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Sample records for cancer treatments radiotherapy

  1. The place of radiotherapy in the treatment of vulva cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss the therapeutic aspects of the treatment of vulva cancers. This analytic retrospective study is based on a set of 15 patients who have been treated between 1996 and 2010, for an epidermoid cancer for 14 of them. Eleven of them have been irradiated. This rare cancer has a negative prognosis, mainly because of early ganglionary metastases. Radiotherapy (external or interstitial curie-therapy) is a prevailing therapeutic tool. Chemotherapy is emerging, notably concomitantly with radiotherapy. Short communication

  2. Radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer: treatment outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokdal, Lars; Høyer, Morten; Maase, Hans von der

    2006-01-01

    The exact value of radiotherapy in the treatment of muscle-invasive       bladder cancer is difficult to establish, as most studies exploring this       issue are retrospective with different procedures for selecting patients       for treatment, as well as varying treatment strategies. An estimate...

  3. Optical body surface profilometry improves radiotherapy treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer treatment has been significantly improved by the adoption of conformal radiotherapy techniques. However, this kind of treatment regime is only effective if accurate and repeatable patient positioning is possible. It has been recognised that current patient positioning methods are inadequate. This paper reports on the development of an optical sensor to accurately measure 3-D patient position, both before and during radiotherapy treatment. A fringe-contouring/analysis technique is used. The analysis method is based upon a modified Fourier fringe analysis technique, resulting in a very robust measurement instrument. A specially constructed twin-fibre interferometer is used to overcome problems caused by siting the sensor within the hostile radiation environment of the treatment room. (author)

  4. Changes in sexual function after radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to assess sexual function before and after definitive irradiation for the treatment of cancer of the prostate. The study comprised 67 patients (mean age 68 years) treated in five radiotherapy departments and assessed with repeated questionnaires about their libido, arousal, frequency and quality of intercourse, and sexual satisfaction. Interviews were obtained before radiotherapy and at the end of the first year after treatment. Sixty-three patients were married and 50 had a sexually effective partner. Forty-six patients presented with another pathology or medical treatment capable of inducing sexual dysfunction. Before radiotherapy, 40 patients were sexually active, with good to acceptable intercourse. Between 10 and 24 months after the end of radiotherapy, no disease progression was observed and prostate-specific antigen levels remained high in only two patients. Sexual function was preserved in 67% of patients but only 50% observed no change. The functional prognosis seemed to be related to the initial frequency and quality of intercourse; more than three times per month, the prognosis remained good, under three per month, it was poor. The patient's age was a predictive factor for the frequency of intercourse. (author)

  5. Mammography findings following electron intraoperative radiotherapy or external radiotherapy for breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, B.P.S.A., E-mail: pacebarbara@hotmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Radiologia, Av. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar 255, 3o andar, Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05403 001 (Brazil); Frasson, A.L., E-mail: alfrasson@hotmail.com [Servico de Mastologia, Hospital Sao Lucas da PUC do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga, 6690, conjunto 714, Jardim Botanico, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande Sul 90 610 000 (Brazil); Santos, M.M., E-mail: gringa2009@hotmail.com [Hospital Sao Lucas da PUC do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga, 6690, conjunto 714, Jardim Botanico, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande Sul 90 610 000 (Brazil); Barros, N. de, E-mail: nestor.barros@hotmail.com [Departamento de Radiologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Radiologia, Av. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar 255, 3o andar, Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05403 001 (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Radiotherapy following breast cancer conserving surgery decreases the risks of local recurrence. Because 85% of breast cancers relapse in or around the surgical bed there has been some debate on the need for irradiating the whole breast. Electron intraoperative radiotherapy (ELIOT) has been used as a viable alternative for conventional external radiotherapy (RT). While the former requires a single dose of 21 Gy in the tumoral bed, the latter requires 5-6 weeks of irradiation with a total dose of 50 Gy and a boost of 10 Gy that irradiates the surgical bed. Herein, we investigated whether any significant differences exist between the mammography findings obtained from patients submitted to one of the two techniques. Two groups of 30 patients each were included in this study. All patients had mammographies taken at 12 and 24 months after finishing treatment. The mammography findings evaluated were: cutaneous thickening (>2 mm), architectural distortion secondary to fibrosis, edema, calcifications (both benign and malignant), and fat necrosis. For all variables studied, there was no statistical difference between the two groups. This indicates that the mammography findings obtained in either 12- or 24-month follow-up periods after breast cancer conserving surgery are similar, regardless of which of the two radiotherapy techniques (ELIOT or RT) is employed as a treatment for breast cancer.

  6. Treatment results of floor of mouth cancer with definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to report treatment results of floor of mouth cancer with definitive radiotherapy. Sixty-five patients with newly diagnosed floor of mouth cancer received definitive (chemo-) radiotherapy at the department of Radiation Oncology at Aichi Cancer Center. Thirty-five patients were treated with only external irradiation, 28 patients with the combination of external irradiation and brachytherapy, and 2 patients with only brachytherapy. Twenty-nine patients received chemotherapy. Systemic chemotherapy was done for 22 patients with advanced disease (both locally-advanced and neck lymph node metastases), and intra-arterial chemotherapy for 7 patients with locally advanced disease. Five-year overall survival rate (OS) was 59% and 5-year progression free survival rate was 49%. Five-year OS for stage I+II was 69% and that for stage III+IV was 51%. We found 23 recurrences, which were divided into 10 in floor of mouth, 7 in neck lymph nodes, 2 in both, and 4 in distant areas. Late complications were found in 30 patients. Thirteen patients had developed mandibular osteomyelitis, 7 of which required surgical intervention. Soft tissue necrosis was found in 12 patients, and only one received surgery. Double cancers were found in 25 patients. There were 7 oral cancers and 6 esophageal cancers. (author)

  7. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  8. Multimodal treatment combining chemotherapy, hyperthermia and radiotherapy for ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been increasing interest in the use of heat in the treatment of cancer. Theoretically cells are the most sensitive to ionizing radiation at mitosis, whereas the cycle phase that is the most resistant to ionizing radiation namely late in the DNA. Synthetic phase (late S) is the most sensitive to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia has been reported to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active chemotherapeutic agents. When thermal potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents against malignant cells is contemplated, normal tissues have a relatively high ambient blood flow which increases in response to thermal stress, thereby dissipating heat, compared to tumors. Tumors, with relatively poor blood flow and a responsive neovasculature, are in capable of augmenting flow and acting as a heat reservoir. This is the phenomenon of a heat reservoir which is one factor to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active anticancer agents for enhancing the uptake in tumor. The importance is in the adjuvant chemotherapy treated for post operative, advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer. Heating enhances the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Thirty patients with ovarian cancer were subjected to the multidisciplinary treatment with combination of hyperthermochemotherapy and radiation. The 30 patients consisted of 18 with endometrioid adenocarcinoma and 7 with serious post operative or recurrent status. Two types of equipments with rediofrequencies of 70 MHz (BSD-1000) or 434 MHZ (TAG MED·HS 434) were used for hyperthermia. Chemotherapeutic agents such as adriamycin, cis DDP, cyclophosphamide and etoposide were injected intravenously. Arterial infusion with reservoir was very effective in advanced stage of ovarian cancer. No severe or fatal side effects were observed. Hyperthermochemotherapy is useful and effective for the postoperative management or the treatment of recurrent cancer of the ovary. (J.P.N.)

  9. Auger Emitter Based Radiotherapy- A Possible New Treatment for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredericia, Pil; Groesser, Torsten; Severin, Gregory; Köster, U.; Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann; Jensen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major cause of mortality worldwide (1). A large fraction of cancer patients undergo external radiotherapy, delivering a lethal dose of radiation to the patient’s tumour(s). The main problem with this approach is the collateral damage caused to healthy, surrounding tissue and the side...... damage produced by Low-LET radiation used in current radiotherapy (2-3) Considerable efforts have been made in the past twenty years to develop Auger emitter-based radiotherapy However, previous studies lack precise measurement of RBE, which is the fundamental factor defining the relationship between...... local radiation dose and biological damage done for the given Auger emitter, thereby brought the development to a halt. We believe we have the techniques to quantify the biological damage done for a given Auger emitter and thereby pushing the development of Auger emitterbased radiotherapy into reality...

  10. Combined Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is used to treat approximately 50% of all cancer patients, with varying success. Radiation therapy has become an integral part of modern treatment strategies for many types of cancer in recent decades, but is associated with a risk of long-term adverse effects. Of these side effects, cardiac complications are particularly relevant since they not only adversely affect quality of life but can also be potentially life-threatening. The dose of ionizing radiation that can be given to the tumor is determined by the sensitivity of the surrounding normal tissues. Strategies to improve radiotherapy therefore aim to increase the effect on the tumor or to decrease the effects on normal tissues, which must be achieved without sensitizing the normal tissues in the first approach and without protecting the tumor in the second approach. Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR), which can be attributed to the fact that heat is a pleiotropic damaging agent, affecting multiple cell components to varying degrees by altering protein structures, thus influencing the DNA damage response. Hyperthermia induces heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; HSPA1A) synthesis and enhances telomerase activity. HSPA1A expression is associated with radioresistance. Inactivation of HSPA1A and telomerase increases residual DNA DSBs post IR exposure, which correlates with increased cell killing, supporting the role of HSPA1A and telomerase in IR-induced DNA damage repair. Thus, hyperthermia influences several molecular parameters involved in sensitizing tumor cells to radiation and can enhance the potential of targeted radiotherapy. Therapy-inducible vectors are useful for conditional expression of therapeutic genes in gene therapy, which is based on the control of gene expression by conventional treatment modalities. The understanding of the molecular response of cells and tissues to ionizing radiation has lead to a new appreciation of the exploitable genetic

  11. Combined Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Punit [Department of Pathology, Scott & White Hospital and the Texas A& M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX 76504 (United States); Hurwitz, Mark D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Medical Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Asea, Alexzander, E-mail: asea@medicine.tamhsc.edu [Department of Pathology, Scott & White Hospital and the Texas A& M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX 76504 (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Radiotherapy is used to treat approximately 50% of all cancer patients, with varying success. Radiation therapy has become an integral part of modern treatment strategies for many types of cancer in recent decades, but is associated with a risk of long-term adverse effects. Of these side effects, cardiac complications are particularly relevant since they not only adversely affect quality of life but can also be potentially life-threatening. The dose of ionizing radiation that can be given to the tumor is determined by the sensitivity of the surrounding normal tissues. Strategies to improve radiotherapy therefore aim to increase the effect on the tumor or to decrease the effects on normal tissues, which must be achieved without sensitizing the normal tissues in the first approach and without protecting the tumor in the second approach. Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR), which can be attributed to the fact that heat is a pleiotropic damaging agent, affecting multiple cell components to varying degrees by altering protein structures, thus influencing the DNA damage response. Hyperthermia induces heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; HSPA1A) synthesis and enhances telomerase activity. HSPA1A expression is associated with radioresistance. Inactivation of HSPA1A and telomerase increases residual DNA DSBs post IR exposure, which correlates with increased cell killing, supporting the role of HSPA1A and telomerase in IR-induced DNA damage repair. Thus, hyperthermia influences several molecular parameters involved in sensitizing tumor cells to radiation and can enhance the potential of targeted radiotherapy. Therapy-inducible vectors are useful for conditional expression of therapeutic genes in gene therapy, which is based on the control of gene expression by conventional treatment modalities. The understanding of the molecular response of cells and tissues to ionizing radiation has lead to a new appreciation of the exploitable genetic

  12. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  13. Radiotherapy for cancer treatment: A growing priority for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , there was a deplorable accident with one of the cobalt units. In 1996, 115 patients were seriously over-irradiated. This sad event made cancer a very important political and medical issue in Costa Rica. As a consequence of this accident, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) made a comprehensive assessment that revealed deficiencies in quality assurance practices. The assessment also established that a) the radiotherapy equipment had exceeded its useful life, estimated at 15 years; b) the country lacked adequate treatment standards; c) there was a shortage of trained personnel; and d) some brachytherapy equipment had expired 10 years previously. Because of this situation, the Costa Rican Institute Against Cancer (known by the acronym ICCC in Spanish) was created in 1998. Its mission is to support and promote cancer prevention and control. An important fact is that the legislation creating the ICCC states as a priority the construction of a specialized hospital. Planning for the new facility was based on the estimated 7,000 new cancer cases every year in Costa Rica, of which 40% (2,800 patients) involve radio-sensitive tumors Of these, about 30% (840 patients) must receive linear accelerator therapy. Given that each linear accelerator may treat 400 patients a year, and taking into consideration that the construction of a specialized hospital must be through public contract (a very complicated and slow process in Costa Rica), the Costa Rican Social Security Fund (Spanish acronym CCSS) decided to purchase three new cobalt units (THERATON 780-E Model 2000), new brachytherapy equipment, two linear accelerators, and X-ray equipment for superficial therapy. Likewise, an early detection program was implemented for cancer of the uterine cervix, which now covers 96% of its target population. A pilot plan for breast cancer detection was started. There are also plans to implement a nationwide gastric cancer detection program, currently sponsored by the Japanese Government

  14. The place of radiotherapy in the treatment of vulva cancer; Place de la radiotherapie dans le traitement du cancer de la vulve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belajouza, S.; Said, N.; Yahiaoui, S.; Bouauoina, N. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital Farhat-Hached, Sousse (Tunisia)

    2011-10-15

    The authors discuss the therapeutic aspects of the treatment of vulva cancers. This analytic retrospective study is based on a set of 15 patients who have been treated between 1996 and 2010, for an epidermoid cancer for 14 of them. Eleven of them have been irradiated. This rare cancer has a negative prognosis, mainly because of early ganglionary metastases. Radiotherapy (external or interstitial curie-therapy) is a prevailing therapeutic tool. Chemotherapy is emerging, notably concomitantly with radiotherapy. Short communication

  15. Impact of Radiotherapy Treatment on Jordanian Cancer Patients’ Quality of Life and Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholoud Abu Obead

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The distressing treatment of cancer whether chemotherapy or radiotherapy is associated with fatigue and has negative impact on patient quality of life (QOL. Objectives: The purposes of this study were to examine the impact of radiotherapy treatment on Jordanian cancer patients’ QOL and fatigue, and to explore the relationship between fatigue and QOL. Methods: One group quasi-experimental correlational design was used with 82 patients who had been diagnosed with cancer and required radiotherapy treatment. QOL was measured using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G. Fatigue was measured using Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS. Data were collected over a period of three months, and analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation, descriptive statistics and paired-sample t-test. Results: Significant differences were found between pre- and post- radiotherapy QOL mean total scores (t=19.3, df=79, P<0.05, as well as physical, emotional, sexual, and functional wellbeing dimensions. Statistically significant differences were found between pre- and post- radiotherapy fatigue mean total scores (t=-8.95, df=79, P<0.05, as well as on behavioral, affective, sensory, and cognitive dimensions of PFS. Quality of life total scores correlated significantly and negatively with total fatigue scores (P<0.01. Conclusions: Exposure of cancer patient to radiotherapy treatment increased their fatigue level and decreased their QOL.  Nurses should assess cancer patients before, during, and after their treatment to design proper interventions to reduce fatigue and enhance QOL.

  16. Unilateral Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Tonsil Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chronowski, Gregory M., E-mail: gchronowski@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Long Island Jewish Hospital (United States); Shah, Shalin J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kupferman, Michael E. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, Kian K.; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess, through a retrospective review, clinical outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with unilateral radiotherapy techniques that irradiate the involved tonsil region and ipsilateral neck only. Methods and Materials: Of 901 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated with radiotherapy at our institution, we identified 102 that were treated using unilateral radiotherapy techniques. All patients had their primary site of disease restricted to the tonsillar fossa or anterior pillar, with <1 cm involvement of the soft palate. Patients had TX (n = 17 patients), T1 (n = 52), or T2 (n = 33) disease, with Nx (n = 3), N0 (n = 33), N1 (n = 23), N2a (n = 21), or N2b (n = 22) neck disease. Results: Sixty-one patients (60%) underwent diagnostic tonsillectomy before radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (26%) underwent excision of a cervical lymph node or neck dissection before radiotherapy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 38 months. Locoregional control at the primary site and ipsilateral neck was 100%. Two patients experienced contralateral nodal recurrence (2%). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95% and 96%, respectively. The 5-year freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence rate was 96%. Nine patients required feeding tubes during therapy. Of the 2 patients with contralateral recurrence, 1 experienced an isolated neck recurrence and was salvaged with contralateral neck dissection only and remains alive and free of disease. The other patient presented with a contralateral base of tongue tumor and involved cervical lymph node, which may have represented a second primary tumor, and died of disease. Conclusions: Unilateral radiotherapy for patients with TX-T2, N0-N2b primary tonsil carcinoma results in high rates of disease control, with low rates of contralateral nodal failure and a low incidence of acute toxicity

  17. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  18. Radiotherapy effect in conservation treatment for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy (RT) in conservative treatment for breast cancer (CT-BC) has been proven to be determinant for the local control of the disease. Radiation therapy was described by several authors as the most important factor affecting the cosmetic results of this treatment. Technical progress in RT, use of filters and wedges and an increased knowledge of the influence of fraction size total dose and irradiated volume on breast tissues contributed to avoid major radiotherapeutic side effects in the CT-BC. Cosmetic outcome from 2 groups of patients (pts) with breast cancer in stage T 1-2(T> = 2,5 cm) N 0-1 M o0 of the prospective trial Milan III were compared. Both groups pts (n=89) were treated with quadrantectomyand axillary dissection. 49 pts received complementary RT with a dose of 50 Gy over 5 weeks with a daily fraction of 2 Gy and a further boost of 10 Gy (10 MeV electrons) on the scar. Remaining 40 pts did not receive RT. Cosmetic results were subjectively and objectively (asymmetry index) evaluated. No significant cosmetic differences were observed between the 2 study groups. A good or excellent symmetry was observed in 59% of irradiated pts and 64% of non irradiated pts. Negative results were observed in 4% and 2% respectively. Subjective ovulation showed similar results, with a good or excellent symmetry in 57% of irradiated pts and 72.5% of non irradiated pts. Poor results were observed in 16.3% and 27.5% respectively. Telangiectasia were observed in 4% of irradiated pts, while hypertrophied scars were only noted in non irradiated pts (15%). No acute side effects of RT, as erythema or ulceration of breast skin, were recorded. In our experience, the standard dose of 50 Gy administered by two opposite tangential fields plus a 10 Gy boost did not affect the cosmetic results of CT.BC, whereas it provided a better local control of disease. The possibility to avoid RT in selected group of pts should be justified by the discomfort of this treatment for the pt, cost

  19. Combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In locally advanced oral cancer, the main modalities of treatment, e.g. surgery and radiotherapy, most often fail to control the disease when used singly. A combination policy of surgery and radiotherapy achieves adequate control of the disease. In order to improve the results in advanced oral cancer, chemotherapy given prior to and during radiation treatment and judicious combination of surgery offer the best possible approach in the management. The experience in the combination policy in the treatment of oral cancer in Northern India is dealt with. (auth.)

  20. Cryotherapy and radiotherapy combination in extensive and recurrent types of head and neck skin cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of infiltrative skin cancer treatment based on different variants of radiotherapy and cryotherapy combination is described. During the period of 1988-2006 the Department of head and neck neoplasms of N. N. Blohin Russian Cancer Research Center provided radiation and cryogenic treatment of 94 patients with locally advanced head and neck epidermoid and basal cell cancer. For this purpose before every radiotherapy session the tumor was exposed to cryo cooling till freezing temperature (-5 degrees C). The total involution of tumors was observed at 91 patients. Residual tumors were removed surgically. The follow-up showed good functional and aesthetic results, retention of local tissues.

  1. Late effects of radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late effects after radiotherapy for breast cancer include radiation induced malignancy and changes in irradiated tissues leading to e.g. edema of the arm, decreased mobility of the shoulder joint, brachial plexus neuropathy, pulmonary fibrosis, telangiectasia or atrophic ulceration of the skin. While radiation-induced malignancy depends on the volume of tissue irradiated and the total dose, other late effects are also fractionation dependent. Several reports have shown increased rates of such late effects after changes of the fractionation schedule which should be isoeffective according to the mathematical models commonly used to predict early effects. Although knowledge of the relation between total dose, number of fractions and radiation effects in late responding tissues has increased, extrapolations from the models should be used cautiously. The dose-response curve seems to be steeper for late effects than for tumour control. The possibility of late effects should be included in the decision as to when and how to treat breast cancer with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Combined modality treatment of chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) differs from other types of lung cancer in its more aggressive clinical course and superior responsiveness to chemo- and radiotherapy. Median survival of patients with unresectable limited disease was reported only 3 months by supportive care alone. SCLC was treated by surgery in 1950s, but results were disappointing. In a British study in the 1960s, radiotherapy proved superior to surgery in survival. However, most patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy alone died of instant metastases with median survival of 5-9 months, indicating a need for primary systemic treatment. In the 1970s, combined chemotherapy came to be the main treatment for SCLC; high response rate and improved survival led to the idea that thoracic radiotherapy added only toxicities with no therapeutic advantage in chemotherapy-treated patients. Considering the fact that 80% of patients treated with chemotherapy alone relapsed in primary sites, and that radio-therapy achieved response in 90% of limited disease patients, it is reasonable to attempt to combine systemic chemotherapy and thoracic radio-therapy to improve therapeutic results for this disease. In 1980s, several randomized trials comparing chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy with thoracic radiotherapy were conducted to clarify the role of thoracic radio-therapy in combination with chemotherapy for limited SCLC. (author). 20 refs., 3 tabs

  3. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  4. Standards, options and recommendations (SOR) for the place of radiotherapy in treatment of renal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Standards, Options and Recommendations' (SOR), initiated in 1993, is a collaborative project between the Federation of the French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), the 20 French Cancer Centres and specialists from French Public Universities, General Hospitals and Private Clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and outcome for cancer patients. The methodology is based on literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary expert group, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. To develop clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, management and treatment of patients with renal cancer. This review is part of previously published complete guidelines and focuses on the place of radiotherapy in this disease. The data was identified by literature search using Medline (up to June 1999) and personal reference lists. The main endpoints considered were survival, risk factors for late effects of radiotherapy, safety and quality of life. The key recommendations are: in localised renal cancer, adjuvant radiotherapy has a limited role: it is not indicated for T1 and T2 tumours and there is no proof of a survival benefit for T3 N1-N2 tumours. Postoperative radiotherapy can be considered in young patients without risk factors for the development of post-radiotherapy complications and without loco-regional invasion (renal capsule, renal pelvis, vena cava, regional lymph nodes); for metastatic tumours, the multidisciplinary team must decide whether palliative radiotherapy is appropriate after consideration of the prognostic factors. An isolated metastasis can be treated by radiosurgery and stereotaxic radiosurgery may be of benefit in the case of one or two cerebral metastasis. The optimal dose for palliative treatment is not known. Radiotherapy followed by immunotherapy can also be considered if the patient has no contraindication to such treatments. (authors)

  5. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tiefenbacher Uta; Hüsing Johannes; Sohn Christof; Heil Joerg; Sterzing Florian; Fetzner Leonie; Häfner Matthias F; Jensen Alexandra D; Askoxylakis Vasileios; Wenz Frederik; Debus Jürgen; Hof Holger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost s...

  6. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21248427

  7. [Stereotactic radiotherapy is established treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailas, Liisa; Virsunen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Surgery has been the standard treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer. Some of the early stage lung cancer patients are not suitable for surgery owing to associated diseases or refusing surgery. Ninety percent of untreated patients die within five years. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a technique in which highly focused radiation treatment is given at a couple of high single doses to the tumor region. The treatment results in an average of 90% local control of the cancer, and the adverse effects are minor. Treatment outcome is equivalent to those of surgical therapy and is better than obtained with conventional external radiation therapy. PMID:27132296

  8. A federal audit of the Belgian radiotherapy departments in breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The Belgian Federal College of Radiotherapy carried out an external audit of breast cancer patient documentation in the 26 Belgian radiotherapy centres. The objective was to assess compliance with the recommendations regarding minimal requirements for documentation of radiotherapy prescription and administration. All centres volunteered to take part in this audit. Methods: Two experienced radiation oncologists site-visited the departments over a 6 month period (Sept. 2003-Feb. 2004), with a list of items to be verified, including details on the surgery, the pathological report, details on systemic treatments, details on the radiotherapy prescription (and consistency with therapeutic guidelines) and delay surgery/radiotherapy. Findings: Three hundred and eighty-nine patients files were reviewed, for a total of 399 breast cancers (10 patients with bilateral cancer). Mean age was 57.8 y (range 29-96). Breast conservative surgery (BCS) was used in 71%; radical mastectomy in 29%. A complete pathological report was present in all files but 2 (99.5% conformity). 5.2% were treated for DCIS, 61.6% for pT1, 28.2% for pT2 and 5% for pT3-4. Data regarding resection margins were specified to be free in 76.2%, tangential in 12% (within 2 mm) and positive for DCIS in 3.8% or invasive cancer in 1.5% (no information, on margins in 6.5%). The pT stage was always specified, and consistent with the macroscopic and microscopic findings. Hormonal receptors were routinely assessed (94.7%), as well as Her2neu (87.4%). Axillary surgery was carried out in 92%, either by sentinel node biopsy or by complete clearance, in which case the median number of nodes analysed was 12 for all centres together (7-17). All radiotherapy prescriptions were in line with evidence-based standards of therapy (i.e., irradiation of breast after BCS or after mamectomy (in case of pN+), but one. The mean delay between surgery and radiotherapy was 5.5 weeks (SD 11days). Conclusion: There was a high

  9. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  10. Preliminary Treatment Results of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kang-Hsing Fan; Yen-Chao Chen; Cheng-Keng Chuang; Min-Li Hsieh; Ji-Hong Hong

    2006-01-01

    Background: To review the initial treatment results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) for prostate cancer.Methods: Ninety-two patients treated with IMRT before July 2003 were included inthis study. The median follow-up was 32 months. The indications for IMRTincluded primary, adjuvant, and salvage treatment. Combined treatment withandrogen suppression therapy was variable. The primary study endpointswere chronic adverse events which were subjectively reported. Only patientswith an aden...

  11. Type and dose of radiotherapy used for initial treatment of non-metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We sought to describe patterns of initial radiotherapy among non-metastatic prostate cancer (PC) patients by recurrence risk groups. Medical records were abstracted for a sample of 9017 PC cases diagnosed in 2004 as a part of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Prostate and Breast Patterns of Care Study in seven states. Non-metastatic PC cases are categorized as low-risk (LR), intermediate-risk (IR) or high-risk (HR) groups based on pretreatment PSA, tumor stage, and Gleason score per 2002 NCCN guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to determine factors associated with the type and dose of radiotherapy by the risk groups. Of the 9,017 patients, 3153 who received definitive radiotherapy either alone or in combination with hormone therapy (HT) were selected for in-depth analysis. Multivariate models showed that LR patients were more likely to receive seed implant brachytherapy (BT) than those in higher risk groups. Those in the IR group were most likely to receive external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) combined with BT or high-dose radiotherapy. Use of HT in combination with radiotherapy was more common in the IR and HR groups than for LR patients. Intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) was used to treat 32.6% of PC patients treated with EBRT, with the majority (60.6%) treated with high-dose radiotherapy. Radiotherapy types and dosage utilization varied by PC risk groups. Patients in IR were more likely than those in LR or HR to receive high-dose radiotherapy. IMRT was used in about one third of patients to deliver high-dose radiotherapy

  12. Partially wedged beams improve radiotherapy treatment of urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Partially wedged beams (PWBs) having wedge in one part of the field only, can be shaped using dynamic jaw intensity modulation. The possible clinical benefit of PWBs was tested in treatment plans for muscle-infiltrating bladder cancer. Material and methods: Three-dimensional treatment plans for 25 bladder cancer patients were analyzed. The originally prescribed standard conformal four-field box technique, which includes the use of lateral ordinary wedge beams, was compared to a modified conformal treatment using customized lateral PWBs. In these modified treatment plans, only the anterior parts of the two lateral beams had a wedge. To analyze the potential clinical benefit of treatment with PWBs, treatment plans were scored and compared using both physical parameters and biological dose response models. One tumour control probability model and two normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were applied. Different parameters for normal tissue radiation tolerance presented in the literature were used. Results: By PWBs the dose homogeneity throughout the target volume was improved for all patients, reducing the average relative standard deviation of the target dose distribution from 2.3 to 1.8%. A consistent reduction in the maximum doses to surrounding normal tissue volumes was also found. The most notable improvement was demonstrated in the rectum where the volume receiving more than the prescribed tumour dose was halved. Treatment with PWBs would permit a target dose escalation of 2-6 Gy in several of the patients analyzed, without increasing the overall risk for complications. The number of patients suitable for dose escalation ranged from 3 to 15, depending on whether support from all or only one of the five applied NTCP model/parameter combinations were required in each case to recommend dose escalation. Conclusion: PWBs represent a simple dose conformation tool that may allow radiation dose escalation in the treatment of muscle

  13. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before radiotherapy can be initiated, the patient must be examined thoroughly according to specific protocol to determine the extent of the tumor. Surgical resection accompanied by radiotherapy may be necessary in instances of persistent carcinoma. The radiation response of the tumor must be evaluated, and the optimal tumor dose must be determined to ensure maximum destruction of the tumor and minimum damage to normal tissues. Follow-up examinations should emphasize good oral hygiene to prevent further disease. (U.S.)

  14. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in cancer treatment during pregnancy: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coexistence of pregnancy and cancer is a challenging situation for the physician. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are often necessary, depending on the type and stage of cancer at diagnosis. When applying such treatment, several key points concerning the health of the fetus must be carefully monitored. Meanwhile, if the appropriate treatment is delayed until postpartum, the mother's life may be at risk. Historically, the mother's health was placed above that of the fetus. This concept has changed, and harmonization of maternal and fetal health is now considered ideal. Numerous reports have shown the safe use of chemotherapy especially during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. In 2004 our department treated seven cases of simultaneous cancer and pregnancy, leading us to review the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy during pregnancy and the repercussions on neonatal outcome. (author)

  15. Factors influencing success and failures in radiotherapy and cost of cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cure in cancer can be defined in terms of disease free interval following initial therapy. Disease free interval of four to five years has only 1% year chance of relapse and therefore can be said to have achieved a cure. Various factors influencing success of radiotherapy are discussed. They are : cell type, host site and tissues infiltrated, oxygenation of tumour cells, radiosensitisation of tumour, patient's condition as to anemia and blood pressure, beam quality, increasing radiosensitivity by using ultrasound simultaneously with radiotherapy, fractionated irradiation, dose rate and treatment planning. Two common causes of failure are undetected metastases and local recurrence or incomplete sterilisation of the treated volume. Factors which may lead to incomplete sterilisation are enumerated. Taking into consideration the cost of various components of treatment, the average recurring cost of radiotherapy per patient worked out to be Rs. 1000/- at the hospital attached to the Medical college, Bikaner. (M.G.B.)

