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Sample records for cancer treatments radiotherapy

  1. Hyperdosed radiotherapy in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machidon, Vasile; Jovmir, Vasile; Stanislav, Anastasia; Scurtu, Elena; Gazibar, Valeria; Lungu, Viorica

    2010-01-01

    The results of 328 patients with metastasizing breast cancer (BCM) are presented in the article. The distant metastases development in 4,5 % from the lot, which received the neoadjuvant treatment, is a high assurance in argumentation of preoperative hyperdosed X-ray therapy in breast cancer treatment. 15,8% from 100% - that is the significance of hyper dosed X-ray therapy versus classic X-ray therapy used preoperative in case of metastasizing breast cancer. The obtained data can not deny the efficacy of hyperdosed X-ray therapy in preoperative treatment of breast cancer. The hyperdosed X-ray therapy in the present moment remains current in the treatment of breast cancer and different localized cancers. (authors)

  2. Treatment of intractable cancer by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1981-07-01

    Intraoperative irradiation, thermotherapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and neutron brachytherapy were used for locally advanced cancer and value and limitations of these therapies were discussed. Intraoperative irradiation was mainly used for cancers of the gastro-intestinal tract. In stage I gastric cancers, no difference in the five-year survival rates was found between the groups with and without intraoperative irradiation. In gastric cancers of stage II or more, intraoperative irradiation had a favourable effect. Thermotherapy was applied to superficial radio-resistant cancer by the use of a thermal system of microwave- and radio-frequency heating. This treatment induced disappearance of approximately 50% of tumor. For the treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizer, studies of phase I and II with Misonidazole were conducted; from these results, the protocol was made for phase III study of esophagus cancer, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, uterus cancer, and brain cancer. Brachytherapy using /sup 252/Cf was also developed for locally advanced cancer.

  3. Clinical research on cancer treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Koyama, Kazuyuki; Morita, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    There are two purposes of using combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancers. One is to suppress distant metastasis, especially micrometastasis; the other is to improve localized control. As a trial of the utility of the former, systemic chemotherapy with CDDP and 5 FU was given successively with radiotherapy to treat nasopharyngeal cancer. The survival rate was significantly improved compared with historical control cases. The main reason for this effectiveness was the improvement of localized control. The suppression of distant metastasis is the subject of future research. As a trial of the utility of the latter, a super-selective intraarterial chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with radiotherapy was used to head and neck localized progressive cancers. The control of localized cancer was remarkably effective. This treatment is considered to be especially suitable for locally advanced tongue cancer and cancer of the root of the tongue. (author)

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of gastric cancer

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    Satomura, Kisaku; Inamoto, Shun; Honda, Kazuo; Takahashi, Masaji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-12-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer were reported. One hundred and five cases of gastric cancer were treated by intraoperative radiotherapy. Whatever the stage of the patient was, 3-year survival rate was found to be better in the radiotherapy group than that of the control group (treated surgical resection only). Five year survival rate of the stages III and IV in the radiotherapy group was better than the control group. Unfavorable side effects were observed in 4 cases out of 105 cases. In one case, penetration of postoperative peptic ulcer into the irradiated aortic wall was found by autopsy. Two cases of bile duct stenosis and one case of ileus due to acutely developed peritonitis carcinomatosa were experienced. In conclusion, intraoperative radiotherapy immediately after surgical resection for the treatment of gastric cancer was found to be an effective method. The most effective application of the method appears to be to cases of stage II and III without liver metastasis and peritoneal disseminations (H/sub 0/P/sub 0/, M, A).

  5. Associations between nutritional status, weight loss, radiotherapy treatment toxicity and treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amanda; Kiss, Nicole; Hodgson, Belinda; Crowe, Timothy C; Walsh, Adam D

    2011-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to nutritional deterioration which may be compounded by radiotherapy treatment toxicities. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy were associated with treatment toxicity and outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Seventy-three gastrointestinal cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy underwent medical record audits assessing body weight, radiotherapy toxicity, unplanned treatment breaks or hospital admissions and completion of prescribed treatment/s. Nutritional status was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 11) using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment tool. Seventy-five percent of patients lost weight throughout radiotherapy. Weight loss was significantly greater in patients experiencing unplanned radiotherapy breaks (-3.1% vs -1.6%, p nutritional status during radiotherapy (as measured by weight loss) may be associated with poorer short-term treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Patient numbers were too small to definitively determine the effect of nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy (defined by PG-SGA) on treatment outcomes. Further research is required to investigate this in larger, longer-term studies. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Tumor motion in lung cancers: An overview of four-dimensional radiotherapy treatment of lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusheel Munshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most modern radiotherapy centers have adopted contouring based treatment. Sparing of the normal structures has been made more achievable than ever before by use of technologies such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT. However, unlike, sites such as brain or head neck, thorax is a site in active motion, mostly contributed by patient's respiratory movement. 4 D radiotherapy, that addresses the issues of motion in thoracic tumours answers this critical question. The present article outlines the scope of need for 4 D radiotherapy and discusses the options available for 4 D treatments of cancer patients.

  7. Changes in sexual function after radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, V.; Hay, M.; Rozan, R.; Lagrange, J.L.; N'Guyen, T.; Giraud, B.

    1996-01-01

    The objective was to assess sexual function before and after definitive irradiation for the treatment of cancer of the prostate. The study comprised 67 patients (mean age 68 years) treated in five radiotherapy departments and assessed with repeated questionnaires about their libido, arousal, frequency and quality of intercourse, and sexual satisfaction. Interviews were obtained before radiotherapy and at the end of the first year after treatment. Sixty-three patients were married and 50 had a sexually effective partner. Forty-six patients presented with another pathology or medical treatment capable of inducing sexual dysfunction. Before radiotherapy, 40 patients were sexually active, with good to acceptable intercourse. Between 10 and 24 months after the end of radiotherapy, no disease progression was observed and prostate-specific antigen levels remained high in only two patients. Sexual function was preserved in 67% of patients but only 50% observed no change. The functional prognosis seemed to be related to the initial frequency and quality of intercourse; more than three times per month, the prognosis remained good, under three per month, it was poor. The patient's age was a predictive factor for the frequency of intercourse. (author)

  8. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.

    1992-01-01

    In the past decade the prognosis of patients with locally advanced lung cancer has not been altered significantly. In both small and non-small cell lung cancer cure rates are poor and 5-year survival rate still has not exceeded the 5% borderline. Despite of initially high response rates, a vast majority of patients suffered from tumor progression within 2 years after the start of treatment. Sites of tumor progression are either the primary tumor or the occurrence of distant metastases. Therefore, improvements of both local and systemic tumor control are necessary to increase long-term survival rate in lung cancer. Combined chemo- and radiotherapy may be an appropriate treatment approach to reach these aims. In patients with locally advanced lung cancer combined chemo-radiotherapy aims at overcoming radio- and chemo-therapy resistance as a cause of local treatment failure and at early eradication of distant micrometastases as a cause of systemic treatment failure. (author). 29 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

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    Api, P; Corcione, S; Magnoni, G

    1985-01-01

    A clinical evaluation regarding the efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in 294 patients with breast cancer is presented. In the author's opinion post-operative radiotherapy is fundamental in the treatment of this tumor. 21 refs.

  10. Treatment planning of radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbi, B.J.; Levitt, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Carcinomas of the lung is the most common form of cancer in men in the United States and many other countries. In the American Cancer Society Survey 1986, cancer of the lung made up 22% of all cancer in men and 11% of all cancer in women. The age-adjusted incidence rate was 70.6 and 14.4 for white men and women, respectively, and 89.6 and 14.4 for black men and women/100,000 population. The disease is more common in older individuals, particularly in the 5th and 6th decade, but rises to its highest incidence in the 7th decade. The proportion of women with carcinoma of the lung has been increasing steadily, while that of the males has been decreasing somewhat. Pathologic classification of carcinoma of the lung includes squamous cell, small-cell, adenocarcinoma, large cell carcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma. Most of the patients, practically 48%, have squamous cell carcinoma, 16% adenocarcinoma and 15% large-cell and 19.9% small-cell carcinoma. Recent studies have shown an increase in incidence of adenocarcinoma so that it may be the most common histologic type

  11. Radiotherapy as a conservative treatment in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfuhl, O.R. von; Miola, U.J.; Campos, J.C.F. de

    1977-01-01

    The review of 545 cases of cancer of the breast, 10% of which were treated by exclusive radiotherapy, emphasized the trend towards conservative treatment, because 29,8% of mastectomized women died within two years from the operation with distant metastases. As it is possible with radiotherapy to cause fibrosis or keep inactive breast tumors up to 5 cm diameter for two years or longer, one must consider irradiation as a good option for young women with small tumors. A combination was used of tangencial radiotherapy up to 5.000 rads to the whole breast with a boost dose two weeks later of 3.000 to 4.000 rads by means of intersticial radiotherapy given only to the palpable tumor. This was fulfilled by the afterloading method according to a system described as geometrization of the breast by parallel plates where holes were drilled for the needles. No recurrence was seen in 4 years in the selected group of 12 patients submitted to the mentioned treatment [pt

  12. Treatment results of radical radiotherapy in uterine cervix cancer

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    Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Bo Kyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Shin, Seong Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kang, Min Kyu; Ahn, Yong Chan [Samsung Medical center, sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the treatment results, prognostic factors, and complication rates after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with uterine cervix cancer who were treated with curative aim. Of 269 cervix cancer patients treated at the department of radiation oncology, Samsung Medical Center from September 1994 to July 1998, the 106 who were treated with radical radiotherapy were analyzed. The median age was 61 years (range 22 to 89). All patients except 4 with carcinoma in situ (CIS) were given external beam radiotherapy (range 30.6 {approx} 50.4 Gy to whole pelvis) and HDR brachytherapy. The common regimens of HDR brachytherapy were a total dose of 24 {approx} 28 Gy with 6 {approx} 7 fractions to point A at two fractions per week. The median overall treatment time was 55 days (range 44 to 104) in patients given both external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy. Early response of radiotherapy were evaluated by gynecologic examination and follow-up MRI 1 month after radiotherapy. Treatment responses were complete remission in 72 patients, partial response in 33 and no response in 1. The overall survival (OS) rate of all patients was 82%, and 73%, and the disease free survival (DFS) rate was 72%, and 69%, at 3, and 5 years, respectively. The pelvic control rate (PCR) was 79% at both 3 and 5 years. According to the FIGO stage, 3 and 5 year OS were 100% and 50% in CIS/IA, 100% in 100% in IB, 83% and 69% in IIA, 87% and 80% in IIB, and 62% and 62% in III, respectively. The 3 year OS in 4 patients with stage IVA was 100%. Three-year DFS were 80% in CIS/IA, 88% in IB, 100% in IIA, 64% in IIB, 58% in III, and 75% in IVA. Three-year PCR were 100% in CIS/IA, 94% in IB, 100% in IIA, 84% in IIB, 69% in III, and 50% in IVA. By univariate analysis, FIGO stage and treatment response were significant factors for OS. The significant factors for DFS were age, FIGO stage, treatment response and overall treatment time (OTT). For pelvic control rate

  13. Role of radiotherapy in the complex treatment for breast cancer

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    Pavlov, A S; Datsenko, V S [Tsentral' nyj Inst. Usovershenstvovaniya Vrachej, Moscow (USSR)

    1978-01-01

    Preoperational irradiation of a primary focus and all the areas of regional metastatic spreading turned out to be most effective in the case of mammary gland cancer complex treating. Postoperational radiotherapy is a less effective version of radiotherapy justified in the case of metastatic affection of lymph nodes and deliberate disturbance of ablastics during the operation. Time interval between the ending of preoperational radiotherapy and the operation must not exceed 3 weeks, as, otherwise, the biological potential of undamaged cancer cells is recovered and the hazard of appearing remote metastases increases. Additional courses of chemotherapy in the case of multiple of lymphogenic metastases improe prognosis for patients with mammary gland cancer.

  14. Radiotherapy for the treatment of primary vaginal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Rajiv; Tam, Tiffany; Dahrouge, Simon; E, Choan

    2005-01-01

    Disease control rates and toxicity were evaluated among 28 primary vaginal cancer patients treated with curative intent using radiotherapy. At 5 years, the majority (60%) of patients were disease-free and local control was 73% when a combination of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were used. Serious late toxicity was seen in 11% of patients

  15. Peroperative radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguier, M.; Schlienger, M.; Houry, S.; Charron, R.

    1987-01-01

    7 patients presenting with unresected (6 cases) or resected (1 case) cancer of the pancreas were treated peroperatively by radiotherapy. Tumors were treated with 15 to 20 Gy delivered by a particle accelerator. There were no post-operative complications. Three patients who were experiencing pain before radiotherapy no longer had pain after radiotherapy and this effect was maintained. Five patients died during the follow-up period after 5 to 10 months. Two patients are still alive after 4 and 9 months follow-up. This experience with peroperative radiotherapy should be continued [fr

  16. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  17. Does Treatment Duration Affect Outcome After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Li Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.; Chen, David Y.T.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The protraction of external beam radiotherapy (RT) time is detrimental in several disease sites. In prostate cancer, the overall treatment time can be considerable, as can the potential for treatment breaks. We evaluated the effect of elapsed treatment time on outcome after RT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and November 2004, 1,796 men with prostate cancer were treated with RT alone. The nontreatment day ratio (NTDR) was defined as the number of nontreatment days divided by the total elapsed days of RT. This ratio was used to account for the relationship between treatment duration and total RT dose. Men were stratified into low risk (n = 789), intermediate risk (n = 798), and high risk (n = 209) using a single-factor model. Results: The 10-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rate was 68% for a NTDR <33% vs. 58% for NTDR ≥33% (p = 0.02; BF was defined as a prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL). In the low-risk group, the 10-year FFBF rate was 82% for NTDR <33% vs. 57% for NTDR ≥33% (p = 0.0019). The NTDR was independently predictive for FFBF (p = 0.03), in addition to T stage (p = 0.005) and initial prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) on multivariate analysis, including Gleason score and radiation dose. The NTDR was not a significant predictor of FFBF when examined in the intermediate-risk group, high-risk group, or all risk groups combined. Conclusions: A proportionally longer treatment duration was identified as an adverse factor in low-risk patients. Treatment breaks resulting in a NTDR of ≥33% (e.g., four or more breaks during a 40-fraction treatment, 5 d/wk) should be avoided

  18. Multimodal treatment combining chemotherapy, hyperthermia and radiotherapy for ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Kei

    1992-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of heat in the treatment of cancer. Theoretically cells are the most sensitive to ionizing radiation at mitosis, whereas the cycle phase that is the most resistant to ionizing radiation namely late in the DNA. Synthetic phase (late S) is the most sensitive to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia has been reported to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active chemotherapeutic agents. When thermal potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents against malignant cells is contemplated, normal tissues have a relatively high ambient blood flow which increases in response to thermal stress, thereby dissipating heat, compared to tumors. Tumors, with relatively poor blood flow and a responsive neovasculature, are in capable of augmenting flow and acting as a heat reservoir. This is the phenomenon of a heat reservoir which is one factor to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active anticancer agents for enhancing the uptake in tumor. The importance is in the adjuvant chemotherapy treated for post operative, advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer. Heating enhances the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Thirty patients with ovarian cancer were subjected to the multidisciplinary treatment with combination of hyperthermochemotherapy and radiation. The 30 patients consisted of 18 with endometrioid adenocarcinoma and 7 with serious post operative or recurrent status. Two types of equipments with rediofrequencies of 70 MHz (BSD-1000) or 434 MHZ (TAG MED·HS 434) were used for hyperthermia. Chemotherapeutic agents such as adriamycin, cis DDP, cyclophosphamide and etoposide were injected intravenously. Arterial infusion with reservoir was very effective in advanced stage of ovarian cancer. No severe or fatal side effects were observed. Hyperthermochemotherapy is useful and effective for the postoperative management or the treatment of recurrent cancer of the ovary. (J.P.N.)

  19. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  20. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knab, Brian; Rash, Carla; Farrey, Karl; Jani, Ashesh B.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral role in the treatment of gastric cancer in the postsurgery setting, the inoperable/palliative setting, and, as in the case of the current report, in the setting of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Typically, anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) or 3-field techniques are used. In this report, we explore the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in a patient whose care was transferred to our institution after 3-field radiotherapy (RT) was given to a dose of 30 Gy at an outside institution. If the 3-field plan were continued to 50 Gy, the volume of irradiated liver receiving greater than 30 Gy would have been unacceptably high. To deliver the final 20 Gy, an opposed parallel AP/PA plan and an IMRT plan were compared to the initial 3-field technique for coverage of the target volume as well as dose to the kidneys, liver, small bowel, and spinal cord. Comparison of the 3 treatment techniques to deliver the final 20 Gy revealed reduced median and maximum dose to the whole kidney with the IMRT plan. For this 20-Gy boost, the volume of irradiated liver was lower for both the IMRT plan and the AP/PA plan vs. the 3-field plan. Comparing the IMRT boost plan to the AP/PA boost-dose range ( 10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan. The IMRT boost plan also irradiated a smaller volume of the small bowel compared to both the 3-field plan and the AP/PA plan, and also delivered lower dose to the spinal cord in comparison to the AP/PA plan. Comparison of the composite plans revealed reduced dose to the whole kidney using IMRT. The V20 for the whole kidney volume for the composite IMRT plan was 30% compared to approximately 60% for the composite AP/PA plan. Overall, the dose to the liver receiving greater than 30 Gy was lower for the composite IMRT plan and was well below acceptable limits. In conclusion, our study suggests a dosimetric benefit of IMRT over conventional planning, and suggests an important role for

  2. Effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, indensity modulated radiotherapy, and conventional radiotherapy ON treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the irradiation volume, short-term and long-term efficacy of conventional radiotherapy (CR, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and indensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the treatment of esophageal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis method was adopted. The patients were divided into CR group (n=42, 3D-CRT group (n=45, and IMRT group (n=40. A follow-up visit was paid to collect the short-term and long-term efficacy, and the occurrence of adverse reactions. The gross tumor voluem (GTV, clinical target volume (CTV, planning target volume (PTV, and irradiation volume of organs (bilateral lungs, spinal cord, and heart at risk (OAR in the three groups were compared. Results: It was found by target volume comparison that the mean values of GTV, CTV, and PTV in the three groups were significantly increased (P0.05. The occurrence rate of adverse reactions in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group was significantly lower than that in CR group (P0.05. The difference of 1-year survival rate among the three groups was not statistically significant (P=0.144, but 3-year and 5-year survival rates in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group were significantly higher than those in CR group (P<0.05. Conclusions: 3D-CRT and IMRT can significantly enhance the short-term and long-term efficacy for esophageal cancer patients, and alleviate the radioactive damage; therefore, they are deserved to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  3. The situation of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion of gynecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Gerbaulet, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors explain the role and possibilities of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion in gynecological cancers as uterine cervix carcinoma, uterus carcinoma, ovary carcinoma and vulva carcinoma

  4. Radiotherapy for cancer treatment: A growing priority for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo Evans, Rogelio

    2001-01-01

    , there was a deplorable accident with one of the cobalt units. In 1996, 115 patients were seriously over-irradiated. This sad event made cancer a very important political and medical issue in Costa Rica. As a consequence of this accident, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) made a comprehensive assessment that revealed deficiencies in quality assurance practices. The assessment also established that a) the radiotherapy equipment had exceeded its useful life, estimated at 15 years; b) the country lacked adequate treatment standards; c) there was a shortage of trained personnel; and d) some brachytherapy equipment had expired 10 years previously. Because of this situation, the Costa Rican Institute Against Cancer (known by the acronym ICCC in Spanish) was created in 1998. Its mission is to support and promote cancer prevention and control. An important fact is that the legislation creating the ICCC states as a priority the construction of a specialized hospital. Planning for the new facility was based on the estimated 7,000 new cancer cases every year in Costa Rica, of which 40% (2,800 patients) involve radio-sensitive tumors Of these, about 30% (840 patients) must receive linear accelerator therapy. Given that each linear accelerator may treat 400 patients a year, and taking into consideration that the construction of a specialized hospital must be through public contract (a very complicated and slow process in Costa Rica), the Costa Rican Social Security Fund (Spanish acronym CCSS) decided to purchase three new cobalt units (THERATON 780-E Model 2000), new brachytherapy equipment, two linear accelerators, and X-ray equipment for superficial therapy. Likewise, an early detection program was implemented for cancer of the uterine cervix, which now covers 96% of its target population. A pilot plan for breast cancer detection was started. There are also plans to implement a nationwide gastric cancer detection program, currently sponsored by the Japanese Government

  5. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy in radical treatment of frail patients with deeply invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellin, G.; Mussari, S.; Graffer, U.; Caffo, O.; Valduga, F.; Tomio, L.; Luciani, L. [S. Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy)

    2004-11-01

    The radical treatment of deeply invasive bladder cancer with full dose radiotherapy and concomitant 5- fluorouracil continuous infusion is feasible even in frail patients, with an acceptable toxicity and a response rate comparable to that obtained using radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin. Many patients can retain a functioning bladder. (author)

  6. The role of radiotherapy in the local treatment of a straightaway metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, D.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is diagnosed when it is already metastatic in about 6 per cent of cases. The author discusses comparative studies which showed that a surgical treatment of the primitive tumour resulted in a global survival benefit for the patients. As the role of radiotherapy in such a situation, either alone or with surgery, is not well documented, he intends to discuss the interest of radiotherapy within the frame of the local treatment of a straightaway metastatic breast cancer. Short communication

  7. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) techniques used in breast cancer treatment to reduce cardiac exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Esther; Hendry, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment has been shown to reduce local recurrence and improve survival rates. However, there is a concern that breast radiotherapy can cause an increase in cardiac mortality, particularly in patients being treated for left-sided breast cancer. This review aims to investigate how cardiac exposure is minimised in breast radiotherapy and determine an optimal method for reducing cardiac dose, using literature from ScienceDirect, Medline and CINAHL. IMRT and breathing-adapted radiotherapy both reduce cardiac exposure but IMRT also increases the irradiated volume at low dose. Several issues were reported with regards to the clinical implementation of these techniques. It is suggested that inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy, is the preferred solution to minimising cardiac exposure but more research is warranted to confirm this. Long-term follow-up is required to determine dose–response relationships. Research needs to focus on breast cancer treatment as a whole in order to effectively reduce cardiac mortality.

  8. Radiotherapy treatment results of bladder cancer: study of 458 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vara Santos, J.; Torre Tomas, A. de la; Romero Fernandez, J.; Regueiro Otero, C.; Clavo Varas, B.; Magallan Sebastian, R.; Valcarcel Sancho, F.; Polo Tolosana, E.; Aragon de la Cruz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1964 to 1990, 458 patients diagnosed of bladder cancer have been treated with radical radiotherapy in our department. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial survival rates were 37% and 27% respectively. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial local control rates, evaluated in 404 patients, were 41% and 38%. In regard to survival, T stage (p=0.013), advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p>0.0001), and squamous differentiation (p<0.0001), reached statistical significance as adverse prognostic factors. In 248 patients, with invasive transitional carcinoma, radical radiotherapy alone was used. In this group of patients, T stage (p=0.006) and advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p=0.0002) were adverse prognostic factors for survival. Our results suggest that radical radiotherapy must be considered and alternative to surgery in management of bladder cancer. On the basis of prognostic factors evidenced in this series a subgroup of patients with low probability of survival when treated with exclusive radiotherapy are defined. This patients must be included in clinical research protocols. (Author) 44 refs

  9. Radiotherapy indications - rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This document is addressed to oncologists radiotherapists and to any health professional concerned by rectum cancer treatment. Rectum cancer therapy is based on various technical procedures including surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments defined for each patient according to his clinical situation. This document precises the specific situations where radiotherapy can be employed. However, the radiotherapy decision must be taken with respect to other therapeutic alternatives. Such a decision must be validated and must be the object of a discussion in the framework of a pluri-disciplinary consultation. (J.S.)

  10. Second cancers following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1983-01-01

    Published reports have shown that there is an increased incidence of second malignancies, particularly sarcomas, following high dose radiotherapy in cancer treatment. However, this increased risk is very small and is relatively negligeable when one considers the beneficial effects of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. This incidence of radiation induced cancer appears to be higher in certain groups of patients, such as children and patients with Hodgkin's disease. In view of scarcity of published data, controlled surveys remain necessary for the quantitative assessment of the cancer risk in various subgroups of irradited patients [fr

  11. [Bladder-conserving treatment for bladder cancer: potential of and developments in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Pieters, Bradley R; Koning, Caro C E

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is surgical removal of the bladder and construction of a neobladder. Recently, important improvements have been made in the potential for bladder-conserving treatment using radiotherapy. External beam radiotherapy has undergone technological improvements, as a result of which it is possible to radiate the tumour more precisely while decreasing radiation to healthy tissue. Radiochemotherapy improves local recurrence-free and overall survival compared with radiotherapy alone. The results of this combined treatment are comparable with those of surgery. Additionally, Dutch radiotherapy departments have collected data in a national database of 1040 selected patients with confined bladder cancer. These patients were treated with external beam radiation, limited surgery and brachytherapy. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 75%. Bladder conserving treatment options for muscle-invasive bladder cancer should be discussed during the multidisciplinary meeting.

  12. Patterns of initial treatment failure of esophageal cancer following radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Nakajima, Kotaro [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohara, Kiyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Irie, Toshiyuki; Itai, Yuji

    1999-11-01

    Sixty patients with stage I-III esophageal squamous cell cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy (RT) were analyzed for patterns of treatment failure. Patients were treated by external RT alone (n=45) or in combination with intraluminal RT (N=15) when suitable, with prescribed total doses ranging from 59.4 to 104.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and/or 5-fluorouracil was administered to 19 patients. The two-year actuarial survival rate and two year disease-free survival rate were 29.5% and 18.3%, respectively. Two-year failure rates were 66.5%, 36.9%, and 3.8%, for the esophagus, lymph nodes, and other sites, respectively. Two-year esophageal failure rates for patients with T1-2 (n=8), T3 (n=30), and T4 disease (n=22) were 14.3%, 64.7%, and 87.9%, respectively (p<0.05). A multivariate analysis of esophageal failure with descriptive variables of T classification, tumor length, and performance of intraluminal RT revealed that only T classification was an independent factor (p=0.021). Two-year lymph node failure rates were 24.8% and 33.6% for patients with N0 (n=36) and N1 disease (n=24), respectively (p=0.0035). Lymph node failure in N0 patients was found exclusively outside the treatment field. These results suggest that inclusion of potential lymph node metastases in the radiation field could lessen the lymph node failure rate in T1-3N0M0 patients. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy effect in conservation treatment for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachini, V.; Ferreri, A.J.M.; Farante, G.; Agresti, R.; Galimberti, V.; Zurrida, S.; Veronesi, P.

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) in conservative treatment for breast cancer (CT-BC) has been proven to be determinant for the local control of the disease. Radiation therapy was described by several authors as the most important factor affecting the cosmetic results of this treatment. Technical progress in RT, use of filters and wedges and an increased knowledge of the influence of fraction size total dose and irradiated volume on breast tissues contributed to avoid major radiotherapeutic side effects in the CT-BC. Cosmetic outcome from 2 groups of patients (pts) with breast cancer in stage T 1-2(T> = 2,5 cm) N 0-1 M o0 of the prospective trial Milan III were compared. Both groups pts (n=89) were treated with quadrantectomyand axillary dissection. 49 pts received complementary RT with a dose of 50 Gy over 5 weeks with a daily fraction of 2 Gy and a further boost of 10 Gy (10 MeV electrons) on the scar. Remaining 40 pts did not receive RT. Cosmetic results were subjectively and objectively (asymmetry index) evaluated. No significant cosmetic differences were observed between the 2 study groups. A good or excellent symmetry was observed in 59% of irradiated pts and 64% of non irradiated pts. Negative results were observed in 4% and 2% respectively. Subjective ovulation showed similar results, with a good or excellent symmetry in 57% of irradiated pts and 72.5% of non irradiated pts. Poor results were observed in 16.3% and 27.5% respectively. Telangiectasia were observed in 4% of irradiated pts, while hypertrophied scars were only noted in non irradiated pts (15%). No acute side effects of RT, as erythema or ulceration of breast skin, were recorded. In our experience, the standard dose of 50 Gy administered by two opposite tangential fields plus a 10 Gy boost did not affect the cosmetic results of CT.BC, whereas it provided a better local control of disease. The possibility to avoid RT in selected group of pts should be justified by the discomfort of this treatment for the pt, cost

  14. Toshiba's advanced technologies contributing to heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iikura, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Toshiba has been focusing effects on cancer treatment in the healthcare field, which is likely to continue to expand in the future. Our objective is to offer healthcare processes from early detection by means of regular cancer examinations, through to precise diagnosis, treatment ensuring the quality of life (QOL) appropriate to individual patients, and aftercare. In particular, we are promoting the development of heavy-ion radiotherapy systems incorporating our range of technologies for particle accelerators, irradiation devices, superconducting magnets, and information processing and networks. By offering heathcare processes with advanced heavy-ion radiotherapy systems as a core, our approach is expected to contribute to high-quality cancer treatment. (author)

  15. Combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagiri, S.; Gupta, B.D.; Dutta, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    In locally advanced oral cancer, the main modalities of treatment, e.g. surgery and radiotherapy, most often fail to control the disease when used singly. A combination policy of surgery and radiotherapy achieves adequate control of the disease. In order to improve the results in advanced oral cancer, chemotherapy given prior to and during radiation treatment and judicious combination of surgery offer the best possible approach in the management. The experience in the combination policy in the treatment of oral cancer in Northern India is dealt with. (auth.)

  16. Guidelines for the treatment of lung cancer using radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Michael J.; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo; Gadia, Rafael; Motta, Rodrigo [Sociedade Brasileira de Radioterapia (SBR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this guideline is to evaluate the most appropriate radiotherapy technique to treat patients with lung cancer. Description of evidence collection method Through the elaboration of four relevant clinical questions related to the proposed theme, we sought to present the main evidences regarding safety, toxicity and effectiveness of the presented radiotherapy techniques. The study population consisted of male and female patients of all ages with lung cancer, regardless of histological type, staging or presence of comorbidities. For this, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in primary scientific databases (Medline – PubMed; Embase – Elsevier; Lilacs – Bireme; Cochrane Library – Record of Controlled Trials). All articles available through April 31, 2015 were considered. The search terms used in the research were: ((lung cancer) OR (lung carcinoma)) and (IMRT OR intensity modulation OR intensity modulated) and (conventional OR 2D OR two dimensional OR bidimensional OR standard OR conformal OR 3D OR tridimensional OR CRT OR three dimensional). The articles were selected based on critical evaluation using the instruments (scores) proposed by Jadad and Oxford. The references with greater degree of evidence were used. The recommendations were elaborated from discussions held with a drafting group composed of four members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group, which specializes in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was released for public consultation for 15 days, and the suggestions obtained were forwarded to the authors for evaluation and possible insertion in the final text. (author)

  17. Cryotherapy and radiotherapy combination in extensive and recurrent types of head and neck skin cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustynskij, I.N.; Paches, A.I.; Tkachev, S.I.; Tabolinovskaya, T.D.; Alieva, S.B.; Yagubov, A.S.; Slanina, S.V.; Bazhutova, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The method of infiltrative skin cancer treatment based on different variants of radiotherapy and cryotherapy combination is described. During the period of 1988-2006 the Department of head and neck neoplasms of N. N. Blohin Russian Cancer Research Center provided radiation and cryogenic treatment of 94 patients with locally advanced head and neck epidermoid and basal cell cancer. For this purpose before every radiotherapy session the tumor was exposed to cryo cooling till freezing temperature (-5 degrees C). The total involution of tumors was observed at 91 patients. Residual tumors were removed surgically. The follow-up showed good functional and aesthetic results, retention of local tissues.

  18. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjamaegi, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective analyses was performed in a series of patients with advanced cervix cancer. The aim of this analyses was to evaluate the efficiency of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced cervix cancer. For the patients with advanced stages, active multidisciplinary treatment is necessary for local control and suppression of distant metastases

  19. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  20. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Chul; Sohn, Seung Chang; Suh, Hyun Suk; Jaun, Woo Ki; Kim, Dong Soon; Sohn, Kwang Hyun

    1986-01-01

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  1. Value of radiotherapy in the treatment ovarium cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.R.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    Thirty-one cases ovarium cancer are studied in different clinical stages and different histological kinds, which were submited to a radiotherapic treatment by the 'moving trip' and 'open field' techniques [pt

  2. Relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy in treatment of brain metastases of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junkoh; Ohtsuka, Sinichi; Yamasaki, Toshiki; Gi, Hidefuku; Ha, Young-Soo; Handa, Hajime

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and sixteen cases of brain metastases of lung cancer were retrospectively analysed with special reference to the relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy. The median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastases was 1.2 months in 27 cases without treatment, 2.5 months in 51 cases treated by surgery alone, 4.2 months in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy alone and 6.5 months in 7 cases treated by surgery and radiotherapy. The survival rate in patients treated by radiotherapy was significantly better than in those not treated by radiotherapy. However, the effect of surgery was not significant in prolongation of survival time. On the other hand, the rate of improvement in neurological symptoms assessed at one month after the initiation of treatment was 80.9% in 47 cases treated by surgery and 19.4 % in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy. The result suggested that surgery is superior to radiotherapy in alleviating neurological symptoms. It is important to understand the nature of effect of each treatment. A better result will be anticipated by proper selection or combination of these treatments. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Hachiya, Kae; Okada, Sunaho; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Although the technical developments of radiotherapy have been remarkable, there are currently few reports on the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as initial treatment in this three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy era. Thus, we retrospectively evaluated the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment. Thirty-two patients who underwent radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The dose per fraction was 2.0–3.5 Gy. Because the treatment schedule was variable, the biological effective dose (BED) was calculated. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates from the completion of radiotherapy were calculated. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year LC rates were 51.5%, 24.5%, 19.6%, 19.6%, and 13.1%, respectively. LC rates were significantly higher for the high BED group (≥75 Gy10) than for the lower BED group (<75 Gy10). All patients who reported pain achieved pain relief. The duration of pain relief was significantly higher for the high BED group than for the lower BED group. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 56.5%, 45.2%, 38.7%, and 23.2%, respectively. There was a trend toward higher OS rates in with higher BED group compared to lower BED group. For patients with unresectable locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone, radiotherapy is effective treatment. The prescribed BED should be more than 75 Gy10, if the dose to the organ at risk is within acceptable levels.

  4. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  5. A federal audit of the Belgian radiotherapy departments in breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houtte, Paul van; Bourgois, Nicolas; Renard, Francoise; Huget, Philippe; D'hoore, William; Scalliet, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Belgian Federal College of Radiotherapy carried out an external audit of breast cancer patient documentation in the 26 Belgian radiotherapy centres. The objective was to assess compliance with the recommendations regarding minimal requirements for documentation of radiotherapy prescription and administration. All centres volunteered to take part in this audit. Methods: Two experienced radiation oncologists site-visited the departments over a 6 month period (Sept. 2003-Feb. 2004), with a list of items to be verified, including details on the surgery, the pathological report, details on systemic treatments, details on the radiotherapy prescription (and consistency with therapeutic guidelines) and delay surgery/radiotherapy. Findings: Three hundred and eighty-nine patients files were reviewed, for a total of 399 breast cancers (10 patients with bilateral cancer). Mean age was 57.8 y (range 29-96). Breast conservative surgery (BCS) was used in 71%; radical mastectomy in 29%. A complete pathological report was present in all files but 2 (99.5% conformity). 5.2% were treated for DCIS, 61.6% for pT1, 28.2% for pT2 and 5% for pT3-4. Data regarding resection margins were specified to be free in 76.2%, tangential in 12% (within 2 mm) and positive for DCIS in 3.8% or invasive cancer in 1.5% (no information, on margins in 6.5%). The pT stage was always specified, and consistent with the macroscopic and microscopic findings. Hormonal receptors were routinely assessed (94.7%), as well as Her2neu (87.4%). Axillary surgery was carried out in 92%, either by sentinel node biopsy or by complete clearance, in which case the median number of nodes analysed was 12 for all centres together (7-17). All radiotherapy prescriptions were in line with evidence-based standards of therapy (i.e., irradiation of breast after BCS or after mamectomy (in case of pN+), but one. The mean delay between surgery and radiotherapy was 5.5 weeks (SD 11days). Conclusion: There was a high

  6. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveit, Kjell Maque; Wiig, Johan N.; Olsen, Dag Rune; Storaas, Andreas; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    1997-01-01

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  7. Segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy as treatment of stage II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.; Schlupp, W.R.; Cunha, L.S.M. da

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of operable breast cancer with segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy has been described since decade 30. Many recent prospective and retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of this conservative management, particularly in stage I. There are still doubts in its use in stage II. (Author) [pt

  8. Results of different modes conformal radiotherapy in treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovs'ka, L.M.; Yivankova, V.S.; Khrulenko, T.V.; Skomorokhova, T.V.; Gorelyina, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Development of techniques for cytotoxic treatment applying different modes of conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy and high-energy (high dose rate - HDR) is one of the promising areas of optimization and efficiency of conservative treatment of patients with regional forms of cervical cancer. At Radiation Oncology Department, National Cancer Institute, 89 patients with stage 2b-3b cervical cancer, aged 29 to 70, underwent examination and combined radiotherapy course. The patients were divided into 2 main groups (56 patients) depending on the mode of developed conformal radiation therapy, and a control group made up by 33 patients (classic, default conformal radiotherapy). Results. Along with external beam radiotherapy, the patients of Group 2 were provided with conformal radiotherapy carried out by means of the linear accelerator of electrons in the mode of enhanced multi fractionation of irradiation dose applied to the small pelvis area (tumor and lymph efflux channels) with the single tumor dose 1.3 Gy twice per day once 4-6 hours up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy applied to the small pelvis lymph nodes. The patients of Group 1 and the ones of the control group underwent conformal radiotherapy in the mode of standard fractionation applied to the small pelvis area with the single tumor dose of 1.8 Gy up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy. Conformal radiotherapy was carried out for the patients of Group 1 associated with chemoradiomodifiers (tegafur, cisplatin). At the stage 2 of combined radiotherapy course, all patients underwent HDR brachytherapy via Co60 source in the mode of the single tumor dose of 5 Gy at point A up to the total radiation dose of 35-40 Gy. Therefore, employing accelerated mode of multifractiation in conformal radiotherapy of patients with regional cervical cancer makes it possible to enhance canrcinocidal irradiation doses applied to a tumor, and an interval between radiotherapy fractions provides conditions for initiation of

  9. Integration of second cancer risk calculations in a radiotherapy treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, M; Schneider, U

    2014-01-01

    Second cancer risk in patients, in particular in children, who were treated with radiotherapy is an important side effect. It should be minimized by selecting an appropriate treatment plan for the patient. The objectives of this study were to integrate a risk model for radiation induced cancer into a treatment planning system which allows to judge different treatment plans with regard to second cancer induction and to quantify the potential reduction in predicted risk. A model for radiation induced cancer including fractionation effects which is valid for doses in the radiotherapy range was integrated into a treatment planning system. From the three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution the 3D-risk equivalent dose (RED) was calculated on an organ specific basis. In addition to RED further risk coefficients like OED (organ equivalent dose), EAR (excess absolute risk) and LAR (lifetime attributable risk) are computed. A risk model for radiation induced cancer was successfully integrated in a treatment planning system. Several risk coefficients can be viewed and used to obtain critical situations were a plan can be optimised. Risk-volume-histograms and organ specific risks were calculated for different treatment plans and were used in combination with NTCP estimates for plan evaluation. It is concluded that the integration of second cancer risk estimates in a commercial treatment planning system is feasible. It can be used in addition to NTCP modelling for optimising treatment plans which result in the lowest possible second cancer risk for a patient.

  10. Application of hyperglycemia induction in combination with radiotherapy for rectal cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimker, V.M.; Goldobenko, G.V.; Ozhiganov, E.L.; Ajtakova, T.I.; Dyuskaliev, Zh.D.

    1986-01-01

    A treatment modality employing radiotherapy wih subsequent hyperglycemia induction was evolved in experiments on mice and then clinically tested in 32 cases of inoperable locally - extensive primary and recurrent cancer of the rectum. A 50% regression of tumor was registered in 14 (43.0%) out of 32 patients treated with radiotherapy in combination with hyperglycemia. Similar degree of regression was observed only in 6 (15.0%) out of 40 patientswo received who received the same radiation treatment unaccompanied by hyperglycemia. The difference was statistically significant. No untoward side-effects developed. The results are encouraging and seem to open up new vistas of clinical research

  11. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  12. Partially wedged beams improve radiotherapy treatment of urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig Paul; Hafslund, Rune; Gustafsson, Anders; Smaaland, Rune; Dahl, Olav

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Partially wedged beams (PWBs) having wedge in one part of the field only, can be shaped using dynamic jaw intensity modulation. The possible clinical benefit of PWBs was tested in treatment plans for muscle-infiltrating bladder cancer. Material and methods: Three-dimensional treatment plans for 25 bladder cancer patients were analyzed. The originally prescribed standard conformal four-field box technique, which includes the use of lateral ordinary wedge beams, was compared to a modified conformal treatment using customized lateral PWBs. In these modified treatment plans, only the anterior parts of the two lateral beams had a wedge. To analyze the potential clinical benefit of treatment with PWBs, treatment plans were scored and compared using both physical parameters and biological dose response models. One tumour control probability model and two normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were applied. Different parameters for normal tissue radiation tolerance presented in the literature were used. Results: By PWBs the dose homogeneity throughout the target volume was improved for all patients, reducing the average relative standard deviation of the target dose distribution from 2.3 to 1.8%. A consistent reduction in the maximum doses to surrounding normal tissue volumes was also found. The most notable improvement was demonstrated in the rectum where the volume receiving more than the prescribed tumour dose was halved. Treatment with PWBs would permit a target dose escalation of 2-6 Gy in several of the patients analyzed, without increasing the overall risk for complications. The number of patients suitable for dose escalation ranged from 3 to 15, depending on whether support from all or only one of the five applied NTCP model/parameter combinations were required in each case to recommend dose escalation. Conclusion: PWBs represent a simple dose conformation tool that may allow radiation dose escalation in the treatment of muscle

  13. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermund, H.; Rappaport, I.; Nethery, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    Before radiotherapy can be initiated, the patient must be examined thoroughly according to specific protocol to determine the extent of the tumor. Surgical resection accompanied by radiotherapy may be necessary in instances of persistent carcinoma. The radiation response of the tumor must be evaluated, and the optimal tumor dose must be determined to ensure maximum destruction of the tumor and minimum damage to normal tissues. Follow-up examinations should emphasize good oral hygiene to prevent further disease. (U.S.)

  14. A comparison of the results of radiotherapy and surgical treatment of tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuki, Hirokazu; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu; Takegawa, Yoshihiro; Kashihara, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the results of tongue cancer treatments retrospectively in order to compare the outcomes of radiotherapy and surgery among patients presenting with early-stage tongue cancer. One-hundred and forty-three patients who underwent radical treatment of tongue cancer between 1976 and 1996 were classified into six treatment groups in order to compare the 5-year survival rate, 5-year local control and lymph node metastasis between the groups. Furthermore, prognostic factors were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. The 5-year survival rate for the entire subject population was 71%, and that for patients diagnosed as having stage I, II, III and IV tumors was 85%, 80%, 76% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate of patients who underwent surgical treatment alone for early-stage tongue cancer was higher than that of patients who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone (100% and 70%, respectively). The 5-year local control rate did not differ significantly between patients who underwent surgical treatment alone for early-stage cancer and those who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone (87% and 86%, respectively). Furthermore, the survival rate did not differ significantly between patients presenting with cervical lymph node metastasis upon initial examination and those who developed cervical lymph node metastasis later (62% and 69%, respectively). The results of a univariate analysis showed that prognosis was significantly better for women and N0 patients, and the results of a multivariate analysis confirmed that prognosis was significantly better for patients under 60 years of age, women, and N0 patients. The survival rate of patients treated for early-stage tongue cancer was slightly higher for those who underwent surgical treatment alone compared with those who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone. However, local control was comparable between these two groups of patients. (author)

  15. Treatment of lymphatic nodes metastasis in advanced cancer with interventional chemotherapy combined radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Shian; Guo Weijian; Wu Guohua; Lin Qing; Jiang Mawei; Yao Yuan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of treatment with interventional chemotherapy combined radiotherapy for lymphatic nodes metastasis in advanced cancer. Methods: Treated with interventional chemotherapy for 27 cases of lymphatic rode metastasis once a month with average 2-3 times totally. Simultaneously treated with linear accelerator radiotherapy with average dose of 40-50 Gy/20-25 times/4-5 weeks. Results: To evaluate the clinical effects after finished the whole treatment program two months later. CR + PR reached 77.8% (24/27). All patients showed tolerance to accept the treatment. Conclusion: Treatment for lymphatic node metastasis in advanced cancer with interventional chemotherapy combined radiation therapy seems to be a valuable way

  16. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in cancer treatment during pregnancy: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuenemann Junior, Eduardo; Urban, Cicero de Andrade; Lima, Rubens Silveira de; Rabinovich, Iris; Spautz, Cleverton C.

