9 Gy (9–15 Gy) HDR boost. Most patients (353; 94%) were prescribed complete androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates were calculated. In the case of BRFS, patients with <26 months of follow-up (n = 106) were excluded to minimize the impact of ADT. Results: The median follow-up for the entire sample was 50 months (range, 12–126), with 5-year actuarial OS and CSS, respectively, of 88% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84–92) and 98% (95% CI: 97–99). The 5-year BRFS was 91% (95% CI: 87–95) in the 271 pts with ⩾26 months (median, 60 months) of follow-up. Late toxicity included grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal toxicity in 17 (4.6%) and 6 pts (1.6%), respectively, as well as grades 2 and 3 genitourinary toxicity in 46 (12.2%) and 3 pts (0.8%), respectively. Conclusion: These long-term outcomes confirm that EBRT plus a single-fraction HDRB boost provides good results in treatment-related toxicity and biochemical control. In addition to the excellent clinical results, this fractionation schedule reduces physician workload, treatment-related expenses, patient discomfort and risks

  8. Second Cancers After Fractionated Radiotherapy: Stochastic Population Dynamics Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Rainer K.; Shuryak, Igor; Brenner, David; Fakir, Hatim; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2007-01-01

    When ionizing radiation is used in cancer therapy it can induce second cancers in nearby organs. Mainly due to longer patient survival times, these second cancers have become of increasing concern. Estimating the risk of solid second cancers involves modeling: because of long latency times, available data is usually for older, obsolescent treatment regimens. Moreover, modeling second cancers gives unique insights into human carcinogenesis, since the therapy involves administering well characterized doses of a well studied carcinogen, followed by long-term monitoring. In addition to putative radiation initiation that produces pre-malignant cells, inactivation (i.e. cell killing), and subsequent cell repopulation by proliferation can be important at the doses relevant to second cancer situations. A recent initiation/inactivation/proliferation (IIP) model characterized quantitatively the observed occurrence of second breast and lung cancers, using a deterministic cell population dynamics approach. To analyze ifradiation-initiated pre-malignant clones become extinct before full repopulation can occur, we here give a stochastic version of this I I model. Combining Monte Carlo simulations with standard solutions for time-inhomogeneous birth-death equations, we show that repeated cycles of inactivation and repopulation, as occur during fractionated radiation therapy, can lead to distributions of pre-malignant cells per patient with variance >> mean, even when pre-malignant clones are Poisson-distributed. Thus fewer patients would be affected, but with a higher probability, than a deterministic model, tracking average pre-malignant cell numbers, would predict. Our results are applied to data on breast cancers after radiotherapy for Hodgkin disease. The stochastic IIP analysis, unlike the deterministic one, indicates: a) initiated, pre-malignant cells can have a growth advantage during repopulation, not just during the longer tumor latency period that follows; b) weekend

  9. Measuring side effects after radiotherapy for pharynx cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Data on side effects after radiotherapy is needed to establish the benefits and drawbacks of new treatments, but side effects are not quantified as easily as survival or local control. Side effects may be quantified using physical measures. Unfortunately, only few endpoints exist where a physical...... side effects. Using pharynx cancer as an example, the purpose of this article is to summarize the possibilities and limitations of different methods for measurement of radiotherapy-induced side effects. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep-17......Data on side effects after radiotherapy is needed to establish the benefits and drawbacks of new treatments, but side effects are not quantified as easily as survival or local control. Side effects may be quantified using physical measures. Unfortunately, only few endpoints exist where a physical...... measure is obtainable, and the case of a patient-relevant measure is even rarer. Radiotherapy is often followed by complex symptoms not easily quantifiable by the observer. Quantitative patient reported side effects can be retrieved using validated questionnaires, but this kind of data is often difficult...

  10. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Linda C., E-mail: Linda.watson@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Interdisciplinary Practice, Community Oncology, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Gies, Donna [Department of Radiation Oncology Nursing, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thompson, Emmanuel [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary Faculty of Science, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thomas, Bejoy [Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Psychosocial Oncology, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from

  11. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy’s questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using

  12. Quo Vadis Radiotherapy? Technological Advances and the Rising Problems in Cancer Management

    OpenAIRE

    Barry J Allen; Eva Bezak; Loredana G. Marcu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions t...

  13. [Role of radiotherapy in the management of node-positive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiot, S; Doré, M; Rio, E; Cellier, P; Mesguez-Nebout, N; Goineau, A

    2016-10-01

    Node-positive prostate cancer patients represent a small proportion of all prostate cancers for whom limited prospective information is available. Most retrospective or cohort data strongly suggest however that radiotherapy combined with androgen-depriving therapies is the preferable treatment in this setting. Only randomized clinical trials would be able to better define both radiotherapy (dose? volume? fractionation?) and androgen-depriving therapies (duration? role of novel androgen-depriving therapy?) modalities. PMID:27575537

  14. Practice patterns of radiotherapy in cervical cancer among member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaffney, David K; Du Bois, Andreas; Narayan, Kailash;

    2007-01-01

    practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph node cases. Items focused on indications for radiation therapy, radiation fields, dose, use of chemotherapy, brachytherapy and others. The cooperative groups from North......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). METHODS AND MATERIALS: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy...... America were compared with the other groups to evaluate potential differences in radiotherapy doses. RESULTS: A total of 39 surveys were returned from 13 different cooperative groups. For the treatment of advanced cervical cancer, external beam pelvic doses and total doses to point A were 47 + 3.5 Gy...

  15. Treatment results and prognostic factors of early breast cancer treated with a breast conserving operation and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic factors affecting local control and survival rates for patients with early breast cancer who received breast conserving treatment (BCT) and to find out the optimal treatment according to their risk factors. From October 1994 to December 2001, 605 patients with 611 stage I and II breast cancers received BCT, and the results were analyzed retrospectively. BCT consists of breast conserving surgery and whole breast irradiation. All the patients underwent lumpectomy or quad-rantectomy. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed in 608 cases (99.5%). The radiation dose to the whole breast was 50.4 Gy over 5 weeks with a 1.8 Gy daily fraction and with boost doses of 9-14.4 Gy administered to the tumor bed. Adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in most of the patients with axillary lymph node metastasis or tumors larger than 1 cm. The median follow-up period was 47 months. Local relapse, regional relapse and distant metastasis occurred in 15 (2.5%), 16 (2.6%) and 43 patients (7.1%), respectively. The 5-year overall survival, local-relapse-free survival, distant-metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival rates were 95.3%, 97.2%, 91.3% and 88.5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age (P=0.02), number of involved axillary lymph nodes (P=0.01) and nuclear grade (P=0.01) affected the local-relapse-free survival. The factors associated with disease-free survival were the T stage (P=0.05), number of involved axillary lymph nodes (P=0.01) and nuclear grade (P=0.001). Overall survival was associated with the T stage (P=0.02), number of involved axillary lymph nodes (P=0.01) and c-erb B2 overexpression (P=0.05). Patients with more than two factors among age≤35 years, positive lymph node metastasis and high nuclear grade showed a poor 5-year local-relapse-free survival rate compared with others (P=0.001). Also, patients with more than two factors among tumor size >1 cm, positive

  16. Cause-Specific Colostomy Rates After Radiotherapy for Anal Cancer: A Danish Multicentre Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Kåre G; Nørgaard, Mette; Lundby, Lilli;

    2011-01-01

    In anal cancer, colostomy-free survival is a measure of anal sphincter preservation after treatment with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Failure to control anal cancer and complications of treatment are alternative indications for colostomy. However, no data exist on cause-specific colostomy...

  17. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study

    OpenAIRE

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O’Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Methods Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct r...

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter van [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  19. [Securitization of the bi-site radiotherapy activity as part of the resumption of treatments in the Hospital of Epinal by the team of Alexis Vautrin Nancy Cancer Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, V; Aigle, D; Peiffert, D; Noel, A; Simon, J-M

    2009-12-01

    In February 2007, the radiation therapy department of the Jean Monnet Hospital in Epinal (France) has stopped the radiotherapy treatments after the discovery of a radiotherapy accident and bad practices leading to overexposure of patients between 1987 and 2006. The Regional Cancer Center "Centre Alexis Vautrin" in Nancy (France) was given the task of the new start of treatment activity. From February 2007 to January 2008, actions of training, updates of equipments and practices have been performed in the Epinal Hospital, guided by the quality approach, allowing the treatment of new patients in February 2008, with the radiation oncologists and the medical physicists of the Centre Alexis Vautrin, with the highest conditions of security and confidence. PMID:19692280

  20. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Radiotherapy Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, Csaba; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Csejtei, András; Gábor, Gabriella; Landherr, László; Mangel, László; Mayer, Árpád; Fodor, János

    2016-09-01

    The radiotherapy expert panel revised and updated the radiotherapy (RT) guidelines accepted in 2009 at the 2nd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference based on new scientific evidence. Radiotherapy of the conserved breast is indicated in ductal carcinoma in situ (St. 0), as RT decreases the risk of local recurrence by 60%. In early stage (St. I-II) invasive breast cancer RT remains a standard treatment following breast conserving surgery. However, in elderly (≥70 years) patients with stage I, hormone receptor positive tumour hormonal therapy without RT can be considered. Hypofractionated (15×2.67 Gy) whole breast irradiation and for selected cases accelerated partial breast irradiation are validated treatment alternatives of conventional (25×2 Gy) whole breast irradiation. Following mastectomy RT significantly decreases the risk of locoregional recurrence and improves overall survival of patients having 1 to 3 (pN1a) or ≥4 (pN2a, pN3a) positive axillary lymph nodes. In selected cases of patients with 1 to 2 positive sentinel lymph nodes axillary dissection can be omitted and substituted with axillary RT. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast conserving surgery whole breast irradiation is mandatory, while after NAC followed by mastectomy locoregional RT should be given in cases of initial stage III-IV and ypN1 axillary status. PMID:27579722

  1. Whither papillon? Future directions for contact radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, J; Gerard, J P; Sun Myint, A;

    2007-01-01

    of rectal cancer. As a result of these efforts, a European company is starting production of the new Papillon RT-50 machine, which will be available shortly. In addition, the ICONE group is planning an observational study on contact X-ray and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (CONTEM) for curative treatment...... old. To address this problem, the International Contact Radiotherapy Evaluation (ICONE) group was formed at a meeting in Liverpool in 2005 with the aim of developing a new contact X-ray unit and to establish clinical protocols that would enable the new machine to safely engage in the treatment...

  2. 肺癌放疗后复发患者用适形放疗再治疗的可行性研究%Study on the feasibility of conformal radiotherapy treatment once again on patients with recurrence lung cancer after radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单光莲

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨肺癌患者放疗后再复发时应用适形放疗的疗效。方法:选择肺癌放疗后复发患者80例,随机分为试验组及对照组。试验组给予适形放射治疗,对照组给予常规放射治疗,比较两种方法治疗效果及不良反应。结果:经过治疗,试验组总有效率高于对照组(P<0.05);治疗2年后,试验组1、2年生存率均高于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:肺癌患者放疗后再复发时采用适形放疗,可提高近期疗效,延长生存期,且不良反应与常规治疗相同。%Objective:To investigate the effect of conformal radiotherapy treatment once again on patients with recurrence lung cancer after radiotherapy.Methods:80 patients with lung cancer who recurrenced after radiotherapy were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group.Patients in the experimental group were treated with conformal radiotherapy,while patients in the control group were received conventional radiotherapy,then we compared the treatment effect and toxicity between the two groups.Results:After the treatment,the total effective rate of the experimental group was higher than that of the control group(P<0.05);after 2 years of treatment,both the 1 year survival rate and 2 years survival rate in the experimental group were higher than in the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:Conformal radiotherapy can improve the short-term effect of patients with lung cancer recurrenced after radiotherapy,and this treatment also can prolong the survival time,and its toxicity is same to the conventional treatment.

  3. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xinhong Wu; Bo Luo; Shaozhong Wei; Yan Luo; Yaojun Feng; Juan Xu; Wei Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the treatment efficiency of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative (TN) phenotype breast cancer patients with brain metastases and their survival times. Materials and Methods : A total of 112 metastatic breast cancer patients treated with whole brain irradiation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were analyzed. Thirty-seven patients were of TN phenotype. Objective response rates were co...

  4. Comparing the effects of conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapies on early skin toxicity and cosmetic outcomes after breast cancer conserving surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, P; AR Sebzari; B Kalaghchi; F Amouzegar Hashemi; Z Shahabi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The high number of breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy after surgery has caused many to think about a shorter period of radiotherapy, which can significantly reduce the radiotherapy machine time, labor hours, and fewer patient visits. This study was designed to evaluate the acute skin effects and cosmetic outcomes of short course radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer in comparison with the conventional treatment method.Methods: Fifty-two patients with operable...

  5. Prevention of erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izak Faiena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With increasing scrutiny of prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis and treatment, much attention has been given to the morbidity caused by radical prostatectomy (RP and/or radiotherapy (RT. One of the most common side-effects of either treatment is erectile dysfunction (ED. [1] Approximately, 40% of patients will experience ED after RT for PCa. The post-RT ED causes significant patient dissatisfaction with cancer treatment as well as decrease in patient and partner psychosocial function. [2] To address this issue in patients undergoing RT, Pisansky et al. [3] conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a phosphodiesterase enzyme-5 inhibitor (PDE5i, tadalafil, as a preventive measure for patients undergoing RT for PCa and found no difference in erectile function between the control and treatment groups.

  6. Conservative treatment of a recto-urethral fistula due to savage HIFU for local recurrence of prostate cancer, 5 years after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Topazio, Luca; Perugia, Claudio; Finazzi-Agro, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Recto-urethral fistula is one of the most serious complications caused by high-intensity-focused ultrasound used as salvage treatment for recurrence of prostate cancer after brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We report the case of a recto-urethral fistula in a 68-year-old patient, who previously had undergone radical prostatectomy and EBRT for prostate cancer (pT3 N0 Mx). The fistula was treated conservatively by an indwelling Foley catheter, without the creation of an intest...

  7. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reported is the case of a 46-year-old male with hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for early glottic cancer, T1N0M0, Stage I. Six months after 60Co irradiation 66 Gy with the radiation field size of 5 x 5 cm was given, the clinical signs of acute hypothyroidism was presented. Retrospective CT examinations proved that over 80% of the total dose was irradiated to about 10% of whole thyroid volume. Since laboratory examinations revealed high serum level of thyrogobrin antibody, we postulated immunological mechanism was associated with the onset of hypothyroidism. (author)

  8. SU-E-P-48: Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Three Different Commercial Planning Systems for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D; Chi, Z; Yang, H; Miao, M; Jing, Z [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the performances of three commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization regarding cervical cancer. Methods: For twenty cervical cancer patients, three IMRT plans were retrospectively re-planned: one with Pinnacle TPS,one with Oncentra TPS and on with Eclipse TPS. The total prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy delivered for PTV and 58.8 Gy for PTVnd by simultaneous integrated boost technique. The treatments were delivered using the Varian 23EX accelerator. All optimization schemes generated clinically acceptable plans. They were evaluated based on target coverage, homogeneity (HI) and conformity (CI). The organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed according to the percent volume under some doses and the maximum doses. The statistical method of the collected data of variance analysis was used to compare the difference among the quality of plans. Results: IMRT with Eclipse provided significant better HI, CI and all the parameters of PTV. However, the trend was not extension to the PTVnd, it was still significant better at mean dose, D50% and D98%, but plans with Oncentra showed significant better in the hight dosage volume, such as maximum dose and D2%. For the bladder wall, there were not notable difference among three groups, although Pinnacle and Oncentra systems provided a little lower dose sparing at V50Gy of bladder and rectal wall and V40Gy of bladder wall, respectively. V40Gy of rectal wall (p=0.037), small intestine (p=0.001 for V30Gy, p=0.010 for maximum dose) and V50Gy of right-femoral head (p=0.019) from Eclipse plans showed significant better than other groups. Conclusion: All SIB-IMRT plans were clinically acceptable which were generated by three commercial TPSs. The plans with Eclipse system showed advantages over the plans with Oncentra and Pinnacle system in the overwhelming majority of the dose coverage for targets and dose sparing of OARs in cervical cancer.

  9. The role of perioperative radiotherapy in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Paulo Batista

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most common neoplasms and a main cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Surgery remains the mainstay for cure and is considered for all patients with potentially curable disease. However, despite the fact that surgery alone usually leads to favorable outcomes in early stage disease, late diagnosis usually means a poor prognosis. In these settings, multimodal therapy has become the established treatment for locally advanced tumors, while the high risk of locoregional relapse has favored the inclusion of radiotherapy in the comprehensive therapeutic strategy. We provide a critical, non-systematic review of gastric cancer and discuss the role of perioperative radiation therapy in its treatment.

  10. Fatigue and radiotherapy: (B) experience in patients 9 months following treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Smets, E. M.; Visser, M. R.; Willems-Groot, A. F.; Garssen, B.; Schuster-Uitterhoeve, A. L.; de Haes, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Little is known regarding the prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients after treatment has ended and no recurrence found. The present study examines fatigue in disease-free cancer patients after being treated with radiotherapy (n = 154). The following questions are addressed. First, how do patients describe their fatigue 9 months after radiotherapy and is this different from fatigue in a nonselective sample from the general population (n = 139)? Secondly, to what degree is fatigue ...

  11. Paediatric Photon and Proton Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Based on Advanced Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.

    -up and medication, and may have a considerable impact on the quality of life of the childhood cancer survivor. The major challenge in modern paediatric cancer therapy is therefore to reduce the incidence of treatment-related toxicities, while maintaining or improving the high cure-rates. In this thesis, we study...... radiotherapy treatment planning in combination with the nuclear medicine imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET). Specifically, we investigate the potential impact on the radiotherapy treatment plans of modern radiotherapy modalities for paediatric and adolescent cancer patients, when adding...... of patients, we found that although radiotherapy with protons instead of photons may provide several benefits in terms of reduced irradiated volumes of healthy tissue and lower doses to organs near the tumour, these benefits cannot be taken for granted. If proton therapy requires slightly larger safety...

  12. Solution IMRT static of a radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer with lymphangitis; Solucion IMRT estatica de un tratamiento radioterapico del cancer de mama con linfangitis carcinomatosa cutanea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puertolas Hernandez, J. R.; Iriondo Igerabide, U.; Urraca de la Serna, J. M.; Lozano Flores, F. J.; Pino Leon, C.; Larretxa Etxarri, R.

    2013-07-01

    In breast cancer, the planning of treatment with IMRT technique mode static MLC has been efficient to get a perfect union of doses in the skin between the lower limit of the supraclavicular fields and the upper limit of the tangential fields. The technique Planning requires the creation of auxiliary volumes that allow you to manage the particularities inherent to the tangential fields of breast. (Author)

  13. Symptomatic vertebral hemangioma: Treatment with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aich Ranen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vertebrae are the second commonest site among skeletal locations affected by hemangioma, but only about one per cent becomes symptomatic throughout the life. Though surgery, intra vertebral injection of various sclerosing agents have been tried in treating this benign process, no general consensus regarding management has been reached. Radiotherapy is emerging as a low cost, simple, non-invasive but very effective modality of treatment of symptomatic vertebral hemangioma. Aim: This study aims to find out the role of external beam radiotherapy in alleviating the symptoms of symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas without compromising the quality of life. Materials and Methods: Seven consecutive patients with symptomatic vertebral hemangioma were treated with a fixed dose of external beam radiotherapy; and muscle power was assessed before, after treatment and during follow-up. Results: All patients showed improvement of muscle power, which increased with the passage of time. Pain relief with improvement of quality of life was obtained in all the patients. Conclusion: Effect of radiotherapy on vertebral hemangioma is dose-dependent and the dose limiting factor is the spinal cord tolerance. In the present era of IMRT, greater dose can be delivered to the parts of vertebra affected by the hemangioma without compromising the spinal cord tolerance and expected to give better results.