  16. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for high-risk T1-bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Current treatment options for high-risk superficial T1-bladder cancer (Grade 3, associated Tis, multifocality, tumor diameter>5 cm or multiple recurrences) include early cystectomy or the goal of organ preservation by adjuvant intravesical therapy after transurethral resection (TURB). We have evaluated the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy on local control, bladder preservation, recurrence rate and long-term survival after TURB of high-risk T1-bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: From May 1982 to May 1999, a total of 74 patients with T1-bladder cancer were treated by either radiotherapy (n=17) or concomitant radiochemotherapy (n=57) after TURB. Radiotherapy was initiated 4 to 8 weeks after TURB; a median dose of 54 (range; 45 to 60) Gy was applied to the bladder with daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.0 Gy. Since 1985 chemotherapy has been given in the 1st and 5th week of radiotherapy and consisted of cisplatin (25 mg/m2/d) in 33 patients, carboplatin (65 mg/m2/d) was administered in 14 patients with decreased creatine clearance (2/d) and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/d) was applied to 10 patients. Salvage cystectomy was recommended for patients with refractory disease or invasive recurrences. At the time of analysis, the median follow-up for surviving patients was 57 (range: 3 to 174) months. Results: After radiotherapy/radiochemotherapy, a complete remission at restaging TURB was achieved in 62 patients (83.7%), 35 of whom (47% with regard to the total cohort of the 74 treated patients) have been continuously free of tumor, 11 patients (18%) experienced a superficial relapse and 16 patients (26%) showed tumor progression after initial complete response. Overall-survival was 72% at 5 years and 50% at 10 years with 77% of the surviving patients maintaining their own bladder at 5 years. Negative prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival were non-complete (R1/2) initial TURB (p=0.12) and recurrent disease (p=0.07); combined radiochemotherapy

  17. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 ± 0.80 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 ± 1.22 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy

  18. Treatment results of radiotherapy for early tongue cancer of young age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment results of early tongue cancer of young age are still controversial. Low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy with or without external radiotherapy was mainly used for early tongue cancer in our institute. Patients with 70 early tongue cancer less than 40 years old were treated with radiotherapy alone. The 5-year local control and cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 78% and 80%, respectively. There were no significant differences between those of the middle age group (40-64 years old) and of the old age group (65 years old or more). Univariate analysis was performed using young patients. Significant factors of poor prognosis were tumor thickness (more than 11 mm) for local control, tumor thickness and sex (male) for nodal control and tumor thickness, T stage (T2) and sex for CSS. The tumor type was not a significant factor in the 5-year control rate. However, higher local recurrence rate was shown in the indurative type within first three years and late recurrences were often observed in the superficial or exophytic type. Treatment results of radiotherapy for early tongue cancer of the young age were not worse than of the older age. However, it seems important to select the treatment method according to prognostic factors. (author)

  19. Intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer, first experience in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is an important step forward in cancer treatment. Aim: To report the first experience in Chile with IMRT for prostate cancer and compare the results obtained with different doses. Patients and Methods: From January 1997 through June 2008, 156 patients with a mean age of 70 years, were treated with radiotherapy and 121 with IMRT. Patients were staged according to American Commission on Cancer Staging. Their biochemical relapse risk was classified according to the MD Anderson classification. Patients were routinely checked during and after therapy to evaluate side effects and relapse. Results: Median follow up was 46 months (4-120). Overall five years survival was 85%. Biochemical relapse free five years survival for low, intermediate and high risk patients was 100, 82 and 70%, respectively. Biochemical relapse free survival for patients receiving radiotherapy doses over 76 Gy was 83%, compared to 30% for those receiving lower doses (p < 0.05). Urinary and gastrointestinal acute toxicity was low in 80% and 90% of patients respectively. Late toxicity developed in less than 3% of patients. Conclusions: IMRT for prostate cancer is readily available and safe in Chile. Biochemical disease free survival improved with higher doses with low toxicity rates Background: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is an important step forward in cancer treatment. Aim: To report the first experience in Chile with IMRT for prostate cancer and compare the results obtained with different doses. Patients and Methods: From January 1997 through June 2008, 156 patients with a mean age of 70 years, were treated with radiotherapy and 121 with IMRT. Patients were staged according to American Commission on Cancer Staging. Their biochemical relapse risk was classified according to the MD Anderson classification. Patients were routinely checked during and after therapy to evaluate side effects and relapse. Results: Median follow up was 46 months

  20. Role of curative radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1963 to 1974, 141 patients with lung cancer were treated with curative intent in the A. Maxwell Evans Clinic in Vancouver. The clinical presentation, age and sex distribution, histology, and reasons for surgery not being carried out are examined. The results of this treatment are presented. An attempt has been made to isolate a group of patients who have a better prognosis so that treatment selection can be improved. Hemoptysis, cough, dyspnea, and incidental finding on routine chest x-ray were the most common manner of presentation. Thirty-four percent of the patients were over 70 years of age and 13% were women. The crude overall three- and five-year survival rates were 18 and 10% (19 and 9% in the men, 17 and 14% in the women). Patients presenting with dyspnea had a better survival than those presenting with cough and hemoptysis. Patients with lesions less than 3 cm in diameter had a 28% three-year survival, compared with 14% for lesions greater than 5 cm in diameter. The three- and five-year survival rates in patients over 70 years of age were 23 and 17% respectively. The response to treatment and the survival were better in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-two percent were alive at three years and 12% at five years as compared with 9 and 5% for other histologies. Fifty-four percent of the 35 patients with a complete response and with squamous cell carcinoma were alive at three years, compared with only 8% of the 12 patients with other histologies who showed a complete response

  1. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  2. Impact of Radiation in Critical Organs in Radiotherapy Treatment of Breast and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Dhungana, Sudarshan

    2010-02-01

    Various 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques are commonly used in the treatment of cancerous tumors at appropriate prescription doses (PDs). The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of radiation in heart and lungs in left breast and left lung cancer patients treated using 3DCRT techniques. Treatment plans for the eight breast cancer patients (n=8), eight lung cancer patients at early stage (m=8), and eight lung cancer patients at stage II and III (k=8) were evaluated. Relative complication probabilities (RCPs) for the irradiated organs were computed from the plans using HART [Med. Phys. 36, p.2547 (2009)] program at PD. The RCPs were found to be (i) 2.3% (n=8, PD=56 Gy), 6.4% (m=8, PD=30.7 Gy), and 16.7% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the heart, (ii) 1% (n=6, PD=58.4 Gy) for the left lung, and (iii) 7% (m=6, PD=31 Gy) and 5.3% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the whole lung. Homogeneous target coverage and improved dose conformality were the major advantages in the treatment of breast cancer. Therefore, simple 3DCRT based whole-breast irradiation and partial lung treatment techniques can offer promising results while adequately sparing the organs in the treatment of breast and lung cancers. )

  3. Radiotherapy in cancer treatment: Present status, realizable clinical advances, and further development trends in radiooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many decades of local cancer therapy have led to the present balance that 35% of all patients can be cured by local measures. Half of the successful cancer treatments are due to high-voltage therapy. With improved local measures, the near future might see a further increase in the cancer healing rate. Surgical treatment has probably reached its limits by now, but further developments in cancer radiotherapy and radiocurability are already in sight. With an optimum development of local cancer therapy, therapy might be successful in more than 50% of all cases. The superiority of radiotherapy with fast neutrons has been clinically proven, and it has become generally applicable by the introduction of neutron generators. Negative pions are extremely expensive and difficult to produce and biologically inferior to fast neutrons. Still, it is possible that they may be used in tumour therapy for a limited range of applications in rare and complex situations in tumour therapy. The application of so-called electron-affine substances of the nitroidimazole type has highly improved the radiocurability of many different tumours in animal experiments. (orig./MG)

  4. Axillary radiotherapy: an alternative treatment option for adjuvant axillary management of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Axillary lymph node dissection is standard management of axilla in invasive breast cancer. Radiotherapy also is important in local treatment. It is controversial as to whether axillary radiotherapy can displace axillary lymph node dissection. We performed a meta-analysis comparing axillary radiotherapy with axillary dissection. No significant difference was observed for disease free survival and overall survival between the radiation group and the dissection group. There was also no significant difference in either the axillary recurrence or the local recurrence between the two groups. But the axillary relapse rate in the radiation group was higher than in the surgery group at five-year follow-up while the local recurrence rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group. A subgroup analysis showed that the difference in the axillary recurrence rate (RR = 0.20, P = 0.01) and local recurrence rate (RR = 4.7, P = 0.01) mainly appeared in the clinical node-positive subgroup. The edema rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group (RR = 2.08, 95%: 1.71–2.54, P < 0.0001). We concluded that radiotherapy may be an alternative treatment option for adjuvant management of the axilla in selected sub-groups of patients. PMID:27212421

  5. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in the treatment of early breast cancer: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Ismaili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT in early breast cancer was investigated by few authors and remains controversial. This treatment is more commonly used for locally advanced breast cancer and showed high rate of complete pathological response. A search of articles published in English literature, between 1980 and November 2012, was conducted on Medline using the following terms: "breast cancer", "chemotherapy", "concurrent radiotherapy", and "Trastuzumab". We identified five phase I/II trials and three randomized phase three trials evaluating concurrent chemoradiotherapy in the adjuvant of breast cancer. In patients with early breast cancer having positive lymph nodes, phases III clinical trials showed that CCRT improved local control after conservative breast surgery. However, these randomized trials used non-standard regimen: Cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF or fluorouracil, mitoxantrone and cyclophosphamide (FNC. In addition, in phases II clinical trials, concurrent use of taxanes and anthracycline with standard whole-breast irradiation showed high rate of toxicity: Pulmonary toxicity with taxane; and cardiac and skin toxicity with anthracycline. Consequentely, CCRT is not be used in practice because of concerns of toxicity with the standard drugs (anthracyclines and taxanes and radiation. Anthracyclines with partial breast irradiation (PBI was feasible according to one phase I clinical trial, and should be investigated in randomized clinical trials. Concurrent Trastuzumab plus radiotherapy is safe and can be used in HER2-positive breast cancer; in this case, cardiac volume sparing and patient selections for internal mammary chain irradiation are highly recommended. The present paper aimed to review the current data evaluating the efficacy and safety of CCRT in early breast cancer.

  6. Remote afterloading high dose-rate intracavity radiotherapy for advanced maxillary cancer. Treatment with individual appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven advanced maxillary cancers, 5 squamous cell carcinomas, and 2 adenoid cystic carcinomas were treated with remote afterloading high dose-rate intracavity radiotherapy. For treatment, we fabricated individual dental acrylic appliances for the postoperative area of the oral cavity. Because the appliance was specially matched to the remaining maxillary structures, radiation doses to the treated area were easily reproduced without distress to the patient. However, minor or major complications (moderate or severe mucositis and osteoradionecrosis) were observed in all patients. In this study, the number of patients was too small to assess the significance of this treatment. Nevertheless, with improvements, we think that remote afterloading high dose-rate intracavity radiotherapy with a dental acrylic appliance will soon be used to treat advanced maxillary carcinoma. (author)

  7. Quantitative MR imaging in planning and assessing novel cancer treatments Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Baustert, I C

    2001-01-01

    Novel treatments in cancer, like conformal radiotherapy and anticancer drugs, require new MRI techniques to assess their benefits and potential. In conformal radiotherapy, MRI can be used to measure the shape and dose of the conformed radiation field in dose sensitive gel test-objects thus validating the predicted dose computed by complex programs. In antiangiogenic drug treatment, the vascular dysfunction of the tumour can be assessed by MRI prior to treatment. Response to treatment may also be monitored by measuring the changes in vascular function. In this thesis, MRI of polyacrylamide gels is investigated as a 3D dosimeter for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Quantitative MRI sequences capable of measuring the wide range of T2 values typically expected in gel dosimetry, are identified. Different T2 measurement methods are compared in terms of accuracy, signal to noise ratio and acquisition time. Examples of a complex dose distribution in 2D and 3D are presented and compared to the planned dose p...

  8. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Medical School

    2003-02-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  9. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  10. Objective assessment of dermatitis following post-operative radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Kuriyama, Keiko; Yoshida, Mineo [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Yamazaki, Hideya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kotsuma, Tadayuki [Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Fujita, Yuka [Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Masuda, Norikazu [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Surgery

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate radiation dermatitis objectively in patients with breast cancer who had undergone post-operative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Skin color (L{sup *}, a{sup *}, and b{sup *} values) and moisture analyses were performed for both breasts (before, after, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy) to examine irradiated and non-irradiated skin divided into four quadrants in 118 patients. These patients underwent breast conservative surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost irradiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). L{sup *}, a{sup *}, and moisture values were changed by irradiation and maximized at completion or 1 month after radiotherapy. One year after radiotherapy, the skin color had returned to the range observed prior to radiotherapy. However, moisture did not return to previous values even 1 year after treatment. The lateral upper side (quadrant C) showed greater changes than other quadrants in the L{sup *} value (darker) at the end of radiotherapy. The Common Toxicity Criteria version 3 scores were found to correlate well with a{sup *} and L{sup *} values at the completion and 1 month after radiotherapy. Boost radiotherapy intensified reddish and darker color changes at the completion of radiotherapy, while chemotherapy did not intensify the skin reaction caused by radiotherapy. Moisture impairment as a result of irradiation lasts longer than color alterations. Objective assessments are useful for analyzing radiation dermatitis. (orig.)

  11. Particle radiotherapy emerging technology for treatment of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Narayan

    2016-01-01

    The results of decades of research and development are providing compelling evidence about the efficacy of radiation therapy with proton and carbon ion beams to achieve superior complication free tumor control leading to a world-wide rapid growth in their clinical use. This book contains comprehensive reviews of the state of the art of the technology and physics of heavy charge particle therapy by the experts from the leading cancer centers of world that will be valuable as a practical guide for radiation therapy professionals interested in these modalities.

  12. Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone in T3-T4 cancers of the pyriform sinus. Treatment results and patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-four patients with T3-T4 squamous cell carcinomas of the pyriform sinus were treated between 1976 and 1990. Surgery with postoperative radiotherapy (n = 32) was the treatment of choice. Radical radiotherapy was used in patients with contraindications for surgery or with inoperable tumors and in patients who refused surgery. The local control rate was significantly higher in the combined treatment group (31/32; 97%) than in the group treated with radical radiotherapy (14/22; 64%) which consisted of more advanced cases. In patients who received radical radiotherapy, the highest local control rates were recorded with doses of 70 Gy and above and with the use of 2 fractions per day. There was no significant difference in regional control and survival rates between the treatment groups. New approaches are indicated to improve the prognosis of hypopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  13. Radiotherapy for oncologic emergencies on weekends: examining reasons for treatment and patterns of practice at a Canadian cancer centre

    OpenAIRE

    Mitera, G.; Swaminath, A.; Wong, S.; Goh, P.; Robson, S.; Sinclair, E.; Danjoux, C.; Chow, E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy for oncologic emergencies is an important aspect of the management of cancer patients. These emergencies—which include malignant spinal cord compression, brain metastases, superior vena cava obstruction, and uncontrolled tumour hemorrhage —may require treatment outside of hospital hours, particularly on weekends and hospital holidays. To date, there remains no consensus among radiation oncologists regarding the indications and appropriateness of radiotherapy treatment on ...

  14. Postoperative radiotherapy in a shorter overall treatment time for patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical data suggests that irradiation given in a shorter overall treatment time with 2.25 and 2.5 Gy dose per fraction is equivalent to conventional treatment with 2 Gy per fraction. This change from conventional fractionation to a short term schedule has been introduced as the basis of a prospective, population based (phase IV) trial. A vast majority of radiotherapy departments (16) in Poland have entered the study. Patients with breast cancer following mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT) who require postoperative radiotherapy will enter this study. The conventional fractionation regimen (2 Gy per fraction /5 weeks) has been replaced by two schedules given in a shorter overall treatment time. Patients undergoing BCT will now receive 42.5 Gy in 2.5 Gy per fraction over 3.5 weeks while postmastectomy patients will receive 45 Gy in 2.25 Gy per fraction over 4 weeks. The study has been designed for 2000 patients and the anticipated accrual time is 1.5 year. Early and late complications will be evaluated at 1, 3, 5, 10 and 15 years. The principal aim of the study is to assess immediate and late post-irradiation complications. Cardiotoxicity will be assessed by comparison of events (myocardial infarction and/or cardiovascular deaths) between patients with tumours of the left breast and of the right breast. Additional evaluation covers local control, recurrence-free survival, overall survival and the aesthetic effects. Implementation of the short term radiotherapy schedule will reduce the waiting list for radiotherapy and thus allow for the treatment of more patients. We hope to reduce the cost of the treatment by approximately 25% and improve the quality of irradiation through its standardization. (author)

  15. Clinical effect observation of VEGF expression interfered by Thalidomide combined with radiotherapy in esophageal cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prospectively study the dynamic variation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the short-term efficiency and the tolerability of the esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy combined with thalidomide. Methods: The serum samples of 86 esophageal cancer patients were collected before, during and after the radiotherapy. The VEGF levels were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 3 patients interrupted the treatment because of intolerance radiotherapy. Based on the changes of VEGF level, 32 esophageal cancer cases whose VEGF levels increased or remained were assigned to the group to which thalidomide was given during the whole course of radiotherapy. The rest 51 patients whose VEGF level decreased received radiotherapy without thalidomide during the whole course.In addition,30 healthy cases were included in control group. Then the efficiency and safety of the introduction of thalidomide in radiotherapy were investigated. Results: The VEGF levels of 86 esophageal cancer cases were significantly higher than the 30 healthy control cases (t=5.07, P<0.01), which were also correlated with the primary tumor size (t=4.55, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (t=7.50, P<0.01), histological type (F=3.40, P<0.01) and clinical stage (t=2.52, P<0.01). However, it was irrelevant to the lesion site,distant metastasis, X-ray pathologic type, gender or age (P>0.05). For the thalidomide involved group, the VEGF level after radiotherapy was significantly lower than during radiotherapy (t=2.37, P<0.05) with an effective rate of 71.88%. For the rest 51 cases without using thalidomide, the effective rate was 78.43% yet there was no significant difference between the VEGF levels during and after radiotherapy (t=0.18, P>0.05). 62.50% patients reported symptoms of dizzy and burnout after using thalidomide, while this incidence was 15.69% for the rest patients (χ2=19.28, P=0.000). For the groups with or without thalidomide combination, the sleepiness

  16. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet B. Eldredge-Hindy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT.

  17. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer. Preliminary results of 148 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of tumoral resection and radiotherapy with preservation of the breast is called conservative treatment of breast cancer. The literature considers this treatment a good option if used by an experient team and with appropriate equipment. This paper shows the results of 148 cases of breast cancer treated by this conservative approach at Centro de Oncologia Campinas. Follow-up varied from 3 to 87 months (mean 28) considered by the histological diagnosis. Overall actuarial survival of 5 years was 77% disease-free survival 55%. Twelve patients (8%) presented local relapse and 13 (9%) had distant metastases as the first therapeutic failure. Cosmetic results were considered good and fair in 89% of patients. These results are similar to others published in the literature (Author)

  18. The situation of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion of gynecological cancers. La place de la radiotherapie dans le traitement de l'envahissement ganglionnaire des cancers gynecologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J.B. (Centre de Recherche de Lutte contre le Cancer Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France)); Gerbaulet, A. (Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France))

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors explain the role and possibilities of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion in gynecological cancers as uterine cervix carcinoma, uterus carcinoma, ovary carcinoma and vulva carcinoma.

  19. Treatment results of different radiotherapy for 763 patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of different radiotherapy protocols in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Methods: From 1976 to 2006, 763 patients with stage III cervical cancer (722 with squamous cell carcinoma and 41 with adenocarcinoma) were treated by radiotherapy in our hospital. 113 patients were treated by two-field whole pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionation plus brachytherapy (CF group), 44 by four-field whole pelvic irradiation in accelerated hyperfractionation plus brachytherapy (AHF group), and 606 by concomitant four-field unconventional fractionation radiotherapy and brachytherapy( FRT group). Sixty-one patients were treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Among 350 patients who had complete data, the shore-term efficacy and toxicities were compared. Results: For patients in CF, AHF and FRT groups, the 3-year overall survival rates (OS) were 65.7%, 66.8% and 44.3%, respectively (P=0.000), and the 5-year OS were 65.7%, 66.8% and 36.3%, respectively (P=0.000). The 10-year OS were 43.3% and 31.9% in CF and FRT groups(P=0.200). For squamous cell carcinoma,the OS was higher of patients with chemotherapy than those without. In 350 patients who had complete data, the local control rates of CF, AHF and FRT groups were 83.0%, 93.2% and 86.1%, respectively (χ2=2.70, P =0.259); AHF group had the lowest side effect rate, especially skin reaction (9.1%, χ2=20.25, P= 0.002); CF group had the lowest acute bone marrow suppression rate (χ2=25.95, P=0.000); for squamous cell carcinoma, the OS was higher in patients with chemotherapy than those without; the acute bone marrow and intestinal toxicities were more in patients with chemotherapy than those without. Conclusions: CF and AHF groups have similar 5-year OS of patients with advanced cervical cancer. AHF group has less toxicities, shorter treatment course and a trend of better local control. Concurrent chemoradiation could improve survival and local control of the patients with

  20. Efficiency of radiotherapy during local hyperthermia in the treatment of laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Choinzonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the larynx and laryngopharynx, which is accessible to visual and instrumental examination, remains the most relevant and complicated problem among head and neck malignances as before. Investigations show that the incidence of cancer at these sites in Russia in the last decade has risen from 4.5 to 9.67 %. This is a severe and poor prognostic form of cancer, which is characterized by its nonspecific early clinical manifestations, complex anatomic and topographic structure, and a high rate of regional metastases. The mainstay of treatment for head and neck cancer involves 3 components: surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy (RT, which are performed alone or in combination. The most commonly used technique is combined, frequently crippling due to organ-removing operations. The clinical introduction of current radio modifiers, local and deep hyperthermia systems, is a promising approach to improving the results of treatment, to enhancing the radiation damage of RT, and to achieving the tumor regression sufficient for surgical intervention without augmenting the early and late toxicity inherent in chemoradiation treatment. The results of the performed study of 35 patients with T2–3N0–2M0 laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer proved the high efficiency of local hyperthermia in treating malignancies in this region during both preoperative (grades III– IV therapeutic pathomorphism and radical beam RT.

  1. Improved internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers. Methods: A total of 70 patients with stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancer, who were admitted to the authors' hospital (Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Oncology) during the period from May 2005 to August 2009, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy was carried out in 32 patients (study group), and simple radiotherapy was adopted in 38 patients (control group). For patients in study group, puncturing of right femoral artery using Seldinger's technique was performed, which was followed by right uterine artery chemoembolization and subsequent super-selective left iliac artery chemotherapy, which lasted for three days. The chemotherapeutic drugs included cisplatin and fluorouracil. Distance external beam linear accelerator was used for radiotherapy together with 192 Ir high dose rate brachytherapy. For patients in control group, only distance external beam linear accelerator radiotherapy with 192 Ir high dose rate brachytherapy was employed, with the radioactive dose being a little bit smaller than that used in the study group. Results: The one-year survival rate for the study group and the control group was 78.1% and 55.3%, respectively (P0.05). The difference in the occurrence of radiotherapy-related complications was not significant between the two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: For the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers, modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than that of simple radiotherapy for a short-term period. The living quality of the patients can be markedly improved. Nevertheless, the five-year survival rate of chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is not statistically difference from that of simple radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  3. Dose distribution over critical organs during the radiotherapy treatment of some commonly occurred cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiotherapy technique for the treatment of malignant diseases is to deliver a dose as high as possible to malignant cells (tumor) with minimum detriment to surrounding healthy tissues. During radiotherapy treatment procedure, different critical organs of the body receive a scattered or leakage radiation doses. Thermoluminescence Dosimeter is the most reliable and convenient dosimeter used for clinical radiotherapy dosimetry. The scattering dose contribution to the different critical organs during treatment is investigated using Alderson Rando Phantom by thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) technique for 60Co beam. In the present study, three different organs such as lung, larynx and pelvis are considered as the target organs and dose distribution to the nearest critical is presented. It has been observed that the critical organs other than the treatment organ have received a high risk in developing fatal and non-fatal cancer due to scattered dose contribution. It is found that, in treating left lung, some portion of the left lung outside the projected area receives a remarkable dose of 101.38±3.54 cGy, whereas the stomach, right lung, larynx, left kidney, pancreas, and right kidney receives a dose of 1.51±0.10 cGy, 1.18±0.12 cGy, 0.79±0.0.06 cGy, 0.85±0.01 cGy, 0.56±0.03 cGy, and 0.41±0.02 cGy respectively for each fractionation of delivering dose of 200 cGy. In case of larynx treatment, lens of eye receives a dose of 4.31±0.513 cGy but for pelvis treatment cervix, urinary bladder and rectum receive a remarkable dose is reported. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose and approach: to summarize the current knowledge on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The results of meta-analyses, phase III-studies, and phase II-studies using chemoradiation (CRT) and chemotherapy for resectable and non-resectable PDAC are reviewed. Results and conclusion: the role of CRT is undefined in the adjuvant setting but there may be a role as additive treatment after R1 resection. Locally advanced borderline resectable tumors may shrink down and be subject to potentially curative resections. In locally advanced clearly unresectable cancers the effect of CRT as well as chemotherapy is poorly defined and the sequence of chemotherapy and CRT should be re-evaluated. Patients with PDAC should always be treated within studies to identify optimal treatment results. (orig.)

  5. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.)

  6. Radiotherapy as a key method for palliative treatment of advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy (RT) has a key role for reducing symptoms due to tumour progression. It is an important part of the palliative care planned for cancer patient. Nearly 50% of all RT treatment in the world has a palliative aim. Although, the Bulgarian RT equipment is old fashioned, it covers patients' needs. Local RT for bone metastases is equally effective in treatment regimes 1 x 8 Gy; 4-5 x 5-4 Gy; 10 x 3 or 20 x 2 Gy. The advantage of single fraction compared to longer treatment is a short treatment course and reirradiation option. It is suitable for high lethal risk patients (Karnovski 89Sr, 32P, 153Sa, 186Re offer a longer and better effect for multiple bone lesions.The radiobiological mechanisms of palliative RT on the tumour as macrophages and osteoclasts involvement, chemical mediators of pain are described. The paper aims to transfer the evidence based current knowledge into Bulgarian radiotherapy practice in order to modernize it in the field of palliative treatment

  7. Analysis of whole Breast Radiotherapy Methods for Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer after Conserving Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. At present moment breast cancer in Latvia is at second place for whole population and at first place among women. In year 2004 there were 1012 new breast cancer cases discovered. There was growth in number of breast cancer patients from 58.6 per 100 000 inhabitants in 1995 to 80.4 per 100 000 inhabitants in 2004. This growth is primarily attributed to breast cancer screening program which is nowadays active in Latvia. Breast cancer is third death cause among cancers in Latvia, - in 1995 there where 27.4 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants and in 2004 - 36.2 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants. Due to screening program there is increasing number of patients with stage I and II breast cancer. In 2004 toe where 9884 women with breast cancer registered in Latvian Cancer Registry and among them 79 percent were presented as stage I or II. Breast conservative surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy as standard part of it plays great role in breast cancer treatment in our Center. In year 2004 there were 103 breast conservative surgeries performed in our Center. Radiotherapy is a standard part of treatment in modem breast saving operations for early stage breast cancer, At present, only whole breast postoperative irradiation is performed in Latvia. For selected group of patients this treatment can be substituted with other radiotherapy methods in order to reduce acute reactions and/or late toxicity, maintaining the same tumor control. Aim of this work is to show that during whole breast irradiation dose maximum and tissue volume which receives doses more than 105% from prescribed dose, is linked with size of treated volume (treated volume - tissue volume receiving > 95% from prescribed dose), which is strictly linked with breast volume. Because of this for large breast volumes there is higher complication probability performing whole breast irradiation, and it seems to be meaningful to use Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy or Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for

  8. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Katarina Wiviann; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard; Borrisova, S.; Mellemgaard, Anders; Behrens, Claus Flensted

    2014-01-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Ho......Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep...... locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking...... perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer....

  9. Determinants of variability in waiting times for radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine psycho-social and geographic determinants of delay in starting radiotherapy in early invasive breast cancer patients. Material and methods: Waiting time was defined as the time elapsed until the beginning of radiotherapy, starting from the date of surgery (in absence of chemotherapy) or from the end of chemotherapy. Results: Eight hundred and ninety six women aged 24-89 took part in the study. Mean waiting times were 52 days (sd = 19) between surgery and radiotherapy and 31 days (sd = 14) between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Differences between radiotherapy centres (p < 0.0001) accounted for 30% and 12%, respectively, of total variance in waiting times. Using a multivariate mixed analysis that took into account intra-centre correlation, the time between surgery and radiotherapy was shorter for young patients (p = 0.020), those who had sought information about their illness (p = 0.024) and those who had undergone surgery and radiotherapy in the same centre (p = 0.021). On the other hand, no patient characteristic was associated with the time between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion: Centre is the major factor that explained longer waiting times in radiotherapy, emphasising the structural hypothesis. It is important to pursue initiatives to improve the organization within radiotherapy centres and then to verify that these initiatives have succeeded in shortening waiting times.