    2007-01-01

    The coexistence of pregnancy and cancer is a challenging situation for the physician. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are often necessary, depending on the type and stage of cancer at diagnosis. When applying such treatment, several key points concerning the health of the fetus must be carefully monitored. Meanwhile, if the appropriate treatment is delayed until postpartum, the mother's life may be at risk. Historically, the mother's health was placed above that of the fetus. This concept has changed, and harmonization of maternal and fetal health is now considered ideal. Numerous reports have shown the safe use of chemotherapy especially during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. In 2004 our department treated seven cases of simultaneous cancer and pregnancy, leading us to review the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy during pregnancy and the repercussions on neonatal outcome. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  18. Use of radiotherapy in the primary treatment of cancer in South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, C.; Chapman, P.; Priest, K.; Roder, D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies point to a lower use of radiotherapy by Australian cancer patients in lower socioeconomic areas and in country regions that are some distance from urban treatment centres. These were cross-sectional studies with the potential for error from changes in place of residence. We used a cohort design to avoid such error. South Australian patients diagnosed in 1990-1994 were followed until the date of censoring of 31 December 1999 using data from the State Cancer Registry. The percentage found to have had megavoltage therapy in the first 12 months following diagnosis varied by leading primary incidence site from 44% for the prostate to 40% for female breast, 38% for lung, 17% for rectum, 3% for colon and 2% for skin (melanoma). Multivariate analysis indicated that determinants of not receiving megavoltage therapy in the first 12 months were older age, female sex, residence in a country region and country of birth. Melanoma data revealed earlier stages for women than men. If this difference by sex applies to other cancers, it might explain the lower exposure of women to radiotherapy. Fewer older patients received radiotherapy, consistent with trends observed in hospital-based cancer-registry data. The influence on this finding of differences in stage and co morbidity requires additional study. While earlier findings of a lower exposure of country residents to radiotherapy were confirmed, the difference was comparatively small in this study. Variations in exposure by socioeconomic status of residential area were not observed. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Dose Distribution over Different Parts of Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy Treatment in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, F.K.; Ahmed, M.F.; Begum, Z.; Alam, B.; Chowdhury, Q.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out to determine the dose distribution over different parts of the body of 12 cancer patients during radiotherapy treatment. Patients with breast cancer, lung cancer, cervix and larynx cancer treated with either X ray therapy or 60 Co therapy were particularly considered. The doses to the organs and tissues outside the primary beam of the patients under treatment were found to vary with a maximum value of 9096 ± 25 mSv at the neck of a lung cancer patient to a minimum value of 2 ± 0.5 mSv at the right leg of a breast cancer patient. The variation of doses was well explained by the exposure and patient data given for each patient. The measured data in each part of the body have been found to be consistent indicating confidence in the measurements. (author)

  20. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 ± 0.80 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 ± 1.22 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy

  1. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  2. Second primary cancer after treatment for cervical cancer. Late effects after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    Using data from the population-based Danish Cancer Registry, the relative risk (RR) of second primary cancer was assessed among 24,970 women with invasive cervical cancer (1943-1982) and 19,470 women with carcinoma in situ of the cervix. The analysis was stratified according to treatment with (+) and without (-) radiation. For all second primaries combined, a RR+ = 1.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.18) and a RR- = 1.3 (95% CI = 1.13-1.40) was observed after invasive cervical cancers and a RR+ = 3.5 (95% CI = 1.4-7.2) and RR- = 1.1 (95% CI = 0.7-1.6) following in situ cancer. The small overall excess of second primary cancer is accounted for by an increase of some cancers such as lung, bladder, and a concurrent decrease in others such as breast. Although not statistically different from nonirradiated, the RR increased with time since treatment among irradiated invasive cervical cancer patients in organs close to and at intermediate distance from the cervix, reaching a maximum after 30 or more years of follow-up (RR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.4-2.5). Altogether, for these sites an excess of 64 cases per 10,000 women per year were attributable to radiation among survivors of 30+ years. The highest risks among long-term survivors were observed for the following: other genital organs (RR = 5.8; 95% CI = 1.8-13.0) bladder (RR = 5.5; 95% CI = 2.8-9.5), connective tissue (RR = 3.3; 95% CI = 0.4-12.0), stomach (RR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.1-4.7) and rectum (RR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.1-4.6). A significant deficit of risk for breast cancer (RR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6-0.8) was observed for 10+ years, may be attributable to the effect of ovarian ablation by radiotherapy

  3. Lymph Node Failure Pattern and Treatment Results of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Heui Kwan; Kim, Soo Geon

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the failure pattern of the celiac axis, gastric lymph node, and treatment outcome in the upper and mid-esophageal region of cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The study constituted the evaluation 108 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 1986 to December 2006. In total, 82 patients treated by planned radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, were analysed retrospectively. The study population consisted of 78 men and 2 women (mean age of 63.2 years). In addition, 51 patients received radiotherapy alone, whereas 31 patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The primary cancer sites were located in the upper portion (17 patients), and mid portion (65 patients), respectively. Further, the patients were in various clinical stages including T1N0-1M0 (7 patients), T2N0-1M0 (18 patients), T3N0-1M0 (44 patients) and T4N0-1M0 (13 patients). The mean follow up period was 15 months. Results: The various treatment outcomes included complete response (48 patients), partial response (31 patients) and no response (3 patients). The failure patterns of the lymph node were comprised of the regional lymph node (23 patients) and the distance lymph node which included celiac axis and gastric lymph node (13 patients). However, metastasis was not observed in the regional and distant lymph node in 10 patients, whereas 36 patients were not evaluated. Furthermore, of the 13 patients who developed celiac axis and gastric lymph node metastases, 3 were in stage T1N0-1M0 and 10 were in stage T2-4N0-1M0. A complete response appeared in 12 patients, whereas a partial response appeared in 1 patient. The mean survival time of the

  4. Definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Correlation between treatment patterns and recurrence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Naoyuki; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes and optimal practice patterns of definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Between 1993 and 2012, 49 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer in three hospitals. Of these, 15 patients (31%) had clinically positive regional lymph node metastasis. A total of 34 patients (70%) received external beam radiotherapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary), and 8 (16%) (with small superficial Stage I tumors) were treated with local radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 1–169 months). The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and loco-regional control (LRC) rates were 83%, 59% and 71%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the histological type (P = 0.044) was significant risk factors for LRC. In Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I cases, 3 of 8 patients (38%) who did not undergo prophylactic lymph node irradiation had lymph node recurrence, compared with 2 of 12 patients (17%) who underwent prophylactic pelvic irradiation. For Stage III–IV tumors, the local recurrence rate was 50% and the lymph node recurrence rate was 40%. Patients with FIGO Stage I/II or clinical Stage N1 had a higher recurrence rate with treatment using a single modality compared with the recurrence rate using combined modalities. In conclusion, our treatment outcomes for vaginal cancer were acceptable, but external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary) was needed regardless of FIGO stage. Improvement of treatment outcomes in cases of FIGO Stage III or IV remains a significant challenge. (author)

  5. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  6. Radiotherapy in Cancer Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for curative or palliative treatment of cancer, either alone or increasingly as part of a multimodality approach in conjunction with chemotherapy, immunotherapy or surgery. Radiation must be delivered in the safest and most effective way. The use of radiologic and nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques, e.g., the use of CT (Computerized Tomography) and PET/CT allow better detection and staging of diseases by displaying both morphological and functional abnormalities within the affected organs and are essential in the process of radiotherapy planning. Technical advances in radiotherapy have allowed better targeting of tumors, sparing of normal tissue and, in the case of radiosurgery, a decrease in the number of treatments. The IAEA Programme in Human Health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the treatment of diseases, including cancer, through the application of nuclear techniques. The Programme supports quality assurance in radiation medicine; DIRAC, the only radiation oncology-specific resource database world-wide; significant, innovative education and training programmes through telemedicine and e-learning accessible via the human health campus website. Technical expertise for country– and region–specific technical cooperation radiation-medicine projects is provided to establish or enhance radiation medicine worldwide. (author)

  7. Treatment outcome after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Park, Kyung Ran [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery.

  8. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade ≥2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [de

  9. Feasibility of preference-driven radiotherapy dose treatment planning to support shared decision making in anal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønde, Heidi S; Wee, Leonard; Pløen, John

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Chemo-radiotherapy is an established primary curative treatment for anal cancer, but clinically equal rationale for different target doses exists. If joint preferences (physician and patient) are used to determine acceptable tradeoffs in radiotherapy treatment planning, multipl...... that preference-informed dose planning is feasible for clinical studies utilizing shared decision making....... dose plans must be simultaneously explored. We quantified the degree to which different toxicity priorities might be incorporated into treatment plan selection, to elucidate the feasible decision space for shared decision making in anal cancer radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective plans.......7%-points; (0.3; 30.6); p decision space available in anal cancer radiotherapy to incorporate preferences, although tradeoffs are highly patient-dependent. This study demonstrates...

  10. Quality of life in locally advanced prostate cancer patients who underwent hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Hirofumi; Naito, Seiji; Fukui, Iwao; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Matsuoka, Naoki; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the feasibility of quality of life (QOL) research and to evaluate the QOL prospectively in locally advanced prostate cancer patients treated with hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy. The treatment schedule was that patients with decreasing prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels below 10 ng/ml after receiving 6 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment were randomly divided into two groups; one group was the continuous hormonal treatment group and the other was the intermittent hormonal treatment group. Both groups received a total dose of 72 Gy external beam radiotherapy with concomitant hormonal treatment followed by 6 months of adjuvant hormonal treatment following radiotherapy. At 14 months, patients either underwent continuous or intermittent hormonal treatment according to the random allocation. QOL was assessed at baseline, and at 6, 8, 14, and 20 months after treatment using functional assessment of cancer treatment-general (FACT-G), P with the other 3 items comprising bother of urination, bother of bowel movement, and bother of sexual activity. Between January 2000 and June 2003, a total of 188 patients were enrolled in this study. The rate of collection of baseline QOL sheets was 98.0%. The rate of answer to questions of QOL sheets was 99.0%. At baseline, the average score of FACT-G, P was 120.7 and the maximum score was more than twice the minimum score. Dysfunction of urination and bowel movement was correlated with the bother of urination and bowel movement, respectively. On the other hand, dysfunction of sexual activity was not correlated with the bother of sexual activity. In June 2003, all of the QOL sheets at baseline, and at 6, 8, and 14 months were completely collected from a total of 72 patients. Although QOL at 8 months was significantly affected compared with QOL at baseline and at 6 months, QOL at 14 months was significantly improved compared with that at 8 months and there was no significant

  11. Cancer research and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1978-01-01

    An actual condition of cancer, and the basis and a future view of radiotherapy were described by adding generally established biological and biochemical knowledge to the author's research. It was described that the relapse of cancer after irradiation was induced from outside of cancerous mass, and the nature of relapsed cancerous cells group was also stated. The histological structure of cancer from a view of cell movement and radioresistant cancerous cells group were described. The differentiation of cancerous cells were described, and a study of inhibition of cancer by redifferentiation was considered. It is important to grasp characteristics and a limit of radiotherapy for cancer, to systematize and materialize reasonable therapy which uses drug and immunotherapy together with surgery, and to use radiotherapy reasonably together with redifferentiation therapy of cancerous cells by extracting characteristics and a limit of radiationtherapy from an actual condition of cancer. (Serizawa, K.)

  12. Intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro Hidalgo, Sabrina A.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was performed on intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer. The strength and attractiveness is established of techniques of partial irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer. The benefit is originated to restrict the area immediate of radiotherapy to the tumor bed or quadrant index and identifying the benefit of being applied during the radiotherapy while surgical lumpectomy. The impact of local recurrence has been established using intraoperative radiotherapy. The advantages of intraoperative radiotherapy was compared in the management of the conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer with external radiotherapy. Different methods of intraoperative radiotherapy have been compared and individual impact on local recurrence ranges. Intraoperative radiotherapy has had many advantages: radiobiological, technical, clinical, psychological and economical in the handling of conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer, compared with external radiotherapy [es

  13. Objective assessment of dermatitis following post-operative radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Kuriyama, Keiko; Yoshida, Mineo; Yamazaki, Hideya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Fujita, Yuka; Masuda, Norikazu

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate radiation dermatitis objectively in patients with breast cancer who had undergone post-operative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Skin color (L * , a * , and b * values) and moisture analyses were performed for both breasts (before, after, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy) to examine irradiated and non-irradiated skin divided into four quadrants in 118 patients. These patients underwent breast conservative surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost irradiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). L * , a * , and moisture values were changed by irradiation and maximized at completion or 1 month after radiotherapy. One year after radiotherapy, the skin color had returned to the range observed prior to radiotherapy. However, moisture did not return to previous values even 1 year after treatment. The lateral upper side (quadrant C) showed greater changes than other quadrants in the L * value (darker) at the end of radiotherapy. The Common Toxicity Criteria version 3 scores were found to correlate well with a * and L * values at the completion and 1 month after radiotherapy. Boost radiotherapy intensified reddish and darker color changes at the completion of radiotherapy, while chemotherapy did not intensify the skin reaction caused by radiotherapy. Moisture impairment as a result of irradiation lasts longer than color alterations. Objective assessments are useful for analyzing radiation dermatitis. (orig.)

  14. Dosimetric Feasibility of Hypofractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Neoadjuvant Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Adams, Judith C; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Alexander, Brian M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of a 5 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) x 5 fraction proton radiotherapy schedule, before initiating a clinical trial of neoadjuvant, short-course proton radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: The first 9 pancreatic cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (1.8 Gy x 28) at the Massachusetts General Hospital had treatment plans generated using a 5 CGE x 5 fraction proton regimen. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Hypofractionated proton and conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans both provided acceptable target volume coverage and dose homogeneity. Improved dose conformality provided by the hypofractionated proton regimen resulted in significant sparing of kidneys, liver, and small bowel, evidenced by significant reductions in the mean doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, to these structures. Kidney and liver sparing was most evident in low-dose regions (≤20% prescribed dose for both kidneys and ≤60% prescribed dose for liver). Improvements in small-bowel dosimetry were observed in high- and low-dose regions. Mean stomach and duodenum doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, were similar for the two techniques. Conclusions: A proton radiotherapy schedule consisting of 5 fractions of 5 CGE as part of neoadjuvant therapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas seems dosimetrically feasible, providing excellent target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing. Hypofractionated proton radiotherapy in this setting merits Phase I clinical trial investigation

  15. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Medical School

    2003-02-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  16. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  17. Particle radiotherapy emerging technology for treatment of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Narayan

    2016-01-01

    The results of decades of research and development are providing compelling evidence about the efficacy of radiation therapy with proton and carbon ion beams to achieve superior complication free tumor control leading to a world-wide rapid growth in their clinical use. This book contains comprehensive reviews of the state of the art of the technology and physics of heavy charge particle therapy by the experts from the leading cancer centers of world that will be valuable as a practical guide for radiation therapy professionals interested in these modalities.

  18. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  19. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jun; Luo Jianjun; Zhang Wen; Huang Yong; Li Dengke; Cao Yueyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of interventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with subsequent pelvic radiotherapy in treating patients with advanced cervical cancer. Methods: According to the therapeutic scheme, 195 patients with phase IIb or beyond advanced cervical cancer were divided into two groups: (1) study group (n = 99), treated with TACE combined with subsequent pelvic radiotherapy (i.e. combination group); (2) control group(n = 96), treated with radiotherapy alone (i. e. radiotherapy alone group). The short-term and long-term clinical results as well as the occurrence of complications were compared between two groups. Results: Different degrees of the tumor shrinkage were found in patients of both groups after treatment. The short-term remission rate of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.012). After the procedure, the anaemia in patients of study group was markedly corrected. The difference in hemoglobin between preoperative levels and postoperative ones was significant (T-test, P < 0.01). Long-term follow-up for 3 years the survival rate of the study group was higher than that of the control group (P = 0.032). Both the recurrence rate and metastatic rate at one and three years after the therapy in the study group were distinctly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05). No significant difference in one-year, five-year survival rate and in five-year recurrent rate existed between two groups. The main short-term complications included digestive untoward reaction, bone marrow depression, hepatic and renal toxicity, etc., which could be well relieved after active symptomatic medication. The long-term complications included radiodermatitis, radiocystitis and / or radioproctitis. The incidence of radiocystitis and radioproctitis in the study group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P

  20. Radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Iizumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shosei; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Tomokazu; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper explained the current state of radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer, and discussed the role of radiotherapy in curative treatment and the future development. In the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer, it is important to judge the existence of pathological muscular layer invasion based on transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). In surgical results in Japan, the U.S., and Switzerland, 5-year survival rate is about 60 to 70%. Standard treatment for bladder cancer with muscle layer invasion had been surgery, and radiotherapy had been applied to the cases without resistance to surgery. Three combined therapy with TUR-BT and simultaneous chemoradiotherapy is the current standard bladder conserving therapy. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 60%, which is superior to the treatment with irradiation alone. Radiotherapy for kidney cancer is most often used as perioperative treatment for locally advanced cancer or as symptomatic treatment for metastatic lesions. However, due to recent improvement in radiotherapy technology, correspondence to respiratory movement and high dose administration associated with improvement in dose concentration have been realized, and stereotactic irradiation using a high single dose for inoperable disease cases or surgery refusal disease cases has come to be clinically applied. (A.O.)

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet B. Eldredge-Hindy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT.

  2. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer. Preliminary results of 148 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.; Koseki, N.; Oliveira Filho, J.A. de

    1986-01-01

    The combination of tumoral resection and radiotherapy with preservation of the breast is called conservative treatment of breast cancer. The literature considers this treatment a good option if used by an experient team and with appropriate equipment. This paper shows the results of 148 cases of breast cancer treated by this conservative approach at Centro de Oncologia Campinas. Follow-up varied from 3 to 87 months (mean 28) considered by the histological diagnosis. Overall actuarial survival of 5 years was 77% disease-free survival 55%. Twelve patients (8%) presented local relapse and 13 (9%) had distant metastases as the first therapeutic failure. Cosmetic results were considered good and fair in 89% of patients. These results are similar to others published in the literature (Author) [pt

  3. The Impact of Colleague Peer Review on the Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Process in the Radical Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, K P; McAleese, J; Crockett, C; Harney, J; Eakin, R L; Young, V A L; Dunn, M A; Johnston, R E; Hanna, G G

    2015-09-01

    Modern radiotherapy uses techniques to reliably identify tumour and reduce target volume margins. However, this can potentially lead to an increased risk of geographic miss. One source of error is the accuracy of target volume delineation (TVD). Colleague peer review (CPR) of all curative-intent lung cancer plans has been mandatory in our institution since May 2013. At least two clinical oncologists review plans, checking treatment paradigm, TVD, prescription dose tumour and critical organ tolerances. We report the impact of CPR in our institution. Radiotherapy treatment plans of all patients receiving radical radiotherapy were presented at weekly CPR meetings after their target volumes were reviewed and signed off by the treating consultant. All cases and any resultant change to TVD (including organs at risk) or treatment intent were recorded in our prospective CPR database. The impact of CPR over a 13 month period from May 2013 to June 2014 is reported. One hundred and twenty-two patients (63% non-small cell lung carcinoma, 17% small cell lung carcinoma and 20% 'clinical diagnosis') were analysed. On average, 3.2 cases were discussed per meeting (range 1-8). CPR resulted in a change in treatment paradigm in 3% (one patient proceeded to induction chemotherapy, two patients had high-dose palliative radiotherapy). Twenty-one (17%) had a change in TVD and one (1%) patient had a change in dose prescription. In total, 6% of patients had plan adjustment after review of dose volume histogram. The introduction of CPR in our centre has resulted in a change in a component of the treatment plan for 27% of patients receiving curative-intent lung radiotherapy. We recommend CPR as a mandatory quality assurance step in the planning process of all radical lung plans. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O.; Andratschke, N.; Alheit, H.; Holy, R.; Moustakis, C.; Nestle, U.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [de

  5. Treatment results of non-operated lung cancer by radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Yasuo; Watarai, Jiro; Kobayashi, Mitsuru; Sashi, Ryuji; Shindo, Masaaki; Kato, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    The treatment results of 152 non-operated lung cancer patients were analyzed. Median survival times (MST; months) for all patients based on the stage (UICC'87) were 28 M (n=12) for stage I, 18 M (n=16) for stage II, 8 M (n=58) for stage III A, 6 M (n=46) for stage III B, and 4 M (n=20) for stage IV. The effect of combined radiochemotherapy was quite evident in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients. Here, the MST of the radiotherapy alone group (n=11) was 5 M, whereas that of radiochemotherapy group (n=14) was 12 M (p<0.05). In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the effect of radiochemotherapy was recognized only in stage III A and III B patients. In this case, the MST of the radiotherapy alone group (n=50) was 6 M, whereas that of the radiochemotherapy group (n=38) was 9 M (p<0.05). The duration of time from the initial therapy to the occurrence of distant metastasis in stage III A and III B patients was longer in the radiochemotherapy group than in the radiotherapy alone group (p<0.05). As for the metastatic sites, a delay in the occurrence of brain, lung and pleural metastasis was also recognized in the radiochemotherapy group (p<0.05). In this retrospective study, the value of combined radiochemotherapy was evident in SCLC and stage III-NSCLC patients. However, there was considerable case to case variation in the dosage, combination of agents and timing of chemotherapy. Recently, more aggressive chemotherapy is now being applied. (author)

  6. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer in elderly patients; Radiotherapie hypofractionnee dans le traitement du cancer du sein de la personne agee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merikhi, T.; Meziane, A.; Laarit, I.; Bali, M.S.; Bendjazia-Djemaa, A. [CHU de Constantine, Constantine (Algeria)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report an assessment on the long term of the efficiency and toxicity of a hypo-fractionated radiotherapy scheme: 5 Gy on d1 and d3, 6,5 Gy on d15 and d17, and 5 Gy on d29 and d31. The study is based on 144 patients treated between 1990 and 2007. Results are presented in terms of average follow-up, of survival rate without relapse by 5 and 8 years. This treatment could be a good solution to reduce therapeutic delays and a good response to expectations of elderly patients suffering from breast cancer. Short communication

  7. Analysis of whole Breast Radiotherapy Methods for Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer after Conserving Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utehina, O.; Popovs, S.; Berzins, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. At present moment breast cancer in Latvia is at second place for whole population and at first place among women. In year 2004 there were 1012 new breast cancer cases discovered. There was growth in number of breast cancer patients from 58.6 per 100 000 inhabitants in 1995 to 80.4 per 100 000 inhabitants in 2004. This growth is primarily attributed to breast cancer screening program which is nowadays active in Latvia. Breast cancer is third death cause among cancers in Latvia, - in 1995 there where 27.4 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants and in 2004 - 36.2 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants. Due to screening program there is increasing number of patients with stage I and II breast cancer. In 2004 toe where 9884 women with breast cancer registered in Latvian Cancer Registry and among them 79 percent were presented as stage I or II. Breast conservative surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy as standard part of it plays great role in breast cancer treatment in our Center. In year 2004 there were 103 breast conservative surgeries performed in our Center. Radiotherapy is a standard part of treatment in modem breast saving operations for early stage breast cancer, At present, only whole breast postoperative irradiation is performed in Latvia. For selected group of patients this treatment can be substituted with other radiotherapy methods in order to reduce acute reactions and/or late toxicity, maintaining the same tumor control. Aim of this work is to show that during whole breast irradiation dose maximum and tissue volume which receives doses more than 105% from prescribed dose, is linked with size of treated volume (treated volume - tissue volume receiving > 95% from prescribed dose), which is strictly linked with breast volume. Because of this for large breast volumes there is higher complication probability performing whole breast irradiation, and it seems to be meaningful to use Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy or Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for

  8. Determinants of variability in waiting times for radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, Gauthier; Ingrand, Isabelle; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Ingrand, Pierre; Breton-Callu, Christel; Migeot, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine psycho-social and geographic determinants of delay in starting radiotherapy in early invasive breast cancer patients. Material and methods: Waiting time was defined as the time elapsed until the beginning of radiotherapy, starting from the date of surgery (in absence of chemotherapy) or from the end of chemotherapy. Results: Eight hundred and ninety six women aged 24-89 took part in the study. Mean waiting times were 52 days (sd = 19) between surgery and radiotherapy and 31 days (sd = 14) between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Differences between radiotherapy centres (p < 0.0001) accounted for 30% and 12%, respectively, of total variance in waiting times. Using a multivariate mixed analysis that took into account intra-centre correlation, the time between surgery and radiotherapy was shorter for young patients (p = 0.020), those who had sought information about their illness (p = 0.024) and those who had undergone surgery and radiotherapy in the same centre (p = 0.021). On the other hand, no patient characteristic was associated with the time between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion: Centre is the major factor that explained longer waiting times in radiotherapy, emphasising the structural hypothesis. It is important to pursue initiatives to improve the organization within radiotherapy centres and then to verify that these initiatives have succeeded in shortening waiting times.

  9. CT images and radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with breast cancer: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here were originally collected for the research project “CT-Scan processing and analysis in patient with breast cancer after radiotherapy”. Also, it reported in our study “Prediction of Lung Tissue Damage by Evaluating Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters in Breast Cancer Patients” (Hasanabdali et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes and directly links to 52 subjects referred to Mahdieh Oncology and Radiotherapy Center from February to August 2015. Treatment planning was done for delivering 50 Gy dose to PTV in 25 fractions. the lungs and heart objects were extracted from CT images along with compliance Dose plan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH and Dose-mass histogram (DMH extracted using CT images and dose plan matrix. Moreover, the complete clinical and dosimetric specifications of subjects is attached.

  10. Curative radiotherapy of supraglottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ho; Chai, Gyu Young

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of curative radiotherapy in the management of supraglottic cancer. Twenty-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the supraglottis were treated with radiotherapy at Gyeongsang National University Hospital between 1990 and 1994. Median follow-up period was 36 months and 95% were observed for at least 2 years. Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 39.3% for 21 patients. The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 75.0% in Stage I, 42.9% in Stage II, 33.3% in Stage III, and 28.6% in Stage IV(p=0.54). The 5-year local control rate was 52.0% for 21 patients. The 5-year local control rate was 75.0% in Stage I, 57.1% in Stage II, 66.7% in Stage III, and 28.6% in Stage IV(p=0.33). Double primary cancer was developed in 3 patients and those were all esophageal cancers. In early stage(Stage I and II) supraglottic cancer, curative radiotherapy would be a treatment of choice and surgery would be better to be reserved for salvage of radiotherapy failure. In advanced stage(Stage III and IV), radiotherapy alone is inadequate for curative therapy and combination with surgery should be done in operable patients. This report emphasizes the importance of esophagoscopy and esophagogram at the follow-up of patients with supraglottic cancer

  11. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V{sub 45}Gy and V{sub 55}Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V{sub 25}Gy and V{sub 40}Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V{sub 40}Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V{sub 45}Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V{sub 55}Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  12. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V 45 Gy and V 55 Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V 25 Gy and V 40 Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V 40 Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V 45 Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V 55 Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  13. Adaptive radiotherapy for long course neo-adjuvant treatment of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Marijnen, Corrie; Herk, Marcel van; Triest, Baukelien van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the potential margin reduction with adaptive radiotherapy (ART) during neo-adjuvant treatment of locally-advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Repeat CT scans were acquired for 28 patients treated with 25 × 2 Gy, daily during the first week, and followed by weekly scans. The CTV was delineated on all scans, and shape variation was estimated. Five ART strategies were tested, consisting of an average CTV over the planning CT and one to five repeat CTs. Required PTV margins were calculated for adapted and non-adapted treatment. The strategy with the least PTV volume over the whole treatment was selected and bowel area dose reduction was estimated. Results: Substantial systematic and random shape variation demanded for a PTV margin up to 2.4 cm at the upper-anterior part of the CTV. Plan adaptation after fraction 4 resulted in a maximum 0.7 cm margin reduction and a significant PTV reduction from 1185 to 1023 cc (p < 0.0001). The bowel area volume receiving 15, 45, and 50 Gy was reduced from 436 to 402 cc, 111 to 81 cc, and 49 to 29 cc, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: With adaptive radiotherapy, maximum required PTV margins can be reduced from 2.4 to 1.7 cm, resulting in significantly less dose to the bowel area.

  14. Cost-benefit analysis on radiotherapy services for cancer treatment, with LINAC type equipments (linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Blois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work consists in analyzing the economic feasibility of the investment to implement a Radiotherapy sector for radiological of cancer treatment by type linear accelerators equipments, based on the case of a public hospital in São Paulo. From technical and financial details of the project and the survey reference values for health care to their procedures, the statistical outcome of treatment on patients' life expectancy and average income indicators of the state's population, were estimated to income (private and social and expenses of this health service and other elements that make up the flow of the investment project box. From these estimates we evaluated public and private investment return, ie, if it fits only on the public sector or if private sector could also implement this projects geared exclusively to free admittance.

  15. The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer: Review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi G, Benjamin; Silva P, Gonzalo; Carvajal C, Claudia; Santini B, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reviewed the potential coadjuvant of Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in the treatment of ovary cancer. However the effectiveness of total abdomen RT (RTAT) versus new QT drugs have not been adequately compared. Both surgery and QT prior to RT increase total and freedom from the disease since tumors become radiosensitive, thus favoring destruction. Diverse techniques such as IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) are being used with excellent results. Despite these advances, many of the patients develop intraabdominal recurrence leaving them out of the therapeutic scope/range for QT. RT may then be used as a palliative in big unique cases watching possible complications. RTAT may eventually be restarted in the treatment of ovary cancer depending on the findings during surgery. Finally, RT/QT concomitants have shown their effect in sensitivity and synergy and it is expected that new drugs with different interactions such as taxan and target molecules are added. Treatment of ovarian cancer remains essentially surgical and with chemotherapy, but both radio and chemotherapy has demonstrated their adjuvant effect. Despite being an unexplored alternative is necessary to study prospectively the promising results of new techniques of radiation therapy in these patients

  16. The role of radiotherapy in cancer treatment ovary: Review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi G, Benjamin; Silva P, Gonzalo; Carvajal C, Claudia; Santini B, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reviewed the potential coadjuvant of Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in the treatment of ovary cancer. However the effectiveness of total abdomen RT (RTAT) versus new QT drugs have not been adequately compared. Both surgery and QT prior to RT increase total and freedom from the disease since tumors become radiosensitive, thus favoring destruction. Diverse techniques such as IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) are being used with excellent results. Despite these advances, many of the patients develop intraabdominal recurrence leaving them out of the therapeutic scope/range for QT. RT may then be used as a palliative in big unique cases watching possible complications. RTAT may eventually be restarted in the treatment of ovary cancer depending on the findings during surgery. Finally, RT/QT concomitants have shown their effect in sensitivity and synergy and it is expected that new drugs with different interactions such as taxan and target molecules are added. Treatment of ovarian cancer remains essentially surgical and with chemotherapy, but both radio and chemotherapy has demonstrated their adjuvant effect. Despite being an unexplored alternative is necessary to study prospectively the promising results of new techniques of radiation therapy in these patients

  17. A randomized study of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy with and without mitomycin C in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzat, M.; Shouman, T.; Zaza, K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally...... advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (1) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). Results: The 2-year overall....... Key Words: Head and Neck cancer , Radiotherapy , Altered fractionation , Mitomycin C....

  18. Every second cancer patient receives radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojala, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiotherapy to treat cancer was given for the first time exactly one hundred years ago. Today, radiotherapy and surgery are the two main modes of treating cancer. One in two cancer patients receives radiotherapy at some point during the course of treatment for the disease. Radiotherapy is applied most commonly in cases where surgery is not possible. Moreover, these two modes of treatment are often used together to supplement each other. About half of new cancer cases detected today can be ordered. The estimate given by the EU for cancers cured is 45 per cent, which is divided between the various treatment modes as follows: surgery 22 %, radiotherapy 12 %, surgery plus radiotherapy 6 %, and drug therapy 6 %. In addition to curative treatment, radiotherapy plays a crucial role in palliative treatment, i.e. treatment that alleviates symptoms. The sensitivity of malignant tumours to radiotherapy varies over a wide range; the same is true for healthy tissues. Radiotherapy can only be used to cure a tumour that is more sensitive to radiation than the surrounding healthy tissue. The tumour must also be sufficiently small in size and limited to a relatively small area. (orig.)

  19. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer treatment: Results of the patterns of care study in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ah Ram; Park, Won [Division for Urologic Cancer, Korean Radiation Oncology Group, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe treatment patterns of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer in Korea. A questionnaire about radiation treatment technique and principles in 2013 was sent to 83 radiation oncologists and data from 57 hospitals were collected analyzed to find patterns of RT for prostate cancer patients in Korea. The number of patients with prostate cancer treated with definitive RT ranged from 1 to 72 per hospital in 2013. RT doses and target volumes increased according to risk groups but the range of radiation doses was wide (60 to 81.4 Gy) and the fraction size was diverse (1.8 to 5 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used for definitive treatment in 93.8% of hospitals. Hormonal therapy was integrated with radiation for intermediate (63.2%) and high risk patients (77.2%). Adjuvant RT after radical prostatectomy was performed in 46 hospitals (80.7%). Indications of adjuvant RT included positive resection margin, seminal vesicle invasion, and capsular invasion. The total dose for adjuvant RT ranged from 50 to 72 Gy in 24–39 fractions. Salvage RT was delivered with findings of consecutive elevations in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA level over 0.2 ng/mL, or clinical recurrence. The total radiation doses ranged from 50 to 80 Gy with a range of 1.8 to 2.5 Gy per fraction for salvage RT. This nationwide patterns of care study suggests that variable radiation techniques and a diverse range of dose fractionation schemes are applied for prostate cancer treatment in Korea. Standard guidelines for RT in prostate cancer need to be developed.

  20. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  1. Transoral laser resection or radiotherapy? Patient choice in the treatment of early laryngeal cancer: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, T; Dawson, R; Sen, M; Makura, Z

    2017-06-01

    The choices made by patients offered treatment for early laryngeal cancer with radiotherapy or transoral laser resection were reviewed. A prospective review was conducted of all patients diagnosed and treated for early laryngeal carcinoma from December 2002 to September 2009 at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. A total of 209 patients with tumour stage T1 or T2 laryngeal cancer were treated; each new patient suitable for radiotherapy or transoral laser resection was seen jointly by the clinical (radiation) oncologist and head and neck surgeon, and offered the choice of treatment. Of the patients, 47.4 per cent were given a choice between radiotherapy and transoral laser resection; 51.2 per cent were advised to have radiotherapy, and there were no records for the remaining 1.4 per cent. From those given the choice, 59.6 per cent chose transoral laser resection (p < 0.02 (t-test)) and 35.4 per cent chose radiotherapy. When given the choice, a statistically significant majority of patients choose transoral laser resection rather than radiotherapy.

  2. PET/CT scanning guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xue-lian, E-mail: duxuelian23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: melody23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Sheng, Xiu-gui, E-mail: jnsd2000@yahoo.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Qing-shui, E-mail: lqs1966@126.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang, Cong, E-mail: jnwc1981@hotmail.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: jnyh2200@sina.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical contribution of positron emission tomography using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and integrated computer tomography (FDG-PET/CT) guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight patients with recurrent ovarian cancer from 2003 to 2008 were retrospectively studied. In these patients, 28 received PET/CT guided IMRT (PET/CT-IMRT group), and 30 received CT guided IMRT (CT-IMRT group). Treatment plans, tumor response, toxicities and survival were evaluated. Results: Changes in GTV delineation were found in 10 (35.7%) patients based on PET-CT information compared with CT data, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the metastasis tumor. PET/CT guided IMRT improved tumor response compared to CT-IMRT group (CR: 64.3% vs. 46.7%, P = 0.021; PR: 25.0% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.036). The 3-year overall survival was significantly higher in the PET-CT/IMRT group than control (34.1% vs. 13.2%, P = 0.014). Conclusions: PET/CT guided IMRT in recurrent ovarian cancer patients improved the delineation of GTV and reduce the likelihood of geographic misses and therefore improve the clinical outcome.

  3. Pulmonary function following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer and the issue of three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.A.R.M.; Glas, U.; Fornander, T.; Rosfors, S.; Bevegard, S.; Wennberg, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: The frequency and grade of pulmonary complications following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer are still debated. This study focuses on loss of pulmonary function. Materials and methods: We have measured the reduction of pulmonary function 5 months following radiotherapy in 144 node-positive stage II breast cancer patients by using pulmonary function tests. Results: No deterioration of pulmonary function was detected among the patients who were treated with local radiotherapy. On the contrary, there was a mean increase in diffusion capacity by 7% (P=0.004) following radiotherapy, which most likely was explained by the adjuvant chemotherapy administered prior to the baseline pulmonary function tests. Patients undergoing loco-regional radiotherapy showed a mean reduction in diffusion capacity by 5% (P<0.001) and in vital capacity by 3% (P=0.001). The subset of patients (9%) who were diagnosed with severe pulmonary complications needing cortisone treatment had significantly larger mean paired differences in vital capacity (-0.446 L, -15% (equivalent to 15 years of normal ageing or the loss of 3/4 of a lung lobe)) compared to the patients who were asymptomatic (-0.084 L) (P<0.05). When the effects of potential confounding factors and different radiotherapy techniques were tested on the reduction of pulmonary function by stepwise multiple regression analysis, a significant correlation was found only to loco-regional radiotherapy including the lower internal mammary lymph nodes. Conclusions: We conclude that a clinically important reduction of pulmonary function is seen in the subset of patients who are diagnosed with severe pulmonary complication following loco-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer. The results of this study warrant further studies based on individual lung dose volume histograms. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Radiotherapy in the curative treatment of breast cancer: current status and future trends. An opinion sample of radiation oncologists active in breast cancer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    A questionnaire regarding the current practice of breast cancer radiotherapy and possible future trends in this field was filled out by 13 radiation oncologists active in breast cancer research. In the opinion of this small group, radiotherapy is presently included in the initial treatment of the large majority of early breast cancers, particularly in the framework of breast-conserving therapy, which is currently used in >50% of these patients. Indications for post-mastectomy irradiation vary greatly among respondents, as do attitudes toward the potentially negative aspects of adjuvant radiotherapy. Most respondents feel that their future practices will be significantly influenced by an increase in screen-detected cancers, the aging of the population, the increasing influence of medical oncologists, participation in clinical trials, and increased patient participation in treatment decisions. An increase is foreseen in the use of breast-conserving approaches, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and a decrease in the use of both total mastectomy and axillary dissection. Most respondents feel that there will be a modest decrease in the percentage of conservatively operated patients receiving radiotherapy. A future role is seen for neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, at least in well-defined subgroups, increasing the number of patients offered breast-conserving approaches. Most respondents expect that irradiation of lymph nodal areas will gain new credibility and be used more often. No majority opinion could be elicited regarding ways of improving the therapeutic ratio in breast cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Treatment results of preoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Naoto; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kurita, Hiroshi; Katsuno, Satoshi

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and nine patients with advanced head and neck cancers (oral cavity: 50, oropharynx: 11, hypopharynx: 18, larynx: 30) received preoperative radiotherapy from 1987 through 1997 in our institute. The median age was 66 years (20-83). Almost all patients had advanced disease (stage II: 17, III: 34, IV: 58). The median dose of preoperative radiotherapy was 40 Gy (20-50). Seventy patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all patients were 66% and 56%, respectively. The 5-year locoregional and distant failure rates were 36% and 10%, respectively. The locoregional failure rate of oral cavity cancer (54%) was worse than those of other sites (13-28%) (p=0.0015). The locoregional failure rates of oral cavity cancers according to clinical stage were 59% (II), 57% (III) and 48% (IV), respectively. Incidentally those of other sites were 0% (II), 16% (III) and 30% (IV), respectively. Thirty-eight patients had major complication after surgery. The locoregional failure rates of preoperative radiotherapy following surgery for oral cavity cancers of all stages and other sites of stage IV were high. Preoperative radiotherapy should be stopped and postoperative radiotherapy for these patients should be considered. (author)

  6. Present and future of the Image Guided Radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.) and its applications in lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Ferreira, I.; Isambert, A.; Le Pechoux, C.; Mornex, F.

    2007-01-01

    These last years, the new irradiation techniques as the conformal 3D radiotherapy and the IMRT are strongly correlated with the technological developments in radiotherapy. The rigorous definition of the target volume and the organs at risk required by these irradiation techniques, imposed the development of various image guided patient positioning and target tracking techniques. The availability of these imaging systems inside the treatment room has lead to the exploration of performing real-time adaptive radiation therapy. In this paper we present the different image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and the adaptive radiotherapy (ART) approaches. IGRT developments are focused in the following areas: 1) biological imaging for better definition of tumor volume; 2) 4D imaging for modeling the intra-fraction organ motion; 3) on-board imaging system or imaging devices registered to the treatment machines for inter-fraction patient localization; and 4) treatment planning and delivery schemes incorporating the information derived from the new imaging techniques. As this paper is included in the 'Cancer Radiotherapie' special volume dedicated to the lung cancers, in the description of the different IGRT techniques we try to present the lung tumors applications when this is possible. (author)

  7. Radiotherapy and oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sealy, R [Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1982-08-01

    A general review article for the non-radiotherapist. The historical, physical and biological background is briefly reviewed. Mention is made of the effects of fraction size, hyperbaric oxygen, neutron beams and radiation sensitizers. The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is discussed, as well as the selection of patients for radiotherapy and the treatment of neck nodes. The author suggests a therapeutic approach to the various disease sites and finally reviews some of the literature on radiation caries and jaw necrosis.

  8. Contribution of customised dosimetry for small animal to the treatments of cancers by metabolic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaleb, Samir

    2010-01-01

    This research thesis first reports a bibliographical study which addressed the use of ionizing radiations in cancer therapy (evolution from ionizing radiation to metabolic radiotherapy, biological and physical parameters, and absorbed dose in metabolic radiotherapy) and the role imagery has in customised dosimetry (absorbed dose calculation methods, determination of cumulative activity, dosimetric models for S factor calculation). Then, the author presents a software which has been specifically developed for the creation of dosimetric models, and reports its validation. He reports the comparison between different dosimetric models in the case of mice. He highlights two applications of the developed tool: radio-immunotherapy and metabolic radiotherapy. He finally proposes a general discussion on the impact of small animal dosimetry on metabolic radiotherapy [fr

  9. Cervix cancer: clinical aspects of tumoral control and radiotherapy treatment time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitto, J.V.

    1994-01-01

    The author analyzed 35 patients with recurrence or residual tumor at the end of the radiotherapy program. These patients were selected out of a group of 338 patients cervix cancer who had also undergone on the same radiotherapy program. Those patients were compared with control group of 30 patients without clinical evidence of the disease, from the same group of 338 patients. It has studied the clinical results considering the total radiotherapy time to developed the radiation program and factors that could modify the time for a longer program, and also modify the final survival results. No significant difference was shown in this study, but it should be taken in consideration the total radiotherapy time, because this is a factor that could change the final results if the time would be longer than what was shown in this work. (author). 26 refs, 10 tabs

  10. Treatment of late sequelae after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strojan, Primož; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Eisbruch, Avraham; Beitler, Jonathan J; Langendijk, Johannes A; Lee, Anne W M; Corry, June; Mendenhall, William M; Smee, Robert; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2017-09-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is used to treat approximately 80% of patients with cancer of the head and neck. Despite enormous advances in RT planning and delivery, a significant number of patients will experience radiation-associated toxicities, especially those treated with concurrent systemic agents. Many effective management options are available for acute RT-associated toxicities, but treatment options are much more limited and of variable benefit among patients who develop late sequelae after RT. The adverse impact of developing late tissue damage in irradiated patients may range from bothersome symptoms that negatively affect their quality of life to severe life-threatening complications. In the region of the head and neck, among the most problematic late effects are impaired function of the salivary glands and swallowing apparatus. Other tissues and structures in the region may be at risk, depending mainly on the location of the irradiated tumor relative to the mandible and hearing apparatus. Here, we review the available evidence on the use of different therapeutic strategies to alleviate common late sequelae of RT in head and neck cancer patients, with a focus on the critical assessment of the treatment options for xerostomia, dysphagia, mandibular osteoradionecrosis, trismus, and hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Uysal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles.