  14. Integrated prostate cancer centers might cause an overutilization of radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: A comparison of treatment trends in the United States and Germany from 2004 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Aim of the study was to analyze changes in primary treatment for low-risk prostate cancer across different healthcare systems. Materials and methods: We compared “Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results” data (USA) with data from four German federal epidemiological cancer registries, both from 2004 to 2011. We excluded metastatic disease and patients aged ⩾80 years. Thereof, we identified 132,506 (USA) and 54,159 (Germany) patients with low-risk according to the 2014 EAU guidelines. We tested treatment trends for statistical significance with a linear regression model. Results: Active treatment was radical prostatectomy (RP) in 36.1% vs. 66.2% and radiotherapy (RT) in 38.4% vs. 11.8%. No active treatment (NAT) was reported in 24.2% vs. 16.2% (p < 0.001 each). Through the study period the use of RP decreased from 37.1% to 34.2% in the USA (p = 0.04) and was constant at a mean of 66.2% in Germany (p = 0.8). The use of RT in the USA decreased from 42.8% to 31.8% (p < 0.001), while it was stable in Germany (p = 0.09). The NAT group grew from 18.0% to 33.2% in the USA (p < 0.001), while it was stable in Germany until 2009 (p = 0.3). From 2009 to 2011 there also was an increase of the NAT group in Germany from 15.2% to 19.4% (p = 0.001). Conclusion: In contrast to former evidence we found the relative use of RT for low-risk prostate cancer much higher in the USA compared to Germany. The implementation of integrated prostate cancer centers in the USA might explain this observation. Deferred and defensive treatment strategies showed a steady increase in the USA. This development seems delayed in Germany by several years

  15. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with induction and concomitant chemotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Impact of total treatment time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, J.; Mercke, C. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Bergman, B. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine

    1998-12-31

    Tumour cell proliferation during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can negatively influence the treatment outcome in patients with unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Accelerated and hyperfractionated RT may therefore have an advantage over conventional RT. Moreover, earlier studies have suggested improved survival with addition of cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT). We present here the results of combined treatment with induction and concomitant CT and accelerated hyperfractionated RT in a retrospective series of patients with advanced NSCLS. Between August 1990 and August 1995, 90 consecutive patients, aged 42-77 years (median 63 years), with locally advanced unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC and good performance status were referred for treatment: stage: I 23%, IIIa 37%, IIIb 40%. Patient histologies included: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 34% and large cell carcinoma 13%. The treatment consisted of two courses of CT (cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m{sup 2} day 1-3 i.v.), the second course given concomitantly with RT. The total RT dose was 61.2-64.6 Gy, with two daily fractions of 1.7 Gy. A one-week interval was introduced after 40.8 Gy to reduce acute toxicity, making the total treatment time 4.5 weeks. Concerning toxicity, 33 patients had febrile neutropenia, 10 patients suffered from grade III oesophagitis and 7 patients had grade III pneumonitis. There were two possible treatment-related deaths, one due to myocardial infarction and the other due to a pneumocystis carinii infection. The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 72%, 46% and 34%, respectively; median survival was 21.3 months. Fifty-nine patients had progressive disease: 21 failed locoregionally, 29 had distant metastases and 9 patients had a combination of these. Pretreatment weight loss was the only prognostic factor found, except for stage. However, the results for stage IIIb were no different from those for stage IIIa

  16. Surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Testori, A; Rutkowski, P; Marsden, J;

    2009-01-01

    on individual circumstances. Radiotherapy is indicated as a treatment option in select patients with lentigo maligna melanoma and as an adjuvant in select patients with regional metastatic disease. Radiotherapy is also indicated for palliation, especially in bone and brain metastases....

  17. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy.

  18. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiravova, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Uk, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia and tumors of the central nervous system also. Radiation-induced tumors begin to appear 5-10 years after irradiation and excess risk persists for decades, perhaps for the remainder of life. The incidence of thyroid cancer is two- to threefold higher among females than males. Most of the thyroid cancers that occur in association with irradiation are of the papillary type, for which the cure rate is high if tumors are detected early. Our Department in co-operation with Department of Children Hematology and Oncology Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital Motol monitors patients after therapy for cancer in childhood for the long term period. The monitoring is focused on detection of thyroid disorders that occur as last consequences of oncology therapy, especially early detection of nodular changes in thyroid gland and thyroid carcinogenesis. The survey presents two patients observed in our department that were diagnosed with the papillary thyroid carcinoma which occurred 15 and more years after radiotherapy for childhood cancer. After total thyroidectomy they underwent therapy with radioiodine. After radiotherapy it is necessary to pursue a long-term following and assure interdisciplinary co-operation which enables early detection of last consequences of radiotherapy, especially the most serious ones as secondary carcinogenesis

  19. Outcome analysis of salvage radiotherapy for occult cervical cancer found after simple hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to analyze the outcomes of the patients, who received salvage radiotherapy for incidentally discovered cervical cancer following simple hysterectomy, and to identify the influence of intracavitary radiotherapy on treatment outcomes. Data from 117 patients with occult cervical cancer who underwent simple hysterectomy followed by salvage radiotherapy from September 1979 to November 2010 were collected. All the patients received external beam radiotherapy with (n=45) or without (n=72) intracavitary radiotherapy. Local control, disease-free survival, overall survival and treatment-related toxicity were investigated. The median follow-up time was 75 months. The 5- and 10-year local control/disease-free survival/overall survival rates were 93/87/87% and 90/84/83%, respectively. Among 98 patients who had no residual disease and negative resection margin on surgical specimens, 32 (33%) received intracavitary radiotherapy and 66 (67%) did not. There were no differences in patient and tumor characteristics between patients treated with and without intracavitary radiotherapy. The 5-year local control rate for the non-intracavitary radiotherapy group was 93 versus 94% for the intracavitary radiotherapy group (P=0.564); the disease-free survival rate was 88 versus 94% (P=0.894); the overall survival rate was 95 versus 85% (P=0.106), respectively. Among all patients, there were 5% of Grade 3 or higher late toxicities. Patients with occult invasive cervical cancer discovered following simple hysterectomy could be treated safely and effectively with salvage radiotherapy. For patients with no residual disease and negative resection margin, intracavitary radiotherapy could be omitted. (author)

  20. The place radiotherapy alone with respect to surgery and radiotherapy in locally advanced vulva cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author report a study which aimed at evaluating the place or radiotherapy associated with surgery and of radiotherapy without surgery when taking into care locally advanced vulva cancers. The study is based on 46 cases. After 24 months, different aspects, such as recurrence and survival, have been assessed. It appears that there is no survival difference without recurrences between both sets. Short communication

  1. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45 G

  2. High-risk endometrial cancer may be benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy plus chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Wei Miao; Xiao-Hong Deng

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To present patterns of practice and outcomes in the adjuvant treatment of intermediate-and high-risk endometrial cancer.Methods:Retrospective data on 224 women with intermediate-risk and high-risk endometrial cancer from 1999 to 2006 were reviewed.All patients underwent surgical staging.Patterns of adjuvant treatment,consisting of pelvic radiotherapy,chemotherapy,and radiotherapy plus chemotherapy,were assessed.The 3-and 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method.Results:The difference in 5-year DSS rate was statistically significant between adjuvant group and non-adjuvant group (80.65% vs.63.80%,P=0.040).In 110 high-risk patients who underwent adjuvant treatment,both 5-year DSS rate and recurrent rate were significantly different in combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy group compared with radiotherapy alone and chemotherapy alone groups (DSS rate,P=0.049; recurrent rate,P=0.047).In 83 intermediate-risk women who underwent adjuvant treatment,there was no significant difference in 5-year DSS rate and recurrence rate among the combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy,radiotherapy alone and chemotherapy alone groups (DSS rate,P=0.776; recurrent rate,P=0.937).Conclusions:Adjuvant radiotherapy plus chemotherapy is associated with a higher 5-year DSS rate and lower recurrence rate compared with radiotherapy alone and chemotherapy alone in high-risk endometrial cancer patients.Patients with intermediate-risk endometrial cancer may be not likely to benefit from adjuvant combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  3. Faecal incontinence following radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Høyer, Morten; Lundby, Lilli;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Faecal incontinence (FI) after radiotherapy is a known phenomenon, but has received little attention to date. This article aimed to review current knowledge on faecal incontinence related to radiotherapy for prostate cancer. METHODS: PubMed was searched for English-language articles...... published from January 1966 to December 2009 using the primary keywords 'faecal incontinence', 'prostate cancer' and 'radiotherapy'. Prospective, retrospective and controlled trials reporting FI as a complication of radiotherapy for prostate cancer were included. The retrieved titles and abstracts were...... for this review. The incidence of faecal incontinence following radiotherapy for prostate cancer varied from 1.6% to 58%. The mechanism of faecal incontinence was not entirely clear but it is most likely due to injury to the nerve plexus of the rectal muscular layer. Correlation between rectal dose...

  4. Modelling beam transport and biological effectiveness to develop treatment planning for ion beam radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Grzanka, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy with carbon ions is a novel technique of cancer radiotherapy, applicable in particular to treating radioresistant tumours at difficult localisations. Therapy planning, where the medical physicist, following the medical prescription, finds the optimum distribution of cancer cells to be inactivated by their irradiation over the tumour volume, is a basic procedure of cancer radiotherapy. The main difficulty encountered in therapy planning for ion radiotherapy is to correctly account for the enhanced radiobiological effectiveness of ions in the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) region over the tumour volume. In this case, unlike in conventional radiotherapy with photon beams, achieving a uniform dose distribution over the tumour volume does not imply achieving uniform cancer cell inactivation. In this thesis, an algorithm of the basic element (kernel) of a treatment planning system (TPS) for carbon ion therapy is developed. The algorithm consists of a radiobiological part which suitably corrects for ...

  5. Dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Endres, Eugene J.; Parker, Brent C. [Physics Dept., Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Sormani, Maria Pia [Biostatistics Unit, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    Purpose: to investigate dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: all patients who underwent external-beam radiotherapy as part of treatment for localized prostate cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA, from May 2002 to November 2006 were extracted from the own database. From the cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), the absolute volumes (V-value) of intestinal cavity (IC) receiving 15, 30, and 45 Gy were extracted for each patient. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was prospectively scored at each weekly treatment visit according to CTC (common toxicity criteria) v2.0. The endpoint was the development of peak grade {>=} 2 diarrhea during RT. Various patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: 149 patients were included in the analysis, 112 (75.2%) treated with whole-pelvis intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) and 37 (24.8%) with prostate-only RT, including or not including, the seminal vesicles (PORT {+-} SV). 45 patients (30.2%) developed peak grade {>=} 2 diarrhea during treatment. At univariate analysis, IC-V{sub 15} and IC-V{sub 30}, but not IC-V{sub 45}, were correlated to the endpoint; at multivariate analysis, only IC-V{sub 15} (p = 0.047) along with peak acute proctitis (p = 0.041) was independently correlated with the endpoint. Conclusion: these data provide a novel and prostate treatment-specific ''upper limit'' DVH for IC. (orig.)

  6. Clinical Introduction of a Novel Liquid Fiducial Marker for Breathing Adapted Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers world-wide and the leading cause of cancer deaths. In locally advanced lung cancer, the recommended treatment is radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy. Lung cancer radiotherapy is a complex issue due to substantial uncertainties in treatment...... for the tumour position in lung cancer patients. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential benefit of a breathing adaptation technique, where patients hold their breath during treatment delivery. We found that this technique reduced both tumour motion and doses to risk organs. Finally, we investigated...

  7. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Icro Meattini; Sara Cecchini; Vanessa Di Cataldo; Calogero Saieva; Giulio Francolini; Vieri Scotti; Pierluigi Bonomo; Monica Mangoni; Daniela Greto; Jacopo Nori; Lorenzo Orzalesi; Donato Casella; Roberta Simoncini; Massimiliano Fambrini; Simonetta Bianchi

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (r...

  8. Short-course palliative radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hye; Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Won Taek; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dong Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho; Jeon, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for the palliation of uterine cervical cancer. Seventeen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix, who underwent palliative hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between January 2002 and June 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. RT was delivered to symptomatic lesions (both the primary mass and/or metastatic regional lymph nodes). The total dose was 20 to 25 Gy (median, 25 Gy) in 5 Gy daily fractions. The median follow-up duration was 12.2 months (range, 4 to 24 months). The median survival time was 7.8 months (range, 4 to 24 months). Vaginal bleeding was the most common presenting symptom followed by pelvic pain (9 patients). The overall response rates were 93.8% and 66.7% for vaginal bleeding control and pelvic pain, respectively. Nine patients did not have any acute side effects and 7 patients showed minor gastrointestinal toxicity. Only 1 patient had grade 3 diarrhea 1 week after completion of treatment, which was successfully treated conservatively. Late complications occurred in 4 patients; however, none of these were of grade 3 or higher severity. Short-course hypofractionated RT was effective and well tolerated as palliative treatment for uterine cervical cancer.

  9. Hypothyroidism After Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the long-term incidence and possible predictive factors for posttreatment hypothyroidism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Four hundred and eight sequential NPC patients who had received regular annual thyroid hormone surveys prospectively after radiotherapy were included in this study. Median patient age was 47.3 years, and 286 patients were male. Thyroid function was prospectively evaluated by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and serum free thyroxine (FT4) levels. Low FT4 levels indicated clinical hypothyroidism in this study. Results: With a median follow-up of 4.3 years (range, 0.54-19.7 years), the incidence of low FT4 level was 5.3%, 9.0%, and 19.1% at 3, 5, and 10 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Hypothyroidism was more common with early T stage (p = 0.044), female sex (p = 0.037), and three-dimensional conformal therapy with the altered fractionation technique (p = 0.005) after univariate analysis. N stage, chemotherapy, reirradiation, and neck electron boost did not affect the incidence of hypothyroidism. Younger age and conformal therapy were significant factors that determined clinical hypothyroidism after multivariate analysis. Overall, patients presented with a low FT4 level about 1 year after presenting with an elevated TSH level. Conclusion: Among our study group of NPC patients, 19.1% experienced clinical hypothyroidism by 10 years after treatment. Younger age and conformal therapy increased the risk of hypothyroidism. We suggest routine evaluation of thyroid function in NPC patients after radiotherapy. The impact of pituitary injury should be also considered.

  10. Non-randomized clinical study comparing chemotherapy plus radiotherapy with radiotherapy alone in neoadjuvant therapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoadjuvant therapy plays an important role for organ preservation and survival rate in the treatment of oral cancer. We clinically compared the effect of neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy in patients with oral cancer. We retrospectively examined 47 patients diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant therapy followed by curative surgery in the oral and maxillofacial surgery department of Ehime University Hospital. We divided them into two groups: radiotherapy alone (24 cases) and chemoradiotherapy (23 cases). The patients in the radiotherapy group underwent irradiation of 32.6±5.0 Gy (mean ±SD). The patients in the chemoradiotherapy group received a low-dose fraction of cisplatin (8 mg/mm2/day, 5 days a week; total dose: 139.4±67.1 mg) and 5-fluorouracil (300 mg/mm2/day, 5 days a week; total dose: 5,900±1,839.8 mg) combined with simultaneous irradiation of 31.0±3.2 Gy. None of the 24 patients had a complete response to radiotherapy alone and 12 (50%) had a partial response. Six (26%) of the 23 patients had a complete response to chemoradiotherapy and 12 (52%) had a partial response. The primary control rate (82.6%) to chemoradiotherapy was higher than that (67.5%) to radiotherapy alone although no significant difference was found. The 5-year survival rate was 64.3% in the radiotherapy group and 62.8% in the chemoradiotherapy group. The findings of the present study suggest that while the combination of radiation and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil in neoadjuvant therapy for oral cancer may not bring a significant benefit to improve survival rate, the primary local control rate is improved in comparison with radiotherapy alone. (author)

  11. Radiotherapy for breast cancer: The predictable consequences of an unmet need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Danielle; Knaul, Felicia M; Lui, Tracey Y; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy has had a transformative impact on the treatment of breast cancer, but is unavailable to the majority of breast cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries. In these settings, where many women present with advanced disease at an age when they are often the primary caregiver for their families, the lack of access to radiotherapy is particularly devastating. Until recently, this disparity has been largely neglected in the medical literature and it had been difficult to convince governments, industry, and policymakers of the importance of investing in radiotherapy, as well as broader cancer control strategies, in low-resource settings. The Lancet Radiotherapy Commission report published in 2015 challenged many assumptions about the affordability of radiotherapy treatment. Data from the Commission is presented here to support radiotherapy investment for breast cancer and discuss how the morbidity and premature mortality among adult women caused by breast cancer has a huge detrimental effect on both the health sector and the economy. PMID:27484014

  12. Outcome of 289 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 289 patients who were treated either by radiotherapy alone (168 patients) or radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (121 patients) from Dec. 1999 to Dec. 2002 were entered into the database for analysis. Pathological types: squamous cancer (152), adenocarcinoma(74), squamoadenocarcinoma(2) and other types (2). 24 showed cancer unclassificable and 35 were diagnosed without pathological proof. Stages: 74 had III A and 215 III B stage disease. Among the 121 patients treated with combined modality, 24 were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, 78 radiotherapy after chemotherapy(C + R), and 19 radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy(R + C). In patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy or C + R, 38 received consolidation chemotherapy after induction treatment. Results: The 1-, 3-, 5-year overall survival, and the median survival were: 45% , 16% , 8%, and 16.2 months for all patients; 57%, 27%, 11%, and 21.7 months for stage IIIA; 41%, 12%, 7%, and 15.3 months for IIIB. By logrank test, clinical stage, KPS performance, tumor volume, hemoglobin level before treatment, consolidation chemotherapy, radiation dose, and response to treatment showed statistically dramatic impact on overall survival. The overall survival rate and median survival time were slightly higher in the combined group than in the radiotherapy alone group, but the difference is statistically insignificant. In Cox multivariable regression, stage and consolidation chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors; KPS performance, radiation dose, and response to treatment were at the margin of statistical significance. Esophagitis and pneumonitis of Grade II or higher were 24% and 8%, respectively. Failure sites included in the thorax(41%), outside of thorax(48%), and both in and outside the thorax(11%). There was no difference between the

  13. Preliminary Study of Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    From March 1997 to November 1999, 45 patients with lung cancer were treated by astereotactic radiotherapy, with 15 cases treated by a stereotactic radiotherapy alone, and 30 cases by the external radiotherapy plus stereotactic radiotherapy. The clinical target volume was 1.89-187. 26 cm3 with the median being 18. 17 cm3. The doses of plan target volume (PTV) edge was 16-30 Gy/2-3 times and the doses of center was 120 % to 150 % of PTV edge doses. The overall response rate was 84.4 % (38/45), with 11 complete response (CR) and 27 partial response (PR). This study confirmed that the stereotactic radiotherapy is a safe and effective therapy for lung cancer. For those early-stage patients who can tolerate neither operation nor even conventional radiotherapy for various reasons, it can both achieve therapeutic purpose and improve quality of life.

  14. Regional radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: is the issue solved?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause, M; Petersen, C; Offersen, B V;

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy is the treatment standard for breast cancer with lymph node metastases after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. The inclusion of regional lymph nodes into the treatment volumes has been a question in recent clinical trials. Their impact on treatment standards and open...

  15. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for organ-confined prostate cancer: is less more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Greco, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Moderate hypofractionation of radiotherapy is widely considered a viable alternative to conventional fractionation for the treatment of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, but stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is rapidly emerging as a novel treatment modality for this disease. Advances in treatment planning, image guidance, target position reproducibility and on-line tracking, coupled with a compelling radiobiological rationale, have promoted SBRT as a safe and effective treatment. Dose escalation to the tumour tissue through a decreased number of radiation fractions improves patient comfort and convenience, as well as treatment cost-effectiveness, compared with conventional radiotherapy regimens. Several clinical trials have investigated moderate and extreme hypofractionation of radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer. Evidence is accumulating which suggests that the use of moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy can be recommended regardless of cancer risk group. Regimens of extremely hypofractionated radiotherapy have shown very good short-term efficacy and safety outcomes, but appropriately designed trials with extended follow-up monitoring are required to confirm long-term outcomes. PMID:27296648

  16. CD44 Expression Predicts Local Recurrence after Radiotherapy in Larynx Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Monique C.; Pramana, Jimmy; van der Wal, Jacqueline E.; Lacko, Martin; Peutz-Kootstra, Carine J.; Takes, Robert P.; Kaanders, Johannes H.; van der Laan, Bernard F.; Wachters, Jasper; Jansen, Jeroen C.; Rasch, Coen R.; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F.; Grenman, Reidar; Hoebers, Frank J.; Schuuring, Ed; van den Brekel, Michiel W.; Begg, Adrian C.; de Jong, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To find molecular markers from expression profiling data to predict recurrence of laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy. Experimental Design: We generated gene expression data on pre-treatment biopsies from 52 larynx cancer patients. Patients developing a local recurrence were matched for T-s

  17. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment planning and target volume delineation of radiotherapy in the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer complicated by atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the impact of PET/CT on the treatment planning and target volume delineation of radiotherapy in patients with NSCLC complicated by atelectasis. Methods: Pre-treatment PET/CT scans were performed in 36 patients with pathologically proven NSCLC complicated by atelectasis of different severity undergoing curative 3D-CRT planning. Clinical staging before and after PET/CT was compared and the change of treatment plan was evaluated. The target volumes were delineated by CT and PET/CT. Results: PET/CT results changed the clinical staging in 18 (50.0%, 18/36) patients. PET/CT identified distant metastatic diseases in 11 (30.6%, 11/36) patients, thus excluding their eligibility for curative 3D-CRT. Of these 11 patients, managements were changed to palliative radiotherapy in 3 patients, chemotherapy in 7 patients and best supportive therapy in 1 patient. In the 25 patients with curative 3D-CRT, PET/CT altered the radiotherapy volume in 21 cases, including 12 with volume reduction, 7 with volume enlargement and 2 with location change. Three patients were given additional conventional radiotherapy, since PET/CT indicated supraclavicular nodal metastases. In the 3 patients with palliative 3D-CRT, 2 had target volume reduction and 1 had target volume enlargement after PET/CT. Conclusions: PET/CT may play a role in the management of patients with NSCLC complicated by atelectasis. It is also helpful for accurate delineation of target volume in 3D-CRT treatment planning. (authors)

  18. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels

  19. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging during radiotherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer - Treatment response assessment using different segmentation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted;

    2015-01-01

    distribution of ADC values. This study evaluates: 1) different segmentation methods; and 2) how they affect assessment of tumor ADC value during RT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eleven patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent MRI three times during their RT: prior to start of RT (PRERT), two weeks......2-weighted MR images using the Jaccard similarity index (JSI). ADC values from segmented volumes were compared and changes of ADC values during therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: Significant difference between the four volumes (GTV, DWIcluster, DWISD4 and DWIregion) was found (p

  20. Impact of New Treatment Technology on Patient Protection in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction of new technologies in radiotherapy has improved patients’ outcomes dramatically. Modern radiotherapy permits precise irradiation of tumours with minimum side effects. However, the methods are often associated with complex procedures with many steps, requiring careful adjustment and parameter setting in each individual patient. Rapid expansion of these new technologies in clinical practice may introduce increased risk of accidental exposure. Education and training for the personnel involved in the treatment procedure are essential for patient protection. These new technologies have successfully improved the dose distribution, resulting in a significant reduction of undesirable radiation to the outside target volume. However, the area which receives relatively low dose radiation may be increased, which might increase the risk of secondary cancer. Health care professionals should also be aware of the possible risk and consider the necessary procedures for patient protection when new technologies are introduced in clinical practice. (author)

  1. Potential clinical predictors of outcome after postoperative radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on local control and survival after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with special focus on waiting and overall treatment times. For 100 NSCLC patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy, overall, relapse-free and metastases-free survival was retrospectively analysed using Kaplan-Meier methods. The impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on treatment outcome was evaluated in uni- and multivariate Cox regression analysis. No statistically significant difference between the survival curves of the groups with a short versus a long time interval between surgery and radiotherapy could be shown in uni- or multivariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in overall survival times for patients with prolonged overall radiotherapy treatment times exceeding 42 days (16 vs. 36 months) and for patients with radiation-induced pneumonitis (8 vs. 29 months). Radiation-induced pneumonitis and prolonged radiation treatment times significantly reduced overall survival after adjuvant radiotherapy in NSCLC patients. The negative impact of a longer radiotherapy treatment time could be shown for the first time in an adjuvant setting. The hypothesis of a negative impact of longer waiting times prior to commencement of adjuvant radiotherapy could not be confirmed. (orig.)