  10. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V45Gy and V55Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V25Gy and V40Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V40Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V45Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V55Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  11. Similar Treatment Outcomes for Radical Cystectomy and Radical Radiotherapy in Invasive Bladder Cancer Treated at a United Kingdom Specialist Treatment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To conduct a retrospective analysis within a large university teaching hospital, comparing outcomes between patients receiving either radical surgery or radiotherapy as curative treatment for bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: Between March 1996 and December 2000, 169 patients were treated radically for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Data were collected from patient notes. Statistical analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compare radiotherapy and surgical outcome data. Results: There was no difference in overall, cause-specific, and distant recurrence-free survival at 5 years between the two groups, despite the radiotherapy group being older (median age, 75.3 years vs. 68.2 years). There were 31 local bladder recurrences in the radiotherapy group (24 solitary), but there was no significant difference in distant recurrence-free survival. In a more recent (2002-2006) cohort, the median age of radiotherapy patients but not the cystectomy patients was higher than in the 1996-2000 cohort (78.4 years vs. 75.3 years for radiotherapy and 67.9 years vs. 68.2 years for surgery). Conclusions: Although the patients undergoing radical cystectomy were significantly younger than the radiotherapy patients, treatment modality did not influence survival. Bladder cancer patients are an increasingly elderly group. Radical radiotherapy is a viable treatment option for these patients, with the advantage of organ preservation

  12. Concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional treatment of localized breast cancer involves the use of both systemic therapy and loco-regional radiation after surgery. The ideal sequence of these two treatments is still undefined. This paper focus on our experience of concomitant chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT), and discusses information from the literature about this issue. Between Jan,1989 and Jan, 1999 a retrospective analysis of 103 patients with ductal carcinoma of the breast who received concomitant CT with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5 flurouracil (CMF) and RT was made. Radiation did not included mammary chain or axilla and total dose was of 50 Gy. End points were tolerance and oxicity leading changes to doses. Mean age was 44y; median follow up time of 33 mo; 62 patients had breast conserving surgery and 41 had mastectomy. All patients received both treatments without a break or dose modification. There was no change or interruption of RT. Ten out of 103 patients had the prescribed dose of CT decreased of 10%-20%. There was no evident changes in cosmetic results. Most of the knowledge regarding the delay of CT or RT comes from retrospective studies, and results are conflicting. It is well accepted that high risk patients need both CT and RT. However, there are data suggesting that giving RT first and CT after may increase the rate of distant metastases. There are also studies showing worse impact in the local control with the delay of radiotherapy. The use of concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy has apparent advantages, but no randomized trial has addressed this issue yet. Our experience has shown that is possible to give concomitant CT with CMF and RT without irradiation of IMC and axilla without major changes in scheduling or dose of both therapies. (author)

  13. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefenbacher Uta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost significantly. To what extent this might be possible without impairing treatment outcome and cosmetic results remains to be clarified. Methods/Design The IMRT-MC2 study is a prospective, two armed, multicenter, randomized phase-III-trial comparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with integrated boost to conventional radiotherapy with consecutive boost in patients with breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. 502 patients will be recruited and randomized into two arms: patients in arm A will receive IMRT in 28 fractions delivering 50.4 Gy to the breast and 64.4 Gy to the tumor bed by integrated boost, while patients in arm B will receive conventional radiotherapy of the breast in 28 fractions to a dose of 50.4 Gy and consecutive boost in 8 fractions to a total dose of 66.4 Gy. Discussion Primary objectives of the study are the evaluation of the cosmetic results 6 weeks and 2 years post treatment and the 2- and 5-year local recurrence rates for the two different radiotherapy strategies. Secondary objectives are long term overall survival, disease free survival and quality of life. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol ID: NCT01322854.

  14. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost significantly. To what extent this might be possible without impairing treatment outcome and cosmetic results remains to be clarified. The IMRT-MC2 study is a prospective, two armed, multicenter, randomized phase-III-trial comparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with integrated boost to conventional radiotherapy with consecutive boost in patients with breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. 502 patients will be recruited and randomized into two arms: patients in arm A will receive IMRT in 28 fractions delivering 50.4 Gy to the breast and 64.4 Gy to the tumor bed by integrated boost, while patients in arm B will receive conventional radiotherapy of the breast in 28 fractions to a dose of 50.4 Gy and consecutive boost in 8 fractions to a total dose of 66.4 Gy. Primary objectives of the study are the evaluation of the cosmetic results 6 weeks and 2 years post treatment and the 2- and 5-year local recurrence rates for the two different radiotherapy strategies. Secondary objectives are long term overall survival, disease free survival and quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol ID: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01322854

  15. Every second cancer patient receives radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy to treat cancer was given for the first time exactly one hundred years ago. Today, radiotherapy and surgery are the two main modes of treating cancer. One in two cancer patients receives radiotherapy at some point during the course of treatment for the disease. Radiotherapy is applied most commonly in cases where surgery is not possible. Moreover, these two modes of treatment are often used together to supplement each other. About half of new cancer cases detected today can be ordered. The estimate given by the EU for cancers cured is 45 per cent, which is divided between the various treatment modes as follows: surgery 22 %, radiotherapy 12 %, surgery plus radiotherapy 6 %, and drug therapy 6 %. In addition to curative treatment, radiotherapy plays a crucial role in palliative treatment, i.e. treatment that alleviates symptoms. The sensitivity of malignant tumours to radiotherapy varies over a wide range; the same is true for healthy tissues. Radiotherapy can only be used to cure a tumour that is more sensitive to radiation than the surrounding healthy tissue. The tumour must also be sufficiently small in size and limited to a relatively small area. (orig.)

  16. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  17. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaert, S.L.; Troost, E.G.C.; Schuurbiers, O.C.J.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Termeer, A.; Span, P.N.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS AND MATERIAL

  18. Prognostic biomarkers for survival after treatment of a cancer disease with radio-therapy and/or chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Carnero, Amancio

    2012-01-01

    The present invention new methods of using proteins markers MAP17 and/or SGLT1, or mRNA encoding these proteins, as indicators for survival after treatment of a human subject suffering from a cancer disease with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.

  19. Pulmonary function following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer and the issue of three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The frequency and grade of pulmonary complications following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer are still debated. This study focuses on loss of pulmonary function. Materials and methods: We have measured the reduction of pulmonary function 5 months following radiotherapy in 144 node-positive stage II breast cancer patients by using pulmonary function tests. Results: No deterioration of pulmonary function was detected among the patients who were treated with local radiotherapy. On the contrary, there was a mean increase in diffusion capacity by 7% (P=0.004) following radiotherapy, which most likely was explained by the adjuvant chemotherapy administered prior to the baseline pulmonary function tests. Patients undergoing loco-regional radiotherapy showed a mean reduction in diffusion capacity by 5% (P<0.001) and in vital capacity by 3% (P=0.001). The subset of patients (9%) who were diagnosed with severe pulmonary complications needing cortisone treatment had significantly larger mean paired differences in vital capacity (-0.446 L, -15% (equivalent to 15 years of normal ageing or the loss of 3/4 of a lung lobe)) compared to the patients who were asymptomatic (-0.084 L) (P<0.05). When the effects of potential confounding factors and different radiotherapy techniques were tested on the reduction of pulmonary function by stepwise multiple regression analysis, a significant correlation was found only to loco-regional radiotherapy including the lower internal mammary lymph nodes. Conclusions: We conclude that a clinically important reduction of pulmonary function is seen in the subset of patients who are diagnosed with severe pulmonary complication following loco-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer. The results of this study warrant further studies based on individual lung dose volume histograms. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Study of effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is described the problems related to the radiotherapy treatments of patients with prostate cancer and hip implants Analyze the effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments and present the methods to overcome the problems that arise in these situations. Our patients are student in a TAC Philips with a range of Hounsfield number of-1000 to 4000. The planning and measurement of CT numbers are done in a RTP ADAC Pinnacle that have a maximum of 32767 CT units. The metallic implants more frequently used, titanium, stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, generate CT numbers from 2000 to 3000, and cause saturation effects. This problem may be solved with modern scanners that use the extended CT range. It is an algorithm that expand the usual range by a factor of 10. An alternative solution to this problem can be used if the prostheses are able to scan to select the window parameters that allow an automatic region of interest (roi) definition that match to the dimensions of the implants. Finally it is assigned the electronic/physical densities to the created roi's. The clinical dosimetry of patients with prostheses have been done defining the usual regions of interests (target volume and risk organs) in first place. Finally the prostheses are outlined using the window parameters previously measured and assigned the electronic or physical densities. The attenuation of the implant may then be calculated accurately. The presence of implants in the treatment fields originate artifacts in the TAC images of patients and underdosage of target volume that range between 12% and 30% in function of material an energy used. It is necessary the application of methods that correct the dose behind the implant, if it is not possible to prevent the incidence of the treatment beams over the prostheses. (Author)

  1. Treatment results of preoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and nine patients with advanced head and neck cancers (oral cavity: 50, oropharynx: 11, hypopharynx: 18, larynx: 30) received preoperative radiotherapy from 1987 through 1997 in our institute. The median age was 66 years (20-83). Almost all patients had advanced disease (stage II: 17, III: 34, IV: 58). The median dose of preoperative radiotherapy was 40 Gy (20-50). Seventy patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all patients were 66% and 56%, respectively. The 5-year locoregional and distant failure rates were 36% and 10%, respectively. The locoregional failure rate of oral cavity cancer (54%) was worse than those of other sites (13-28%) (p=0.0015). The locoregional failure rates of oral cavity cancers according to clinical stage were 59% (II), 57% (III) and 48% (IV), respectively. Incidentally those of other sites were 0% (II), 16% (III) and 30% (IV), respectively. Thirty-eight patients had major complication after surgery. The locoregional failure rates of preoperative radiotherapy following surgery for oral cavity cancers of all stages and other sites of stage IV were high. Preoperative radiotherapy should be stopped and postoperative radiotherapy for these patients should be considered. (author)

  2. Evaluation of superficial hyperthermia and radiotherapy combination as a palliative treatment of skin and lymphatic nodes cancer metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Evaluation of superficial hyperthermia and radiotherapy combination effectiveness and toxicity as a palliative treatment of skin and lymphatic nodes cancer metastases. Mean tumor diameter before the treatment was 4.7 cm and varied from 0.5 to 15 cm. Tumor diameter decreased to 3.2 cm within two weeks. During following two controls mean tumor diameters were 3.6 and 3.8 cm. Next, majority of tumors started to progress and 7.5 months after treatment mean diameter was 5.4 cm. During two next examinations mean tumor diameter were 6.0 and 5.7 cm respectively. Mean percentage regression was biggest two weeks after treatment completion (28 %). This values were 20 % and 23 % during two following controls. Next, the progression started. The correlation analysis showed statistically significant dependency between total radiation dose and regression after 1.5 months after the treatment (p=0.04, R=0.4). No significant dependencies were found between tumor regressions dependently on pathological, clinical diagnoses and metastases location. Obtained results allow to form conclusion that combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy could be as useful as a palliative treatment modality for skin and nodal cancer metastases, but final evaluation of such treatment is very difficult because of its local character and systemic character of advanced cancers. Eventual gain from this combined treatment should be confirmed in relation to radiotherapy alone, probably for each techniques performed in particular centers. (author)

  3. Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  4. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies tha...

  5. Contribution of customised dosimetry for small animal to the treatments of cancers by metabolic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis first reports a bibliographical study which addressed the use of ionizing radiations in cancer therapy (evolution from ionizing radiation to metabolic radiotherapy, biological and physical parameters, and absorbed dose in metabolic radiotherapy) and the role imagery has in customised dosimetry (absorbed dose calculation methods, determination of cumulative activity, dosimetric models for S factor calculation). Then, the author presents a software which has been specifically developed for the creation of dosimetric models, and reports its validation. He reports the comparison between different dosimetric models in the case of mice. He highlights two applications of the developed tool: radio-immunotherapy and metabolic radiotherapy. He finally proposes a general discussion on the impact of small animal dosimetry on metabolic radiotherapy

  6. Physical and clinical implications of radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer using a full bladder protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambria, Raffaella; Cattani, Federica; Luraschi, Rosa; Pedroli, Guido [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Medical Physics; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Orecchia, Roberto [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. degli Studi of Milano, Milan (Italy); Zerini, Dario [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Serafini, Flavia [Unita operativa di radioterapia, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant' Anna, Como (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    To assess the dosimetric and clinical implication when applying the full bladder protocol for the treatment of the localized prostate cancer (PCA). A total of 26 consecutive patients were selected for the present study. Patients underwent two series of CT scans: the day of the simulation and after 40 Gy. Each series consisted of two consecutive scans: (1) full bladder (FB) and (2) empty bladder (EB). The contouring of clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs at risk (OAR) were compared to evaluate organ motion. Treatment plans were compared by dose distribution and dose-volume histograms (DVH). CTV shifts were negligible in the laterolateral and superior-inferior directions (the maximum shift was 1.85 mm). Larger shifts were recorded in the anterior-posterior direction (95% CI, 0.83-4.41 mm). From the dosimetric point of view, shifts are negligible: the minimum dose to the CTV was 98.5% (median; 95%CI, 95-99%). The potential advantage for GU toxicity in applying the FB treatment protocol was measured: the ratio between full and empty bladder dose-volume points (selected from our protocol) is below 0.61, excluding the higher dose region where DVHs converge. Having a FB during radiotherapy does not affect treatment effectiveness, on the contrary it helps achieve a more favorable DVH and lower GU toxicities.

  7. Cispaltino in radiotherapy and treatment of cancer advanced cervical and high risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulltext: Uterine cervix cancer (CCU) is a frequent disease Uruguay, killing more than 100 women per year. The standard treatment CCU for patients with locoregionally advanced cataloged as (LRA), stages IIB-IVA and operated and in those patients with high risk factors relapse (AFR) was until 1999 the radiotherapy (RT) exclusive. in February that year the National Cancer Institute USA underwent a medical alert recommending the use of chemotherapy (CT) with concomitant RT (mainly cisplatin) in this group of patients. This alert was due to the publication of 5 randomized work showing an improvement in both the locoregional control and overall survival. In June 2000, both the RT Service ospital and Clinics in INDO, I modified the standard treatment of these patients by adding cisplatin 40mg/m2 weekly for the treatment of external RT. From that date until January 2003, 36 patients were included with CCU LRA or operated with AFR. the risk factors were: tumors larger than 4cm, parametrial invasion, lymph positive, involved margins, suboptimal surgery or deep infiltration stroma. 18 patients had stage IIIB or IV and of which 6 had failure obstructive acute renal (acute obstructive renal failure). Tolerance was acceptable, only one patient not tolerated treatment for severe leucopenia continuing exclusive RT; 68% had leukopenia grade - 2 and there was no increase in toxicity gastrointestinal or urinary. There were no treatment related deaths. When comparing historical results verified an improvement in complete answers to all stages primarily for advanced in the second period with the addition of cisplatin. Stage IB2-IIB: 52% (RT-CT) - 45% RT (historical) ns. Stage IIB: 22% (RT-CT) - 15% RT (historical) sl. In those patients with acute obstructive renal failure in any complete response was not achieved. Due to the short track differences still not tested for the surviving whole or survive disease-free

  8. Genital-sparing technique of pelvic radiotherapy for treatment of rectal and anal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe our genital-sparing technique of postoperative radiotherapy used to deliver 5,000 rad in six weeks to only the pelvic tissues at risk for recurrence following surgery for adenocarcinoma of the rectum, as well as our technique of combined external-beam and interstitial endocurietherapy used to deliver 9,000 rad to primary anal cancers. (author)

  9. Palliative treatment of Erdheim-Chester disease with radiotherapy: A Rare Cancer Network study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of the use of palliative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in nine patients with Erdheim-Chester disease was conducted through the Rare Cancer Network. Patients received EBRT for bone pain, brain infiltration, or retro-orbital involvement. EBRT typically provided short-term palliation, with later recurrence of symptoms in most cases

  10. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V20, V30, or V40) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within 20 was 364.0 cm3 and 160.0 cm3 (p 30 was 144.6 cm3vs 77.0 cm3 (p = 0.0012), V35 was 93.9 cm3vs 57.9 cm3 (p = 0.005), V40 was 66.5 cm3vs 45.4 cm3 (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures

  11. A technique using 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT for radiotherapy treatment planning for liver cancers or metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) requires a sufficient functional liver volume to tolerate the treatment. The current study extended the work of de Graaf et al. (2010) [3] on the use of 99mTc-mebrofenin imaging for presurgery planning to radiotherapy planning for liver cancer or metastases. Patient was immobilized and imaged in an identical position on a single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT-CT) system and a radiotherapy simulation CT system. 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT was registered to the planning CT through image registration of noncontrast CT from SPECT-CT system to the radiotherapy planning CT. The voxels with higher uptake of 99mTc-mebrofenin were transferred to the planning CT as an avoidance structure in optimizing a 2-arc RapidArc plan for SBRT delivery. Excellent dose coverage to the target and sparing of the healthy remnant liver volume was achieved. This report illustrated a procedure for the use of 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT for optimizing radiotherapy for liver cancers and metastases

  12. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT

  13. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Maxillary Sinus Cancer: Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicities of Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the effects of three changes in radiotherapy technique on the outcomes for patients irradiated postoperatively for maxillary sinus cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 146 patients treated between 1969 and 2002 were reviewed. The patients were separated into two groups according to the date of treatment. Group 1 included 90 patients treated before 1991 and Group 2 included 56 patients treated after 1991, when the three changes were implemented. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: No differences were found in the 5-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, local control, nodal control, or distant metastasis rates between the two groups (51% vs. 62%, 51% vs. 57%, 76% vs. 70%, 82% vs. 83%, and 28% vs. 17% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively). The three changes were to increase the portals to cover the base of the skull in patients with perineural invasion, reducing their risk of local recurrence; the addition of elective neck irradiation in patients with squamous or undifferentiated histologic features, improving the nodal control, distant metastasis, and recurrence-free survival rates (64% vs. 93%, 20% vs. 3%, and 45% vs. 67%, respectively; p < 0.05 for all comparisons); and improving the dose distributions within the target volume, reducing the late Grade 3-4 complication rates (34% in Group 1 vs. 8% in Group 2, p = 0.014). Multivariate analysis revealed advancing age, the need for enucleation, and positive margins as independent predictors of worse overall survival. The need for enucleation also predicted for worse local control. Conclusion: The three changes in radiotherapy technique improved the outcomes for select patients as predicted. Despite these changes, little demonstrable overall improvement occurred in local control or survival for these patients and additional work must be done

  14. Targeting EGFR and COX-2 as a potential treatment improvement strategy in cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular targeting, i.e. use of agents that counteract molecular processes that are dysregulated in cancer cells, which may be responsible for tumor radio-or chemoresistance, is a recently extensively investigated approach to further improve radiotherapy, chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Many potential targets for augmentation of radio (or chemo) response have been identified including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, mutated ras and angiogenic molecules. Agents that selectively inhibit these molecules are becoming available at a rapid rate, and many of them have been shown in preclinical testing to be highly effective in improving tumor radioresponse or chemoresponse, without significantly affecting normal tissues. The interaction of EGFR and COX-2 inhibitors with radiation has attracted a flare of investigational interest, and is over-viewed here. EGFR is frequently overexpressed or mutated in many types of cancer, which is associated with more aggressive tumor behavior and poorer tumor response to cytotoxic agents, including radiation. Blockade of EGFR or interference with its downstream signaling processes can improve tumor treatment. Our own studies, using human tumor xenografts, demonstrated that blocking EGFR with C225 anti-EGFR antibody produces a dramatic enhancement of tumor radioresponse, and even more dramatic response when radiation is combined with chemotherapeutic agents. C225 acts by a number of mechanisms including inhibition of DNA repair from radiation damage, enhancement of apoptosis and tumor necrosis, and by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activation by small molecule agents, such as Iressa or Tarceva, is another approach in interfering with EGFR-signaling, which also showed potent enhancing effect on tumor radioresponse. There are two COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. While COX-1 is a ubiquitous constitutive enzyme having housekeeping physiological function, COX-2 is an

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity

  16. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, αspread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  17. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  18. Combined treatment of advanced oropharyngeal cancer with external radiotherapy and three-step radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer remains grim due to poor locoregional tumour control. In the attempt to eradicate residual disease, various novel modalities have been tested, among which radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has shown some potential. We present a case of locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma successfully treated with a combination of various treatments including surgery, radio-chemotherapy and three-step RIT, with the avidin-biotin pretargeting system. A partial tumour response was achieved after surgery and radio-chemotherapy; persistent disease was documented at computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) and immunoscintigraphy (ISG) 10 weeks after the end of chemo-radiotherapy. The good correlation between the tracer localization in the scintigraphic images and residual mass visualized at CT suggested the application of three-step RIT using systemic administration of yttrium-90 (py) biotin. At present, 17 months after RIT, the patient is alive with no evidence of disease as documented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and US. This is the first case of complete clinical remission of a head and neck carcinoma induced by combined treatment including pretargeted RIT with 90Y-biotin. (orig.)

  19. [Cryotherapy, combined drug therapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cavity cancer: 3 years' experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellino, V; Goia, F; Gandolfo, S; Camoletto, D

    1980-01-01

    The medium-term (three years) result of a multidisciplinary association treatment of carcinoma of the oral cavity has been reviewed. Treatment was Cryosurgery-polychemotherapy-ratiotherapy and the technique has been described along with the times of association in an introduction that has already been published in this review (see bibliography). Thirty patients were treated with the association because they refused or could not be submitted to surgery at the intital therapeutic action. All these patients present fairly extensive lesions and a three-year follow-up. Results were positive: 56.6% of patients showed disappearance of any objective or subjective sign of cancer and, in all cases, appreciable remission in terms of both extent and duration. The easiness of the technique is confirmed as well as the excellent conversation of the anatomical structures involved. However, a critical review of cases presenting partial failure suggest a classifications of oral carcinomatous lesions (for therapeutic purposes only) on the basis of which the condition can be treated with cryo-polychemo-radiotherapy alone or with a variation of this which provides for the addition of local exersis. PMID:6935521

  20. Radiotherapy of bronco-pulmonary cancer; Radiotherapie des cancers brochopulmonaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourry, N.; Millardet, C.; Lapeyre, M.; Verrelle, P.; Gross, E.; Champeaux-Orange, E.; Lahbabi, K.; Galland, S.; Chomy, F.; Lagarde, P.; Blanchard, P

    2007-11-15

    Six oral communications as follow: tomography by positron emission with {sup 18}F-FDG and target volume determination in the non at small cells bronchi cancers: interest and limit; adjuvant radiotherapy in the non at small cells pulmonary cancers; pulmonary stereotaxic radiotherapy; the chemoradiotherapy of locally evolved bronco-pulmonary cancers; the mesothelioma: place of radiotherapy; predictive factors of the toxicity and the care of complications of thorax irradiation. (N.C.)

  1. Technical progress, the concept of individualized cancer treatment and the innovation of computer-assisted radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a first step of cancerogenesis, the further development of the tumor is an individual process. At the end of this process the tumor is formed as an individual in the individual. The individuality of cancer exists on the level of organs, tissues and cells and includes an individual tumor-host relationship. Today, optimized cancer treatment requires a most precise biological characterization possible of the tumor and of the tumor-host relationship, which will provide objective information about the individual character of every tumor. Routine analysis and strict therapeutic consideration of the clinical and biological individuality of human cancer can offer real chances for the improvement of cancer treatment. A routine acquisition of individual tumor characteristics will be possible only if methods and equipment are available for the registration of suitable parameters. In this context technical innovations have an essential influence on the realization of the concept of individualized cancer treatment. With the method of flow cytophotometry and other techniques examples are given in how far the ideas of individual cancer management can be realized by introduction of new technical solutions into medical research and clinical practice. Unfortunately there is still a lack of methodology in individualizing cancer treatment. The individualization of radiotherapy is connected to an extremely high degree of technical innovations. Particularly this refers to the topometrical description of the target volume in relation to the adjacent anatomical structures and the body contour as well as the fitting of isodoses to the shape and size of the target volume. As an example of innovation of a technical solution for individual radiotherapy planning the computer-assisted radiotherapy planning system DOPSY is described. (author)

  2. Predictive Modelling of Toxicity Resulting from Radiotherapy Treatments of Head and Neck Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Dean, Jamie A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    In radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, the radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa (mucosal lining of the throat) is thought to be a major contributing factor to dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction), the most commonly reported severe toxicity. There is a variation in the severity of dysphagia experienced by patients. Understanding the role of the dose distribution in dysphagia would allow improvements in the radiotherapy technique to be explored. The 3D dose distributions delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa of 249 patients treated as part of clinical trials were reconstructed. Pydicom was used to extract DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) data (the standard file formats for medical imaging and radiotherapy data). NumPy and SciPy were used to manipulate the data to generate 3D maps of the dose distribution delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa and calculate metrics describing the dose distribution. Multivariate predictive modelling of severe dysphagia, including descriptions of the d...

  3. Current trends of the external radiotherapy in treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer belongs to the most frequent malign cancer on the world. Local and loco-regional methods of therapy are for this form of cancer highly important. Dominant position has radiation therapy, which is treating 60 % of all patients. Author provides an overview about the conventional and non-conventional sources of radiation, mainly about linear accelerator, which is used in therapy of NSCLC. This article offers basic information about conventional radiotherapy; it evaluates the fractional modes and doses used for curative and palliative radiation therapy. (author)

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers: Impact of anatomic subsite on treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have retrospectively reviewed the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for advanced oral cavity cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of anatomic subsite on the results of treatment. Between 1975 and 1985, 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (OT = 29 patients) and floor of mouth (FOM = 22 patients) were treated with combined surgery plus RT. All had an indication(s) for RT including advanced primary disease (T3 or T4) (29 patients), close or positive margins (34 patients), and multiple positive neck nodes and/or extracapsular extension (41 patients). With a median follow-up of 6 years, the 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74% and the rate of distant metastasis (DM) was 34%. Despite the similar T stage, margin status and median RT dose, the 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 38% for OT vs. 11% for FOM (p = 0.03). Furthermore, the median survival after recurrence was 9 months for OT and 40 months for FOM (p = 0.02). At 5 years the determinate survival for both sites was (55%), and the likelihood of developing a second malignancy was 31%. The likelihood of developing DM was 50% for FOM (N0-N1 = 3 of 12, N2-N3 = 8 of 10) and 21% for OT (N0-N1 = 4 of 21, N2-N3 = 1 of 8). This study highlights significant differences between FOM and OT cancers in response to combined surgery and RT. Future strategies should be directed at the enhancement of local control for OT and better systemic therapy for those with advanced N-stage FOM

  5. Conservative treatment for invasive bladder cancer: neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy; Traitement conservateur des cancers infiltrants de la vessie: chimiotherapie neoadjuvante et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prie, L.; Gaston, R.; Richaud, P.; Brui, B.N. [Institut Bergonie, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Ferriere, J.M.; Le Guillou, M. [Hopital Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    1998-04-01

    Retrospective evaluation of tolerance and efficiency of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in non metastatic invasive cancer of the bladder. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy leads to CR in 44 % of patients and CR is observed in 64 % of the patients after radiation therapy. However, the survival rate at 5 years is insufficient, even if the rate of bladder conservation is high. (author)

  6. A comparison of different three-dimensional treatment planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Four different three-dimensional planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer were compared with regard to dose homogeneity within the target volume and dose to organs at risk, dependent upon tumor stage. Patients and Methods: Six patients with stage T1, 7 patients with stage T2 and 4 patients with stage T3 were included in this study. Four different 3D treatment plans (rotation, 4-field, 5-field and 6-field technique) were calculated for each patient. Dose was calculated with the reference point at the isocenter (100%). The planning target volume was encompassed within the 95% isodose surface. All the techniques used different shaped portal for each beam. Dose volume histograms were created and compared for the planning target volume and the organs at risk (33%, 50%, 66% volume level) in all techniques. Results: The 4 different three-dimensional planning techniques revealed no differences concerning dose homogeneity within the planning target volume. The dose volume distribution at organs at risk show differences between the calculated techniques. In our study the best protection for bladder and rectum in stage T1 and T2 was achieved by the 6-field technique. A significant difference was achieved between 6-field and 4-field technique only in the 50% volume of the bladder (p=0.034), between the 6-field and rotation technique (all volume levels) and between 5-field and rotation technique (all volume levels). In stage T1, T2 6-field and 4-field technique in 50% (p-0.033) and 66% (p=0.011) of the rectum volume. In stage T3 a significant difference was not observed between the 4 techniques. The best protection of head of the femur was achieved by the rotation technique. Conclusion: In the localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer in stage T1 or T2 the best protection for bladder and rectum was achieved by a 3D-planned conformal 6-field technique. If the seminal vesicles have been included in the target volume and in the case of large

  7. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  8. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy method for lung cancer: imaging, treatment planning and delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasti, H.; Cho, Y. B.; Vandermeer, A. D.; Abbas, A.; Norrlinger, B.; Shubbar, S.; Bezjak, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present treatment planning methods based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) to incorporate tumour motion using (1) a static field and (2) a dynamic field. Static 4D fields are determined to include the target in all breathing phases, whereas dynamic 4D fields are determined to follow the shape of the tumour assessed from 4D-CT images with a dynamic weighting factor. The weighting factor selection depends on the reliability of patient breathing and limitations of the delivery system. The static 4D method is compared with our standard protocol for gross tumour volume (GTV) coverage, mean lung dose and V20. It was found that the GTV delineated on helical CT without incorporating breathing motion does not adequately represent the target compared to the GTV delineated from 4D-CT. Dosimetric analysis indicates that the static 4D-CT based technique results in a reduction of the mean lung dose compared with the standard protocol. Measurements on a moving phantom and simulations indicated that 4D radiotherapy (4D-RT) synchronized with respiration-induced motion further reduces mean lung dose and V20, and may allow safe application of dose escalation and CRT/IMRT. The motions of the chest cavity, tumour and thoracic structures of 24 lung cancer patients are also analysed.