  12. Proton Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Is Not Associated With Post-Treatment Testosterone Suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R. Charles, E-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Henderson, Randal H.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li Zuofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph A. [Division of Urology, University of Florida Shands Hospital, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Three independent studies of photon (x-ray) radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer have demonstrated evidence of testosterone suppression after treatment. The present study was undertaken to determine whether this would also be the case with conformal protons. Methods and Materials: Between August 2006 and October 2007, 171 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled and underwent treatment according to University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute institutional review board-approved PR01 and PR02 protocols. Of the 171 patients, 18 were excluded because they had received androgen deprivation therapy either before (n = 17) or after (n = 1) RT. The pretreatment serum testosterone level was available for 150 of the remaining 153 patients. These 150 patients were included in the present study. The post-treatment levels were compared with the pretreatment levels. Results: The median baseline pretreatment serum testosterone level was 357.9 ng/dL. The median post-treatment testosterone value was 375.5 ng/dL at treatment completion (p = .1935) and 369.9 ng/dL (p = .1336), 348.7 ng/dL (p = .7317), 353.4 ng/dL (p = .6996), and 340.9 ng/dL (p = .1669) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after proton therapy, respectively. Conclusions: Conformal proton therapy to the prostate, as delivered using University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute PR01 and PR02 protocols, did not appear to significantly affect the serum testosterone levels within 24 months after RT.

  13. Proton Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Is Not Associated With Post-Treatment Testosterone Suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Henderson, Randal H.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li Zuofeng; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph A.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Three independent studies of photon (x-ray) radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer have demonstrated evidence of testosterone suppression after treatment. The present study was undertaken to determine whether this would also be the case with conformal protons. Methods and Materials: Between August 2006 and October 2007, 171 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled and underwent treatment according to University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute institutional review board-approved PR01 and PR02 protocols. Of the 171 patients, 18 were excluded because they had received androgen deprivation therapy either before (n = 17) or after (n = 1) RT. The pretreatment serum testosterone level was available for 150 of the remaining 153 patients. These 150 patients were included in the present study. The post-treatment levels were compared with the pretreatment levels. Results: The median baseline pretreatment serum testosterone level was 357.9 ng/dL. The median post-treatment testosterone value was 375.5 ng/dL at treatment completion (p = .1935) and 369.9 ng/dL (p = .1336), 348.7 ng/dL (p = .7317), 353.4 ng/dL (p = .6996), and 340.9 ng/dL (p = .1669) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after proton therapy, respectively. Conclusions: Conformal proton therapy to the prostate, as delivered using University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute PR01 and PR02 protocols, did not appear to significantly affect the serum testosterone levels within 24 months after RT.

  14. Cispaltino in radiotherapy and treatment of cancer advanced cervical and high risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini, A.; Mara, C.; Terradas, M.; Ferreira, V.; Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Fulltext: Uterine cervix cancer (CCU) is a frequent disease Uruguay, killing more than 100 women per year. The standard treatment CCU for patients with locoregionally advanced cataloged as (LRA), stages IIB-IVA and operated and in those patients with high risk factors relapse (AFR) was until 1999 the radiotherapy (RT) exclusive. in February that year the National Cancer Institute USA underwent a medical alert recommending the use of chemotherapy (CT) with concomitant RT (mainly cisplatin) in this group of patients. This alert was due to the publication of 5 randomized work showing an improvement in both the locoregional control and overall survival. In June 2000, both the RT Service ospital and Clinics in INDO, I modified the standard treatment of these patients by adding cisplatin 40mg/m2 weekly for the treatment of external RT. From that date until January 2003, 36 patients were included with CCU LRA or operated with AFR. the risk factors were: tumors larger than 4cm, parametrial invasion, lymph positive, involved margins, suboptimal surgery or deep infiltration stroma. 18 patients had stage IIIB or IV and of which 6 had failure obstructive acute renal (acute obstructive renal failure). Tolerance was acceptable, only one patient not tolerated treatment for severe leucopenia continuing exclusive RT; 68% had leukopenia grade - 2 and there was no increase in toxicity gastrointestinal or urinary. There were no treatment related deaths. When comparing historical results verified an improvement in complete answers to all stages primarily for advanced in the second period with the addition of cisplatin. Stage IB2-IIB: 52% (RT-CT) - 45% RT (historical) ns. Stage IIB: 22% (RT-CT) - 15% RT (historical) sl. In those patients with acute obstructive renal failure in any complete response was not achieved. Due to the short track differences still not tested for the surviving whole or survive disease-free

  15. Factors influencing treatment results of definitive radiotherapy following transurethral surgery for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tatsuyuki; Kanehira Chihiro

    1999-01-01

    To determine the prognostic factors influencing the outcome of bladder cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy following transurethral tumor resection (TURBT). From March 1977 through August 1991, 83 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were treated with TURBT (as thoroughly as possible) and definitive radiotherapy (median total dose: 64 Gy, median fractional dose: 2 Gy). Cystectomy was performed when possible for the residual or recurrent invasive cancer following radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 76 months. The overall survival (OS) and bladder-preserving survival (BPS) rates at 5 years were 38% and 28%, respectively. Univariate analysis indicated that depth of invasion (T2 vs T3), tumor diameter (<3 cm vs. ≥3 cm), and visible (R1) or not visible (R0) residual tumor after TURBT influenced both OS and BPS. In multivariate analysis, absence of visible residual tumor after TURBT was the only significant prognostic factor related to OS (p<0.001) and BPS (p=0.002). Five-year OS and BPS were 54% and 43% in T2-3R0 and 14% and 7% in T2-3R1, respectively. Absence of visible residual tumor after TURBT was significantly associated with better overall survival and bladder-preserving survival for muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy following TURBT. (author)

  16. Treatment of late sequelae after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strojan, Primož; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Eisbruch, Avraham; Beitler, Jonathan J; Langendijk, Johannes A; Lee, Anne W M; Corry, June; Mendenhall, William M; Smee, Robert; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    Radiotherapy (RT) is used to treat approximately 80% of patients with cancer of the head and neck. Despite enormous advances in RT planning and delivery, a significant number of patients will experience radiation-associated toxicities, especially those treated with concurrent systemic agents. Many

  17. Hypofractionated Proton Boost Combined with External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Johansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT. The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU and gastrointestinal (GI toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity.

  18. Hypofractionated Proton Boost Combined with External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Silvia; Åström, Lennart; Sandin, Fredrik; Isacsson, Ulf; Montelius, Anders; Turesson, Ingela

    2012-01-01

    Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT). The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity. PMID:22848840

  19. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Liu Yueping; Wang Weihu; Song Yongwen; Li Tao; Li Ning; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m 2 /day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m 2 , daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles

  20. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, James; Amini, Arya; Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt; Soh, Hendrick; Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V 20 , V 30 , or V 40 ) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within 20 was 364.0 cm 3 and 160.0 cm 3 (p 30 was 144.6 cm 3 vs 77.0 cm 3 (p = 0.0012), V 35 was 93.9 cm 3 vs 57.9 cm 3 (p = 0.005), V 40 was 66.5 cm 3 vs 45.4 cm 3 (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures

  1. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Maxillary Sinus Cancer: Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicities of Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristol, Ian J.; Ahamad, Anesa; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, K. Kian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of three changes in radiotherapy technique on the outcomes for patients irradiated postoperatively for maxillary sinus cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 146 patients treated between 1969 and 2002 were reviewed. The patients were separated into two groups according to the date of treatment. Group 1 included 90 patients treated before 1991 and Group 2 included 56 patients treated after 1991, when the three changes were implemented. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: No differences were found in the 5-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, local control, nodal control, or distant metastasis rates between the two groups (51% vs. 62%, 51% vs. 57%, 76% vs. 70%, 82% vs. 83%, and 28% vs. 17% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively). The three changes were to increase the portals to cover the base of the skull in patients with perineural invasion, reducing their risk of local recurrence; the addition of elective neck irradiation in patients with squamous or undifferentiated histologic features, improving the nodal control, distant metastasis, and recurrence-free survival rates (64% vs. 93%, 20% vs. 3%, and 45% vs. 67%, respectively; p < 0.05 for all comparisons); and improving the dose distributions within the target volume, reducing the late Grade 3-4 complication rates (34% in Group 1 vs. 8% in Group 2, p = 0.014). Multivariate analysis revealed advancing age, the need for enucleation, and positive margins as independent predictors of worse overall survival. The need for enucleation also predicted for worse local control. Conclusion: The three changes in radiotherapy technique improved the outcomes for select patients as predicted. Despite these changes, little demonstrable overall improvement occurred in local control or survival for these patients and additional work must be done

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy in oligometastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Thomas A C; Corkum, Mark T; Louie, Alexander V

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastatic cancer describes a disease state somewhere between localized and metastatic cancer. Proposed definitions of oligometastatic disease have typically used a cut-off of five or fewer sites of disease. Treatment of oligometastatic disease should have the goal of long-term local control, and in selected cases, disease remission. While several retrospective cohorts argue for surgical excision of limited metastases (metastasectomy) as the preferred treatment option for several clinical indications, limited randomized data exists for treating oligometastases. Alternatively, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a radiotherapy technique that combines high radiation doses per fraction with precision targeting with the goal of achieving long-term local control of treated sites. Published cohort studies of SABR have demonstrated excellent local control rates of 70-90% in oligometastatic disease, with long-term survival in some series approaching 20-40%. A recent randomized phase 2 clinical trial by Gomez et al. demonstrated significantly improved progression free survival with aggressive consolidative therapy (surgery, radiotherapy ± chemotherapy or SABR) in oli-gometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As additional randomized controlled trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy of SABR in oligometastatic disease, SABR is increasingly being used within routine clinical practice. This review article aims to sum-marize the history and current paradigm of the oligometastatic state, review recently pub-lished literature of SABR in oligometastatic cancer and discuss ongoing trials and future directions in this context.

  3. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhung, Joanne E.; Gomez, Jennifer; Chan, Kelvin; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity

  5. Postoperative radiotherapy for patients with invasive cervical cancer following treatment with simple hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shangwen; Liang Jian; Yang Shihneng; Lin Fangjen

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the survival and complications of patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer following inadvertent simple hysterectomy. From September 1992 through to December 1998, 54 patients who had received simple hysterectomies for benign lesions, but were incidentally found with invasive carcinoma of the cervix in the surgical specimen, were referred to our department for postoperative irradiation. They were categorized into two groups according to pathological findings. Group A consisted of 25 patients whose specimen showed microinvasion alone, with the depth of stromal invasion <5 mm. Group B consisted of 29 patients whose pathological findings included deep stromal invasion, tumor emboli in cervix, lymphovascular permeation, positive or close resection margin, endometrial or myometrial invasion and vaginal involvement. After external beam irradiation dose of 44 Gy in 22 fractions over 4-5 weeks to the whole pelvis, the radiation field was reduced to true pelvis for a further 10 Gy in five fractions. Brachytherapy was performed using an Ir-192 remote after-loading technique for 1-2 courses. The prescribed dose for each treatment was 7.5 Gy to the vaginal surface. A retrospective analysis was conducted to compare radiation-therapy outcomes for these 54 patients. After 37-102 months of follow-up (median, 58 months), 47 patients were alive without evidence of disease; five patients in Group B died of the disease (three with distant metastasis, one with local relapse, one with both). Two patients died of other concurrent diseases. The 5-year actuarial survival (AS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates for all patients were 88 and 90%, respectively. The respective 5-year AS and DFS rates for Group A/B were 95/82% (P=0.07) and 100/83% (P=0.03). Ten patients (18.5%) developed Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Grade 1-4 rectal complications. Five patients (9.3%) developed RTOG Grade 3-4 bladder complications

  6. [Mechanism and Prospect of Radiotherapy Combined with Apotatinib
in the Treatment of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohui; Wang, Chunbo; E, Mingyan

    2017-12-20

    Non-small cell lung cancer is one of the most commom malignant tumor being harmful to people's life and health. Most of the patients have developed to the last stage which not suitable for surgical indications, so radiation and chemotherapy is the main treatment strategy. In recent years, with the theory of anti-angiogenesis therapy for malignant tumors, apatinib as a promising novel medicine to treat malignant tumors, represents synergistic antitumor effects in combination with radiotherapy. The underlying mechanisms may include make blood vessel normalization, alleviating inner hypoxia, and angiogenic factors regulation. Apatinib in combination with radiotherapy may become a new and effective treatment strategy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  7. Technical progress, the concept of individualized cancer treatment and the innovation of computer-assisted radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, K.; Tanneberger, S.; Matschke, S.

    1985-01-01

    After a first step of cancerogenesis, the further development of the tumor is an individual process. At the end of this process the tumor is formed as an individual in the individual. The individuality of cancer exists on the level of organs, tissues and cells and includes an individual tumor-host relationship. Today, optimized cancer treatment requires a most precise biological characterization possible of the tumor and of the tumor-host relationship, which will provide objective information about the individual character of every tumor. Routine analysis and strict therapeutic consideration of the clinical and biological individuality of human cancer can offer real chances for the improvement of cancer treatment. A routine acquisition of individual tumor characteristics will be possible only if methods and equipment are available for the registration of suitable parameters. In this context technical innovations have an essential influence on the realization of the concept of individualized cancer treatment. With the method of flow cytophotometry and other techniques examples are given in how far the ideas of individual cancer management can be realized by introduction of new technical solutions into medical research and clinical practice. Unfortunately there is still a lack of methodology in individualizing cancer treatment. The individualization of radiotherapy is connected to an extremely high degree of technical innovations. Particularly this refers to the topometrical description of the target volume in relation to the adjacent anatomical structures and the body contour as well as the fitting of isodoses to the shape and size of the target volume. As an example of innovation of a technical solution for individual radiotherapy planning the computer-assisted radiotherapy planning system DOPSY is described. (author)

  8. Postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers: Impact of anatomic subsite on treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, M.J.; Harrison, L.B.; Fass, D.E.; Armstrong, J.; Spiro, R.H.; Shah, J.P.; Strong, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    We have retrospectively reviewed the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for advanced oral cavity cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of anatomic subsite on the results of treatment. Between 1975 and 1985, 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (OT = 29 patients) and floor of mouth (FOM = 22 patients) were treated with combined surgery plus RT. All had an indication(s) for RT including advanced primary disease (T3 or T4) (29 patients), close or positive margins (34 patients), and multiple positive neck nodes and/or extracapsular extension (41 patients). With a median follow-up of 6 years, the 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74% and the rate of distant metastasis (DM) was 34%. Despite the similar T stage, margin status and median RT dose, the 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 38% for OT vs. 11% for FOM (p = 0.03). Furthermore, the median survival after recurrence was 9 months for OT and 40 months for FOM (p = 0.02). At 5 years the determinate survival for both sites was (55%), and the likelihood of developing a second malignancy was 31%. The likelihood of developing DM was 50% for FOM (N0-N1 = 3 of 12, N2-N3 = 8 of 10) and 21% for OT (N0-N1 = 4 of 21, N2-N3 = 1 of 8). This study highlights significant differences between FOM and OT cancers in response to combined surgery and RT. Future strategies should be directed at the enhancement of local control for OT and better systemic therapy for those with advanced N-stage FOM

  9. Comparison of three radiotherapy modalities on biochemical control and overall survival for the treatment of prostate cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieters, Bradley R.; Back, Djuna Z. de; Koning, Caro C.E.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: For the radiation treatment of prostate cancer high dose should be delivered for optimal biochemical control. Treatment can be given by dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or external beam radiotherapy combined with a radioactive seed implantation (EBSeeds) or high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy (EBTI). Differences in outcome between the modalities were assessed by a systematic review. Materials and methods: A systematic search was performed resulting in 40 articles to be used. Data were extracted on biochemical control and overall survival at 3, 5, and 8 years and other time points mentioned in the articles. Also known prognostic parameters were noted. Comparison of the modalities was done by a Weibull survival analysis and estimation of Hazard Ratio's (HR) was done with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: The HR for biochemical recurrence was 1.40 (95% CI 1.31-1.51) for EBRT relative to EBTI, and was 1.37 (95% CI 1.26-1.49) for EBSeeds relative to EBTI. The HR for overall survival was 1.50 (95% CI 1.29-1.73) for EBRT relative to EBTI, and was 2.33 (95% CI 2.04-2.66) for EBSeeds relative to EBTI. Conclusion: The combination of external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy results in a superior biochemical control and overall survival found in a systematic review on radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  10. Radiotherapy in Cancer Care. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, E.; Zubizarreta, E.; Camacho, R.; Vikram, B.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer control, cancer care and cancer treatment are three different concepts, although the terms are often used interchangeably. Cancer control is the reduction in the incidence, morbidity and mortality of cancer, as well as the improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients and their families. As such, cancer control includes actions relating to prevention, early detection and screening, diagnosis, treatment and palliative care. Cancer care includes all actions and interventions aimed at supporting, assisting and treating cancer patients. Cancer care includes cancer treatment, but also other forms of support such as nutrition, symptom relief, speech therapy, physiotherapy, stoma care, nursing care, lymphoedema care and psychosocial care. Cancer treatment includes medical interventions aimed at the cure or palliation of a patient who has been diagnosed with cancer. As such, cancer treatment modalities include surgery, radiotherapy, systemic therapies such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy and other investigational strategies.

  11. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, Sylvie; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  12. A comparison of different three-dimensional treatment planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koswig, S.; Dinges, S.; Buchali, A.; Boehmer, D.; Salk, J.; Rosenthal, P.; Harder, C.; Schlenger, L.; Budach, V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Four different three-dimensional planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer were compared with regard to dose homogeneity within the target volume and dose to organs at risk, dependent upon tumor stage. Patients and Methods: Six patients with stage T1, 7 patients with stage T2 and 4 patients with stage T3 were included in this study. Four different 3D treatment plans (rotation, 4-field, 5-field and 6-field technique) were calculated for each patient. Dose was calculated with the reference point at the isocenter (100%). The planning target volume was encompassed within the 95% isodose surface. All the techniques used different shaped portal for each beam. Dose volume histograms were created and compared for the planning target volume and the organs at risk (33%, 50%, 66% volume level) in all techniques. Results: The 4 different three-dimensional planning techniques revealed no differences concerning dose homogeneity within the planning target volume. The dose volume distribution at organs at risk show differences between the calculated techniques. In our study the best protection for bladder and rectum in stage T1 and T2 was achieved by the 6-field technique. A significant difference was achieved between 6-field and 4-field technique only in the 50% volume of the bladder (p=0.034), between the 6-field and rotation technique (all volume levels) and between 5-field and rotation technique (all volume levels). In stage T1, T2 6-field and 4-field technique in 50% (p-0.033) and 66% (p=0.011) of the rectum volume. In stage T3 a significant difference was not observed between the 4 techniques. The best protection of head of the femur was achieved by the rotation technique. Conclusion: In the localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer in stage T1 or T2 the best protection for bladder and rectum was achieved by a 3D-planned conformal 6-field technique. If the seminal vesicles have been included in the target volume and in the case of large

  13. Cancer occurring after radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy can effectively control cancer but can also cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Almost all types of cancer have been associated with radiotherapy. The breast, thyroid, and bone marrow are the organs most susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis. The bone marrow is also most frequently involved by chemotherapy and the leukemia risk is much higher than after radiotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. The latent period between radiotherapy/chemotherapy and the appearance of a second primary cancer ranges from a few years to several decades. The risk for a second primary cancer following radiotherapy or chemotherapy emphasizes the need for life long follow-up of patients receiving such treatments. This is particularly the case in individuals with long life expectancy, for example, patients treated for childhood neoplasms. The benefits of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in oncology exceed the risks for second primary cancers. Efforts should be directed towards identifying those patients who will benefit from the treatments so that only they are exposed to the risk. 33 references

  14. Impact of pelvic nodal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy on treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Robert A.; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Horwitz, Eric; Buyyounouski, Mark; Ruth, Karen J.; Ma, C.-M.; Pollack, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of treating the pelvic lymphatic regions during prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with respect to our routine acceptance criteria. Methods and Materials: A series of 10 previously treated prostate patients were randomly selected and the pelvic lymphatic regions delineated on the fused magnetic resonance/computed tomography data sets. A targeting progression was formed from the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles only to the inclusion of all pelvic lymphatic regions and presacral region resulting in 5 planning scenarios of increasing geometric difficulty. IMRT plans were generated for each stage for two accelerator manufacturers. Dose volume histogram data were analyzed with respect to dose to the planning target volumes, rectum, bladder, bowel, and normal tissue. Analysis was performed for the number of segments required, monitor units, 'hot spots,' and treatment time. Results: Both rectal endpoints were met for all targets. Bladder endpoints were not met and the bowel endpoint was met in 40% of cases with the inclusion of the extended and presacral lymphatics. A significant difference was found in the number of segments and monitor units with targeting progression and between accelerators, with the smaller beamlets yielding poorer results. Treatment times between the 2 linacs did not exhibit a clinically significant difference when compared. Conclusions: Many issues should be considered with pelvic lymphatic irradiation during IMRT delivery for prostate cancer including dose per fraction, normal structure dose/volume limits, planning target volumes generation, localization, treatment time, and increased radiation leakage. We would suggest that, at a minimum, the endpoints used in this work be evaluated before beginning IMRT pelvic nodal irradiation

  15. Multimodal treatment utilizing intraoperative radiotherapy for advanced cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Tokio

    1982-01-01

    A multimodal treatment was consisted of intraoperative radiation, external radiation, by-pass operation, chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition if necessary to cover decreased oral-intake. Thirty-three cases were subjected to this therapy for 6 years. The stage of the tumors varied from a localized tumor in the pancreas to a huge tumor with multiple metastases, though the latter abandoned recently to be contraindication to this therapy. At laparotomy, a high energy electron beam was irradiated to the tumor with a dosage of 3,000 rad using a 20 MeV Betatron. The tumor was carefully prepared in order to avoid irradiating the duodenum and stomach. Choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy were performed in almost all of patients with cancer of head of pancreas. In some patients, external radiation was added with a dosage of 3,000 rad by linear X-ray. After radiotherapy, chemotherapy employing 5-FU or FT-207 was continued including. The survival time after this therapy was varied mainly according to the stages of the tumor. In patients with multiple metastasis to the liver or peritoneal dissemination, no remarkable effects were obtained by this therapy. On the otherhand, among 14 patients with localized tumor in the pancreas, 7 survived more than one year and the mean survival time of treated patients was nevershorter than that of patients who received resection of the tumor. Most of the treated patients could spend at home until their condition became critical, because by-pass operation could overcome jaundice or the duodenal stenosis and intraoperative radiation could palliate the pain of cancer of pancreas. Tumor effect of intraoperative radiation was confirmed by both of the second laporatomy for twice intraoperative radiation and laparatomy. (author)

  16. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  17. Second cancer after radiotherapy of the uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Tadashi; Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Obayashi, Kayoko; Ishida, Teruko; Takada, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Shoji; Kimura, Shuji

    1993-01-01

    To study the relative risk of second cancer after radiotherapy, we reviewed 2465 cases of uterine cervical cancer who were treated in our institute from 1962 to 1986 and were followed up for more than 5 years. Among them, 1502 cases were treated by radiotherapy with or without surgery (radiotherapy group), and the remainder were treated by surgery only (surgery only group). We defined second cancer as malignancy that occurred in another organ after an interval of 5 years or more from the end of treatment of the first cancer. The relative risk of second cancer was computed by the person-year method advocated by Schoenberg. Second cancer was observed among 8 cases of the surgery group, whereas 43 cases were observed among the radiotherapy group. The cases were: rectal cancer, 6 cases; bladder cancer, 4 cases. The observed and expected ratio (O/E ratio) was 4.02 in rectal cancer and 7.98 in bladder cancer. This incidence of the both cancers was significantly high in the radiotherapy group. Three of the 6 cases with rectal cancer underwent operation in our institute. The incubation periods between the first and second cancers were from 9 to 21 years. Each case exhibited symptoms of chronic radiation proctitis after radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. It is thought necessary to follow up such cases carefully to detect radiation induced cancer. (author)

  18. MR-only Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Maspero, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a local approach that involves the use of ionising radiation by exploiting its cell-killing effect to cure cancer. This effect, however, is not specific to damage only cancerous cells and spare healthy cells. Therefore, developments in radiotherapy aimed at reducing treatment uncertainties such that therapeutic radiation dose may be delivered to a malignant tumour while decreasing the dose received by healthy tissues. The recent advances in imaging techniques impacted and radi...

  19. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Falk; Nicolay, Nils H; Nguyen, Tam; Saleh-Ebrahimi, Ladan; Askoxylakis, Vasilis; Bostel, Tilman; Zwicker, Felix; Debus, Juergen; Timke, Carmen; Huber, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to

  20. Radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy superior to radiotherapy alone in the treatment of locally advanced anal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial of the EORTC radiotherapy and gastrointestinal tract cooperative groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelink, H.; Roelofsen, F.; Bosset, J.F.; Eschwege, F.; Rougier, Ph.; Peiffert, D.; Glabbeke, M. van; Pierart, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential gain of the concomitant use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in improving local control and reducing the need for colostomy, a randomized phase-III trial was performed in patients with locally advanced anal cancer. Material and methods: In the period 1987-1994 110 patients were randomized between radiotherapy alone and a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The patients had tumors larger than 4 cm, or T 3-4 N 0-3 , or T 1-2 N 1-3 anal cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy given in 5 weeks, with a daily dose of 1.8 Gy. After a rest period of 6 weeks a boost of 15 Gy or 20 Gy was given in case of partial or complete response respectively. Chemotherapy was given during radiotherapy, 750 mg/m2 daily as continuous infusion on day 1-5 and 29-33, a single dose of Mitomycin C 15 mg/m 2 was administered on day 1. Results: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy has resulted in an increase in the complete remission rate from 54% to 80%, and from 83% to 94% if results are considered after surgical resections. This has led to a significant improvement in loco-regional control and colostomy free survival (P=0.04, P=0.003 resp.) both in favor of the combined modality treatment. No significant difference was found when severe side effects were considered. The survival rate remained similar in both treatment arms. Skin ulceration, nodal involvement and sex were the most important prognostic factors for both local control and survival. These remained significant after multivariate analysis. The improvement seen in local control by adding chemotherapy to radiotherapy remained also significant after adjusting for prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The concomitant use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy resulted in an improved local control rate and a reduction in the need for colostomy in patients with locally advanced anal cancer

  1. SU-G-TeP1-05: Development and Clinical Introduction of Automated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, D; Bol, GH; Asselen, B van; Hes, J; Scholten, V; Kerkmeijer, LGW; Raaymakers, BW

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow for prostate cancer in order to generate clinical treatment plans. Methods: A fully automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow was developed based on the treatment planning system Monaco (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). To evaluate our method, a retrospective planning study (n=100) was performed on patients treated for prostate cancer with 5 field intensity modulated radiotherapy, receiving a dose of 35×2Gy to the prostate and vesicles and a simultaneous integrated boost of 35×0.2Gy to the prostate only. A comparison was made between the dosimetric values of the automatically and manually generated plans. Operator time to generate a plan and plan efficiency was measured. Results: A comparison of the dosimetric values show that automatically generated plans yield more beneficial dosimetric values. In automatic plans reductions of 43% in the V72Gy of the rectum and 13% in the V72Gy of the bladder are observed when compared to the manually generated plans. Smaller variance in dosimetric values is seen, i.e. the intra- and interplanner variability is decreased. For 97% of the automatically generated plans and 86% of the clinical plans all criteria for target coverage and organs at risk constraints are met. The amount of plan segments and monitor units is reduced by 13% and 9% respectively. Automated planning requires less than one minute of operator time compared to over an hour for manual planning. Conclusion: The automatically generated plans are highly suitable for clinical use. The plans have less variance and a large gain in time efficiency has been achieved. Currently, a pilot study is performed, comparing the preference of the clinician and clinical physicist for the automatic versus manual plan. Future work will include expanding our automated treatment planning method to other tumor sites and develop other automated radiotherapy workflows.

  2. Approaches for improving cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, Vijay K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation and cancer are intricately related. Radiotherapy, either alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy, is used for treatment of 60% of cancers. It will continue to be the mainstay for multi-modality treatment protocols unit new molecular therapies can be developed and brought to the stage of clinical trials. It will continue to be relevant thereafter, to compare the efficacy and cost effectiveness of the novel drugs under development. And it could also be useful as an adjuvant therapy, to augment the effects of novel drugs, at optimum dose levels. However, radiation is a well documented carcinogenic agent. Several studies have shown a statistically significant, though small enhancement in the risk of second malignancies, particularly in long-term survivors. The above discussions suggest that it is imperative to carry out preclinical radiobiological research for increasing tumor cell damage, while reducing the effective radiation doses. Development of radiobiological research programs in our institutions of higher learning such as post graduate medical institutions, cancer centers and universities could lead to the generation of a wealth of radiobiological data with potential clinical applications. Radiobiologists could utilize the infra-structure such as expensive radiotherapy equipment as well as clinical materials. For example, tumour biopsies readily available in the medical and cancer centers. However, if these studies have clinically meaningful implications it will be important to facilitate very close interactions between the basic scientists and clinicians. Some of the approaches for improving radiotherapy of cancer will be very briefly reviewed. Our current work about the effects of radiation-drug and drug-drug interactions for increasing cellular damage and death in brain tumor cells will also be presented. (author)

  3. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  4. The hypo-fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of the prostate cancer: Radiate less to treat more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissier, R.; Gross, E.

    2012-01-01

    The principle of the hypo-fractionation in radiotherapy is to deliver a higher dose by session and to reduce the duration of treatment. In the particular case of the cancer of prostate, a hypo-fractionated protocol allows to deliver an equivalent radiobiological dose identical even higher than a standard plan of irradiation. The hypo-fractionation is presented as a solution to improve the access to the care (fewer processing times by patient, more patients treated by machine) while increasing the quality of the care: better carcinological control, less radiotoxicity. The objective of this article is to make a clarification on the hypo-fractionated radiotherapy in first intention in the treatment of the localized prostate cancer. We count three studies on large cohorts, comparing standard plans to 1.8 2 Gy/session and hypo-fractionated plans (2.5 3 Gy/session). The inferior carcinological results of the two first comparative studies with regard to the study of phase I/II of the Cleveland clinic were owed to a sub-dosage of hypo-fractionated plans. The administered equivalent biological doses were lower than the at present recommended total doses and lower than the theoretical doses, calculated on the bases of an erroneous evaluation of the radio-sensibility of the prostate cancer. In the comparative study of Arcangeli, the rate of survival without biological recurrence in 4 years (82%) was significantly to the advantage of the hypo-fractionated group, while reducing the duration of treatment of 3 weeks. Four comparative studies reported acute/late toxicity, gastrointestinal (GI)/genito-urinary acceptable (GU) even lower with a hypo-fractionated plan. The hypo-fractionation is potentially the future of the radiotherapy in the treatment of the localized prostate cancer thanks to the technological innovation, but for all that does not constitute at present a standard. (authors)

  5. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Tadahide; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Junichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakazawa, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  6. Genetically targeted radiotherapy using the sodium-iodide symporter for treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaut, A.W.; Niu, G.; Graham, M.M.; Domann, F.E.; Krager, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    Attempts at using gene therapy for cancer treatment have achieved limited success. Traditional in vivo gene therapy techniques are limited by relatively inefficient gene transfer, with only a small fraction of tumor cells transfected with the gene of interest. Gene therapy strategies yielding substantial bystander cytotoxicity are preferable and could yield significant clinical effect despite a lack of gene transfer to the entire tumor. We report the successful use of such a strategy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene, expressed primarily in the thyroid, is responsible for physiologic iodide accumulation. Expression of NIS in non-thyroid cell lines has been shown to confer iodide-concentrating ability. Using a recombinant adenovirus-NIS construct (Ad-NIS) delivered to HNSCC cell lines, we demonstrate radioiodide accumulation 15- to 30-fold higher than that of cell lines transduced with a control (Ad-Bgl II) adenovirus. Consistent with NIS-mediated uptake, this accumulation is inhibited by treatment with perchlorate. Using a clonogenic cell survival assay, we demonstrate a statistically significant, dose-dependent decrease in cell survival after delivery of Ad-NIS followed by administration of varying doses of I-131. Compared to a control, Ad-Bgl II-treated group, absolute survival was reduced by 80% at the highest dose of I-131 in Ad-NIS-treated cells. We also demonstrate the ability of NIS gene transfer followed by systemic administration of I-131 to dramatically attenuate tumor formation in nude mice. Three weeks after subcutaneous injection of tumor cells, tumors treated with Ad-NIS had decreased in size by 0.7±0.1 mm, whereas control tumors treated with Ad-Bgl II had increased in size by 7.4±1.7 mm. The relative accessibility of head and neck cancers make them attractive targets for gene therapy. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of genetically targeted radiotherapy using the NIS gene as a

  7. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Soh, Hendrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  8. Impact of the ''belly board'' device on treatment reproducibility radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.; Bischof, S.; Nouet, P.

    2002-01-01

    Background: The use of the belly board device (BBD) in the prone position has gained acceptance to spare small bowel in rectal cancer patients irradiated postoperatively, but there are few data in the preoperative setting, and the advantages of the BBD regarding normal tissue sparing may be counteracted by problems of patient positioning. This study was undertaken to investigate prospectively the influence of the BBD on treatment reproducibility in patients irradiated preoperatively in the prone position. Patients and Methods: 23 patients with rectal carcinoma in clinical stages II/III were included in this study. Axis displacement was evaluated in 14 patients treated without the BBD and nine with. The BBD is a commercial device (Belly Board, Radiation Products Design, Albertville, MN) made of a 17-cm thick hard sponge with an opening of 42 x 42 cm 2 . No specific patient immobilization devices were used. During radiotherapy, twelve patients had four control films, while eleven patients had three. The mean treatment position deviation was calculated for the medio-lateral, cranio-caudal and antero-posterior directions. Results: When comparing the first control film to the corresponding simulation film for patients without the BBD and with the BBD, the mean lateral displacements were 1.5 mm and 3.2 mm (p=0.26), the mean cranio-caudal displacements were 1.55 mm and 4.2 mm (p=0.13), and the mean antero-posterior displacements were 1.8 mm and 4.5 mm (p=0.04), respectively. When considering all control films, for the three directions, the amplitudes of the displacements were greater when using the BBD, particularly for the antero-posterior direction where the difference was highly significant (p=0.0006). Conclusions: Our data show that, in patients treated prone for rectal cancer, the use of the BBD in the preoperative setting without immobilization devices was associated with problems of patient position reproducibility, particularly for the antero-posterior direction

  9. Clinical picture and treatment of complications of lower part of large intestine resulting from radiotherapy for intra-pelvic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshihito; Sunagawa, Keishin; Matsumura, Shigejiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Masaoka, Yoshio

    1976-01-01

    The authors described clinical pictures and those treatments of 40 patients with complications of the lower part of the large intestine resulting from radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, ovarium or the penis. As the radiotherapy, 60 Co-telecobalt (6,000-16,000R) and 60 Co-needle (1,000-8,568 mch) intracavitary irradiation were used alone or in combination. Findings in the complications of the lower part of the large intestine were classified into Grade I (13 cases), II (14), III (14), and IV (4) according to Sherman. The prodromal symptoms of the complications appeared in 2-6 months following the irradiation in more than a half of the patients, and it appeared within a year in most of the patients. Most of the patients complained about melena, anemia, proctagra, tenesmus and diarrhea. In the cases of Grade III, the symptoms of ileus such as constipation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain appeared. Internal treatment was given principally, and preternal anus was made when frequent blood transfusion was required. Fourteen cases of those in Grade I and II recovered within 1-3 years. The cases which received proctostomy, including those who had bleeding, stricture and fistulation, had favorable prognosis. This result suggested that the radiotherapy for intra-pelvic cancer should be controlled to prevent further development of the complications in the rectum beyond Grade I. (Serizawa, K.)

  10. Treatment modalities of oral mucositis after radiation of head and neck cancers; Prise en charge des mucites apres radiotherapie des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapeyre, M.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Kaminsky, M.C.; Geoffrois, L.; Dolivet, G.; Pourel, N.; Marchal, C.; Bey, P.; Maire, F.; Simon, M. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Toussaint, B. [Hopital Central, Service de Chirurgie ORL, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2001-11-01

    Acute mucositis is common after radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. During the past 3 decades, there was a gradual evolution in the treatment modalities for locally advanced carcinomas (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy). These new strategies are accompanied by an increase in early mucosal reactions. At the present time, there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. Many traditional remedies or new agents seem ineffective (Sucralfate, Chlorhexidine, GM-CSF, Silver nitrate, Prostaglandin, anti-oxidants, Benzydamine hydrochloride), while others seem promising (Povidone-iodine, nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges and anti-fungal, local GM-CSF, Glutamide, Low-energy laser, corticosteroids). Radioprotectors are controversial and should be only used in experimental protocols and not in routine practice. However, some recommendations can be proposed: general prevention and global care before cancer therapy should be systematic (oral hygiene, dental and periodontal treatment, advice to avoid the use of tobacco and alcohol); frequent oral rinsing with a bland mouthwash (Povidone-iodine or others) should be used at the start of treatment because there are significant modifications of the oral microflora increased by a disturbed salivary flow; these mouthwashes could be associated with nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges or anti-fungal topical (bicarbonates, Amphotericine B); Systematic percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy should be decided before any aggressive treatments (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy); pain should be controlled; finally, the radiation technique should be optimized (mucosal sparing block, conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy). (authors)

  11. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in cancer treatment during pregnancy: a literature review; Radioterapia e quimioterapia no tratamento do cancer durante a gestacao - revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuenemann Junior, Eduardo; Urban, Cicero de Andrade; Lima, Rubens Silveira de [Hospital Nossa Senhora das Gracas, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Oncologia; Rabinovich, Iris; Spautz, Cleverton C. [Hospital Nossa Senhora das Gracas, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Ginecologia e Obstetricia

    2007-01-15

    The coexistence of pregnancy and cancer is a challenging situation for the physician. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are often necessary, depending on the type and stage of cancer at diagnosis. When applying such treatment, several key points concerning the health of the fetus must be carefully monitored. Meanwhile, if the appropriate treatment is delayed until postpartum, the mother's life may be at risk. Historically, the mother's health was placed above that of the fetus. This concept has changed, and harmonization of maternal and fetal health is now considered ideal. Numerous reports have shown the safe use of chemotherapy especially during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. In 2004 our department treated seven cases of simultaneous cancer and pregnancy, leading us to review the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy during pregnancy and the repercussions on neonatal outcome. (author)

  12. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saika, Kazumi

    2001-01-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  13. Treatment outcome and prognostic variables for local control and survival in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokdal, Lars; Hoeyer, Morten; Maase, Hans von der [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of radical radiotherapy in 292 patients with bladder cancer and to identify prognostic factors for local control and survival. Median age was 72.3 years (range 45-83 years). Median follow up was 66 months (range 18-121 months). All patients were treated by use of a standard 3-field technique with 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the tumor and the bladder. The elective lymph nodes were treated with doses in the range from 46 Gy to 60 Gy. Complete response was obtained in 52% of the patients at 3-month control. However, 41% of all patients with an initial CR developed recurrence during follow-up. The 3-year and 5-year overall survival rate was 31% and 21%, respectively. Performance status, T-stage, macroscopic complete TURB, hydronephrosis, and serum creatinine were independent prognostic factors for overall survival and, thus, important for the selection of patients for curative intended radiotherapy. During radiotherapy acute transient side effects were recorded in 78% of the patients; severe bowel complications were recorded in 9 patients (3%). Following radiotherapy, 10 patients (3%) developed intestinal reactions requiring surgery. Three patients (1%) were cystectomized because of severe radiation reactions in the bladder. At 5-year follow-up, the actuarial risk of complications requiring surgery was 15%. Treatment-related mortality was 2%.

  14. Study of the effect of misonidazole in conjunction with radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henk, J.M.; Adams, G.E.; Ash, D. (Medical Research Council, London (UK))

    1984-07-01

    The effect of the hypoxic cell sensitiser misonidazole as an adjuvant to radiotherapy of head and neck cancer was tested in a randomised double blind study. Patients with squamous carcinoma of the upper alimentary and respiratory tract, excluding those with early disease with good prognosis, who were deemed suitable for radical radiotherapy and fit to receive the drug were entered. Two radiotherapy regimes were employed, 10 fractions in 3 weeks to a modal tumour dose of 4000-4500 cGy, and 20 fractions in 4 weeks to a modal tumour dose of 5000-5750 cGy. Participating radiotherapists opted for one of the schemes. Misonidazole or placebo capsules were administered 4 to 5 hours before each fraction of radiotherapy to a total of 11 to 13 g/m/sup 2/. 168 patients were treated with 10 fractions and 99 with 20 fractions, between March 1979 and November 1981, when entry was stopped because of the high incidence of drug toxicity and lack of benefit. The estimated hazard ratio for local control was 0.89, indicating a slight advantage to misonidazole, statistically insignificant (p = 0.5). Peripheral neuropathy occurred in 56 patients receiving misonidazole, and was more severe when treatment was given in 10 fractions.

  15. Literature-based recommendations for treatment planning and execution in high-dose radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senan, Suresh; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Giraud, Philippe; Mirimanoff, Rene; Budach, Volker

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: To review the literature on techniques used in high-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice and for use in research protocols. Patients and methods: A literature search was performed for articles and abstracts that were considered both clinically relevant and practical to use. The relevant information was arbitrarily categorized under the following headings: patient positioning, CT scanning, incorporating tumour mobility, definition of target volumes, radiotherapy planning, treatment delivery, and scoring of response and toxicity. Results: Recommendations were made for each of the above steps from the published literature. Although most of the recommended techniques have yet to be evaluated in multicenter clinical trials, their use in high-dose radiotherapy to the thorax appears to be rational on the basis of current evidence. Conclusions: Recommendations for the clinical implementation of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for lung tumours were identified in the literature. Procedures that are still considered to be investigational were also highlighted

  16. A case of radiation gastritis required surgical treatment in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagino, Daisuke; Arai, Yuko; Komatsu, Atsushi; Inoue, Kumiko; Takechi, Kimihiro

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of radiation gastritis in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A 61-year-old woman received irradiation of a metastatic lesion of the second lumbar vertebra. Six months later she complained of fatigue and presented with severe anemia, and her diagnosis was hemorrhagic radiation gastritis. She was treated endoscopically, but that failed to control the bleeding, making it necessary to resect surgically. The incidence of radiation gastritis is very low because the stomach is rarely within the treated field, but it is of importance to be aware that the stomach is by no means more radioresistant than other organs. (author)

  17. A case of radiation gastritis required surgical treatment in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagino, Daisuke; Arai, Yuko; Komatsu, Atsushi; Inoue, Kumiko; Takechi, Kimihiro [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Tomobe (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of radiation gastritis in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A 61-year-old woman received irradiation of a metastatic lesion of the second lumbar vertebra. Six months later she complained of fatigue and presented with severe anemia, and her diagnosis was hemorrhagic radiation gastritis. She was treated endoscopically, but that failed to control the bleeding, making it necessary to resect surgically. The incidence of radiation gastritis is very low because the stomach is rarely within the treated field, but it is of importance to be aware that the stomach is by no means more radioresistant than other organs. (author)

  18. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  19. Radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokdal, Lars; Høyer, Morten; von der Maase, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The exact value of radiotherapy in the treatment of muscle-invasive       bladder cancer is difficult to establish, as most studies exploring this       issue are retrospective with different procedures for selecting patients       for treatment, as well as varying treatment strategies. An estima...

  20. Effect of 3D radiotherapy planning compared to 2D planning within a conventional treatment schedule of advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraube, P.; Spahn, U.; Oetzel, D.; Wannenmacher, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The effect of 3D radiotherapy planning (3D RTP) in comparison to 2D radiotherapy planning (2D RTP) was evaluated in a usually practiced treatment schedule (starting by v./d. opposing portals, continued with computer-planned portals) for non-small-cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: In 20 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer the computer-planned part of the treatment schedule was calculated 2- and 3-dimensionally. Target volume were the primary tumor, the involved and the electively irradiated mediastinal lymph nodes. The results of the 2D RTP were recalculated 3-dimensionally and the mean doses to target volume and organs at risk were defined. Further, the normal tissue complications were calculated. Results: Under the prerequisite of 44 Gy maximally allowed to the spinal cord and a dose to the reference point of 50 Gy a small, but significant advantage with 2.1 Gy to the target (p=0.004) and a reduction of 3.6 Gy to the heart (p=0.05) was achievable for 3D RTP. The dose to the lungs did not differ significantly (19.7 Gy for 2D RTP, 20.3 Gy for 3D RTP). The dose to the heart was not estimated critical by NTCP (normal tissue complication probability). The NTCP for the ipsilateral lung was 16.1 and 18.7% for 2D RTP and 3D RTP, respectively. Regarding the simulator-planned ap/pa fields at the start of the radiotherapy the advantage of 3D RTP was further reduced but remained significant. Favorable with respect to the mean lung dose and the NTCP (18.7% NTCP ipsilateral lung for early onset of 3D planned radiotherapy vs 31.7% for late onset of 3D planned radiotherapy) but not significantly measurable is the early start of the treatment by computerized RTP. Conclusion: The main advantage of 3D RTP in treatment of advanced lung cancer is the better coverage of the target volume. A reduction of the mean lung dose cannot be expected. A dose escalation by 3D RTP to target volumes as described here seems not to be possible because of

  1. Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Borchsenius, Julie I Helene; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer are well described. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors and thus an increasing number of patients with long-term side effects...... of their cancer treatments. This article describes the short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following thoracic radiotherapy and further, optimal cardiovascular assessments and diagnostic tools in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients....