  2. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kylie H. [School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S., E-mail: Simon.Lo@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  3. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications

  4. External beam radiotherapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indications for and techniques of external beam radiotherapy for thyroid tumours can be clearly defined in relation to the histological type of tumour and stage of disease. Localized treatment for carcinoma can easily be accomplished as can wide field irradiation for lymphoma. However, when either extensive lateral neck disease is present or tumour extends into the superior mediastinum, it becomes difficult to adequately encompass the required volume without including the spinal cord. Several techniques are described which overcome this problem and thus allow a radical dose to be given without significant risk of transverse myelitis

  5. NTCP models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: The role of dosimetric and clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this multicentre prospective study was to develop multivariable logistic regression models to make valid predictions about the risk of moderate-to-severe patient-rated xerostomia (XERM6) and sticky saliva 6 months (STICM6) after primary treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and materials: The study population was composed of 178 consecutive HNC patients treated with IMRT. All patients were included in a standard follow up programme in which acute and late side effects and quality of life were prospectively assessed, prior to, during and after treatment. The primary endpoints were XERM6 and STICM6 as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 after completing IMRT. Organs at risk (OARs) potentially involved in salivary function were delineated on planning-CT, including the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands and the minor glands in the soft palate, cheeks and lips. Patients with moderate-to-severe xerostomia or sticky saliva, respectively, at baseline were excluded. The optimal number of variables for a multivariate logistic regression model was determined using a bootstrapping method. Results: Eventually, 51.6% of the cases suffered from XERM6. The multivariate analysis showed that the mean contralateral parotid gland dose and baseline xerostomia (none vs. a bit) were the most important predictors for XERM6. For the multivariate NTCP model, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was 0.68 (95% CI 0.60–0.76) and the discrimination slope was 0.10, respectively. Calibration was good with a calibration slope of 1.0. At 6 months after IMRT, 35.6% of the cases reported STICM6. The mean contralateral submandibular gland dose, the mean sublingual dose and the mean dose to the minor salivary glands located in the soft palate were most predictive for STICM6. For this model, the AUC was 0.70 (95% CI 0.61–0.78) and the discrimination slope was 0

  6. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  7. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  8. The value of regional nodal radiotherapy (dose/volume) in the treatment of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: an RTOG analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether or not the traditional practice of including all thoracic regional nodal areas in the radiotherapy volume in the treatment of unresectable lung cancer is of any therapeutic benefit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,705 patients from four large RTOG trials (78-11, 79-17, 83-11, 84-07) were analyzed for this purpose. Each of these trials had data on dose delivered to the nodal regions and assessment of nodal borders. The nodes were separated into mediastinal, contralateral hilar, ipsilateral hilar, and supraclavicular. Each node site was assessed for progression, defined as in-field or out-of-field, at the node site. In patients with adequate nodal field borders, the results were also analyzed according to the dose delivered. RESULTS: The majority (74%) of patients were between the age of 55 to 75. Forty-six percent of patients had KPS of 60 to 80 and 52% KPS of 90 to 100. Sixty percent of patients had a weight loss of less than 5%, and 40% had a weight loss of over 5% six months prior to diagnosis. Major variations from protocol in defining field borders (unacceptable field borders) were lowest for ipsilateral hilum ((42(727))) and the highest for mediastinal borders ((158(743))). Three groups had statistically significant differences in outcome (progression) between the per protocol and the unacceptable per protocol: ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders), 14% versus 26% (p = 0.03); dose to mediastinal nodes in CALGB eligible patients, 9% versus 19% (p = 0.02); and ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders) for high-dose patients assigned to greater than or equal to 69.6 Gy, 14% versus 31% (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that inclusion of the ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes affect outcome in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer. Exclusion of the other thoracic lymph node regions did not affect outcome in this study. These findings have important implications for combined modality therapy and three

  9. Alternating chemo-radiotherapy in bladder cancer: A conservative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orsatti, M.; Franzone, P.; Giudici, S. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-08-30

    The aim of this Phase II study was to determine a bladder-sparing treatment in patients with invasive bladder cancer, allowing a better quality of life. Objectives were to test toxicity and disease-free and overall survival of patients given an alternated chemo-radiotherapy definitive treatment. Seventy-six patients with bladder cancer Stage T1G3 through T4 N0 M0 were entered in the same chemotherapy regimen (Cisplatin 20 mg/mq and 5-Fluorouracil 200 mg/mq daily for 5 days) alternated with different radiotherapy scheduling, the first 18 patients received two cycles of 20 Gy/10 fractions/12 days each; the second group of 58 patients received two cycles of 25 Gy/10 fractions/12 days each (the last 21 patients received Methotrexate 40 mg/mq instead of 5-Fluorouracil). A clinical complete response was observed in 57 patients (81%), partial response in 7 patients (10%), and a nonresponse in 6 patients (9%). At a median follow-up of 45 months, 33 patients (47%) were alive and free of tumor. The 6-year overall survival and progression-free survival was 42% and 40%, respectively. Systemic side effects were mild, while a moderate or severe local toxicity was observed in 14 patients and 13 patients (about 20%), respectively. Our conservative combination treatment allowed bladder-sparing in a high rate of patients and resulted in a survival comparable to that reported after radical cystectomy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Advanced head and neck cancer: Long-term results of chemo-radiotherapy, complications and induction of second malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Munker, Reinhold; Purmale, L.; Aydemir, Ü.; Reitmeier, M.; Pohlmann, H.; Schorer, H.; Hartenstein, R.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Chemo-radiotherapy is superior to radiotherapy alone in the treatment of advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. The long-term treatment results, the induction of second malignant tumors, and other long-term toxicities are not well defined. Patients and Methods: 100 consecutive patients with advanced head and neck cancer who were treated at our center were studied. Treatment results, survival, the occurrence of late complications, and second malignant tumors (SMT) were investig...

  11. A practical approach on radioprotection in the radiotherapy treatment of thyroid cancer; Uma abordagem pratica sobre radioprotecao no tratamento de radioiodoterapia para cancer de tireoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Janaina D.S., E-mail: janaina.mendes@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA/HCI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kubo, Ana Luiza S.L., E-mail: analuslima@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rebelo, Ana Maria de O., E-mail: arebelo55@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    There are several protocols for the treatment and follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer. All of them gather evidence on the evolution and treatment and try to establish a treatment standard. However, there are few occasions in which this issue is addressed from the standpoint of radiological protection, as the ICRP 94 and TECDOC 1806. The focus of our work is to demonstrate that simple actions in the routine of workers in the Nuclear Medicine Service interfere positively in the radiation protection of all those involved in the patient's care, also optimizing their well being during the procedure. In the current model, the patient participates in an interview with nurses, doctors and physicists, before admission, and receives written and verbal information about the treatment procedures in order to diminish his anxiety and clarify possible doubts. In all the cases under hospital care there were no instances of high exposure (above 1mSv/month or 6 mSv/year) among the staff. With the participation of all involved, there was an escalating improvement in the reduction of complications generated by the patient's anxiety, waste decrease providing better comfort during hospital care) and minimization of occupational hazard affecting the staff in charge of the patient's room maintenance after hospital leave. (author)

  12. Analysis of health related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, one year after treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone versus EBRT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of cancer diagnosed among North American men. Most patients present with localized disease, which can be effectively treated with a variety of different modalities. These are associated with widely different acute and late effects, which can be both physical and psychological in nature. HRQoL concerns are therefore important for these patients for selecting between the different treatment options. One year after receiving radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer 117 patients with localized prostate cancer were invited to participate in a quality of life (QoL) self reported survey. 111 patients consented and participated in the survey, one year after completion of their treatment. 88 patients received EBRT and 23 received EBRT and HDRBT. QoL was compared in the two groups by using a modified version of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) survey instrument. One year after completion of treatment, there was no significant difference in overall QoL scores between the two groups of patients. For each component of the modified FACT-P survey, i.e. physical, social/family, emotional, and functional well-being; there were no statistically significant differences in the mean scores between the two groups. In prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT alone versus combined EBRT and HDRBT, there was no significant difference in the QoL scores at one year post-treatment

  13. Predicting toxicity in radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, Valeria; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Valdagni, Riccardo; Rancati, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    This comprehensive review addresses most organs at risk involved in planning optimization for prostate cancer. It can be considered an update of a previous educational review that was published in 2009 (Fiorino et al., 2009). The literature was reviewed based on PubMed and MEDLINE database searches (from January 2009 up to September 2015), including papers in press; for each section/subsection, key title words were used and possibly combined with other more general key-words (such as radiotherapy, dose-volume effects, NTCP, DVH, and predictive model). Publications generally dealing with toxicity without any association with dose-volume effects or correlations with clinical risk factors were disregarded, being outside the aim of the review. A focus was on external beam radiotherapy, including post-prostatectomy, with conventional fractionation or moderate hypofractionation (<4Gy/fraction); extreme hypofractionation is the topic of another paper in this special issue. Gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity are the most investigated endpoints, with quantitative data published in the last 5years suggesting both a dose-response relationship and the existence of a number of clinical/patient related risk factors acting as dose-response modifiers. Some results on erectile dysfunction, bowel toxicity and hematological toxicity are also presented. PMID:27068274

  14. Trends in the Application of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer With 1 to 3 Positive Axillary Nodes and Tumors ≤5 cm in the Modern Treatment Era: A Retrospective Korean Breast Cancer Society Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jee Suk; Choi, Jung Eun; Park, Min Ho; Jung, Sung Hoo; Choi, Byung Ock; Park, Hyung Seok; Park, Seho; Kim, Yong Bae

    2016-05-01

    Despite high-level evidence, the benefit of postmastectomy RT in these patients in recent years has not been fully elucidated. We investigated postmastectomy radiotherapy (RT) use and evaluated clinicopathologic and treatment factors influencing RT use in Korean women with pT1-2N1 breast cancer.We identified women diagnosed with pT1-2N1 breast cancer between 1994 and 2009 using the Korean Breast Cancer Registry. Factors associated with RT use were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. The median follow-up was 95 months.Of the 6196 women, 11.9% underwent postmastectomy RT. RT was applied more frequently in women with 3 positive lymph nodes (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.69) and larger tumors (OR per centimeter, 1.10). RT use was not significantly associated with well-established risk factors (e.g., tumor grade, hormone receptor status, and lymphovascular space invasion). Although RT utilization increased gradually during the study period (OR per year, 1.07), factors associated with RT were similar over time. The estimated 5-year overall survival increased significantly from 84.1% in 1994 to 2000 to 94.6% in 2005 to 2009.This population-based analysis revealed that the indications for postmastectomy RT in pT1-2N1 breast cancer in Korea are based solely on conventional anatomical factors, although their survival has increased significantly in the modern treatment era. There is a significant unmet need for better risk stratification in these patients and for tailored RT with the incorporation of tumor biology-associated factors. PMID:27175662

  15. Breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From March 1987 through September 1989, a total of 31 patients with early breast cancer were treated with breat-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. As of February 1989, all patients are alive without recurrence. Cosmetic results were satisfactory (excellent; 25%, good; 75%) at 1 year after radiotherapy. Mild radiation pneumonitis requiring medication developed in 3 patients. (author)

  16. Large fraction radiotherapy plus misonidazole for treatment of advanced lung cancer: report of a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From August 1978 through December 1979, 51 patients with advanced non-oat cell carcinoma of the lung were enrolled in a Phase I/II trial sponsored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) employing misonidazole (a 2-nitroimidazole) as a hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation. The purpose of this study was to test drug and radiation tolerance and to assess the short term efficacy of this unconventional treatment. Tumor doses of 600 rad were given twice weekly for three weeks for a total of 3600 rad, preceded four to six hours by misonidazole in a dose of 2 gm/m2 or 1.75 gm/m2, administered orally. Forty-nine patients were evaluable. Serious toxicity from this treatment was rare. Grade 2 or 3 peripheral neuro-toxicity occurred in eight of 24 patients (33%) with drug doses of 2 gm/m2 and in four of 26 patients (15%) who received 1.75 gm/m2. Grade 3 or 4 central nervous system toxicity occurred in two patients. Two patients developed serious late radiation complications: one patient had a transverse myelitis that appeared one year following delivery of 3600 rad to the spinal cord; a second patient developed a tracheoesophageal fistula and pericarditis eight months following treatment. Objective responses were reported in 67% of patients (complete in 18%); 70% of the patients died with a median survival time of nine months. Of 32 patients eligible for 12 month follow-up, 34% survived more than one year. Patterns of relapse after initial treatment and comparison with results from other RTOG trials using conventional fractionation are discussed

  17. Large fraction radiotherapy plus misonidazole for treatment of advanced lung cancer: report of a phase I/II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.R. (Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology, St. Louis, MO); Perez, C.A.; Phillips, T.L.; Concannon, J.P.; Carella, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    From August 1978 through December 1979, 51 patients with advanced non-oat cell carcinoma of the lung were enrolled in a Phase I/II trial sponsored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) employing misonidazole (a 2-nitroimidazole) as a hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation. The purpose of this study was to test drug and radiation tolerance and to assess the short term efficacy of this unconventional treatment. Tumor doses of 600 rad were given twice weekly for three weeks for a total of 3600 rad, preceded four to six hours by misonidazole in a dose of 2 gm/m/sup 2/ or 1.75 gm/m/sup 2/, administered orally. Forty-nine patients were evaluable. Serious toxicity from this treatment was rare. Grade 2 or 3 peripheral neuro-toxicity occurred in eight of 24 patients (33%) with drug doses of 2 gm/m/sup 2/ and in four of 26 patients (15%) who received 1.75 gm/m/sup 2/. Grade 3 or 4 central nervous system toxicity occurred in two patients. Two patients developed serious late radiation complications: one patient had a transverse myelitis that appeared one year following delivery of 3600 rad to the spinal cord; a second patient developed a tracheoesophageal fistula and pericarditis eight months following treatment. Objective responses were reported in 67% of patients (complete in 18%); 70% of the patients died with a median survival time of nine months. Of 32 patients eligible for 12 month follow-up, 34% survived more than one year. Patterns of relapse after initial treatment and comparison with results from other RTOG trials using conventional fractionation are discussed.

  18. Hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for second cancer reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besserer Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose A model for carcinoma and sarcoma induction was used to study the dependence of carcinogenesis after radiotherapy on fractionation. Materials and methods A cancer induction model for radiotherapy doses including fractionation was used to model carcinoma and sarcoma induction after a radiation treatment. For different fractionation schemes the dose response relationships were obtained. Tumor induction was studied as a function of dose per fraction. Results If it is assumed that the tumor is treated up to the same biologically equivalent dose it was found that large dose fractions could decrease second cancer induction. The risk decreases approximately linear with increasing fraction size and is more pronounced for sarcoma induction. Carcinoma induction decreases by around 10% per 1 Gy increase in fraction dose. Sarcoma risk is decreased by about 15% per 1 Gy increase in fractionation. It is also found that tissue which is irradiated using large dose fractions to dose levels lower than 10% of the target dose potentially develop less sarcomas when compared to tissues irradiated to all dose levels. This is not observed for carcinoma induction. Conclusions It was found that carcinoma as well as sarcoma risk decreases with increasing fractionation dose. The reduction of sarcoma risk is even more pronounced than carcinoma risk. Hypofractionation is potentially beneficial with regard to second cancer induction.

  19. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiotherapy (EBRT is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method.

  20. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  1. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, M.L., E-mail: m.bondar@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ahmad, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Programme of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia); Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To design and evaluate individualized nonadaptive and online-adaptive strategies based on a pretreatment established motion model for the highly deformable target volume in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 14 patients, nine to ten variable bladder filling computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired at pretreatment and after 40 Gy. Individualized model-based internal target volumes (mbITVs) accounting for the cervix and uterus motion due to bladder volume changes were generated by using a motion-model constructed from two pretreatment CT scans (full and empty bladder). Two individualized strategies were designed: a nonadaptive strategy, using an mbITV accounting for the full-range of bladder volume changes throughout the treatment; and an online-adaptive strategy, using mbITVs of bladder volume subranges to construct a library of plans. The latter adapts the treatment online by selecting the plan-of-the-day from the library based on the measured bladder volume. The individualized strategies were evaluated by the seven to eight CT scans not used for mbITVs construction, and compared with a population-based approach. Geometric uniform margins around planning cervix-uterus and mbITVs were determined to ensure adequate coverage. For each strategy, the percentage of the cervix-uterus, bladder, and rectum volumes inside the planning target volume (PTV), and the clinical target volume (CTV)-to-PTV volume (volume difference between PTV and CTV) were calculated. Results: The margin for the population-based approach was 38 mm and for the individualized strategies was 7 to 10 mm. Compared with the population-based approach, the individualized nonadaptive strategy decreased the CTV-to-PTV volume by 48% {+-} 6% and the percentage of bladder and rectum inside the PTV by 5% to 45% and 26% to 74% (p < 0.001), respectively. Replacing the individualized nonadaptive strategy by an online-adaptive, two-plan library further decreased the percentage of

  2. [18F]Choline PET/CT and stereotactic body radiotherapy on treatment decision making of oligometastatic prostate cancer patients: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new entity of patients with recurrent prostate cancer limited to a small number of active metastatic lesions is having growing interest: the oligometastatic patients. Patients with oligometastatic disease could eventually be managed by treating all the active lesions with local therapy, i.e. either surgery or ablative stereotactic body radiotherapy. This study aims to assess the impact of [18F]Choline ([18F]FMCH) PET/CT and the use stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients (pts) with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Twenty-nine pts with oligometastatic PCa (≤3 synchronous active lesions detected with [18F]FMCHPET/CT) were treated with repeated salvage SBRT until disease progression (development of > three active synchronous metastases). Primary endpoint was systemic therapy-free survival measured from the baseline [18F]FMCHPET/CT. A total of 45 lesions were treated with SBRT. After a median follow-up of 11.5 months (range 3–40 months), 20 pts were still in the study and did not receive any systemic therapy. Nine pts started systemic therapy, and the median time of the primary endpoint was 39.7 months (CI 12.20–62.14 months). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was recorded. Repeated salvage [18F]FMCHPET/CT-guided SBRT is well tolerated and could defer the beginning of systemic therapy in selected patients with oligometastatic PCa

  3. A dual model HU conversion from MRI intensity values within and outside of bone segment for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korhonen, Juha, E-mail: juha.p.korhonen@hus.fi [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Kapanen, Mika [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Medical Physics, Tampere University Hospital, POB-2000, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Keyriläinen, Jani; Seppälä, Tiina; Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The lack of electron density information in magnetic resonance images (MRI) poses a major challenge for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). In this study the authors convert MRI intensity values into Hounsfield units (HUs) in the male pelvis and thus enable accurate MRI-based RTP for prostate cancer patients with varying tissue anatomy and body fat contents. Methods: T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}*-weighted MRI intensity values and standard computed tomography (CT) image HUs in the male pelvis were analyzed using image data of 10 prostate cancer patients. The collected data were utilized to generate a dual model HU conversion technique from MRI intensity values of the single image set separately within and outside of contoured pelvic bones. Within the bone segment local MRI intensity values were converted to HUs by applying a second-order polynomial model. This model was tuned for each patient by two patient-specific adjustments: MR signal normalization to correct shifts in absolute intensity level and application of a cutoff value to accurately represent low density bony tissue HUs. For soft tissues, such as fat and muscle, located outside of the bone contours, a threshold-based segmentation method without requirements for any patient-specific adjustments was introduced to convert MRI intensity values into HUs. The dual model HU conversion technique was implemented by constructing pseudo-CT images for 10 other prostate cancer patients. The feasibility of these images for RTP was evaluated by comparing HUs in the generated pseudo-CT images with those in standard CT images, and by determining deviations in MRI-based dose distributions compared to those in CT images with 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the anisotropic analytical algorithm and 360° volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with the Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm. Results: The average HU differences between the constructed pseudo-CT images and standard CT images of each

  4. A dual model HU conversion from MRI intensity values within and outside of bone segment for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The lack of electron density information in magnetic resonance images (MRI) poses a major challenge for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). In this study the authors convert MRI intensity values into Hounsfield units (HUs) in the male pelvis and thus enable accurate MRI-based RTP for prostate cancer patients with varying tissue anatomy and body fat contents. Methods: T1/T2*-weighted MRI intensity values and standard computed tomography (CT) image HUs in the male pelvis were analyzed using image data of 10 prostate cancer patients. The collected data were utilized to generate a dual model HU conversion technique from MRI intensity values of the single image set separately within and outside of contoured pelvic bones. Within the bone segment local MRI intensity values were converted to HUs by applying a second-order polynomial model. This model was tuned for each patient by two patient-specific adjustments: MR signal normalization to correct shifts in absolute intensity level and application of a cutoff value to accurately represent low density bony tissue HUs. For soft tissues, such as fat and muscle, located outside of the bone contours, a threshold-based segmentation method without requirements for any patient-specific adjustments was introduced to convert MRI intensity values into HUs. The dual model HU conversion technique was implemented by constructing pseudo-CT images for 10 other prostate cancer patients. The feasibility of these images for RTP was evaluated by comparing HUs in the generated pseudo-CT images with those in standard CT images, and by determining deviations in MRI-based dose distributions compared to those in CT images with 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the anisotropic analytical algorithm and 360° volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with the Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm. Results: The average HU differences between the constructed pseudo-CT images and standard CT images of each test patient

  5. Diffusion Weighted MRI as a predictive tool for effect of radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars;

    Diffusion weighted MRI has shown great potential in diagnostic cancer imaging and may also have value for monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy. Patients with advanced cervical cancer are treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. This study evaluates the value of DW......-MRI for predicting outcome of patients with advanced cervical cancer at time of brachytherapy. Volume of hyper-intensity on highly diffusion sensitive images and resulting ADC value for treatment responders and non-responders is compared. The change of ADC and volume of hyper-intensity over time of BT is also...