  9. Spacers in radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer: Is reduction of toxicity cost-effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of treating prostate cancer patients with intensity-modulated radiation therapy and a spacer (IMRT+S) versus IMRT-only without a spacer (IMRT-O). Materials and methods: A decision-analytic Markov model was constructed to examine the effect of late rectal toxicity and compare the costs and quality-adjusted Life Years (QALYs) of IMRT-O and IMRT+S. The main assumption of this modeling study was that disease progression, genito-urinary toxicity and survival were equal for both comparators. Results: For all patients, IMRT+S revealed a lower toxicity than IMRT-O. Treatment follow-up and toxicity costs for IMRT-O and IMRT+S amounted to €1604 and €1444, respectively, thus saving €160 on the complication costs at an extra charge of €1700 for the spacer in IMRT+S. The QALYs yielded for IMRT-O and IMRT+S were 3.542 and 3.570, respectively. This results in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €55,880 per QALY gained. For a ceiling ratio of €80,000, IMRT+S had a 77% probability of being cost-effective. Conclusion: IMRT+S is cost-effective compared to IMRT-O based on its potential to reduce radiotherapy-related toxicity

  10. Is photodynamic therapy a good alternative to surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Nyst; I.B. Tan; F.A. Stewart; A.J.M. Balm

    2009-01-01

    The mainstay treatments for head and neck carcinomas are surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These treatment options may be associated with considerable complications. Radical radiotherapy and chemotherapy can generally be employed only once, which presents difficulties in cases of recurrent dis

  11. A study of the optimal treatment positioning in the treatment of prostate cancer with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During external irradiation for the prostate cancer, the doses those exceed the tolerance level of the adjacent rectum or bladder are often delivered. Therefore, efforts are made to reduce the volume of these organs within the high-dose region. For example, some have tried to reduce the rectal volume within the radiation fields by controlling the fullness of the rectum and bladder, optimizing beam arrangement, and placing the patient in prone position in the hope of anterior displacement of the prostate. However, the evidence favoring prone positioning is far from conclusive. Moreover, prone position may tend to be less reproducible, thereby impairing accurate dose delivery. Therefore, prone position should be required larger safety margin than supine position theoretically. We evaluated a group of 17 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent planning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in supine and prone positions taking geometric uncertainty into consideration. In the case of identical safety margin size for both treatment positions, prone position is associated with significant reduction of the dose to rectum in the high-dose region. However, adding more 1 mm to safety margin size in the prone position, the significant reduction of the dose to rectum compared to the supine position does not observed. This indicates that the increased separation of the rectum and the prostate in the prone position might be offset by geometric uncertainty. Prone position of prostate cancer patients undergoing 3D-CRT, therefore, cannot be uncritically accepted as superior to supine position. (author)

  12. Comparison of the treatments in conventional and conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer by means of thermo luminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the prostate cancer treatment, the dose prescribes by the medical radio-oncologist depends on the extension of the disease and the threshold dose of the adjacent healthy tissues. In order to achieve an optimal tumoral control in early and locally advanced stages, it is necessary to increase the dose with a low morbidity probability at the vesicle a rectal level. This is achieved through conformal radiotherapy. The Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia uses this technique, but two questions arise from the medical-physicists and medical radio-oncologist: In accordance with clinical protocols, the conformal radiotherapy delivers a low dose to the adjacent healthy tissues. What experimental method exists that can prove with certainly the veracity of this affirmation? And, Do the dosimetric simulation systems calculate suitably the dose for each tissue, as recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency quality control programs for ionizer radiation? This paper seeks to answer these questions. Through thermoluminescent dosimetry and the use of a physical simulator, we measured the absorbed dose at the target volume and the adjacent tissues using conformal and conventional radiotherapy. We proved that organs such as the rectum and bladder, receive a minor dose in conformal radiotherapy, hence reducing their morbidity probability. In addition, the readings from the thermoluminescent dosimeters and the doses calculated by the ECLIPSE dosimetric system were compared, concluding that the patient's prescribes dose is effectively delivered as recommended by the quality control programs in radiotherapy

  13. Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose ≥25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving ≥25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity

  14. Multimodal treatment utilizing intraoperative radiotherapy for advanced cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multimodal treatment was consisted of intraoperative radiation, external radiation, by-pass operation, chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition if necessary to cover decreased oral-intake. Thirty-three cases were subjected to this therapy for 6 years. The stage of the tumors varied from a localized tumor in the pancreas to a huge tumor with multiple metastases, though the latter abandoned recently to be contraindication to this therapy. At laparotomy, a high energy electron beam was irradiated to the tumor with a dosage of 3,000 rad using a 20 MeV Betatron. The tumor was carefully prepared in order to avoid irradiating the duodenum and stomach. Choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy were performed in almost all of patients with cancer of head of pancreas. In some patients, external radiation was added with a dosage of 3,000 rad by linear X-ray. After radiotherapy, chemotherapy employing 5-FU or FT-207 was continued including. The survival time after this therapy was varied mainly according to the stages of the tumor. In patients with multiple metastasis to the liver or peritoneal dissemination, no remarkable effects were obtained by this therapy. On the otherhand, among 14 patients with localized tumor in the pancreas, 7 survived more than one year and the mean survival time of treated patients was nevershorter than that of patients who received resection of the tumor. Most of the treated patients could spend at home until their condition became critical, because by-pass operation could overcome jaundice or the duodenal stenosis and intraoperative radiation could palliate the pain of cancer of pancreas. Tumor effect of intraoperative radiation was confirmed by both of the second laporatomy for twice intraoperative radiation and laparatomy. (author)

  15. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia for treatment of primary locally advanced cervix cancer: results in 378 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franckena, M.; Lutgens, L.C.; Koper, P.C.; Kleynen, C.E.; Steen-Banasik, E.M. van der; Jobsen, J.J.; Leer, J.W.H.; Creutzberg, C.L.; Dielwart, M.F.; Norden, Y. Van; Canters, R.A.; Rhoon, G.C. van; Zee, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report response rate, pelvic tumor control, survival, and late toxicity after treatment with combined radiotherapy and hyperthermia (RHT) for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and compare the results with other published series. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1996 to

  16. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to

  17. Radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A teaching text on external beam radiotherapy treatment planning is presented. Chapters are included on machines, radiation units, the physics of a single radiation field, the multiple-field isodose curve pattern, electron beam therapy, manual addition of isodose curves and dose calculation methods. (U.K.)

  18. Intraoperative radiotherapy as a protocol for the treatment of initial breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report on preliminary outcomes of single-dose intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer based on local recurrence rates and complications. Methods: fifty postmenopausal women with ≤2.5cm breast tumors and clinically normal axillary lymph nodes were submitted to quadrantectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and intraoperative radiotherapy and studied. Mean follow-up time was 52.1 months. Results: mean patient age was 65.5 years; mean tumor diameter was 1.41cm 82% of nodules were hormonal receptor positive and HER-2negative. All patients received a 21 Gy radiation dose for a mean time of 8.97 minutes. Distant metastases were not observed. Local recurrence was documented in three cases, with identical histological diagnosis as the primary tumors. Thirty-five (70%) patients had local fibrosis, with gradual improvement and complete resolution over 18 months. Postoperative infection and seroma formation were not observed. Conclusion: partial radiotherapy is a potentially feasible and promising technique. Careful patient selection is recommended before a longer follow-up period has elapsed to confirm intraoperative radiotherapy safety and efficacy. (author)

  19. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  20. Treatment modalities of oral mucositis after radiation of head and neck cancers; Prise en charge des mucites apres radiotherapie des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapeyre, M.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Kaminsky, M.C.; Geoffrois, L.; Dolivet, G.; Pourel, N.; Marchal, C.; Bey, P.; Maire, F.; Simon, M. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Toussaint, B. [Hopital Central, Service de Chirurgie ORL, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2001-11-01

    Acute mucositis is common after radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. During the past 3 decades, there was a gradual evolution in the treatment modalities for locally advanced carcinomas (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy). These new strategies are accompanied by an increase in early mucosal reactions. At the present time, there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. Many traditional remedies or new agents seem ineffective (Sucralfate, Chlorhexidine, GM-CSF, Silver nitrate, Prostaglandin, anti-oxidants, Benzydamine hydrochloride), while others seem promising (Povidone-iodine, nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges and anti-fungal, local GM-CSF, Glutamide, Low-energy laser, corticosteroids). Radioprotectors are controversial and should be only used in experimental protocols and not in routine practice. However, some recommendations can be proposed: general prevention and global care before cancer therapy should be systematic (oral hygiene, dental and periodontal treatment, advice to avoid the use of tobacco and alcohol); frequent oral rinsing with a bland mouthwash (Povidone-iodine or others) should be used at the start of treatment because there are significant modifications of the oral microflora increased by a disturbed salivary flow; these mouthwashes could be associated with nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges or anti-fungal topical (bicarbonates, Amphotericine B); Systematic percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy should be decided before any aggressive treatments (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy); pain should be controlled; finally, the radiation technique should be optimized (mucosal sparing block, conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy). (authors)

  1. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for 'lung-island' tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ∼10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type

  2. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devpura, S.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chen, D.; Liu, D.; Li, H.; Kumar, S.; Gordon, J.; Ajlouni, M.; Movsas, B.; Chetty, I. J.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for "lung-island" tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ~10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type), a Monte

  3. Impact of the ''belly board'' device on treatment reproducibility radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The use of the belly board device (BBD) in the prone position has gained acceptance to spare small bowel in rectal cancer patients irradiated postoperatively, but there are few data in the preoperative setting, and the advantages of the BBD regarding normal tissue sparing may be counteracted by problems of patient positioning. This study was undertaken to investigate prospectively the influence of the BBD on treatment reproducibility in patients irradiated preoperatively in the prone position. Patients and Methods: 23 patients with rectal carcinoma in clinical stages II/III were included in this study. Axis displacement was evaluated in 14 patients treated without the BBD and nine with. The BBD is a commercial device (Belly Board, Radiation Products Design, Albertville, MN) made of a 17-cm thick hard sponge with an opening of 42 x 42 cm2. No specific patient immobilization devices were used. During radiotherapy, twelve patients had four control films, while eleven patients had three. The mean treatment position deviation was calculated for the medio-lateral, cranio-caudal and antero-posterior directions. Results: When comparing the first control film to the corresponding simulation film for patients without the BBD and with the BBD, the mean lateral displacements were 1.5 mm and 3.2 mm (p=0.26), the mean cranio-caudal displacements were 1.55 mm and 4.2 mm (p=0.13), and the mean antero-posterior displacements were 1.8 mm and 4.5 mm (p=0.04), respectively. When considering all control films, for the three directions, the amplitudes of the displacements were greater when using the BBD, particularly for the antero-posterior direction where the difference was highly significant (p=0.0006). Conclusions: Our data show that, in patients treated prone for rectal cancer, the use of the BBD in the preoperative setting without immobilization devices was associated with problems of patient position reproducibility, particularly for the antero-posterior direction

  4. The impact of overall radiotherapy treatment time and delay in initiation of radiotherapy on local control and distant metastases in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the impact of time factors on local and distant metastases in stomach cancer. 67 patients with gastric cancer who received adjuvant treatment were reviewed for the time to initiation of radiotherapy, overall duration of RT and the events of first local recurrence or distant metastasis. The risk probability of local recurrence is increased by 10% (HR = 1.1, p = 0.0009) in association with each additional day of radiotherapy and by 3.8% (HR = 1.038, p = 0.13) per increased day of waiting time before the initiation of RT. The risk probability of distant recurrence was associated with an increase of 7.4% (HR = 1.074 p = 0.0031) with each additional day of RT time and by 2.3% (HR = 1.023, p = 0.0598) following the increase of a day of waiting time. Each day of prolongation of RT beyond 36 days was associated with an increased risk of local recurrence by 10% (OR = 1.1, p = 0.015). Prolongation of waiting time prior to initiation of irradiation retained significance in multivariate analysis. There is an association between total treatment time and, to some extent, the time between the surgery and the initiation of radiation on local control and distant metastases

  5. Hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for the treatment of the patients with esophageal cancer invading the neighboring organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety two cases of a3 esophageal cancer invading the neighboring organs diagnosed by histopathology post operation were described. They underwent no treatment before operation; radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy before operation; or hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy (HCR) before operation. For chemotherapy, bleomycin or CDDP was used. Radiation dose was 30 Gy in total at 1.5-2.0 Gy x 5/wk. For hyperthermotherapy, radiofrequency wave was generated by the intracavitary hyperthermia system, Endoradiotherm 100A (Olympus Kohgaku Ltd.) and the treatment was carried out at 42-45 degC for 30 min x 2/wk x 6. The HCR case exhibited significantly (p<0.05) higher survival rates of 3 years of 21.2% and 5 years of 12.7% than other two cases where no one survived after 3 years. In particular, some of patients of grade 3 who were judged to have markedly responded to the HCR survived for a long period. HCR might be thus useful for a3 esophageal cancer. (K.H.)

  6. Clinical picture and treatment of complications of lower part of large intestine resulting from radiotherapy for intra-pelvic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors described clinical pictures and those treatments of 40 patients with complications of the lower part of the large intestine resulting from radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, ovarium or the penis. As the radiotherapy, 60Co-telecobalt (6,000-16,000R) and 60Co-needle (1,000-8,568 mch) intracavitary irradiation were used alone or in combination. Findings in the complications of the lower part of the large intestine were classified into Grade I (13 cases), II (14), III (14), and IV (4) according to Sherman. The prodromal symptoms of the complications appeared in 2-6 months following the irradiation in more than a half of the patients, and it appeared within a year in most of the patients. Most of the patients complained about melena, anemia, proctagra, tenesmus and diarrhea. In the cases of Grade III, the symptoms of ileus such as constipation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain appeared. Internal treatment was given principally, and preternal anus was made when frequent blood transfusion was required. Fourteen cases of those in Grade I and II recovered within 1-3 years. The cases which received proctostomy, including those who had bleeding, stricture and fistulation, had favorable prognosis. This result suggested that the radiotherapy for intra-pelvic cancer should be controlled to prevent further development of the complications in the rectum beyond Grade I. (Serizawa, K.)

  7. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  8. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saika, Kazumi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-05-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  9. A case of radiation gastritis required surgical treatment in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagino, Daisuke; Arai, Yuko; Komatsu, Atsushi; Inoue, Kumiko; Takechi, Kimihiro [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Tomobe (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of radiation gastritis in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A 61-year-old woman received irradiation of a metastatic lesion of the second lumbar vertebra. Six months later she complained of fatigue and presented with severe anemia, and her diagnosis was hemorrhagic radiation gastritis. She was treated endoscopically, but that failed to control the bleeding, making it necessary to resect surgically. The incidence of radiation gastritis is very low because the stomach is rarely within the treated field, but it is of importance to be aware that the stomach is by no means more radioresistant than other organs. (author)

  10. A case of radiation gastritis required surgical treatment in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of radiation gastritis in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A 61-year-old woman received irradiation of a metastatic lesion of the second lumbar vertebra. Six months later she complained of fatigue and presented with severe anemia, and her diagnosis was hemorrhagic radiation gastritis. She was treated endoscopically, but that failed to control the bleeding, making it necessary to resect surgically. The incidence of radiation gastritis is very low because the stomach is rarely within the treated field, but it is of importance to be aware that the stomach is by no means more radioresistant than other organs. (author)

  11. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  12. Radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy as combined treatment in rectal cancer. Final results of a phase III study of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is controversy whether adjuvant radiotherapy should be given before or after surgery for locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy substantially reduces local recurrence rates but may increase postoperative complications. In addition, patients found to have early cancers are treated unnecessarily. This study is a randomized trial of postoperative radiotherapy in patients who had a potentially curative resection for locally advanced rectal carcinoma. This trial failed to demonstrate any importance in overall survival or local control when postoperative irradiation was given following resection of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. (author)

  13. Tangential vs. defined radiotherapy in early breast cancer treatment without axillary lymph node dissection. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have demonstrated low regional recurrence rates in early-stage breast cancer omitting axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in patients who have positive nodes in sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND). This finding has triggered an active discussion about the effect of radiotherapy within this approach. The purpose of this study was to analyze the dose distribution in the axilla in standard tangential radiotherapy (SRT) for breast cancer and the effects on normal tissue exposure when anatomic level I-III axillary lymph node areas are included in the tangential radiotherapy field configuration. We prospectively analyzed the dosimetric treatment plans from 51 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. We compared and analyzed the SRT and the defined radiotherapy (DRT) methods for each patient. The clinical target volume (CTV) of SRT included the breast tissue without specific contouring of lymph node areas, whereas the CTV of DRT included the level I-III lymph node areas. We evaluated the dose given in SRT covering the axillary lymph node areas of level I-III as contoured in DRT. The mean VD95% of the entire level I-III lymph node area in SRT was 50.28 % (range, 37.31-63.24 %), VD45Gy was 70.1 % (54.8-85.4 %), and VD40Gy was 83.5 % (72.3-94.8 %). A significant difference was observed between lung dose and heart toxicity in SRT vs. DRT. The V20Gy and V30Gy of the right and the left lung in DRT were significantly higher in DRT than in SRT (p < 0.001). The mean heart dose in SRT was significantly lower (3.93 vs. 4.72 Gy, p = 0.005). We demonstrated a relevant dose exposure of the axilla in SRT that should substantially reduce local recurrences. Furthermore, we demonstrated a significant increase in lung and heart exposure when including the axillary lymph nodes regions in the tangential radiotherapy field set-up. (orig.)

  14. Combined treatment of laryngeal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy under HBO contitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study was made of the efficacy of radiotherapy given to patients with laryngeal cancer, Stages 2-3 using mean dose fractionation 03.3 Gy thrice a week up to the integral dose of 33 Gy) in the air and under HBO conditions. Thirty patients were entered into the maxn group Cirradiation under HBO conditions) and 34 into the control group. It has been established that preoperative irradiation is well tolerated by patients with laryngeal cancer, neither does it complicate subsequent surgical intervention nor produces a negative influence on the healing of postoperative wounds. Irradiation under HBO conditions as compared to irradiation in the air has some advantages: a growing degree of tumor damage by irradiation with the weakening of local radiation reactions and later on the improvement of early therapeutic results. While planning resection of the larynx, particularly in patients with Stage 3, preference should be given to preoperative irradiation under HBO conditions

  15. Optimization of radiotherapy. Some notes on the principles and practice of optimization in cancer treatment and implications for clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods dominate cancer treatment--one, the traditional best practice, individualized treatment method and two, the a priori determined decision method of the interinstitutional, cooperative, clinical trial. In the first, choices are infinite and can be made at the time of treatment; in the second, choices are finite and are made in advance of treatment on a random basis. Neither method systematically selects, identifies, or formalizes the optimum level of effect in the treatment chosen. Of the two, it can be argued that the first, other things being equal, is more likely to select the optimum treatment. The determination of level of effect for the optimization of cancer treatment requires the generation of dose-response relationships for both benefit and risk and the introduction of benefit and risk considerations and judgements. The clinical trial, as presently constituted, doses not yield this kind of information, it being, generally, of the binary yes or no, better or worse type. The best practice, individualized treatment method can yield, when adequately documented, both a range of dose-response relationships and a variety of benefit and risk considerations. The presentation will be limited to a consideration of a single modality of cancer treatment, radiation therapy, but an analogy with other modalities of cancer treatment will be inferred. Criteria for optimization will be developed and graphic means for its identification and formalization will be demonstrated with examples taken from the radiotherapy literature. The general problem of optimization theory and practice will be discussed; the necessity for its exploration in relation to the increasing complexity of cancer treatment will be developed; and recommendations for clinical research will be made including a proposal for the support of clinics as an alternative to the support of programs

  16. A prospective longitudinal study of voice characteristics and health-related quality of life outcomes following laryngeal cancer treatment with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Therese; Bergström, Liza; Ward, Elizabeth; Finizia, Caterina

    2016-06-01

    Background To investigate potential changes in perceptual, acoustic and patient-reported outcomes over 12 months for laryngeal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Material and methods A total of 40 patients with Tis-T3 laryngeal cancer treated with curative intent by radiotherapy were included in this prospective longitudinal descriptive study. Patients were followed pre-radiotherapy, one month, six months and 12 months post-radiotherapy, where voice recordings and patient-reported outcome instruments (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire Core30, Head and Neck35, Swedish Self-Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer) were completed at each appointment. Perceptual analysis, using the Grade-Roughness-Breathiness-Asthenia-Strain scale and vocal fry parameters, and acoustic measures including harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), jitter, shimmer and mean spoken fundamental frequency (MSFF) were produced from voice recordings. Results All patients presented with dysphonic voices pre-radiotherapy, where 95% demonstrated some degree of vocal roughness. This variable improved significantly immediately post-radiotherapy, however, then deteriorated again between six and 12 months. Vocal fry also increased significantly at 12 months. Acoustic measures were abnormal pre- and post-treatment with no significant change noted except for MSFF, which lowered significantly by 12 months. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) deteriorated post-radiotherapy but returned to pretreatment levels by 12 months. Conclusion By 12 months, most perceptual, acoustic, patient-reported voice and HRQL outcomes for laryngeal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy had showed no significant improvements compared to pretreatment function. Further studies are required to investigate potential benefits of voice rehabilitation following radiotherapy. PMID:27056401

  17. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment standard for patients with rectal cancer depends on the initial staging and includes surgical resection, radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy. For stage II and III tumors, radiochemotherapy should be performed in addition to surgery, preferentially as preoperative radiochemotherapy or as short-course hypofractionated radiation. Advances in surgical approaches, especially the establishment of the total mesorectal excision (TME in combination with sophisticated radiation and chemotherapy have reduced local recurrence rates to only few percent. However, due to the high incidence of rectal cancer, still a high absolute number of patients present with recurrent rectal carcinomas, and effective treatment is therefore needed. Carbon ions offer physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increase relative biological effectiveness (RBE, which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese data on the treatment of patients with recurrent rectal cancer previously not treated with radiation therapy have shown local control rates of carbon ion treatment superior to those of surgery. Therefore, this treatment concept should also be evaluated for recurrences after radiotherapy, when dose application using conventional photons is limited. Moreover, these patients are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological efficacy of carbon ions. Methods and design In the current Phase I/II-PANDORA-01-Study the recommended dose of carbon ion radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer will be determined in the Phase I part, and feasibilty and progression-free survival will be assessed in the Phase II part of the study. Within the Phase I part, increasing doses from 12 × 3 Gy E to 18

  18. Single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients: comparative effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is an effective treatment for symptomatic bone metastases from a variety of primary malignancies. Previous meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported on the efficacy of EBRT on bone metastases from multiple primaries. This review is focused on the comparative effectiveness of single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103Pd or 125I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7% of

  20. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  1. The relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Akahane, Keiko [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)], e-mail: nnakamur-tky@umin.ac.jp; Shikama, Naoto [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical Univ., Hidaka (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu [Div. of General Internal Medicine, Dept. of Medicine, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hama, Yukihiro [Dept. of Radiology, Edogawa Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Dept. of Radiology, Tokyo Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Background and purpose: There is no current consensus regarding the optimal bladder volumes in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Two hundred and forty-three patients underwent definitive radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer. The prescribed dose defined as 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 100 % of the prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the prostate with a 5-mm margin and 2 cm of the proximal seminal vesicle. The PTV was defined as the CTV with a 5-mm margin. Treatment plans were optimized to satisfy the dose constraints defined by in-house protocols for PTV and organs at risk (rectum wall, bladder wall, sigmoid colon and small intestine). If all dose constraints were satisfied, the plan was defined as an optimal plan (OP). Results: An OP was achieved with 203 patients (84%). Mean bladder volume ({+-} 1 SD) was 266 ml ({+-} 130 ml) among those with an OP and 214 ml ({+-}130 ml) among those without an OP (p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis also showed that bladder volumes below 150 ml decreased the possibility of achieving an OP. However, the percentage of patients with an OP showed a plateau effect at bladder volumes above 150 ml. Conclusions. Bladder volume is a significant factor affecting OP rates. However, our results suggest that bladder volumes exceeding 150 ml may not help meet planning dose constraints.

  2. Radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison of treatment outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Lee, Kang Hyun; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-kyung; Lee, Se Byeong [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    We retrospectively compared the treatment outcomes of localized prostate cancer between radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We retrospectively analyzed 738 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent either RP (n = 549) or EBRT (n = 189) with curative intent at our institution between March 2001 and December 2011. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml in the RP group and the nadir of + ≥ 2 ng/ml in the EBRT group. The median (range) follow-up duration was 48.8 months (0.7-133.2 months) and 48.7 months (1.0-134.8 months) and the median age was 66 years (45-89 years) and 71 years (51-84 years; p < 0.001) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Overall, 21, 42, and 36 % of patients in the RP group, and 15, 27, and 58 % of patients in the EBRT group were classified as low, intermediate, and high risk, respectively (p < 0.001). Androgen-deprivation therapy was more common in the EBRT group (59 vs. 27 %, respectively; p < 0.001). The 8-year biochemical failure-free survival rates were 44 and 72 % (p < 0.001) and the disease-specific survival rates were 98 % and 97 % (p = 0.543) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Although the EBRT group included more high-risk patients than did the RP group, the outcomes of EBRT were not inferior to those of RP. Our data suggest that EBRT is a viable alternative to RP for treating localized prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Wir vergleichen retrospektiv die Verfahrensergebnisse des lokal begrenzten Prostatakarzinoms zwischen radikaler Prostatektomie (RP) und externer Strahlentherapie (EBRT). Wir analysieren zurueckblickend 738 Patienten mit lokal begrenztem Prostatakarzinom, die zwischen Maerz 2001 und Dezember 2011 in unserem Institut entweder eine RP (n = 549) oder eine EBRT (n = 189) mit kurativer Intention durchliefen. Biochemischer Fehler wurde als prostataspezifisches Antigen (PSA) ≥ 0,2 ng/ml in der RP-Gruppe und ein Nadir +

  3. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking. Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result: Geometrical similarities were found between propagated and manually delineated structures, with a slightly favour of FB imaging. Special notice should be taken to registrations where image artefacts or low tissue contrast are present. Conclusion: This study does not support the hypothesis that DIBH images perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer.

  4. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, W.; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.; Mellemgaard, A.; Behrens, C. F.

    2014-03-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking. Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result: Geometrical similarities were found between propagated and manually delineated structures, with a slightly favour of FB imaging. Special notice should be taken to registrations where image artefacts or low tissue contrast are present. Conclusion: This study does not support the hypothesis that DIBH images perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer.

  5. Radiotherapy for prostate cancer and sexual health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Incrocci (Luca)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSexual dysfunction is very common after treatment of prostate cancer. Radiation therapy together with radical prostatectomy is the most effective treatment for localized disease. Percentages of erectile dysfunction (ED) reported in prospective studies after external-beam radiotherapy (RT

  6. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    König, A

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is...

  7. Combined treatment of syngeneic murine tumors and xenotransplanted human lung cancer by immunotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synergistic effect of nonspecific immunotherapy with cell-wall skeleton of BCG on radiotherapy against two syngeneic murine tumors, a methylcho-lanthrene-induced tumor (MCA) and a spontaneous well-differentiated mammary adenocarcinoma (Br-1), was studied in (+/+) BALB/c mice and (nu/nu) mice of BALB/c background. Single irradiation of tumors with a dose of 2000 rad induced complete shrinkage in about 18% of MCA and Br-1 tumors in (+/+) mice. Single irradiation did not induce complete shrinkage of tumors in (nu/nu) mice. When immunotherapy was combined with radiotherapy, the rates of complete shrinkage of MCA and Br-1 tumors increased to 82 and 61%, respectively. In contrast, such a strong synergistic effect was not observed in (nu/nu) mice. Moreover, human lung cancers (two squamous cell carcinomas and two small cell carcinomas) xenotransplanted to nude mice were treated with the combined therapy. The effect was stronger on squamous cell carcinomas than on small cell carcinomas. (author)

  8. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Westmead Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  9. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  10. Dosimetric analysis of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Priyusha Bagdare; Om Prakash Gurjar; Garima Shrivastav; Virendra Bhandari; Krishna Lal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the dosimetric parameters of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Methods: Ten patients with inoperable NSCLC were selected for this study. The 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated for all patients following Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. Generated plans were then compared on the basis of planning target ...

  11. Phase I trial of Orzel (UFT plus leucovorin), cisplatin, and radiotherapy in the treatment of potentially resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Fluorinated pyrimidines have been established as radiosensitizers in the combined modality therapy of esophageal cancer. UFT, an oral combination of a 5-fluorouracil pro-drug (uracil) and a dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase inhibitor (ftorafur), may provide improvement in the ease of administration with equal efficacy. This Phase I study was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of UFT, leucovorin, and cisplatin when given with radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of resectable esophageal cancer. Methods: Chemotherapy consisted of i.v. cisplatin 80 mg/m2 (Days 1 and 22) and UFT with leucovorin orally on Days 1-35. UFT was escalated in 50-mg/m2 increments, starting at 200 mg/m2/d. Radiotherapy consisted of 4500 cGy in 25 fractions. Patients underwent resection 4-6 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. Results: Ten patients with resectable esophageal cancer were enrolled. Of the 7 patients entered at dose level 1, 1 developed a dose-limiting toxicity of nausea. All 3 patients entered at dose level 2 developed dose-limiting toxicity. The maximal tolerated dose for UFT was the starting level, 200 mg/m2/d. Of the 10 patients enrolled, 8 underwent esophagectomy and 2 developed progressive disease and did not undergo surgery. The disease of 6 of the 8 patients was downstaged at surgery. Conclusion: The recommended UFT dose for Phase II studies is 200 mg/m2/d given orally in two divided doses when given with leucovorin, cisplatin, and radiotherapy

  12. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of ...

  13. Pre-treatment nomogram for biochemical control after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy for clinically localised prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, C C; Norman, A R; Huddart, R A; Horwich, A; Dearnaley, D P

    2002-01-01

    Phase III studies have demonstrated the clinical benefit of adding neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation to radical radiotherapy for clinically localised prostate cancer. We have developed a nomogram to describe the probability of PSA control for patients treated in this way. Five hundred and seventeen men with clinically localised prostate cancer were treated with 3–6 months of neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy (64 Gy in 32#) between 1988 and 1998. Median presenting PSA ...