  2. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, Astrid N.; Leer, Jan-Willem H.; Collins, C. David; Wondergem, Jan; Hermans, Jo; Timothy, Adrian

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The policy of the Radiotherapy Department of St. Thomas' Hospital in London for patients with invasive bladder cancer, used to be treatment with hypofractionated radiotherapy. The advantages of this fractionation scheme included reduction of the number of treatment sessions and better use of limited resources. Our results after hypofractionation were compared to series with more conventional radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between 1975 and 1985, 123 patients with a T2-T3 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were treated by a radical course of hypofractionated radiotherapy. Local control, survival and morbidity rates were analysed retrospectively. Results: The actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years were 31 and 29%, respectively. The actuarial cancer-specific 5- and 10-year survival rates were 48 and 39%, respectively. Acute side effects were observed in 87% of patients. The actuarial overall and severe late complication rates at 5 years were 33 and 9%, respectively. The local control, survival and early side effect rates we found, were in the same range as those reported in literature. Late radiation side effects however, were more common after hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy schedules. Conclusions: We conclude that the potential advantage of a reduced number of treatment sessions may be lost in the long term, because of the higher incidence of late morbidity after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Hypofractionation however, remains a valuable technique for palliation and deserves further investigation for radical treatment where access to equipment is difficult or resources are limited

  3. Overview of different available chemotherapy regimens combined with radiotherapy for the neoadjuvant and definitive treatment of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Ghidini, Michele; Barni, Sandro; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Petrelli, Fausto

    2017-06-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) is the current standard of care for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction. Many efforts have been made over the last years to identify the best chemotherapy and radiotherapy combination regimen, but specific randomized trials addressing this issue are still lacking. Areas covered: A systematic review of the literature was performed searching in PubMed all published studies of combinations CTRT regimens for operable or unresectable esophageal cancer to describe activity and toxicity. Studies considered were prospective series or clinical phase II-III trials including at least 40 patients and published in English language. Expert commentary: Long-term results of CROSS trial have established RT combined with carboplatin plus paclitaxel chemotherapy as the preferred neoadjuvant treatment option for both squamous and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. More effective multimodal treatment strategies integrating novel biological agents including immunotherapy and based on an extensive molecular tumor characterization are eagerly awaited.

  4. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M.; Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103 Pd or 125 I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ 2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7

  6. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

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    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  7. Semicentenial history of development of radiotherapy and Treatment of Oesophageal Cancer in Azerbaijan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasirova, F.J.; Shiraliyev, O.K.; Beibutov, Sh.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The history of Oesophageal Cancer Therapy in Azerbaijan dates back to 1953-1956 when during the Soviet era, when we published our work on radiotherapy of oesophageal cancer for the first time. During the past more than 50 years a total of 5283 patients of oesophageal cancer have been treated by radiotherapy using several devices, e.g., GUTCo- 400, GUT-Co-1200, Luch-l, Agat-R and Rockus-M. Of them were 67.7% men and 32.3% women. The age of patients ranged between 24-88 years. 80.1% patients were aged more than 50 years. The majority of patients reported to the hospital with very late stages of disease: only 2.6% belonged to stage-1, while 30.6% were stage-2, 64% stage- 3 and 2.4% stage-4. Duration of disease after the beginning of the first symptoms averaged 4-5 months. Histologically 95% of patients had squamous carcinoma and the rest had adeno-carcinoma and others kinds of tumour n macroscopical picture of tumour patients were distributed as follows: circular sclerosing cancer at 28.4%, papillary fungoid one at 7,1%, saucer-like one at 29.2%, nodular medulla ring at 35.32%. Extent of defect changed within the limits of 2-15 sm, only at 2.7% were 2-3 sm. Majority of the tumours were located in the middle (56,1%), less often in lower (29,9%) and in the upper third of esophagus (14%). The defects of adjacent organs were at 27.1% cases. In view of the age, the associated diseases and the extent of tumour the radical surgical intervention could b. offered to only 10-15% of hospitalized patients. All patients received radiation therapy after a proper topometric and dosimetric evaluation. During the past several decades, the technique of radiotherapy has improved with time and the process has been modernized in keeping with international standards. Results: Our results show that average 1,2,3 and 5 year survival of our patients have been 40-60%, 18-27%, 10-12% and 6-7% respectively. The optimum factor for good prognosis has been the early detection of disease

  8. Outcome for esophageal cancer following treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy but not esophagectomy: nonsurgical treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Zingg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Urs Zingg1,2, Dennis DiValentino1, Alexander McQuinn1, Ahmad Mardzuki1, Sarah K Thompson2,  Christos S Karapetis1,3, David I Watson11Flinders University Department of Surgery, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia; 2Discipline of Surgery, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 3Department of Medical Oncology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: More than 50% of patients with esophageal cancer are not suitable for surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of patients undergoing standard nonsurgical treatment.Methods: Data of all patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for esophageal cancer were identified from a prospective database.Results: Seventy-five patients were treated for localized disease, and 52 for metastatic disease at diagnosis. Except for age, which was higher in patients without metastases, there were no significant differences between the patients with vs. without metastatic disease. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed a median survival of 10.8 months for all patients. There was a significant difference in survival (p < 0.001 between the groups with versus without metastases, with median survival in the patients without metastases 13.6 months versus 6.5 months in patients with metastases. Patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for localized disease had a five-year survival of 12%. No significant difference between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was identified. Subanalysis of patients who received chemoradiotherapy revealed similar results to the overall group of patients.Conclusion: In patients with localized disease at diagnosis, long-term survival can be achieved in some patients, whereas five-year survival is rare in patients who present with metastatic disease.Keywords: nonsurgical treatment, esophageal cancer, chemoradiotherapy, metastases, survival

  9. Treatment-Planning Study of Prostate Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With a Varian Clinac Operated Without a Flattening Filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Kry, Stephen F.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using photon beams from an accelerator operated without a flattening filter; and to determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using unflattened beams for this type of treatment. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated for 10 patients with early-stage prostate cancer. For each patient, four plans were generated: with and without the flattening filter, at 6 and 18 MV. The prescription dose was 75.6 Gy to 98% of the planning target volume. The number of beams, their orientations, and optimization constraints were the same for all plans. Plans were generated with Eclipse 8.0 (Varian Medical Systems). Results: All the plans developed with unflattened beams were clinically acceptable. In terms of patient dose distributions, plans with unflattened beams were similar to the corresponding plans with flattened beams. Plans with unflattened beams required fewer monitor units (MUs) per plan: on average, by a factor of 2.0 at 6 MV and 2.6 at 18 MV, assuming that removal of the flattening filter was not followed by recalibration of MUs. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for prostate cancer can be developed with unflattened beams at both 6 and 18 MV. Dosimetrically, flattened and unflattened beams generated similar treatment plans. The plans with unflattened beams required substantially fewer MUs. The reduction in the number of MUs indicates corresponding reduction in beam-on time and in the amount of radiation outside the target

  10. The relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Akahane, Keiko; Shikama, Naoto; Takahashi, Osamu; Hama, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is no current consensus regarding the optimal bladder volumes in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Two hundred and forty-three patients underwent definitive radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer. The prescribed dose defined as 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 100 % of the prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the prostate with a 5-mm margin and 2 cm of the proximal seminal vesicle. The PTV was defined as the CTV with a 5-mm margin. Treatment plans were optimized to satisfy the dose constraints defined by in-house protocols for PTV and organs at risk (rectum wall, bladder wall, sigmoid colon and small intestine). If all dose constraints were satisfied, the plan was defined as an optimal plan (OP). Results: An OP was achieved with 203 patients (84%). Mean bladder volume (± 1 SD) was 266 ml (± 130 ml) among those with an OP and 214 ml (±130 ml) among those without an OP (p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis also showed that bladder volumes below 150 ml decreased the possibility of achieving an OP. However, the percentage of patients with an OP showed a plateau effect at bladder volumes above 150 ml. Conclusions. Bladder volume is a significant factor affecting OP rates. However, our results suggest that bladder volumes exceeding 150 ml may not help meet planning dose constraints

  11. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-01-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  12. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  13. [Radiotherapy in node-positive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, D; Bartkowiak, D; Bolenz, C; Wiegel, T

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous randomized trials to guide the management of patients with localized (and metastatic) prostate cancer, but only a few (mostly retrospective) studies have specifically addressed node-positive patients. Therefore, there is uncertainty regarding optimal treatment in this situation. Current guidelines recommend long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone or radiotherapy plus long-term ADT as treatment options. This overview summarizes the existing literature on the use of radiotherapy for node-positive prostate cancer as definitive treatment and as adjuvant or salvage therapy after radical prostatectomy. In this context, we also discuss several PET tracers in the imaging evaluation of patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. As for definitive treatment, retrospective studies suggest that ADT plus radiotherapy improves overall survival compared with ADT alone. These studies also consistently demonstrated that many patients with node-positive prostate cancer can achieve long-term survival - and are likely curable - with aggressive therapy. The beneficial impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on survival in patients with pN1 prostate cancer seems to be highly influenced by tumor characteristics. Men with ≤ 2 positive lymph nodes in the presence of intermediate- to high-grade disease, or positive margins, and those with 3 or 4 positive lymph nodes are the ideal candidates for adjuvant radiotherapy (plus long-term ADT) after surgery. There is a need for randomized trials to further examine the potential role of radiotherapy as either definitive or adjuvant treatment, for patients with node-positive prostate cancer.

  14. Radiotherapy with or without hyperthermia in the treatment of superficial localized breast cancer: results from five randomized controlled trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, Clare C.; Hand, Jeffrey W.; Field, Stanley B.; Machin, David; Whaley, Jill B.; Zee, Jacoba van der; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Rhoon, Gerard C. van; Dijk, Jan D.P. van; Gonzalez, Dionisio Gonzalez; Liu, F.-F.; Goodman, Phyllis; Sherar, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Claims for the value of hyperthermia as an adjunct to radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer have mostly been based on small Phase I or II trials. To test the benefit of this form of treatment, randomized Phase III trials were needed. Methods and Materials: Five randomized trials addressing this question were started between 1988 and 1991. In these trials, patients were eligible if they had advanced primary or recurrent breast cancer, and local radiotherapy was indicated in preference to surgery. In addition, heating of the lesions and treatment with a prescribed (re)irradiation schedule had to be feasible and informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of all trials was local complete response. Slow recruitment led to a decision to collaborate and combine the trial results in one analysis, and report them simultaneously in one publication. Interim analyses were carried out and the trials were closed to recruitment when a previously agreed statistically significant difference in complete response rate was observed in the two larger trials. Results: We report on pretreatment characteristics, the treatments received, the local response observed, duration of response, time to local failure, distant progression and survival, and treatment toxicity of the 306 patients randomized. The overall CR rate for RT alone was 41% and for the combined treatment arm was 59%, giving, after stratification by trial, an odds ratio of 2.3. Not all trials demonstrated an advantage for the combined treatment, although the 95% confidence intervals of the different trials all contain the pooled odds ratio. The greatest effect was observed in patients with recurrent lesions in previously irradiated areas, where further irradiation was limited to low doses. Conclusion: The combined result of the five trials has demonstrated the efficacy of hyperthermia as an adjunct to radiotherapy for treatment of recurrent breast cancer. The implication of these encouraging results is that

  15. Treatment of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Surgery or Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy?

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    Esengül Koçak Uzel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC has improved recently due to advances in surgical and radiation modalities. Minimally-invasive procedures like Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS lobectomy decreases the morbidity of surgery, while the numerous methods of staging the mediastinum such as endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies are helping to achieve the objectives much more effectively. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR has become the frontrunner as the standard of care in medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients, and has also been branded as tolerable and highly effective. Ongoing researches using SABR are continuously validating the optimal dosing and fractionation schemes, while at the same time instituting its role for both inoperable and operable patients.

  16. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassam, Zahra; Lockwood, Gina; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James; Swallow, Carol; Oza, Amit; Siu, Lillian; Knox, Jennifer J.; Wong, Rebecca; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Moore, Malcolm; Ringash, Jolie

    2006-01-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study

  17. Phase I trial of Orzel (UFT plus leucovorin), cisplatin, and radiotherapy in the treatment of potentially resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedesco, Karen L.; Berlin, Jordan; Blanke, Charles D.; Teng Ming; Choy, Hak; Roberts, John; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Leach, Steve; Wyman, Ken; Tarpley, John; Shyr, Yu; Caillouette, Carol; Chakravarthy, Bapsi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Fluorinated pyrimidines have been established as radiosensitizers in the combined modality therapy of esophageal cancer. UFT, an oral combination of a 5-fluorouracil pro-drug (uracil) and a dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase inhibitor (ftorafur), may provide improvement in the ease of administration with equal efficacy. This Phase I study was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of UFT, leucovorin, and cisplatin when given with radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of resectable esophageal cancer. Methods: Chemotherapy consisted of i.v. cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 (Days 1 and 22) and UFT with leucovorin orally on Days 1-35. UFT was escalated in 50-mg/m 2 increments, starting at 200 mg/m 2 /d. Radiotherapy consisted of 4500 cGy in 25 fractions. Patients underwent resection 4-6 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. Results: Ten patients with resectable esophageal cancer were enrolled. Of the 7 patients entered at dose level 1, 1 developed a dose-limiting toxicity of nausea. All 3 patients entered at dose level 2 developed dose-limiting toxicity. The maximal tolerated dose for UFT was the starting level, 200 mg/m 2 /d. Of the 10 patients enrolled, 8 underwent esophagectomy and 2 developed progressive disease and did not undergo surgery. The disease of 6 of the 8 patients was downstaged at surgery. Conclusion: The recommended UFT dose for Phase II studies is 200 mg/m 2 /d given orally in two divided doses when given with leucovorin, cisplatin, and radiotherapy

  18. Feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to improve lung sparing in treatment planning for distal esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Anurag; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Liu, H. Helen; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Wang Xiaochun; Murshed, Hasan; Bonnen, Mark D.; Garg, Amit K.; Stevens, Craig W.; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melinda D.; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be used to reduce doses to normal lung than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in treating distal esophageal malignancies. Patients and methods: Ten patient cases with cancer of the distal esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. IMRT plans using four, seven, and nine beams (4B, 7B, and 9B) were developed for each patient and compared with the 3DCRT plan used clinically. IMRT and 3DCRT plans were evaluated with respect to PTV coverage and dose-volumes to irradiated normal structures, with statistical comparison made between the two types of plans using the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Results: IMRT plans (4B, 7B, 9B) reduced total lung volume treated above 10 Gy (V 1 ), 20 Gy (V 2 ), mean lung dose (MLD), biological effective volume (V eff ), and lung integral dose (P 1 , 5% for V 2 , and 2.5 Gy for MLD. IMRT improved the PTV heterogeneity (P<0.05), yet conformity was better with 7B-9B IMRT plans. No clinically meaningful differences were observed with respect to the irradiated volumes of spinal cord, heart, liver, or total body integral doses. Conclusions: Dose-volume of exposed normal lung can be reduced with IMRT, though clinical investigations are warranted to assess IMRT treatment outcome of esophagus cancers

  19. The impact of bladder preparation protocols on post treatment toxicity in radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yat Man Tsang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The empty bladder preparation approach has non-inferior acute and intermediate post RT GI and GU toxicities in patients treated for localised prostate cancer with advanced radiotherapy techniques compared to the full bladder preparation.

  20. Radiotherapy in addition to radical surgery in rectal cancer: evidence for a dose-response effect favoring preoperative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimelius, Bengt; Isacsson, Ulf; Jung, Bo; Paahlman, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the relationship between radiation dose and reduction in local recurrence rate after preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: All randomized trials initiated prior to 1988 comparing preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy with surgery alone or with each other were included. Local failure rates were available in 5626 randomized patients. The linear quadratic formula was used to compensate for different radiotherapy schedules. Results: For preoperative radiotherapy, a clear dose-response relationship could be established. For postoperative radiotherapy, the range of doses was narrow, and a dose-response relationship could not be demonstrated. At similar doses, preoperative radiotherapy appeared to be more efficient in reducing local failure rate than postoperative. The only trial comparing preoperative with postoperative radiotherapy confirms this notion. A 15-20 Gy higher dose may be required postoperatively than preoperatively to reach similar efficacy. Neither approach alone significantly influences survival, although it is likely that a small survival benefit may be seen after preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions: The information from the entire randomized experience suggests that preoperative radiotherapy may be more dose efficient than postoperative radiotherapy

  1. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, M; Li, X Allen

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher T pot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer. This set of parameters is consistent with in vitro

  2. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Mallik, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  3. Rehabilitation of patients with laryngeal and lung cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strashinin, A.I.; Gerasimyak, V.G.; Vladimirova, V.A.; Ivanova, L.V.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of medical and social-occupational rehabilitation after a course of radiotherapy in patients with respiratory system cancer have been determined. Medical rehabilitation in patients with lung cancer comprises expedient planning of radiotherapy by means of systematic medicamental treatment. It is shown that it is necessary to place the patients in special rehabilitation departments after radiotherapy of carry out the treatment of pneumonities

  4. Results of treatment with concurrent radiotherapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy for cancer of the uterine cervix - a preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusiecka, M.; Dryl, B.; Bojarowska, K.; Slocka, B.; Ziemba, B.

    2002-01-01

    To compare results of radiochemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Fifty three patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, undergoing combined radiochemotherapy (C) and a control group of 50 patients treated with irradiation only (R) entered the study. All patients in group C treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy showed positive therapeutic effect - no cases of stable disease nor progress. Complete remission (CR) was observed in more than half of the cases (54.72 %) directly after treatment, as compared with group R - 19.64%. However, more than 70% of patients treated with combined therapy demonstrated bone-marrow damages. Only 4 of these patients (7.55%) did not complete cytostatic treatment because of thrombocytopoenia. Low thrombocyte count caused permanent exclusion of the patient from the chemotherapy schedule. Post-irradiation side effects, such as proctitis, urocystis and enterocolitis posed another problem: combined radiochemotherapy increased the percentage of patients with post-irradiation reactions, although the intensity of these reactions was neither increased nor lenghtier. Our results of combining irradiation with cisplatin-based chemotherapy treatment allow to recommend this schedule of therapy as a standard for locally advanced cervical cancer treatment. (author)

  5. White paper of radiotherapy in France. Twelve objectives to improve one of the major cancer treatments -2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, Bruno; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Mahe, Marc-Andre; Maingon, Philippe; Mornex, Francoise; Azria, David; Barillot, Isabelle; Chauvet, Bruno; Denis, Fabrice; Lartigau, Eric; Lipinski, Francis; Maingon, Philippe; Mornex, Francoise; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Caudrelier, Valerie; Diaz, Olivia; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Martel, Catherine de; Dubray, Bernard; Estivalet, Stephane; Faivre, Jean-Christophe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Ferlay, Jacques; Fumagalli, Ingrid; Giraud, Philippe; Hennequin, Christophe; Henoch, Herve; Khodri, Mustapha; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Llacer, Carmen; Lorchel, Fabrice; Mahe, Marc-Andre; Meyrieux, Charlotte; Noel, Georges; Oozeer, Rashid; Peiffert, Didier; Pourel, Nicolas; Pradier, Olivier; Rocher, Francois; Thureau, Sebastien; Eschwege, Francois; Martin, Philippe; Parmentier Gerard; Eschwege, Francois

    2013-01-01

    This white paper aims at presenting the status and perspectives of radiotherapy in France, at proposing solutions for the improvement of treatment quality and safety. Along with surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy is one of the major techniques of cancer treatment and the first part gives an overview of increased needs due to population ageing, of the fast technical advances (better definition of target volumes and doses, better taking into account of anatomy variations and movements), of the impact of these advances on treatment results for various types of cancer, and of the current status of equipment (a slow evolution is noticed) and future needs. The second part addresses the various professions and their demography. The third part examines how to correct the unequal access to care with respect to geography, to equipment and treatment quality, or to delay before treatment. It also evokes collaborations between centres, the diffusion of good practices, specialisation, and makes some proposals for an equal access to care. The fourth part highlights quality and security improvements due to quality control practices, recommendations, prevention actions and risk management. The next part addresses the financial aspect and makes some proposals to reduce inequalities and archaisms. It also compares costs in France and in Europe. The report then gives an overview of the administrative and professional environment and of the different involved bodies, and outlines the need of a better coordination. Patient information is discussed (patients are better informed) as well as support cares. The last parts address activities of research and development and the organisation and possibilities offered by education and training

  6. Uterine cervix cancer treatment in IIB, IIIA and IIIB stages with external radiotherapy versus external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose. ION SOLCA. Years 1998-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Doris; Falquez, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    We realized study of retrospective accomplished in course of years 1998-2000, reviewing clinical charts of statistical department of ION SOLCA. We reviewed 544 cases in 1998, 603 patients in 1999, and 630 cases in 2000. In the radiotherapy service, 133 patients received treatment with external radiotherapy between February 1998 to February 1999 in IIB, IIIA, IIIB stages and only 80 patients were treated with external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose rate in the same stages between March 1999 to March 2000. (The author)

  7. Interest of Supportive and Barrier Protective Skin Care Products in the Daily Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Antoine; Regueiro, Carlos; Hijal, Tarek; Pasquier, David; De La Fuente, Cristina; Le Tinier, Florence; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Lartigau, Eric; Moyal, Dominique; Seité, Sophie; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2018-01-01

    As many as 50% of patients with cancer develop acute skin reactions to some degree with radiotherapy. Proactive skin care is often recommended to minimise these skin reactions and maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier; nevertheless, no consensual guidelines are systematically used. This multicentre, observational, prospective study evaluated the tolerability and benefit of supportive and barrier protective skin care products in preventing radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in 253 women initiating radiotherapy (exclusive or adjuvant) for breast cancer. Patients received a kit of 5 commercially available skin care products before the first radiotherapy treatment. The following variables were assessed: cutaneous adverse events, investigator-assessed skin reactions (oedema, erythema, dryness, desquamation) before and after radiotherapy course, investigator, and patient opinion on products benefit. Results were analysed by frequency of product use (heavy versus low). Average age was 60 years (range: 34-85). Over 92% of patients reported good to excellent tolerance on irradiated skin for each product. During the 6-week radiotherapy period, we observed that heavy product users had less skin reactions than the low users, particularly within 10 days of radiotherapy initiation (8% versus 18%; p  = .031). Positive physician's opinion on product use was more frequent for high (66.6%) versus low (32%) users. Patient-assessed patient benefit index was generally >1, indicating relevant treatment benefit, with a tendency for better benefit in high versus low users. These results support recommendations to use skin care products to minimise the impact of secondary cutaneous reactions with radiotherapy cancer treatment.

  8. Interest of Supportive and Barrier Protective Skin Care Products in the Daily Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Berger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As many as 50% of patients with cancer develop acute skin reactions to some degree with radiotherapy. Proactive skin care is often recommended to minimise these skin reactions and maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier; nevertheless, no consensual guidelines are systematically used. This multicentre, observational, prospective study evaluated the tolerability and benefit of supportive and barrier protective skin care products in preventing radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in 253 women initiating radiotherapy (exclusive or adjuvant for breast cancer. Methods: Patients received a kit of 5 commercially available skin care products before the first radiotherapy treatment. The following variables were assessed: cutaneous adverse events, investigator-assessed skin reactions (oedema, erythema, dryness, desquamation before and after radiotherapy course, investigator, and patient opinion on products benefit. Results were analysed by frequency of product use (heavy versus low. Results: Average age was 60 years (range: 34-85. Over 92% of patients reported good to excellent tolerance on irradiated skin for each product. During the 6-week radiotherapy period, we observed that heavy product users had less skin reactions than the low users, particularly within 10 days of radiotherapy initiation (8% versus 18%; p  = .031. Positive physician’s opinion on product use was more frequent for high (66.6% versus low (32% users. Patient-assessed patient benefit index was generally >1, indicating relevant treatment benefit, with a tendency for better benefit in high versus low users. Conclusions: These results support recommendations to use skin care products to minimise the impact of secondary cutaneous reactions with radiotherapy cancer treatment.

  9. Radiotherapy Results of Early Uterine Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : This study was done to analyze survivals, patterns of failure, and complications of early uterine cervix cancer after curative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials : Eighty patients with uterine cervix cancer FIGO Stage IB (48 cases) and Stage IIA (32 cases) treated with radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were treated from November 1985 to May 1993, and minimum follow up period was 24 months. and 6 cases were lost to follow up. All of them were treated with external radiotherapy and different fractions of high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy. Survival rates, failure patterns, complication rates and degrees of severity were analyzed according to several factors. Results : Overall 5 year survival rate and relapse free survival rate were 72.3%, and 72.8% respectively. Prognostic factors were stage, size, pathology, RT response and there was no significant survival difference among the reasons of radiotherapy choice. There were 19 cases of treatment failure, another 3 cases were not tumor related death, and most of treatment related failure occurred within 24 months. Late complication rate of bladder and rectum were 8.8%, 15% respectively, frequency and severity of complication were correlated with ICR fractionation dose and total dose. Conclusion : These results showed that survival rates of early stage radiation treated cervix cancer patients were comparable to surgical series, but more aggressive treatment methods needed for stage IIA poor prognostic patients, To decrease late complication, choice of proper ICR dose and meticulous vaginal packing is needed

  10. A treatment planning study comparing helical tomotherapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for the treatment of anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kurian Jones; Syme, Alasdair; Small, Cormac; Warkentin, Heather; Quon, Harvey; Ghosh, Sunita; Field, Colin; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Patel, Samir; Usmani, Nawaid; Severin, Diane; Nijjar, Tirath; Fallone, Gino; Pedersen, John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A planning study to compare helical tomotherapy (HT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for the treatment of anal canal cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen (8 males and 8 females) patients with anal cancer previously treated radically were identified. HT and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric comparisons of the plans were performed. The planning goals were to deliver 54 Gy to the tumor (PTV 54Gy ) and 48 Gy to the nodes at risk (PTV Node ) in 30 fractions. Results: PTVs: HT plans were more homogeneous for both men and women. Male patients: HT vs. IMRT: D max : 55.87 ± 0.58 vs. 59.17 ± 3.24 (p = 0.036); D min : 52.91 ± 0.36 vs. 44.09 ± 6.84 (p = 0.012); female patients: HT vs. IMRT: D max : 56.14 ± 0.71 vs. 59.47 ± 0.81 (p = 0.012); D min : 52.36 ± 0.87 vs. 50.97 ± 1.42 (p = 0.028). OARs: In general, HT plans delivered a lower dose to the peritoneal cavity, external genitalia and the bladder and IMRT plans resulted in greater sparing of the pelvic bones (iliac crest/femur) for both men and women. Iliac crest/femur: the difference was significant only for the mean V10 Gy of iliac crest in women (p ≤ 0.012). External genitalia: HT plans achieved better sparing in women compared to men (p ≤ 0.046). For men, the mean doses were 18.96 ± 3.17 and 15.72 ± 3.21 for the HT and IMRT plan, respectively (p ≤ 0.017). Skin: both techniques achieved comparable sparing of the non-target skin (p = NS). Conclusions: HT and IMRT techniques achieved comparable target dose coverage and organ sparing, whereas HT plans were more homogeneous for both men and women.

  11. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Zhaomei; Ma, C-M; Chen Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Chen Lili; Pollack, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS; (5) docetaxel + RT; (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg −1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio. (paper)

  12. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zhaomei; Ma, C.-M.; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Pollack, Alan; Chen, Lili

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS (5) docetaxel + RT (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg-1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio.

  13. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. Toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also. (author)

  14. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment: toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also.

  15. Treatment of invasive bladder cancer with cisplatin, fluorouracil and concurrent radiotherapy: a pilot study; Traitement des cancers infiltrants de vessie par cisplatine, fluoro-uracile et radiotherapie concomitante: resultats d`une etude pilote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, B.; Felix-Faure, C.; Berger, C.; Vincent, P.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Davin, J.L. [Clinique Rhone-Durance, Avignon (France)

    1998-04-01

    Pilot study to assess treatment feasibility and results of a 2-drug chemotherapy (CT) regimen administered concurrently with radiotherapy (RT) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The median follow-up was 38 months. The feasibility of concurrent CT-RT was excellent: 96 % of the patients completed radiotherapy and 100 % of them received the two courses of P-FU. The acute toxicity was mild: no hematological toxicity or renal toxicity over grade II, 4 cases of bowel or rectal reversible grade III toxicity and 2 cases of reversible grade III cystitis. A complete response was achieved in 30 out of the 42 evaluable patients (65.2 %). Nine patients received an immediate salvage treatment (3TUR, 3 additional radiotherapy and 3 cystectomies). Ten patients had local failure. Projected 3-year locoregional control was 49 % for the 46 patients. Projected overall 3-year survival was 53 %. Functional results were good for disease-free patients with preserved bladder: 1 grade I, 3 grade II, and no grade III cystitis. Concurrent 2-drug chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil is feasible without major toxicity and offers a potentially curative and conservative treatment for patients with localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer. (authors)

  16. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author)

  17. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yuji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author).

  18. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Derived Adaptive Radiotherapy for Radical Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, Maria A.; Brooks, Corrinne; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Aitken, Alexandra; Tait, Diana M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for reduction in normal tissue irradiation by creating a patient specific planning target volume (PTV) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging acquired in the first week of radiotherapy for patients receiving radical radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Patients receiving radical RT for carcinoma of the esophagus were investigated. The PTV is defined as CTV(tumor, nodes) plus esophagus outlined 3 to 5 cm cranio-caudally and a 1.5-cm circumferential margin is added (clinical plan). Prefraction CBCT are acquired on Days 1 to 4, then weekly. No correction for setup error made. The images are imported into the planning system. The tumor and esophagus for the length of the PTV are contoured on each CBCT and 5 mm margin is added. A composite volume (PTV1) is created using Week 1 composite CBCT volumes. The same process is repeated using CBCT Week 2 to 6 (PTV2). A new plan is created using PTV1 (adaptive plan). The coverage of the 95% isodose of PTV1 is evaluated on PTV2. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for lungs, heart, and cord for two plans are compared. Results: A total of 139 CBCT for 14 cases were analyzed. For the adaptive plan the coverage of the 95% prescription isodose for PTV1 = 95.6% ± 4% and the PTV2 = 96.8% ± 4.1% (t test, 0.19). Lungs V20 (15.6 Gy vs. 10.2 Gy) and heart mean dose (26.9 Gy vs. 20.7 Gy) were significantly smaller for the adaptive plan. Conclusions: A reduced planning volume can be constructed within the first week of treatment using CBCT. A single plan modification can be performed within the second week of treatment with considerable reduction in organ at risk dose.

  19. Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Associated Diabetes Mellitus Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary breast cancer when detected early can be treated by radical mastectomy alone. However, 20-30% of women treated as such later on, develop local or regional recurrence. This leads to an additional treatment with radiotherapy by the oncologist for the sake of the 20-30% of patients that may need it postoperatively.

  20. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT...

  1. Proposed guide for radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer in the CCSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguello Mendez, Julio Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer has been the most common carcinoma occurred in women. The increase of this type epidemiological neoplasm is worrisome; the application of therapies, the diagnosis and treatment of breast diseases as work perspective, must integrate multidisciplinary oncological principles and therapeutic approaches. The reduction of the impact of breast cancer in Costa Rica has been the mission of breast units of hospitals in the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social. The prevention and treatment of the disease have formed joint and integral part to meet this goal. An attention is offered to fulfill this mission based on the evidence with the help of an essential tool as have been the clinical practice guidelines (CPG). These guidelines have helped to maintain therapeutic equity among patients; as a consequence, the development, implementation and evaluation of results and the guides have been considered suitable to carry out the evidence-based care. Also, the therapeutic discussion with the patient, has been strengthened enabling to reach a shared decision making. The guidelines are submitted which out not intended to substitute at any time the medical criteria, or standardize the management of breast cancer because in each case is due individualizing. The number of survivors has been increasing and this thanks to the planning of care, provided long-term, the patient and communication with health personnel. Thus, the highest attention has been given to breast cancer survivors. The multidisciplinary team of cancer care and treatment have played a key role. Guides have tried to conceptualize and optimize this role [es

  2. Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A literature review of 10 series using electrocoagulation, fulguration, or local excision demonstrates that about 70% of all patients had tumors smaller than 3 cm and the remainder had tumors measuring between 4 cm and 7 cm. Although primary tumor size in rectal cancer has little prognostic value per se, it is obviously important when determining the appropriateness of local therapy. Selecting patients for local therapy based on tumor size alone seems reasonable, since the recurrence and survival rates for the patients are similar to those achieved with radical surgery. Since patients treated with local excision alone have predominantly T1 or T2 tumors, a comparison with the data of others illustrates the prognostic utility of the degree of bowel penetration and shows five-year survival rates of 71% to 76% for patients with limited disease. In this chapter, the author describes an additional group of patients who also did well following postoperative radiotherapy after conservative surgical treatment

  3. Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Bergsma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC typically presents at an advanced stage, which is often felt to be incurable, and such patients are usually treated with a palliative approach. Accumulating retrospective and prospective clinical evidence, including a recently completed randomized trial, support the existence of an oligometastatic disease state wherein select individuals with advanced NSCLC may experience historically unprecedented prolonged survival with aggressive local treatments, consisting of radiotherapy and/or surgery, to limited sites of metastatic disease. This is reflected in the most recent AJCC staging subcategorizing metastatic disease into intra-thoracic (M1a, a single extra thoracic site (M1b, and more diffuse metastases (M1c. In the field of radiation oncology, recent technological advances have allowed for the delivery of very high, potentially ablative, doses of radiotherapy to both intra- and extra-cranial disease sites, referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (or SABR, in much shorter time periods compared to conventional radiation and with minimal associated toxicity. At the same time, significant improvements in systemic therapy, including platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, molecular agents targeting oncogene-addicted NSCLC, and immunotherapy in the form of checkpoint inhibitors, have led to improved control of micro-metastatic disease and extended survival sparking newfound interest in combining these agents with ablative local therapies to provide additive, and in the case of radiation and immunotherapy, potentially synergistic, effects in order to further improve progression-free and overall survival. Currently, despite the tantalizing potential associated with aggressive local therapy in the setting of oligometastatic NSCLC, well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to detect and measure the possible added benefit afforded by this approach are

  4. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  5. Redefining radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer with single dose ablative treatment : a study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charaghvandi, R K; van Asselen, B; Philippens, M E P; Verkooijen, H M; van Gils, C H; van Diest, P J; Pijnappel, R M; Hobbelink, M G G; Witkamp, A J; van Dalen, T; van der Wall, E; van Heijst, T C; Koelemij, R; van Vulpen, M; van den Bongard, H J G D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A shift towards less burdening and more patient friendly treatments for breast cancer is currently ongoing. In low-risk patients with early-stage disease, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an alternative for whole breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery.

  6. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  7. The comparison of 5-field conformal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of prostate cancer: The best for femoral head sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Mahkameh; Lashkari, Marzieh; Ghalehtaki, Reza; Ghasemi, Arash; Dehghan Manshadi, Hamidreza; Mir, Ali; Noorollahi, Somayeh; Alamolhoda, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    External radiotherapy is a standard treatment procedure for localized prostate cancer. Given the relatively high long term survival treatment complications have been brought in center of attention. In this planning study, between 2012 and 2014, CT simulation data of 90 consecutive high-risk prostate cancer patients were collected. In the first phase, all were planned for whole pelvis irradiation up to 46Gy in 23 daily fractions. In the second phase, only the prostate gland was the target of radiation. Next, the subjects were divided randomly into three groups and each received a unique 5field conformal radiation plan including Plan A (Gantry angle: 0, 60, 120, 240, and 300), Plan B (Gantry angles: 0, 90, 120, 240, and 270) and Plan C (Gantry angles: 0, 60, 90, 270, and 300). The total dose was 70Gy. For each patient, the rectum, bladder, and both femoral heads were contoured as the at risk organs (OAR). From dose volume histograms, the proportional dose of PTV V100, the bladder and rectum V80 and V90 and femoral head V50 and V100 were calculated in all subjects and compared across plans. A statistically significant difference in the femoral head V50 and V100 was found between our studied 5field plans so that in Plan A (beam angles: 0, 60, 120, 240 and 300) less dose was received by both heads of femur. This study suggests that 5 field treatment planning including an anterior, two anterior oblique and two posterior oblique portals to be more proper for 3D conformal radiotherapy in order to spare femoral head with acceptable PTV coverage, and bladder and rectal doses.

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a promising treatment option for the boost of oropharyngeal cancers not suitable for brachytherapy: a single-institutional experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamgani, A.; Tans, L.; Teguh, D.N.; Rooij, P. van; Zwijnenburg, E.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 2005 and 2010,

  9. Adenocarcinoma of the stomach following radical radiotherapy for testicular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, C.D.M.; Chadderton, R.; Bourke, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Two male patients who underwent curative surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (with further chemotherapy in one) for testicular cancer developed adenocarcinoma of the stomach 5 and 19 years after treatment. The stomach is included in the field of radiotherapy used to treat the para-aortic lymph nodes and this may lead to dysplastic changes in the stomach mucosa which can lead to frank malignancy. Early endoscopy should be offered to patients with dyspeptic symptoms after adjuvant radiotherapy for testicular cancer. (author)

  10. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker; Radiotherapie pour un cancer du sein et stimulateur cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M. [Oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M. [Departement d' anesthesie-reanimation-douleur, institut Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker

  11. The role of external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of hepatocellular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Fumiko; Stephens, Sarah Jo; Choi, Steve S; Marin, Daniele; Kim, Charles Y; Morse, Michael A; Godfrey, Devon J; Czito, Brian G; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha

    2018-04-12

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in incidence and mortality. Although the prognosis remains poor, long-term survival has improved from 3% in 1970 to an 18% 5-year survival rate today. This is likely because of the introduction of well tolerated, oral antiviral therapies for hepatitis C. Curative options for patients with HCC are often limited by underlying liver dysfunction/cirrhosis and medical comorbidities. Less than one-third of patients are candidates for surgery, which is the current gold standard for cure. Nonsurgical treatments include embolotherapies, percutaneous ablation, and ablative radiation. Technological advances in radiation delivery in the past several decades now allow for safe and effective ablative doses to the liver. Conformal techniques allow for both dose escalation to target volumes and normal tissue sparing. Multiple retrospective and prospective studies have demonstrated that hypofractionated image-guided radiation therapy, used as monotherapy or in combination with other liver-directed therapies, can provide excellent local control that is cost effective. Therefore, as the HCC treatment paradigm continues to evolve, ablative radiation treatment has moved from a palliative treatment to both a "bridge to transplant" and a definitive treatment. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  12. Swallowing therapy and progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajdú, Sara F; Wessel, Irene; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients are often challenged by treatment induced dysphagia and trismus. Traditionally, rehabilitation is initiated when loss of function has already occurred. There is increasing evidence that it is of benefit to patients to initiate an early rehabilitation...... process before and during treatment. HNC patients have a unique set of functional challenges such as pre- and post-treatment dysphagia, pain and weight loss. The aim of the trial is to investigate the effects of swallowing and mouth-opening exercises combined with progressive resistance training (PRT...

  13. Prostate cancer radiotherapy in elderly person; Radiotherapie du cancer de la prostate chez la personne agee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serre, A. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    The author discusses the issue of prostate cancer radiotherapy in the case of elderly persons. The choice of the therapeutic strategy (local, hormonotherapy, simple monitoring) is complex. Different aspects must be considered: the carcinologic situation assessment, the patient health condition, the patient life expectancy, and the possible side effects of treatment. Radiotherapy appears to be a major therapeutic asset, but dose levels, toxicity effects must then be considered. Short communication

  14. The future of breast cancer radiotherapy: From one size fits all to taylor-made treatment; L'avenir de la radiotherapie du cancer du sein: de la taille unique au sur-mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France); Azria, D. [Departement de cancerologie radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Universite de Montpellier I, 5, boulevard Henri-IV, CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier cedex 2 (France); Inserm U896, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Various subgroups of breast tumours have been identified during the last 10 years according to the risk of local relapse. Prognostic factors for local relapse are age, surgical margins, tumour size, Her2 expression and hormonal receptors status. For tumours with a high risk of local relapse, an increased in boost dose or the addition of new drugs (trastuzumab, anti-angiogenics, PARP inhibitors) could be considered. For low risk tumours, hypo-fractionated, accelerated partial breast and intraoperative radiotherapy are being evaluated. The classical schedule (45-50 Gy to the whole gland followed by a boost dose of 16 Gy) is no longer the universal rule. Treatment individualization, according to clinical and biological characteristics of the tumour and - possibly - to the radiobiological profile of the patient, is likely to be the future of breast cancer radiotherapy. (authors)

  15. Beam angle selection for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer: are noncoplanar beam angles necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D S; Bartlett, G K; Das, I J; Cardenes, H R

    2013-09-01

    External beam radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy (CRT) is widely used for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Noncoplanar (NCP) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and coplanar (CP) IMRT have been reported to lower the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). The purpose of this article is to examine the utility of noncoplanar beam angles in IMRT for the management of pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients who were treated with CRT for unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head or neck were re-planned using CP and NCP beams in 3DCRT and IMRT with the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Compared to CP IMRT, NCP IMRT had similar target coverage with slightly increased maximum point dose, 5,799 versus 5,775 cGy (p = 0.008). NCP IMRT resulted in lower mean kidney dose, 787 versus 1,210 cGy (p kidney dose, but did not improve other dose-volume criteria. The use of NCP beam angles is preferred only in patients with risk factors for treatment-related kidney dysfunction.

  16. Solution IMRT static of a radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer with lymphangitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puertolas Hernandez, J. R.; Iriondo Igerabide, U.; Urraca de la Serna, J. M.; Lozano Flores, F. J.; Pino Leon, C.; Larretxa Etxarri, R.

    2013-01-01

    In breast cancer, the planning of treatment with IMRT technique mode static MLC has been efficient to get a perfect union of doses in the skin between the lower limit of the supraclavicular fields and the upper limit of the tangential fields. The technique Planning requires the creation of auxiliary volumes that allow you to manage the particularities inherent to the tangential fields of breast. (Author)

  17. Undesirable financial effects of head and neck cancer radiotherapy during the initial treatment period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Egestad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare cost and reforms are at the forefront of international debates. One of the current discussion themes in oncology is whether and how patients’ life changes due to costs of cancer care. In Norway, the main part of the treatment costs is supported by general taxpayer revenues. Objectives: The objective of this study was to clarify whether head and neck cancer patients (n=67 in northern Norway experienced financial health-related quality of life (HRQOL deterioration due to costs associated with treatment. Design: HRQOL was examined by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30 in the beginning and in the end of radiation treatment in patients treated at the University Hospital in Northern Norway. Changes in financial HRQOL were calculated and compared by paired sample T-tests. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine correlations among gender, marital status, age and treatment with or without additional chemotherapy and changes in the HRQOL domain of financial difficulties. Results: The majority of score results at both time points were in the lower range (mean 15–25, indicating limited financial difficulties. We observed no statistically significant differences by gender, marital status and age. Increasing financial difficulties during treatment were reported by male patients and those younger than 65, that is, patients who were younger than retirement age. The largest effect was seen in singles. However, differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: During the initial phase of the disease trajectory, no significant increase in financial difficulties was found. This is in line with the aims of the Norwegian public healthcare model. However, long-term longitudinal studies should be performed, especially with regard to the trends we observed in single, male and younger patients.