  6. Radiotherapy in the treatment of ameloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a lack of well-documented evidence in the literature concerning the relative radioresponsiveness or radioresistance of ameloblastomas, although they are generally considered radioresistant. Most of the previous papers referring to this subject lack acceptable histopathologic proof of the diagnosis, adequate radiotherapeutic data, and/or follow-up information; many predate the use of megavoltage irradiation. The present article reports 5 cases of ameloblastoma that were treated by radiotherapy, 3 by megavoltage irradiation. All have been confirmed histologically by an oral pathologist, all have adequate radiotherapeutic data and, with one exception, adequate follow-up information. In addition, the reasons for our present lack of knowledge of this subject are discussed; objective criteria are presented for evaluating the results of radiotherapy on ameloblastomas; the only other series of ameloblastomas treated by megavoltage irradiation is analyzed. Although radiotherapy can reduce the size of an ameloblastoma, primarily that part of the tumor which has expanded the jaw or broken into the soft tissues, it does not appear to be an appropriate treatment for an operable ameloblastoma. Its main use is in inoperable cases, primarily in the posterior maxilla. (author)

  7. Surgery vs. radiotherapy in localized prostate cancer. Which is best?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery and radiotherapy are currently accepted alternatives for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. In the absence of relevant randomized trials no decision regarding the superiority of any of the given approaches can be made. Up to now several cohort-based approaches indicate similar outcomes for both treatments. Based on a new population based approach, Merglen and co-workers recently concluded that surgery would offer the best chance of long-term control in terms of 10-year survival for T1–T3 prostate cancer patients. Unfortunately the strength of this trial is limited by several shortcomings. Most importantly, issues of radiation dosage have not been taken into account. In addition, several relevant parameters including Gleason score and PSA are not well balanced between the arms and the assignment to arbitrary risk groups does not reflect the real biological behaviour. Thus, the data provided do not support the strong conclusion issued by the authors. Based on the data available, surgery and radiotherapy still have to be considered as equally effective

  8. Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix uteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkawa, R.; Takamizawa, H. (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Arai, T.; Morita, S.

    1981-03-01

    Investigations of sexual consciousness and sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix uteri were performed on patients of middle and old ages by questionnaires and questioning by doctors, and the following results were obtained. 1. Before radiotherapy, sexual activity was most prominent in their twenties and thirties. However, patients who were in fifties when this study was performed had most active sexual lives during the ages from 35 to 50 years. 2. Frequencies of sexual intercourse decreased markedly just before radiotherapy, and many patients received radiotherapy when sexual activity fell. 3. 32% of the patients have not experienced sexual intercourse after radiotherapy. 4. Decreases in the sex urge, sexuality, vaginal discharge, and frequency of sexual intercourse after radiotherapy were recognized in 77%, 77%, 70%, and 93% respectively. 5. Patients who became unwilling to maintain sexual lives after radiotherapy because of fear about recurrence or aggravation of cancer were 38% by questionaires and 49% by questioning by doctors. 6. Pains on sexual intercourse were found in 69% by questionaires and 49% by questionning by doctors. Most pains occurred at penis insertion and was thought to be due to atrophy and inflammation of vagina and external genitalia in most cases. 7. Both vaginal damage and sexual dysfunction in patients with radiotherapy following surgery for cancer of the cervix uteri, in patients with radiotherapy alone for cancer of the cervix uteri, and in patients with radiotherapy following surgery for cancer of the ovary and corpus uteri were marked, modest and mild, respectively. 8. Vaginal damage score was higher in patients treated more than 5 years before than those less than 2 years ago, but there were no differences in sexual dysfunction score between both groups.

  9. Eating As Treatment (EAT) study protocol: a stepped-wedge, randomised controlled trial of a health behaviour change intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Ben; McCarter, Kristen; Baker, Amanda; Wolfenden, Luke; Wratten, Chris; Bauer, Judith; Beck, Alison; McElduff, Patrick; Halpin, Sean; Carter, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintaining adequate nutrition for Head and Neck Cancer (HNC) patients is challenging due to both the malignancy and the rigours of radiation treatment. As yet, health behaviour interventions designed to maintain or improve nutrition in patients with HNC have not been evaluated. The proposed trial builds on promising pilot data, and evaluates the effectiveness of a dietitian-delivered health behaviour intervention to reduce malnutrition in patients with HNC undergoing radiotherapy: Eating As Treatment (EAT). Methods and analysis A stepped-wedge cluster randomised design will be used. All recruitment hospitals begin in the control condition providing treatment as usual. In a randomly generated order, oncology staff at each hospital will receive 2 days of training in EAT before switching to the intervention condition. Training will be supplemented by ongoing supervision, coaching and a 2-month booster training provided by the research team. EAT is based on established behaviour change counselling methods, including motivational interviewing, cognitive–behavioural therapy, and incorporates clinical practice change theory. It is designed to improve motivation to eat despite a range of barriers (pain, mucositis, nausea, reduced or no saliva, taste changes and appetite loss), and to provide patients with practical behaviour change strategies. EAT will be delivered by dietitians during their usual consultations. 400 patients with HNC (nasopharynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx, oral cavity or larynx), aged 18+, undergoing radiotherapy (>60 Gy) with curative intent, will be recruited from radiotherapy departments at 5 Australian sites. Assessments will be conducted at 4 time points (first and final week of radiotherapy, 4 and 12 weeks postradiotherapy). The primary outcome will be a nutritional status assessment. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval from all relevant bodies has been granted. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer

  10. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer I

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlmayer, F.; Sautter-Bihl, M.-L.; Budach, W.; Dunst, J.; Fastner, G.; Feyer, P.; Fietkau, R; Haase, W.; Harms, W.; Souchon, R; Wenz, F.; Sauer, R.; ,

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following b...

  11. Radiotherapy professionals faced with the obligation of treatments safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of a major accident in Epinal (2006), followed by one in Toulouse (2007), led the Ministry of Health to mobilize the whole actors in radiotherapy in order to define national measures intended to improve health care security. Compiled in the so-called 'road map', these measures were presented in November 2007, and implemented in the 2009-2013 cancer programme. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) undertook a study aiming at assessing the effects of the above-mentioned measures on organization and safety management of radiotherapy facilities, but also on treatment achievement procedures and health professionals. More specifically, IRSN sought to examine the ability of health professionals to take into account new safety demands and to adapt their practices accordingly. With these purposes objectives, a qualitative study using the methods of ergonomics and sociology of organizations was completed in 2009-2010. The results of the study presented in this report show an effective improvement of health care safety along with a variable integration of safety measures depending on radiotherapy facilities and units. In particular, integration depends on 1) the governance mode of the health care facility, more or less conducive to promoting safety, 2) the pre-existence of a safety culture and safety organization, and 3) the facility commitment to health care safety improvement actions. The study also reveals that the implementation of new safety demands and the changes they involve create new constraints, which put pressure on health professionals and may threaten the durability of the improvements made. In order to facilitate the appropriation and implementation by radiotherapy units of the measures meant to improve health care safety, IRSN identifies 6 lines of thought: - strengthen coordination between institutional actors in order to ensure the consistency of the requests addressed to the facilities and limit their

  12. Challenges in integrating 18FDG PET-CT into radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, P; Partridge, M; Kazi, R; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Newbold, K

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy forms one of the major treatment modalities for head and neck cancers (HNC), and precision radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy require accurate target delineation to ensure success of the treatment. Conventionally used imaging modalities, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging are used to delineate the tumor. Imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET)-CT, which combines the functional and anatomic modalities, is increasingly being used in the management of HNC. Currently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radioisotope, which is accumulated in areas of high glucose uptake, such as the tumor tissue. Because most disease recurrences are within the high-dose radiotherapy volume, defining a biological target volume for radiotherapy boost is an attractive approach to improve the results. There are many challenges in employing the PET-CT for radiotherapy planning, such as patient positioning, target edge definition, and use of new PET tracers, which represent various functional properties, such as hypoxia, protein synthesis, and proliferation. The role of PET-CT for radiotherapy planning is ever expanding and more clinical data underlining the advantages and challenges in this approach are emerging. In this article, we review the current clinical evidence for the application of functional imaging to radiotherapy planning and discuss some of the current challenges and possible solutions that have been suggested to date.

  13. Nutrition and cancer: issues related to treatment and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Gary

    2013-10-01

    This paper reviews nutritional issues related to cancer treatment and further explores nutritional needs pertinent to cancer survivorship. It examines the major problems with nutrition when patients undergo the main cancer treatment modalities of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. Particular attention is paid to long-term dietary advice in acknowledgement of the improved effectiveness of cancer treatment and the chronic nature of the condition.

  14. Acute and long-term toxicity following radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, JH; Pras, E; Willemse, PHB; de Vries, EGE

    2003-01-01

    Randomised studies in locally advanced cervical cancer patients showed that cisplatin should be given concurrently with radiotherapy, because of a better long-term survival compared to radiotherapy alone. This increases the relevance of treatment related toxicity. This review summarises the acute an

  15. Dosimetric comparison of stereotactic body radiotherapy using 4D CT and multiphase CT images for treatment planning of lung cancer: Evaluation of the impact on daily dose coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of using 4D CT and multiphase (helical) CT images for treatment planning target definition and the daily target coverage in hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Materials and methods: For 10 consecutive patients treated with SBRT, a set of 4D CT images and three sets of multiphase helical CT scans, taken during free-breathing, end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold, were obtained. Three separate planning target volumes (PTVs) were created from these image sets. A PTV4D was created from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed 4D images by adding a 3 mm margin to the internal target volume (ITV). A PTV3CT was created by generating ITV from gross target volumes (GTVs) contoured from the three multiphase images. Finally, a third conventional PTV (denoted PTVconv) was created by adding 5 mm in the axial direction and 10 mm in the longitudinal direction to the GTV (in this work, GTV = CTV = clinical target volume) generated from free-breathing helical CT scans. Treatment planning was performed based on PTV4D (denoted as Plan-1), and the plan was adopted for PTV3CT and PTVconv to form Plan-2 and Plan-3, respectively, by superimposing 'Plan-1' onto the helical free-breathing CT data set using modified beam apertures that conformed to either PTV3CT or PTVconv. We first studied the impact of PTV design on treatment planning by evaluating the dosimetry of the three PTVs under the three plans, respectively. Then we examined the effect of the PTV designs on the daily target coverage by utilizing pre-treatment localization CT (CT-on-rails) images for daily GTV contouring and dose recalculation. The changes in the dose parameters of D95 and D99 (the dose received by 95% and 99% of the target volume, respectively), and the Vp (the volume receiving the prescription dose) of the daily GTVs were compared under the three plans before and after setup error correction. Results: For all

  16. Impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer. A study of 2940 setup deviations in 980 MVCTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to assess the impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) of the prostatic gland. In all, 28 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this study. After the placement of an endorectal balloon, the planning target volume (PTV) was treated to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. A simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction and per day) was delivered to a smaller target volume. All patients underwent daily prostate-aligned IGRT by megavoltage CT (MVCT). Retrospectively, three different setup approaches were evaluated by comparison to the prostate alignment: setup by skin alignment, endorectal balloon alignment, and automatic registration by bones. A total of 2,940 setup deviations were analyzed in 980 fractions. Compared to prostate alignment, skin mark alignment was associated with substantial displacements, which were ≥ 8 mm in 13 %, 5 %, and 44 % of all fractions in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions, respectively. Endorectal balloon alignment yielded displacements ≥ 8 mm in 3 %, 19 %, and 1 % of all setups; and ≥ 3 mm in 27 %, 58 %, and 18 % of all fractions, respectively. For bone matching, the values were 1 %, 1 %, and 2 % and 3 %, 11 %, and 34 %, respectively. For prostate radiotherapy, setup by skin marks alone is inappropriate for patient positioning due to the fact that, during almost half of the fractions, parts of the prostate would not be targeted successfully with an 8-mm safety margin. Bone matching performs better but not sufficiently for safety margins ≤ 3 mm. Endorectal balloon matching can be combined with bone alignment to increase accuracy in the vertical direction when prostate-based setup is not available. Daily prostate alignment remains the gold standard for high-precision radiotherapy with small safety margins. (orig.)

  17. Postmastectomy radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Ja; Chung, Woong Ki; Nam, Taek Keun; Nah, Byung Sik; Song, Ju Young; Park, Seung Jin [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes after postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. The PMRT were retrospectively analyzed in 83 patients with stage II-III female breast cancer treated between 1989, and 1995. The median age was 46 years (range, 23-77); Seventy-seven patients had modified radical mastectomies. 5 radical mastectomies and 1 simple mastectomy. Three patients (4%) had pathologically negative axillae, and the remaining 80 (96%) had positive axillae. Eleven, 23, 44 and 5 patients had pathological stages IIA, IIB, IIIA, and IIIB, retrospectively. Eighty (96%) patients were treated with hockey-stick fields. The median dose of PMRT was 50.4 Gy, in 1.8 Gy fractions. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy was given to 74 patients (89%). CMF-based or doxorubicin-containing regimens were given to 54 patients (65%). The median follow-up time was 82 months (range, 8-171) after the mastectomy. The 5 and 10-year overall survival rates for all patients were 65 and 49%, respectively. The univariate and multivariate analyses of the factors affecting the overall survival revealed the stage to be the most significant prognostic factor ({rho} = 0.002), followed by the combination of chemotherapy. Thirteen patients (16%) developed a LRF, at an interval of 4-48 months after radiotherapy, with a median of 20 months. The only significant prognostic factor affecting LRF was the combination of chemotherapy, in both the univariate and multivariate analyses. With respect to the sequence of chemoradiation, the sequence had no statistical significance ({rho} = 0.90). According to the time interval from mastectomy to the onset of radiotherapy, the LRFR of the patients group treated by RT within or after 6 month postmastectomy 6 months were 14 vs. 27%, respectively ({rho} = 0.24). One third of the patients (26/83) developed distant metastasis, in 2-29 months, after radiotherapy, with a median of 21 months. The most commonly involved site was bone in

  18. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0–III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8–2 Gy per f...

  19. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark: From 2D to 3D treatment planning guidelines of The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette Skovhus; Berg, Martin; Nielsen, Hanne M.;

    2008-01-01

    with PWT. The dose to the internal mammary nodes (IMN) was not satisfactory for five of the seven patients for 3F, whereas only two of the seven patients had a minimum dose lower than 95% of the prescribed dose with PWT. Finally, the dose to the contralateral breast was increased when using PWT compared...... to 3F. It was concluded that PWT was an appropriate choice of technique for future radiation treatment of post-mastectomy patients. A working group was formed and guidelines for 3D planning were developed during a series of workshops where radiation oncologists and physicists from all radiotherapy...

  20. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  1. Radiotherapy and Antiangiogenic TM in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed K. Khan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrathiomolybdate (TM is a potent nontoxic orally delivered copper complexing agent under development for the last several years for the treatment of Wilson's disease. It has been shown to block angiogenesis in primary and metastatic tumors. Therefore, the combination of cytotoxic radiotherapy (RT and antiangiogenic TM could target both the existing tumor and the tumor microvasculature in a comprehensive strategy. Using a Lewis lung high metastatic (LLHM carcinoma mouse tumor model, we demonstrate that the combination of TM and RT is more effective than either used as monotherapy. We also show that their therapeutic effects are additive, with no additional toxicity. We show that TM has no significant cytotoxicity in vitro against LLHM tumor cells, further supporting the antiangiogenic mechanism for its action.

  2. Advances in the External Radiotherapy Treatment; Avances en el tratamiento con Radioterapia externa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristu, J. J.

    2003-07-01

    External Radiotherapy is one of the most important specific therapeutic techniques used in the treatment of cancer. The technological development this technique has undergone provides noteworthy benefits for the patient, acquiring the administration of a more precise treatment by adapting it more to the tumour and insignificantly reducing the acute complications derived from it. (Author)

  3. Dosimetric comparison of carbon ion and X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Nobuteru; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the dose–volume histograms of patients with Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with carbon ion radiotherapy with those of patients treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Patients with Stage IIIA NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach) were enrolled. Both radiotherapy plans were calculated with the same targets and organs at risk on the same CT. The treatment plan for the prophylactic lymph node and primary tumor (PTV1) delivered 40 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 40 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The total doses for the primary tumor and clinically positive lymph nodes (PTV2) were 60 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 60 Gy (RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The homogeneity indexes for PTV1 and PTV2 were superior for carbon ion radiotherapy in comparison with X-ray radiotherapy (PTV1, 0.57 vs 0.65, P = 0.009; PTV2, 0.07 vs 0.16, P = 0.005). The normal lung mean dose, V5, V10 and V20 for carbon ion radiotherapy were 7.7 Gy (RBE), 21.4%, 19.7% and 17.0%, respectively, whereas the corresponding doses for X-ray radiotherapy were 11.9 Gy, 34.9%, 26.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Maximum spinal cord dose, esophageal maximum dose and V50, and bone V10, V30 and V50 were lower with carbon ion radiotherapy than with X-ray radiotherapy. The present study indicates that carbon ion radiotherapy provides a more homogeneous target dose and a lower dose to organs at risk than X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:27242341

  4. BRAIN ASTROCYTOMAS : A STUDY OF EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FINDINGS, TREATMENT RESULTS AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN TEHRAN CANCER INSTITUTE'S RADIOTHERAPY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Amouzegar - Hashemi

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available - Astrocytomas, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, arc the most common brain tumors. Post-operative radiotherapy plays an important rote in their treatment. Records of all patients with a pathologic diagnosis of astrocytoma referred for radiotherapy from 1987-1992 were reviewed and prognostic factors with regard to recurrences were analyzed."nDuring the study period, 162 astrocytoma patients were treated by radiation in our department. Malc-to~fcmalc ratio was 1.4:1. Tlic disease was most prevalent in the 3rd ami 4th decades of life. Most tumors were in cerebral hemispheres and grade IV. In nearly all patients only CT scan had been used for diagnosis, and total resection had been performed."nRadiation dose was mostly 5,000-5,500 cGy by standard fractionation. Follotv-up was available for 91 patients, and in these patients CCNU (tomustine chemotherapy was prescribed for high-grade tumors. Tltrec-year local control was 77% . Grade, extent of surgery, and use of CCNU were statistically significant as prognostic factors. Also 4 GBM long-term survivors were found. Treatment of brain astrocytomas by radiation in our department was concluded to he reasonably successful.

  5. Fatal pneumonitis associated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: Case report and review

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yan; Li, Jingjing; SU, XIAOYAN

    2012-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is the most significant complication of acute treatment-related toxicities in lung cancer. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with inverse planning enables us to achieve the desired dose distribution. However, there are many high-risk procedures associated with lung irradiation, including chemotherapy and surgery. We report a case of fatal treatment-related pneumonitis, where the patient had undergone postoperative IMRT for lung cancer. Following completion of ...