  14. Rehabilitation of patients with laryngeal and lung cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ways of medical and social-occupational rehabilitation after a course of radiotherapy in patients with respiratory system cancer have been determined. Medical rehabilitation in patients with lung cancer comprises expedient planning of radiotherapy by means of systematic medicamental treatment. It is shown that it is necessary to place the patients in special rehabilitation departments after radiotherapy of carry out the treatment of pneumonities

  15. White paper of radiotherapy in France. Twelve objectives to improve one of the major cancer treatments -2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This white paper aims at presenting the status and perspectives of radiotherapy in France, at proposing solutions for the improvement of treatment quality and safety. Along with surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy is one of the major techniques of cancer treatment and the first part gives an overview of increased needs due to population ageing, of the fast technical advances (better definition of target volumes and doses, better taking into account of anatomy variations and movements), of the impact of these advances on treatment results for various types of cancer, and of the current status of equipment (a slow evolution is noticed) and future needs. The second part addresses the various professions and their demography. The third part examines how to correct the unequal access to care with respect to geography, to equipment and treatment quality, or to delay before treatment. It also evokes collaborations between centres, the diffusion of good practices, specialisation, and makes some proposals for an equal access to care. The fourth part highlights quality and security improvements due to quality control practices, recommendations, prevention actions and risk management. The next part addresses the financial aspect and makes some proposals to reduce inequalities and archaisms. It also compares costs in France and in Europe. The report then gives an overview of the administrative and professional environment and of the different involved bodies, and outlines the need of a better coordination. Patient information is discussed (patients are better informed) as well as support cares. The last parts address activities of research and development and the organisation and possibilities offered by education and training

  16. Treatment of multiple primary lung cancers using stereotactic radiotherapy, either with or without surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Multiple primary lung cancers (MPLC) are not an uncommon presentation. Current guidelines recommend a curative approach when early-stage MPLC is diagnosed as favorable outcomes have been reported after surgery. We studied outcomes following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Materials and methods: Following review of imaging and pathology at a multi-disciplinary tumor board, a total of 62 patients were referred for SABR with a diagnosis of synchronous MPLC. SABR was performed for both lesions in 56 patients, while another 6 underwent SABR for only one lesion and surgery for the other lesion. A total dose of 54–60 Gy was delivered in 3–8 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (95% CI: 29–59). Overall survival of all patients was 31 months (95% CI: 17–44), with an actuarial 2-year survival of 56%. No grade 4 or 5 post-SABR toxicity was observed. Local control rates calculated per lesion, were 84% at 2 years, and 78% at 3 years. The two-year actuarial regional control rate was 87%. Conclusions: SABR for synchronous MPLC achieves a lesion control rate of 84% after 2 years, with limited toxicity. SABR should be considered when patients with lung cancer present with a synchronous second lesion and no nodal involvement

  17. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS; (5) docetaxel + RT; (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg−1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio. (paper)

  18. Long-term outcome and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer: the importance of boost volume assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yeon Sil; Cheon, Jae Seok; Song, Jin Ho; SON, Seok Hyun; Jang, Ji Sun; Kang, Young Nam; Kang, Jing Hyoung; Jung, So Lyoung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods Between March 2004 and July 2007, 26 patients with locally advanced, medically inoperable head and neck cancer or gross residual tumors in close proximity to critical structures following head and neck surgery were treated with SBRT as a boost treatment. All patients were initially tre...

  19. Long-term outcome and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer: the importance of boost volume assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Dong; Kim Yeon; Cheon Jae; Song Jin; Son Seok; Jang Ji; Kang Young; Kang Jing; Jung So; Yoo Ie; Jang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods Between March 2004 and July 2007, 26 patients with locally advanced, medically inoperable head and neck cancer or gross residual tumors in close proximity to critical structures following head and neck surgery were treated with SBRT as a boost treatment. All patients were init...

  20. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. Toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also. (author)

  1. A randomized study of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy with and without mitomycin C in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzat, M.; Shouman, T.; Zaza, K.;

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally...... advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (1) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). Results: The 2-year overall...... survival (OS) of the whole group was 21%. The OS according to treatment arm was 23%, 20%, and 28% in CF, AF, and AF+MMC arms respectively (p<0.19). The 2-year loco-regional control (LC) rate was 22% for the whole group of patients. The LC was 10%, 25%, and 30% for the CF, AF, and AF+MMC respectively (p=0...

  2. Treatment of invasive bladder cancer with cisplatin, fluorouracil and concurrent radiotherapy: a pilot study; Traitement des cancers infiltrants de vessie par cisplatine, fluoro-uracile et radiotherapie concomitante: resultats d`une etude pilote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, B.; Felix-Faure, C.; Berger, C.; Vincent, P.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Davin, J.L. [Clinique Rhone-Durance, Avignon (France)

    1998-04-01

    Pilot study to assess treatment feasibility and results of a 2-drug chemotherapy (CT) regimen administered concurrently with radiotherapy (RT) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The median follow-up was 38 months. The feasibility of concurrent CT-RT was excellent: 96 % of the patients completed radiotherapy and 100 % of them received the two courses of P-FU. The acute toxicity was mild: no hematological toxicity or renal toxicity over grade II, 4 cases of bowel or rectal reversible grade III toxicity and 2 cases of reversible grade III cystitis. A complete response was achieved in 30 out of the 42 evaluable patients (65.2 %). Nine patients received an immediate salvage treatment (3TUR, 3 additional radiotherapy and 3 cystectomies). Ten patients had local failure. Projected 3-year locoregional control was 49 % for the 46 patients. Projected overall 3-year survival was 53 %. Functional results were good for disease-free patients with preserved bladder: 1 grade I, 3 grade II, and no grade III cystitis. Concurrent 2-drug chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil is feasible without major toxicity and offers a potentially curative and conservative treatment for patients with localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer. (authors)

  3. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  4. Analysis of dose in heterogeneity adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical treatment of cases of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assuming the systems planning radiotherapy recognize all body structures of the same density (d=1 g/cm³), variations in electron density within the irradiated area, as is the case of patients who undergo reconstruction mammary processes and use tissue expanders, may influence the dose distribution in the treatment and may produce heterogeneities which are not measured by changing its actual distribution into healthy tissues or in the target volume to be irradiated. Through the calculation of the algorithms' dose distribution of the XiO® planning system (Fast Fourier Transform, Convolution, Superposition, Fast Superposition e Clarkson), when using correction of heterogeneity between tissues of different densities, there was obtained a percentage ratio of dose increase in the structures of interest, and of the amount of absorbed dose by healthy organs adjacent to the target volume. (author)

  5. Breast radiotherapy as part of loco-regional treatments in stage IV breast cancer patients with oligometastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Local treatments seem to improve metastasis progression-free survival (MPFS) and overall survival (OS) when added to systemic therapies in stage IV breast cancer. Methods: From 1990 to 2003, we reviewed 9138 cases treated and registered in the Institut Gustave-Roussy breast cancer database. Among them, 308 had presented with stage IV disease. Eighty percent of patients (n = 239) had received a loco-regional treatment and they were categorized into two groups: loco-regional radiotherapy (LRRT) alone (Group 1; n = 147) or breast and axillary surgery ± LRRT (Group 2; n = 92). Results: The median follow-up was 6.5 years. LRRT obtained a long-standing loco-regional clinical response in 85% of patients. The 3-year MPFS rates were 20% in Group 1 and 39% in Group 2; the 3-year OS rates were 39% and 57%, respectively. However, no significant differences in MPFS or OS were observed between the two groups when adjusted on prognostic factors. Conclusions: Radiation therapy alone provides long-standing local control and yields MPFS and OS rates equivalent to those obtained when radiation therapy is combined with surgery, whatever the prognostic factors. Loco-regional therapies, especially radiation therapy alone, may have an important role to play in the treatment of selected patients with stage IV breast cancer.

  6. Proposed guide for radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer in the CCSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer has been the most common carcinoma occurred in women. The increase of this type epidemiological neoplasm is worrisome; the application of therapies, the diagnosis and treatment of breast diseases as work perspective, must integrate multidisciplinary oncological principles and therapeutic approaches. The reduction of the impact of breast cancer in Costa Rica has been the mission of breast units of hospitals in the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social. The prevention and treatment of the disease have formed joint and integral part to meet this goal. An attention is offered to fulfill this mission based on the evidence with the help of an essential tool as have been the clinical practice guidelines (CPG). These guidelines have helped to maintain therapeutic equity among patients; as a consequence, the development, implementation and evaluation of results and the guides have been considered suitable to carry out the evidence-based care. Also, the therapeutic discussion with the patient, has been strengthened enabling to reach a shared decision making. The guidelines are submitted which out not intended to substitute at any time the medical criteria, or standardize the management of breast cancer because in each case is due individualizing. The number of survivors has been increasing and this thanks to the planning of care, provided long-term, the patient and communication with health personnel. Thus, the highest attention has been given to breast cancer survivors. The multidisciplinary team of cancer care and treatment have played a key role. Guides have tried to conceptualize and optimize this role

  7. Efficacy of selective alpha-1 blocker therapy in the treatment of acute urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an alpha-1 adrenoreceptor blocking agent for acute urinary symptoms in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1987 and 1995, 743 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT. A total of 275 (37%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary symptoms as defined by the RTOG morbidity scoring system. Terazosin hydrochloride (THC), a selective alpha-1 adrenoceptor blocking agent, was given to 119 (43%) patients for treatment of their urinary symptoms, whereas nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAID) were administered to 71 patients (26%). Thirty-one patients (11%) were treated with other medications, and 54 (20%) did not seek pharmacologic intervention for their urinary symptoms. Patients were monitored weekly to assess changes in urinary urgency, frequency, and nocturia. Results: Treatment with THC resulted in a significant resolution of urinary symptoms in 79 of 119 patients (66%), while 26 (22%) had moderate improvement, and 14 (12%) had minimal to no response to this drug. In contrast, only 11 of 71 (16%) of the patients treated with NSAIDs experienced significant symptom relief, 20 (28%) had moderate improvement, and 40 (56%) had minimal to no response. The difference in the significant symptomatic improvement between THC and NSAID therapy (66% vs. 16%) was highly significant (p < 0.001). For patients treated with THC, a higher likelihood of significant symptom relief was observed in patients who did not receive neoadjuvant androgen ablation (p = 0.04) and in those who were younger than 65 years of age (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Alpha-1 selective adrenoceptor blocking agents are effective in ameliorating the acute urinary symptoms in patients receiving radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Although this was not a randomized prospective study, the data suggest that NSAIDs were less effective in relieving radiation-induced urinary

  8. Treatment of primary liver cancer using highly-conformal radiotherapy with kv-image guidance and respiratory control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To implement a reliable, practical and reproducible treatment procedure, based on in-room kV-image guidance and respiratory control, for liver cancer patients treated with high dose conformal radiotherapy using a commercially available treatment system. Materials and methods: CT stimulation was conducted under voluntary breath hold or gating using the Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) System. Treatments were delivered daily under kV image guidance to verify the diaphragmatic or lipiodol-defined tumor position. Results: Thirty-three patients with liver confined hepatocellular carcinoma were treated between May 2006 and Dec 2009. After a median follow-up period of 16.5 months (range: 3.5–40.7), all but 2 patients demonstrated radiological tumor regression. Eight patients (24%) achieved complete remission. The median tumor shrinkage was 42% (27–100%). Subsequent in-field tumor progression was observed in only three patients (10%). For the 23 patients with abnormal alpha fetoprotein level, 22 of them showed biochemical response with a median AFP level drop of 78%. The treatment was well tolerated: Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 5 patients (1 leucopenia, 1 elevated liver enzyme and 3 elevated bilirubin level) but there was no grade 4 toxicity or treatment related death. The 1 year overall survival rate is 71.7% and median survival time is 17.2 months (3.5–40.7 months). Conclusions: Excellent treatment results with minimal toxicities could be achieved in a clinical environment with a commercially available highly sophisticated radiotherapy system.

  9. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy) or combined with (sequential or concurrent) chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI) after one year and 56% (±14%) after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11%) after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013) with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly) combined with chemotherapy

  10. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level). PMID:25647734

  11. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  12. Impact of hormonal treatment duration in combination with radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinnarò Paola

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormone therapy plus radiotherapy significantly decreases recurrences and mortality of patients affected by locally advanced prostate cancer. In order to determine if difference exists according to the hormonal treatment duration, a literature-based meta-analysis was performed. Methods Relative risks (RR were derived through a random-effect model. Differences in primary (biochemical failure, BF; cancer-specific survival, CSS, and secondary outcomes (overall survival, OS; local or distant recurrence, LR/DM were explored. Absolute differences (AD and the number needed to treat (NNT were calculated. Heterogeneity, a meta-regression for clinic-pathological predictors and a correlation test for surrogates were conducted. Results Five trials (3,424 patients were included. Patient population ranged from 267 to 1,521 patients. The longer hormonal treatment significantly improves BF (with significant heterogeneity with an absolute benefit of 10.1%, and a non significant trend in CSS. With regard to secondary end-points, the longer hormonal treatment significantly decrease both the LR and the DM with an absolute difference of 11.7% and 11.5%. Any significant difference in OS was observed. None of the three identified clinico-pathological predictors (median PSA, range 9.5-20.35, Gleason score 7-10, 27-55% patients/trial, and T3-4, 13-77% patients/trial, did significantly affect outcomes. At the meta-regression analysis a significant correlation between the overall treatment benefit in BF, CSS, OS, LR and DM, and the length of the treatment was found (p≤0.03. Conclusions Although with significant heterogeneity (reflecting different patient' risk stratifications, a longer hormonal treatment duration significantly decreases biochemical, local and distant recurrences, with a trend for longer cancer specific survival.

  13. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Hope, Andrew; Moseley, Douglas; Brink, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS AND...... MATERIALS: Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT...... markers to predict lung density changes induced by radiotherapy was investigated. RESULTS: Age and CBCT markers extracted at 10th, 20th, and 30th treatment fraction significantly predicted lung density changes in a multivariable analysis, and a set of response models based on these parameters were...

  14. Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer by concomitant hormonotherapy and radiotherapy: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining radiation and hormone therapy has become common clinical practice in recent years for locally advanced prostate cancer. The use of such concomitant therapy in the treatment of breast disease has been very infrequently reported in the literature, but such an application seems justified given the common hormonal dependence of breast cancer and the potential synergetic effect of these two treatment modalities. As adjuvant therapy, tamoxifen is the key drug in the hormonal treatment arsenal, providing a significant improvement in both local control and global survival rates. Aromatase inhibitors are currently being evaluated in this setting, and initial results are promising. In vitro, tamoxifen does not seem to offer a protective effect against radiation. In clinical use, the few available published studies confirm the superiority of the association of radiation with tamoxifen as opposed to radiation therapy alone in decreasing local recurrences of surgically removed breast tumors. Toxicity associated with such concomitant therapy includes mainly subcutaneous and pulmonary fibrosis. However, subcutaneous fibrosis and its cosmetic impact on the treated breast are frequently described side effects of radiation therapy, and their incidence may actually be reduced when tamoxifen is associated. The evidence is less controversial for pulmonary fibrosis, which is more common with the concomitant therapy. The association of radiation and aromatase inhibitors has as of yet rarely been reported. Letrozole (Femara) has a radiosensitizing effect on breast-cancer cell lines transfected with the aromatase gene. Clinical data assessing this effect in vivo are not available. The FEMTABIG study (letrozole vs. tamoxifen vs. sequential treatment) did not specify the sequence of radiation and hormonal therapy. The ATAC study comparing the adjuvant use of anastrozole (Arimidex )and tamoxifen does not provide any information on the number of patients receiving radiation

  15. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  16. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin WANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescription and reporting, arrangement of beams, controlling of dose volume and treatment delivering.

  17. Late treatment-related morbidity in breast cancer patients randomized to postmastectomy radiotherapy and systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejris, I.; Andersen, J.; Overgaard, M.; Overgaard, J. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2000-07-01

    Late treatment-related morbidity after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic treatment with and without postoperative irradiation was assessed in 84 patients randomized in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Trials 82b and c. A structured interview and physical examination, using a standardized assessment sheet, constructed on the basis of the late effects normal tissues (LENT) scoring system, was used. The median length of follow-up from mastectomy was 9 years (range 6-13 years). Lymphedema was measured in 14%, of the irradiated patients versus 3% of the non-irradiated patients (NS). Slightly decreased shoulder morbidity was measured in 45% of the irradiated women versus 15% of the non-irradiated patients, but moderate or more severe impairment was seen in only 5% of the irradiated patients and in none of the non-irradiated patients (p = 0.004). Seventeen percent of the irradiated patients and 2% of the non-irradiated patients found that impairment of shoulder movement caused symptoms (p = 0.001)

  18. Late treatment-related morbidity in breast cancer patients randomized to postmastectomy radiotherapy and systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late treatment-related morbidity after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic treatment with and without postoperative irradiation was assessed in 84 patients randomized in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Trials 82b and c. A structured interview and physical examination, using a standardized assessment sheet, constructed on the basis of the late effects normal tissues (LENT) scoring system, was used. The median length of follow-up from mastectomy was 9 years (range 6-13 years). Lymphedema was measured in 14%, of the irradiated patients versus 3% of the non-irradiated patients (NS). Slightly decreased shoulder morbidity was measured in 45% of the irradiated women versus 15% of the non-irradiated patients, but moderate or more severe impairment was seen in only 5% of the irradiated patients and in none of the non-irradiated patients (p = 0.004). Seventeen percent of the irradiated patients and 2% of the non-irradiated patients found that impairment of shoulder movement caused symptoms (p = 0.001)

  19. Undesirable financial effects of head and neck cancer radiotherapy during the initial treatment period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Egestad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare cost and reforms are at the forefront of international debates. One of the current discussion themes in oncology is whether and how patients’ life changes due to costs of cancer care. In Norway, the main part of the treatment costs is supported by general taxpayer revenues. Objectives: The objective of this study was to clarify whether head and neck cancer patients (n=67 in northern Norway experienced financial health-related quality of life (HRQOL deterioration due to costs associated with treatment. Design: HRQOL was examined by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30 in the beginning and in the end of radiation treatment in patients treated at the University Hospital in Northern Norway. Changes in financial HRQOL were calculated and compared by paired sample T-tests. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine correlations among gender, marital status, age and treatment with or without additional chemotherapy and changes in the HRQOL domain of financial difficulties. Results: The majority of score results at both time points were in the lower range (mean 15–25, indicating limited financial difficulties. We observed no statistically significant differences by gender, marital status and age. Increasing financial difficulties during treatment were reported by male patients and those younger than 65, that is, patients who were younger than retirement age. The largest effect was seen in singles. However, differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: During the initial phase of the disease trajectory, no significant increase in financial difficulties was found. This is in line with the aims of the Norwegian public healthcare model. However, long-term longitudinal studies should be performed, especially with regard to the trends we observed in single, male and younger patients.

  20. Intra-arterial chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy for the treatment of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Hashine, Katsuyoshi [National Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital, Matsuyama (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    Authors reported results of three different therapies for bladder cancer. 1. Between September 1979 and March 1990, 45 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were treated with intra-arterial doxorubicin (ADM) chemotherapy plus low-dose irradiation. ADM was administered intraarterially at a dose of 20 or 30 mg/body/day from day 1 to 3. Radiotherapy was given at a dose of 2 Gy/session concomitant with intra-arterial administration. Twenty-eight patients achieved complete response (CR) and in all of them, a functional bladder could be preserved. The median follow-up was 9.8 years. Of the 45 patients, 13 died of cancer, including 3 of the 28 with CR. The 10-year cause-specific survival rate of patients with CR was 90%. In contrast, the 10-year survival rate of 17 patients who did not achieve CR was 34%. 2. Authors have treated 21 patients who had locally advanced bladder cancer with this regimen. As an induction therapy, the intra-arterial chemotherapy consisted of 15 mg/m{sup 2}/day pirarubicin (THP) and 25 mg/m{sup 2}/day cisplatin (CDDP) plus 2 Gy of irradiation, which was given just before each chemotherapy session. As a maintenance treatment, patients were treated with THP once a month for 2 years. Among these patients, 19 achieved CR while 2 did not. One patient with CR had relapsed lung metastases 24 months after treatment and underwent thoracotomy. Only one patient who did not achieved CR died of cancer, while the remaining 19 patients show no evidence of disease and were able to preserve a functional bladder. 3. Nine patients were treated with glutathione and compared with 15 patients who were treated with the same regimen but without glutathione. The two groups did not differ regarding CR rate, however the incidence of neurotoxicity among patients receiving glutathione was significantly lower than that among patients who did not receive glutathione. (K.H.)

  1. The future of breast cancer radiotherapy: From one size fits all to taylor-made treatment; L'avenir de la radiotherapie du cancer du sein: de la taille unique au sur-mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France); Azria, D. [Departement de cancerologie radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Universite de Montpellier I, 5, boulevard Henri-IV, CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier cedex 2 (France); Inserm U896, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Various subgroups of breast tumours have been identified during the last 10 years according to the risk of local relapse. Prognostic factors for local relapse are age, surgical margins, tumour size, Her2 expression and hormonal receptors status. For tumours with a high risk of local relapse, an increased in boost dose or the addition of new drugs (trastuzumab, anti-angiogenics, PARP inhibitors) could be considered. For low risk tumours, hypo-fractionated, accelerated partial breast and intraoperative radiotherapy are being evaluated. The classical schedule (45-50 Gy to the whole gland followed by a boost dose of 16 Gy) is no longer the universal rule. Treatment individualization, according to clinical and biological characteristics of the tumour and - possibly - to the radiobiological profile of the patient, is likely to be the future of breast cancer radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. Radiotherapy for the vulvar cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen patients who had primary vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy as an initial treatment at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults and Hyogo Cancer Center from January 1971 to December 1990 are presented. Two patients were stage 0, one stage I, three stage II and nine stage III. Nine patients received electron irradiation with or without interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. Five patients received megavoltage X-ray irradiation using AP/PA parallel opposed fields including the pelvic nodes and perineum followed by boost irradiation of electrons, interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. The total dose delivered to the primary tumor ranged from 50 to 100 Gy (73 Gy on average). The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients was 43.6%. Complete regression (CR) was achieved in 60% of the patients. However, CR was not achieved in any of five patients with palpable inguinal nodes. In contrast, all the patients who had tumors of less than 2 cm in diameter achieved CR. Five of nine CR cases relapsed. First sites of failure were vagina, groin and vulvar region. Recurrence occurred more than four years after treatment in three cases. Necrosis occurred in five of nine CR cases. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy for the vulvar cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Motohara, Tomofumi (Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-03-01

    Fifteen patients who had primary vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy as an initial treatment at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults and Hyogo Cancer Center from January 1971 to December 1990 are presented. Two patients were stage 0, one stage I, three stage II and nine stage III. Nine patients received electron irradiation with or without interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. Five patients received megavoltage X-ray irradiation using AP/PA parallel opposed fields including the pelvic nodes and perineum followed by boost irradiation of electrons, interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. The total dose delivered to the primary tumor ranged from 50 to 100 Gy (73 Gy on average). The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients was 43.6%. Complete regression (CR) was achieved in 60% of the patients. However, CR was not achieved in any of five patients with palpable inguinal nodes. In contrast, all the patients who had tumors of less than 2 cm in diameter achieved CR. Five of nine CR cases relapsed. First sites of failure were vagina, groin and vulvar region. Recurrence occurred more than four years after treatment in three cases. Necrosis occurred in five of nine CR cases. (author).

  4. The effect of increasing the treatment time beyond three weeks on the control of T2 and T3 laryngeal cancer using radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local control of cancer by radiotherapy may be prejudiced by accelerated tumor clonogen repopulation particularly during protracted treatment schedules. A series of 496 cases of T2 and T3 larynx cancer treated here by radiotherapy has been studied to examine the impact on local control of treatment durations ranging from 9-41 days. Data were analysed using a linear-quadratic formulation describing the fractionation sensitivity, with the incorporation of a parameter relating to treatment time. Using combined T2 and T3 data, the increase in dose required to maintain a constant local control (the time factor) was between 0.5-0.6 Gy/day. These values are similar to those reported for 4 weeks or more in the literature. Also, the calculated dose to control 50% of tumors, given over the standard Christie duration of 21 days, was on the line projected back from literature data over 28-66 days. The present data are consistent with the presence of such a time factor following a lag phase of not more than 3 weeks after starting radio-therapy. Hence, further consideration should be given to using shorter overall treatment times in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. (author). 17 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  5. The effect of increasing the treatment time beyond three weeks on the control of T[sub 2] and T[sub 3] laryngeal cancer using radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slevin, N.J. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (United Kingdom)); Hendry, J.H.; Roberts, S.A.; Agren-Cronqvist, A. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (United Kingdom). Paterson Labs.)

    1992-08-01

    Local control of cancer by radiotherapy may be prejudiced by accelerated tumor clonogen repopulation particularly during protracted treatment schedules. A series of 496 cases of T[sub 2] and T[sub 3] larynx cancer treated here by radiotherapy has been studied to examine the impact on local control of treatment durations ranging from 9-41 days. Data were analysed using a linear-quadratic formulation describing the fractionation sensitivity, with the incorporation of a parameter relating to treatment time. Using combined T[sub 2] and T[sub 3] data, the increase in dose required to maintain a constant local control (the time factor) was between 0.5-0.6 Gy/day. These values are similar to those reported for 4 weeks or more in the literature. Also, the calculated dose to control 50% of tumors, given over the standard Christie duration of 21 days, was on the line projected back from literature data over 28-66 days. The present data are consistent with the presence of such a time factor following a lag phase of not more than 3 weeks after starting radio-therapy. Hence, further consideration should be given to using shorter overall treatment times in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. (author). 17 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs.

  6. Adverse effect of a distended rectum in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The retrospective planning study for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer evaluated whether proximal rectum and supra-anal rectum/anal canal should be delineated as separated organs-at-risk (OARs) to achieve optimal dose distributions to the anorectal region. Patients and methods: For 10 patients with localized prostate cancer IMRT plans were generated with the rectum and anal canal as separated OARs (Rec-sep) and as one single OAR (Rec-tot). Two different treatment planning systems (TPS) were utilized. Influence on dose distributions to target and OARs was analyzed. Results: Results from both TPS showed significantly increased doses to the distal rectum/anal canal for plans Rec-tot compared with Rec-sep in case of a distended rectum in the planning CT study: doses were increased by up to mean 31% (P=0.02) and 18% (P=0.03), respectively, in both TPS. For the patient with the largest rectum, the maximum dose increase was 61%. No significant differences in doses to target, bladder, femoral head and proximal rectum were seen. Conclusions: For patients with a distended rectum in the planning CT, delineation of separated OARs for proximal rectum and distal rectum/anal canal resulted in superior dose distributions to the anorectal region and therefore, we recommend this as standard procedure for IMRT planning of prostate cancer

  7. Radiotherapy for head and neck cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Elderly patients with head and neck cancer may not be treated aggressively with radiotherapy, due to concerns regarding tolerance of treatment and toxicity. A retrospective study was undertaken of patients aged 80 years and over, treated by definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Material and methods: 98 patients aged 80-92 received radiotherapy for carcinoma of the head and neck between 1991 and 1995. All patients received beam directed radiotherapy with radical intent using an immobilisation shell. Results: Cancer specific survival was 59% and overall local control was 70% at 5 years. Both were significantly affected by T stage and site of disease. Cancer specific survival was comparable to that of patients aged below 80 years. Seven patients died within 6 months of the treatment. Three patients developed severe late toxicity. Metastatic disease occurred in eight patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a beneficial and well tolerated treatment in elderly patients with carcinoma of the head and neck

  8. Radiotherapy through intensity modulation (IMRT). A new modality in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the treatment and evaluate the advantages of IMRT in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Material and methods: Four years ago, at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Catolica, the IMRT technique for the treatment of head and neck tumors was implemented. The IMRT technique is based on modifying the intensity of the radiation beam through a multisheet collimator in order to produce a more exact distribution in the radiation doses. The results are evaluated with dose/ volume histograms. The distributions of doses and toxicity for tridimensional con formed therapy (CRT-3D) and IMRT are compared. Results: The distribution of the dose in the dose/volume histograms showed a better coverage of the white volume (PTV), with IMRT. The doses received by the organs under risk: salivary glands, eyes, ears and brain diminish with IMRT. The spinal marrow is protected with IMRT without dividing the treatment area, preventing points with lower dosage that could reduce control of the tumor. Conclusions: IMRT achieves a better conformation of the dose obtaining a better coverage of the tumor and higher protection of the organs under risk

  9. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark: From 2D to 3D treatment planning guidelines of The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette Skovhus; Berg, Martin; Nielsen, Hanne M.;

    2008-01-01

    , it was investigated whether it was possible to find a treatment technique alternative to the one recommended by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG). A dosimetric comparison of a combined photon/electron 3-field technique (3F) and a partial wide tangent technique (PWT) was carried out on individual......This paper describes the procedure of changing from 2D to 3D treatment planning guidelines for post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark. The aim of introducing 3D planning for post-mastectomy radiotherapy was to optimize the target coverage and minimize the dose to the normal tissues. Initially...... to 3F. It was concluded that PWT was an appropriate choice of technique for future radiation treatment of post-mastectomy patients. A working group was formed and guidelines for 3D planning were developed during a series of workshops where radiation oncologists and physicists from all radiotherapy...

  10. Carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Carbon ion therapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and enhanced biological effects. It has been suggested that carbon ion therapy is effective against radioresistant pancreatic cancer. In April 2000, clinical studies examining the treatment of pancreatic cancer with carbon ions were begun at the HIMAC. As of February 2010, 48 patients treated with preoperative carbon ion radiotherapy and 89 patients treated for locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into the clinical trials. Both protocols are still ongoing. The interim results of these clinical trials suggest that carbon ion radiotherapy provides good local control and offers a survival advantage for patients with otherwise hard to cure pancreatic cancer, without unacceptable morbidity. (author)

  11. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs at r...

  12. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs at risk, requiring less than...