  18. Clinical variability of target volume description and treatment plans in conformal radiotherapy in muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logue, John P; Sharrock, Carole L; Cowan, Richard A.; Read, Graham; Marrs, Julie; Mott, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The delineation of tumor and the production of a treatment plan to encompass this is the prime step in radiotherapy planning. Conformal radiotherapy is developing rapidly and although plentiful research has addressed the implementation of the radiotherapy prescription, scant attention has been made to the fundamental step of production, by the clinician, of an appropriate target volume. As part of an ongoing randomized trial of conformal radiotherapy, in bladder cancer, we have therefore assessed the interphysician variability of radiologists and radiation oncologists (RO) in assessing Gross Tumor Volume(GTV) (ICRU 50) and the adherence of the radiation oncologists to the study protocol of producing a Planning Target Volume (PTV). Materials and Methods: Four patients with T3 carcinoma of bladder who had been entered into the trial were identified. The clinical details, MR scans and CT scans were made available. Eight RO and 3 dedicated diagnostic oncology radiologists were invited to directly outline the GTV onto CT images on a planning computer consul. The RO in addition created a PTV following the trial protocol of 15mm margin around the GTV. Three RO sub-specialized in Urological radiotherapy; all RO had completed training. Volumes were produced, for each clinician, and comparison of these volumes and their isocenters were analyzed. In addition the margins allowed were measured and compared. Results: There was a maximum variation ratio (largest to smallest volume outlined) of the GTV in the four cases of 1.74 among radiologists and 3.74 among oncologists. There was a significant difference (p=0.01) in mean GTV between RO and the radiologists. The mean GTV of the RO exceeded the radiologists by a factor of 1.29 with a mean difference of 13.4 cm 3 The between observer variance within speciality comprised only 9.9% of the total variance in the data having accounted for case and observers speciality. The variation ratio in PTV among oncologists

  19. Guidelines for primary radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Dirk; Maingon, Philippe; Poortmans, Philip; Baron, Marie-Helene; Miralbell, Raymond; Remouchamps, Vincent; Scrase, Christopher; Bossi, Alberto; Bolla, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Background and purposes: The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of target delineation as well as clinical quality assurance procedures. Patients and methods: Pathological and imaging studies provide valuable information on tumour extension. In addition, clinical investigations on patient positioning and immobilisation as well as treatment verification data offer an abundance of information. Results: Target volume definitions for different risk groups of prostate cancer patients based on pathological and imaging studies are provided. Available imaging modalities, patient positioning and treatment preparation studies as well as verification procedures are collected from literature studies. These studies are summarised and recommendations are given where appropriate. Conclusions: On behalf of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Radiation Oncology Group this article presents a common set of recommendations for external beam radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer

  20. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs at risk, requiring less than...

  1. Increased pancreatic cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Michael; Børge Johannesen, Tom; Gilbert, Ethel S; Stovall, Marilyn; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Rajaraman, Preetha; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita E; Aleman, Berthe M P; Andersson, Michael; Curtis, Rochelle E; Dores, Graça M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Hall, Per; Holowaty, Eric J; Joensuu, Heikki; Kaijser, Magnus; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Langmark, Frøydis; Lynch, Charles F; Pukkala, Eero; Storm, Hans H; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W; Morton, Lindsay M; Fossa, Sophie D; Travis, Lois B

    2016-09-27

    Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated among testicular cancer (TC) survivors. However, the roles of specific treatments are unclear. Among 23 982 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1947-1991, doses from radiotherapy to the pancreas were estimated for 80 pancreatic cancer patients and 145 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Cumulative incidence of second primary pancreatic cancer was 1.1% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. Radiotherapy (72 (90%) cases and 115 (80%) controls) was associated with a 2.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-7.8) increased risk. The OR increased linearly by 0.12 per Gy to the pancreas (P-trendcancer risk, and persists for over 20 years. These excesses, although small, should be considered when radiotherapy with exposure to the pancreas is considered for newly diagnosed patients. Additional data are needed on the role of chemotherapy.

  2. Radiotherapy through intensity modulation (IMRT). A new modality in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besa de C, Pelayo; Venencia M, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the treatment and evaluate the advantages of IMRT in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Material and methods: Four years ago, at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Catolica, the IMRT technique for the treatment of head and neck tumors was implemented. The IMRT technique is based on modifying the intensity of the radiation beam through a multisheet collimator in order to produce a more exact distribution in the radiation doses. The results are evaluated with dose/ volume histograms. The distributions of doses and toxicity for tridimensional con formed therapy (CRT-3D) and IMRT are compared. Results: The distribution of the dose in the dose/volume histograms showed a better coverage of the white volume (PTV), with IMRT. The doses received by the organs under risk: salivary glands, eyes, ears and brain diminish with IMRT. The spinal marrow is protected with IMRT without dividing the treatment area, preventing points with lower dosage that could reduce control of the tumor. Conclusions: IMRT achieves a better conformation of the dose obtaining a better coverage of the tumor and higher protection of the organs under risk

  3. What margins should be added to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy treatment planning of lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, L.; Wittgren, L.; Holmberg, O.

    1995-01-01

    When defining the planning target volume (PTV) in radiotherapy treatment planning, it is vital to add geometrical margins of normal tissue around the clinical target volume (CTV). This is to ensure that the whole CTV will receive the planned absorbed dose taking into account both set-up deviations and target movements as well as other geometrical variations in the treatment chain. The problem is our limited knowledge of how large these margins should be. To assess the size of needed margins around the CTV in conformal radiotherapy of lung cancer, electronic portal imaging was employed in 232 irradiation field set-ups of 14 patients. This was done in order to quantify the uncertainty in the execution of treatment considering patient movement and set-up displacements. For an estimation of the added geometrical variation from target movement during irradiation, fluoroscopy was used at the simulation of the irradiation fields. The set-up study showed an average systematic deviation for all individual fields of 3.1 mm and an average maximal systematic deviation (in either transversal or craniocaudal direction) of 4.8 mm. The random errors can be described by an average standard deviation of 2.8 mm for all fields in either direction. Major gradual displacements as a function of time was also detected in one of the patients. CTV-movements of several millimetres during respiration could be observed. It was also seen that heartbeats could add to CTV-movements during irradiation with an equal magnitude. The combined effect of these factors are considered when making an overall estimation of margins that should be added to the CTV

  4. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer: results after five years of a randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarelli, M.; Raffetto, N.; Torcia, P.; Vitturini, A.; Tombolini, V.; Maurizi Enrici, R. [Istituto di radiologia Universita Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy)

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: this study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two regimens of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: from 1992 to 1997, 127 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (stage III-IV) were randomized. Sixty-six patients (group a), 42 male and 24 female, with a median age of 48 years (range 40-72) received during radiotherapy two courses (1.-6. week) of chemotherapy with carbo-platin (300 mg/m{sup 2} day 1) and etoposide (60 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3). Sixty-one patients (group b), 40 male and 21 female, with a median age of 51 years (range 42-69) received two cycles of chemotherapy with 5 FU (750 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 5) and MIT C ( 10 mg/m{sup 2} day 1). The median dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy (range 55-66 Gy) 180 cGy /d 5w. Results: the actuarial five-year survival rate(Kaplan-Meier) was 38 % for group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) and 25 % for group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.036). Toxicity group a: mucositis G III in 41 patients and G IV in 16; dysphagia G III in 46 patients and IV in 5; leukopenia in 24 patients; 28 patients required nutritional therapy. Toxicity group b: mucositis G III in 38 patients and G IV in 17; dysphagia G III in 48 patients and G IV in 3; leukopenia in 23 patients; 25 patients needed nutritional therapy. Conclusions: the data of the actuarial survival five-year rate suggest that concomitant chemotherapy in group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) is better than the concomitant chemotherapy in group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). (author)

  5. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer: results after five years of a randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarelli, M.; Raffetto, N.; Torcia, P.; Vitturini, A.; Tombolini, V.; Maurizi Enrici, R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: this study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two regimens of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: from 1992 to 1997, 127 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (stage III-IV) were randomized. Sixty-six patients (group a), 42 male and 24 female, with a median age of 48 years (range 40-72) received during radiotherapy two courses (1.-6. week) of chemotherapy with carbo-platin (300 mg/m 2 day 1) and etoposide (60 mg/m 2 days 1 to 3). Sixty-one patients (group b), 40 male and 21 female, with a median age of 51 years (range 42-69) received two cycles of chemotherapy with 5 FU (750 mg/m 2 days 1 to 5) and MIT C ( 10 mg/m 2 day 1). The median dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy (range 55-66 Gy) 180 cGy /d 5w. Results: the actuarial five-year survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 38 % for group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) and 25 % for group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.036). Toxicity group a: mucositis G III in 41 patients and G IV in 16; dysphagia G III in 46 patients and IV in 5; leukopenia in 24 patients; 28 patients required nutritional therapy. Toxicity group b: mucositis G III in 38 patients and G IV in 17; dysphagia G III in 48 patients and G IV in 3; leukopenia in 23 patients; 25 patients needed nutritional therapy. Conclusions: the data of the actuarial survival five-year rate suggest that concomitant chemotherapy in group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) is better than the concomitant chemotherapy in group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). (author)

  6. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  7. Treatment of uterine corpus cancer 1/1 state of development. Pt. 3. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, J.

    1975-01-01

    The efficacity of irradiation therapy, as a unique method, was evaluated in 50 women with diagnosed uterine corpus cancer in 1/1 stage of clinical development. These patients refused other forms of therapy (surgery). The results were compared with those observed in 232 women treated by complex technique (surgery and irradiation). The percent of 5 years survival rate in the subjects treated by irradiation only made 54%, while in the complex therapy group it made 81.1%. The difference was found significant. The complications resulting from the irradiation therapy were present in 13 women (26%), while in the complex therapy group these were met in 25 women (10.8%) which difference was also significant. These facts strongly advocate the superiority of complex treatment in recent cases of uterine corpus cancer. (author)

  8. Evaluation of the utilization of external radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in Andalusia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito, José; Linares, Isabel; Castillo, Isabel; Martínez, Miguel; Vargas, Pilar; Herruzo, Ismael; Medina, José Antonio; Palacios, Amalia; Bayo, Eloísa; Peracaula, Francisco; Jaén, Javier; Sánchez, José Antonio; Ortiz, María José

    2015-12-30

    Around 27,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year in Spain and 5400 die from this disease. Radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined, has proven to be effective as initial treatment in patients with localized disease. Our objective was to evaluate the use of external beam RT (EBRT) in our region, comparing the indication rate and irradiation rate and examining variability in its application among hospitals. We conducted a review of RT guidelines and indication studies for prostate cancer (% expected irradiation). Data were gathered from all twelve public healthcare centers in Andalusia (Spain) on RT-treated prostate cancer patients during 2013 (% actual irradiation) and from nine of the centers on RT discharge reports. Information was classified according to type of hospital, tumor risk category and RT treatment (technique, dosage, volume, toxicity). The estimated RT rate was 67 % (1289/1917), 43 % were aged > 70 years, 44.7 % had ECOG performance status of 0); 44.7 % had high-risk tumors; 57 % underwent RT associated with hormone therapy; 70 % of patients receiving RT were treated with 3D planning (30 % IGRT); and doses were 70-76 Gy in 70 % of cases and >76 Gy in 10.7 %. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were < grade 2 in 79 and 89 % of patients, respectively. An irradiation rate significantly below the mean for the study was found in four provinces. There was a significant difference among provinces in the distribution of risk groups. Underutilization of EBRT was estimated to be around 30 % in prostate cancer patients, with an elevated variability in irradiation rates among hospitals related to differences in available technology and in the distribution of patients with different risk levels. These data should be a matter of concern to regional health managers, given the negative and measurable impact on the survival of patients.

  9. Evaluation of the utilization of external radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in Andalusia, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expósito, José; Linares, Isabel; Castillo, Isabel; Martínez, Miguel; Vargas, Pilar; Herruzo, Ismael; Medina, José Antonio; Palacios, Amalia; Bayo, Eloísa; Peracaula, Francisco; Jaén, Javier; Sánchez, José Antonio; Ortiz, María José

    2015-01-01

    Around 27,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year in Spain and 5400 die from this disease. Radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined, has proven to be effective as initial treatment in patients with localized disease. Our objective was to evaluate the use of external beam RT (EBRT) in our region, comparing the indication rate and irradiation rate and examining variability in its application among hospitals. We conducted a review of RT guidelines and indication studies for prostate cancer (% expected irradiation). Data were gathered from all twelve public healthcare centers in Andalusia (Spain) on RT-treated prostate cancer patients during 2013 (% actual irradiation) and from nine of the centers on RT discharge reports. Information was classified according to type of hospital, tumor risk category and RT treatment (technique, dosage, volume, toxicity). The estimated RT rate was 67 % (1289/1917), 43 % were aged > 70 years, 44.7 % had ECOG performance status of 0); 44.7 % had high-risk tumors; 57 % underwent RT associated with hormone therapy; 70 % of patients receiving RT were treated with 3D planning (30 % IGRT); and doses were 70–76 Gy in 70 % of cases and >76 Gy in 10.7 %. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were < grade 2 in 79 and 89 % of patients, respectively. An irradiation rate significantly below the mean for the study was found in four provinces. There was a significant difference among provinces in the distribution of risk groups. Underutilization of EBRT was estimated to be around 30 % in prostate cancer patients, with an elevated variability in irradiation rates among hospitals related to differences in available technology and in the distribution of patients with different risk levels. These data should be a matter of concern to regional health managers, given the negative and measurable impact on the survival of patients

  10. Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting-the MSKCC experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site. The median radiation dose was 63 Gy. Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30). Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 60 months, the 5-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 62%, 87%, 82%, 55%, and 67%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, squamous cell histology and cribriform plate involvement predicted for an increased likelihood of local recurrence, and squamous cell histologic features predicted for worse overall survival. None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye. Conclusion: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer. Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques. Local recurrence remains a significant problem

  11. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, M.K.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Madhu, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma

  12. Radiotherapy of early stage glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Chai, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the role of curative radiotherapy and salvage surgery in patients with T1, T2 glottic cancer. Between June 1989 and December 1994, 23 patients with early glottic cancer, 18 with T1N0M0 and 5 with T2N0M0, were treated with radiotherapy at Gyeongsang University Hospital. All patients were male. Median follow-up period was 46 months, and 100% were observed for at least 3 years. Actuarial survival rates at 5 years were 84.3% for 23 patients. The 5-year actuarial survival rates were 94.4% for T1 and 53.3% for T2 (P=0.05). The 5-year local control rates was 70.0% for T1 and 60.0% for T2 (P=0.44). Of 8 patients with treatment failure, 6 patients (75.0%) were salvaged with surgery. After surgical salvage, the 5-year local control rates were 87.2% for T1 and 80.0% for T2 (p=0.55). In early stage (Stage I and II) glottic cancer, curative radiotherapy can be a treatment of choice and surgery reserved for salvage of radiotherapy failure. (author)

  13. Clinical and technical guide on prostate cancer proposal treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loria Ruiz, Rolando Alberto

    2013-01-01

    New treatment schemes with radiotherapy in prostate cancer are reviewed. The different modalities for the treatment of prostate cancer are described, such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Hypofractionated treatments and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are studied. The benefit of implementing these schemes in the Caja Costarricense del Seguro Social is analyzed [es

  14. Endocavitary radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Martenson, James A.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis was performed to evaluate the results of endocavitary radiotherapy (RT) administered for early rectal cancer at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine the results of endocavitary RT regarding survival, local control, and complications. Between 1987 and 1994, 25 patients were treated with endocavitary RT for early rectal cancer. Twenty had early, low grade tumors and met the criteria for treatment with curative intent. Five had more advanced, high grade, or multiple recurrent tumors and were treated with palliative intent. The tumors were treated to between 20 and 155 Gy in one to four fractions with 50 KV x-rays given through a specialized proctoscope. Patients were followed for 5 to 84 months (median = 55 months) after therapy. Local control and survival were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control was achieved in 18 of the 20 patients treated with curative intent and 4 of 5 treated with palliative intent. For those patients treated with curative intent, the 5-year local control rate was 89% and the 5-year survival rate was 76%. The most significant toxicity was ulceration that occurred in 5 of the 25 patients. The ulcers were asymptomatic in three cases and associated with bleeding in one case. The fifth patient had pain. One ulcer was biopsied, resulting in perforation that was treated with an abdominal perineal resection (APR). There was no tumor found upon pathologic evaluation. Conclusions: Endocavitary RT can be used to treat patients with early, low-grade rectal cancers and will yield a high level of disease control and a low risk of serious complications. Major advantages of this treatment technique are that it requires neither general anesthesia nor hospitalization

  15. Quadrantectomy and radiotherapy (QUART) in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latini, P.; Checcaglini, F.; Maranzano, E.; Panizza, B.M.; Aristei, C.; Caprino, G.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred twenty nine patients with T1 N0 M0 breast cancer were selectively treated with QUART. Mean age was 50 years. Ninety-eight patients (76%) were N- and 31 (24%) were N+. N+ cases received chemotherapy or Tamoxifen if R+. Patients evaluated are 95/129 in a 3 years average follow-up (range 2-7 years). Overall actuariall survival rate at 5 years is 88.9%. Three patients died; local relapses were 3/95 and metastases 3/95. Overall treatment tolerance was satisfactory and esthetic results were good

  16. Quadrantectomy and radiotherapy (QUART) in the treatment of early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latini, P; Checcaglini, F; Maranzano, E; Panizza, B M; Aristei, C; Caprino, G

    1986-01-01

    One hundred twenty nine patients with T1 N0 M0 breast cancer were selectively treated with QUART. Mean age was 50 years. Ninety-eight patients (76%) were N- and 31 (24%) were N+. N+ cases received chemotherapy or Tamoxifen if R+. Patients evaluated are 95/129 in a 3 years average follow-up (range 2-7 years). Overall actuariall survival rate at 5 years is 88.9%. Three patients died; local relapses were 3/95 and metastases 3/95. Overall treatment tolerance was satisfactory and esthetic results were good. 27 refs.

  17. Californium-252 Brachytherapy Combined With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Long-Term Treatment Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Xin; Qian Chengyuan; Qing Yi; Zhao Kewei; Yang Zhengzhou; Dai Nan; Zhong Zhaoyang; Tang Cheng; Li Zheng; Gu Xianqing; Zhou Qian; Feng Yan; Xiong Yanli; Shan Jinlu; Wang Dong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To observe, by retrospective analysis, the curative effects and complications due to californium-252 ( 252 Cf) neutron intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 1999 to December 2007, 696 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB to IIIB) were treated with 252 Cf-ICBT in combination of EBRT. Of all, 31 patients were at Stage IB, 104 at IIA, 363 at IIB, 64 at IIIA, and 134 at IIIB. Californium-252 ICBT was delivered at 7–12 Gy per insertion per week, with a total dose of 29–45 Gy to reference point A in three to five insertions. The whole pelvic cavity was treated with 8-MV X-ray external irradiation at 2 Gy per fraction, four times per week. After 16–38 Gy of external irradiation, the center of the whole pelvic field was blocked with a 4-cm-wide lead shield, with a total external irradiation dose of 44–56 Gy. The total treatment course was 5 to 6 weeks. Results: Overall survival rate at 3 and 5 years for all patients was 76.0% and 64.9%, respectively. Disease-free 3- and 5-year survival rates of patients were 71.2% and 58.4%, respectively. Late complications included vaginal contracture and adhesion, radiation proctitis, radiation cystitis, and inflammatory bowel, which accounted for 5.8%, 7.1%, 6.2%, and 4.9%, respectively. Univariate analysis results showed significant correlation of stage, age, histopathologic grade, and lymph node status with overall survival. Cox multiple regression analysis showed that the independent variables were stage, histopathologic grade, tumor size, and lymphatic metastasis in all patients. Conclusion: Results of this series suggest that the combined use of 252 Cf-ICBT with EBRT is an effective method for treatment of cervical cancer.

  18. Biochemical failure as single abnormality in patients with prostate cancer following radical treatment with external radiotherapy: follow-up without immediate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biochemical failure has been defined as 3 consecutive increases in PSA following curative treatment of prostate cancer. The appropriate management in such cases is controversial. The most usual treatment has been early introduction of hormones. Such patients will live for many years and hormone therapy causes important secondary effects and increases costs. The guideline in our Department of Radiotherapy has been to follow up, with no initial therapy, cases with low PSA and short PSA doubling time. The present study reports this experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 528 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by radical approach between 1992 and 1999, with external radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant hormone therapy. After a median follow-up of 77 months, there were 207 (39% cases with biochemical failure, 78 of which were followed without therapy after the identification of biochemical failure. All of them were asymptomatic patients and had negative radiographic examinations or did not have imaging exams requested since they presented a favorable outcome. The follow-up included at least 2 annual visits with physical examination and PSA. RESULTS: Of the 78 patients with biochemical failure followed without initial therapy, 7 died from other causes than prostate cancer and the remaining 71 cases were alive and asymptomatic in the last follow-up. Prognostic factors previous to radiotherapy such as stage and Gleason score were not considered when deciding for follow-up without initial therapy in these cases. The most significant aspects considered for this decision were low PSA value (median PSA on the last visit for the 78 cases was only 3.9 ng/mL and a slow PSA doubling time (in the present experience the median PSA doubling time was 22.5 months. CONCLUSION: There seems to be space for expectant management, without initial hormone therapy, in patients with prostate cancer who present biochemical failure and are

  19. Radiotherapy without boost in the tumor bed after conserving surgery in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvanova, V.; Pandova, V.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse satisfactory local control and breast preservation with particular emphasis on the importance of the microscopic negative margin in patients who not receiving tumor bed boost therapy. Authors analysed 122 consecutive patients with breast cancer in pathological stages I and II, who were treated with quadrantectomy at full axillary dissection between 1992 and 1997. The median follow up was 34 months. The radiation treatment was started 60 - 80 day in 14 patients (11.5%) with high risk for metastases, because they underwent chemotherapy. The patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy on the entire breast to a mean total dose of 48.8 Gy. A boost to a tumor bed was not delivered. Only patients with follow-up period above 24 months were evaluated for the purpose of analysis of cosmetic results. Analyzed variables were: age, size, lymph node status, two-field versus three-field technique, operating scare. The major goal of breast conserving therapy is the preservation of cosmetically acceptable breast without local relapses in all patients of our study. A 43 years old patient with liver metastases and any regional and local relapses was dead 27 months after the radiotherapy. A single significant factor impairing excellent cosmetic outcome in our study is the surgical scar. The very high percent (51) of excellent cosmetic results and low percent of post radiotherapy injury is due to precise for breast conserving therapy, the prevailing number of young patients and precise CT and dosimetric planning on three level of treatment volume (author)

  20. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.; Ajani, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain 33 papers grouped under the headings of: Heath memorial award lecture; Large bowel cancer; Esophageal cancer; Pancreatic, Endocrime, and Hepatobiliary cancer; Gastric cancer; Joanne Vandenberge hill award and William O. Russell lectureship in anatomic pathology; and Jeffrey A. Gottlieb memorial lecture

  1. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramita Saha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthracycline based regiments and/or taxanes and adjuvant radiotherapy; the main modalities of treatment for breast cancers are associated with deterioration of pulmonary functions and progressive pulmonary toxicities. Aim: Assessment of pulmonary toxicities and impact on pulmonary functions mainly in terms of decline of forced vital capacity (FVC and the ratio of forced expiratory volume (FEV in 1 Second and FEV1/FVC ratio with different treatment times and follow ups in carcinoma breast patients receiving anthracycline and/or taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A prospective single institutional cohort study was performed with 58 breast cancer patients between January 2011 to July 2012 who received either anthracycline based (37 patients received 6 cycles FAC= 5 FU, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide regime and radiotherapy or anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy (21 patients received 4cycles AC= Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide; followed by 4 cycles of T=Taxane and radiotherapy. Assessment of pulmonary symptoms and signs, chest x-ray and pulmonary function tests were performed at baseline, midcycle, at end of chemotherapy, at end radiotherapy, at 1 and 6 months follow ups and compared. By means of a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA model, the course of lung parameters across the time points was compared. Results and Conclusion: Analysis of mean forced vital capacities at different points of study times showed definitive declining pattern, which is at statistically significant level at the end of 6th month of follow up (p=0.032 .The FEV1/FVC ratio (in percentage also revealed a definite decreasing pattern over different treatment times and at statistically significant level at 6th month follow up with p value 0.003. Separate analysis of mean FEV1/FVC ratios over time in anthracycline based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group as well as anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group

  2. Radioactive EGFR Antibody Cetuximab in Multimodal Cancer Treatment: Stability and Synergistic Effects With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Wolff, Christian; Nadrowitz, Roger; Breunig, Christian; Schild, Steven E.; Baehre, Manfred; Meller, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Systemic therapies when added to whole brain radiotherapy have failed to improve the survival of patients with multiple brain metastases. The epidermal growth factor receptor antibody cetuximab is an attractive option, if it is able to cross the blood-brain barrier. This might be proven with molecular imaging if the radiolabeled antibody is stable long enough to be effective. This study investigated the stability of radiolabeled cetuximab (Erbitux) ( 131 I-Erbi) and potential synergistic effects with radiotherapy in vitro. Methods and Materials: Two cell lines were investigated, A431 with numerous epidermal growth factor receptors, and JIMT without epidermal growth factor receptors. We labeled 0.4 mg cetuximab with 50 MBq of [ 131 I] iodide. Stability was determined for 72 h. The cell cultures were incubated with 131 I-Erbi or cold cetuximab for 72 h. Uptake and cell proliferation were measured every 24 h after no radiotherapy or irradiation with 2, 4, or 10 Gy. Results: The radiolabeling yield of 131 I-Erbi was always >80%. The radiochemical purity was still 93.6% after 72 h. A431 cells showed a 131 I-Erbi uptake about 100-fold greater than the JIMT controls. After 48 h, the A431 cultures showed significantly decreased proliferation. At 72 h after irradiation, 131 I-Erbi resulted in more pronounced inhibition of cell proliferation than the cold antibody in all radiation dose groups. Conclusion: 131 I-Erbi was stable for ≤72 h. Radiotherapy led to increased tumor cell uptake of 131 I-Erbi. Radiotherapy and 131 I-Erbi synergistically inhibited tumor cell proliferation. These results provide the prerequisite data for a planned in vivo study of whole brain radiotherapy plus cetuximab for brain metastases.

  3. Tangential vs. defined radiotherapy in early breast cancer treatment without axillary lymph node dissection. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Universitaet Kiel, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Kiel (Germany); Temme, Nils; Foerster, Manuela; Reible, Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated low regional recurrence rates in early-stage breast cancer omitting axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in patients who have positive nodes in sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND). This finding has triggered an active discussion about the effect of radiotherapy within this approach. The purpose of this study was to analyze the dose distribution in the axilla in standard tangential radiotherapy (SRT) for breast cancer and the effects on normal tissue exposure when anatomic level I-III axillary lymph node areas are included in the tangential radiotherapy field configuration. We prospectively analyzed the dosimetric treatment plans from 51 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. We compared and analyzed the SRT and the defined radiotherapy (DRT) methods for each patient. The clinical target volume (CTV) of SRT included the breast tissue without specific contouring of lymph node areas, whereas the CTV of DRT included the level I-III lymph node areas. We evaluated the dose given in SRT covering the axillary lymph node areas of level I-III as contoured in DRT. The mean V{sub D95} {sub %} of the entire level I-III lymph node area in SRT was 50.28 % (range, 37.31-63.24 %), V{sub D45} {sub Gy} was 70.1 % (54.8-85.4 %), and V{sub D40} {sub Gy} was 83.5 % (72.3-94.8 %). A significant difference was observed between lung dose and heart toxicity in SRT vs. DRT. The V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and V{sub 30} {sub Gy} of the right and the left lung in DRT were significantly higher in DRT than in SRT (p < 0.001). The mean heart dose in SRT was significantly lower (3.93 vs. 4.72 Gy, p = 0.005). We demonstrated a relevant dose exposure of the axilla in SRT that should substantially reduce local recurrences. Furthermore, we demonstrated a significant increase in lung and heart exposure when including the axillary lymph nodes regions in the tangential radiotherapy field set-up. (orig.) [German] Aktuelle Studien zeigen

  4. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric...

  5. Radiotherapy in Cancer Care: Facing the Global Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Cancer treatment is complex and calls for a diverse set of services. Radiotherapy is recognized as an essential tool in the cure and palliation of cancer. Currently, access to radiation treatment is limited in many countries and non-existent in some. This lack of radiotherapy resources exacerbates the burden of disease and underscores the continuing health care disparity among States. Closing this gap represents an essential measure in addressing this global health equity problem. This publication presents a comprehensive overview of the major topics and issues to be taken into consideration when planning a strategy to address this problem, in particular in low and middle income countries. With contributions from leaders in the field, it provides an introduction to the achievements and issues of radiation therapy as a cancer treatment modality around the world. Dedicated chapters focus on proton therapy, carbon ion radiotherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, radiotherapy for children, HIV/AIDS related malignancies, and costing and quality management issues.

  6. A practical approach on radioprotection in the radiotherapy treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Janaina D.S.; Kubo, Ana Luiza S.L.; Rebelo, Ana Maria de O.

    2013-01-01

    There are several protocols for the treatment and follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer. All of them gather evidence on the evolution and treatment and try to establish a treatment standard. However, there are few occasions in which this issue is addressed from the standpoint of radiological protection, as the ICRP 94 and TECDOC 1806. The focus of our work is to demonstrate that simple actions in the routine of workers in the Nuclear Medicine Service interfere positively in the radiation protection of all those involved in the patient's care, also optimizing their well being during the procedure. In the current model, the patient participates in an interview with nurses, doctors and physicists, before admission, and receives written and verbal information about the treatment procedures in order to diminish his anxiety and clarify possible doubts. In all the cases under hospital care there were no instances of high exposure (above 1mSv/month or 6 mSv/year) among the staff. With the participation of all involved, there was an escalating improvement in the reduction of complications generated by the patient’s anxiety, waste decrease providing better comfort during hospital care) and minimization of occupational hazard affecting the staff in charge of the patient’s room maintenance after hospital leave. (author)

  7. Reappearance of cancer of the cervix 19 years after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampil, F. [Lousiana State Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Louisiana (United States); Bell, M.; Martin, D. [Lousiana State Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Obstetrics- Gynecology, Louisiana (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Most of the recurrences after Wertheim hysterectomy or definitive radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix occur within two or three years following treatment. Late recurrence is an uncommon event accounting for less than 1% of all patients with cancer of the cervix treated by radiotherapy. We present a case of reappearance of cervical cancer 19 years after irradiation and review the literature. (au) 7 refs.

  8. Radiotherapy and bleomycin-containing chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer: report of six patients and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forastiere, A.A.; Uikram, B.; Spiro, R.H.; Wittes, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    In an effort to improve the complete remission rate achievable with bleomycin and cisplatin, administered prior to radiotherapy in previously untreated patients with unresectable epidermoid carcinoma of the head and neck, we initiated a pilot study employing simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Six patients were treated with bleomycin (B) 15 mg i.m. t.i.w. 30-60 minutes prior to radiotherapy (RT) treatment with conventional fractionation, 180-200 rad/fx, 5 fx/week. During interruptions in B + RT for healing of mucocutaneous reactions, patients received cisplatin 40 mg/mg m 2 once weekly. Toxicity included severe mucositis within the radiation port in all patients, three episodes of infection, and significant myelosuppression in one patient. Transient mild serum creatinine elevation occurred in four patients. Three patients did not complete treatment because of severity of toxicity. Response was: primary--4/6CR, 1/6 PR; regional nodes--1/5 CR, 4/5 PR. Review of the literature of concurrent bleomycin and radiotherapy trials in head and neck cancer indicates that other investigators have encountered severe toxicity using bleomycin dose and radiation fractionation schedules similar to ours. Toxicity may be reduced when lower doses of concurrent bleomycin and/or alternative radiation fractionation schedules are employed. Although results of uncontrolled trials suggest a possible therapeutic advantage to treatment with the combination compared to radiotherapy alone, this has not clearly been established in the four randomized trials reviewed

  9. Results of the conservative treatment associating radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy in the bladder filtering cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Karsenty, G.; Tallet, A.; Lopez, L.; Alzieu, C.; Serment, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: purpose: to describe outcome of patients with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma treated with multimodality therapy in our institution from 1993 to 2002. Patients and methods: the charts of sixty patients with T2-4, N0-1, M0 treated with TURBT followed by a chemo-radiotherapy combination were retrospectively reviewed: 22 received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (CMV/MVAC) followed by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (weakly cisplatin/carbo-platin or a cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil association) and the other 38 concomitant chemo-radiotherapy alone. Radiotherapy delivered a median dose of 45 Gy to the pelvis and 65 Gy to the bladder in a mono-fractionated or twice a day fractionation scheme. Follow-up evaluations included cystoscopy with biopsies at regular intervals. Salvage cystectomy was recommended in case of local persistent tumor or bladder relapse. Results: median follow-up was 48.5 months (10-126 months). 82% (18/22) of the patients receiving neo-adjuvant chemotherapy had 2 or more cycles and 85% (51/60) got the concomitant chemotherapy as planned. Radiotherapy was completed in 56 patients. Twenty-eight patients relapsed either locally (14 did not achieve local complete response after chemo-radiation and 6 had true local relapse during follow-up) or at distant sites. Actuarial 5-year disease-specific survival and freedom from local and distant relapse rate are respectively 54% and 42%. Actuarial local control rate with intact bladder was 56% at 5-year. When separated according to stage and grade, patients with T2/3 grade 2 tumors had significantly better chance of remaining relapse-free than the others (p = 0.045). Salvage cystectomy (n = 11) for isolated local failure in this population achieved limited results. Conclusion: our experience shows that a significant number of patients will achieve long survival with their bladder intact after multimodality therapy. (authors)

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, O.; Fenoglietto, P.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique allowing dose escalation and normal tissue sparing for various cancer types. For breast cancer, the main goals when using IMRT were to improve dose homogeneity within the breast and to enhance coverage of complex target volumes. Nonetheless, better heart and lung protections are achievable with IMRT as compared to standard irradiation for difficult cases. Three prospective randomized controlled trials of IMRT versus standard treatment showed that a better breast homogeneity can translate into better overall cosmetic results. Dosimetric and clinical studies seem to indicate a benefit of IMRT for lymph nodes irradiation, bilateral treatment, left breast and chest wall radiotherapy, or accelerated partial breast irradiation. The multiple technical IMRT solutions available tend to indicate a widespread use for breast irradiation. Nevertheless, indications for breast IMRT should be personalized and selected according to the expected benefit for each individual. (authors)

  11. Hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer is not associated with post-treatment testosterone suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States); Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org; And others

    2013-04-15

    Background: To investigate post-treatment changes in serum testosterone in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between April 2008 and October 2011, 228 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved prospective protocol. Patients received doses ranging from 70 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) to 72.5 CGE at 2.5 CGE per fraction using passively scattered protons. Three patients were excluded for receiving androgen deprivation therapy (n = 2) or testosterone supplementation (n = 1) before radiation. Of the remaining 226 patients, pretreatment serum testosterone levels were available for 217. Of these patients, post-treatment serum testosterone levels were available for 207 in the final week of treatment, 165 at the six-month follow-up, and 116 at the 12-month follow-up. The post-treatment testosterone levels were compared with the pretreatment levels using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for matched pairs. Results: The median pretreatment serum testosterone level was 367.7 ng/dl (12.8 nmol/l). The median changes in post-treatment testosterone value were as follows: +3.0 ng/dl (+0.1 nmol/l) at treatment completion; +6.0 ng/dl (+0.2 nmol/l) at six months after treatment; and +5.0 ng/dl (0.2 nmol/l) at 12 months after treatment. None of these changes were statistically significant. Conclusion: Patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy do not experience testosterone suppression. Our findings are consistent with physical measurements demonstrating that proton radiotherapy is associated with less scatter radiation exposure to tissues beyond the beam paths compared with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy.

  12. The role of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: a controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Kowalska, T.; Glinski, C.

    2000-01-01

    Radiotherapy remains the basic form of treatment in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but there still exist controversies concerning optimal radiotherapy regimen and in particular, the total dose and fractionation schedules. To prove whether the question: if using an unconventional dose fractionation regimen (accelerated hyperfractionation) could improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy patients with NSCLC. Between 1997 and 2000 in the Cancer Centre in Cracow (COOK) a controlled clinical trial was conducted in a group of 150 patients with locally advanced (III Deg) inoperable and unsuitable for radical radiotherapy NSCLC, with no major symptoms of the disease. In 76 patients conventionally fractionated radiotherapy was performed - 50 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks (CF). 74 patients were irradiated twice a day (AHF); the dose per fraction was 1.25 Gy and the minimum interval between fractions - 6 hours. The total dose was 50 Gy in 40 fractions during 26 days. The probability of 12 months survival was 47.4% in the CF arm and 45.9% in the AHF arm; the probability of 24 months survival was 16.2% and 15.8%, respectively. In all 76 patients in CF arm the treatment was carried out in prescribed time without breaks. Out of 74 patients in the A HF group 8 (10,8%) did not complete the treatment and 2 of then died in 3rd and 4th week of treatment. The use of accelerated hyperfractionation does not improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC without severe symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The treatment of choice in this group of patients os conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in 5 week of treatment. (author)

  13. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor E. R. Harris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for early stage breast cancer is a technique for partial breast irradiation. There are several technologies in clinical use to perform breast IORT. Regardless of technique, IORT generally refers to the delivery of a single dose of radiation to the periphery of the tumor bed in the immediate intraoperative time frame, although some protocols have performed IORT as a second procedure. There are two large prospective randomized trials establishing the safety and efficacy of breast IORT in early stage breast cancer patients with sufficient follow-up time on thousands of women. The advantages of IORT for partial breast irradiation include: direct visualization of the target tissue ensuring treatment of the high-risk tissue and eliminating the risk of marginal miss; the use of a single dose coordinated with the necessary surgical excision thereby reducing omission of radiation and the selection of mastectomy for women without access to a radiotherapy facility or unable to undergo several weeks of daily radiation; favorable toxicity profiles; patient convenience and cost savings; radiobiological and tumor microenvironment conditions which lead to enhanced tumor control. The main disadvantage of IORT is the lack of final pathologic information on the tumor size, histology, margins, and nodal status. When unexpected findings on final pathology such as positive margins or positive sentinel nodes predict a higher risk of local or regional recurrence, additional whole breast radiation may be indicated, thereby reducing some of the convenience and low-toxicity advantages of sole IORT. However, IORT as a tumor bed boost has also been studied and appears to be safe with acceptable toxicity. IORT has potential efficacy advantages related to overall survival related to reduced cardiopulmonary radiation doses. It may also be very useful in specific situations, such as prior to oncoplastic reconstruction to improve accuracy of

  14. Cost-effectiveness of radiotherapy during surgery compared with external radiation therapy in the treatment of women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedie Mosalanezhad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraoperative radiation therapy device (IORT is one of the several options for partial breast irradiation. IORT is sent to the tumor bed during surgery and can be replaced with conventional standard therapy (EBRT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of IORT machine compared with EBRT and to determine the dominant option in terms of the cost-effectiveness. Method: This study was conducted in two phases; the first phase was a comprehensive review of the electronic databases search that was extracted after extraction and selection of the articles used in this article on effectiveness outcomes. Data collection form was completed by professionals and experts to estimate the cost of treatment, intraoperative radiotherapy and radiotherapy cost when using external radiation therapy process; direct costs were considered from the perspective of service provider and they were calculated in the second phase to determine the option of cost-effective ICER. Excel software was used for data analysis and sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the strength of the results of cost-effectiveness. Results:18 studies were selected but only 8 of them were shown to have acceptable quality. The consequences like “rate of cancer recurrence”, “seroma”, “necrosis”, “toxic”, “skin disorders and delayed wound healing” and “spread the pain” were among the consequences used in the selected articles. The total costs for each patient during a course of treatment for EBRT and IORT were estimated 1398 and $5337.5, respectively. During the analysis, cost-effectiveness of the consequences of cancer recurrence, seroma, necrosis and skin disorders and delayed wound healing ICER was calculated. And IORT was found to be the dominant supplier in all cases. Also, in terms of implications of toxicity and prevalence of pain, IORT had a lower cost and better effectiveness and consequently the result was more cost

  15. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K.-H.; Duchesne, G.; See, A.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Travelling for treatment; does distance and deprivation affect travel for intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the rural setting for head and neck cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosway, B; Douglas, L; Armstrong, N; Robson, A

    2017-06-01

    NHS England has commissioned intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers from Newcastle hospitals for patients in North Cumbria. This study assessed whether travel distances affected the decision to travel to Newcastle (to receive intensity-modulated radiotherapy) or Carlisle (to receive conformal radiotherapy). All patients for whom the multidisciplinary team recommended intensity-modulated radiotherapy between December 2013 and January 2016 were included. Index of multiple deprivation scores and travel distances were calculated. Patients were also asked why they chose their treating centre. Sixty-nine patients were included in this study. There were no significant differences in travel distance (p = 0.53) or index of multiple deprivation scores (p = 0.47) between patients opting for treatment in Carlisle or Newcastle. However, 29 of the 33 patients gave travel distance as their main reason for not travelling for treatment. Quantitatively, travel distance and deprivation does not impact on whether patients accept intensity-modulated radiotherapy. However, patients say distance is a major barrier for access. Future research should explore how to reduce this.

  17. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  18. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  19. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, A.

    2001-05-01

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is decreasing, while therapy-related symptoms are increasing in the course of radiotherapy. Even after the end of the therapy these symptoms keep on causing distress, sometimes in a higher amount than before. A correlation between sex, sort of cancer and curative or palliative treatment and the amount of distress was found. Conclusion: the results stress the importance of adequate emotional support for patients undergoing radiotherapy especially in the first week of treatment and after the treatment. There is a need for the development of a valid radiotherapy - questionnaire in order to be able to measure the distress of these patients. (author)

  20. Risk of cancer formation by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Described are the difference between exposures to radiation for medical purpose and to environmental radiation at low dose, estimation of carcinogenic risk by medical radiation, and notice for referring the risk at clinical practice. ICRP employs linear non-threshold (LNT) model for risk of cancer formation even at <200 mSv for safety, with a recognition that it is scientifically obscure. The model essentially stands on data of A-bomb survivors (the Gold Standard), where the relationship between 5-10% excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer formation and dose 0.05-2.5 Sv is linear. Analyses of the secondary carcinogenesis after radiotherapy have begun to be reported since around 2005: e.g., the secondary thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients treated with radiotherapy has a peak at 20 Gy, suggesting the actual risk depends both on the linearity of carcinogenic increase and on the exponential probability of cell death increase. On this concept, the risk of cancer formation is not always linear to dose. At the practical radiotherapy, its secondary carcinogenic risk should be estimated not only on the dose but also on other factors such as the individual organ, patient's age and attainable age/time after the treatment. In treated teen-ager patients, ERRs of mortality/Gy are 2.28 for cancers of the skin of non-malignant melanoma, 1.32 of bladder and 1.21 of thyroid and in patients of fifties, 1.15 of bladder and lung. The EER tends to become lower as the treated age is older. Pediatric cancer patients to be treated with radiotherapy should be informed about the secondary cancer that the low dose risk given by ICRP is not always appropriate, a certain cancer risk has a peak dose, and ERR of cancer mortality is not a cancer risk of an organ. Many factors like anticancers and immuno-modifiers, modify the outcome of radiotherapy and should be carefully speculated for evaluating the outcome. (T.T.)

  1. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer (MRC ASTEC and NCIC CTG EN.5 randomised trials): pooled trial results, systematic review, and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P; Swart, Ann Marie; Orton, J; Kitchener, H; Whelan, T; Lukka, H; Eisenhauer, E; Bacon, M; Tu, D; Parmar, M K B; Amos, C; Murray, C; Qian, W

    2009-01-10

    was 6.1%. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy cannot be recommended as part of routine treatment for women with intermediate-risk or high-risk early-stage endometrial cancer with the aim of improving survival. The absolute benefit of external beam radiotherapy in preventing isolated local recurrence is small and is not without toxicity.