  6. Dosimetry audit of radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) various calculation algorithms are used. The accuracy of dose calculations has to be verified. Numerous phantom types, detectors and measurement methodologies are proposed to verify the TPS calculations with dosimetric measurements. A heterogeneous slab phantom has been designed within a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the IAEA. The heterogeneous phantom was developed in the frame of the IAEA CRP. The phantom consists of frame slabs made with polystyrene and exchangeable inhomogeneity slabs equivalent to bone or lung tissue. Special inserts allow to position thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) capsules within the polystyrene slabs below the bone or lung equivalent slabs and also within the lung equivalent material. Additionally, there are inserts that allow to position films or ionisation chamber in the phantom. Ten Polish radiotherapy centres (of 30 in total) were audited during on-site visits. Six different TPSs and five calculation algorithms were examined in the presence of inhomogeneities. Generally, most of the results from TLD were within 5 % tolerance. Differences between doses calculated by TPSs and measured with TLD did not exceed 4 % for bone and polystyrene equivalent materials. Under the lung equivalent material, on the beam axis the differences were lower than 5 %, whereas inside the lung equivalent material, off the beam axis, in some cases they were of around 7 %. The TLD results were confirmed with the ionisation chamber measurements. The comparison results of the calculations and the measurements allow to detect limitations of TPS calculation algorithms. The audits performed with the use of heterogeneous phantom and TLD seem to be an effective tool for detecting the limitations in the TPS performance or beam configuration errors at audited radiotherapy departments. (authors)

  7. Radiotherapy in Palliative Cancer Care: Development and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    on Cancer, the International Union against Cancer and the International Network for Cancer Treatment and Research (INCTR), to design, implement and integrate comprehensive and cost effective national cancer programmes across all areas of cancer control and treatment, including palliative care. It is important to note that palliative care is not only care of the dying, since even with advanced and disseminated cancer, patients are now living longer. The goal of palliative care is to relieve symptoms effectively and efficiently and to maintain the maximum quality of life for the duration of the patient's life. The interventions recommended depend on the patient's clinical status, severity of disease, and the location of the symptomatic site. Radiotherapy has an important role to play as a cost effective and simple method to relieve symptoms caused by bone or brain metastases, tumour bleeding, or visceral/lymphovascular obstruction due to cancer. This report was written following an IAEA consultants meeting in October 2007 and further electronic communications. The aims of the discussions were to: recognize and document the diversity and complexity of cancer types, rates, diagnoses and treatments worldwide; and to provide guidelines to ensure optimum delivery of comprehensive palliative cancer care. This report makes five recommendations: 1. The management and control of cancer symptoms is needed in all health care systems. There is a shortage of palliative care specialists in all health systems, relative to the number of cancer patients needing palliative care. 2. Because palliative care specialists can reach only a small proportion of the patients in need, palliative care principles and techniques should form a core element of the medical education for all health care providers, and especially for those who regularly treat cancer patients. 3. There is a specific need for training in comprehensive palliative care amongst the radiation oncology community. Radiation

  8. Treatment with a belly-board device significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated and results in low acute toxicity in adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To determine whether treatment prone on a belly-board significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated in women receiving adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer, and to prospectively study acute small bowel toxicity using an accepted recording instrument. Material and methods: Thirty-two gynecologic patients underwent simulation with CT scanning supine and prone. Small bowel was delineated on every CT slice, and treatment was prone on the belly-board using 3-5 fields-typically Anterior, Right and Left Lateral, plus or minus Lateral Boosts. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy and all treatments were delivered in 1.8 Gy fractions. Concomitant Cisplatin was administered in 13 patients with cervical carcinoma. Comparison of small bowel dose-volumes was made between supine and prone, with each subject acting as their own matched pair. Acute small bowel toxicity was prospectively measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria: Version 2.0. Results: Treatment prone on the belly-board significantly reduced the volume of small bowel receiving ≥100; ≥95; ≥90; and ≥80% of the prescribed dose, but not ≥50%. This was found whether volume was defined in cubic centimeters or % of total small bowel volume. Of 29 evaluable subjects, 2 (7%) experienced 1 episode each of grade 3 diarrhoea. All other toxicity events were grade 2 or less and comprised diarrhoea (59%), abdominal pain or cramping (48%), nausea (38%), anorexia (17%), vomiting (10%). There were no Grade 4 events and no treatment days were lost due to toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment prone on a belly-board device results in significant small bowel sparing, during adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. The absence of Grade 4 events or Treatment Days Lost compares favorably with the published literature

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, Joern; Guckenberger, Matthias; Haedinger, Ulrich; Oppitz, Ulrich; Mueller, Gerd; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2006-09-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical results of stereotactic radiotherapy in primary liver tumors and hepatic metastases. Five patients with primary liver cancer and 39 patients with 51 hepatic metastases were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy since 1997. Twenty-eight targets were treated in a 'low-dose'-group with 3x10 Gy (n=27) or 4x7 Gy (n=1) prescribed to the PTV-encl. 65%-isodose. In a 'high-dose'-group patients were treated with 3x12 - 12.5 Gy (n=19; same dose prescription) or 1x26 Gy/PTV-enclosing 80%-isodose (n=9). Median follow-up was 15 months (2-48 months) for primary liver cancer and 15 months (2-85 months) for hepatic metastases. While all primary liver cancers were controlled, nine local failures (3-19 months) of 51 metastases were observed resulting in an actuarial local control rate of 92% after 12 months and 66% after 24 months and later. A borderline significant correlation between dose and local control was observed (p=0.077): the actuarial local control rate after 12 and 24?months was 86% and 58% in the low-dose-group versus 100% and 82% in the high-dose-group. In multivariate analysis high versus low-dose was the only significant factor predicting local control (p=0.0089). Overall survival after 1 and 2 years was 72% and 32% for all patients and was impaired due to systemic progression of disease. No severe acute or late toxicity exceeding RTOG/EORTC-score 2 were observed. Stereotactic irradiation of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases offers a locally effective treatment without significant complications in patients, who are not amenable for surgery. Patient selection is important, because those with low risk for systemic progression are more likely to benefit from this approach.

  10. Stereotactic radiotherapy of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical results of stereotactic radiotherapy in primary liver tumors and hepatic metastases. Five patients with primary liver cancer and 39 patients with 51 hepatic metastases were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy since 1997. Twenty-eight targets were treated in a 'low-dose'-group with 3x10 Gy (n=27) or 4x7 Gy (n=1) prescribed to the PTV-encl. 65%-isodose. In a 'high-dose'-group patients were treated with 3x12 - 12.5 Gy (n=19; same dose prescription) or 1x26 Gy/PTV-enclosing 80%-isodose (n=9). Median follow-up was 15 months (2-48 months) for primary liver cancer and 15 months (2-85 months) for hepatic metastases. While all primary liver cancers were controlled, nine local failures (3-19 months) of 51 metastases were observed resulting in an actuarial local control rate of 92% after 12 months and 66% after 24 months and later. A borderline significant correlation between dose and local control was observed (p=0.077): the actuarial local control rate after 12 and 24?months was 86% and 58% in the low-dose-group versus 100% and 82% in the high-dose-group. In multivariate analysis high versus low-dose was the only significant factor predicting local control (p=0.0089). Overall survival after 1 and 2 years was 72% and 32% for all patients and was impaired due to systemic progression of disease. No severe acute or late toxicity exceeding RTOG/EORTC-score 2 were observed. Stereotactic irradiation of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases offers a locally effective treatment without significant complications in patients, who are not amenable for surgery. Patient selection is important, because those with low risk for systemic progression are more likely to benefit from this approach

  11. Breast cancer: results and side effects of radiotherapy after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The locoregional control is a crucial step in the achievement of a cancer cure. After mastectomy, the locoregional irradiation clearly reduces the chest wall and nodal relapses, especially with initial lesions more than 5 cm or with nodal involvement and/or large lymphatic or vascular emboli. Two recent randomized trials confirmed the benefit of well-adapted locoregional irradiation. In the Danish trial, including pre-menopausal 'high-risk' women treated by mastectomy and chemotherapy (CMF protocol), the radiotherapy reduced the locoregional relapses from 32 to 9% (P< 0.001) and increased the 10-year survival rates from 45 to 54% (P< 0.001). These results are now also confirmed in a postmenopausal group, with an increased 10-year survival rate of 36 to 45% (P< 0.001). In the Canadian trial, locoregional relapse rate decreased from 25 to 13% and 10-year survival rate increased from 56 to 65%. The meta-analysis published in 1995 by the Early Breast Cancer Trialist Collaborative Group (EBCTCG) showed only a modest benefit due to locoregional irradiation in breast cancer. However, when small trials and older trials started before 1970 are excluded due to imperfect methodologies and for inadequate irradiation techniques, the benefit of the 'modern' radiotherapy appears significant in the 7,840 patients selected in this way. Thus, since the locoregional irradiation can avoid some metastatic evolutions developed only after 'local' or 'nodal' relapse, it must be integrated in a multidisciplinary strategy. Nevertheless, this treatment must be safe and this is possible by the use of new techniques, including the definition of anatomical volumes and provisional dosimetry. The most important point concerns the treatment of the internal mammary nodes, especially when previous chemotherapy including anthracycline was performed. The use of a direct field, with at least 40% of the dose delivered by electrons in an alternating scheme, is recommended to ensure very good protection

  12. Radiation protection and secondary cancer prevention using biological radioprotectors in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Abdollahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is the feasible treatment approach for many malignant diseases and cancers. New radiotherapy techniques such as ion therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiation therapy deliver higher low dose radiation to large volume of normal tissues and are in debating as more secondary cancers inducers. A secondary cancer after radiotherapy is an important issue that reduces treatment efficiency and should be decreased. Radioprotective compounds are of importance in clinical radiation therapy for saving normal tissues. In the present study, we are so interest to introduce, suggest and review the application of biological radioprotectors in radiotherapy. We propose probiotics, prebiotics, gas, vitamin and nanoparticle producing microorganisms as new biological systems based radioprotectors to protect normal tissues. Also, we reviewed the main biological pathways, molecules and also radioadaptive response that act as radioprotectors. In this review we tried to address the secondary cancer induction by radiotherapy and also main biological radiation protection approaches, although there is a wealth of data in this subject.  

  13. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    for commissioning of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator, ensuring agreement with measurements within 1% for a range of situations, is presented. The resulting Monte Carlo model was validated against measurements for a wider range of situations, including small field output factors, and agreement...... modulating the intensity of the field during the irradiation. The workflow described has the potential to fully model the dynamic delivery, including gantry rotation during irradiation, of modern radiotherapy. Three corner stones of Monte Carlo Treatment Planning are identified: Building, commissioning...... and validation of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator (i), converting a CT scan of a patient to a Monte Carlo compliant phantom (ii) and translating the treatment plan parameters (including beam energy, angles of incidence, collimator settings etc) to a Monte Carlo input file (iii). A protocol...

  14. Adaptive Management of Liver Cancer Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy for liver cancer has the potential to reduce normal tissue complications and enable dose escalation, allowing the potential for tumor control in this challenging site. Using adaptive techniques to tailor treatment margins to reflect patient specific breathing motions and image-guidance techniques can reduce the high dose delivered to surrounding normal tissues while ensuring the prescription dose is delivered to the tumor. Several treatment planning and delivery tec...

  15. MR images of oral cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the relationship between the effect of preoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer and the changes of signal intensity with MR images. T2-weighted images were compared before and after radiotherapy in 18 patients with primary oral cancer, and the effect on the lesions was histologically evaluated in surgically resected specimens obtained four weeks after the therapy. The MR images showed significantly decreased signal intensity of the lesions. The decrease of signal intensity was remarkable starting at two weeks after completion of the radiotherapy, compared with the decrease at less than two weeks after the therapy. The change of signal intensity was more obvious in tongue cancer than in other oral cancers. There was no significant difference in the change of the signal intensity between cancers with histologically poor response to the therapy and those with good response. These results suggested that signal intensity of oral cancer on T2-weighted images showed a significant decrease after preoperative radiotherapy, and that the intensity could be affected by duration after radiotherapy and primary sites. (author)

  16. Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer; Radiotherapie postoperatoire des cancers de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richaud, P.; Sargos, P.; Henriques Figueiredo, B. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Latorzeff, I. [Service de radiotherapie, clinique Pasteur, 31 - Toulouse (France); Mongiat-Artus, P. [Service d' urologie, hopital Saint-Louis, 75 - Paris (France); Houede, N. [Service d' oncologie medicale, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Salomon, L. [Service d' urologie, 94 - Creteil (France); Wallerand, H. [Service d' urologie, faculte de medecine Victor-Segalen, CHU Pellegrin-Tripode, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2010-10-15

    After radical prostatectomy, the risk of biological recurrence at 5 years varies from 10 to 40 % and this natural evolution of the disease has led radiation therapy being proposed as a supplement to surgery. When the recurrence risk is essentially local, supplementary radiotherapy is justified in the aim of improving biological recurrence-free survival, local control, metastasis-free survival and specific and global survival, while respecting patient quality of life. Three recent studies, EORTC 22911, ARO 9602 and SWOG 8794 found a similar advantage for biological recurrence-free survival without higher major additional toxicity. However, only the SWOG 8794 study found a significant improvement for metastasis-free survival and global survival. In an adjuvant setting, the optimal moment to propose this postoperative radiotherapy remains uncertain: should it be proposed systematically to all pT3 R1 patients, running the risk of pointlessly treating patients who will never recur, or should it only be proposed at recurrence? The GETUG AFU 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. (authors)

  17. 肺癌骨转移同期放化疗临床疗效分析%Prospective clinical study of chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy in treatment of lung cancer patients with bone metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩萍

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨同期放、化疗治疗肺癌骨转移临床疗效.方法 分析我院2004年1月~2008年1月收治的63例肺癌骨转移患者,A组同期放、化疗+帕米膦酸二钠;B组序贯放、化疗+帕米膦酸二钠.结果 A、B组治疗疼痛缓解率86.7%、39.4%,差异有统计学意义A、B组治疗局部病灶的总有效率60.0%、33.3%,差异有统计学意义;两个组2年生存率的差异有统计学意义;A、B组治疗前后生存质量比较及A、B组之间生存质量比较无统计学意义.结论 肺癌骨转移后采取同期放、化疗为主的综合治疗可明显减轻症状,延长患者生存时间.%Objective To research the clinical efficacy of simultaneous radiotherapy and chemotherapy for lung cancer with bone metastasis. Methods Analyzing 63 cases of lung cancer with bone metastasis in our hospital from January 2004 to January 2008. Group A : simultaneous radiotherapy and chemotherapy + pamidronate disodium; Group B : sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy + pamidronate disodium. Results The pain relief rate was 86. 7% in group A and 39. 4% in group B. There was a statistical difference between group A and group B. The total effective rate of partial focus was 60. 0% in group A and 33. 3% in group B. There was a statistical difference hetween group A and group B ; There was a statistical difference between group A and group B;In the 2-year survival rate , There was no a statistical difference between group A and group B in the quality of life before and after the treatment. Conclusion The comprehensive treatment of simultaneous radiotherapy and chemotherapy for lung cancer with bone metastasis can noticeably alleviate the symptoms, extend the survival time of patients.

  18. Radiotherapy combined with aclarubicin and neocarzinostatin for cancer of the gallbladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Shin-ichi; Mishina, Hitoshi; Funaki, Ken-ichi; Mori, Toshihiko (Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai (Japan))

    1991-03-01

    Cancer of the gallbladder is radioresistant. When it was found inoperable, she was subjected to radiotherapy combined with aclarubicin and neocarzinostatin. Therapeutic effectiveness was confirmed at autopsy as she later succumbed to uterine cervical cancer. Thus, the present radiochemotherapeutic regimen would probably provide a means of overcoming those radioresistant inoperable malignancies. Intravenous administrations of appropriate antibiotics such as azthreonam and reniran may probably be helpful in the prevention and treatment of septic peritonitis possible during the course of reinforced radiotherapy of the abdomen. (author).

  19. Elective radiotherapy of the regional lymph node areas in breast cancer; Radiotherapie prophylactique des aires ganglionnaires dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortmans, P.M.P. [Institut Docteur-Bernard-Verbeeten, Dept. de Radiotherapie, Tilburg Pays-Bas (Netherlands)

    2006-11-15

    In breast cancer patients, the incidence of involvement of the regional lymph nodes and the risk for developing a locoregional recurrence are highly influenced by several prognostic factors. A meta-analysis of the EBCTCG showed a reduction of about 70% of the locoregional recurrence rate with radiotherapy for all patients, independent of age, characteristics of the tumour or the administration of systemic treatment. At the same time, this meta-analysis confirmed that radiotherapy can lead to an increased risk for developing contralateral breast cancer and to an increase in the risk of non-breast cancer related mortality, mainly due to cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. Because of this, the net effect of regional radiotherapy will be strongly influenced by the individual risk factors of the patients and by the quality of the technical aspects of the radiotherapy. The thin line between the benefits of elective regional lymph node irradiation and the possible late toxicity for patients with early stage breast cancer is currently the subject of several prospective randomized trials, the results of which will only become available in several years. Moreover, recent developments in the field of novel prognostic factors will open completely new ways to be explored, which might give bus new tools for estimating the individual benefit/risk ratio for every single patient. (author)

  20. New perspectives in the nursing role in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavdaniti M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the radiotherapy is one of the types of cancer treatment. It is calculated that more than half of all people with cancer will undergoing radiotherapy as at least part of their cancer treatment. Purpose: The purpose of the present study was the description of role of nurse in radiation oncology. Method: Literature review of the relevant articles in the databases pubmed and scopus was conducted, but also were used articles of international professional nursing organizations Results: The radiation oncology nursing role is multidimensional and is focused in patient assessment, patient and family education, support and counselling, physical care of patient and in the research. The patient’s care is mainly focused in the conducting of suitable nursing interventions that will alleviate the patient from the side effects of radiotherapy. Conclusions: The nurses should be known the technologies that are used in the radiotherapy so that they are enable to educate their patients and provide qualitative nursing care. Changes in the health care environment and changes in treatment and technology continue to drive cancer care. So nurses should collaborate and communicate with other members of interdisciplinary team and incorporate evidence into practice

  1. Intraoperative radiotherapy in primary rectal cancer; Intraoperative Radiotherapie des primaeren Rektumkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mund, Christian

    2013-06-17

    According to the results of several studies intraoperative radiotherapy seems to influence local control for primary rectal cancer in UICC-Stage II / III positively, though recommendations in therapy cannot be given as studies of high evidence level do not exist. As IORT is rarely available and makes patient recruitment difficult, prospective randomised trials have not been carried out yet. This emphasizes the importance of non-randomised trials for an evaluation of IORT. A comparison of 21 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who had been treated with intraoperative radiation therapy and 21 similar cases without an application of IORT could not show any significant improvements in prognosis (recurrences, metastases and disease-specific survival). Nevertheless the employment of intraoperative radiation showed a trend in improvement of local control. This hast been shown by several other studies before. Thus the application of IORT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is considered a useful part in multimodal treatment and should further be evaluated in specialized centres. In case-control studies 1:1-matching leads to a good comparability of groups and renders conclusions of high internal validity possible. To gain a sufficient power, this type of trials should however primarily be carried out by centres with a high number of cases.

  2. Comparing Cystatin C Changes as a Measure of Renal Function Before and After Radiotherapy in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ameri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine and compare Cystatin C changes before and after radiotherapy in patients with stomach cancer who were candidate for radiotherapy. This study was conducted as a prospective cohort one. Eighteen patients with definite diagnosis of stomach cancer under treatment by radiotherapy who presented to Radiotherapy-Oncology Center of Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran-Iran, and the treatment in all cases was simultaneous chemoradiation with Xeloda were included. In all patients before radiotherapy and after radiotherapy serum creatinine (Cr and Cystatin C were measured simultaneously. Mean cystatin level before treatment (1.2±0.4 was significantly lower than that of post-treatment (1.6±0.36, (P=0.001. Serum Cr level before treatment was 1.15±0.33 and after radiotherapy was 1.08±0.24 and did not show significant difference. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR of the patients before radiotherapy was -46.8 ± 21.0 and after radiotherapy was 43.8±15.8 that did not have significant difference (P=0.146 and also blood urea nitrogen (BUN before radiotherapy was 20.72±3.7 and 20 ± 6.38 after radiotherapy that did not have significant difference (P=0.6. Comparison of the Cystatin C difference with total radiation dose of the kidneys that are put in three dose groups in radiotherapy field had association that in dose of less that 18 gray (Gy the Cystatin C change showed significant and positive association (P=0.027; r=0.52 and about 18-24 Gy the Cystatin C difference showed significant and negative association (P=0.023, r=-0.53. It seems that for evaluating the renal function, serum Cystatin C measurement is preferable than serum Cr. level.