  13. Calibration system of the software for treatment in conformational radiotherapy with a phantom for cases of cervical cancer prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The main objective of this work is to design a calibration method for two planning software systems for treatment with conformational radiotherapy to be used for prostate and cervix cancer. For this purpose, a phantom is designed to simulate the prostate and cervix anatomical regions. The phantom is made of acrylic and nylon. These materials have densities similar to soft tissue and bone and they are readily available in Peru at a low cost. The phantom is imaged using a calibrated CT scanner (Siemens - Somatom). The CT images are used for the calculation of the absorbed dose using two software planning systems (WINPLT-3D and KENOS-2D) at the isocenter and at critical points during the process of simulation of the treatment. This calculation is compared to the experimentally measured data in the phantom. Radiation is applied by means of the linear accelerator clinical Varian 2100 C/D, and dosimetry measured using an ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Preliminary results show that the planned dose and the measured dose differ in less than ± 5.6% with WINPLT-3D and ± 3.3% with KENOS-2D. The measured relative doses at the critical organs to protect originally measured with TLDs at the isocenter point, having results from ± 2.5% to ± 3.5%. These results indicate that the planning software systems are calibrated within the range required by international standards for patients with cancer (ICRU - Report 50). (author)

  14. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer: results after five years of a randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: this study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two regimens of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: from 1992 to 1997, 127 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (stage III-IV) were randomized. Sixty-six patients (group a), 42 male and 24 female, with a median age of 48 years (range 40-72) received during radiotherapy two courses (1.-6. week) of chemotherapy with carbo-platin (300 mg/m2 day 1) and etoposide (60 mg/m2 days 1 to 3). Sixty-one patients (group b), 40 male and 21 female, with a median age of 51 years (range 42-69) received two cycles of chemotherapy with 5 FU (750 mg/m2 days 1 to 5) and MIT C ( 10 mg/m2 day 1). The median dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy (range 55-66 Gy) 180 cGy /d 5w. Results: the actuarial five-year survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 38 % for group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) and 25 % for group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.036). Toxicity group a: mucositis G III in 41 patients and G IV in 16; dysphagia G III in 46 patients and IV in 5; leukopenia in 24 patients; 28 patients required nutritional therapy. Toxicity group b: mucositis G III in 38 patients and G IV in 17; dysphagia G III in 48 patients and G IV in 3; leukopenia in 23 patients; 25 patients needed nutritional therapy. Conclusions: the data of the actuarial survival five-year rate suggest that concomitant chemotherapy in group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) is better than the concomitant chemotherapy in group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). (author)

  15. Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting-the MSKCC experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site. The median radiation dose was 63 Gy. Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30). Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 60 months, the 5-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 62%, 87%, 82%, 55%, and 67%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, squamous cell histology and cribriform plate involvement predicted for an increased likelihood of local recurrence, and squamous cell histologic features predicted for worse overall survival. None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye. Conclusion: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer. Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques. Local recurrence remains a significant problem

  16. Evaluation of the utilization of external radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in Andalusia, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around 27,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year in Spain and 5400 die from this disease. Radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined, has proven to be effective as initial treatment in patients with localized disease. Our objective was to evaluate the use of external beam RT (EBRT) in our region, comparing the indication rate and irradiation rate and examining variability in its application among hospitals. We conducted a review of RT guidelines and indication studies for prostate cancer (% expected irradiation). Data were gathered from all twelve public healthcare centers in Andalusia (Spain) on RT-treated prostate cancer patients during 2013 (% actual irradiation) and from nine of the centers on RT discharge reports. Information was classified according to type of hospital, tumor risk category and RT treatment (technique, dosage, volume, toxicity). The estimated RT rate was 67 % (1289/1917), 43 % were aged > 70 years, 44.7 % had ECOG performance status of 0); 44.7 % had high-risk tumors; 57 % underwent RT associated with hormone therapy; 70 % of patients receiving RT were treated with 3D planning (30 % IGRT); and doses were 70–76 Gy in 70 % of cases and >76 Gy in 10.7 %. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were < grade 2 in 79 and 89 % of patients, respectively. An irradiation rate significantly below the mean for the study was found in four provinces. There was a significant difference among provinces in the distribution of risk groups. Underutilization of EBRT was estimated to be around 30 % in prostate cancer patients, with an elevated variability in irradiation rates among hospitals related to differences in available technology and in the distribution of patients with different risk levels. These data should be a matter of concern to regional health managers, given the negative and measurable impact on the survival of patients

  17. Quadrantectomy and radiotherapy (QUART) in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred twenty nine patients with T1 N0 M0 breast cancer were selectively treated with QUART. Mean age was 50 years. Ninety-eight patients (76%) were N- and 31 (24%) were N+. N+ cases received chemotherapy or Tamoxifen if R+. Patients evaluated are 95/129 in a 3 years average follow-up (range 2-7 years). Overall actuariall survival rate at 5 years is 88.9%. Three patients died; local relapses were 3/95 and metastases 3/95. Overall treatment tolerance was satisfactory and esthetic results were good

  18. Biochemical failure as single abnormality in patients with prostate cancer following radical treatment with external radiotherapy: follow-up without immediate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biochemical failure has been defined as 3 consecutive increases in PSA following curative treatment of prostate cancer. The appropriate management in such cases is controversial. The most usual treatment has been early introduction of hormones. Such patients will live for many years and hormone therapy causes important secondary effects and increases costs. The guideline in our Department of Radiotherapy has been to follow up, with no initial therapy, cases with low PSA and short PSA doubling time. The present study reports this experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 528 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by radical approach between 1992 and 1999, with external radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant hormone therapy. After a median follow-up of 77 months, there were 207 (39% cases with biochemical failure, 78 of which were followed without therapy after the identification of biochemical failure. All of them were asymptomatic patients and had negative radiographic examinations or did not have imaging exams requested since they presented a favorable outcome. The follow-up included at least 2 annual visits with physical examination and PSA. RESULTS: Of the 78 patients with biochemical failure followed without initial therapy, 7 died from other causes than prostate cancer and the remaining 71 cases were alive and asymptomatic in the last follow-up. Prognostic factors previous to radiotherapy such as stage and Gleason score were not considered when deciding for follow-up without initial therapy in these cases. The most significant aspects considered for this decision were low PSA value (median PSA on the last visit for the 78 cases was only 3.9 ng/mL and a slow PSA doubling time (in the present experience the median PSA doubling time was 22.5 months. CONCLUSION: There seems to be space for expectant management, without initial hormone therapy, in patients with prostate cancer who present biochemical failure and are

  19. Radiotherapy without boost in the tumor bed after conserving surgery in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to analyse satisfactory local control and breast preservation with particular emphasis on the importance of the microscopic negative margin in patients who not receiving tumor bed boost therapy. Authors analysed 122 consecutive patients with breast cancer in pathological stages I and II, who were treated with quadrantectomy at full axillary dissection between 1992 and 1997. The median follow up was 34 months. The radiation treatment was started 60 - 80 day in 14 patients (11.5%) with high risk for metastases, because they underwent chemotherapy. The patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy on the entire breast to a mean total dose of 48.8 Gy. A boost to a tumor bed was not delivered. Only patients with follow-up period above 24 months were evaluated for the purpose of analysis of cosmetic results. Analyzed variables were: age, size, lymph node status, two-field versus three-field technique, operating scare. The major goal of breast conserving therapy is the preservation of cosmetically acceptable breast without local relapses in all patients of our study. A 43 years old patient with liver metastases and any regional and local relapses was dead 27 months after the radiotherapy. A single significant factor impairing excellent cosmetic outcome in our study is the surgical scar. The very high percent (51) of excellent cosmetic results and low percent of post radiotherapy injury is due to precise for breast conserving therapy, the prevailing number of young patients and precise CT and dosimetric planning on three level of treatment volume (author)

  20. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  1. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramita Saha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthracycline based regiments and/or taxanes and adjuvant radiotherapy; the main modalities of treatment for breast cancers are associated with deterioration of pulmonary functions and progressive pulmonary toxicities. Aim: Assessment of pulmonary toxicities and impact on pulmonary functions mainly in terms of decline of forced vital capacity (FVC and the ratio of forced expiratory volume (FEV in 1 Second and FEV1/FVC ratio with different treatment times and follow ups in carcinoma breast patients receiving anthracycline and/or taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A prospective single institutional cohort study was performed with 58 breast cancer patients between January 2011 to July 2012 who received either anthracycline based (37 patients received 6 cycles FAC= 5 FU, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide regime and radiotherapy or anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy (21 patients received 4cycles AC= Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide; followed by 4 cycles of T=Taxane and radiotherapy. Assessment of pulmonary symptoms and signs, chest x-ray and pulmonary function tests were performed at baseline, midcycle, at end of chemotherapy, at end radiotherapy, at 1 and 6 months follow ups and compared. By means of a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA model, the course of lung parameters across the time points was compared. Results and Conclusion: Analysis of mean forced vital capacities at different points of study times showed definitive declining pattern, which is at statistically significant level at the end of 6th month of follow up (p=0.032 .The FEV1/FVC ratio (in percentage also revealed a definite decreasing pattern over different treatment times and at statistically significant level at 6th month follow up with p value 0.003. Separate analysis of mean FEV1/FVC ratios over time in anthracycline based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group as well as anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group

  2. European organization for research on treatment of cancer trials using radiotherapy with multiple fractions per day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decade (1976-1986), radiotherapy with altered fractionation schemes using multiple fractions per day (MFD) was the major field of the clinical research undertaken in the EORTC Cooperative Group of Radiotherapy. Some of its participating institutions (Portsmouth, Dijon, Leuven, Amsterdam, Rome) performed pilot studies in the midseventies in more than 400 patients. Then largely based upon the previous institutional experiences, EORTC-labelled phase II and III were activated: 1,678 patients have been entered in 8 trials during the period 1978-1987. In order to summarize these clinical experiments covering various fields of tumor pathology, radiotherapy schemes are divided according to the type of altered fractionation: pure hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation and mixed hyprfractionated and accelerated schemes

  3. A practical approach on radioprotection in the radiotherapy treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several protocols for the treatment and follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer. All of them gather evidence on the evolution and treatment and try to establish a treatment standard. However, there are few occasions in which this issue is addressed from the standpoint of radiological protection, as the ICRP 94 and TECDOC 1806. The focus of our work is to demonstrate that simple actions in the routine of workers in the Nuclear Medicine Service interfere positively in the radiation protection of all those involved in the patient's care, also optimizing their well being during the procedure. In the current model, the patient participates in an interview with nurses, doctors and physicists, before admission, and receives written and verbal information about the treatment procedures in order to diminish his anxiety and clarify possible doubts. In all the cases under hospital care there were no instances of high exposure (above 1mSv/month or 6 mSv/year) among the staff. With the participation of all involved, there was an escalating improvement in the reduction of complications generated by the patient’s anxiety, waste decrease providing better comfort during hospital care) and minimization of occupational hazard affecting the staff in charge of the patient’s room maintenance after hospital leave. (author)

  4. Tangential vs. defined radiotherapy in early breast cancer treatment without axillary lymph node dissection. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Universitaet Kiel, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Kiel (Germany); Temme, Nils; Foerster, Manuela; Reible, Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated low regional recurrence rates in early-stage breast cancer omitting axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in patients who have positive nodes in sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND). This finding has triggered an active discussion about the effect of radiotherapy within this approach. The purpose of this study was to analyze the dose distribution in the axilla in standard tangential radiotherapy (SRT) for breast cancer and the effects on normal tissue exposure when anatomic level I-III axillary lymph node areas are included in the tangential radiotherapy field configuration. We prospectively analyzed the dosimetric treatment plans from 51 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. We compared and analyzed the SRT and the defined radiotherapy (DRT) methods for each patient. The clinical target volume (CTV) of SRT included the breast tissue without specific contouring of lymph node areas, whereas the CTV of DRT included the level I-III lymph node areas. We evaluated the dose given in SRT covering the axillary lymph node areas of level I-III as contoured in DRT. The mean V{sub D95} {sub %} of the entire level I-III lymph node area in SRT was 50.28 % (range, 37.31-63.24 %), V{sub D45} {sub Gy} was 70.1 % (54.8-85.4 %), and V{sub D40} {sub Gy} was 83.5 % (72.3-94.8 %). A significant difference was observed between lung dose and heart toxicity in SRT vs. DRT. The V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and V{sub 30} {sub Gy} of the right and the left lung in DRT were significantly higher in DRT than in SRT (p < 0.001). The mean heart dose in SRT was significantly lower (3.93 vs. 4.72 Gy, p = 0.005). We demonstrated a relevant dose exposure of the axilla in SRT that should substantially reduce local recurrences. Furthermore, we demonstrated a significant increase in lung and heart exposure when including the axillary lymph nodes regions in the tangential radiotherapy field set-up. (orig.) [German] Aktuelle Studien zeigen

  5. Palliative radiotherapy for cancers other than brain or bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in the palliation of patients with uncontrolled cancer and is important in any comprehensive care program. There are fewer phase III trials on palliative radiotherapy of other symptomatic tumors than there are for the treatment of bone metastases. However, the number of such trials has been increasing, especially for the treatment of lung cancer. In particular, symptoms from bronchial obstruction, superior vena cava obstruction and other solid tumors as well as cancer-related bone pain and brain metastases can all be palliated effectively with radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Radiotherapy for recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinico-radiobiological characteristics of radiotherapy for relapsed breast cancer were studied. Adequate choice of tissue mass to be exposed appeared much more important than any change in focal dose within 50-80 Gy, to achieve higher frequency of locoregional therapeutic effect. However, recurrent tumors more than 3 large lower radiosensitivity involving a sharp rise in the likelihood of dissemination. Radiotherapy for primary tumor did not affect the radiosensitivity of recurrent malignancies but slowed down the rate of its growth. Also, it might promote the dissemination acceleration

  7. Hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer is not associated with post-treatment testosterone suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States); Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org; And others

    2013-04-15

    Background: To investigate post-treatment changes in serum testosterone in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between April 2008 and October 2011, 228 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved prospective protocol. Patients received doses ranging from 70 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) to 72.5 CGE at 2.5 CGE per fraction using passively scattered protons. Three patients were excluded for receiving androgen deprivation therapy (n = 2) or testosterone supplementation (n = 1) before radiation. Of the remaining 226 patients, pretreatment serum testosterone levels were available for 217. Of these patients, post-treatment serum testosterone levels were available for 207 in the final week of treatment, 165 at the six-month follow-up, and 116 at the 12-month follow-up. The post-treatment testosterone levels were compared with the pretreatment levels using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for matched pairs. Results: The median pretreatment serum testosterone level was 367.7 ng/dl (12.8 nmol/l). The median changes in post-treatment testosterone value were as follows: +3.0 ng/dl (+0.1 nmol/l) at treatment completion; +6.0 ng/dl (+0.2 nmol/l) at six months after treatment; and +5.0 ng/dl (0.2 nmol/l) at 12 months after treatment. None of these changes were statistically significant. Conclusion: Patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy do not experience testosterone suppression. Our findings are consistent with physical measurements demonstrating that proton radiotherapy is associated with less scatter radiation exposure to tissues beyond the beam paths compared with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy.

  8. Concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer; Quimioterapia concomitante a radioterapia no tratamento adjuvante do cancer da mama localizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Oliveira Filho, Juvenal A.; Garcia, Alice R.; Amalfi, Christiane; Spirandeli, Julia M.B.; Campos, Eliane C. de [Hospital Mario Gatti, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: avo@correionet.com.br

    2001-06-01

    The conventional treatment of localized breast cancer involves the use of both systemic therapy and loco-regional radiation after surgery. The ideal sequence of these two treatments is still undefined. This paper focus on our experience of concomitant chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT), and discusses information from the literature about this issue. Between Jan,1989 and Jan, 1999 a retrospective analysis of 103 patients with ductal carcinoma of the breast who received concomitant CT with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5 flurouracil (CMF) and RT was made. Radiation did not included mammary chain or axilla and total dose was of 50 Gy. End points were tolerance and oxicity leading changes to doses. Mean age was 44y; median follow up time of 33 mo; 62 patients had breast conserving surgery and 41 had mastectomy. All patients received both treatments without a break or dose modification. There was no change or interruption of RT. Ten out of 103 patients had the prescribed dose of CT decreased of 10%-20%. There was no evident changes in cosmetic results. Most of the knowledge regarding the delay of CT or RT comes from retrospective studies, and results are conflicting. It is well accepted that high risk patients need both CT and RT. However, there are data suggesting that giving RT first and CT after may increase the rate of distant metastases. There are also studies showing worse impact in the local control with the delay of radiotherapy. The use of concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy has apparent advantages, but no randomized trial has addressed this issue yet. Our experience has shown that is possible to give concomitant CT with CMF and RT without irradiation of IMC and axilla without major changes in scheduling or dose of both therapies. (author)

  9. The role of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: a controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy remains the basic form of treatment in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but there still exist controversies concerning optimal radiotherapy regimen and in particular, the total dose and fractionation schedules. To prove whether the question: if using an unconventional dose fractionation regimen (accelerated hyperfractionation) could improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy patients with NSCLC. Between 1997 and 2000 in the Cancer Centre in Cracow (COOK) a controlled clinical trial was conducted in a group of 150 patients with locally advanced (III Deg) inoperable and unsuitable for radical radiotherapy NSCLC, with no major symptoms of the disease. In 76 patients conventionally fractionated radiotherapy was performed - 50 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks (CF). 74 patients were irradiated twice a day (AHF); the dose per fraction was 1.25 Gy and the minimum interval between fractions - 6 hours. The total dose was 50 Gy in 40 fractions during 26 days. The probability of 12 months survival was 47.4% in the CF arm and 45.9% in the AHF arm; the probability of 24 months survival was 16.2% and 15.8%, respectively. In all 76 patients in CF arm the treatment was carried out in prescribed time without breaks. Out of 74 patients in the A HF group 8 (10,8%) did not complete the treatment and 2 of then died in 3rd and 4th week of treatment. The use of accelerated hyperfractionation does not improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC without severe symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The treatment of choice in this group of patients os conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in 5 week of treatment. (author)

  10. Targeting Radiotherapy to Cancer by Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    R. J. Mairs; Boyd, M.

    2003-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is an alternative method of radiation treatment which uses a tumor-seeking agent carrying a radioactive atom to deposits of tumor, wherever in the body they may be located. Recent experimental data signifies promise for the amalgamation of gene transfer with radionuclide targeting. This review encompasses aspects of the integration of gene manipulation and targeted radiotherapy, highlighting the possibilities of gene transfer to assist the targeting of cancer ...

  11. Follow-up of bronchial cancer patients after treatment by surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy or combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging techniques are an integral element of any well defined and standardized follow-up program. The purpose of follow-up programs is to detect and treat unexpected progression or recurrence of the disease as early as possible, to identify treatment-related conditions in good time, to institute palliative measures in the incurable stage and to offer patients medical, psychological and social help after primary management. Examination techniques needed for this purpose should be evaluated for their efficiency and feasibility and minimized in their scope to what is absolutely necessary in view of the cost factor and the acceptance by the patients. In the post-treatment follow-up of bronchial cancer patients X-rays of the chest in two projections play a major role. They may be supplemented by conventional tomography and computed tomography. Ultrasonography is also a routine component of follow-up programs. Additional diagnostic studies involving complex and sophisticated technical systems are limited. Their need will depend on the patient's symptoms and the benefits that can be expected from them for secondary management should be used as a criterion for their application. (Author)

  12. Late toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study is to describe and classify chronic complications due to radiotherapy in breast cancer. Also the impact of radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients is evaluated. Materials and methods: 50 patients with breast cancer at early stages (78% in situ, 22% I and II) treated with radiotherapy in breast volume plus boost (45/50 Gy + 18/20 Gy) with a follow up over 5 years. Acute toxicities were found retrospectively and chronic toxicities were assessed though physical examination and review of complementary studies. To facilitate data collection, pre printed forms were used. Bibliographic searches were made. Results: 10% received chemotherapy and 64% tamoxifen. The predominant chronic toxicity were found in skin (66%), although grade I and II (hyperpigmentation 26%, dryness 22%, telangiectasia 10% fibrosis, 4%, other 4%). A 50% of the patients showed hypoesthesia in ipsilateral upper limb. The other toxicities were presented in low rate and magnitude: mastodynia 16%; actinic pneumonitis 4%, pyrosis 4%, Tachycardia 2%, among others. Of the patients with acute toxicity, only 30% were grade III. The 70% of the patients had a positive impact of radiotherapy on quality of life. Conclusions: We found low rates and degrees of late toxicity. It was noticed a relationship between acute and chronic toxicity, because those who presented adverse effects during treatment developed late effects. It reflects the importance of integrating monitoring as part of radiation treatment. It should be adopted a single score of late toxicity measurement to unify data from different series. (authors)

  13. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  14. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  15. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  16. A survey on staging and treatment in uterine cervical carcinoma in the Radiotherapy Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), we conducted a survey in 1997-1998 to determine the variability of pre-treatment assessment and treatment options. The variability of choosing surgery, defined radiation therapy techniques and chemotherapy are investigated, as well as the center's choices of future treatment strategies. Fifty two of 81 RCG centers from the RCG have participated in the survey. As one would expect, there is a large variation in the techniques used for pretreatment evaluation and treatment options. There is no 'standard' for reporting acute and late side effects. Chemotherapy is used neither systematically nor uniformly, and some centers continue to use neadjuvant chemotherapy modalities. Furthermore, the survey reveals that there is a strong demand for the reduction of overall treatment-time, for clinical investigation of novel combined modality treatment strategies, especially chemo-radiation therapy, and also for the use of new radiation sensitizers. We conclude that a more homogeneous approach to the pretreatment evaluation as well as treatment techniques is required in order to allow adequate quality control in any future trial of the RCG in the EORTC. (author)

  17. Neoadjuvant treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction and Objectives: To analyze the results of the treatment in patients with cancer of prostate of high risk. Material and Method: Retrospective and observational analysis of 130 patients operated by CAP of high risk (criteria of D'Amico) average 41,48 months, divided in form nonrandomized in three groups 1: radical prostatectomy, 2: neoadjuvant hormonoterapy (BAC) + PR, 3: BAC + PR + x-ray (RT). Statistical analysis: multivaried, test of curved Chi2 and p statistical and of Kaplan Meier. Results: Biochemical relapse 68 patients (52.3%), average 23,37 months. Without differences according to therapeutic modality (p: 0.043). In the multivaried analysis of the 3 factors of presurgical, single risk we found a statistically significant relation in the coexistence of the 3 factors with the presence of positive margin in the PR piece. (p: 0,002). The analysis to make or not, neoadjuvant BAC without significant difference (p: 0,403) evaluating in such the rate of M+, actuarial global survival according to curves of Kaplan Meier to 5 and 10 years (P: 0,5257) and survival 5 actuarial specific cancer to and 10a (P: 0,2165). Conclusions: Without significant differences in: RB, clinical progression, pathological relapse, global and specific survival, rate of positive surgical margins. The 3 criteria of D'Amico were predictive of positive surgical margins and RB, the patients with RB in group 2 presented/displayed greater risk of clinical progression, the PR demonstrated a global survival and specify actuarial to 10 years greater to 50%, considering it therapeutic an option been worth. (authors)

  18. Radiotherapy alone in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective analysis was conducted on breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone at The Princess Margaret Hospital and at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. These patients had either operable tumours, but were unfit for general anesthesia, or had inoperable tumors due to local contraindications to surgery. Previous results showed that a radiation dose increase of 15 Gy can decrease the relative risk of tumour or lymph node recurrence twofold. In this third report, the same data were analyzed to determine the treatment-related complication rates and to correlate these to the radiation dose levels. Overall results were analyzed on 453 patients, but detailed analyses on complications were conducted on 372 patients not developing local recurrence in the first 6 months of follow-up. Each complication was graded on a 3-level previously defined scale. Most frequent complications were skin changes of different degrees, which were usually asymptomatic. More disabling complications were arm edema, impaired shoulder mobility, rib fractures and brachial plexopathy. The incidence of disabling complications was low. The only factor significantly increasing the risk of complications was the radiation dose level to the tumour and axilla. Technical factors such as overlapping fields should also be taken into account. As the more effective control of tumour and lymph nodes obtained in patients treated with higher radiation doses is counterbalanced by an increase in the complication rate, the dose to be delivered for each patient should be carefully chosen according to individual risk factors. (author). figs

  19. Can concomitant-boost accelerated radiotherapy be adopted as routine treatment for head-and-neck cancers? A 10-year single-institution experience

    OpenAIRE

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Taussky, Daniel; Mach, Nicolas; Becker, Minerva; Bieri, Sabine; Dulguerov, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated schedules are effective in overcoming repopulation during radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancers, but their feasibility is compromised by increased toxicity. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the 10-year experience of a single institution in the routine use of concomitant boost RT as standard radical treatment in all but the most favorable stage patients.

  20. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node–positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m2)/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m2) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  1. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, William C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kim, Janice [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH (United States); Silverman, Paula [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Overmoyer, Beth [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Cooper, Brenda W. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Anthony, Sue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary [Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hanks, Shelli H. [Arizona Institute of Urology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Lyons, Janice A., E-mail: janice.lyons@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  2. Risk of cancer formation by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are the difference between exposures to radiation for medical purpose and to environmental radiation at low dose, estimation of carcinogenic risk by medical radiation, and notice for referring the risk at clinical practice. ICRP employs linear non-threshold (LNT) model for risk of cancer formation even at <200 mSv for safety, with a recognition that it is scientifically obscure. The model essentially stands on data of A-bomb survivors (the Gold Standard), where the relationship between 5-10% excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer formation and dose 0.05-2.5 Sv is linear. Analyses of the secondary carcinogenesis after radiotherapy have begun to be reported since around 2005: e.g., the secondary thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients treated with radiotherapy has a peak at 20 Gy, suggesting the actual risk depends both on the linearity of carcinogenic increase and on the exponential probability of cell death increase. On this concept, the risk of cancer formation is not always linear to dose. At the practical radiotherapy, its secondary carcinogenic risk should be estimated not only on the dose but also on other factors such as the individual organ, patient's age and attainable age/time after the treatment. In treated teen-ager patients, ERRs of mortality/Gy are 2.28 for cancers of the skin of non-malignant melanoma, 1.32 of bladder and 1.21 of thyroid and in patients of fifties, 1.15 of bladder and lung. The EER tends to become lower as the treated age is older. Pediatric cancer patients to be treated with radiotherapy should be informed about the secondary cancer that the low dose risk given by ICRP is not always appropriate, a certain cancer risk has a peak dose, and ERR of cancer mortality is not a cancer risk of an organ. Many factors like anticancers and immuno-modifiers, modify the outcome of radiotherapy and should be carefully speculated for evaluating the outcome. (T.T.)

  3. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is decreasing, while therapy-related symptoms are increasing in the course of radiotherapy. Even after the end of the therapy these symptoms keep on causing distress, sometimes in a higher amount than before. A correlation between sex, sort of cancer and curative or palliative treatment and the amount of distress was found. Conclusion: the results stress the importance of adequate emotional support for patients undergoing radiotherapy especially in the first week of treatment and after the treatment. There is a need for the development of a valid radiotherapy - questionnaire in order to be able to measure the distress of these patients. (author)

  4. Experience in treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of local control and breast conservation, intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy has been indicated in patients with locally advanced breast cancer both in primary and recurrent cases. The present series, evaluated during the past 4 years, consisted of 15 patients 35-83 years of age, with invasive ductal carcinoma, including 10 with primary breast cancer (stage IIIb: 1, IV: 9) and 5 with postoperative recurrence (stage IIIb: 2, IV: 3). Intraarterial chemotherapy is started, basically infusing ADM 50 mg, MMC 10 mg and CDDP 50 mg into the internal thoracic and/or subclavian artery 1-3 times, followed by reduction surgery (quadrantectomy: 4, wide resection: 2) and radiotherapy to the breast, supraclavicular, parasternal and cervical regions according to tumor extent. Local response after arterial infusion was CR: 2, PR: 10, NC: 3 (response rate: 73% ). The response rate of distant metastases after arterial infusion was 73%. Of 10 patients with primary breast cancer, recurrence was noted in 1. Breast conservation was successful in 8 of 10 patients. One of them, in stage IIIb, has survived for 4.5 years with no evidence of disease and with breast conservation. Five patients with postoperative recurrence showed CR with no recurrence after intraarterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Acute skin reaction occurred in 6 patients, and was especially frequent in patients with postoperative recurrence (4 of 5). According to these results, combined therapy affords breast conservation even in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, and improves patient's QOL in stage IV. (author)

  5. Modification of staging and treatment of head and neck cancer by FDG-PET/CT prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Reliable tumor staging is a fundamental pre-requisite for efficient tumor therapy and further prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare head and neck cancer (HNC) staging before and after FDG-PET/CT, evaluating the stage modifications for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Patients and methods: A total of 102 patients with untreated primary HNC, who underwent conventional staging and staging including FDG-PET/CT before RT, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Blinded pre-FDG-PET/CT and post-FDG-PET/CT staging data were compared. The impact on patient management was tested by comparing the intention before and after FDG-PET/CT. Results: Significant modifications of T, N, and M stage as well as clinical stage were detected after inclusion of FDG-PET/CT data (p = 0.002, 0.0006, 0.001, 0.03, respectively). Overall, the implementation of FDG-PET/CT led to modification of RT intention decision in 14 patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT demonstrates essential influence on tumor staging in HNC patients scheduled for irradiation. Implementation of FDG-PET/CT in imaging protocol improves selection of candidates for curative and palliative RT and allows further optimization of treatment management and therapy intention. (orig.)

  6. Radiotherapy of early glottic cancer. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed retrospective analysis of the results and complications of treatment of early glottic cancers is presented. Two hundred and four patients treated by radiotherapy at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis in Amsterdam are reviewed. The results are analyzed in terms of local control, cure and complication rates. These data are compared and contrasted with a similar group of patients treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital during the same time period. It is concluded that the risk of major complications in the larynx from radiotherapy rises very rapidly once the dose of 2050 ret is exceeded. The presence of diabetes and/or hypertension and the severity of acute reaction are related to the subsequent risk of major complications. The dose cure curve for early glottic cancer has been found to be flat over the dose range considered

  7. Efficiency of radiotherapy during local hyperthermia in the treatment of laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Choinzonov; I. O. Spivakova; M. R. Mukhamedov; Zh. A. Startseva; O. V. Cheremisina; I. G. Frolova; D. E. Kulbakin; P. V. Surkova

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the larynx and laryngopharynx, which is accessible to visual and instrumental examination, remains the most relevant and complicated problem among head and neck malignances as before. Investigations show that the incidence of cancer at these sites in Russia in the last decade has risen from 4.5 to 9.67 %. This is a severe and poor prognostic form of cancer, which is characterized by its nonspecific early clinical manifestations, complex anatomic and topographic structure, and a high...