  2. Neoadjuvant treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorticati, Carlos; Aguilar, Jorge A.; Gonzalez Granda, Pablo; Mendez, Fernando; Montiel, Raul; Rege, Eduardo; Alvarez, Patricio; Lopez, Miguel A.; Rizzi, Alfredo; Mazza, Osvaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: To analyze the results of the treatment in patients with cancer of prostate of high risk. Material and Method: Retrospective and observational analysis of 130 patients operated by CAP of high risk (criteria of D'Amico) average 41,48 months, divided in form nonrandomized in three groups 1: radical prostatectomy, 2: neoadjuvant hormonoterapy (BAC) + PR, 3: BAC + PR + x-ray (RT). Statistical analysis: multivaried, test of curved Chi2 and p statistical and of Kaplan Meier. Results: Biochemical relapse 68 patients (52.3%), average 23,37 months. Without differences according to therapeutic modality (p: 0.043). In the multivaried analysis of the 3 factors of presurgical, single risk we found a statistically significant relation in the coexistence of the 3 factors with the presence of positive margin in the PR piece. (p: 0,002). The analysis to make or not, neoadjuvant BAC without significant difference (p: 0,403) evaluating in such the rate of M+, actuarial global survival according to curves of Kaplan Meier to 5 and 10 years (P: 0,5257) and survival 5 actuarial specific cancer to and 10a (P: 0,2165). Conclusions: Without significant differences in: RB, clinical progression, pathological relapse, global and specific survival, rate of positive surgical margins. The 3 criteria of D'Amico were predictive of positive surgical margins and RB, the patients with RB in group 2 presented/displayed greater risk of clinical progression, the PR demonstrated a global survival and specify actuarial to 10 years greater to 50%, considering it therapeutic an option been worth. (authors) [es

  3. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sithamparam, S; Ahmad, R; Sabarudin, A; Othman, Z; Ismail, M

    2017-01-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients. (paper)

  4. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  5. A survey on staging and treatment in uterine cervical carcinoma in the Radiotherapy Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coucke, P.A.; Ciernik, I.F.; Maingon, P.; Do, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), we conducted a survey in 1997-1998 to determine the variability of pre-treatment assessment and treatment options. The variability of choosing surgery, defined radiation therapy techniques and chemotherapy are investigated, as well as the center's choices of future treatment strategies. Fifty two of 81 RCG centers from the RCG have participated in the survey. As one would expect, there is a large variation in the techniques used for pretreatment evaluation and treatment options. There is no 'standard' for reporting acute and late side effects. Chemotherapy is used neither systematically nor uniformly, and some centers continue to use neadjuvant chemotherapy modalities. Furthermore, the survey reveals that there is a strong demand for the reduction of overall treatment-time, for clinical investigation of novel combined modality treatment strategies, especially chemo-radiation therapy, and also for the use of new radiation sensitizers. We conclude that a more homogeneous approach to the pretreatment evaluation as well as treatment techniques is required in order to allow adequate quality control in any future trial of the RCG in the EORTC. (author)

  6. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy followed by mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. An alternative treatment option for locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazos, Montserrat; Corradini, Stefanie; Schoenecker, Stephan; Scheithauer, Heike; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Dian, Darius [Mednord Munich Clinic, Munich (Germany); Bodungen, Vera von; Ditsch, Nina; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Harbeck, Nadia [LMU Munich, Breast Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The optimal sequence of mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is still under debate. Increased rates of postoperative complications are described following postmastectomy RT. Neoadjuvant RT aims to improve the aesthetic results and simplify the reconstructive pathway. A total of 22 patients diagnosed with LABC and treated with neoadjuvant RT followed by mastectomy and IBR between 04/2012 and 03/2015 were retrospectively analyzed. RT consisted of external beam RT to the breast and the regional lymphatics, if indicated. Both implant-based and autologous tissue-transfer reconstruction techniques were used. At the time of RT, 10 patients had no prior surgery and 12 patients had previously undergone breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with positive resection margins without the possibility to perform a second BCS. Additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 18 patients prior to RT. A complete pathological response was achieved in 55.0% of patients. The 2-year overall survival rate was 89.3%, the 2-year disease-free-survival 79.8% and the local-recurrence-free survival was 95.2%. The cosmetic result was excellent or good in 66% of the patients treated with upfront mastectomy and 37% of the patients who had previously undergone BCS. Among patients who received implant-based IBR, 4 patients developed serious wound-healing problems with implant loss. The most satisfactory results were achieved with autologous tissue reconstruction. A sequential neoadjuvant chemo-/radiotherapy to allow IBR following mastectomy in selected cases of LABC seems feasible and can be safely attempted. Careful patient selection, close monitoring, and continuous patient support is mandatory to ensure compliance in this treatment strategy. (orig.) [German] Die optimale Therapiesequenz von Mastektomie mit sofortiger Brustrekonstruktion (IBR) und Radiotherapie (RT) beim lokal fortgeschrittenen

  7. Invasive bladder cancer treated by radical external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, M.O.; Thomas, D.M.; Lim, A.; Berry, R.J.; Milroy, E.J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-three consecutive unselected patients with invasive bladder cancer, Stage T2 to T3, treated by radical radiotherapy have been reviewed. Cystectomy was reserved for patients with significant worsening of disease during treatment, histologically confirmed persistent or recurrent invasive tumour after treatment, or patients with intolerable symptoms due to radiation cystitis. In 64% of our patients a favourable tumour response to radiotherapy was seen, while a further 31% showed disease progression either during or on completion of radiotherapy. Cystectomy was performed on 22% of patients, mainly for radiation cystitis, and was not associated with a significant operative mortality rate. The crude 5-year survival rate was 42%. We conclude that radical radiotherapy is as effective as other forms of treatment for invasive bladder cancer, but that there remains a need to identify those bladder tumours destined to respond poorly to radiotherapy at an earlier stage. (author)

  8. Radiotherapy for stage IV oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kaori; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Motegi, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with stage IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy in our facility from January 1993 to August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. The age of the patients was 34-84 (median 62) years old. Thirty-four were male and 14 were female. Subsite of the tumor was anterior: 16, lateral: 39, posterior: 1, and superior: 1. Forty-nine patients were treated with chemotherapy. Induction chemotherapy (ICT) was done in 25 patients, ICT+concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in 15 patients, and CCRT in 9 patients. A dose of 60-82 Gy (median 72 Gy) by hyperfractionated radiotherapy, at 1.2 Gy/fraction twice a day, was delivered in 37 patients, and 60-72 Gy (median 66 Gy) with a conventional daily fractionation in 20 patients. Salvage surgery was performed in 5 patients as a part of primary treatment after radiotherapy. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate and disease-free survival rate were 52.9% and 51.4%, respectively. By univariate analysis, the impact of age, sex, T-stage, N-stage, histological differentiation, chemotherapy and fractionation of radiation therapy on survivals were evaluated. T-stage, N-stage and histological differentiation were significantly covariate correlated with survival. The treatment results were not satisfactory. Further investigation of the treatment strategy to improve the treatment outcome of advanced oropharyngeal cancer is desired. (author)

  9. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies

  10. Modification of staging and treatment of head and neck cancer by FDG-PET/CT prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyuk, A.; University Hospital Dresden; Appold, S.; Zoephel, K.; Baumann, M.; University Hospital Dresden; Abolmaali, N.; University Hospital Dresden

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reliable tumor staging is a fundamental pre-requisite for efficient tumor therapy and further prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare head and neck cancer (HNC) staging before and after FDG-PET/CT, evaluating the stage modifications for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Patients and methods: A total of 102 patients with untreated primary HNC, who underwent conventional staging and staging including FDG-PET/CT before RT, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Blinded pre-FDG-PET/CT and post-FDG-PET/CT staging data were compared. The impact on patient management was tested by comparing the intention before and after FDG-PET/CT. Results: Significant modifications of T, N, and M stage as well as clinical stage were detected after inclusion of FDG-PET/CT data (p = 0.002, 0.0006, 0.001, 0.03, respectively). Overall, the implementation of FDG-PET/CT led to modification of RT intention decision in 14 patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT demonstrates essential influence on tumor staging in HNC patients scheduled for irradiation. Implementation of FDG-PET/CT in imaging protocol improves selection of candidates for curative and palliative RT and allows further optimization of treatment management and therapy intention. (orig.)

  11. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pluridirectional High-Energy Agile Scanning Electron Radiotherapy (PHASER): Extremely Rapid Treatment for Early Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    esophagus , and anal cancer cases. We performed Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations and we optimized the dose in a research version of RayStation... esophagus , and anal cancer cases. We 44 performed Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations and we optimized the dose in a research version of...clinical cases were: acoustic neuroma, and liver, lung, esophagus and anal cancer 120 cases. Target sizes ranged from 1.2 cm3 to 990.4 cm3 (Table 1

  13. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  14. The Comparison 2D and 3D Treatment Planning in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy with Emphasis on Dose Homogeneity and Lung Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Falahatpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast conserving radiotherapy is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is usually used for this purpose. This technique is performed using 2D or 3D treatment planning systems. The aim of this study was to compare 2D treatment planning with 3D treatment planning in tangential irradiation in breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses in the breast volume and lung dose were considered. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included in this study. The patients were CT scanned. Two-dimensional treatment planning with the Alfard 2D TPS was performed for each patient using a single central CT slice. The data used on the Alfard 2D TPS was imported into the Eclipse 3D TPS, on which 3D treatment planning was performed. Cobalt-60 beams were used in all plans. Results: Comparing 2D and 3D treatment planning, homogeneity of isodoses was improved in 3D treatment planning (p30Gy was increased in 3D treatment planning (p< 0.01. Discussion and Conclusion: 3D treatment planning is a more suitable option for patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery because of improved dose homogeneity in 3D treatment planning. The results of the treatment can be improved with reduced recurrence probability and skin problems.

  15. Efficacy of radiotherapy of oral mucosa cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, Yu.I.; Garbuzov, M.I.; Sarantseva, I.P.; Popov, N.V.; Pereslegin, O.I.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of 10-year experience of a radiological department (962 patients) indicated late admission of oral mucosa cancer patients for specialized treatment: 75-85% of the patients were admitted with Stage 2-4 disease. The assessment of the efficacy of radiotherapy according to the 3 ad 5-year survival rates showed that better results were obtained for buccal mucosa cancer and the worst for mouth fundus cancer. Regional metastates are a poor prognostic sign, particularly fixed metastases in patients with tongue and mouth fundus cancer. Combined therapy turned out be the most effective in tongue cancer. In different variants of dose delivery in time the most favorable results were obtained with small fractionation (a conventional course). However it should be noted that a split course was usually applied to weak elderly patients with advanced stages of disease

  16. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O'Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-05-02

    Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct radiotherapy costs for long- (assumed at 45-50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over a 5 week period) and short-courses (assumed at 25 Gy in 5 daily fractions over a one week period). Following interviews and on-site visits to radiotherapy departments in two designated cancer centers, a radiotherapy care pathway for a typical rectal cancer patient was developed. Total direct costs were derived by applying fixed and variable unit costs to resource use within each care phase. Costs included labor, capital, consumables and overheads. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Radiotherapy treatment was estimated to cost between €2,080 (5-fraction course) and €3,609 (25-fraction course) for an average patient in 2012. Costs were highest in the treatment planning phase for the short-course (€1,217; 58% of total costs), but highest in the radiation treatment phase for the long-course (€1,974: 60% of total costs). By simultaneously varying treatment time, capacity utilization rates and linear accelerator staff numbers, the base cost fell by 20% for 5-fractions: (€1,660) and 35% for 25-fractions: (€2,354). Traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer is relatively inexpensive. Moreover, significant savings may be achievable through service organization and provision changes. These results suggest that a strong economic argument can be made for expanding the use of radiotherapy in rectal cancer treatment.

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  19. Hypofractionated radiotherapy as local hemostatic agent in advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Tumor bleeding continues to remain a challenge in an oncological setting, and radiotherapy has been studied as a local hemostatic agent. We studied the role of local radiotherapy in controlling bleeding at our center. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 25 treated cases (cancer urinary bladder: 12, lung cancer: 5, cervical cancer: 4, uterine cancer: 1, rectal cancer: 2, schwanoma: 1 at our center from March 2008 to December 2010. All patients had either an advanced or recurrent disease. Radiotherapy schedule was either 20 Gray in 5 fractions or 15 Gray in 5 fractions and was delivered with Cobalt 60. Results and Conclusion : Of 25 patients, 22 (88% responded, and there was complete cessation of bleeding. Both 15 Gray and 20 Gray dose schedule had equal efficacy. Treatment was well tolerated without any intermission. Radiotherapy is a safe and effective option in controlling tumor bleeding.

  20. Radiotherapy in the treatment of solitary plasmacytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothirmayi, R; Gangadharan, V P; Nair, M K; Rajan, B

    1997-05-01

    Solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SPB) and extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) are rare. High local control rates are reported with radiotherapy, although the optimal dose and extent of radiotherapy portals remains controversial. Between 1983 and 1993, 30 patients with solitary plasmacytoma were seen at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, India. 23 patients had SPB and seven EMP. The mean age was 52 years and the male to female ratio 3.2:1. Diagnosis of SPB was confirmed by biopsy in 16 patients and tumour excision in seven. 20 patients received megavoltage radiotherapy to the bone lesion with limited margins, and one received chemotherapy. Two patients who underwent complete tumour excision received no further treatment. All seven patients with EMP received megavoltage radiotherapy, four following biopsy and three after tumour excision. Local control was achieved in all patients with SPB. Nine progressed to multiple myeloma and one developed a solitary plasmacytoma in another bone. Six patients with EMP achieved local control. Three later progressed to multiple myeloma and one had local relapse. Median time to relapse was 28 months in SPB and 30 months in EMP. 5-year overall survival rates were 82% and 57% for patients with SPB and EMP, respectively. The corresponding progression free survival rates were 55% and 50%, respectively. Age, sex, site of tumour, serum M protein and haemoglobin levels did not significantly influence progression free survival. The extent of surgery, radiotherapy dose or time to relapse were not significant prognostic factors. Radiotherapy appears to be an effective modality of treatment of solitary plasmacytoma. No dose-response relationship is observed, and high local control rates are achieved with limited portals. Progression to multiple myeloma is the commonest pattern of failure, although no prognostic factors for progression are identified. The role of chemotherapy in preventing disease progression needs further evaluation.

  1. Radiotherapy in skin cancer - present day aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocheva, L.

    2009-01-01

    Skin carcinomas (SC) are the leading ones in the structure of oncological morbidity in both genders in Bulgaria, as well as in white populations in the world. Regardless of their high frequency, their treatment is successful and mortality due to SC has been reduced by 20 - 30% during the last decades. In Bulgaria SC in 2003 comprise 9.3% of all oncological diseases in men and women. According to their frequency they occupy the second phase after lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The treatment of SC is realized applying various therapeutic approaches, distinguished as basic (radical) and alternative ones. The first include surgical treatment and radiotherapy (RT) (definitive or adjuvant) and the alternative ones - curettage and electro-coagulation, cryotherapy, local chemotherapy and immunotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, etc. When defining the therapeutic approach, the method affording the best chances of curing with acceptable cosmetic results should be selected. The present review is aimed at considering the contemporary aspects in RT of SC, including used radiotherapy methods and techniques, volumes, doses, fractionation, and achieved therapeutic effects. The indications for implementing definitive and adjuvant RT are given in detail. The applied radiotherapy methods - external beam RT and brachytherapy, are also discussed. The used planned radiotherapy volumes, doses, fractionation schemes, attained therapeutic effects and possible radiation reactions are considered as well. The curability of SC is high, exceeding 90% after adequate treatment. Regardless of the fact that RT has partially ceded its leading role in SC treatment, it still remains to be one of the basic and successful therapeutic approaches

  2. A treatment planning comparison of four target volume contouring guidelines for locally advanced pancreatic cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Eccles, Cynthia; Patel, Neel; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Warren, Samantha; McKenna, W. Gillies; Brunner, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Contouring of target volumes varies significantly in radiotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). There is a lack of consensus as to whether elective lymph nodes (eLN’s) should be included or not in the planning target volume (PTV). In the present study we analyzed the dosimetric coverage of the eLN’s and organs at risk (OAR) by comparing four different contouring guidelines. Methods and materials: PTVs were delineated with (Oxford and RTOG guidelines) or without (Michigan and SCALOP guidelines) including the eLNs in eleven patients with PDAC. eLNs included the peripancreatic, paraaortic, paracaval, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric and portal vein clinical target volumes (CTVs). A 3D-CRT plan (50.40 Gy in 28 fractions) was performed to analyze and compare the dosimetric coverage of all eLNs and OAR between the 4 contouring guidelines. Results: The size of Oxford and RTOG PTVs was comparable and significantly larger than the SCALOP and Michigan PTVs. Interestingly the eLNs received a significant amount of incidental dose irradiation by PTV-based plans that only aimed to treat the tumor without the eLNs. The dosimetric coverage of eLN presented a large variability according to the respective contouring methods. The difference in the size of the 4 PTVs was reflected to the dose distribution at the OAR. Conclusions: Our study provides important information regarding the impact of different contouring guidelines on the dose distribution to the eLNs and the OAR in patients with locally advanced PDAC treated with radiotherapy

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  4. Hypo fractionated radiotherapy in advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa de; Saito, Newton Heitetsu; Gomes, Herbeni Cardoso; Aguilar, Patricia Bailao; Nadalin, Wladimir

    1996-01-01

    Patients with advanced lung cancers have bad prognosis and, many times, are submitted to prolonged and not always efficient treatments. We present a study where 51 patients were treated with hypo fractionated radiotherapy, based on two distinct schemes, according to the performance status and social conditions of each patient: continuous treatment: 30 Gy, 10 fractions of 3 Gy, 5 days/week (37 cases); weekly treatment: 30 Gy, 6 fractions of 5 Gy, once a week (14 cases). Symptoms relief and impact in survival were evaluated. In both groups, we observed improvement of symptoms in about 70% of the occurrences with a medium survival of three months. We conclude that hypo fractionation is an effective palliative treatment for lung cancers, in patients with short life-expectancy and must be considered as a option in advanced cases, in patients with short life-expectancy that deserve some kind of treatment. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimator leaves in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shichao; Ai, Ping; Xie, Li; Xu, Qingfeng; Bai, Sen; Lu, You; Li, Ping; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To study the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (standard MLC [sMLC] width of 10 mm and micro-MLC [mMLC] width of 4 mm) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Between January 2010 and August 2010, a retrospective analysis was conducted on 12 patients with cervical cancer. The treatment plans for all patients were generated with the same machine setup parameters and optimization methods in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. The dose distribution for the planning tumor volume (PTV), the dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units (MUs), and the number of IMRT segments were evaluated. For the delivery efficiency, the MUs were significantly higher in the sMLC-IMRT plan than in the mMLC-IMRT plan (802 ± 56.9 vs 702 ± 56.7; p 0.05). For the planning quality, the conformity index (CI) between the 2 paired IMRT plans with the mMLC and the sMLC did not differ significantly (average: 0.817 ± 0.024 vs 0.810 ± 0.028; p > 0.05). The differences of the homogeneity index (HI) between the 2 paired plans were statistically significant (average: 1.122 ± 0.010 vs 1.132 ± 0.014; p 10 , V 20 , V 30 , and V 40 , percentage of contoured OAR volumes receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, and the mean dose (D mean ) received. The IMRT plans with the mMLC protected the OARs better than the plans with the sMLC. There were significant differences (p 30 and V 40 of the rectum and V 10 , V 20 , V 40 , and D mean of the bladder. IMRT plans with the mMLC showed advantages over the plans with the sMLC in dose homogeneity for targets, dose sparing of OARs, and fewer MUs in cervical cancer

  6. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, T.; Itami, J.; Kotaka, K.; Toriyama, M.

    1996-01-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [de

  7. Radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer in patients under 50 years old

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-nine cases of laryngeal cancer treated by radiotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients were less than 50 years old. The median total dose of the radiation delivered to the primary tumor site was 70 Gy. The overall 5-yr survival rate and 5-yr local control rate were 88% and 72%, respectively. Five (8.5%) of the 59 patients developed late recurrence more than five yr after initial treatment, but subsequent salvage operations were successful for disease control; three patients had T1 glottic cancer, one had T2-3 glottic cancer and one had T3N1 supraglottic cancer. Since the local control rate and the 5-yr survival rate after radiotherapy are satisfactory, radiotherapy, which allows both functional and esthetic conservation, has an important role in the treatment of laryngeal cancer in adults under 50 yr of age. (author)

  8. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  9. Radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. 20-year experience from a single institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrian, K.; Sauer, T.; Klemm, S.; Bayer, C.; Haller, B.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To report the efficacy and toxicity of radio(chemo)therapy (RCT) in the management of squamous cell anal carcinoma (SQ-AC) and to evaluate the prognostic factors influencing the outcomes. Patients and methods: A consecutive cohort of 138 patients with cT1-4, cN0-3, cM0 SQ-AC were treated with RCT between 1988 and 2011 at our department. Median follow-up time for surviving patients from the start of RCT was 98 months (range, 1-236 months). Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 56 Gy (range, 4-61 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 119 patients (86%). Results: The survival rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 88 {+-} 3, 82 {+-} 4, and 59 {+-} 6%, respectively, with a median overall survival (OS) of 167 months. The cumulative incidence for local recurrence at 2 and 5 years was 8 {+-} 2 and 11 {+-} 3%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) times were 132 and 135 months, respectively. In 19 patients (14%), a distant metastasis was diagnosed after a median time of 19 months. In the multivariate analysis, UICC (International Union Against Cancer) stage I-II, female gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1, and good/moderate histologic differentiation (G1-2) were significantly associated with a better OS, DFS, and CFS. Conformal radiotherapy planning techniques were significantly associated with a lower cumulative incidence of local recurrence (11 {+-} 3% vs. 38 {+-} 19% at 5 years, p = 0.006). A higher radiation dose beyond 54 Gy was not associated with an improvement in outcome, neither for smaller - (T1/T2) nor for larger tumors (T3/T4). Conclusion: RCT leads to excellent outcomes - especially in patients with stage I/II and G1/G2 tumors - with acceptable toxicity. The probable advantages of high-dose radiotherapy should be considered carefully against the risk of a higher rate of toxicity. Future studies are needed to investigate the role of a more

  10. Combined curative radiotherapy including HDR brachytherapy and androgen deprivation in localized prostate cancer: A prospective assessment of acute and late treatment toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, Thomas; Nilsson, Sten; Ryberg, Marianne; Brandberg, Yvonne; Lennernaes, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Self-reported symptoms including urinary, bowel and sexual side effects were investigated prospectively at multiple assessment points before and after combined radiotherapy of prostate cancer including HDR brachytherapy and neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Between April 2000 and June 2003, patients with predominantly advanced localized prostate tumours subjected to this treatment were asked before treatment and on follow-up visits to complete a questionnaire covering urinary, bowel and sexual problems. The mainly descriptive analyses included 525 patients, responding to at least one questionnaire before or during the period 2-34 months after radiotherapy. Adding androgen deprivation before radiotherapy significantly worsened sexual function. During radiotherapy, urinary, bowel and sexual problems increased and were reported at higher levels up to 34 months, although there seemed to be a general tendency to less pronounced irritative bowel and urinary tract symptoms over time. No side effects requiring surgery were reported. Classic late irradiation effects such as mucosal bleeding were demonstrated mainly during the second year after therapy, but appear less pronounced in comparison with dose escalated EBRT series. In conclusion, despite the high radiation dose given, the toxicity seemed comparable with that of other series but long term (5-10 years) symptom outcome has to be determined

  11. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  12. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.

    2014-01-01

    locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking...

  13. A comparison of four patient immobilization devices in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Paul Y.; Washington, Maxine; Vaida, Florin; Hamilton, Russell; Spelbring, Danny; Wyman, Brenda; Harrison, Joanne; Chen, George T. Y.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the variability of patient positioning during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer treated with no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices, and to determine the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on patient movement with each individual immobilization technique. Methods and Materials: To see whether our immobilization techniques have improved day-to-day patient movement, a retrospective analysis was carried out. A total of 62 patients treated at one facility on a single machine with 3D-CRT via a four-field box technique (anterior-posterior and opposed laterals) in the supine position with either no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices. Five groups of patients were compared: (a) group 1-no immobilization; (b) group 2-alpha cradle from the waist to upper thigh; (c) group 3-alpha cradle from waist to below the knees; (d) group 4-styrofoam leg immobilizer (below knees); and (e) group 5-aquaplast cast encompassing the entire abdomen and pelvis to midthigh with alpha cradle immobilization to their lower legs and feet. Prior to starting radiotherapy, portal films of all four treatment fields were obtained 1 day before treatment. Subsequently, portal films were then obtained at least once a week. Portal films were compared with the simulation films and appropriate changes were made and verified on the next day prior to treatment. A deviation of greater than 0.5 cm or greater was considered to be clinically significant in our analysis. We studied the difference among the types of immobilization and no immobilization by looking at the frequency of movements (overall, and on each of the three axes) that a patient had during the course of his treatment. Using a logistic regression model, the probability of overall and individual directional movement for each group was obtained. In addition, the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on movement were

  14. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Debus, Jürgen; Habermehl, Daniel; Kieser, Meinhard; Dreher, Constantin; Werner, Jens; Haselmann, Renate; Jäkel, Oliver; Jäger, Dirk; Büchler, Markus W

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  15. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Hope, Andrew; Moseley, Douglas; Brink, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT markers to predict lung density changes induced by radiotherapy was investigated. Age and CBCT markers extracted at 10th, 20th, and 30th treatment fraction significantly predicted lung density changes in a multivariable analysis, and a set of response models based on these parameters were established. The correlation coefficient for the models was 0.35, 0.35, and 0.39, when based on the markers obtained at the 10th, 20th, and 30th fraction, respectively. The study indicates that younger patients without lung tissue reactions early into their treatment course may have minimal radiation induced lung density increase at follow-up. Further investigations are needed to examine the ability of the models to identify patients with low risk of symptomatic toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Referral rates and trends in radiotherapy as part of primary treatment of cancer in South Netherlands, 1988-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulto, Ans; Louwman, Marieke; Rodrigus, Patrick; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To study referral rates and time trends in the use of primary radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: The proportion and number of irradiated patients were calculated in a population-based setting among 58,436 cancer patients diagnosed between 1988 and 2002. Results: The number of patients receiving RT within 6 months of diagnosis (RT6mo) increased by about 3.3% annually, the proportion of all incident cases that received RT6mo remained stable (±30%). Only 20% of elderly patients (75+) received RT6mo. The proportion of cancer patients that received RT6mo increased markedly between 1988-1992 and 1998-2002 for patients with prostate cancer (15 and 28%, respectively), rectal cancer (33 and 43%) and brain tumours (48 and 67%). The absolute number of irradiated breast cancer patients increased 30% between 1988 and 2002. Among patients with rectal cancer, a shift occurred from postoperative to preoperative RT since 1995. The percentage of irradiated patients with stage I endometrial cancer decreased from 47% in 1988-1992 to 15% in 1998-2002. Conclusions: The percentage of cancer patients who received primary RT remained stable throughout 1988-2002, being consistently lower for older patients. The increased number of irradiated patients was due mainly to earlier detection and the ageing of the population. To clarify the overall percentage of patients irradiated, population-based studies on RT given after 6 months since diagnosis are warranted

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade ≥3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  18. A history of radiotherapy to 1950: cancer and radiotherapy in Britain 1850-1950

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis explores the establishment of radiotherapy as a medical specialty in Britain; its development is explored within the context of hospital treatment and care for cancer patients. The themes examined in the thesis are: the role of hospital provision for cancer; the development of new medical therapies; the establishment of new medical specialities; the role of State support for medicine; public interest in cancer and its treatment. (author)

  19. The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Institute of Oncology (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philipp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Zaucha, Renata [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University, Gdansk (Poland); Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Lagrange, Jean L. [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Oezsoy, Orhan [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHCVs-RSV, Sion (Switzerland); Nguyen, Tan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Baize, Adele [Department de Radio-Oncologie, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles (Belgium); Boujelbene, Noureddine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Collen, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Scandolaro, Luciano [Radioterapia, Azienda Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Untereiner, Michel [Centre Francois Baclesse, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Goldberg, Hadassah [Oncology Departement, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Pesce, Gianfranco A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Opedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Anacak, Yavuz [Department of Radiation Oncology, EGE University, Izmir (Turkey); Friedrich, Esther E.; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Beer, Karl T. [Radio Onkologiezentrum Biel (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38-93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2-16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

  20. Progression-free Survival Following Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment-naive Recurrence: A Multi-institutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Piet; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; As, Nicholas Van; Zilli, Thomas; Muacevic, Alexander; Olivier, Kenneth; Henderson, Daniel; Casamassima, Franco; Orecchia, Roberto; Surgo, Alessia; Brown, Lindsay; Tree, Alison; Miralbell, Raymond; De Meerleer, Gert

    2016-01-01

    The literature on metastasis-directed therapy for oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence consists of small heterogeneous studies. This study aimed to reduce the heterogeneity by pooling individual patient data from different institutions treating oligometastatic PCa recurrence with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We focussed on patients who were treatment naive, with the aim of determining if SBRT could delay disease progression. We included patients with three or fewer metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate distant progression-free survival (DPFS) and local progression-free survival (LPFS). Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. In total, 163 metastases were treated in 119 patients. The median DPFS was 21 mo (95% confidence interval, 15-26 mo). A lower radiotherapy dose predicted a higher local recurrence rate with a 3-yr LPFS of 79% for patients treated with a biologically effective dose ≤100Gy versus 99% for patients treated with >100Gy (p=0.01). Seventeen patients (14%) developed toxicity classified as grade 1, and three patients (3%) developed grade 2 toxicity. No grade ≥3 toxicity occurred. These results should serve as a benchmark for future prospective trials. This multi-institutional study pools all of the available data on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for limited prostate cancer metastases. We concluded that this approach is safe and associated with a prolonged treatment progression-free survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy for rectal and rectosigmoid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Lebesque, J.V.; Hart, A.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, 206 patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy after macroscopically complete surgery for rectal or (recto)sigmoid cancer. Depending on an estimation of the amount of small bowel in the intended treatment volume a total dose was, in general, 45 or 50 Gy. An additional boost of 10 Gy was given to 6 patients because of microscopically involved surgical margins. For tumor stage B a statistically significant trend (p=0.017) for higher local control with higher total dose was observed comparing patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy or less, with more than 45 Gy but less than 50 Gy or with a total dose of 50 Gy or more. This finding illustrates the impact of total dose on local control for postoperative radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma. (author). 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Late toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Coletti, F.; Rafailovici, L.; Filomia, M.L.; Chiozza, J.; Dosoretz, B.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to describe and classify chronic complications due to radiotherapy in breast cancer. Also the impact of radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients is evaluated. Materials and methods: 50 patients with breast cancer at early stages (78% in situ, 22% I and II) treated with radiotherapy in breast volume plus boost (45/50 Gy + 18/20 Gy) with a follow up over 5 years. Acute toxicities were found retrospectively and chronic toxicities were assessed though physical examination and review of complementary studies. To facilitate data collection, pre printed forms were used. Bibliographic searches were made. Results: 10% received chemotherapy and 64% tamoxifen. The predominant chronic toxicity were found in skin (66%), although grade I and II (hyperpigmentation 26%, dryness 22%, telangiectasia 10% fibrosis, 4%, other 4%). A 50% of the patients showed hypoesthesia in ipsilateral upper limb. The other toxicities were presented in low rate and magnitude: mastodynia 16%; actinic pneumonitis 4%, pyrosis 4%, Tachycardia 2%, among others. Of the patients with acute toxicity, only 30% were grade III. The 70% of the patients had a positive impact of radiotherapy on quality of life. Conclusions: We found low rates and degrees of late toxicity. It was noticed a relationship between acute and chronic toxicity, because those who presented adverse effects during treatment developed late effects. It reflects the importance of integrating monitoring as part of radiation treatment. It should be adopted a single score of late toxicity measurement to unify data from different series. (authors) [es

  3. The effect of aerobic exercise on treatment-related acute toxicity in men receiving radical external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, G; Windsor, P M; McCowan, C

    2010-09-01

    We retrospectively analysed acute radiation toxicity data for patients who had participated in a randomised controlled study in our centre in order to assess the impact of aerobic exercise on acute rectal and bladder morbidity during treatment. Data from 65 of 66 patients were analysed: 33 allocated into a control group (standard advice) and 33 into an exercise group (aerobic walking for 30 min at least three times per week) during 4 weeks of external beam radiotherapy; one patient in the exercise group withdrew after randomisation before starting radiotherapy. There was a trend towards less severe acute rectal toxicity in the exercise group with a statistically significant difference in mean toxicity scores over the 4 weeks of radiotherapy (P=0.004), with no significant difference in bladder toxicity scores between the two groups (P=0.123). The lack of an association for severity of bladder toxicity could be attributed to the confounding effect of lower urinary tract symptoms from their prostate cancer. Keeping active and being asked to adhere to a well-defined exercise schedule appears to reduce the severity of rectal toxicity during radiotherapy to the prostate.

  4. Prediction of response to radiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer using stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, Justin K.; Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Baanstra, Mirjam; Bussink, Johan; Hollema, Harry; Os, Ronald P. van; Plukker, John Th. M.; Coppes, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated whether cancer stem cell marker expressing cells can be identified that predict for the response of esophageal cancer (EC) to CRT. Materials and methods: EC cell-lines OE-33 and OE-21 were used to assess in vitro, stem cell activity, proliferative capacity and radiation response. Xenograft tumors were generated using NOD/SCID mice to assess in vivo proliferative capacity and tumor hypoxia. Archival and fresh EC biopsy tissue was used to confirm our in vitro and in vivo results. Results: We showed that the CD44+/CD24− subpopulation of EC cells exerts a higher proliferation rate and sphere forming potential and is more radioresistant in vitro, when compared to unselected or CD44+/CD24+ cells. Moreover, CD44+/CD24− cells formed xenograft tumors faster and were often located in hypoxic tumor areas. In a study of archival pre-neoadjuvant CRT biopsy material from EC adenocarcinoma patients (N = 27), this population could only be identified in 50% (9/18) of reduced-responders to neoadjuvant CRT, but never (0/9) in the complete responders (P = 0.009). Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation into the possible clinical benefit of CD44+/CD24− as a predictive marker in EC patients for the response to chemoradiation

  5. Patterns of practice of regional nodal irradiation in breast cancer: results of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) NOdal Radiotherapy (NORA) survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Kaidar-Person, O.; Poortmans, P.; Ozsahin, M.; Valli, M.-C.; Russell, N.; Kunkler, I.; Hermans, J.; Kuten, A.; van Tienhoven, G.; Westenberg, H.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting outcome of breast cancer (BC) patients based on sentinel lymph node (SLN) status without axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is an area of uncertainty. It influences the decision-making for regional nodal irradiation (RNI). The aim of the NORA (NOdal RAdiotherapy) survey was to examine

  6. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  7. Influence of surgery-radiotherapy interval on recurrence in breast-conserving treatment of small breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourquet, A.; Dreyfus, H.; Maher, M.; Gozy, M.; Campana, F.; Vilcoq, J. R.; Colombani, H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the possible influence of surgery-radiotherapy interval (SRI) on breast recurrence in patients (pts.) with small breast cancers who had a breast-conserving treatment. Materials and Methods: Between January 1981 and December 1988, of 2012 pts. with stage I-II breast cancers treated with wide excision, axillary node dissection and breast irradiation, 1839 (91%) did not received adjuvant chemotherapy and were included in this study. Median age was 51 yrs. [23-88]. Mean tumor size was 2.1 cm [0.5-5]. Median tumor bed irradiation dose was 65 Gy [50-90]. The median SRI was 32 days [5-137]. Pts. were distributed among three SRI groups: 56 days (61 pts). Breast recurrence risk and survival were determined by Kaplan-Meier estimates. The following prognostic factors were evaluated for their possible influence on breast recurrence: age, tumor size, node involvement, estrogen receptor levels, Bloom and Richardson grading (SBR). Therapeutic factors were also analyzed: place of surgery (inside or outside the institution), breast and tumor bed radiation dose, and SRI as a time-dependent variable. A multivariate analysis of breast recurrence risk was performed to adjust for the various confounding factors. A prognostic index was established and the influence of SRI on recurrence was determined within the various prognostic groups. Results: Median follow-up for living pts. was 78 months [3-158]. Breast recurrence rate at 7 years was 11 % [10-13]. The 7-year survival rate was 89 % [88-91]. The 7-year breast recurrence risks in the three SRI groups were 12 %, 9 %, and 18%, respectively (p=0.045). The relative risk (RR) of breast failure was significantly lower in the 35-56 days SRI group compared with the 56 days) were also associated with a higher risk of recurrence, though not statistically significant because of the small numbers. The effect of SRI was time-dependent, i. e. influencing early recurrences and disappearing after 5 years. It was

  8. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  9. Conformal radiotherapy of urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig Paul; Smaaland, Rune; Dahl, Olav

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in radiotherapy (RT) are founded on the enhanced tumour visualisation capabilities of new imaging modalities and the precise deposition of individualised radiation dose distributions made possible with the new systems for RT planning and delivery. These techniques have a large potential to also improve the results of RT of urinary bladder cancer. Major challenges to take full advantage of these advances in the management of bladder cancer are to control, and, as far as possible, reduce bladder motion, and to reliably account for the related intestine and rectum motion. If these obstacles are overcome, it should be possible in the near future to offer selected patients with muscle invading bladder cancer an organ-sparing, yet effective combined-modality treatment as an alternative to radical surgery

  10. Adjuvant radiotherapy and its role in the treatment of stage II lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lung carcinoma remains an enormous clinical challenge for all health care personnel involved in the care of these patients. Those patients with unresected primary lung carcinoma are ultimately referred for radiation therapy in order to control local regional disease. It is important to recognize the great gains in longevity have not materialized with the addition of adjuvant therapy. However, a very real benefit in the quality of life for most patients with carcinoma of the lung can be achieved with the judicious and thoughtful application of sophisticated radiation therapy, for a small but significant portion of the population, a cure will result from this treatment. This chapter reviews the role of radiation therapy as an adjuvant to definitive surgical treatment

  11. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A; Johnson, N; Cornes, P; Simera, I; Collingwood, M; Williams, C; Kitchener, H

    2007-04-18

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy) in stage I endometrial cancer following total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH and BSO) remains unclear. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CancerLit, Physician Data Query (PDQ) of National Cancer Institute. Handsearching was also carried out where appropriate. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared adjuvant radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer were included. Quality of the studies was assessed and data collected using a predefined data collection form. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence and endometrial cancer death. Data on quality of life (QOL) and morbidity were also collected. A meta-analysis on included trials was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager Software 4.2. The meta-analysis was performed on four trials (1770 patients). The addition of pelvic external beam radiotherapy to surgery reduced locoregional recurrence, a relative risk (RR) of 0.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.44, p ASTEC; Lukka) are awaited. External beam radiotherapy carries a risk of toxicity and should be avoided in stage 1 endometrial cancer patients with no high risk factors.

  12. Radiotherapy Boost Following Conservative Surgery for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cendales, Ricardo; Ospino, Rosalba; Torres, Felipe; Cotes, Martha

    2009-01-01

    Nearly half of breast cancer patients in developing countries present with a locally advanced cancer. Treatment is centered on a multimodal approach based on chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. The growing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy has led to a more conservative surgical approach; nonetheless, it is not yet considered as a standard. There are no clear recommendations on the use of a radiotherapy boost in such situation. A Medline search was developed. Most articles are retrospective series. Survival free of locoregional relapse in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy is good. All articles described a boost administered to nearly all patients without regard to their prognostic factors, given that a locally advanced tumor is already considered as a poor prognostic factor. Even tough the poor level of evidence, a recommendation can be made: radiotherapy boost should be administered to all patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast conserving surgery.

  13. Advanced Portal Images Processing for Cobalt Radiotherapy Systems and Lineal Accelerator for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Cabrera, D.

    2013-01-01

    It is presented an investigation project to design software that allows image processing and treatment of an Electronic Portal Image Device (EPID) for lineal accelerators and cobalt machines. For the development of the software it was used the programming language MATLAB and DICOM RT images with a spatial resolution in the isocenter of 0.40 mm/pixel, dimensions of 1024x1024 pixels and 65536 tones in grey scale, that were taken by a linac from Elekta trademark located in the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology. Methods and algorithms implemented were the improvements in the contrast, brightness, equalization and inversion of grey scale of images through modifications in their histogram; the possibility of making rotations, segmentations of zones of interest basing in users criteria for thresholding taking in count the visualization of pixels intensity and measuring of distances in pixels. For the calculations of displacements and rotations between the reference and the actual image was used the canny method for edges detection of the radiation fields and anatomical structures, and normalized bidimensional correlation algorithms for seeking and calculation of objects of interest between two images. The results were obtained using 23 pairs of images of six treatments and the average of the reported errors were: horizontal, vertical and rotational fields errors: ± .531 mm, ± 1.278 mm and ± 0.087 o ; horizontal, vertical and rotational anatomical structures errors: ± 0.766 mm, ± 0.573 mm, ± 0.174 o . these values are under the limit values for each one of these treatments according to the consulted bibliography. (Author)

  14. Clinical and anatomical guidelines in pelvic cancer contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portaluri, M.; Bambace, S.; Giuliano, G.; Pili, G.; Didonna, V.; Perez, C.; Angone, G.; Alloro, E.; Scialpi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose. Many observations on potential inadequate coverage of tumour volume at risk in advanced cervical cancer (CC) when conventional radiation fields are used, have further substantiated by investigators using MRI, CT or lymph-angiographic imaging. This work tries to obtain three dimensional margins by observing enlarged nodes in CT scans in order to improve pelvic nodal chains clinical target volumes (CTVs) drawing, and by looking for corroborative evidence in the literature for a better delineation of tumour CTV. Method. Eleven consecutive patients (seven males, four females, mean age 62 years, range 43 8) with CT diagnosis of nodal involvement caused by pathologically proved carcinoma of the cervix (n = 2), carcinoma of the rectum (n = 2), carcinoma of the prostate (n = 2), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n 2), Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1), carcinoma of the penis (n = 1) and carcinoma of the corpus uteri (n = 1) were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty CT scans with 67 enlarged pelvic nodes were reviewed in order to record the more proximal structures (muscle, bone, vessels, cutis or sub-cutis and other organs) to each enlarged node or group of nodes according to the four surfaces (anterior, lateral, posterior and medial) in a clockwise direction. Results. summary of the observations of each nodal chain and the number of occurrences of every marginal structure on axial CT slices is presented. Finally, simple guidelines are proposed. Conclusions. Tumour CTV should be based on individual tumour anatomy mainly for lateral beams as it results from sagittal T2 weighted MRI images. Boundaries of pelvic nodes CTVs can be derived from observations of enlarged lymph nodes in CT scans. (author)

  15. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Rades, D.; Oborn, B.; Bode, F.; Liney, G.; Hunold, P.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  16. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  17. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, S; Blanck, O; Oborn, B; Bode, F; Liney, G; Hunold, P; Rades, D; Schweikard, A; Keall, P J

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior-inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior-posterior), and 2 mm (left-right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the ideal scenario, compromising

  18. Leukemia risk following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Flannery, J.T.; Moloney, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate further the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and leukemia incidence, a nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 22,753 women who were 18-month survivors of invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1935 to 1972. Women treated for breast cancer after 1973 were excluded to minimize the possible confounding influence of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The cases had histologically confirmed leukemia reported to the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) between 1935 and 1984. A total of 48 cases of leukemia following breast cancer were included in the study. Two controls were individually matched to each leukemia case on the basis of age, calendar year when diagnosed with breast cancer, and survival time. Leukemia diagnoses were verified by one hematologist. Radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated by medical physicists on the basis of the original radiotherapy records of study subjects. Local radiation doses to each of the 16 bone marrow components for each patient were reconstructed; the dose averaged over the entire body was 530 rad (5.3 Gy). Based on this dosage and assuming a linear relationship between dose and affect, a relative risk (RR) in excess of 10 would have been expected. However, there was little evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of leukemia (RR = 1.16; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.6 to 2.1). The risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignancies without evidence for an association with ionizing radiation, was not significantly increased (RR = 1.8; n = 10); nor was the risk for all other forms of leukemia (RR = 1.0; n = 38). There was no indication that risk varied over categories of radiation dose

  19. A study to 3D dose measurement and evaluation for respiratory motion in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byeong Geol; Choi, Chang Heon; Yun, Il Gyu; Yang, Jin Seong; Lee, Dong Myeong; Park, Ju Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, VHS Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study aims to evaluate 3D dosimetric impact for MIP image and each phase image in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For each of 5 patients with non-small-cell pulmonary tumors, a respiration-correlated four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) study was performed . We obtain ten 3D CT images corresponding to phases of a breathing cycle. Treatment plans were generated using MIP CT image and each phases 3D CT. We performed the dose verification of the TPS with use of the Ion chamber and COMPASS. The dose distribution that were 3D reconstructed using MIP CT image compared with dose distribution on the corresponding phase of the 4D CT data. Gamma evaluation was performed to evaluate the accuracy of dose delivery for MIP CT data and 4D CT data of 5 patients. The average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 2 mm/2% about 99%. The average Homogeneity Index difference between MIP and each 3D data of patient dose was 0.03∼0.04. The average difference between PTV maximum dose was 3.30 cGy, The average different Spinal Coad dose was 3.30 cGy, The average of difference with V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 5} of Lung was -0.04%∼2.32%. The average Homogeneity Index difference between MIP and each phase 3D data of all patient was -0.03∼0.03. The average PTV maximum dose difference was minimum for 10% phase and maximum for 70% phase. The average Spain cord maximum dose difference was minimum for 0% phase and maximum for 50% phase. The average difference of V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 5} of Lung show bo certain trend. There is no tendency of dose difference between MIP with 3D CT data of each phase. But there are appreciable difference for specific phase. It is need to study about patient group which has similar tumor location and breathing motion. Then we compare with dose distribution for each phase 3D image data or MIP image data. we will determine appropriate image data for treatment plan.