  3. Predictive value of bcl-2 immunoreactivity in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Recent experimental evidence suggests that overexpression of bcl-2, a protein functioning by blocking apoptosis, may influence the treatment outcome in human tumours, including prostate cancer. To test the clinical implications of this hypothesis, tumours from patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were investigated for bcl-2 immunoreactivity (IR) and correlated with prognosis and treatment outcome. Materials and methods: Bcl-2 IR was evaluated in archival tumour specimens obtained through transurethral resection from 42 patients with localized prostate cancer (T0-T4, N0 and M0). Bcl-2 IR expression was related to stage, grade and cancer-specific survival. Specimens were obtained prior to administrating routine radiotherapy for all patients. Results: Bcl-2 IR was present in 19/42 (45%) tumours. The bcl-2-positive patients had a significantly longer cancer-specific survival than the bcl-2-negative patients (10.3 versus 3.4 years, P<0.04). At follow-up (7-19 years), nine patients were still alive, 26 patients had died of prostate cancer and seven patients had died of other causes. Conclusions: This study indicates that pre-treatment bcl-2 overexpression is related to a favourable outcome in prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. Low bcl-2 along with a high stage may be a predictor of poor prognosis and these patients might benefit from additional treatment. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Efficacy and toxicity of (chemo)radiotherapy for primary subglottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Minagawa, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Taguchi, T.; Nishimura, G.; Takahashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Sano, D. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2013-01-15

    Background and purpose: Primary subglottic cancer is a rare malignancy. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy for subglottic cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis received radiotherapy, 14 of whom also underwent chemotherapy. Of the 19 patients, 15 received definitive radiotherapy to the gross tumors with total doses of 70-70.2 Gy in 35-39 fractions, and 4 underwent preoperative radiotherapy with total doses of 37.8-55.8 Gy in 21-31 fractions, followed by total laryngectomy. Results: Of the 19 patients, 5 developed local progression and 2 developed distant metastasis at the median follow-up period of 5 years. The 5-year local control and disease-free rates were 74 and 63%, respectively. Three patients died of tumor progression, and the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 80 and 63%, respectively. Regarding acute toxicities, transient mucositis and dermatitis of grade 3 or lower were observed in all patients, but there were no late toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis. The use of chemotherapy together with radiotherapy may enhance treatment efficacy and contribute to larynx preservation through good local control. (orig.)

  5. Oligometastases in prostate cancer: restaging stage IV cancers and new radiotherapy options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are various subgroups of patients with metastatic prostate cancer: polymetastatic, oligometastatic, or oligo-recurrent cancers whose progression follows different courses and for whom there are different treatment options. Knowledge of tumor dissemination pathways and different genetic and epigenetic tumor profiles, as well as their evolution during disease progression, along with new diagnostic and therapeutic advances has allowed us to address these situations with local ablative treatments such as stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery. These treatments provide high rates of local control with low toxicity in metastatic spread for primary cancers including those of pulmonary, digestive, and renal origin, while these types of treatments are still emerging for cancers of prostatic origin. There are several retrospective studies showing the effectiveness of such treatments in prostate cancer metastases, which has led to the emergence of prospective studies on the issue and even some phase II studies intended to prevent or delay systemic treatments such as chemotherapy. Here we collect together and review these past experiences and the studies currently underway. These types of radiotherapy treatments redefine how we approach extracranial metastatic disease and open up new possibilities for combination therapy with new systemic treatment agents

  6. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres for a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Daily variations in bladder filling make conformal treatment of bladder cancer challenging. On-line adaptive radiotherapy with a choice of plans has been demonstrated to reduce small bowel irradiation in single institution trials. In order to support a multicentre feasibility clinical trial on adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01) a credentialing programme was developed for centres wishing to participate. Methods: The credentialing programme entails three components: a facility questionnaire; a planning exercise which tests the ability of centres to create three adaptive plans based on a planning and five cone beam CTs; and a site visit during which image quality, imaging dose and image guidance procedures are assessed. Image quality and decision making were tested using customised inserts for a Perspex phantom (Modus QUASAR) that mimic different bladder sizes. Dose was assessed in the same phantom using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Results: All 12 centres participating in the full credentialing programme were able to generate appropriate target volumes in the planning exercise and identify the correct target volume and position the bladder phantom in the phantom within 3 mm accuracy. None of the imaging doses exceeded the limit of 5 cGy with a CT on rails system having the lowest overall dose. Conclusion: A phantom mimicking the decision making process for adaptive radiotherapy was found to be well suited during site visits for credentialing of centres participating in a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer. Combined with a planning exercise the site visit allowed testing the ability of centres to create adaptive treatment plans and make appropriate decisions based on the volumetric images acquired at treatment.

  7. Potential of radiosensitizing agents in cancer chemo-radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girdhani S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential of herbs and other plant-based formulations have been increasingly recognized in prevention and treatment of human diseases including cancer. There exist enormous prospect for screening and evaluation of herbal/plant products for developing effective radiosensitization and radioprotection relevant to nuclear research program. Investigations in our laboratory have focused on the mechanism of activity of variety of anticancer and antioxidant agents, namely, Eugenol, (EU, Ellagic acid (EA, Triphala (TPL, Tocopherol Succinate (TOS and Arachidonic acid on normal and cancer cells with view to design effective protocols in practical radioprotection and cancer radiotherapy. This paper is mainly focused on studies on cytotoxic effects on cancer cell lines. Results have shown that these agents produced radiosensitizing action involving oxidative damage, membrane alteration and damage to nucleic acid in various human cell lines. Studies were performed employing fluorescence probes and electron spin resonance methods and gel electrophoresis protocols. It has been found that cytotoxic effect was induced by initiating membrane oxidative damage and by triggering intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS by gamma radiation in combination with phytochemicals like TPL, EA and TOS in tumor cell line Ehrlich Ascites (EAC, Human cervical (HeLa and breast (MCF-7 cells. Membrane damage and ROS generation was measured by DPH and DCF-FDA fluorescent probes respectively after exposure to low to moderate doses of gamma radiation. This talk will present the cytotoxic effects of phytochemicals in combination with ionizing radiation. It is emphasized that modulation of membrane peroxidative damage and intra cellular ROS may help achieve efficient killing of cancer cells which may provide a new approach to developing effective treatment of cancer.

  8. Curative and organ-preserving treatment with intra-arterial carboplatin induction followed by surgery and/or radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: single-center five-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinelli Carmine

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the feasibility, toxicity, response rate and survival of neoadjuvant superselective intra-arterial infusion of high dose carboplatin in advanced head and neck cancer. Methods Forty-six patients with primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma received 3 cycles of intra-arterial carboplatin (300 to 350 mg/m2 per cycle every 2 weeks, followed by radiotherapy or surgery plus radiotherapy. Results No complications or severe toxicity occurred. Sixteen patients (35% were complete responders, 20 (43% partial responders while 10 (22% did not respond to treatment. After completion of the multimodality treatment, 38/46 patients (83% were complete responders. After a 5-year follow-up period, 18/46 patients (39% are alive and disease-free, 3 (6,5% have died of a second primary tumor and 25 (54,5% have died of the disease. Conclusion Intra-arterial carboplatin induction chemotherapy is a safe, well-tolerated technique that discriminates between responders and non-responders and so may have prognostic significance in planning further integrated treatments aimed to organ preservation for advanced head and neck carcinomas.

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations and Radiotherapy 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing ZHONG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the treatment for lung cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC which predicts tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment response may also has effect on radiation response. NSCLC harboring kinase-domain mutations in EGFR exhibits enhanced radio-sensitivity due to dramatically diminished capacity to resolve radiation-induced DSBs (DNA double-strand breaks associating with the inefficiency of EGFR nuclear translocation. Recently, several preliminary clinical studies show certain efficacy of concurrent EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and radiotherapy. However its further response in EGFR-mutated NSCLC is unclear. The correlation between EGFR mutation genotype and the radiotherapy response and clinical outcome is worthy of further study.

  10. Does family history of prostate cancer affect outcomes following radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To examine family history (FH) as a prognostic factor following radiotherapy (RT). Materials and methods: Between 1989 and 2007, 1711 men with clinically localized prostate cancer and complete family history who had received RT (median RT dose = 74 Gy) without androgen deprivation therapy were analyzed. FH was defined as any prostate cancer in a first degree relative. For the biochemical failure (BF) outcome, this sample size has 85% power to detect a hazard ratio of 1.56 for positive versus negative FH. Results: With a median follow-up of 71 months, there was no significant difference in the distribution of Gleason score (GS) or prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on FH. A positive FH was not an independent predictor of BF, distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM), or overall mortality (OM) in Cox proportional multivariable analysis. On further analysis in a Cox proportional multivariable analysis, men with two or more first degree relatives with prostate cancer had a significantly higher likelihood of BF and DM than those with no FH, although there was no difference in PCSM or OM. Men with a positive FH (23%) were more likely to be younger, have a lower PSA, and non-palpable disease. There was no interaction between a positive FH and neither race nor treatment era (pre-PSA vs. PSA era). Conclusions: A positive FH is not a prognostic factor following RT and should not alter standard treatment recommendations. Patients with two or more first degree relatives with prostate cancer had a higher likelihood of BF and DM, but there was no effect on survival. There was no interaction between a positive FH and African American race or treatment era. A positive FH was however, associated with more favorable PSA values and T-stage that may be the result of earlier screening

  11. Perineal Skin Toxicity according to Irradiation Technique in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various treatment techniques have been attempted for the radiotherapy of anal cancer because of acute side effects such as perineal skin reactions. This study was performed to investigate an optimal radiotherapy technique in anal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study subjects included 35 patients who underwent definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer in Yonsei Cancer Center between 1990 and 2007. The patients' clinical data, including irradiation technique, were reviewed retrospectively. The primary lesion, regional lymph nodes, and both inguinal lymph nodes were irradiated by 41.4-45 Gy with a conventional schedule, followed by a boost does to the primary lesion or metastatic lymph nodes. The radiotherapy technique was classified into four categories according to the irradiation field and number of portals. In turn, acute skin reactions associated with the treatment interruption period were investigated according to each of the four techniques. Results: 28 patients (80.0%) had grade 2 radiation dermatitis or greater, whereas 10 patients (28.6%) had grade 3 radiation dermatitis or greater during radiotherapy. Radiation dermatitis and the treatment interruption period were relatively lower in patients belonging to the posterior-right-left 3 x-ray field with inguinal electron boost and in patients belonging to electron thunderbird techniques. The interruption periods were 8.2±10.2 and 5.7±7.7 for the two technique groups, respectively. Twenty-seven patients (77.1%) went into complete remission at 1 month after radiotherapy and the overall 5 year survival rates were 67.7%. Conclusion: Field size and beam arrangement can affect patients compliance in anal cancer radiotherapy, whereas a small x-ray field for the perineum seems to be helpful by decreasing severe radiation dermatitis

  12. Perineal Skin Toxicity according to Irradiation Technique in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sei Hwan; Seong, Jin Sil; Koom, Woong Sub [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Various treatment techniques have been attempted for the radiotherapy of anal cancer because of acute side effects such as perineal skin reactions. This study was performed to investigate an optimal radiotherapy technique in anal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study subjects included 35 patients who underwent definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer in Yonsei Cancer Center between 1990 and 2007. The patients' clinical data, including irradiation technique, were reviewed retrospectively. The primary lesion, regional lymph nodes, and both inguinal lymph nodes were irradiated by 41.4-45 Gy with a conventional schedule, followed by a boost does to the primary lesion or metastatic lymph nodes. The radiotherapy technique was classified into four categories according to the irradiation field and number of portals. In turn, acute skin reactions associated with the treatment interruption period were investigated according to each of the four techniques. Results: 28 patients (80.0%) had grade 2 radiation dermatitis or greater, whereas 10 patients (28.6%) had grade 3 radiation dermatitis or greater during radiotherapy. Radiation dermatitis and the treatment interruption period were relatively lower in patients belonging to the posterior-right-left 3 x-ray field with inguinal electron boost and in patients belonging to electron thunderbird techniques. The interruption periods were 8.2{+-}10.2 and 5.7{+-}7.7 for the two technique groups, respectively. Twenty-seven patients (77.1%) went into complete remission at 1 month after radiotherapy and the overall 5 year survival rates were 67.7%. Conclusion: Field size and beam arrangement can affect patients compliance in anal cancer radiotherapy, whereas a small x-ray field for the perineum seems to be helpful by decreasing severe radiation dermatitis.

  13. Nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: preliminary study of a Phase II clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2013-11-01

    toxicities. Complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were observed in 0, 22 (52.4%, 17 (40.5% and 3 (7.1% patients at 1 month after the treatment. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression rate was 95.2%. After a median follow-up of 37 months, the median survival time (MST was 14 months. The 2 year and 3 year overall survival (OS rates were 33.3% and 26.2%, respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS time was 10 months. The 2 year and 3 year PFS rates were 24.5% and 22.1%, respectively. The MST in the 13 patients with (+++ EGFR expression (group A and 7 patients with (++ EGFR expression (group B was 15 and 11 months, respectively. The 2 year and 3 year OS rates were 46.2% and 38.5% in group A and 28.6% and 28.6% in group B, respectively (P = 0.405.Conclusion: Although concurrent chemoradiotherapy was the standard care for locally advanced esophageal cancer, radiotherapy was the choice for those who were refused or could not tolerate chemoradiotherapy. Our study shows that nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy was well tolerated in patients with esophageal cancer. EGFR overexpression was more common than previously reported. OS was higher after combined therapy than after historical control radiotherapy alone. Further studies are required to confirm the therapeutic efficacy of nimotuzumab in esophageal cancer.Keywords: esophageal neoplasms, nimotuzumab, radiotherapy, targeted therapy, treatment outcomes

  14. Results of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens De Lichtenberg, Mette; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer.......To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer....

  15. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this ... a combination of drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated ...

  16. Expected relationship between a radiotherapy unit and other hospital services in cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a relatively new speciality in medical practice. It is however an important and rapidly growing modality of cancer treatment that should be developed in all countries regardless of their economic conditions. Differences in the size and functions of a radiotherapy unit may change from one country to the other. Nevertheless, in all situations radiotherapy should be considered an independent speciality with its special building, staff, equipment, budget and administration. On the other hand, it should be fully integrated with other national and hospital services in the field of cancer, and should have close associations with national and regional planning authorities specially those related to cancer central programmes, central cancer registries, the national atomic energy authorities and medical teaching, training and research programmes. A strong relationship should be developed with University and Teaching Hospitals, especially with diagnostic departments i.e. pathology, radiology and nuclear medicine and therapeutic departments such as surgery and medicine. Joint clinics and team work should be the guidelines of service. Also a close association should be built between the radiotherapy unit and district hospitals and primary health-care units for the purposes of early detection, patients' follow-up and rehabilitation. These relations may vary from one country to the other depending on various factors such as the size of the radiotherapy unit, the volume and nature of work and its status of autonomy. 6 refs, 3 tabs

  17. Human papilloma virus (HPV) status associated with prognosis of cervical cancer after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko; Miyazaki, Yuki; Imamura, Masahiro; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Our study explored whether the HPV status of tumors is associated with the outcome of radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. A total of 84 patients with cervical cancer (6 stage I, 10 stage II, 49 stage III, and 19 stage IV) who underwent definitive radiotherapy between January 1995 and June 2000 were included in this study. Tumor samples were obtained from all patients by punch biopsy prior to radiotherapy. The presence of HPV and its type were analyzed by PCR-based assay using the consensus primers for E6 and L1 regions. Actuarial methods were used to calculate overall survival, and disease-free survival. A total of 42 patients (50%) had cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. HPV-positive tumors were found in 76.2% (64 cases) of the patients. HPV-negative patients survived significantly shorter compared to the HPV-positive patients in the overall survival (p=0.007) and the disease-free survival (p=0.005). According to multivariate analysis, HPV status is a significant predictor of both overall (p=0.02) and disease-free survival time (p=0.005). These results of this study suggest that HPV-negative patients with cervical carcinoma are have a significantly poorer prognosis after radiotherapy, and may be used as a marker in order to optimize the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. (author)

  18. Outcome following radiotherapy for loco-regionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local and regional recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer is reported to occur in 13-20% of treatment failures after resection. Reported post-recurrent median survival following radiotherapy ranges from 9 to 14 months. This study examines survival following radiotherapy alone for patients with loco-regionally recurring non-small cell lung cancer after initial surgery. Fifty-five patients, receiving radiotherapy at Westmead Hospital between 1979 and 1997, were eligible for study. Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing patient records. The end-point was overall survival. Symptom control was also recorded. Prognostic factors for analysis included age, sex, original presenting stage, disease-free interval (DFI), performance status, site of recurrence, treatment intent and dose. The median overall survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval: 8.1-13.0). Survival following treatment with radical intent was 26 months compared to 10.5 months for patients treated with palliative intent (P = 0.025). There was no significant difference in survival for short (<2 years) or long DFI, performance status, radiation dose, age, sex, site of recurrence or stage. Most patients (55%) had partial or complete resolution of symptoms. Radiotherapy results in overall post-recurrence median survival of nearly 1 year, consistent with previous published data. Radical treatment intent predicts better prognosis as a result of patient selection and higher dose. Radiotherapy is effective at palliating symptoms of this disease Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  19. On the radiotherapy of cancer of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period between 1963 and 1979 a total of 132 patients showing squamous cell carcinomas of the vulva underwent radical or partial excision of vulvar tissue and were subsequently subjected to radiotherapy at the Radiological Centre set up by the University of Essen. This irradiation of the vulva and surrounding area was carried out using a combination of speeding electrons and photons (n=78) or by exposure to either photons or electrons alone (n=15 and n=39, resp.) As a general rule, doses in the range from 40 to 60 Gy were administered. In 81 patients (61.4%) the area of irradiation was chosen so as to include the inguinal tissue. Taking together all tumour stages, it was calculated that 48.5% of the patients survived beyond 3 years and 34.1% beyond 5 years. The mean survival time was determined to be 31.5 months. Surprisingly, the rate of relapses was not observed to differ significantly between patients with radical vulvectomy and those with generous removal of vulvar tissue and subsequent radiotherapy, which was attributed to the beneficial effects of irradiation. From the results of this analysis and relevant data in the literature a stepwise strategy for the treatment of cancer of the vulva is derived. Radical vulvectomy including removal of the inguinal lymph nodes is the obvious method here. The use of radiotherapy in the vulvar region should be considered in cases, where radical excision is not absolutely indicated or impossible to carry out. Irradiation of efferent lymph vessels is advisable, where these are shown to be affected and surgery is precluded by the circumstances given. (orig.)

  20. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  1. Hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, Jens; Audry, H.;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several trials have studied the role of unconventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, but the effect of such treatment on survival is not clear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess whether this type of radiotherapy could improve survival......-specified categories: hyperfractionated, accelerated, and accelerated with total dose reduction. FINDINGS: 15 trials with 6515 patients were included. The median follow-up was 6 years. Tumours sites were mostly oropharynx and larynx; 5221 (74%) patients had stage III-IV disease (International Union Against Cancer...... radiotherapy (2% with accelerated fractionation without total dose reduction and 1.7% with total dose reduction at 5 years, p=0.02). There was a benefit on locoregional control in favour of altered fractionation versus conventional radiotherapy (6.4% at 5 years; p<0.0001), which was particularly efficient in...

  2. An Integer Linear Programming Model for the Radiotherapy Treatment Scheduling Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Edmund K; Petrovic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy represents an important phase of treatment for a large number of cancer patients. It is essential that resources used to deliver this treatment are employed effectively. This paper presents a new integer linear programming model for real-world radiotherapy treatment scheduling and analyses the effectiveness of using this model on a daily basis in a hospital. Experiments are conducted varying the days on which schedules can be created. Results obtained using real-world data from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, UK, are presented and show how the proposed model can be used with different policies in order to achieve good quality schedules.

  3. IMRT, IGRT, SBRT - Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, JL

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 4 years, IMRT, IGRT, SBRT: Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy has become a standard reference in the field. During this time, however, significant progress in high-precision technologies for the planning and delivery of radiotherapy in cancer treatment has called for a second edition to include these new developments. Thoroughly updated and extended, this new edition offers a comprehensive guide and overview of these new technologies and the many clinical treatment programs that bring them into practical use. Advances in intensity-modulated radiothera

  4. Influence of preventive dental treatment on mutans streptococci counts in patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Buzati Meca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium fluoride and sodium iodine on mutans streptococci counts in saliva of irradiated patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five patients were separated into three experimental groups and received chlorhexidine (0.12%, sodium fluoride (0.5% or sodium iodine (2%, which were used daily during radiotherapy and for 6 months after the conclusion of the treatment. In addition, a fourth group, composed by 15 additional oncologic patients, who did not receive the mouthwash or initial dental treatment, constituted the control group. Clinical evaluations were performed in the first visit to dental clinic, after initial dental treatment, immediately before radiotherapy, after radiotherapy and 30, 60, 90 days and 6 months after the conclusion of radiotherapy. After clinical examinations, samples of saliva were inoculated on SB20 selective agar and incubated under anaerobiosis, at 37ºC for 48 h. Total mutans streptococci counts were also evaluated by using real-time PCR, through TaqMan system, with specific primers and probes for S. mutans and S. sobrinus. RESULTS: All preventive protocols were able to reduce significantly mutans streptococci counts, but chlorhexidine gluconate was the most effective, and induced a significant amelioration of radiotherapy side effects, such as mucositis and candidosis. CONCLUSION: These results highlights the importance of the initial dental treatment for patients who will be subjected to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer treatment.