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  9. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  10. Combined breast conserving surgery, chemotherapy, and irradiation in breast cancer treatment. Role of the interval between surgery and onset of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The timing of breast conserving surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment has become the subject of increasing interest over the last years. Results: Five years after start of treatment overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence rates were 86% (95%-confidence limits, 76 to 93%), 73% (61 to 83%), and 8% (3 to 16%), respectively (totally 72 patients). For disease-free survival, the only significant prognostic factor was the number of involved lymph nodes: 0 to 3=86%, ≥4=40% (p20 weeks) had no significant influence on disease-free survival or local tumor control. In contrast, there was a trend of increased regional and distant failure with shortening of the interval due to the delivery of less than 6 cycles chemotherapy before the onset of radiotherapy. Conclusions: In our experience, there was no negative impact of a delay of radiotherapy in order to deliver full course chemotherapy before initiation of radiotherapy. However, the low statistical power of this analysis due to the small number of patients must be considered. It appears possible that a less intense chemotherapy before starting radiation treatment correlates with enhanced distant failure and subsequently decreased disease-free survival rates. Therefore, for patients at increased risk for distant metastasis, we prefer to give 6 cycles polychemotherapy before irradiation. (orig./VHE)

  11. Radiotherapy in skin cancer - present day aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin carcinomas (SC) are the leading ones in the structure of oncological morbidity in both genders in Bulgaria, as well as in white populations in the world. Regardless of their high frequency, their treatment is successful and mortality due to SC has been reduced by 20 - 30% during the last decades. In Bulgaria SC in 2003 comprise 9.3% of all oncological diseases in men and women. According to their frequency they occupy the second phase after lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The treatment of SC is realized applying various therapeutic approaches, distinguished as basic (radical) and alternative ones. The first include surgical treatment and radiotherapy (RT) (definitive or adjuvant) and the alternative ones - curettage and electro-coagulation, cryotherapy, local chemotherapy and immunotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, etc. When defining the therapeutic approach, the method affording the best chances of curing with acceptable cosmetic results should be selected. The present review is aimed at considering the contemporary aspects in RT of SC, including used radiotherapy methods and techniques, volumes, doses, fractionation, and achieved therapeutic effects. The indications for implementing definitive and adjuvant RT are given in detail. The applied radiotherapy methods - external beam RT and brachytherapy, are also discussed. The used planned radiotherapy volumes, doses, fractionation schemes, attained therapeutic effects and possible radiation reactions are considered as well. The curability of SC is high, exceeding 90% after adequate treatment. Regardless of the fact that RT has partially ceded its leading role in SC treatment, it still remains to be one of the basic and successful therapeutic approaches

  12. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  13. A treatment planning comparison of four target volume contouring guidelines for locally advanced pancreatic cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Contouring of target volumes varies significantly in radiotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). There is a lack of consensus as to whether elective lymph nodes (eLN’s) should be included or not in the planning target volume (PTV). In the present study we analyzed the dosimetric coverage of the eLN’s and organs at risk (OAR) by comparing four different contouring guidelines. Methods and materials: PTVs were delineated with (Oxford and RTOG guidelines) or without (Michigan and SCALOP guidelines) including the eLNs in eleven patients with PDAC. eLNs included the peripancreatic, paraaortic, paracaval, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric and portal vein clinical target volumes (CTVs). A 3D-CRT plan (50.40 Gy in 28 fractions) was performed to analyze and compare the dosimetric coverage of all eLNs and OAR between the 4 contouring guidelines. Results: The size of Oxford and RTOG PTVs was comparable and significantly larger than the SCALOP and Michigan PTVs. Interestingly the eLNs received a significant amount of incidental dose irradiation by PTV-based plans that only aimed to treat the tumor without the eLNs. The dosimetric coverage of eLN presented a large variability according to the respective contouring methods. The difference in the size of the 4 PTVs was reflected to the dose distribution at the OAR. Conclusions: Our study provides important information regarding the impact of different contouring guidelines on the dose distribution to the eLNs and the OAR in patients with locally advanced PDAC treated with radiotherapy

  14. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimator leaves in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (standard MLC [sMLC] width of 10 mm and micro-MLC [mMLC] width of 4 mm) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Between January 2010 and August 2010, a retrospective analysis was conducted on 12 patients with cervical cancer. The treatment plans for all patients were generated with the same machine setup parameters and optimization methods in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. The dose distribution for the planning tumor volume (PTV), the dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units (MUs), and the number of IMRT segments were evaluated. For the delivery efficiency, the MUs were significantly higher in the sMLC-IMRT plan than in the mMLC-IMRT plan (802 ± 56.9 vs 702 ± 56.7; p 0.05). For the planning quality, the conformity index (CI) between the 2 paired IMRT plans with the mMLC and the sMLC did not differ significantly (average: 0.817 ± 0.024 vs 0.810 ± 0.028; p > 0.05). The differences of the homogeneity index (HI) between the 2 paired plans were statistically significant (average: 1.122 ± 0.010 vs 1.132 ± 0.014; p 10, V20, V30, and V40, percentage of contoured OAR volumes receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, and the mean dose (Dmean) received. The IMRT plans with the mMLC protected the OARs better than the plans with the sMLC. There were significant differences (p 30 and V40 of the rectum and V10, V20, V40, and Dmean of the bladder. IMRT plans with the mMLC showed advantages over the plans with the sMLC in dose homogeneity for targets, dose sparing of OARs, and fewer MUs in cervical cancer

  15. Radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. 20-year experience from a single institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrian, K.; Sauer, T.; Klemm, S.; Bayer, C.; Haller, B.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To report the efficacy and toxicity of radio(chemo)therapy (RCT) in the management of squamous cell anal carcinoma (SQ-AC) and to evaluate the prognostic factors influencing the outcomes. Patients and methods: A consecutive cohort of 138 patients with cT1-4, cN0-3, cM0 SQ-AC were treated with RCT between 1988 and 2011 at our department. Median follow-up time for surviving patients from the start of RCT was 98 months (range, 1-236 months). Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 56 Gy (range, 4-61 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 119 patients (86%). Results: The survival rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 88 {+-} 3, 82 {+-} 4, and 59 {+-} 6%, respectively, with a median overall survival (OS) of 167 months. The cumulative incidence for local recurrence at 2 and 5 years was 8 {+-} 2 and 11 {+-} 3%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) times were 132 and 135 months, respectively. In 19 patients (14%), a distant metastasis was diagnosed after a median time of 19 months. In the multivariate analysis, UICC (International Union Against Cancer) stage I-II, female gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1, and good/moderate histologic differentiation (G1-2) were significantly associated with a better OS, DFS, and CFS. Conformal radiotherapy planning techniques were significantly associated with a lower cumulative incidence of local recurrence (11 {+-} 3% vs. 38 {+-} 19% at 5 years, p = 0.006). A higher radiation dose beyond 54 Gy was not associated with an improvement in outcome, neither for smaller - (T1/T2) nor for larger tumors (T3/T4). Conclusion: RCT leads to excellent outcomes - especially in patients with stage I/II and G1/G2 tumors - with acceptable toxicity. The probable advantages of high-dose radiotherapy should be considered carefully against the risk of a higher rate of toxicity. Future studies are needed to investigate the role of a more

  16. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  17. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.;

    2014-01-01

    locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking...

  18. Treatment of patients with unresectable squamous head and neck cancer with induction chemotherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: the contribution of induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy (h.f.R.T.) in unresectable squamous head and neck cancer has been evaluated in a single institution as an assistancial protocol. Patients and methods: from March 1994 to June 2000 all consecutive patients with unresectable disease were treated with four courses of platin plus fluorouracil based CT followed by h.f.R.T.. Tumor resectability and response was assessed by a multidisciplinary committee. Results: ninety-nine patients (pts) were treated. All of them had stage IV-M0 disease: 67 T4, 88 N2-N3. Tumor location: 62 oropharynx, 22 hypopharynx, eight oral cavity and seven larynx. Tumor response at the end of treatment: 61 patients complete response, 17 partial response, two stable disease, 10 progressive disease and nine unevaluated. With a median follow-up of 70 months the 5-year loco-regional control and overall survival was 30.3% (95% CI: 21.9-38.6) and 21.6% (95% CI: 13.4-29.8), respectively. Loco-regional control and overall survival is significantly influenced by prior response to induction CT. Main grade 3-4 toxicity related to CT was stomatitis, but there were five patients with an ischemic event. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: 47 stomatitis, 20 epithelitis. Chronic toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: six emergency tracheotomies due to laryngeal edema, five pneumonia and one mucous/soft-tissue necrosis. There were eight toxic related deaths. Conclusion: induction CT followed by h.f.R.T. might increase the overall survival rate in unresectable disease. H.f.R.T. resulted in a high rate of acute toxicity and its use would not be warranted in those patients with no response to induction CT who had a low probability of long-term control. (authors)

  19. The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38–93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2–16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

  20. The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Institute of Oncology (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philipp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Zaucha, Renata [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University, Gdansk (Poland); Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Lagrange, Jean L. [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Oezsoy, Orhan [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHCVs-RSV, Sion (Switzerland); Nguyen, Tan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Baize, Adele [Department de Radio-Oncologie, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles (Belgium); Boujelbene, Noureddine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Collen, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Scandolaro, Luciano [Radioterapia, Azienda Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Untereiner, Michel [Centre Francois Baclesse, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Goldberg, Hadassah [Oncology Departement, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Pesce, Gianfranco A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Opedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Anacak, Yavuz [Department of Radiation Oncology, EGE University, Izmir (Turkey); Friedrich, Esther E.; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Beer, Karl T. [Radio Onkologiezentrum Biel (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38-93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2-16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

  1. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  2. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  3. Prediction of response to radiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer using stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated whether cancer stem cell marker expressing cells can be identified that predict for the response of esophageal cancer (EC) to CRT. Materials and methods: EC cell-lines OE-33 and OE-21 were used to assess in vitro, stem cell activity, proliferative capacity and radiation response. Xenograft tumors were generated using NOD/SCID mice to assess in vivo proliferative capacity and tumor hypoxia. Archival and fresh EC biopsy tissue was used to confirm our in vitro and in vivo results. Results: We showed that the CD44+/CD24− subpopulation of EC cells exerts a higher proliferation rate and sphere forming potential and is more radioresistant in vitro, when compared to unselected or CD44+/CD24+ cells. Moreover, CD44+/CD24− cells formed xenograft tumors faster and were often located in hypoxic tumor areas. In a study of archival pre-neoadjuvant CRT biopsy material from EC adenocarcinoma patients (N = 27), this population could only be identified in 50% (9/18) of reduced-responders to neoadjuvant CRT, but never (0/9) in the complete responders (P = 0.009). Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation into the possible clinical benefit of CD44+/CD24− as a predictive marker in EC patients for the response to chemoradiation

  4. Treatment with stereotactic radiotherapy body in lung cancer using tomography with taper beam of megavoltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzes variations inter and intra fraction and their corrections online, for this case and for the 13 first. We study the dosimetric parameters recommended in the RTOG 0813 Protocol. Reported global dosimetry of treatments; discussed pros and cons of this methodology. (Author)

  5. Prospective multicenter study of combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer women with the rare clinical scenario of ipsilateral supraclavicular node recurrence without distant metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of chemotherapy combined with curative radiotherapy in breast cancer patients who presented with recurrent ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastases (ISLM) without 'nonregional disease,' we designed an observational study performed prospectively. Patients and Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients with ISLM from breast cancer as part of recurrent regional disease without distant metastases were included in this study. All patients received chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based schema or paclitaxel for six courses and curative radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions of 2 Gy/5 days a week). An 'involved field' radiation was delivered during the interval between the third and fourth chemotherapy course; hormonal therapy was given based on receptor status. Results: The rate of overall clinical response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy was 94.9%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 28 and 40 months, respectively; the 5-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 35% (95% confidence interval, 19-51) and 20% (95% confidence interval, 6-34), respectively. Conclusion: A curative course of intravenous chemotherapy and radical irradiation is feasible in patients with ISLM. All patients presenting recurrence in supraclavicular nodes should be treated with definitive locoregional treatments and systemic therapy because the outcomes are better than might be historically assumed

  6. Advantage of three-dimensional treatment planning for localized radiotherapy of early stage prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional two-dimensional (2-d) treatment planning was compared to three-dimensional (3-d) treatment planning for patients with prostatic carcinoma. Both types of treatment planning were performed for all ten patients with five fixed fields. In 3-d planning we used irregular shaped fields. For further evaluation we performed conventional planning in rotation technique in two patients. The target volume included prostate prostate, seminal vesicles and a surrounding security margin of 2 cm. Using the MPR-version of the MEVAPLAN planning system, the three-dimensional dose calculations were performed. For the volumes of interest (VOI's) we discussed quality of the dose distribution concerning homogeneity in the target volume and isodose distribution in the organs at risk, which are the rectum and the urinary bladder. We defined the tumor encompassing reference isodose (ca. 95%) for the calculation of the involved rectum- and bladder volume. Using the five-field technique our results show a reduction of the radiation related rectum- and bladder volume concerning the tumor encompassing reference isodose (ca. 95%) for the rectum inbetween 9.5 and 36.6% (median: 19%, n=10) and for the urinary bladder inbetween 15.7 and 47.8% (median 28%, n=10). Calculated for 80% of the reference isodose the difference for the rectum was 15.7 to 31.3% (median: 23%) and for the urinary bladder 24.5% to 56.7% (median: 42%). A significant reduction of radiation related side-effects concerning rectum and urinary bladder can be expected by a reduction of volume involvement and a consecutive dosage limitation. (orig.)

  7. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  8. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  9. Lung cancer treatment with high cyclophosphamide doses versus high cyclophosphamide doses plus radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty-six evaluable male patients with a histologically proved inoperable lung cancer, with a Karnofsky's score greater than or equal to 30, were considered for study. The mean age was 57.2 (range 20 to 74) years. Tumor cell types were of epidermoid carcinoma 50, adenocarcinoma 6, undifferentiated small cell carcinoma 5, and undifferentiated large cell carcinoma 5. Fifty patients had limited disease and 15 had extensive disease. They were treated with combined modality therapy Cyclophosphamide (CY) 50 mg/kg body weight, administered into the tubing of a freely running intravenous infusion of 5% dextrose every 10 to 12 days, followed by radiation therapy with 60Co, 6000 rad and then, with CY 17 mg/kg body weight every 15 days until progression (Ch-R-Ch group). The control group (Ch) of 31 patients was treated with CY 50 mg/kg body every 10/12 days. Complete response was achieved in 3/35 patients and partial response in 15/35 patients of the Ch-R-Ch group. In the control group, 12/31 patients achieved partial response. Total dose of CY was higher in responders achieving a significantly longer survival (median 12+ months) in comparison to non-responders (median 7 months) and the control group (median 6 months). Less toxic reactions were seen in patients responding to Ch-R-Ch regimen. Bone marrow depletion did not affect the patient's survival, but cystitis and alopecia, it appeared, decreased life expectancy. It is concluded that combined modality therapy is better than chemotherapy alone, with less cytotoxicity in responders

  10. Quadrantectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conservative treatment of early breast cancer always requires irradiation of residual mammary tissue. The preliminary results obtained in 45 early breast cancer patients, who received quadrantectomy plus axillary dissection, followed by radiation of residual breast are reported. Radiation was performed by the two opposed field technique. In some cases the residual breast tissue was compressed using a special accessory provided with the Theratron 780. In addition to the tumor dose of 50 GY, 10 GY boots was added to the surgical scar using 7 MeV electrons. The 6 patients with positive axillary nodes received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF) after radiotherapy. All patients are currently alive and free of disease. The 64% (29 patients) were followed up for at least 5 years, and 36% (16 patients) for at least 3 years. Only 2 cases of local recurrence were encountered (4,4%). The esthetic result was satisfactory in all cases. No side effects due to treatment were noted

  11. Biological planning of treatment that combines local external radiotherapy with molecular systemic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of different therapy modalities for cancer treatment has been often used in order to enhance the outcomes. Therapeutic schemes that combines external beam irradiation ('eLRT') and systemic molecular radiotherapy (sMRT) could be an alternative in those patients with multiple lesions or when the constrains for OARs will difficult the planning. The formulation could be used for biological evaluation of prescriptions in treatment that combines external beam radiotherapy with systemic molecular radiotherapy. The advantage of ccRT v.s. scRT depends of treatment prescription (administered activity and dose fractioning) and tissue response. Treatment planning and optimization it is possible to be done in those cases where highly conformed dose boost using systemic molecular radiotherapy could be an option (author)

  12. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for the palliation of advanced head and neck cancer in patients unsuitable for curative treatment - 'Hypo Trial'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The primary purpose of the trial was to assess rate of tumour response to a hypofractionated course of radiotherapy in patients with incurable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Secondary objectives included radiation toxicity, symptom control, quality of life (QoL) and progression-free and overall survival. Patients and methods: Patients were planned to receive 30 Gy in 5 fractions at 2/week, at least 3 days apart, with an additional boost of 6 Gy for small volume disease (≤3 cm) in suitable patients. Thirty-seven patients were enrolled between August 2004 and March 2006. Median age was 68 (43-87) years, 81% were male and the predominant primary site was oropharynx (32%). The majority (73%) presented with Stage III-IV disease. Results: Thirty-five patients received radiotherapy, 1 died prior to treatment and one refused treatment. Of the 35 patients receiving radiotherapy, 31 (88%) received ≥30 Gy. Of the 35 patients who received treatment the overall objective response was 80%. Grade 3 mucositis and dysphagia were experienced in 9/35 (26%) and 4/35 (11%), respectively. QoL and symptom control were assessable in 21 patients. Thirteen (62%) reported an overall improvement in QoL and 14 (67%) experienced an improvement in pain. The median time to progression and death was 3.9 and 6.1 months, respectively. Conclusion: The 'Hypo Trial' regimen provided effective palliative treatment in HNSCC unsuitable for curative treatment. Compliance was excellent and resulted in high response rates, symptom control and improvement in QoL with acceptable toxicity. However, progression free and overall survival was short

  13. External radiotherapy in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the management of thyroid carcinoma (TC) of any histological type, surgery is the primary mode of treatment. The second modality for the management is treatment with radioactive iodine (131I), especially, when the tumor has the ability to concentrate 131I. External radiotherapy has a limited use in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). It is useful in the management of bulky residual tissue which is not completely resected, metastatic disease which does not concentrated radioiodine and as a palliative treatment for reliving pain in patients with distant metastases. The ER as an adjuvant treatment in both anaplastic and medullary carcinoma has a significant role to play and should be used more frequently than is presently being advocated and practiced

  14. Comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a stomach cancer treatment;Comparacion dosimetrica de radioterapia conformal 3D versus radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT) de un tratamiento de cancer de estomago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernui de V, Maria Giselle; Cardenas, Augusto; Vargas, Carlos [Hospital Nacional Carlos Alberto Seguin Escobedo (ESSALUD), Arequipa (Peru). Servicio de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the dosimetry in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in a treatment of stomach cancer. For this comparison we selected a patient who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and D2 dissection for a T3N3 adenocarcinoma Mx ECIIIB receiving treatment under the scheme Quimio INT 0116 - in adjuvant radiotherapy. In the treatment plan was contouring the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) was generated from the expansion of 1cm of the CTV, the risky organs contouring were: the liver, kidneys and spinal cord, according to the consensus definition of volumes in gastric cancer. The 3D Conformal Radiotherapy planning is carried out using 6 half beams following the Leong Trevol technique; for the IMRT plan was used 8 fields, the delivery technique is step-and-shoot. In both cases the fields were coplanar, isocentric and the energy used was 18 MV. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), in this case has proved to be a good treatment alternative to the technique of 3D Conformal Radiotherapy; the dose distributions with IMRT have better coverage of PTV and positions of the hot spots, as well as the kidneys volume that received higher doses to 2000 cGy is lower, but the decrease in dose to the kidneys is at the expense of increased dose in other organs like the liver. (author)

  15. Cancer risk following radiotherapy of cervical cancer: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women treated for cervical cancer were selected for study because (a) doses to body organs following radiotherapy can be accurately determined and vary sufficiently to permit dose-response evaluations, (b) organs remote from the cervix receive low-dose exposures in the range of current scientific interest, (c) treatment is relatively successful and many patients survive long enough to be at risk of late complications of radiotherapy, and (d) several nonexposed groups of women with cervical cancer are also available for comparison. In addition, population-based cancer registries provide an opportunity to inexpensively study large numbers of individuals over many decades. The careful procedures normally used by cancer registries to record second primary cancers facilitate the study of cancer incidence for which a wider view of radiation risk is expected than can be seen in investigations of mortality. Other special features of studies of cervical cancer patients include the ability to assess the effects of very large partial-body exposures, differences in organ sensitivities to radiation, interactions of radiation with biological factors such as age, and the duration of carcinogenic response

  16. Peptides for radiotherapy of neuroendocrine cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade there has been a resurgence of interest in therapeutic nuclear medicine, due to the limitation of conventional or external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of secondary or metastatic cancer sites outside of the primary treatment area. Some of the human tumours that produce metastases express high levels of somatostatin receptors. In order to make possible the diagnostic and radiotherapeutic treatment of these kind of tumours, various somatostatin analogue peptides have been developed in recent years. Peptides have become an important class of radiopharmaceuticals,due to its unique ability to detect specific sites as receptors or enzymes. This paper describes the work with 99m Tc to establish the labelling and analytical conditions for a somatostatin analogue as a precursor, to undertake a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical labelled with 188 Re for treatment of somatostatin receptor positive tumours. (Author)

  17. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy and treatment at a high volume facility is associated with improved survival in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: This study examined the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NoTx), conventional fractionated radiotherapy (ConvRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. This population based cohort also allowed us to examine what facility level characteristics contributed to improved outcomes. Methods: We included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n = 13,036). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The median follow up was 68 months (interquartile range: 35–83 months) in surviving patients. Among the cohort, 52% received NoTx, 41% received ConvRT and 6% received SBRT. The 3-year OS was 28% for NoTx, 36% for ConvRT radiotherapy, and 48% for the SBRT cohort (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for SBRT and ConvRT were 0.67 and 0.77, respectively, as compared to NoTx (1.0 ref) (p < 0.0001). Patients treated at a high volume facility vs. low volume facility had a hazard ratio of 0.94 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with early stage inoperable lung cancer treated with SBRT and at a high volume facility had a survival benefit compared to patients treated with ConvRT or NoTx or to those treated at a low volume facility

  19. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB–IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3–4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154–0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m2 chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m2 regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  20. Health-related quality of life and treatment outcomes for men with prostate cancer treated by combined external-beam radiotherapy and hormone therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) is important when considering the treatment options for prostate cancer. From 1992 to 1998, 57 patients were treated by radiotherapy plus hormone therapy (median age, 79 years; median prostate-specific antigen concentration, 15.0 ng/ml; median radiotherapy dosage, 60 Gy). General HR-QOL was measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer QOL Questionnaire, and a newly developed disease-specific QOL survey was used to assess urinary and bowel functions. QOL was also measured in a control group of patients admitted for prostate biopsy. The general HR-QOL scores in the radiation group ranged from 70.0 to 91.3, with sexual problems showing the lowest (i.e., worst) score (38.5). Compared with the control group, the scores in the radiation group were worse for physical function and sexual problems. For disease-specific QOL, the radiation group had worse urinary function than controls, but were more satisfied with their urinary function. There was no difference between the radiation group and controls in satisfaction with bowel function. When the control group was subdivided at into two groups: age 75 years or less, and age over 75 years, the QOL score in the radiation group was the same as that in the subgroup aged over 75 years. In subgroups of the radiation patients, according to survey period, there was no difference between the first and last surveys in longitudinal HR-QOL evaluations. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 67.6% and 41.6%, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were 97.9% and 94.7%. The combination of radiotherapy and hormone therapy has a good outcome and patients do not experience poor HR-QOL, except for sexual problems. Moreover, the disease-specific QOL is good, especially for urinary bother. (author)

  1. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.kr [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eui-Don [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3-4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154-0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m{sup 2} chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m{sup 2} regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  2. Salvage radiotherapy after high intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Peter; Sundar, Santhanam

    2012-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a technique that has been used to treat localised prostate cancer. There is no standard treatment for patients who relapse with prostate cancer following primary treatment with HIFU; here we report the case of a patient who was successfully treated with external beam radiotherapy for disease relapse following HIFU. To date, our patient remains disease free with no toxicity from his treatment.

  3. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases

  4. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, Hedda; Mercke, Claes [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Johansson, Karl-Axel [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiophysics; Ejnell, Hasse; Edstroem, Staffan [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lung cancer: current status and future developments

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, C; Lang, S.; Rowbottom, C; Guckenberger, M.; Faivre-Finn, C

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of lung cancer, with over 50% of patients receiving this modality at some point during their treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique that adds fluence modulation to beam shaping, which improves radiotherapy dose conformity around the tumor and spares surrounding normal structures. Treatment with IMRT is becoming more widely available for the treatment of lung cancer, despite the paucity of high level evidence sup...

  6. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  7. Delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuta, Atsushi; Tatematsu, Masanori; Ishinaga, Hajime; Harada, Teruhiko; Majima, Yuichi [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    Seven cases of delayed airway stenosis after radiotherapy for early staged head and neck cancers during 1989 and 1999 were evaluated (aged 54-77 yrs, 6 male and a female). The cases included five glottic laryngeal cancers (T1a, T1b, and three T2), a subglottic laryngeal cancer, and an unknown origin, but strongly suspected laryngeal cancer, with neck metastasis. Radio injury was found from 3 months to 47 months after radiotherapy. {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy was used in all seven cases, although {sup 60}Co radionuclide was changed to Liniac in 1997. The total dose was 60 Gy for 3 cases, and 70 Gy for 4 cases. Tracheostomy was performed in 3 cases due to bilateral vocal cord impairment. Background, treatment, and response to radiotherapy were compared to those of 90 patients of a control group with early staged laryngeal cancer who did not fail radiation injury during the same period. As a result, radionuclide ({sup 60}Co), total dose, cervical surgery, antiinflammatory drugs, laryngeal edema during radiotherapy were risk factors. The intensity and the period of mucositis by radiotherapy was important for indicating delayed airway stenosis. (author)

  8. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum; Radiotherapie des cancers cutanes au cours du xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, route Majida-Bouleila, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  9. Dosimetric analysis of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyusha Bagdare

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the dosimetric parameters of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases. Methods: Ten patients with inoperable NSCLC were selected for this study. The 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated for all patients following Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG guidelines. Generated plans were then compared on the basis of planning target volume (PTV coverage, dose delivered to organs at risk, homogeneity index (HI, and conformity index (CI for the prescribed dose (PD of 50 Gy in 25 fractions.Results: The mean D95 and D99 (dose to the 95% and 99% volume for the PTV were found better in the 3DCRT plans compared to the ones in the IMRT plans. On an average, the volume receiving 20 Gy (V20 of contralateral lung was 2.91% and 3.03% in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively. The Dmean of contralateral lung was 3.17 Gy (3DCRT versus 4.2 Gy (IMRT, whereas the Dmean of ipsilateral lung was 12.69 Gy (3DCRT and 13.82 Gy (IMRT. The V20 of ipsilateral lung was found to be slightly lower in the 3DCRT (25.67% when compared to the IMRT (30.50%. The dose to the heart was comparable in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans (mean dose: 4.42 Gy versus 4.48 Gy; D33: 3.77 Gy versus and 4.02 Gy. For the spinal cord, the Dmax was found to be lower in the 3DCRT plans (18.40 Gy when compared to the IMRT plans (25.49 Gy. The HI was 1.08 versus 1.41 in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively. The CI was identical (1.67 in both sets of plans.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the PTV coverage was found to be slightly better in the 3DCRT plans when compared to the one in the IMRT plans. On average, the dose to the organs at risk were found to be comparable.

  10. The effect on the radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life and the related health education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an important means of cervical cancer, due to the specificity of tumor site and side effect of radiotherapy, lack of knowledge of radiotherapy for patients and relatives about the disease, It is particularly important during radiotherapy on health education. By the analysis of radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life, it is the purpose of patients during the period of radiotherapy of whole course health education. Including before radiotherapy, radiotherapy in health education and the guide of the leaving hospital. In order to improve the compliance of patients, reduce the complications. Further it is improved the clinical treatment effect. (author)

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27–91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3–135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia ≥Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  13. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  14. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  15. Multimodal treatment utilizing intraoperative radiotherapy and high-dose combination chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation for advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 51 cases of pancreatic cancer, intraoperative radiotherapy was given in 9, and pain-relief was noted in 6. Excluding 2 patients who died from hemorrhage from the gastrointestinal tract soon after irradiation, the mean survival period was 2.9 mo. in cases with distant metastatic cases and 7.8 mo. in cases without it. Hemorrhage, necrosis and stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract were observed as complications. ABMT and high-dose chemotherapy were given in combination in 7 cases, of which the mean survival period was 3.9 mo. in cases with distant metastasis and 7.0 mo. in those without it. As side effects of high-dose chemotherapy, symptoms of the digestive system and hair loss were observed in all cases, but marked leukopenia and thrmbopenia recovered rapidly after the 2nd week after ABMT. (Chiba, N.)