  20. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Flannery, J.T.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Incidence of second primary cancers was evaluated in 7,127 women with invasive cancer of the cervix uteri, diagnosed between 1935 and 1978, and followed up to 38 years (average, 8.9 yr) in Connecticut. Among 5,997 women treated with radiation, 449 developed second primary cancers compared with 313 expected (relative risk . 1.4) on the basis of rates from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Excess incidence was noticeable 15 years or more after radiotherapy and attributed mostly to cancers of sites in or near the radiation field, especially the bladder, kidneys, rectum, corpus uteri, and ovaries. No excess was found for these sites among the 1,130 nonirradiated women. The ratio of observed to expected cancers for these sites did not vary appreciably by age at irradiation. The data suggested that high-dose pelvic irradiation was associated with increase in cancers of the bladder, kidneys, rectum, ovaries, corpus uteri, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma but, apparently, not leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, or colon cancer

  1. Quadrantectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriele, A.M.; Boidi Trotti, A.; Tardy, A.

    1987-01-01

    The conservative treatment of early breast cancer always requires irradiation of residual mammary tissue. The preliminary results obtained in 45 early breast cancer patients, who received quadrantectomy plus axillary dissection, followed by radiation of residual breast are reported. Radiation was performed by the two opposed field technique. In some cases the residual breast tissue was compressed using a special accessory provided with the Theratron 780. In addition to the tumor dose of 50 GY, 10 GY boots was added to the surgical scar using 7 MeV electrons. The 6 patients with positive axillary nodes received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF) after radiotherapy. All patients are currently alive and free of disease. The 64% (29 patients) were followed up for at least 5 years, and 36% (16 patients) for at least 3 years. Only 2 cases of local recurrence were encountered (4,4%). The esthetic result was satisfactory in all cases. No side effects due to treatment were noted

  2. Small cell lung cancer: chemo- and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drings, P.

    1992-01-01

    Small-Cell Lung Cancer - Chemo- and Radiotherapy: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) should be regarded as a systematic disease for which systematic therapy, i.e. chemotherapy, is considered as the cornerstone of treatment. Combination chemotherapy consisting of 2 or mostly 3 active drugs, given at an adequate dose, should be used. Thoracic radiation therapy promises both survival and local-regional control benefits to patients though its optimal role remains to be definitively established. The results of treatment have reached a plateau with a remission rate of up to 90% in stage 'limited disease' and 60% in stage 'extensive disease'. But considering long-term results diseasefree survival and cure only seem possible in 5-10% of patients with limited disease. (orig.) [de

  3. External radiotherapy in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    In the management of thyroid carcinoma (TC) of any histological type, surgery is the primary mode of treatment. The second modality for the management is treatment with radioactive iodine ( 131 I), especially, when the tumor has the ability to concentrate 131 I. External radiotherapy has a limited use in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). It is useful in the management of bulky residual tissue which is not completely resected, metastatic disease which does not concentrated radioiodine and as a palliative treatment for reliving pain in patients with distant metastases. The ER as an adjuvant treatment in both anaplastic and medullary carcinoma has a significant role to play and should be used more frequently than is presently being advocated and practiced

  4. Radiotherapy following bronchial artery infusion (BAI) chemotherapy for lung cancer. Analysis of long-term treatment results of 168 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaji, Noriaki

    1995-01-01

    Local control is known to contribute to a better survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Radiotherapy with bronchial artery infusion (BAI) of anticancer agents was employed to improve the response rate and prognosis of lung cancer. One hundred and sixty-eight patients of lung cancer were treated by this combined therapy. There were 138 with NSCLC and 30 with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of NSCLC was 11.3% and median survival time (MST) was 12 months. The response rate of 84% was obtained by this combined therapy. CR cases showed a better result of 35% of 5-year survival. Histology did not influence survival. Stage IIIA patients showed a significantly better survival than stage IIIB patients (p<0.05). No significant difference in survival was observed in the MMC/ADM group and the CDDP group. In SCLC patients, the overall cumulative 5-year survival was 4% and MST was 12 months. In limited disease (LD) group, MST was 13 months and extensive disease (ED) showed 11 months of MST. Two-year survival of LD was 18%. The response rate of this combined therapy was 94% and CR rate was 31%. On patterns of failure, the lower local recurrence rate of 6% (1/18) suggested contribution of BAI in SCLC. However, the long-term survival of SCLC was not greatly improved by radiotherapy combined with BAI. Thus these results suggest that it is necessary for improvement of survival to achieve CR in NSCLC patients, but local control may not contribute to it in SCLC patients. (author)

  5. Costs of conventional radical radiotherapy versus continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer or carcinoma of the bronchus. Medical Research Council CHART Steering Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, D; Drummond, M F

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the costs of treatment with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) and those of conventional radiotherapy for patients with (1) head and neck cancer and (2) carcinoma of the bronchus. The study was conducted concurrently with two multicentre randomized controlled trials. Data were collected on the use of hospital and community service resources and patients' travel for treatment. Data on resource use up to 3 months after entry to the study were available for 526 head and neck patients (314 receiving CHART and 212 conventional therapy) and 284 bronchus patients (175 CHART and 109 conventional therapy). For patients with head and neck cancer, CHART cost Pounds 1092 (P hostel facilities. The results of this cost analysis will help to facilitate a decision about whether the benefits of CHART, as determined by the clinical trials, are worth the additional costs of hospital-based resource use. The collection of detailed patient-specific resource-use data from a number of centres allows the determination of ways for reducing the cost differential between therapies and making CHART a more cost effective treatment alternative.

  6. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for the palliation of advanced head and neck cancer in patients unsuitable for curative treatment - 'Hypo Trial'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porceddu, Sandro V.; Rosser, Brenda; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Jones, Mark; Hickey, Brigid; Baumann, Kacy; Gogna, Kumar; Pullar, Andrew; Poulsen, Michael; Holt, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The primary purpose of the trial was to assess rate of tumour response to a hypofractionated course of radiotherapy in patients with incurable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Secondary objectives included radiation toxicity, symptom control, quality of life (QoL) and progression-free and overall survival. Patients and methods: Patients were planned to receive 30 Gy in 5 fractions at 2/week, at least 3 days apart, with an additional boost of 6 Gy for small volume disease (≤3 cm) in suitable patients. Thirty-seven patients were enrolled between August 2004 and March 2006. Median age was 68 (43-87) years, 81% were male and the predominant primary site was oropharynx (32%). The majority (73%) presented with Stage III-IV disease. Results: Thirty-five patients received radiotherapy, 1 died prior to treatment and one refused treatment. Of the 35 patients receiving radiotherapy, 31 (88%) received ≥30 Gy. Of the 35 patients who received treatment the overall objective response was 80%. Grade 3 mucositis and dysphagia were experienced in 9/35 (26%) and 4/35 (11%), respectively. QoL and symptom control were assessable in 21 patients. Thirteen (62%) reported an overall improvement in QoL and 14 (67%) experienced an improvement in pain. The median time to progression and death was 3.9 and 6.1 months, respectively. Conclusion: The 'Hypo Trial' regimen provided effective palliative treatment in HNSCC unsuitable for curative treatment. Compliance was excellent and resulted in high response rates, symptom control and improvement in QoL with acceptable toxicity. However, progression free and overall survival was short

  7. Systemic treatment after whole-brain radiotherapy may improve survival in RPA class II/III breast cancer patients with brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xiaoli; Ma, Jinli; Cai, Gang; Yang, Zhaozhi; Cao, Lu; Chen, Xingxing; Guo, Xiaomao; Chen, Jiayi

    2013-09-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the most widely used treatment for brain metastasis (BM), especially for patients with multiple intracranial lesions. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of systemic treatments following WBRT in breast cancer patients with BM who had different clinical characteristics, based on the classification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and the breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (Breast-GPA). One hundred and one breast cancer patients with BM treated between 2006 and 2010 were analyzed. The median interval between breast cancer diagnosis and identification of BM in the triple-negative patients was shorter than in the luminal A subtype (26 vs. 36 months, respectively; P = 0.021). Univariate analysis indicated that age at BM diagnosis, Karnofsky performance status/recursive partitioning analysis (KPS/RPA) classes, number of BMs, primary tumor control, extracranial metastases and systemic treatment following WBRT were significant prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) (P RPA classes and systemic treatments following WBRT remained the significant prognostic factors for OS. For RPA class I, the median survival with and without systemic treatments following WBRT was 25 and 22 months, respectively (P = 0.819), while for RPA class II/III systemic treatments significantly improved OS from 7 and 2 months to 11 and 5 months, respectively (P RPA class II/III patients.

  8. Peptides for radiotherapy of neuroendocrine cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez A, L.

    2002-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a resurgence of interest in therapeutic nuclear medicine, due to the limitation of conventional or external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of secondary or metastatic cancer sites outside of the primary treatment area. Some of the human tumours that produce metastases express high levels of somatostatin receptors. In order to make possible the diagnostic and radiotherapeutic treatment of these kind of tumours, various somatostatin analogue peptides have been developed in recent years. Peptides have become an important class of radiopharmaceuticals,due to its unique ability to detect specific sites as receptors or enzymes. This paper describes the work with 99m Tc to establish the labelling and analytical conditions for a somatostatin analogue as a precursor, to undertake a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical labelled with 188 Re for treatment of somatostatin receptor positive tumours. (Author)

  9. Delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuta, Atsushi; Tatematsu, Masanori; Ishinaga, Hajime; Harada, Teruhiko; Majima, Yuichi [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    Seven cases of delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for early staged head and neck cancers during 1989 and 1999 were evaluated (aged 54-77 yrs, 6 male and a female). The cases included five glottic laryngeal cancers (T1a, T1b, and three T2), a subglottic laryngeal cancer, and an unknown origin, but strongly suspected laryngeal cancer, with neck metastasis. Radio injury was found from 3 months to 47 months after radiotherapy. {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy was used in all seven cases, although {sup 60}Co radionuclide was changed to Liniac in 1997. The total dose was 60 Gy for 3 cases, and 70 Gy for 4 cases. Tracheostomy was performed in 3 cases due to bilateral vocal cord impairment. Background, treatment, and response to radiotherapy were compared to those of 90 patients of a control group with early staged laryngeal cancer who did not fail radiation injury during the same period. As a result, radionuclide ({sup 60}Co), total dose, cervical surgery, antiinflammatory drugs, laryngeal edema during radiotherapy were risk factors. The intensity and the period of mucositis by radiotherapy was important for indicating delayed airway stenosis. (author)

  10. Delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuta, Atsushi; Tatematsu, Masanori; Ishinaga, Hajime; Harada, Teruhiko; Majima, Yuichi

    2002-01-01

    Seven cases of delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for early staged head and neck cancers during 1989 and 1999 were evaluated (aged 54-77 yrs, 6 male and a female). The cases included five glottic laryngeal cancers (T1a, T1b, and three T2), a subglottic laryngeal cancer, and an unknown origin, but strongly suspected laryngeal cancer, with neck metastasis. Radio injury was found from 3 months to 47 months after radiotherapy. 60 Co for radiotherapy was used in all seven cases, although 60 Co radionuclide was changed to Liniac in 1997. The total dose was 60 Gy for 3 cases, and 70 Gy for 4 cases. Tracheostomy was performed in 3 cases due to bilateral vocal cord impairment. Background, treatment, and response to radiotherapy were compared to those of 90 patients of a control group with early staged laryngeal cancer who did not fail radiation injury during the same period. As a result, radionuclide ( 60 Co), total dose, cervical surgery, antiinflammatory drugs, laryngeal edema during radiotherapy were risk factors. The intensity and the period of mucositis by radiotherapy was important for indicating delayed airway stenosis. (author)

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy and treatment at a high volume facility is associated with improved survival in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshy, Matthew; Malik, Renuka; Mahmood, Usama; Husain, Zain; Sher, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NoTx), conventional fractionated radiotherapy (ConvRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. This population based cohort also allowed us to examine what facility level characteristics contributed to improved outcomes. Methods: We included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n = 13,036). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The median follow up was 68 months (interquartile range: 35–83 months) in surviving patients. Among the cohort, 52% received NoTx, 41% received ConvRT and 6% received SBRT. The 3-year OS was 28% for NoTx, 36% for ConvRT radiotherapy, and 48% for the SBRT cohort (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for SBRT and ConvRT were 0.67 and 0.77, respectively, as compared to NoTx (1.0 ref) (p < 0.0001). Patients treated at a high volume facility vs. low volume facility had a hazard ratio of 0.94 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with early stage inoperable lung cancer treated with SBRT and at a high volume facility had a survival benefit compared to patients treated with ConvRT or NoTx or to those treated at a low volume facility

  12. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.kr [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eui-Don [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3-4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154-0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m{sup 2} chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m{sup 2} regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  13. Health-related quality of life and treatment outcomes for men with prostate cancer treated by combined external-beam radiotherapy and hormone therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Azuma, Kouji; Koizumi, Takahiro; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru

    2005-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) is important when considering the treatment options for prostate cancer. From 1992 to 1998, 57 patients were treated by radiotherapy plus hormone therapy (median age, 79 years; median prostate-specific antigen concentration, 15.0 ng/ml; median radiotherapy dosage, 60 Gy). General HR-QOL was measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer QOL Questionnaire, and a newly developed disease-specific QOL survey was used to assess urinary and bowel functions. QOL was also measured in a control group of patients admitted for prostate biopsy. The general HR-QOL scores in the radiation group ranged from 70.0 to 91.3, with sexual problems showing the lowest (i.e., worst) score (38.5). Compared with the control group, the scores in the radiation group were worse for physical function and sexual problems. For disease-specific QOL, the radiation group had worse urinary function than controls, but were more satisfied with their urinary function. There was no difference between the radiation group and controls in satisfaction with bowel function. When the control group was subdivided at into two groups: age 75 years or less, and age over 75 years, the QOL score in the radiation group was the same as that in the subgroup aged over 75 years. In subgroups of the radiation patients, according to survey period, there was no difference between the first and last surveys in longitudinal HR-QOL evaluations. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 67.6% and 41.6%, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were 97.9% and 94.7%. The combination of radiotherapy and hormone therapy has a good outcome and patients do not experience poor HR-QOL, except for sexual problems. Moreover, the disease-specific QOL is good, especially for urinary bother. (author)

  14. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, K.M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2000-01-01

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  15. Technological advances in radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lorraine; Morgia, Marita; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2011-09-01

    To discuss the important technological advances that have taken place in the planning and delivery of both external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, and the implications for improved clinical outcomes. Technological advances in external beam radiation treatment and brachytherapy for patients with cervical cancer allow more precise targeting of tumour and relative sparing of surrounding normal organs and tissues. Early evidence is emerging to indicate that these advances will translate into improvements in tumour control and reduced side effects. However, there are patient, tumour and treatment-related factors that can detract from these benefits. Foremost among these is complex, unpredictable and sometimes dramatic internal tumour and normal organ motion during treatment. The focus of current research and clinical development is on tracking internal anatomic change in individual patients and adapting treatment plans as required to assure that optimal tumour coverage and normal tissue sparing is maintained at all times. The success of this approach will depend on clear definitions of target volumes, high resolution daily soft tissue imaging, and new software tools for rapid contouring, treatment planning and quality assurance. Radiation treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer is evolving rapidly, driven by advances in technology, towards more individualized patient care that has the potential to substantially improve clinical outcomes.

  16. Sparing of the submandibular glands by intensity modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarilahti, Kauko; Kouri, Mauri; Collan, Juhani; Kangasmaeki, Aki; Atula, Timo; Joensuu, Heikki; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: The submandibular glands produce most of the unstimulated saliva output and are the key in prevention of radiation-related xerostomia. We investigated whether sparing of the submandibular function is feasible with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and methods: Thirty-six patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer were treated with IMRT and had at least one parotid gland excluded from the planning target volume. In a subset, of these patients (n=18) where the risk of cancer recurrence in the contralateral submandibular region was judged low, the contralateral submandibular gland was spared from full-dose irradiation. The total unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates and adverse effects were monitored. Results: Twelve months following IMRT mean unstimulated saliva flow was 60% of the baseline value among patients who had one submandibular gland spared and 25% among those who did not (P=0.006). Patients whose contralateral submandibular was spared reported less grade two or three xerostomia (4 vs. 11; P=0.018), and used less saliva substitutes. No cancer recurrences were detected at the vicinity of the spared glands during a median follow-up time of 31 months. Conclusions: Submandibular gland sparing with IMRT is safe in selected patients treated for head and neck cancer. It is effective in prevention of radiation-associated xerostomia

  17. The effect on the radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life and the related health education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xinli

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important means of cervical cancer, due to the specificity of tumor site and side effect of radiotherapy, lack of knowledge of radiotherapy for patients and relatives about the disease, It is particularly important during radiotherapy on health education. By the analysis of radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life, it is the purpose of patients during the period of radiotherapy of whole course health education. Including before radiotherapy, radiotherapy in health education and the guide of the leaving hospital. In order to improve the compliance of patients, reduce the complications. Further it is improved the clinical treatment effect. (author)

  18. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum; Radiotherapie des cancers cutanes au cours du xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, route Majida-Bouleila, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  19. Radiotherapy treatment results of bladder cancer: study of 458 patients. Resultados del tratamiento radioterapico en cancer de vejiga: estudio retrospectivo de 458 pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vara Santos, J.; Torre Tomas, A. de la; Romero Fernandez, J.; Regueiro Otero, C.; Clavo Varas, B.; Magallan Sebastian, R.; Valcarcel Sancho, F.; Polo Tolosana, E.; Aragon de la Cruz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1964 to 1990, 458 patients diagnosed of bladder cancer have been treated with radical radiotherapy in our department. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial survival rates were 37% and 27% respectively. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial local control rates, evaluated in 404 patients, were 41% and 38%. In regard to survival, T stage (p=0.013), advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p>0.0001), and squamous differentiation (p<0.0001), reached statistical significance as adverse prognostic factors. In 248 patients, with invasive transitional carcinoma, radical radiotherapy alone was used. In this group of patients, T stage (p=0.006) and advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p=0.0002) were adverse prognostic factors for survival. Our results suggest that radical radiotherapy must be considered and alternative to surgery in management of bladder cancer. On the basis of prognostic factors evidenced in this series a subgroup of patients with low probability of survival when treated with exclusive radiotherapy are defined. This patients must be included in clinical research protocols. (Author) 44 refs.

  20. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiotherapy. Treatment feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.G.; Martin, T.; Kolotas, C.; Hey, S.; Schneider, L.; Templin, T.; Zamboglou, N.; Dornoff, W.; Kettner, H.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The anti-neoplastic effect of paclitaxel has been demonstrated in various clinical studies in different malignant diseases. Clinical studies have also demonstrated a greater efficacy for simultaneous radio-chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy alone when using radiosensitizing drugs. Based on these clinical and in-vitro data we initiated several pilot studies using paclitaxel as a radiosensitizing agent and we now present our initial experience in its use in a combined modality protocol, radiation and simultaneous chemotherapy with paclitaxel. Methods: I. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): In a phase-I-study we applicated paclitaxel (45 to 65 mg/m 2 ) as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 3 to 7 weeks simultaneously with primary radiotherapy in shrinking field technique with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 59.4 Gy. - II. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation for breast cancer as neoadjuvant or palliative: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 6 weeks simultaneous with neoadjuvant or palliative radiotherapy of the breast/chest wall with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 54.0 Gy. - III./IV. Concurrent paclitaxel/carboplatin and combined radiation (EBRT+brachytherapy) for locally advanced inoperable cancer of the cervix: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 5 weeks, 50 mg/m 2 carboplatin at day 1 to 5 in week 1 and 5 simultaneously with external beam radiotherapy of the pelvis with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 54.0 Gy and endocavitary LDR-brachytherapy (4x5 Gy). - V. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation for locally advanced inoperable cancer of the bladder: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 5 weeks simultaneous with radiotherapy of the pelvis with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 50.4 Gy. VI. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation in locally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 7 to 8 weeks simultaneous with radiotherapy in shrinking field technique

  1. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, M.V.; Silveira Filho, L.; Martorelli Filho, B.

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement [pt

  2. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederman, M V; Silveira Filho, L; Martorelli Filho, B [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement.

  3. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto

    2015-01-01

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  4. Breast cancer in elderly person: which role for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, S.; Cutuli, B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors briefly discuss the issue and practices of treatment of elderly women suffering from breast cancer. Even if radiotherapy is sometimes forgotten in such cases, disease characteristics and the tolerance capacity of the patient must be considered before implementing treatment protocols. Short communication

  5. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is not associated with increased risk of cied implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J. B.; Rehammar, J. C.; Jorgensen, O. D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an important treatment in early stage breast cancer but it is claimed that radiotherapy causes damage to the cardiac conduction system and increases the risk implantation of CIED (pacemaker or ICD). However, this paradigm is based on smaller series of case reports. Due...... to the anatomy, radiotherapy will potential mainly affect the conduction system in left sided breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk of implantation of a CIED subsequent to radiotherapy for breast cancer by comparing left- versus right sided radiotherapy in a nationwide cohort. Methods: From...... the database of the Danish Breast Cancer Collaborative Group, we identified women treated with radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark from 1982 to 2005. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on CIED implants subsequent to radiotherapy. The rate...

  6. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Byung Chul; Jeung, Kyung Min; Lee, Seong Uk; Bae, Yeong Geol; Na, Hyun Seok

    2013-01-01

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  7. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Byung Chul; Jeung, Kyung Min; Lee, Seong Uk; Bae, Yeong Geol; Na, Hyun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  8. Comparison of two dimensional and three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Elena M.; Joy Williams, Frances; Ethan Lyn, Basil; Aird, Edwin G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer being treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less (CHARTWEL) were planned and treated with a three dimensional (3D) conformal protocol and comparison made with two dimensional (2D) planning, as used previously, to compare past practice and methods. Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients were planned initially using 3D and then replanned using a 2D system. The 2D plans were transferred onto the 3D system and recalculated. Dose volume histograms could then be constructed of planning target volumes for phases 1 and 2 (PTV 1 and 2, respectively), lung and spinal cord for the 2D plans and compared with the 3D plans. Results: There was a significantly lower absolute dose to the isocentre with 2D compared to 3D planning with dose reductions of 3.9% for phase 1, 4.4% for phase 2 and 4.7% for those treated with a single phase. Maximum dose to spinal cord was greater in 17 of the 24 2D plans with a median dose reduction of 0.82 Gy for 3D (P=0.04). The percentage volume of whole lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V 20 ) was greater in 16 of the 24 2D plans with a median reduction in V 20 of 2.4% for 3D (P=0.03). Conclusions: A lower dose to tumour was obtained using 2D planning due to the method of dose calculation and spinal cord and lung doses were significantly higher

  9. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  10. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mehta, Minesh P.; Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [de

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27–91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3–135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia ≥Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  13. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Linz Univ. (Austria). Medical Faculty; Roach, Mack III [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Van As, Nicholas (ed.) [The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  14. Breast cancer in elderly person: which role for radiotherapy; Cancer du sein chez la personne agee: place de la radiotherapie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, S. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Lille (France); Cutuli, B. [ICC Reims, Reims (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors briefly discuss the issue and practices of treatment of elderly women suffering from breast cancer. Even if radiotherapy is sometimes forgotten in such cases, disease characteristics and the tolerance capacity of the patient must be considered before implementing treatment protocols. Short communication

  15. A prospective study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET on CT-based radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Trevor; Everitt, Craig; Yuen, Kally; Condron, Sara; Hui, Andrew; Ngan, Samuel Y.K.; Pitman, Alexander; Lau, Eddie W.F.; MacManus, Michael; Binns, David; Ackerly, Trevor; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study sought to determine how the use of combined PET/CT for radiotherapy treatment planning of oesophageal cancer would alter the delineation of tumour volumes compared to CT alone if PET/CT is assumed to more accurately represent true disease extent. Patients and methods: All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning in the radiotherapy treatment position. For each patient, two separate gross tumour volumes (GTV) were defined, one based on CT images alone (GTV-CT) and another based on combined PET/CT data (GTV-PET). Corresponding planning target volumes (PTV) were generated, and separate treatment plans were then produced. For each patient, volumetric analysis of GTV-CT, PTV-CT and GTV-PET was performed to quantify the proportion of PET-avid disease that was not included in the GTV and PTV (geographic miss) if CT data alone were used for radiotherapy planning. Assessment of the cranial and caudal extent of the primary oesophageal tumour as defined by CT alone vs PET/CT was also compared. Results: The addition of PET information altered the clinical stage in 8 of 21 eligible patients enrolled on the study (38%); 4 patients had distant metastatic disease and 4 had unsuspected regional nodal disease. Sixteen patients proceeded to the radiotherapy planning phase of the study and received definitive chemoradiation planned with the PET/CT data set. The GTV based on CT information alone excluded PET-avid disease in 11 patients (69%), and in five patients (31%) this would have resulted in a geographic miss of gross tumour. The discordance between CT and PET/CT was due mainly to differences in defining the longitudinal extent of disease in the oesophagus. The cranial extent of the primary tumour as defined by CT vs PET/CT differed in 75% of cases, while the caudal extent differed in 81%. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that if combined PET/CT is used for radiotherapy treatment planning, there may be alterations to the delineation

  16. Chronic fatigue in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinska, M.; Wojtukiewicz, M.Z.; Tokajuk, P.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and profound symptoms related to both malignancy and anti-neoplastic treatment. It is being reported in 60% to 80% of cancer patients. We review the correlation between the cancer-related fatigue syndrome and radiotherapy. In patients undergoing radiotherapy, fatigue is often cumulative and may reach its peak during the last weeks of treatment. The presence of fatigue prior to therapy initiation is the most important predictive factor of the occurrence of radiotherapy-related cancer fatigue syndrome. Occasionally, fatigue persists for a prolonged period of months and even years beyond radiotherapy. Anemia may be one of major causative factors responsible for the development of the cancer-related fatigue syndrome. Fatigue has an enormous physical, mental, emotional, and economic impact on cancer patients, their families and care-providers. The treatment of radiation-related fatigue remains unknown. The initial approach should cover efforts aimed at the correction of potential etiologies, especially anemia. Education concerning fatigue greatly benefits some patients. It seems that exercise may be beneficial in relieving fatigue, bearing in mind that the exercise program for cancer patients should be initiated gradually and significantly individualized. (author)

  17. Intraoperative radiotherapy as a protocol for the treatment of initial breast cancer; Radioterapia intraoperatoria como protocolo de tratamento do cancer de mama inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo de Morais, E-mail: sbromberg@terra.com.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2013-07-01

    To report on preliminary outcomes of single-dose intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer based on local recurrence rates and complications. Methods: fifty postmenopausal women with ≤2.5cm breast tumors and clinically normal axillary lymph nodes were submitted to quadrantectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and intraoperative radiotherapy and studied. Mean follow-up time was 52.1 months. Results: mean patient age was 65.5 years; mean tumor diameter was 1.41cm 82% of nodules were hormonal receptor positive and HER-2negative. All patients received a 21 Gy radiation dose for a mean time of 8.97 minutes. Distant metastases were not observed. Local recurrence was documented in three cases, with identical histological diagnosis as the primary tumors. Thirty-five (70%) patients had local fibrosis, with gradual improvement and complete resolution over 18 months. Postoperative infection and seroma formation were not observed. Conclusion: partial radiotherapy is a potentially feasible and promising technique. Careful patient selection is recommended before a longer follow-up period has elapsed to confirm intraoperative radiotherapy safety and efficacy. (author)

  18. Prostate cancer: Doses and volumes of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Rivera, S.; Quero, L.; Latorzeff, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is nowadays a major therapeutic option in prostate cancer. Technological improvements allowed dose escalation without increasing late toxicity. Some randomized trials have shown that dose escalation decreases the biochemical failure rate, without any benefit in survival with the present follow-up. However, some studies indicate that the distant metastases rate is also decreased. Most of these studies have been done without hormonal treatment, and the role of dose escalation in case of long-term androgen deprivation is unknown. The target volume encompassed the whole gland: however, complete or partial focal treatment of the prostate can be done with sophisticated IMRT technique and must be evaluated. Proximal part of the seminal vesicles must be included in the target volumes. The role of nodal irradiation is another debate, but it could be logically proposed for the unfavourable group. (authors)

  19. Radiotherapy for superficial esophageal cancer of poor risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Tachimori, Yuji; Kato, Hoichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tokuue, Kouichi; Sumi, Minako; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Imai, Atsushi; Nakayama, Shuji

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The reported incidence of superficial esophageal cancer (SEC) has steadily increased in Japan as result of endoscopic examination has been become common. In Japan, treatment of SEC is endoscopical mucosal resection (EMR) for mucosal cancer or esophagectomy with 3 fields lymph nodes resection for submucosal cancer. Radiotherapy is little place for the management of SEC. Because of some reasons, we treated patients with SEC by radiotherapy alternative to surgery. Purpose of this report is to evaluate efficacy of radiotherapy for SEC. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 to 1996, eighteen patients with SEC were treated with radiotherapy at our hospital. Reasons of radiotherapy that was chosen as the primary methods of treatment were refusal of surgery in one patient, poor medical condition in 4 patients and double primary cancer in 13 patients (head and neck: 11, simultaneously: 11). No patients had indication of EMR. Diagnosis was made by endoscopy and radiography. Some patients were examined with endoscopic ultrasound. Two patients (11.1%) had tumor limited to the mucosa and 16 patients (88.9%) had tumor invaded the submucosa. Seven of these tumors (38.9%) were multicentric. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma. There were 17 male patients and one female patient. The age range was 49 years to 87 years with a median of 62 years. Stage of all patients was T1N0M0 according to UICC staging system. Ten patients underwent external radiotherapy (Ex) (50 Gy - 66 Gy) alone and 8 patients did both Ex and intracavitary radiotherapy (IC) (30-60 Gy of Ex with 5-15 Gy of IC). No patients received chemotherapy. Duration of follow-up was 6 months to 96 months with a median of 30 months. Results: The overall survival rate was 55.9% in 3-year and 14% in 5-year, and the cause-specific 5-year survival rate was 100%. Causes of death were malignant tumor other than esophageal cancer in 4 patients, intercurrent disease other than malignant tumor in 3 patients and no

  20. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body's ability to fight ...

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. Z.; Chun, H. C.; Kim, I. S.; Chung, T. J. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Radical gastrectomy is main treatment of gastric cancer. We analyzed patients with stage III and IV stomach cancer who had radical operation and received postoperative radiation therapy combined with or without chemotherapy retrospectively. From March 1985 to June 1993, 68 patients treated with curative resection and received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy with 36Gy or more were evaluated. Median age was 60years(range 28-66 yrs). Thirty seven patients had non signet ring adenocarcinoma, 29 signet ring cell, 2 other cell. Patients with stage IIIA, IIIB, IV disease were 19, 25 and 24 respectively. Chemotherapy was given to all patients except two. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate were 36.6% and 33.6T, respectively. Recurrence was documented in 34 patients. High recurrence was seen in omentum and peritoneum with 23.5%, and remnant stomach, anastomosis site, A-loop and E-loop had also high recurrence with 13.2%. In field locoregional recurrence was 20.7% and total distant metastases were 39.7%. Total intraabdominal failure was 47.1% and extraabdominal failure was 13.2%. Treatment toxicity was considered to be acceptable. 22.1% of patients had grade 3 and only 1 patient had grade 4 leukopenia. Six patients(8.8%) had weigh loss more than 10%. Treatment toxicity was acceptable with combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Locoregional recurrence was relatively low compared to distant failure with addition of irradiation. Peritoneal and omental seeding was high. Five-year survival was increased with combined modality. Radiation may eradicate minimal residual disease and improve survival. Furthermore to reduce intraabdominal failure, role of intraabdominal chemotherapy in addition to combined chemotherapy plus radiation has to be explored. (author).

  2. Radiotherapy effect in conservation treatment for breast cancer. Efecto de la radioterapia sobre los resultados esteticos del tratamiento conservados del cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachini, V; Ferreri, A J.M.; Farante, G; Agresti, R; Galimberti, V; Zurrida, S; Veronesi, P [Instituto Nazionale per los Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan (Italy)

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) in conservative treatment for breast cancer (CT-BC) has been proven to be determinant for the local control of the disease. Radiation therapy is an important factor affecting the cosmetic results of this treatment. Technical progress in RT, use of filters and wedges and an increased knowledge of the influence of fraction size total dose and irradiated volume on breast tissues contributed to avoid major radiotherapeutic side effects in the CT-BC. Cosmetic outcome from 2 groups of patients (pts) with breast cancer in stage T 1-2(T> = 2,5 cm) N 0-1 M o0 of the prospective trial Milan III were compared. Both groups pts (n=89) were treated with quadrantectomyand axillary dissection. 49 pts received complementary RT with a dose of 50 Gy over 5 weeks with a daily fraction of 2 Gy and a further boost of 10 Gy (10 MeV electrons) on the scar. Remaining 40 pts did not receive RT. Cosmetic results were evaluated. No significant cosmetic differences were observed. A good or excellent symmetry was observed in 59% of irradiated pts and 64% of non irradiated pts. Negative results were observed in 4% and 2% respectively. Subjective ovulation showed similar results, with a good or excellent symmetry in 57% of irradiated pts and 72.5% of non irradiated pts. Poor results were observed in 16.3% and 27.5% respectively. Telangiectasia were observed in 4% of irradiated pts, while hypertrophied scars were only noted in non irradiated pts (15%). No acute side effects of RT, as erythema or ulceration of breast skin, were recorded. In our experience, the standard dose of 50 Gy administered by two opposite tangential fields plus a 10 Gy boost did not affect the cosmetic results of CT.BC, whereas it provided a better local control of disease. The possibility to avoid RT in selected group of pts should be justified by the discomfort of this treatment for the pt, cost analysis and lack of RT centers around the world rather cosmetic reasons. (Author)

  3. Phase I/II trial evaluating combined radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer--A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Bin S.; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Kernen, Kenneth; Chou, C.-C.; Shalev, Moshe; Vlachaki, Maria T.; Miles, Brian; Kadmon, Dov; Mai, W.-Y.; Caillouet, James; Davis, Maria; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas; Brady, Jett; Carpenter, L. Steve; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Woo, Shiao Y.; Thompson, Timothy; Butler, E. Brian

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To report the preliminary results of a Phase I/II study combining radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy (adenovirus/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/valacyclovir) with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Arm A: low-risk patients (T1-T2a, Gleason score <7, pretreatment PSA <10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy. A mean dose of 76 Gy was delivered to the prostate with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Arm B: high-risk patients (T2b-T3, Gleason score ≥7, pretreatment PSA ≥10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy and hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy was comprised of a 4-month leuprolide injection and 2-week use of flutamide. Arm C: Stage D1 (positive pelvic lymph node) patients received the same regimen as Arm B, with the additional 45 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program common toxicity score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity score. Results: Thirty patients (13 in Arm A, 14 in Arm B, and 3 in Arm C) completed the trial. Median follow-up was 5.5 months. Eleven patients (37%) developed flu-like symptoms (Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Grade 1) of fatigue and chills/rigors after gene therapy injection but recovered within 24 h. Four patients (13%) and 2 patients (7%) developed Grade 1 and 2 fever, respectively. There was no patient with weight loss. One patient in Arm B developed Grade 3 elevation in liver enzyme, whereas 11 and 2 patients developed Grade 1 and 2 abnormal liver function tests. There was no Grade 2 or above hematologic toxicity. Three patients had transient rise in creatinine. There was no RTOG Grade 3 or above lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Toxicity levels were as follows: 4 patients (13%), Grade 2; 6 patients (20%), Grade 1; and 20 patients (67%), no toxicity. There was 1 patient with RTOG Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, 12 patients (40%) with Grade 2, 8 patients

  4. Survey of factors underlying treatment choice for patients with localized prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy vs extrabeam radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Sakiko; Ota, Tomonori; Itaya, Naoshi; Maniwa, Akimitsu; Matsui, Takashi; Nishimura, Yoji; Shoji, Kazufusa

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding factors for decision-making on treatment by localized prostate cancer patients. We therefore conducted a survey series of cases for influence on treatment decision making, and also satisfaction after therapy. A total of 51 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) were mailed original questionnaires about their treatment decision-making factors and satisfaction and the results compared between the two groups. Some 48 (94.1%) patients responded to the questionnaire, 38 (79.2%) and 10 (20.8%) after RP and EBRT, respectively. The major factor determining the decision as to treatment approach was the physician in both groups (more than 90%). Excluding physicians, family or others were more important in the RP group than the EBRT group (p=0.023). RP group patients desired removal of their prostate for cancer control, while, EBRT group patients favored the less invasive approach in consideration of side effects. Over 80% patients indicated they would definitely or probably choose the same treatment again, although some of the RP group would switch to watchful-waiting because of sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence and the invasive nature of the procedure. Physicians are in a most important position to help patients understand prostate cancer and treatment, outcomes, and need to help them make their best choice, with appropriate follow up including mental care. (author)

  5. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jae Won

    1993-01-01

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60 Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  6. Young age under 60 years is not a contraindication to treatment with definitive dose escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klayton, Tracy L.; Ruth, Karen; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Kutikov, Alexander; Chen, David Y.T.; Sobczak, Mark; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is widely believed that younger prostate cancer patients are at greater risk of recurrence following radiotherapy (RT). Methods: From 1992 to 2007, 2168 (395 age ⩽60) men received conformal RT alone for prostate cancer at our institution (median dose = 76 Gy, range: 72–80). Multivariable analysis (MVA) was used to identify significant predictors for BF and PCSM. Cumulative incidence was estimated using the competing risk method (Fine and Gray) for BF (Phoenix definition) and PCSM to account for the competing risk of death. Results: With a median follow-up of 72.2 months (range: 24.0–205.1), 8-year BF was 27.1% for age ⩽60 vs. 23.7% for age >60 (p = 0.29). Eight-year PCSM was 3.0% for age ⩽60 vs. 2.0% for age >60 (p = 0.52). MVA for BF identified initial PSA [adjusted HR = 1.7 (PSA 10–20), 2.6 (PSA >20), p 12 months), p < 0.01] as significant, but not age or ADT <12 months. MVA for PCSM identified Gleason score [adjusted HR = 3.0 (G8–10), p = 0.01] and T-stage [adjusted HR = 8.7 (T3-4), p < 0.01] as significant, but not age, PSA, or ADT. Conclusion: This is the largest, most mature study of younger men treated with RT for prostate cancer that confirms young age is not prognostic for BF.

  7. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Di; Liang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  8. Adverse reactions of radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Treatment of radiation reactions in the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Czerżyńska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to painless nature and poorly specific symptoms, such as hoarseness or sore throat, head and neck cancers are usually diagnosed when the disease is locally advanced. A typical patient is older than 50 years. Low social awareness concerning the occurrence of these cancers and rare appointments with specialist physicians escalate the problem. As a result, patients usually seek medical advice when the disease is advanced and prognosis poor. The risk of these cancers increases by regular consumption of weak alcoholic beverages, cigarette smoking and infection with human papilloma virus. The head and neck location, which is a richly vascularised and innervated anatomic region, necessitates the application of highly specialised treatment, i.e. intensitymodulated radiation therapy. Radiation reactions can be divided into early (acute and late (chronic based on the time of occurrence. Early reactions include inflammation and fibrosis of the oral mucosa. Late reactions are more troublesome and persistent. They include: mandible necrosis or permanent impairment of salivary gland secretory function. The most common adverse effects of radiotherapy include mucositis. Patients irradiated for head and neck cancers usually suffer from persistent oral mucosa dryness that requires particular care and hygiene. Preventive measures in patients undergoing radiotherapy include: systematic plaque removal, using high-fluoride agents for oral hygiene, following a low-sugar diet and regular dental check-ups.

  9. Pregnancy and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kumiko

    2013-01-01

    Cancer in pregnancy is relatively uncommon but breast cancer is one of the most common malignancy occur with pregnancy. Prescribed doses of radiotherapy are significantly higher than those of diagnostic procedures. Fetal exposure and damage can occur during radiotherapy within target area. Because of those risks, radiotherapy during pregnancy is basically has to avoid. Even though, feral damage depends on fetal dose and has some threshold dose. Practically, even in stochastic effect, there are some minimal doses. A most important point is careful estimation of fetal dose before radiation. The physician has to inform the patient about risk and benefit of radiotherapy to fetus and to mother and have an ethical balance to help the mother and family to make a final decision. (author)

  10. Correlation of pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET tumor textural features with gene expression in pharyngeal cancer and implications for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shang-Wen [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University, School of Medicine, Taichung (China); Taipei Medical University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); China Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); Shen, Wei-Chih [China Medical University, Cancer Center and Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung (China); Asia University, Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, Taichung (China); Lin, Ying-Chun [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University and Academia Sinica, The Ph.D. Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, Taichung (China); Chen, Rui-Yun [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Taichung (China); Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yen, Kuo-Yang [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Kao, Chia-Hung [China Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); Asia University, Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Taichung (China)

    2017-04-15

    This study investigated the correlation of the matrix heterogeneity of tumors on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with gene-expression profiling in patients with pharyngeal cancer and determined the prognostic factors for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 57 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer who had completed definitive therapy. Four groups of the textural features as well as 31 indices were studied in addition to maximum standard uptake value, metastatic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis. Immunohistochemical data from pretreatment biopsy specimens (Glut1, CAIX, VEGF, HIF-1α, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, CLAUDIN-4, YAP-1, c-Met, and p16) were analyzed. The relationships between the indices and genomic expression were studied, and the robustness of various textural features relative to cause-specific survival and primary relapse-free survival was analyzed. The overexpression of VEGF was positively associated with the increased values of the matrix heterogeneity obtained using gray-level nonuniformity for zone (GLNUz) and run-length nonuniformity (RLNU). Advanced T stage (p = 0.01, hazard ratio [HR] = 3.38), a VEGF immunoreactive score of >2 (p = 0.03, HR = 2.79), and a higher GLNUz value (p = 0.04, HR = 2.51) were prognostic factors for low cause-specific survival, whereas advanced T stage, a HIF-1α staining percentage of ≥80%, and a higher GLNUz value were prognostic factors for low primary-relapse free survival. The overexpression of VEGF was associated with the increased matrix index of GLNUz and RLNU. For patients with pharyngeal cancer requiring radiotherapy, the treatment outcome can be stratified according to the textural features, T stage, and biomarkers. (orig.)

  11. Correlation of pretreatment 18F-FDG PET tumor textural features with gene expression in pharyngeal cancer and implications for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Shen, Wei-Chih; Lin, Ying-Chun; Chen, Rui-Yun; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the correlation of the matrix heterogeneity of tumors on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with gene-expression profiling in patients with pharyngeal cancer and determined the prognostic factors for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 57 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer who had completed definitive therapy. Four groups of the textural features as well as 31 indices were studied in addition to maximum standard uptake value, metastatic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis. Immunohistochemical data from pretreatment biopsy specimens (Glut1, CAIX, VEGF, HIF-1α, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, CLAUDIN-4, YAP-1, c-Met, and p16) were analyzed. The relationships between the indices and genomic expression were studied, and the robustness of various textural features relative to cause-specific survival and primary relapse-free survival was analyzed. The overexpression of VEGF was positively associated with the increased values of the matrix heterogeneity obtained using gray-level nonuniformity for zone (GLNUz) and run-length nonuniformity (RLNU). Advanced T stage (p = 0.01, hazard ratio [HR] = 3.38), a VEGF immunoreactive score of >2 (p = 0.03, HR = 2.79), and a higher GLNUz value (p = 0.04, HR = 2.51) were prognostic factors for low cause-specific survival, whereas advanced T stage, a HIF-1α staining percentage of ≥80%, and a higher GLNUz value were prognostic factors for low primary-relapse free survival. The overexpression of VEGF was associated with the increased matrix index of GLNUz and RLNU. For patients with pharyngeal cancer requiring radiotherapy, the treatment outcome can be stratified according to the textural features, T stage, and biomarkers.

  12. Cancer patients and delay in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausen, O.G.; Olofsson, J.; Rosengren, B.

    1989-01-01

    Radiotherapeutical resources in Norway are inadequate, which was further verified in this retrospective study of 73 patients with cancer of head and neck. The average duration of symptoms before the first ear-nose-throat examination was 153 days, and it took about 10 days after the examination to get the diagnosis. An unacceptably long time (mean 30 days) elapsed between the decision on therapy until the radiotherapy was initiated. There is no doubt that radiotherapy departments in Norway need better resources

  13. Cancer treatment: what's ahead?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.

    2005-01-01

    Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are standard modalities for cancer treatment. Biological therapy (immunotherapy, biotherapy, or biological response modifier therapy) is a comparatively novel addition to this armamentarium. Biological therapies use the body's immune system, either directly or indirectly, to fight cancer or to lessen the side effects that may be caused by some cancer treatments. Biological therapeutic agents include interferons, interleukins, colony-simulating factors, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and nonspecific immunomodulating agents. A promising form of cancer treatment is immunotherapy. Immunotherapy for cancer is essentially the stimulation of the immune system through a variety of reagents such as vaccines, infusion of T-cells, or cytokines. These reagents act through one of several mechanisms including stimulating the anti-tumour response, decreasing suppressor mechanisms, altering tumour cells to increase their immunogenicity and making them more susceptible to immunologic defenses, and improving tolerance to cytotoxic agents or radiotherapy. This review describes some novel approaches in the immunotherapy in cancer. (author)

  14. Validation of nonrigid registration for multi-tracer PET-CT treatment planning in rectal cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagmolen, Pieter; Roels, Sarah; Loeckx, Dirk; Haustermans, Karin; Maes, Frederik

    2009-02-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is to deliver maximal dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the surrounding tissue. This requires accurate target definition. In sites were the tumor is difficult to see on the CT images, such as for rectal cancer, PET-CT imaging can be used to better define the target. If the information from multiple PETCT images with different tracers needs to be combined, a nonrigid registration is indispensable to compensate for rectal tissue deformations. Such registration is complicated by the presence of different volumes of bowel gas in the images to be registered. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of different nonrigid registration approaches by looking at the overlap of manually delineated rectum contours after registration. Using a B-spline transformation model, the results for two similarity measures, sum of squared differences and mutual information, either calculated over the entire image or on a region of interest are compared. Finally, we also assess the effect of the registration direction. We show that the combination of MI with a region of interest is best able to cope with residual rectal contrast and differences in bowel filling. We also show that for optimal performance the registration direction should be chosen depending on the difference in bowel filling in the images to be registered.