  5. Clinical Usefulness of Implanted Fiducial Markers for Hypofractionated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Min; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Woo Joo; Yoon, Jin Han; Kim, Tae Hyo; Kim, Soo Dong; Yun, Seong Guk [Dong-A University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To assess the usefulness of implanted fiducial markers in the setup of hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients by comparing a fiducial marker matched setup with a pelvic bone match. Four prostate cancer patients treated with definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy between September 2009 and August 2010 were enrolled in this study. Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate and through the rectum under ultrasound guidance around a week before radiotherapy. Glycerin enemas were given prior to each radiotherapy planning CT and every radiotherapy session. Hypofractionated radiotherapy was planned for a total dose of 59.5 Gy in daily 3.5 Gy with using the Novalis system. Orthogonal kV X-rays were taken before radiotherapy. Treatment positions were adjusted according to the results from the fusion of the fiducial markers on digitally reconstructed radiographs of a radiotherapy plan with those on orthogonal kV X-rays. When the difference in the coordinates from the fiducial marker fusion was less than 1 mm, the patient position was approved for radiotherapy. A virtual bone matching was carried out at the fiducial marker matched position, and then a setup difference between the fiducial marker matching and bone matching was evaluated. Three patients received a planned 17-fractionated radiotherapy and the rest underwent 16 fractionations. The setup error of the fiducial marker matching was 0.94{+-}0.62 mm (range, 0.09 to 3.01 mm; median, 0.81 mm), and the means of the lateral, craniocaudal, and anteroposterior errors were 0.39{+-}0.34 mm, 0.46{+-}0.34 mm, and 0.57{+-}0.59 mm, respectively. The setup error of the pelvic bony matching was 3.15{+-}2.03 mm (range, 0.25 to 8.23 mm; median, 2.95 mm), and the error of craniocaudal direction (2.29{+-}1.95 mm) was significantly larger than those of anteroposterior (1.73{+-}1.31 mm) and lateral directions (0.45{+-}0.37 mm), respectively (p< 0.05). Incidences of over 3 mm and 5 mm in setup

  6. Salvage treatments for prostatic radiation failure; Traitements de rattrapage apres radiotherapie prostatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumert, H. [Service d' urologie, groupe hospitalier Paris Saint-Joseph, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-10-15

    Local recurrence after external radiotherapy or brachytherapy occurs in 30% of patients treated for prostate cancer. These recurrences can be localised to the prostate and controlled by salvage treatment. Salvage prostatectomy is the gold standard treatment, however, it is associated with a high morbidity rate. Minimally invasive treatments such as cryo-therapy and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be proposed to treat local recurrences. Indications, complications and oncological results of these salvage treatments are discussed in this article. (author)

  7. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... focused beam of light to destroy cancer cells. Laser therapy can be used to: Destroy tumors and precancerous growths Shrink tumors that are blocking the stomach, colon, or esophagus Help treat cancer symptoms, such as bleeding Seal nerve endings after ...

  8. Clinical efficacy of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited data describe the prognosis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer. Thus, we evaluated treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for those patients. The study involved patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for one to three lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer at a single institution. A total dose of 40–60 Gy (median, 48 Gy) in three or four fractions was prescribed. A total of 79 metastatic lung lesions from 50 patients who underwent curative resection for their primary colorectal cancer or salvage treatment at a recurrent site were included. The one- and three-year local control rates were 88.7 % and 70.6 %, respectively. The three-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 64.0 % and 24.0 %, respectively. Patients with tumor volume ≤1.5 mL had a significantly better overall survival rate than those with tumor volume >1.5 mL (68.0 % vs. 60.0 % at three-year, p = 0.02). Local control was associated with a trend towards better survival (p = 0.06). No pulmonary complications greater than grade 2 were observed. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a competitive treatment modality for the management of lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer

  9. Quality assurance in radiotherapy of mammary cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Mangold, C A

    2000-01-01

    characteristics and correction factors necessary for the clinical application are investigated. For the brachytherapy treatment the dose distributions calculated with the TPS are in good agreement with both TLD and radiochromic film measurements (average deviations of point doses < +- 6 %). However, close to the interface tissue-air the dose is overestimated by the TPS since it neglects the finite size of a breast and hence the associated lack of backscatter (average deviations of point doses up to -13 %). The average deviation for the in vivo measurements performed on the body surface is -9.5 (+-5.3) %. Doses delivered by external radiotherapy are significantly overestimated by the TPS in the dose points located close to the surface (up to -16 %). The deviations are due to the insufficient ability of the TPS to account for the absence of tissue in the beam. In the wedged fields negative deviations are also observed for inner dose points (up to -8 %). These disagreements are either due to a wrong determina...

  10. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-Li; Xue, Chao-Fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6-8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64-66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68-70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  11. Intensity modulated radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy in breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    KR Muralidhar; Bhudevi Soubhagya; Shabbir Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the capacity to optimize the dose distribution. We analyzed the dosimetric differences of plans in treatment planning system (TPS) between VMAT and IMRT in treating breast cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were simulated, planned, and treated with VMAT using single, double or partial arcs. IMRT treatments were generated using 4 to 5 tangential IMRT fields for the same patients. All treatment plan...

  12. Treatment planning system for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama-Ito, Hiroko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the treatment planning (TP) and its peripheral system for carbon ion therapy that has been developed and in clinical use in recent two years at our institution. A new treatment planning system which is FOCUS customized to our irradiation system will be launched in clinical use soon. A new DICOM based PACS has been developed and in use. Now MRI, PET images are ready to be utilized for patient definition with image fusion functionality of radiotherapy TP. We implemented the exchange functionality of TP data specified by RTOG 3D QA Center in FOCUS, Pinnacle3 and heavy ion TP. Target volume and normal structure contours and dose distributions are exchangeable. A database system of carbon ion therapy dedicated to analysis of therapy data has been designed and implemented. All accessible planning data and treatment records of more than 1000 patients treated for seven and half years have been archived. The system has a DICOM RT sever and a database for miscellaneous text data. Limited numbers of private attributes were introduced for ion therapy specific objects. On-line as well as manual registration along with edit functionalities is prepared. Standard web browser is used to search and retrieve information. A DICOM RT viewer has been developed to view and retrieve RT images, dose distributions and structure set. These system described above are all designed to conform to the up-to-date standards of radiation therapy so as to be bases of the future development of the therapy at our institution. (author)

  13. Analysis of the value of DWI in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer after radiotherapy%DWI在宫颈癌诊断和放疗后疗效评价中的价值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊焕煜

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyse the value of DWI in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer after radiotherapy.Methods:97 patients with cervical cancer,76 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy,98 health patients were selected,DWI imaging of the magnetic resonance imaging is carried out,and the results are compared and analyzed.Results:The normal control group showed a high-low-slightly higher signal on DWI,the difference of ADC values between the cervical glands and the fibers was significant(P<0.05),DWI showed high signal in cervical cancer,and the ADC value was significantly lower than that of normal cervix(P<0.05),the cervical cancer ADC value was significantly higher in cervical cancer than in newly diagnosed cervical cancer(P<0.05).Conclusion:Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical cancer patients with magnetic resonance imaging can be performed for accurate diagnosis and differential diagnosis,and it has important value for the prognosis of DWI.%目的:分析DWI在宫颈癌诊断和放疗后疗效评价中的价值.方法:收治宫颈癌患者97例、宫颈癌放疗后患者76例以及宫颈健康手术者98例,对其展开磁共振DWI成像,而后对检查结果进行对比分析.结果:正常对照组宫颈DWI上表现为高-低-稍高信号,宫颈腺体、纤维间质ADC值差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);宫颈癌的DWI表现高信号,ADC值较正常宫颈明显降低(P<0.05);放疗后宫颈癌ADC值较初诊宫颈癌发生明显升高(P<0.05).结论:宫颈癌患者经磁共振DWI成像可以进行准确的诊断和鉴别,对放疗后的预后监测具有重要价值.

  14. Tangential volumetric modulated arc therapy technique for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Virén, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Janne; Myllyoja, Kimmo; Koskela, Kristiina; Lahtinen, Tapani; Seppälä, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to introduce a new restricted tangential volumetric modulated arc therapy (tVMAT) technique for whole breast irradiation and compare its dosimetric properties to other currently used breast cancer radiotherapy techniques. Method Ten consecutive women with left-sided breast cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study. Four treatment plans were generated for each patient: 1) standard tangential field-in-field (FinF), 2) tangential intensity modul...

  15. Dosimetric and clinical advantages of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) during radiotherapy of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Abate, Armando; Pinnarò, Paola; D’Andrea, Marco; Infusino, Erminia; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Giordano, Carolina; Ferraro, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the potential dosimetric and clinical benefits of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) technique during radiotherapy of breast cancer compared with Free Breathing (FB). Methods Eight left-sided breast cancer patients underwent a supervised breath hold during treatment. For each patient, two CT scans were acquired with and without breath hold, and virtual simulation was performed for conventional tangential fields, utilizing 6 or 15 MV photon fields. The resulting dose...

  16. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction

  17. Conservative Surgery and Primary Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer; Yonsei Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Chang Ok; Lee, Hy De; Lee, Kyung Sik; Jung, Woo Hee; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    Breast conserving surgery and irradiation is now accepted as preferable treatment method for the patients with stage I and II breast cancer. Our institution activated team approach for breast conservation 1991 and treated on hundred and forty patients during the next three years. Purpose: To present our early experience with eligibility criteria, treatment techniques, and the morbidities of primary radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty four patients with early stage breast cancer who received breast conserving treatment between January 1991 and December 1992 were evaluated. All patients received partial mastectomy(wide excision to quadrantectomy) and axillary node dissection followed by radiotherapy. Total dose of 4500-5040 cGy in 5-5 1/2 weeks was given to entire involved breast and boost dose of 1000-2000 cGy in 1-2 weeks was given to the primary tumor site. Linac 4 MV X-ray was used for breast irradiation and electron beam was used for boost. Thirty five patients received chemotherapy before or after radiotherapy. Patients characteristics, treatment techniques, and treatment related morbidities were analyzed. Results: Age distribution was ranged from 23 to 59 year old with median age of 40. Twenty-seven patients had T1 lesions and 34 patients had T2 lesions. In three patients, pathologic diagnosis was ductal carcinoma in situ. Thirty-seven patients were N0 and 27 patients were N1. There were three recurrences, one in the breast and two distant metastases during follow-up period(6-30 months, median 14 months). Only one breast recurrence occurred at undetected separate lesion with microcalcifications on initial mammogram. There was no serious side reaction which interrupted treatment courses or severe late complication. Only one symptomatic radiation pneumonitis and one asymptomatic radiation peumonitis were noted. Conclusions: Conservative surgery and primary radiotherapy for early breast cancer in proven to be safe and comfortable treatment method without

  18. Nutritional status of cancer patients given different treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, K; Roy, R K; Vijayalakshmi; Prakash, Jamuna

    2004-08-01

    The nutritional status of 91 cancer patients was assessed at the time of diagnosis and follow-up assessments were carried out at the third and sixth week after initiating different treatment modalities to study the effect of type and duration of treatment on nutritional status. Parameters assessed were anthropometry, biochemical status and clinical signs and symptoms of nutritional deficiencies. Treatment modalities studied were radiotherapy, chemotherapy, chemotherapy+radiotherapy, and combined treatment modality (surgery+radiotherapy+chemotherapy). The nutritional status of male patients was affected most by chemotherapy+radiotherapy while females were affected most with radiotherapy. Biochemical parameters showed a marginal decline in total serum protein and serum albumin concentrations. Haemoglobin concentrations declined substantially with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The lymphocyte count decreased substantially irrespective of the treatment modality. Clinical examination revealed increased incidences of deficiency signs and symptoms in all patients during follow-up irrespective of treatment modality.

  19. Prognostic factors, patterns of recurrence and toxicity for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of definitive chemo-radiation or radiotherapy alone in patients with esophageal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of n = 238 patients with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the esophagus treated with definitive radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy at our institution between 2000 and 2012. Patients of all stages were included to represent actual clinical routine. We performed univariate and multivariate analysis to identify prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Moreover, treatment-related toxicity and patterns of recurrence were assessed. Patients received either chemo-radiation (64%), radiotherapy plus cetuximab (10%) or radiotherapy alone (26%). In 69%, a boost was applied, resulting in a median cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy; the remaining 31% received a median total dose of 50 Gy. For the entire cohort, the median OS and PFS were 15.0 and 11.0 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, important prognostic factors for OS and PFS were T stage (OS: P = 0.005; PFS: P = 0.006), M stage (OS: P = 0.015; PFS: P = 0.003), concomitant chemotherapy (P < 0.001) and radiation doses of >55 Gy (OS: P = 0.019; PFS: P = 0.022). Recurrences occurred predominantly as local in-field relapse or distant metastases. Toxicity was dominated by nutritional impairment (12.6% with G3/4 dysphagia) and chemo-associated side effects. Definitive chemo-radiation in patients with esophageal cancer results in survival rates comparable with surgical treatment approaches. However, local and distant recurrence considerably restrict prognosis. Further advances in radio-oncological treatment strategies are necessary for improving outcome. (author)

  20. Spanish patterns of care for 3D radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Curative radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer is a difficult challenge, despite the use of conformal radiotherapy. Optimal three-dimensional delineation of treatment volumes is essential for improvement of local control and for limiting of tissue toxicity. Material and Methods: A planning course on clinical practice of lung cancer was held in Barcelona. A questionnaire was given concerning (1) patient positioning, (2) planning-computed tomography scan, (3) accounting for tumor mobility, (4) investigative-procedure respiration-gated radiotherapy and breath-holding maneuvers, (5) generation of target volumes, (6) treatment planning, and (7) treatment delivery. This questionnaire was made to determine the Spanish application of European recommendations. Results: On the negative side, 1 hospital did not use three-dimensional tools, less than 50% used immobilization devices, and 55.6% used computed tomography slices of greater than 5 mm. On the positive side, 70.4% did not use standard margins for gross target volume derived from a computed tomography scan, 92.6% agreed with the inclusion of Naruke anatomic criteria of 1 cm or more in gross target volume planning, and 75% used V20 to estimate the risk of pneumonitis. Conclusions: This study is the first validation of European recommendations for treatment planning and execution of radiotherapy in lung cancer. The main conclusion is the need to improve the negative aspects determined

  1. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  2. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Laura [Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Pearson, Erik A. [Techna Institute and the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Pelizzari, Charles A., E-mail: c-pelizzari@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  3. Lack of benefit for the addition of androgen deprivation therapy to dose-escalated radiotherapy in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krauss, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Assessment of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) benefits for prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1991 to 2004, 1,044 patients with intermediate- (n = 782) or high-risk (n = 262) prostate cancer were treated with dose-escalated RT at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients received external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy (high or low dose rate), or high dose rate brachytherapy plus pelvic EBRT. Intermediate-risk patients had Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10.0-19.9 ng\\/mL, or Stage T2b-T2c. High-risk patients had Gleason score 8-10, PSA >\\/=20, or Stage T3. Patients were additionally divided specifically by Gleason score, presence of palpable disease, and PSA level to further define subgroups benefitting from ADT. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 5 years; 420 patients received ADT + dose-escalated RT, and 624 received dose-escalated RT alone. For all patients, no advantages in any clinical endpoints at 8 years were associated with ADT administration. No differences in any endpoints were associated with ADT administration based on intermediate- vs. high-risk group or RT modality when analyzed separately. Patients with palpable disease plus Gleason >\\/=8 demonstrated improved clinical failure rates and a trend toward improved survival with ADT. Intermediate-risk patients treated with brachytherapy alone had improved biochemical control when ADT was given. CONCLUSION: Benefits of ADT in the setting of dose-escalated RT remain poorly defined. This question must continue to be addressed in prospective study.

  4. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy for the locally advanced rectum cancer; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante dans le cancer du rectum localement evolue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haoui, M.; Aksil, N.; Boualga, K.; Moussaoui, D.; Ladj, O. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre anti-cancer, Blida (Algeria)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study which aimed at assessing the use of a concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, its tolerance and its feasibility in the case of a locally advanced rectum cancer. Based on data obtained among 62 patients presenting a rectum cancer, they analyse the results in terms of tolerance (cases of leukopenia, anemia, diarrhea, radiodermatitis), of relapses, and survival. Toxicity is acceptable and the concomitant treatment renders the tumour operable in many cases. Short communication

  5. Examining Mediators and Moderators of Yoga for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Milbury, Kathrin; Chandwani, Kavita D; Chaoul, Alejandro; Perkins, George; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Haddad, Robin; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao; Raghuram, N V; Spelman, Amy; Arun, Banu; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Hypothesis This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy.Methods Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 1-, 3-, and 6-months posttreatment. Results Baseline depressive symptoms (P = .03) and sleep disturbances (P Yoga may provide the greatest mental-health-related QOL benefits for those experiencing pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms. Yoga may improve physical-health-related QOL by increasing ability to find benefit in the cancer experience. PMID:26867802

  6. Research progress on the treatment of reducing cardiac injury related to breast cancer radiotherapy%降低乳腺癌放疗心脏损伤相关治疗措施的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林权(综述); 鄂明艳(审校)

    2016-01-01

    乳腺癌放疗后患者长期受到心脏损伤的影响,心脏损伤涉及很多结构,包括冠状动脉、心肌、传导系统、心包及瓣膜等。这些损伤增加了放射相关性心脏病的风险,从而影响患者的远期生存率和生活质量。随着现代放射治疗技术、物理学及其他各项技术的发展,乳腺癌患者放射治疗后发生心脏损伤的几率明显降低。本文针对降低乳癌患者放疗心脏损伤的各项技术及治疗措施(包括乳腺托架定位及俯卧位放疗、3DCRT及IMRT放射治疗、呼吸门控技术、大分割放疗、加速部分乳腺放疗及质子治疗等)做一综述。%Long term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiothera-py.Cardiac injury has been described involving essentially almost all structures of the heart,including the coro-nary arteries,myocardium,conduction systems,pericardium and valves.These injuries have increased the risk of heart disease,which affects the long term survival and quality of life.With the development of modern radiation therapy technology,physics and other technologies,the incidence of cardiac injury in the patients with breast canc-er after radiotherapy has been significantly reduced.The paper is a review of the techniques and treatment meas-ures(including breast board,prone positioning,3DCRT,IMRT,DIBH,Hypofractionation radiotherapy,APBI and protons radiotherapy) for reducing cardiac injury in the patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

  7. The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of desmoid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1974 to 1983 in the Netherlands Cancer Institute, 21 patients with desmoid tumours were treated with radiation therapy. Nineteen patients were irradiated postoperatively (11 patients had micro- or macroscopic residual disease, 8 patients treated for recurrent disease had narrow surgical margins), 2 patients with inoperable tumours were treated with radiation alone. The entire involved muscle received a dose of 40 Gy, while a boost of 20 Gy was delivered to the tumour bed. Local control was achieved in 19 out of 21 patients, with an actuarial 5 year disease-free survival of 90%. No relation could be found between the amount of tumour present and local control. With careful set-up of treatment fields and long-term physical therapy, complications like fibrosis, ankylosis and oedema could be minimised. These excellent results with radiotherapy for minimal residual tumour, or even for macroscopic tumour, makes mutilating surgery unnecessary. (Auth.)

  8. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33–5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94–0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88–0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19–2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  9. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstedt, Dan, E-mail: dan.lundstedt@vgregion.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Magnus [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Malmstroem, Per [Skane Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Alsadius, David [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sundberg, Agnetha [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Holmberg, Erik [Oncologic Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  10. Predictors of continuous tobacco smoking in a clinical cohort study of Danish laryngeal cancer patients smoking before treated with radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pia Krause; Tolstrup, Janne S; Olsen, Maja H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many cancer patients who are smokers when starting cancer therapy continue smoking despite evidence of tobacco smoking as a risk factor for poor treatment response and secondary primary cancers. Small samples and inconsistent results in previous studies warrant further research...... to identify predictors of being a continuous smoker during and after radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the clinical database of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA), we identified 1455 patients diagnosed with laryngeal cancer between 2000 and 2010, who were all smokers at date of diagnosis...... and treated with primary radiotherapy. Information on the socio-economic characteristics of the study cohort was obtained from Statistics Denmark the year prior to diagnosis. Logistic regression analyses were applied. RESULTS: In the cohort of laryngeal cancer patients smoking before starting radiotherapy, 50...

  11. Impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer. A study of 2940 setup deviations in 980 MVCTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, Kilian; Specht, Hanno; Kampfer, Severin; Duma, Marciana Nona [Technische Universitaet Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Petrucci, Alessia [University of Florence, Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence (Italy); Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern Linz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Linz (Austria); Schuster, Tibor [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this study was to assess the impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) of the prostatic gland. In all, 28 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this study. After the placement of an endorectal balloon, the planning target volume (PTV) was treated to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. A simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction and per day) was delivered to a smaller target volume. All patients underwent daily prostate-aligned IGRT by megavoltage CT (MVCT). Retrospectively, three different setup approaches were evaluated by comparison to the prostate alignment: setup by skin alignment, endorectal balloon alignment, and automatic registration by bones. A total of 2,940 setup deviations were analyzed in 980 fractions. Compared to prostate alignment, skin mark alignment was associated with substantial displacements, which were ≥ 8 mm in 13 %, 5 %, and 44 % of all fractions in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions, respectively. Endorectal balloon alignment yielded displacements ≥ 8 mm in 3 %, 19 %, and 1 % of all setups; and ≥ 3 mm in 27 %, 58 %, and 18 % of all fractions, respectively. For bone matching, the values were 1 %, 1 %, and 2 % and 3 %, 11 %, and 34 %, respectively. For prostate radiotherapy, setup by skin marks alone is inappropriate for patient positioning due to the fact that, during almost half of the fractions, parts of the prostate would not be targeted successfully with an 8-mm safety margin. Bone matching performs better but not sufficiently for safety margins ≤ 3 mm. Endorectal balloon matching can be combined with bone alignment to increase accuracy in the vertical direction when prostate-based setup is not available. Daily prostate alignment remains the gold standard for high-precision radiotherapy with small safety margins. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie bestand darin, den Einfluss verschiedener Herangehensweisen bei der Einstellung einer

  12. Acquired lymphangiectasis following surgery and radiotherapy of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori Gnaneshwar Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired lymphangiectasia (AL is a significant and rare complication of surgery and radiotherapy. We report lymphangiectasia in a 40-year-old woman who had undergone radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. After 4 years of combined therapy, she developed multiple vesicles and bullae. Skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangiectasia. The case is unique as it is not associated with lymphedema, which is a usual accompaniment of lymphangiectasia following surgery and radiotherapy. AL is usually asymptomatic, but trauma may cause recurrent cellulitis. Treatment modalities include electrodessication, surgical excision, sclerotherapy and carbon dioxide laser ablation.