  15. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldstein, Cora; Poetter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor; Doerr, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects. (orig.) [de

  16. Preoperative radiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIB cervix cancer. A retrospective analysis of histological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Trippe, N; Novaes, P.E.; Brandani, I.B.; Hanriot, R.; Souza, L.M.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Baraldi, H.E.; Maia, M.A.; Fogaroli, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    statistically different. Conclusions: The EBRT realized concomitant with two HDR weekly insertions of 6,0Gy at point A showed a reasonable complete histologically remission rate of the specimens. In other words, about 60% of the patients had no necessity to be underwent to surgery. The scheme of radiation therapy alone at our institution performs four HDR weekly insertion of 6,0Gy at point A, which would probably leads to a higher complete histologically remission rate. The time of follow up of some patients is still too short to conclude about the impact on overall and disease free survival with preoperative radiotherapy. Furthermore, future prospective and randomized trials will be necessary to compare the efficiency between preoperative radiotherapy and radiation therapy alone in the treatment of stage IIB cancer of the cervix

  17. Disease volume and distribution as drivers of treatment decisions in metastatic prostate cancer: From chemohormonal therapy to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of oligometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Ronak; Cheung, Patrick; Zukotynski, Katherine; Emmenegger, Urban

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis of men with metastatic, castration-sensitive prostate cancer (CSPC) depends on both the distribution and extent of metastases, among other things. Patients with low-volume or oligometastatic disease have improved survival compared with those with high-volume metastases. While chemohormonal therapy is the new standard of care for men with high-volume metastatic CSPC, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is emerging as a promising treatment option with low toxicity for the management of oligometastatic CSPC. Our review summarizes the current evidence on the role of SABR in oligometastatic prostate cancer. SABR shows control rates of metastases ranging from 88% to 100% at 6 months to 3 years, and progression-free survival commonly reported as >50% for the first 12 months. In addition, SABR may allow androgen-deprivation therapy to be delayed by more than 2 years in selected patients, minimizing the chronic side effects associated with such therapy. However, much still needs to be learned before SABR can be implemented as standard treatment for oligometastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chencharick, J.D.; Mossman, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient

  19. Patterns of Failure and Treatment-Related Toxicity in Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients Treated Using Extended Field Radiotherapy With Curative Intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Barkati, Maroie; Narayan, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in cervical cancer patients who had metastatic disease in common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent, using extended field radiotherapy (EFRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study involving 39 patients treated from January 1996 to June 2007, using EFRT with concurrent chemotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. EFRT consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Radiation to involved nodes was boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. Primary tumor radiation was boosted to a dose of 80 Gy using brachytherapy. Results: Overall, 30 patients (77%) have relapsed. The 5-year OS rate was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11-44). The 5-year DFS rate was 19.4% (95% CI, 8-35). Only 3 patients (7.5%) experienced treatment failure exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 patients underwent salvage treatment. Grade 3 to 4 acute bone marrow and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in 10 (26%) and 7 (18%) patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemotherapy and EFRT treatment was well tolerated. Most patients showed failure at multiple sites and outside the treatment field. Only 3/39 patients had failures exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 underwent salvage treatment.

  20. Biology of cancer and cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarin, R.; Prasad, D.

    2005-01-01

    It is evident that the better understanding of cancer biology coupled with technological advances have enabled clinicians to provide better care and more cures to their patients. However, most advanced cancers are not cured with the present methods of treatment and this provides the impetus for vigorous efforts for basic, translational and clinical research, and to develop, test and disseminate novel or cost effective technology

  1. The effects of radiotherapy and surgery on the sexual function of women treated for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flay, Linda D.; Matthews, John H.L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the short- and medium-term effects of pelvic radiotherapy and surgery on the sexual function of women treated for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixteen women with Stages I, II, or III disease referred for radiotherapy treatment were assessed. Six had undergone prior hysterectomy. The women were assessed with questionnaires prior to radiotherapy, at completion of radiotherapy, and at 6 weeks and 14 weeks after radiotherapy treatment. The clinical findings at routine follow-up were noted. Results: The study showed significant changes in sexual activity and satisfaction as a result of treatment. This was due to a number of physical and psychological factors. The level of sexual activity was lowest at completion of radiotherapy treatment. A feeling of vaginal shortening was the most frequent reason and was more common in women who were treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Dyspareunia, bleeding, and concern of bleeding and/or recurrence were all significant factors. Conclusions: The questionnaires were an effective way of assessing women's sexual function. Radiotherapy caused sexual dysfunction in one-half of women. Combined treatment with radiotherapy and surgery results in a higher risk than radiotherapy alone. Women with cervical cancer and undergoing radiotherapy treatment require considerable counseling and support

  2. Study of a bio-mechanical model of the movements and deformations of the pelvic organs and integration in the process of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azad, M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals of optimizing treatment planning of prostate cancer radiation therapy is to maintain the margins added to the clinical target volume (CTV) as small as possible to reduce the volumes of normal tissue irradiated. Several methods have been proposed to define these margins: 1) Methods based on the observation of movements obtained by different imaging systems, 2) The predictive methods of the movement of organs, from a model representing the motions of pelvis organs, a calculation of a margin can be made. We have developed and optimized a finite element bio-mechanical model of the prostate, bladder and rectum. This model describes the movement and deformation of the pelvic organs during the filling of certain organs such as the bladder and rectum. An evaluation of this model to predict the movement of the prostate during the various sessions of radiotherapy is shown using a series of CBCT images (Cone Beam Computerized Tomography). (author)

  3. Long-term results of ipsilateral radiotherapy for tonsil cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryoolk; Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of ipsilateral radiotherapy for the patient with well lateralized tonsil cancer: not cross midline and <1 cm of tumor invasion into the soft palate or base of tongue. From 2003 to 2011, twenty patients with well lateralized tonsil cancer underwent ipsilateral radiotherapy. Nineteen patients had T1-T2 tumors, and one patient had T3 tumor; twelve patients had N0-N2a disease and eight patients had N2b disease. Primary surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed in fourteen patients: four of these patients received chemotherapy. Four patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The remaining two patients received induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and definitive CCRT, respectively. No patient underwent radiotherapy alone. We analyzed the pattern of failure and complications. The median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 11 to 106 months) for surviving patients. One patient had local failure at tumor bed. There was no regional failure in contralateral neck, even in N2b disease. At five-year, local progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and progression-free survival rates were 95%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. One patient with treatment failure died, and the five-year overall survival rate was 95%. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia was found in one patient at least 6 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Ipsilateral radiotherapy is a reasonable treatment option for well lateralized tonsil cancer. Low rate of chronic xerostomia can be expected by sparing contralateral major salivary glands.

  4. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  5. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references

  6. Icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment in patients with brain metastases from EGFR-mutant nonsmall cell lung cancer: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ai-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Hai-Long; Gao, Feng; Lv, Yu-Feng

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect and toxicity of icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy (IWBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from nonsmall cell lung cancer (BMNSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant among Chinese Han population.A total of 55 patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC were included. They received orally icotinib (125 mg/tablet, 125 mg each time, 3 times daily) until disease progression. In addition, they also underwent whole-brain radiotherapy (3-Gy fractions once daily, 5 days weekly for a total dose of 30 Gy) in an attempt to extend their survival time. The outcomes consisted of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progress disease (PD), overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In addition, toxicity was also recorded in this study.The CR, PR, SD, PD, ORR, PFS, and OS were 38.2%, 52.8%, 5.4%, 3.6%, 90.1%, 12.5%, and 48.0% months, respectively. In addition, mild toxicity was observed in this study.This study demonstrated that IWBRT is efficacious with acceptable toxicity for patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC among Chinese Han population.

  7. Icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment in patients with brain metastases from EGFR-mutant nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ai-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Hai-Long; Gao, Feng; Lv, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to explore the effect and toxicity of icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy (IWBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from nonsmall cell lung cancer (BMNSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant among Chinese Han population. A total of 55 patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC were included. They received orally icotinib (125 mg/tablet, 125 mg each time, 3 times daily) until disease progression. In addition, they also underwent whole-brain radiotherapy (3-Gy fractions once daily, 5 days weekly for a total dose of 30 Gy) in an attempt to extend their survival time. The outcomes consisted of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progress disease (PD), overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In addition, toxicity was also recorded in this study. The CR, PR, SD, PD, ORR, PFS, and OS were 38.2%, 52.8%, 5.4%, 3.6%, 90.1%, 12.5%, and 48.0% months, respectively. In addition, mild toxicity was observed in this study. This study demonstrated that IWBRT is efficacious with acceptable toxicity for patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC among Chinese Han population. PMID:29642161

  8. How PET is changing the management of cancer with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, M.

    2005-01-01

    Information from PET scanning is transforming the management of many malignancies and the impact of PET is likely to increase further as new indications are recognised. PET is of particular value in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. These patients rarely undergo invasive surgical staging and therefore imaging is crucial in determining the extent of disease before treatment. More accurate staging with PET means that futile aggressive RT or chcmoRT can be avoided in patients with incurable extensive disease. FDG-PET is of proven value in the staging of common metabolically-active malignancies treated with radiotherapy. These include lung cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphomas and oesophageal carcinoma. It has been shown that PET can improve the selection of patients for radical surgery or radiotherapy in lung cancer and that PET-based staging more accurately predicts survival than conventional staging. For those patients that remain eligible for definitive RT after PET. treatment can be more accurately targeted at the tumour and involved regional nodes. The value of PET for treatment planning is enhanced significantly when PET and CT scans are acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner. Fused PET-CT images can be imported into the radiotherapy planning computer and used to accurately target tumour with the best beam arrangement. After treatment, response may be hard to assess with structural imaging. PET-rcsponse to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts survival in NSCLC more accurately than CT response. However, PET has much more potential than imaging with FDG alone can realise. Markers such as FLT can be used to image proliferation in tumours, misonidazole or FAZA can be used to image hypoxia and labeled metabolites of anti-cancer drugs such as 5-FU can be used to study pharmacokinetics. New combinations of radiation and drugs may emerge that can be selected based on biological characteristics of

  9. Progress of radiotherapy by three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hajime; Nomoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    The recent progress of three-dimensional radiation treatment planning was reviewed. And clinical cases such as lung cancer and breast cancer are introduced. In the University of Occupational and Development Health, the treatment system FOCUS which is made up of CT simulator and linac was used mainly. Three-dimensional treatment planning was carried for about 90% of 330 patients who underwent radiotherapy for one year. The target becomes to be accurate and dose distribution with all CT slices in radiation field can be confirmed by using three-dimensional radiation treatment planning apparatus. High dose irradiation localized to tumor part is possible. Relations between total dose and volume of normal tissue and/or tumor can be estimated numerically and easily by DVH. A prediction of indication and affection became possible by this procedure. In conclusion, generalization of three-dimensional radiation treatment planning will bring progress of more effective radiotherapy with less adverse reaction. (K.H.). 21 refs

  10. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannomiya, Eduardo Kazuo; Medici Filho, Edmundo; Moraes, Luiz Cesar de; Castilho, Julio Cezar de Melo; Furukawa, Souhei

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, 1042 cases where reviewed in School Dentistry - Osaka Univ. Seven hundred and fifteen were male and three hundred and twenty-seven were female. Ora cancer was affected more male than female patients, with mean age of 582 years old. The tongue was the most common anatomic localization of oral cancer. In tongue, the use of external radiotherapy y combined with brachytherapy and brachytherapy isolated presented better results than chemotherapy combined with external radiotherapy. In buccal mucosa, there was not differences in the treatment's results using external radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. In tongue's floor and upper and jaw gingiva the combined treatment with chemotherapy and external radiotherapy presented better results than isolated external radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Second cancers in children treated with modern radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Lomax, Antony; Timmermann, Beate

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The scattered radiation from the treatment volume might be more significant for children than for adults and, as a consequence, modern radiotherapy treatment techniques such as IMRT and passive proton therapy could potentially increase the number of secondary cancers. In this report, secondary cancer risk resulting from new treatment technologies was estimated for an adult prostate patient and a child. Material and methods: The organ equivalent dose (OED) concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau and a linear dose-response curve was applied to dose distributions of an adult prostate patient and a child with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate. Conformal radiotherapy, IMRT with 6 MV photons and proton therapy were planned. OED (cancer risk) was estimated for the whole body, the rectum and the bladder. In addition, relative cumulative risk was calculated. Results: Secondary cancer risk in the adult is not more than 15% it increased when IMRT or passive proton therapy was compared to conventional treatment planning. In the child, risk remains practically constant or was even reduced for proton therapy. The cumulative risk in the child relative to that in the adult can be as large as 10-15. Conclusions: By a comparison between an adult patient and a child treated for a disease of the prostate, it was shown that modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy (active and passive) do not increase the risk for secondary cancers

  12. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, I.

    1982-01-01

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility

  13. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: low risk of chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large series of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.; McLaughlin, P. William; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Addison, Heather; Forman, Jeffrey; Lichter, Allen

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) may provide a technique to increase the dose delivered to target tissues while sparing uninvolved normal structures. To evaluate the role of 3D treatment in reducing the treatment toxicity, we analyzed the chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large group of patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1987 through 1992, 721 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D CRT at the University of Michigan or Providence Hospital. All had axial computed tomography (CT) specifically for RT planning, multiple structures contoured on the axial images, and beam's-eye-view conformal beams edited to provide 3D dose coverage. Using current American Joint Commission (AJCC) staging, 537 patients had T1-T2 tumors, 123 had T3-T4 tumors, and 60 were treated postprostatectomy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated in 462 patients. Prostate boosts were delivered with four-field axial, six-field axial, or four-field oblique, nonaxial fields. The median dose was 68.40 Gy (range 59.4-80.4). Median follow-up was 20.4 months; 175 were followed more than 3 years. All complications have been graded conservatively using the RTOG system. Results: Using a Cox proportional hazard's model, patient age, T-stage, prescribed dose, pelvic treatment, and boost technique were analyzed. The factor most strongly related to risk of morbidity was dose (p = 0.05); however, the boost technique was also related: the four-field oblique field had the lowest relative risk. Most episodes of rectal morbidity have been mild: 82 Grade 1 or 2. There have been only 14 more serious complications including 12 Grade 3 and 2 Grade 4. The actuarial risk of a Grade 3 or 4 complication is 3% at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: A very small proportion of patients treated with 3D CRT had significant rectal morbidity related to RT, supporting the use of conformal treatment planning and dose delivery as a mechanism to minimize complications

  14. Radiotherapy for prostatic cancer in patients aged 75 or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisada, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Masaaki; Mogami, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Uemura, Masahiko; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Nagao, Shuji

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with prostatic cancer treated with radiotherapy giving a mean dose of 60.7 Gy between 1992 and 1997 at Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital were reviewed and the treatment outcomes were investigated retrospectively. About two-third of the patients were treated with radiation by linear accelerator with 40 to 46 Gy to the whole pelvis and with 20 to 26 Gy boost to the prostate area and the other one-third were treated only to the prostate area. For almost patients, external beam radiotherapy in combination with endocrine therapy was used. The median duration of follow-up was 36 months. Overall 5-year survival and 5-year relapse-free survival rate were 65.8%, and 88.9%, respectively. Severe rectal late morbidity (over grade 3) according to RTOG grading system were seen in one (2.6%). Although the number of cases was rather small and the follow-up duration was rather short, conventional external beam radiotherapy in combination with endocrine therapy may contribute to the survival benefit of patients with prostatic cancer in aged 75 or older. Radiotherapy for elderly prostatic cancer patients should be treated with an effort to decrease the late morbidity and not to deteriorate the QOL of the patients, because many patients were died of other causes than cancer. (author)

  15. Study of effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments in prostate cancer; Estudio de los efectos de las protesis metalicas en tratamientos radioterapicos en irradiacion pelvica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, P.; Mateos, J. C.; Herrador, M.; Ortiz, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    In this work it is described the problems related to the radiotherapy treatments of patients with prostate cancer and hip implants Analyze the effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments and present the methods to overcome the problems that arise in these situations. Our patients are student in a TAC Philips with a range of Hounsfield number of-1000 to 4000. The planning and measurement of CT numbers are done in a RTP ADAC Pinnacle that have a maximum of 32767 CT units. The metallic implants more frequently used, titanium, stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, generate CT numbers from 2000 to 3000, and cause saturation effects. This problem may be solved with modern scanners that use the extended CT range. It is an algorithm that expand the usual range by a factor of 10. An alternative solution to this problem can be used if the prostheses are able to scan to select the window parameters that allow an automatic region of interest (roi) definition that match to the dimensions of the implants. Finally it is assigned the electronic/physical densities to the created roi's. The clinical dosimetry of patients with prostheses have been done defining the usual regions of interests (target volume and risk organs) in first place. Finally the prostheses are outlined using the window parameters previously measured and assigned the electronic or physical densities. The attenuation of the implant may then be calculated accurately. The presence of implants in the treatment fields originate artifacts in the TAC images of patients and underdosage of target volume that range between 12% and 30% in function of material an energy used. It is necessary the application of methods that correct the dose behind the implant, if it is not possible to prevent the incidence of the treatment beams over the prostheses. (Author)

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shinichi; Satake, Ichiro; Tujii, Toshihiko; Tari, Kiyonobu; Sakura, Mizuyoshi

    1988-01-01

    Between February 1982 and February 1986, 30 patients with prostatic cancer received intaoperative radiotherapy (IORT). First 10 cases were treated by the transperineal approach, and after April 1983, 20 cases were done by the retropubic approach. We chose the retropubic approach, because it has advantages over the transperineal approach, which has a risk of rectal damage, lymph-adenectomy can not be performed and the patient can not sit down for a long time after the operation. In the IORT procedure for prostatic cancer by the retropubic approach, a longitudinal lower abdominal incision is made, and pushing down the bladder, the treatment cone is inserted to the prostate. We performed lymph-adenectomy at the same operation, if hard and large lymph-nodes were touched. Of 30 patients, 2 had stage B disease, 10 had stage C and 18 had stage D disease. The overall 5-year survival rate (Kaplan-Meier method) after IORT was 42.6 % where as that the 31 cases seen (stage C : 6 cases, stage D : 25 cases) since the Center was founded (October 1975) until the introduction of IORT was 3.2 %. Although no definite conclusion can be drawn because all cases received multidisciplinary therapy, IORT appears useful for the treatment of carcinoma of the prostate. (author)

  17. Pre-Radiotherapy dental evaluation criteria and treatment needs of oral side effects after head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Arriagada, Wilfredo Alejandro; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Carvalho de Andrade, Marco Aurelio; De Andrade Elias, Rogerio; Ajudarte Lopes, Marcio

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to present pre-radiotherapy evaluation criteria and the main needs for treatment of these patients after the radiation therapy. Were revised articles in English, Spanish and Portuguese language between 1995 and 2009 indexed in Pubmed and Scielo. The keywords were oral cancer and radiotherapy, complications in head and neck radiotherapy, oral pre-radiotherapy evaluation.The adverse complications of radiotherapy in head and neck area could be temporary or late. The late effects, such as radiation caries and osteorradionecrosis could be directly associated with the fact that previous dental evaluation was not performed and can severely affect the post-operatory quality of life. The participation of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team and dental evaluation of the patients that will receive radiotherapy in the head and neck area are of vital importance to improve the post-operatory quality of life of these patients

  18. Contribution of radiotherapy to the treatment of malignant tumors, 3. Combined drugs and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niibe, Hideo; Takahashi, Iku; Tamaki, Yoshio (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of cytotoxic agent, hormone, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protector combined with radiation therapy in cancer management were analysed. The results were as follows: 1) An increase in response was seen in 25% or more of tumor nodules given radiotherapy combined with misonidazole, anoxic cell sensitizer, compared with radiotherpy alone. But the drug was also found to be neurotoxic and peripheral neuropathy. 2) Evidence has been given that Amifostine may protect the mucosal damage from radiation when Amifostine prior to irradiation was administrated to patients with tumor in the head and neck or in the pelvis. 3) There were no difference between five year survival of radiotherapy alone and with chemotherapy for patients with stage I Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy following radiotherapy for patients with stage II was more effective treatment method than radiotherapy alone. 4) Radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer was performed to control only primary site. The success rates of local control were over 80%. The near future holds extensive promise for a combination of radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormone therapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protectors. All of these when used in the appropriate circumstances may yield significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio and in the long-tern control of tumors.

  19. Conkiss: Conformal Kidneys Sparing 3D Noncoplanar Radiotherapy Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer As an Alternative to IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebestyen, Zsolt; Kovacs, Peter; Gulyban, Akos; Farkas, Robert; Bellyei, Szabolcs; Liposits, Gabor; Szigeti, Andras; Esik, Olga; Derczy, Katalin; Mangel, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    When treating pancreatic cancer using standard (ST) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) beam arrangements, the kidneys often receive a higher dose than their probable tolerance limit. Our aim was to elaborate a new planning method that-similarly to IMRT-effectively spares the kidneys without compromising the target coverage. Conformal kidneys sparing (CONKISS) 5-field, noncoplanar plans were compared with ST plans for 23 consecutive patients retrospectively. Optimal beam arrangements were used consisting of a left- and right-wedged beam-pair and an anteroposterior beam inclined in the caudal direction. The wedge direction determination (WEDDE) algorithm was developed to adjust the adequate direction of wedges. The aimed organs at risk (OARs) mean dose limits were: kidney <12 Gy, liver <25 Gy, small bowels <30 Gy, and spinal cord maximum <45 Gy. Conformity and homogeneity indexes with z-test were used to evaluate and compare the different planning approaches. The mean dose to the kidneys decreased significantly (p < 0.05): left kidney 7.7 vs. 10.7 Gy, right kidney 9.1 vs. 11.7 Gy. Meanwhile the mean dose to the liver increased significantly (18.1 vs. 15.0 Gy). The changes in the conformity, homogeneity, and in the doses to other OARs were not significant. The CONKISS method balances the load among the OARs and significantly reduces the dose to the kidneys, without any significant change in the conformity and homogeneity. Using 3D-CRT the CONKISS method can be a smart alternative to IMRT to enhance the possibility of dose escalation.

  20. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. Methods From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84% or without (16% chemotherapy. Results The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  1. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Lin, Shoei Long; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chen, Chien-An; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Kuo, Ying-Shiung; Liao, Li-Jen; Hu, Kawang-Yu; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Wu, Le-Jung; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wang, Li-Ying

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT) for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84%) or without (16%) chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings

  2. The impact of oral rehabilitation on oral health-related quality of life in patients receiving radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweyen, Ramona; Kuhnt, Thomas; Wienke, Andreas; Eckert, Alexander; Hey, Jeremias

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the influence of dental treatment on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in head and neck cancer patients. This study included the data of 116 patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT) because of head and neck cancer. For each patient, the variables age, sex, tumor site, irradiation technique, dose on the spared parotid gland, concomitant chemotherapy, and denture status were documented. OHRQoL was determined using the OHIP-G14 questionnaire. Patients were divided into subgroups according to denture status: none or fixed partial dentures (none/FPD), removable partial dentures (RPD), and full dentures (CD). OHIP summary scores were determined and tested for clinical relevant differences with respect to the different variables. The association between OHRQol and the variables was assessed using linear regression. No clinically relevant influence on OHRQoL was found for gender, irradiation technique, and chemotherapy. Patients with tumors located in the oral cavity had a significantly higher OHIP score than patients with other tumor sites (p < 0.001). None/FPD and RPD patients had higher values than those found in a normal population, but did not differ significantly from each other (p = 0.387). In contrast to tumor site, teeth and type of denture seem to have a limited effect on OHRQoL in head and neck cancer patients. Prosthetic treatment in head and neck cancer patients do not lead to the same improvement in OHRQoL as found in the normal population. This might be taken into account especially if extensive dental treatment is intended.

  3. Cognitive function after radiotherapy for supratentorial low-grade glioma: A North Central Cancer Treatment Group prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laack, Nadia N.; Brown, Paul D.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Furth, Alfred F. M.S.; Ballman, Karla V.; Hammack, Julie E.; Arusell, Robert M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Buckner, Jan C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of cranial radiotherapy (RT) on cognitive function in patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Twenty adult patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma were treated with 50.4 Gy (10 patients) or 64.8 Gy (10 patients) localized RT. The patients then were evaluated with an extensive battery of psychometric tests at baseline (before RT) and at approximately 18-month intervals for as long as 5 years after completing RT. To allow patients to serve as their own controls, cognitive performance was evaluated as change in scores over time. All patients underwent at least two evaluations. Results: Baseline test scores were below average compared with age-specific norms. At the second evaluation, the groups' mean test scores were higher than their initial performances on all psychometric measures, although the improvement was not statistically significant. No changes in cognitive performance were seen during the evaluation period when test scores were analyzed by age, treatment, tumor location, tumor type, or extent of resection. Conclusions: Cognitive function was stable after RT in these patients evaluated prospectively during 3 years of follow-up. Slight improvements in some cognitive areas are consistent with practice effects attributable to increased familiarity with test procedures and content

  4. Cancer Deaths due to Lack of Universal Access to Radiotherapy in the Brazilian Public Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, L C; Moraes, F Y; Fernandes, G Dos S; Weltman, E

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a fundamental role in the treatment of cancer. Currently, the Brazilian public health system cannot match the national radiotherapy demand and many patients requiring radiotherapy are never exposed to this treatment. This study estimated the number of preventable deaths in the public health system if access to radiotherapy was universal. Incidence rates for the year 2016 provided by Instituto Nacional de Cancer were used in this analysis. The number of untreated patients requiring radiotherapy was obtained through the difference between the total number of patients requiring radiotherapy and the total amount of delivered radiotherapy treatments in the public health system. The number of deaths for the three most common cancers in each gender due to radiotherapy shortage was calculated. Initially, the total number of patients per cancer type was divided in stages using Brazilian epidemiological data. Subsequently, previously published tree arm diagrams were used to define the rate of patients requiring radiotherapy in each specific clinical setting. Finally, the clinical benefit of radiotherapy in overall survival was extracted from studies with level 1 evidence. Over 596 000 cancer cases were expected in Brazil in 2016. The public health system covers more than 75% of the Brazilian population and an estimated 111 432 patients who required radiotherapy in 2016 did not receive this treatment. Breast, colorectal and cervix cancers are the most frequent malignant tumours in women and prostate, lung and colorectal in men. The number of deaths due to a radiotherapy shortage in the year 2016 for these types of cancer were: (i) breast: 1011 deaths in 10 years; (ii) cervix: 2006 deaths in 2 years; (iii) lung: 1206 deaths in 2 years; (iv) prostate, intermediate risk: 562 deaths in 13 years; high risk: 298 deaths in 10 years; (v) colorectal: 0 deaths, as radiotherapy has no proven benefit in overall survival. Thousands of cancer patients requiring

  5. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  6. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M., E-mail: stefanic@cae.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Regional de Referencia con Patrones Secundarios para Dosimetria - CNEA, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon 15, B1802AYA Ezeiza (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  7. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M.

    2014-08-01

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  8. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon

  9. Evaluation of quality of life and psychological response in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Hondo, Mikito; Nishimura, Keiichiro; Kitani, Akira; Yamano, Takafumi; Yanagita, Hisami; Osada, Hisato; Shinbo, Munefumi; Honda, Norinari

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the quality of life (QOL) and mental condition of patients being treated for cancer is now recognized. In this study, we evaluated QOL and mental condition in patients with cancer before and after radiotherapy. The subjects were 170 patients who had undergone radiotherapy. The examination of QOL was performed using the quality of life questionnaire for cancer patients treated with anticancer drugs (QOL-ACD), and mental condition (anxiety and depression) was examined using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). These examinations were performed at the start of radiotherapy and immediately after radiotherapy. The QOL score was slightly higher in all patients after the completion of radiotherapy than before the start of radiotherapy. In the palliative radiotherapy group, QOL score was significantly improved by treatment. Anxiety and depression were improved after radiotherapy. There was a correlation between the degrees of improvement of the HADS and QOL score. We could treat cancer patients by radiotherapy without reducing their QOL, and improvement in QOL was significant in the palliative radiotherapy group. Mental condition was also improved after radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Radiotherapy for prevention and therapy of gynecomastia due to antiandrogen treatment in prostate cancer patients. A patterns-of-care-study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, Burkhard; Sautter, Verena; Melcher, Ute; Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Momm, Felix [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Gynecomastia is a frequent side effect of antiandrogen therapy for prostate cancer and may compromise quality of life. Although it has been successfully treated with radiotherapy (RT) for decades, the priority of RT as a preferred treatment option has recently been disputed as tamoxifen was also demonstrated to be effective. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of indications, frequency, and technique of RT in daily practice in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. On behalf of the DEGRO-AG GCG-BD (German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy of Benign Diseases) a standardized questionnaire was sent to 294 RT institutions. The questionnaires inquired about patient numbers, indications, RT technique, dose, and - if available - treatment results. Moreover, the participants were asked whether they were interested in participating in a prospective study. From a total of 294 institutions, 146 replies were received, of which 141 offered RT for gynecomastia. Seven of those reported prophylactic RT only, whereas 129 perform both preventive and symptomatic RT. In 110 of 137departments, a maximum of 20 patients were treated per year. Electron beams (76%) were used most often, while 24% of patients received photon beams or orthovolt x-rays. Total doses were up to 20 Gy for prophylactic and up to 40 Gy for therapeutic RT. Results were reported by 19 departments: prevention of gynecomastia was observed in 60-100% of patients. Only 13 institutions observed side effects. Prophylactic and symptomatic RT is widely used in the German-speaking countries, but patient numbers are small. The clinical results indicate that RT is a highly effective and well-tolerated treatment.

  11. Treatment and Prognosis of Isolated Local Relapse after Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Clinical Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Importance of Salvage Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Chen, Fengshi; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts have been made to detect local relapse (LR) in the follow-up after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) although limited data are available on its treatment and prognosis. We aimed to characterize treatment options and clarify long-term outcomes of isolated LR after SBRT for patients with clinical stage I NSCLC. We reviewed our institutional database in search of patients with isolated LR after SBRT for clinical stage I NSCLC at our institution between 1999 and 2013. Patient characteristics were compared with Mann-Whitney U test, χ2 test, or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. Survival outcomes were estimated with Kaplan-Meier method. Potential prognostic factors were investigated using Cox proportional hazard model. Of 308 patients undergoing SBRT for clinical stage I NSCLC, 49 patients were identified to have isolated LR. Twelve patients underwent salvage surgery, none underwent radiotherapy, and eight patients received chemotherapy, whereas 29 patients received best supportive care. No patient characteristic except operability was significantly related with patient selection for LR treatments. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate of the whole cohort was 47.9% from SBRT and 25.7% from LR. Salvage surgery was associated with improved OS after LR (p = 0.014), and 5-year OS for patients undergoing salvage surgery was 79.5% from LR. It was confirmed that our patient selection for salvage surgery for isolated LR was associated with favorable survival outcomes. Operability based on multidisciplinary conferences, rather than measurable patient characteristics, is essential for appropriate patient selection for salvage surgery.

  12. SFRO booklets - The radiotherapy of cancers: of anal canal (Anus), brain, mediastinum, pancreas, lung, prostate, rectum, breast, upper aero-digestive tract (ENT cancers), cervix, endometrium (cervical cancers), and bladder for a better understanding of radiotherapy, sarcoma radiotherapy - To better understand your treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Thomas; Mornex, Francoise; Peiffert, Didier; Thariat, Juliette; Faivre, Jean-Christophe; Huguet, Florence; Vendrely, Veronique; Barillot, Isabelle; Janoray, Guillaume; Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Antoni, Delphine; Crehange, Gilles; Meillan, Nicolas; Pichon, Baptiste; Biau, Julian; Pointreau, Yoann; Mirabel, Xavier; Leysalle, Axel; Claren, Audrey; Cartier, Lysian; Chand, Mari-Eve; Jacob, Julian; Renard-Oldrini, Sophie; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ducassou, Anne; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Lagrange, Jean Leon; Molina, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    This document gathers several booklets which, for different types of cancers, propose information regarding the anatomy and location of the cancer, its diagnosis, possible treatments, secondary effects during treatment, some practical advices, issues related to the post-treatment period, associations and other resources which can be useful for patient information, and a glossary of the main terms used for this cancer and its treatment. Cancer types are anal canal (Anus), brain, mediastinum, pancreas, lung, prostate, rectum, breast, upper aero-digestive tract (ENT cancers), cervix, endometrium (cervical cancers), and bladder cancers

  13. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  14. Three-dimensional non-coplanar conformal radiotherapy yields better results than traditional beam arrangements for adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W; Melamud, Alex; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field "box" was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical practice.

  15. Physical status of human papillomavirus integration in cervical cancer is associated with treatment outcome of the patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV DNA into the host genome is a critical aetiological event in the progression from normal cervix to intraepithelial neoplasm, and finally to invasive cervical cancer. However, there has been little work on how HPV integration status relates to treatment outcome for cervical carcinomas. In the current study, HPV E2 and E6 gene copy numbers were measured in 111 cervical cancer tissues using real-time QPCR. Integration patterns were divided into four groups: single copy-integrated with episomal components (group 1, single copy-integrated without episomal components (group 2, multicopy tandem repetition-integrated (group 3, and low HPV (group 4 groups. A relapse-predicting model was constructed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to classify patients into different risk groups for disease-free survival (DFS. The model was internally validated using bootstrap resampling. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed to evaluate gene expression patterns in relation to the different integration groups. DFS rate was inferior in the order of the patients in group 4, group 2/3, and group 1. Multivariate analysis showed that histologic grade, clinical stage group, and integration pattern were significant prognostic factors for poor DFS. The current prognostic model accurately predicted the risk of relapse, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.74 (bootstrap corrected, 0.71. In conclusion, these data suggest that HPV integration pattern is a potent prognostic factor for tailored treatment of cervical cancer.

  16. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, T. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Itami, J. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Kotaka, K. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Toriyama, M. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    1996-08-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Von 1974 bis 1992 wurden 37 zuvor nicht behandelte Patienten mit T3-Larynxkarzinomen (15 supraglottisch, 22 glottisch) primaer kurativ bestrahlt und, wenn erforderlich, einer Salvage-Operation unterzogen. Die Zwei-Jahres-Kontrollrate bei alleiniger Strahlentherapie, die Rate der Stimmerhaltung sowie die unter Einschluss der Operation erreichbare lokale Kontrollrate bei supraglottischen T3-Larynxkarzinomen betrugen 33%, 33% und 60%. Bei glottischen T3-Karzinomen wurden jeweils 32%, 23% und 77% erreicht. Die Fuenf-Jahres-Ueberlebensrate betrug 47% bei supraglottischen T3-Karzinomen und 77% bei den glottischen Karzinomen. Im Fall von supraglottischen Karzinomen erreichte keiner der vier Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung eine lokale Kontrolle durch alleinige Strahlentherapie. Die lokoregionale rezidivfreie Zeit war bei den Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung oder Tracheostomie vor Einleitung der

  17. Effect of combined treatment with salvage radiotherapy plus androgen suppression on quality of life in patients with recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Andrew; Choo, Richard; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Szumacher, Ewa; Cheung, Patrick; Deboer, Gerrit; Chander, Sarat

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of salvage radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence or PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a phase II study. Quality of life was prospectively assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-Item Version 3.0 with the added prostate cancer-specific module at baseline and predefined follow-up visits. Results: Patients experienced a significant increase in bowel dysfunction (23%) by the end of RT (p < 0.0001). This bowel dysfunction improved after RT but remained slightly elevated (5-10%) throughout the 2-year AS period. This extent of residual bowel dysfunction would be considered of minimal clinical importance. A similar, but less pronounced, pattern of change did occur for urinary dysfunction. Erectile function showed no change during RT, but had an abrupt decline (10%) with initiation of AS that was of moderate clinical significance (p < 0.01). None of the other QOL domains demonstrated a persistent, significant change from baseline that would be considered of major clinical significance. Conclusion: The combined treatment with salvage RT plus 2-year AS had relatively minor long-term effects on QOL

  18. SU-E-T-332: Dosimetric Impact of Photon Energy and Treatment Technique When Knowledge Based Auto-Planning Is Implemented in Radiotherapy of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Grow, A; Hayes, C; Balamucki, C [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salmon, H; Thompson, M [Lake City Cancer Center, Lake City, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of the combination of photon energy and treatment technique on radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer when knowledge based planning was used. Methods: A total of 16 patients with localized prostate cancer were retrospectively retrieved from database and used for this study. For each patient, four types of treatment plans with different combinations of photon energy (6X and 10X) and treatment techniques (7-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were created using a prostate DVH estimation model in RapidPlan™ and Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical System). For any beam arrangement, DVH objectives and weighting priorities were generated based on the geometric relationship between the OAR and PTV. Photon optimization algorithm was used for plan optimization and AAA algorithm was used for final dose calculation. Plans were evaluated in terms of the pre-defined dosimetric endpoints for PTV, rectum, bladder, penile bulb, and femur heads. A Student’s paired t-test was used for statistical analysis and p > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For PTV, V95 was statistically similar among all four types of plans, though the mean dose of 10X plans was higher than that of 6X plans. VMAT plans showed higher heterogeneity index than IMRT plans. No statistically significant difference in dosimetry metrics was observed for rectum, bladder, and penile bulb among plan types. For left and right femur, VMAT plans had a higher mean dose than IMRT plans regardless of photon energy, whereas the maximum dose was similar. Conclusion: Overall, the dosimetric endpoints were similar regardless of photon energy and treatment techniques when knowledge based auto planning was used. Given the similarity in dosimetry metrics of rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, the genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities should be comparable among the selections of photon energy and treatment techniques.

  19. On the percutaneous radiotherapy of uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breit, A.; Ries, G.

    1986-01-01

    Whereas the local effect of radiotherapy in the postoperative treatment of uterine cervix cancer developing lymphogenic metastases may be regarded as clearly demonstrated, there is no evidence of its effect on the survival of patients. A definite answer to this question is only possible on the basis of prospective studies. In primary radiotherapy, more importance than in former days is given to percutaneous irradiation which allows a more homogeneous dose to the small pelvis. According to the present state of knowledge it is not justified to do without contact therapy except in cases of a very advanced disease. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients: a framework for new paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méry, Benoîte; Ndong, Sylvie Mengue; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Assouline, Avi; Falk, Alexander T; Valeille, Anaïs; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Rivoirard, Romain; Auberdiac, Pierre; Vallard, Alexis; Espenel, Sophie; Moriceau, Guillaume; Collard, Olivier; Bosacki, Claire; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; de Laroche, Guy; Fournel, Pierre; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-05-09

    No consensus exists regarding the role of radiotherapy in the management of gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 19 consecutive nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer (6 endometrial cancers, 6 cervical cancers, 4 vulvar cancers, and 3 vaginal cancers) who were treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was performed mainly in a palliative setting (n = 12; 63.2%), with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 6-76 Gy). Infrequent major acute or late toxicities were reported. Among 19 patients, 9 (47.4%) experienced tumor progression, 5 (26.3%) experienced complete response, 2 (10.5%) experienced stable disease and/or partial response. At last follow-up, 12 patients (63.2%) had died; most deaths (n = 9) occurred because of the cancer. These results suggest that radiotherapy is feasible in the treatment of nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer.

  1. Radiotherapy in breast cancer and its prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitter, Mihir

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of breast cancer are discussed. These include clinical staging, histological grading, site of growth, frequency and lactation, immunological response and prognosis, and survival of untreated cases. Importance of early detection is emphasised and prognosis after radiotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is briefly discussed. (M.G.B.)

  2. Second malignancies after radiotherapy for testicular seminoma: 2 cases; Seconds cancers apres radiotherapie pour seminome testiculaire: a propos de deux cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Lorchel, F.; Bontemps, P.; Bosset, J.F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2006-05-15

    Orchidectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy of retroperitoneal paraaortic and ipsilateral iliac nodes is the standard treatment for localized testicular seminoma (I, IIA, IIB). Post therapeutic follow-up allows to detect local relapse and radio-induced second cancer. Nevertheless, evaluation of risk of second malignancy still remains difficult. We report 2 cases of rectal cancer after radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. (authors)

  3. Daily Megavoltage Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: Correlation Between Volumetric Changes and Local Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bral, Samuel; De Ridder, Mark; Duchateau, Michael; Gevaert, Thierry; Engels, Benedikt; Schallier, Denis; Storme, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the predictive or comparative value of volumetric changes, measured on daily megavoltage computed tomography during radiotherapy for lung cancer. Patients and Methods: We included 80 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiotherapy was combined with concurrent chemotherapy, combined with induction chemotherapy, or given as primary treatment. Patients entered two parallel studies with moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy. Tumor volume contouring was done on the daily acquired images. A regression coefficient was derived from the volumetric changes on megavoltage computed tomography, and its predictive value was validated. Logarithmic or polynomial fits were applied to the intratreatment changes to compare the different treatment schedules radiobiologically. Results: Regardless of the treatment type, a high regression coefficient during radiotherapy predicted for a significantly prolonged cause-specific local progression free-survival (p = 0.05). Significant differences were found in the response during radiotherapy. The significant difference in volumetric treatment response between radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy plus induction chemotherapy translated to a superior long-term local progression-free survival for concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03). An enhancement ratio of 1.3 was measured for the used platinum/taxane doublet in comparison with radiotherapy alone. Conclusion: Contouring on daily megavoltage computed tomography images during radiotherapy enabled us to predict the efficacy of a given treatment. The significant differences in volumetric response between treatment strategies makes it a possible tool for future schedule comparison.

  4. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy for elderly head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Among head and neck cancers, cases affecting elderly people are increasing. Radical treatment is sometimes difficult in advanced cases of elderly patients. With progressive cancer, because radical surgery is often difficult, radiotherapy is chosen and may be used together with chemotherapy when overall status is good. However, according to the meta-analysis of Pignon et al., the chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients 71 years old or older, the hazard ratio becomes approximately 0.95, and there is little chemotherapy combined effect. In terms of 5-year survival rate, chemotherapy combined effect is -0.7%. Chemotherapy effect in elderly patients is not clear in past clinical trials. We examined 50 cases 75 years or older treated mainly by radiotherapy at Tokyo Medical Center between February, 2003 and August, 2011. In all, 21 of the 50 patients died, including four who died due to other cancers, while pneumonia accounted for five other deaths. These results suggested that various complications are often present and multiple primary cancers often occur in elderly people. With chemotherapy for elderly people, the effect of radiotherapy treatment and quality of life of the patients should be considered fully based on characteristics of elderly people, and a treatment plan devised accordingly. It is also necessary to undertake care after treatment. (author)

  5. Using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to evaluate the location reliability of the highest–skin dose area detected by treatment planning in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Li-Min, E-mail: limin.sun@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chih-Jen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hsiao-Yun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China); Meng, Fan-Yun [Department of General Surgery, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China); Lu, Tsung-Hsien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Min-Jen [Department of General Surgery, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin reaction during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer is an inevitable process, and its severity is related to the skin dose. A high–skin dose area can be speculated based on the isodose distribution shown on a treatment planning. To determine whether treatment planning can reflect high–skin dose location, 80 patients were collected and their skin doses in different areas were measured using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to locate the highest–skin dose area in each patient. We determined whether the skin dose is consistent with the highest-dose area estimated by the treatment planning of the same patient. The χ{sup 2} and Fisher exact tests revealed that these 2 methods yielded more consistent results when the highest-dose spots were located in the axillary and breast areas but not in the inframammary area. We suggest that skin doses shown on the treatment planning might be a reliable and simple alternative method for estimating the highest skin doses in some areas.

  6. Using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to evaluate the location reliability of the highest–skin dose area detected by treatment planning in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Meng, Fan-Yun; Lu, Tsung-Hsien; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin reaction during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer is an inevitable process, and its severity is related to the skin dose. A high–skin dose area can be speculated based on the isodose distribution shown on a treatment planning. To determine whether treatment planning can reflect high–skin dose location, 80 patients were collected and their skin doses in different areas were measured using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to locate the highest–skin dose area in each patient. We determined whether the skin dose is consistent with the highest-dose area estimated by the treatment planning of the same patient. The χ 2 and Fisher exact tests revealed that these 2 methods yielded more consistent results when the highest-dose spots were located in the axillary and breast areas but not in the inframammary area. We suggest that skin doses shown on the treatment planning might be a reliable