  13. The use of preoperative radiotherapy in the management of patients with clinically resectable rectal cancer: a practice guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumble R Bryan

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This systematic review with meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the literature and to develop recommendations regarding the use of preoperative radiotherapy in the management of patients with resectable rectal cancer. Methods The MEDLINE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, and abstracts published in the annual proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology were systematically searched for evidence. Relevant reports were reviewed by four members of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group and the references from these reports were searched for additional trials. External review by Ontario practitioners was obtained through a mailed survey. Final approval of the practice guideline report was obtained from the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. Results Two meta-analyses of preoperative radiotherapy versus surgery alone, nineteen trials that compared preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery to surgery alone, and five trials that compared preoperative radiotherapy to alternative treatments were obtained. Randomized trials demonstrate that preoperative radiotherapy followed by surgery is significantly more effective than surgery alone in preventing local recurrence in patients with resectable rectal cancer and it may also improve survival. A single trial, using surgery with total mesorectal excision, has shown similar benefits in local recurrence. Conclusion For adult patients with clinically resectable rectal cancer we conclude that: • Preoperative radiotherapy is an acceptable alternative to the previous practice of postoperative radiotherapy for patients with stage II and III resectable rectal cancer; • Both preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy decrease local recurrence but neither improves survival as much as postoperative radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Therefore, if preoperative radiotherapy is used

  14. Influence of TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy on primary liver cancer patients’ malignant biological indicators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Liu; Yu Wang; Guang-Yan Lei; Xiao-Hong Yan; Qiao Yang; Hai-Ping Zhu; Yi Geng

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the influence of TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy on primary liver cancer patients’ malignant biological indicators.Methods:A total of 112 cases of primary liver cancer patients who received treatment in our hospital, Xijing Hospital and Tumor Hospital of Shaanxi Province were chosen as research subjects and divided into control group (TACE therapy alone) with 63 cases in it and observation group (TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy) with 49 cases according to different treatment, and then the levels of malignant biological indicators after 2 months of treatment were compared between two groups.Results:Serum VEGF, FGF and MMP levels of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group; serum AFP-L3, GP73, Sb7-H3, AFU and CatS levels were significantly lower than those of control group; serum ICAM-1, ESM-1 and uPA levels were lower than those of control group.Conclusion: TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy can effectively reduce primary liver cancer patients’ serum malignant biological indicator levels, decrease the degree of malignancy of cancer cells and slow disease progression, and is an ideal treatment.

  15. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  17. A review of bone metastasis and its treatments, with a special emphasis on local and systemic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of bone metastases consist of analgesics, radiotherapy, surgery and bisphosphonates. Control of bone metastases is a challenging process, necessitating a multi-disciplinary approach and teamwork between the treating physicians. Radiotherapy is the most useful modality for this purpose in oncology, given both as a local and systemic therapy. We hope that this review would be able to help in choosing the best treatment option for this common palliative situation in Iranian cancer patients.

  18. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase III Double-Blind, Randomized Trial From the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A two-arm, double-blind, randomized trial was performed to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma who were undergoing external beam radiotherapy to the breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream daily. The primary study endpoint was the provider-assessed maximal grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, radiation dermatitis. The secondary endpoints included provider-assessed Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse event monitoring. The patient-reported outcome measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and a quality-of-life self-assessment. An assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 176 patients were enrolled between September 21, 2007, and December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary endpoint showed no difference in the mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs. 1.3 for placebo; p = .18). Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity was greater in the placebo group (p = .04), primarily from pruritus. For the patient-reported outcome measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for the MMF group showed less itching (p = .008), less irritation (p = .01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (p = .02), and less annoyance with skin problems (p = .04). The group's maximal Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (p = .02) and less itching (p = .002). Conclusion: Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy might experience reduced acute skin toxicity compared with patients receiving placebo.

  19. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase 3 Double-Blind, Randomized Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert C.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Stoffel, Thomas J.; Haselow, Robert E.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Bearden, James D.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Martenson, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A 2-arm, double-blinded, randomized trial to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma receiving external beam radiotherapy to breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to daily apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream. Primary study end point was provider-assessed maximum grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 radiation dermatitis. Secondary end points included provider-assessed CTCAE grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse-event monitoring. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and quality of life self-assessment. Assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results In total, 176 patients were enrolled from September 21, 2007 through December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary end point showed no difference in mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs 1.3 for placebo; P=.18). CTCAE toxicity was greater in placebo group (P=.04), primarily from pruritus. For PRO measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for MMF group showed less itching (P=.008), less irritation (P=.01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (P=.02), and less annoyance with skin problems (P=.04); the group's maximum Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (P=.02) and less itching (P=.002). Conclusion Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy may experience reduced acute skin toxicity in comparison to placebo. PMID:20800381

  20. Psychological functioning in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiegelis, HE; Ranchor, AV; Sanderman, R

    2004-01-01

    Although many side-effects of radiotherapy (RT) are physical, previous studies have shown that patients, when treated with RT, also experience psychological problems. This review describes the psychological functioning of cancer patients prior to, during, and after RT. Moreover, we examined whether

  1. Treatment accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To assess the geometric accuracy of the delivery of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for brain tumours using the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) relocatable frame. Accuracy of treatment delivery was measured via portal images acquired with an amorphous silicon based electronic portal imager (EPI). Results were used to assess the existing verification process and to review the current margins used for the expansion of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV). Patients and methods: Patients were immobilized in a GTC frame. Target volume definition was performed on localization CT and MRI scans and a CTV to PTV margin of 5 mm (based on initial experience) was introduced in 3D. A Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) fiducial system was used for stereotactic coordinate definition. The existing verification process consisted of an intercomparison of the coordinates of the isocentres and anatomy between the localization and verification CT scans. Treatment was delivered with 6 MV photons using four fixed non-coplanar conformal fields using a multi-leaf collimator. Portal imaging verification consisted of the acquisition of orthogonal images centred through the treatment isocentre. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) created from the CT localization scans were used as reference images. Semi-automated matching software was used to quantify set up deviations (displacements and rotations) between reference and portal images. Results: One hundred and twenty six anterior and 123 lateral portal images were available for analysis for set up deviations. For displacements, the total errors in the cranial/caudal direction were shown to have the largest SD's of 1.2 mm, while systematic and random errors reached SD's of 1.0 and 0.7 mm, respectively, in the cranial/caudal direction. The corresponding data for rotational errors (the largest deviation was found in the sagittal plane) was 0.7 deg. SD (total error), 0.5 deg. (systematic) and 0

  2. Influence of radiotherapy on the dose of adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    399 patients with early breast cancer were randomly allocated to treatment by either modified radical mastectomy or lumpectomty and radiotherapy. 169 had histologically involved axillary nodes and were randomised to receive either adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy (76 patients) or no systemic adjuvant treatment (93 patients). Chemotherapy comprised a combination of oral cyclophosphamide and intravenous methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) for 12 cycles over one year. Patients in the mastectomy group received a significantly higher percentage of the planned chemotherapy dose compared with those in the radiotherapy group (median 85% v. 71% p < 0.05). Patients treated with radiotherapy were more frequently nauseated and developed more severe alopecia, but these differences were not statistically significant. At median follow-up of 37 months the relapse-rate and pattern of relapse were similar in both groups of patients receiving CMF. (author). 11 refs.; 5 tabs

  3. Interfractional Prostate Shifts: Review of 1870 Computed Tomography (CT) Scans Obtained During Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using CT-on-Rails for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shifts of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift

  4. Intraoperative avidination for radionuclide treatment as a radiotherapy boost in breast cancer: results of a phase II study with 90Y-labeled biotin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after conservative surgery for early breast cancer requires 5-7 weeks. For elderly patients and those distant from an RT center, attending for EBRT may be difficult or impossible. We investigated local toxicity, cosmetic outcomes, and quality of life in a new breast irradiation technique - intraoperative avidination for radionuclide therapy (IART) - in which avidin is administered to the tumor bed and 90Y-labelled biotin later administered intravenously to bind the avidin and provide irradiation. Reduced duration EBRT (40 Gy) is given subsequently. After surgery, 50 (ten patients), 100 (15 patients) or 150 mg (ten patients) of avidin was injected into the tumor bed. After 12-24 h, 3.7 GBq 90Y-biotin (beta source for therapeutic effect) plus 185 MBq 111In-biotin (gamma source for imaging and dosimetry) was infused slowly. Whole-body scintigraphy and SPECT/CT images were taken for up to 30 h. Shortened EBRT started 4 weeks later. Local toxicity was assessed by RTOG scale; quality of life was assessed by EORTC QOL-30. Of 35 patients recruited (mean age 63 years; range 42-74) 32 received IART plus EBRT. 100 mg avidin provided 19.5 ± 4.0 Gy to the tumor bed and was considered the optimum dose. No side-effects of avidin or 90Y-biotin occurred, with no hematological or local toxicity. Local G3 toxicity occurred in 3/32 patients during EBRT. IART plus EBRT was well accepted, with good cosmetic outcomes and maintained quality of life. IART plus reduced EBRT can accelerate irradiation after conservative breast surgery. (orig.)

  5. Intraoperative avidination for radionuclide treatment as a radiotherapy boost in breast cancer: results of a phase II study with {sup 90}Y-labeled biotin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Giovanni; De Cicco, Concetta; Carbone, Giuseppe; Pacifici, Monica [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila E.; Cremonesi, Marta; Di Dia, Amalia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Gianmatteo; Galimberti, Viviana; Luini, Alberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ferrari, Annamaria; Orecchia, Roberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy); De Santis, Rita [Sigma-Tau SpA R and D, Rome (Italy); Zurrida, Stefano [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); Veronesi, Umberto [European Institute of Oncology, Scientific Director, Milan (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after conservative surgery for early breast cancer requires 5-7 weeks. For elderly patients and those distant from an RT center, attending for EBRT may be difficult or impossible. We investigated local toxicity, cosmetic outcomes, and quality of life in a new breast irradiation technique - intraoperative avidination for radionuclide therapy (IART) - in which avidin is administered to the tumor bed and {sup 90}Y-labelled biotin later administered intravenously to bind the avidin and provide irradiation. Reduced duration EBRT (40 Gy) is given subsequently. After surgery, 50 (ten patients), 100 (15 patients) or 150 mg (ten patients) of avidin was injected into the tumor bed. After 12-24 h, 3.7 GBq {sup 90}Y-biotin (beta source for therapeutic effect) plus 185 MBq {sup 111}In-biotin (gamma source for imaging and dosimetry) was infused slowly. Whole-body scintigraphy and SPECT/CT images were taken for up to 30 h. Shortened EBRT started 4 weeks later. Local toxicity was assessed by RTOG scale; quality of life was assessed by EORTC QOL-30. Of 35 patients recruited (mean age 63 years; range 42-74) 32 received IART plus EBRT. 100 mg avidin provided 19.5 {+-} 4.0 Gy to the tumor bed and was considered the optimum dose. No side-effects of avidin or {sup 90}Y-biotin occurred, with no hematological or local toxicity. Local G3 toxicity occurred in 3/32 patients during EBRT. IART plus EBRT was well accepted, with good cosmetic outcomes and maintained quality of life. IART plus reduced EBRT can accelerate irradiation after conservative breast surgery. (orig.)

  6. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Günther

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. Materials and methods In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on (i the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease, (ii a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and (iii the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy, (iv the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. Results The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. Conclusions The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients.

  7. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a comparative study of quality control adherence at two cancer hospitals in Spain and Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed a clinical audit of preoperative rectal cancer treatment at two European radiotherapy centres (Poland and Spain). The aim was to independently verify adherence to a selection of indicators of treatment quality and to identify any notable inter-institutional differences. A total of 162 patients, in Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) 68 and in Greater Poland Cancer Centre (GPCC) 94, diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy were included in retrospective study. A total of 7 quality control measures were evaluated: waiting time, multidisciplinary treatment approach, portal verification, in vivo dosimetry, informed consent, guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, and patient monitoring during treatment. Several differences were observed. Waiting time from pathomorphological diagnosis to initial consultation was 31 (ICO) vs. 8 (GPCC) days. Waiting time from the first visit to the beginning of the treatment was twice as long at the ICO. At the ICO, 82% of patient experienced treatment interruptions. The protocol for portal verification was the same at both institutions. In vivo dosimetry is not used for this treatment localization at the ICO. The ICO utilizes locally-developed guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, while the GPCC is currently developing its own guidelines. An independent external clinical audit is an excellent approach to identifying and resolving deficiencies in quality control procedures. We identified several procedures amenable to improvement. Both institutions have since implemented changes to improve quality standards. We believe that all radiotherapy centres should perform a comprehensive clinical audit to identify and rectify deficiencies

  8. Evolution of Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer – The Sunnybrook Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hima Bindu Musunuru

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR is a newer method of ultra hypo fractionated radiotherapy that uses combination of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT or volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT, to deliver high doses of radiation in a few fractions to a target, at the same time sparing the surrounding organs at risk(OAR.SABR is ideal for treating small volumes of disease and has been introduced in a number of disease sites including brain, lung, liver, spine and prostate. Given the radiobiological advantages of treating prostate cancer with high doses per fraction, SABR is becoming a standard of care for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer patients based upon the results from Sunny Brook and also the US-based prostate SABR consortium. This review examines the development of moderate and ultra hypo fractionation schedules at the Odette Cancer centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences. Moderate hypo fractionation protocol was first developed in 2001 for intermediate risk prostate cancer and from there on different treatment schedules including SABR evolved for all risk groups.

  9. [Elective radiotherapy of the regional lymph node areas in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poortmans, P-M-P

    2006-11-01

    In breast cancer patients, the incidence of involvement of the regional lymph nodes and the risk for developing a locoregional recurrence are highly influenced by several prognostic factors. A meta-analysis of the EBCTCG showed a reduction of about 70% of the locoregional recurrence rate with radiotherapy for all patients, independent of age, characteristics of the tumour or the administration of systemic treatment. At the same time, this meta-analysis confirmed that radiotherapy can lead to an increased risk for developing contralateral breast cancer and to an increase in the risk of non-breast cancer related mortality, mainly due to cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. Because of this, the net effect of regional radiotherapy will be strongly influenced by the individual risk factors of the patients and by the quality of the technical aspects of the radiotherapy. The thin line between the benefits of elective regional lymph node irradiation and the possible late toxicity for patients with early stage breast cancer is currently the subject of several prospective randomised trials, the results of which will only become available in several years. Moreover, recent developments in the field of novel prognostic factors will open completely new ways to be explored, which might give us new tools for estimating the individual benefit/risk ratio for every single patient. PMID:16962355

  10. Pneumonitis after radiotherapy of lung cancer - incidence and influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The most important side effect in radiotherapy of lung cancer is pneumonitis. The incidence of pneumotitis was evaluated in a retrospective study in the patient collective of the University of Heidelberg. Therapy related and therapy independent factors have been evaluated. Results: Regarding the treatment prior to irradiation patients with primary irradiation were affected in 26.5% (17% slight, 9.5% severe), with postoperative irradiation in 14% (9.3% slight, 4.7% severe), with radiochemotherapy of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in 15.4% (12% slight, 3.4% severe) by this side effect. These differences were not significant (p=0.32). The median onset of pneumonitis was 31 days after end of irradiation (severe 23 days, slight 44 days, p=0.026). By a univariate analysis the total dose at the prescription point was the most important factor (30 to 50.5 Gy 11%, 52 to 59 Gy 15%, 60 to 74 Gy 26%, p=0.007). High single doses (2.5 Gy) were only applied within a study of radiochemotherapy with a randomised sequential and alternating schedule. So that the increased rate of pneumonitis (42%) is not clearly separable from other influencing variables. A correlation between the applied techniques and the irradiated volume (measured by planimetric methods) was not demonstrable. Regarding the independent factors a high age, female sex and a low FeV1 were unfavourable. However, age and sex corrected FeV1 was not predictive. (orig./AJ)

  11. Influence of surgical treatment and radiotherapy of the advanced intraoral cancers on complete blood count, body mass index, liver enzymes and leukocyte CD64 expression:

    OpenAIRE

    Didanovič, Vojislav; Dovšak, Tadej; Ihan Hren, Nataša; Ihan, Alojz; Kansky, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    Background. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of the surgery and radiotherapy of the advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma on the complete blood count, body mass index (BMI), acute inflam-matory response, liver enzymes and expression of the CD64 index on leukocytes in the peripheral blood. Patients and method. Venous blood was obtained from 16 patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas treated with radical surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Blood samples were c...

  12. Relationship between radiation dose and lung function in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radical radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. The dose is limited by consequential pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Hence, a better understanding of the relationship between the dose-volume distributions and normal tissue side effects is needed. CT is a non-invasive method to monitor the development of fibrosis and pneumonitis, and spirometry is an established tool to measure lung function. NSCLC patients were included in a multicenter trial and treated with megavoltage conformal radiotherapy. In a subgroup comprising 16 patients, a total dose of 59-63 Gy with 1.8-1.9 Gy per fraction was given. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and corrected according to the linear-quadratic formula using alpha/beta=3 Gy. The patients underwent repetitive CT examinations (mean follow-up, 133 days) following radiotherapy, and pre and post treatment spirometry (mean follow-up, 240 days). A significant correlation was demonstrated between local lung dose and changes in CT numbers >30 days after treatment (p40 Gy Gy there was a sudden increase in CT numbers at 70-90 days. Somewhat unexpectedly, the highest mean lung doses were found in patients with the least reductions in lung function (peak expiratory flow; p<0.001). The correlation between CT numbers, radiation dose and time after treatment show that CT may be used to monitor development of lung fibrosis/pneumonitis after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Paradoxically, the patients with the highest mean lung doses experienced the minimum deterioration of lung function. This may be explained by reduction in the volume of existing tumour masses obstructing the airways, leading to relief of symptoms. This finding stresses the role of radiotherapy for lung cancer, especially where the treatment aim is palliative

  13. Quality of life after radiotherapy for prostate cancer; Qualite de vie apres radiotherapie pour un cancer localise de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, F. [Service d' oncologie medicale, CLCC Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France); CHU Cote-de-Nacre, 14 - Caen (France); Degrendel, A.C. [Service de radiotherapie, CLCC Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France); Guizard, A.V. [Registre general des tumeurs du Calvados, CLCC Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France)

    2010-10-15

    The goal of localized prostate cancer radiotherapy is to cure patients. The decision-making must integrate the survival but also the quality of life of patients. Some French validated self-reported questionnaires are available to evaluate quality of life. Whatever the treatments (radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, external beam radiation, with or without hormono-therapy), even if patients report more sequelae, their long-term quality of life is similar to that of the general population, except for patients treated with hormono-therapy who complain more decline of physical quality of life. In comparison with prostatectomy, patients treated with external beam radiation report less long-lasting urinary symptoms, but more bowel side effects, with no difference in global quality of life. Sexual disorders are initially less important with external beam radiation but increase over time. Brachytherapy shows no sexual function preservation benefit relative to radiation and may be less favourable with more urinary sequelae. The association of hormono-therapy and external beam radiation decreases the quality of life of the patients, with a negative impact on vitality, sexuality and increase urinary disorders. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) seems to better preserve the long-term digestive quality of life in comparison with conformal radiation therapy. Post-prostatectomy could induce more digestive toxicity, such as rectal irritation. The adjunction of hormono-therapy to radiation, the previous medical history of abdominal surgery, the field of radiation and the acute reactions to radiation are the main predictive factors to late toxicity and should be considered in the choice of initial treatment and for the follow-up. (authors)

  14. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field 'box' pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT) plans were generated for comparison. The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old). The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS) for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004). IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate

  15. Results of radiotherapy and combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy of inoperable lung cancer (A joint randomized study in some CMEA member countries, project 9.1.3 of the 9.1 Lung Cancer Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative analysis is presented of immediate results after radiotherapy and combined treatment (radio- and chemotherapy) in 174 patients with highly differentiated inoperable lung cancer. The data were provided by the participants of joint investigation in some CMEA member countries (Hungary, USSR, Czechoslovakia) during the period of 1976 to 1980. In the randomized study, radiotherapy (a total dose of 60 Gy) was applied in 98 patients, radiotherapy with chemotherapy (methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil) was applied in 76 patients. The comparative analysis showed that the employment of complementary chemotherapy tends to improve the immediate therapeutic effects. In case of highly differentiated planocellular carcinoma a pronounced positive effect was seen in 48.6% of patients as compared to 31.2% of those t