  16. Status of hypo fractionated radiotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been assumed that in the case of a majority of tumours hypo fractionation radiotherapy is of limited value because it negatively affected the ratio of curability to late adverse effects. However, there now exists data to suggest that hypo fractionation may be advisory in breast cancer. The author presents a number of recently published and currently ongoing trials, which may provide evidence for the use of hypo fractionated radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. The possible implications for primary breast cancer are that modest increase in fraction size combined with reduction in treatment time may translate into worthwhile gains in tumour control, without enhanced late normal tissue injuries. This may affect future decision-making in the course of radiotherapy for breast cancer if the ongoing trials are confirmatory. (author)

  17. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  18. A pilot study of preoperative continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, external microwave hyperthermia, and external beam radiotherapy for treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, or recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combining external beam radiotherapy, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and external microwave hyperthermia in patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Methods and Materials: From 7/95 through 2/99, 15 patients were enrolled in the study. The treatment regimen consisted of continuous infusion 5-FU 250 mg/m2/d 7 days/week beginning on day 1, external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis, 4500 cGy, 180 cGy/d 5 days/week using a 3 or 4-field technique, and external microwave hyperthermia on days 3, 8, 15, 22, and 29. Chemotherapy was stopped on the last day of radiotherapy. Surgical resection, if feasible, was scheduled 3-6 weeks after completing thermochemoradiotherapy. For this regimen to be considered feasible, no more than 2 of the 15 patients should fail to complete therapy due to life-threatening toxicity. Toxicity was scored using National Cancer Institute Criteria. Results: All patients completed the chemoradiotherapy portion of the protocol. Eleven of the 15 patients completed all 5 hyperthermia treatments. Of the 4 patients who did not receive the full course of hyperthermia, only 1 patient had treatment stopped due to life-threatening toxicity. The other 3 patients did not complete hyperthermia due to scheduling errors (n = 2) or patient request (n = 1). Five of 15 patients required a treatment interruption due to toxicity no. >=no. Grade 3. Seven patients experienced lesser degrees of toxicity which did not require treatment interruption. Three patients experienced no side effects. The most common toxicities were dermatitis and diarrhea. Of the 14 patients in whom surgery was planned, 11 (79%) were resectable. There was one pathologic complete response. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver thermochemoradiotherapy, as prescribed in this study, to patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or recurrent rectal cancer. The therapy is moderately toxic, with one

  19. A Randomized Study of Accelerated Fractionation Radiotherapy with and Without Mitomycin C in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in thc treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (I) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). The 2-year overall survival (OS) of the whole group was 21 %. The OS according to treatment arm was 23%, 20%. and 28% in CF. AF. and AF+MMC arms respectively (ρ<0. 19). The 2-year loco-regional control (LC) rate was 22% for the whole group of patients. The LC was 10%, 25%. and 30% for the CF, AF, and AF+MMC respectively (ρ=0.27). The only significant parameters for OS and LC were performance status and pre-treatment hemoglobin level. Mucositis grades 3 and 4 occurred in 70% and 90% of the patients in the AF and AF+MMC arm respectively compared to 55% of patients in the CF arm (ρ=0.04). However the addition of MMC did not significantly increase the incidence or severity of mucositis between AF and AF+MMC (ρ=0.13). Hematological toxicity grades 3 and 4 were significantly higher after MMC (occurred in 40% of patients versus 10% and 5% in CF and AF arms respectively, ρ=0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of grade 3 dryness of mouth (ρ=0.06). fibrosis (ρ=0.6). or lymphoedema (ρ=0.39) among the three arms. There was a trend for improvement of LC and OS rates with the use or AF and the addition of MMC to AF compared to CF radiotherapy. although the difference was not statistically significant. The small number of the patients in each treatment arm and the inclusion or multiple tumor sites may contribute to these statistically insignificant results. Accordingly we advise to continue

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Treatment for Elderly Patients with Medically-Inoperable Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DwightEHeron

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With a growing elderly population, elderly patients with head-and-neck cancers represent an increasing challenge with limited prospective data to guide management. The complex interplay between advanced age, associated comorbidities, and conventional local therapies such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, can significantly impact elderly patients’ quality-of-life (QOL. SBRT is a well-established curative strategy for medical-inoperable early-stage lung cancers even in elderly populations; however there is limited data examining SBRT as primary therapy in head-and-neck cancer. Material/Methods: Twelve patients with medically-inoperable head-and-neck cancer treated with SBRT ± cetuximab from 2002 through 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. SBRT consisted of primarily 44Gy in 5 fractions delivered on alternating days over 1-2 weeks. Concurrent cetuximab was administer at a dose of 400mg/m2 on day -7 followed by 250mg/m2 on day 0 and +7 in n=3 (25%. Patient reported quality-of-life (PRQoL was prospectively recorded using the previously-validated University-of-Washington Quality-of-Life Revised (UW-QoL-R. Results: Median clinical follow-up was 6-months (range: 0.5 – 29 months. The 1-year actuarial local progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival for definitively treated patients were 69%, 100%, 69% and 64%, respectively. One patient (8% experienced acute grade 3 dysphagia and one patient (8% experienced late grade 3 mucositis; there were no grade 4-5 toxicities. Prospective collection of patient report quality-of-life as assessed by UW-QoL-R was preserved across domains. Conclusion: SBRT shows encouraging survival and relatively low toxicity in elderly patients with unresectable head-and-neck cancer; which may provide an aggressive potentially curative local therapy while maintaining quality-of-life.

  1. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  2. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Byung Chul; Jeung, Kyung Min; Lee, Seong Uk; Bae, Yeong Geol; Na, Hyun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  3. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Linz Univ. (Austria). Medical Faculty; Roach, Mack III [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Van As, Nicholas (ed.) [The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    The aim of radiation therapy is to deliver a radiation dose to the tumour that is high enough for all cancer cells to be killed, while sparing healthy organs to such an extent that the side effects are as low as possible. Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men in Denmark......, and for prostate cancer treatments, the proximity of the bladder and rectum makes radiotherapy treatment of this site a challenging task. Furthermore, the prostate may move during the radiation delivery and treatment margins are necessary to ensure that it is still receiving the intended dose. The main aim...

  5. Chronic fatigue in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and profound symptoms related to both malignancy and anti-neoplastic treatment. It is being reported in 60% to 80% of cancer patients. We review the correlation between the cancer-related fatigue syndrome and radiotherapy. In patients undergoing radiotherapy, fatigue is often cumulative and may reach its peak during the last weeks of treatment. The presence of fatigue prior to therapy initiation is the most important predictive factor of the occurrence of radiotherapy-related cancer fatigue syndrome. Occasionally, fatigue persists for a prolonged period of months and even years beyond radiotherapy. Anemia may be one of major causative factors responsible for the development of the cancer-related fatigue syndrome. Fatigue has an enormous physical, mental, emotional, and economic impact on cancer patients, their families and care-providers. The treatment of radiation-related fatigue remains unknown. The initial approach should cover efforts aimed at the correction of potential etiologies, especially anemia. Education concerning fatigue greatly benefits some patients. It seems that exercise may be beneficial in relieving fatigue, bearing in mind that the exercise program for cancer patients should be initiated gradually and significantly individualized. (author)

  6. Intraoperative radiotherapy as a protocol for the treatment of initial breast cancer; Radioterapia intraoperatoria como protocolo de tratamento do cancer de mama inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo de Morais, E-mail: sbromberg@terra.com.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2013-07-01

    To report on preliminary outcomes of single-dose intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer based on local recurrence rates and complications. Methods: fifty postmenopausal women with ≤2.5cm breast tumors and clinically normal axillary lymph nodes were submitted to quadrantectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and intraoperative radiotherapy and studied. Mean follow-up time was 52.1 months. Results: mean patient age was 65.5 years; mean tumor diameter was 1.41cm 82% of nodules were hormonal receptor positive and HER-2negative. All patients received a 21 Gy radiation dose for a mean time of 8.97 minutes. Distant metastases were not observed. Local recurrence was documented in three cases, with identical histological diagnosis as the primary tumors. Thirty-five (70%) patients had local fibrosis, with gradual improvement and complete resolution over 18 months. Postoperative infection and seroma formation were not observed. Conclusion: partial radiotherapy is a potentially feasible and promising technique. Careful patient selection is recommended before a longer follow-up period has elapsed to confirm intraoperative radiotherapy safety and efficacy. (author)

  7. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  8. Radical Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty patients with head and neck carcinoma were studied retrospectively to assess the impact of treatment on survival and local control rate by stage in the Dept of Radiation Therapy, Korea University Had Wha Hospital between March 1981 and March 1986. Prior to definite radiotherapy, patients were evaluated by physical examination and radiologic studies including heart, paryngogram and CT scan and then these patients were grouped according to the American Joint Committee(AJC) staging system. They were Treated with RT alone or postoperative irradiation to the dose of 7,200 cGy/8 weeks and 6,000 cGy/7 weeks respectively. The results were obtained and as follows; 1. overall male to female sex ratio was 3.6:1. The peak age of patients with head and neck cancer was 6th decade. 2. In all patients treated by RT, the ratio of squamous cell carcinoma to non-squamous cell carcinoma was 3.5:1 (60/77 patients). 3. The incidence according to the anatomic site of primary tumor was 22 cases in the larynx, 12 cases in PNS, 7 cases in nasopharynx, 6 cases in oropharynx, and 3 cases in hypopharynx. 4. According to AJC staging system, 4 cases were Stage I, 7 in Stage II, 19 in Stage III and 27 in Stage IV. 5. The overall incidence of cervical lymph node metastases was 43% and subdigatric and submaxillary triangle lymph nodes were the most frequent site of metastases. 6. Local control was achieved in 48% of patients treated by radio-therapy. 7. The lung was the most common site for distant metastases, comprising 4 cases among 7 cases in which distant metastases occurred. 8. The overall estimated 5-year survival rate was 43% in the head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy by life-table analysis

  9. Survey of factors underlying treatment choice for patients with localized prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy vs extrabeam radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known regarding factors for decision-making on treatment by localized prostate cancer patients. We therefore conducted a survey series of cases for influence on treatment decision making, and also satisfaction after therapy. A total of 51 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) were mailed original questionnaires about their treatment decision-making factors and satisfaction and the results compared between the two groups. Some 48 (94.1%) patients responded to the questionnaire, 38 (79.2%) and 10 (20.8%) after RP and EBRT, respectively. The major factor determining the decision as to treatment approach was the physician in both groups (more than 90%). Excluding physicians, family or others were more important in the RP group than the EBRT group (p=0.023). RP group patients desired removal of their prostate for cancer control, while, EBRT group patients favored the less invasive approach in consideration of side effects. Over 80% patients indicated they would definitely or probably choose the same treatment again, although some of the RP group would switch to watchful-waiting because of sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence and the invasive nature of the procedure. Physicians are in a most important position to help patients understand prostate cancer and treatment, outcomes, and need to help them make their best choice, with appropriate follow up including mental care. (author)

  10. Radiotherapy for superficial esophageal cancer of poor risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The reported incidence of superficial esophageal cancer (SEC) has steadily increased in Japan as result of endoscopic examination has been become common. In Japan, treatment of SEC is endoscopical mucosal resection (EMR) for mucosal cancer or esophagectomy with 3 fields lymph nodes resection for submucosal cancer. Radiotherapy is little place for the management of SEC. Because of some reasons, we treated patients with SEC by radiotherapy alternative to surgery. Purpose of this report is to evaluate efficacy of radiotherapy for SEC. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 to 1996, eighteen patients with SEC were treated with radiotherapy at our hospital. Reasons of radiotherapy that was chosen as the primary methods of treatment were refusal of surgery in one patient, poor medical condition in 4 patients and double primary cancer in 13 patients (head and neck: 11, simultaneously: 11). No patients had indication of EMR. Diagnosis was made by endoscopy and radiography. Some patients were examined with endoscopic ultrasound. Two patients (11.1%) had tumor limited to the mucosa and 16 patients (88.9%) had tumor invaded the submucosa. Seven of these tumors (38.9%) were multicentric. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma. There were 17 male patients and one female patient. The age range was 49 years to 87 years with a median of 62 years. Stage of all patients was T1N0M0 according to UICC staging system. Ten patients underwent external radiotherapy (Ex) (50 Gy - 66 Gy) alone and 8 patients did both Ex and intracavitary radiotherapy (IC) (30-60 Gy of Ex with 5-15 Gy of IC). No patients received chemotherapy. Duration of follow-up was 6 months to 96 months with a median of 30 months. Results: The overall survival rate was 55.9% in 3-year and 14% in 5-year, and the cause-specific 5-year survival rate was 100%. Causes of death were malignant tumor other than esophageal cancer in 4 patients, intercurrent disease other than malignant tumor in 3 patients and no

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Cuong V; Steenbergen, Peter; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Heijmink, Stijn W T J P; Pos, Floris J; Haustermans, Karin; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2016-03-01

    For radiotherapy of prostate cancer, MRI is used increasingly for delineation of the prostate gland. For focal treatment of low-risk prostate cancer or focal dose escalation for intermediate and high-risk cancer, delineation of the tumor is also required. While multi-parametric MRI is well established for detection of tumors and for staging of the disease, delineation of the tumor inside the prostate is not common practice. Guidelines, such as the PI-RADS classification, exist for tumor detection and staging, but no such guidelines are available for tumor delineation. Indeed, interobserver studies show substantial variation in tumor contours. Computer-aided tumor detection and delineation may help improve the robustness of the interpretation of multi-parametric MRI data. Comparing the performance of an earlier developed model for tumor segmentation with expert delineations, we found a significant correlation between tumor probability in a voxel and the number of experts identifying this voxel as tumor. This suggests that the model agrees with 'the wisdom of the crowd', and thus could serve as a reference for individual physicians in their decision making. With multi-parametric MRI it becomes feasible to revisit the GTV-CTV concept in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. While detection of index lesions is quite reliable, contouring variability and the low sensitivity to small lesions suggest that the remainder of the prostate should be treated as CTV. Clinical trials that investigate the options for dose differentiation, for example with dose escalation to the visible tumor or dose reduction to the CTV, are therefore warranted. PMID:26858164

  12. Treatment of small cell lung cancer with a combination of VP16-213 and cyclophosphamide with cisplatin or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty five patients with small cell lung cancer were treated with a VP16-213 combination chemotherapy regimen in two consecutive series. The first series included 24 patients; 10 with limited and 14 with extensive disease were treated with VP16-213, 120 mg/m2 p.o. daily for 5 consecutive days, Cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 i.v. and Cisplatin 80 mg/m2 i.v. with hydratation and manitol induced diuresis. The cycle was repeated every 3 weeks. The second series included 31 similar patients, 16 limited, and 15 extensive disease, treated with VP16-213 at the same dose and Cyclophosphamide at 1,200 mg/m2 i.v. also repeated every 3 weeks; after three cycles the patients were treated with radiotherapy to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes with 4,000 rads in a split course of three weeks interval, followed by the same combination chemotherapy. Response rate was 75% for the first series with 6 of 24 (25%) of complete responses in four limited and two extensive disease and a median survival time of 24 weeks. In the second series of patients there were 26 of 31 (83.8%) responses with 10 of 31 (32%) complete responses in nine limited and one extensive disease and a median survival time of 33 weeks for responders. Duration of response for complete responders was 36.8 weeks for the first series and 51 weeks for the second. Toxicity was mild and indludes nausea and vomitting, myelosupression, alopecia in both series, with one toxic death in the second series. Both regimes are active with a low complete response rate, which was increased in the second series by the addition of radiotherapy, which did not increase overall survival. (orig.)

  13. Secondary cancers after radiotherapy: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being intentional, delivering high radiation doses in well-defined volumes for cancer patients, radiotherapy poses a specific problem in terms of radio-induced secondary neoplasias. Actually, second cancers after radiotherapy have been almost ignored for decades, mostly because oncologists had not available large series of patients cured of cancer with more than 10-15 years of follow-up. Only anecdotal cases were reported (skin carcinomas, thyroid cancers, soft tissue sarcomas, osteosarcomas after retinoblastoma irradiation...). The picture changed in the 80's, in particular when large series of Hodgkin's disease patients were analyzed after a long follow-up. Second solid tumours were found to be significantly related to irradiation, and more precisely to dose and extend of radiation. In parallel, data from breast radiotherapy (for cancer or benign diseases), from fluoroscopy and atomic explosions, also suggested a small but increase in risk of breast cancer after a few Gy. Although the risk/benefit ratio remains usually exceedingly small, radiotherapy should help to answer two additional basic questions: In a group of irradiated patients, can we individualize those cancers induced by radiation from those which were not? and is there within the cancer patient population a subgroup of individuals more prone to cancer radio-induction (and for whom strategy should be possibly readapted)? (author)

  14. Long-term outcome and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer: the importance of boost volume assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods Between March 2004 and July 2007, 26 patients with locally advanced, medically inoperable head and neck cancer or gross residual tumors in close proximity to critical structures following head and neck surgery were treated with SBRT as a boost treatment. All patients were initially treated with standard external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. SBRT boost was prescribed to the median 80% isodose line with a median dose of 21 (range 10–25 Gy in 2–5 (median, 5 fractions. Results The median follow-up after SBRT was 56 (range 27.6 − 80.2 months. The distribution of treatment sites in 26 patients was as follows: the nasopharynx, including the base of the skull in 10 (38.5%; nasal cavity or paranasal sinus in 8 (30.8%; periorbit in 4 (15.4%; tongue in 3 (11.5%; and oropharyngeal wall in 1 (3.8%. The median EBRT dose before SBRT was 50.4 Gy (range 39.6 − 70.2. The major response rate was 100% with 21 (80.8% complete responses (CR. Severe (grade ≥ 3 late toxicities developed in 9 (34.6% patients, and SBRT boost volume was a significant parameter predicting severe late complication. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that a modern SBRT boost is a highly efficient tool for local tumor control. However, we observed a high frequency of serious late complications. More optimized dose fractionation schedule and patient selection are required to achieve excellent local control without significant late morbidities in head and neck boost treatment.

  15. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  16. Predicting recurrence after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begg, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Radiotherapy is a mainstay of treatment, either alone for early stage tumors or combined with chemotherapy for late stage tumors. An overall 5-year survival rate of around 50% for HNSCC demonstrates that treatme

  17. Whither papillon? Future directions for contact radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, J; Gerard, J P; Sun Myint, A;

    2007-01-01

    Although contact radiotherapy was developed 70 years ago, and is highly effective with cure rates of over 90% for early rectal cancer, there are few centres that offer this treatment today. One reason is the lack of replacement of ageing contact X-ray machines, many of which are now over 30 years...

  18. Treatment of advanced stage ovarian carcinoma with a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and radiosensitizer: report of a pilot study from the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-eight patients with Stage III or IV ovarian carcinoma were treated with combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy employing a unique protocol. Four cycles of cyclophosphamide and hexamethylmelamine alternated with four cycles of concurrent cisplatin, whole abdominal radiotherapy, and intraperitoneal misonidazole. The entire treatment program lasted six months. Clinical complete responses were seen in 50% of the patients with an overall response rate of 61%. Pathologic complete response (PCR) confirmed at second look surgery occurred in 18% of the group (5 patients). Median survival of the entire group was 15.2 months with all PCR's alive NED. This outcome was no different than our previous experience with combination chemotherapy alone. Toxicities seen included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. However, these side effects were manageable. Two non-tumor deaths occurred. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining drug and radiation therapy concurrently in the treatment of ovarian cancer; further research is needed to explore different sequencing and dose levels that could improve the outcome

  19. Revisiting radiotherapy in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head and neck cancers form 20% of the total cancers in India. It comprise of soft tissue neoplasms of oral/nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses/pharynx/larynx and salivary glands. Majority of them are squamous cell carcinomas, which shows a higher prevalence among rural population in the 4th decade of life with an equal male-female ratio. Buccal mucosa is the commonest site followed by tongue. Tobacco/related products and alcohol are its major causative factors. Though surgical resection is the main treatment modality; patients in the advanced stages of disease or those with multiple/extensive lymph node involvement are done through a multi-disciplinary approach involving radiation therapy. Typical doses of 60Cobalt irradiation are from 30-72 Grays (Gy). Overall treatment is from 15 to 80 days with a dose per fraction ranging from 1.8-6 Gy. High doses cause mouth sores/dry mouth/dysphagia/dysgeusia/jaw stiffness. However, modern radiation protocols considerably minimize exposure to healthy tissues. This paper evaluates the radiotherapy systems for head and neck cancers in the contemporary and future domains. (author)

  20. Benefit, risk, and optimization by ROC analysis in cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of definitive cancer radiation therapy is cure or control. The attainment of that objective is not without risk of treatment-induced radiation injury. The optimum treatment is, therefore, that level of radiotherapeutic effect with the maximum probability of benefit and the minimum associated probability of injury. An objective of radiotherapy research is the formulation of a model of optimization that is independent of a consensus of what constitutes optimization. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is such a model, for it can relate probabilities of benefit and injury yielding a graphical determination of the optimum level of radiotherapeutic effect. ROC analysis is explained, an example taken from the contemporary radiotherapy literature is presented, and clinical research requirements for a general application of ROC analysis to the optimization of definitive cancer radiotherapy are developed

  1. Progress of cervical cancer genetic-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although cervical cancer gene therapy has a distance to clinical use due to some problems, the combinating of irradiation and gene therapy holds much promise in cancer therapy based on the traditional radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. This review focuses on the group of radiogenic therapy that are either. (authors)

  2. 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT in estimation of the treatment response to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore whether the degree of 99Tcm-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) uptake in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be correlated with the treatment response to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Methods: A total of 102 patients with NSCLC were studied with 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT before radiotherapy. The patients were classified by a follow-up CT as responders (complete or partial remission) and non-responders (stable or progressive disease). After intravenous administration of 740 MBq 99Tcm-MIBI, SPECT imaging at 10-30 min (early) and 2-3 h (delayed) were performed. Region of interest (ROI) was placed over the tumors and contralateral normal lung tissue. The uptake ratio of tumor to contralateral normal lung (T/N) was obtained from both early (ER) and delayed (DR) SPECT images. The retention index (RI) was measured as: RI = (DR - ER)/ER x 100%. Statistical analysis was performed by two independent-sample t-test and Mann-Whitney U test using software SPSS 13.0. Results: 99Tcm-MIBI uptake was significantly higher in responders than in non-responders: 2.36 ±0.17 vs 1.82 ±0.14 (ER) and 2.48 ± 0.20 vs 1.94 ± 0.16 (DR), respectively (t = - 13.1, - 12.7, both P99Tcm-MIBI SPECT might be useful to estimate the treatment response to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients with NSCLC. (authors)

  3. Pregnancy and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer in pregnancy is relatively uncommon but breast cancer is one of the most common malignancy occur with pregnancy. Prescribed doses of radiotherapy are significantly higher than those of diagnostic procedures. Fetal exposure and damage can occur during radiotherapy within target area. Because of those risks, radiotherapy during pregnancy is basically has to avoid. Even though, feral damage depends on fetal dose and has some threshold dose. Practically, even in stochastic effect, there are some minimal doses. A most important point is careful estimation of fetal dose before radiation. The physician has to inform the patient about risk and benefit of radiotherapy to fetus and to mother and have an ethical balance to help the mother and family to make a final decision. (author)

  4. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging during radiotherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer - treatment response assessment using different segmentation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and the derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value has potential for monitoring tumor response to radiotherapy (RT). Method used for segmentation of volumes with reduced diffusion will influence both volume size and observed...... volumes changed significantly during treatment (p < 0.01). There was a significant difference in JSI among segmentation methods at time of PRERT (p < 0.016) with region growing having the lowest JSIGTV (mean± sd: 0.35 ± 0.1), followed by the SD4 method (mean± sd: 0.50 ± 0.1) and clustering (mean± sd: 0.......52 ± 0.3). There was no significant difference in mean ADC value compared at same treatment time. Mean tumor ADC value increased significantly (p < 0.01) for all methods across treatment time. CONCLUSION: Among the three semi-automatic segmentations of hyper-intense intensities on DW-MR images...

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Combined with Chemotherapy in Stages III-IV Hypopharynx-Larynx Cancer: Treatment Compliance and Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Franchin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Retrospective review of our experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT combined with chemotherapy as the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancers. Materials and Methods. Between September 2008 and June 2012, 60 patients (26 with larynx and 34 hypopharynx cancers were treated. Our policy was to offer SIB-IMRT plus concurrent cisplatin to patients affected by larynx cancer stage T3N0-N1 and NCT with TPF (docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil followed by SIB-IMRT to patients with larynx cancer stage T2-4N2-3 or hypopharynx cancer T2-4N0-3. SIB-IMRT consisted in a total dose of 70.95 Gy (2.15 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week to the gross primary and nodal disease and differentiated dosages for high risk and low risk nodal regions. Results. Complete remission was achieved in 53/60 (88% of patients. At a median follow up of 31 months (range 9–67, the rate of overall survival and locoregional control with functional larynx at 3 years were 68% and 60%, respectively. T stage (T1–3 versus T4 resulted in being significant for predicting 3-year freedom from relapse (it was 69% and 35%, resp., for T1–T3 and T4 tumors; P=0.04, while site of primary disease (larynx versus hypopharynx was not significant (P=0.35. Conclusion. Our results indicated that combining SIB-IMRT with induction chemotherapy or concurrent chemotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for organ preservation in advanced larynx/hypopharynx cancer.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Combined with Chemotherapy in Stages III-IV Hypopharynx-Larynx Cancer: Treatment Compliance and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. Retrospective review of our experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) combined with chemotherapy as the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancers. Materials and Methods. Between September 2008 and June 2012, 60 patients (26 with larynx and 34 hypopharynx cancers) were treated. Our policy was to offer SIB-IMRT plus concurrent cisplatin to patients affected by larynx cancer stage T3N0-N1 and NCT with TPF (docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil) followed by SIB-IMRT to patients with larynx cancer stage T2-4N2-3 or hypopharynx cancer T2-4N0-3. SIB-IMRT consisted in a total dose of 70.95 Gy (2.15 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the gross primary and nodal disease and differentiated dosages for high risk and low risk nodal regions. Results. Complete remission was achieved in 53/60 (88%) of patients. At a median follow up of 31 months (range 9–67), the rate of overall survival and locoregional control with functional larynx at 3 years were 68% and 60%, respectively. T stage (T1–3 versus T4) resulted in being significant for predicting 3-year freedom from relapse (it was 69% and 35%, resp., for T1–T3 and T4 tumors; (Ρ =0.35),while site of primary disease (larynx versus hypopharynx) was not significant (Ρ =0.35). Conclusion. Our results indicated that combining SIB-IMRT with induction chemotherapy or concurrent chemotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for organ preservation in advanced larynx/hypopharynx cancer.

  7. Concepts of radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) relies heavily on medical imaging. Until recently, the most important planning tool was the treatment simulator. The kilovoltage radiographic capabilities in a treatment simulator enabled the boundaries of treatment fields to be visualized with respect to bony anatomic landmarks. Perhaps the most important advance in treatment planning in recent years is the ability to visualize the passage of the beams with respect to a more accurate geometrical representation of the tumor and other soft tissue structures. This 'virtual simulation' uses a computer-based representation of a patient to determine the extent of the disease and the location of radiation sensitive normal tissue. Computer tomographic (CT) imaging produces a high-resolution three-dimensional representation of anatomy that can be correlated with other image sets such as magnetic resonance images (MRI) of function. Positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging is beginning to be used to determine tumor proliferation and the presence of distant disease. It is likely that accurate RTP in conjunction with CT simulators will eliminate traditional treatment simulators in the future. Traditionally, patient dose calculation algorithms have been based on correcting measured dose in water phantoms to take into account beam modifiers, patient surface contours and internal tissue inhomogeneities. Recently, model-based algorithms have been computing the dose directly in the patient representation using the CT to obtain a voxel-by-voxel density map. The convolution/superposition method, which uses a Monte Carlo-derived transport kernel, is the current state-of-the-art algorithm for dose computation. Soon direct Monte Carlo simulation will be used in model-based dose computation. Model-based dose computations enable a simpler monitor unit calculation formulation. The other major breakthrough in RTP is computer-based optimization. The goals of the treatment are specified as

  8. Comparing Cystatin C Changes as a Measure of Renal Function Before and After Radiotherapy in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Ameri; Asadollah Alidoosti; Khosro Mojir Sheybani; Farnaz Taslimi; Morteza Tabatabaiefar; Maryam Mirzaie Moghadam; Hooshang Amir Rasouli; Pedram Fadavi; Shahrzad Aref

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and compare Cystatin C changes before and after radiotherapy in patients with stomach cancer who were candidate for radiotherapy. This study was conducted as a prospective cohort one. Eighteen patients with definite diagnosis of stomach cancer under treatment by radiotherapy who presented to Radiotherapy-Oncology Center of Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran-Iran, and the treatment in all cases was simultaneous chemoradiation with Xeloda were included. I...

  9. Nomograms to predict late urinary toxicity after prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Romain; Arango, Juan David Ospina; Beckendorf, Véronique; Delobel, Jean-Bernard; Messai, Taha; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Le Prisé, Elisabeth; Guerif, Stéphane; Simon, Jean-Marc; Dubray, Bernard; Zhu, Jian; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Pommier, Pascal; Gnep, Khemara

    2013-01-01

    International audience OBJECTIVE: To analyze late urinary toxicity after prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT): symptom description and identification of patient characteristics or treatment parameters allowing for the generation of nomograms. METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty-five patients underwent RT in seventeen French centers for localized prostate cancer. Median total dose was 70 Gy (range, 65-80 Gy), using different fractionations (2 or 2.5 Gy/day) and techniques. Late urinary toxicity an...

  10. Study of a bio-mechanical model of the movements and deformations of the pelvic organs and integration in the process of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the goals of optimizing treatment planning of prostate cancer radiation therapy is to maintain the margins added to the clinical target volume (CTV) as small as possible to reduce the volumes of normal tissue irradiated. Several methods have been proposed to define these margins: 1) Methods based on the observation of movements obtained by different imaging systems, 2) The predictive methods of the movement of organs, from a model representing the motions of pelvis organs, a calculation of a margin can be made. We have developed and optimized a finite element bio-mechanical model of the prostate, bladder and rectum. This model describes the movement and deformation of the pelvic organs during the filling of certain organs such as the bladder and rectum. An evaluation of this model to predict the movement of the prostate during the various sessions of radiotherapy is shown using a series of CBCT images (Cone Beam Computerized Tomography). (author)

  11. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  12. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer

  13. The effects of radiotherapy and surgery on the sexual function of women treated for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study investigated the short- and medium-term effects of pelvic radiotherapy and surgery on the sexual function of women treated for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixteen women with Stages I, II, or III disease referred for radiotherapy treatment were assessed. Six had undergone prior hysterectomy. The women were assessed with questionnaires prior to radiotherapy, at completion of radiotherapy, and at 6 weeks and 14 weeks after radiotherapy treatment. The clinical findings at routine follow-up were noted. Results: The study showed significant changes in sexual activity and satisfaction as a result of treatment. This was due to a number of physical and psychological factors. The level of sexual activity was lowest at completion of radiotherapy treatment. A feeling of vaginal shortening was the most frequent reason and was more common in women who were treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Dyspareunia, bleeding, and concern of bleeding and/or recurrence were all significant factors. Conclusions: The questionnaires were an effective way of assessing women's sexual function. Radiotherapy caused sexual dysfunction in one-half of women. Combined treatment with radiotherapy and surgery results in a higher risk than radiotherapy alone. Women with cervical cancer and undergoing radiotherapy treatment require considerable counseling and support

  14. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient

  15. Accelerated high-dose radiotherapy alone or combined with either concomitant or sequential chemotherapy; treatments of choice in patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of high-dose chemo-radiotherapy (CRT), using the treatment schedules of EORTC study 08972/22973 or radiotherapy (RT) alone were analyzed among all patients (pts) with Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative intent in our department from 1995–2004. Included are 131 pts with medically inoperable or with irresectable NSCLC (TNM stage I:15 pts, IIB:15 pts, IIIA:57 pts, IIIB:43 pts, X:1 pt). Group I: Concomitant CRT: 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fractions (fx)/33 days combined with daily administration of cisplatin 6 mg/m2: 56 pts (standard). Group II: Sequential CRT: two courses of a 21-day schedule of chemotherapy (gemcitabin 1250 mg/m2 d1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 d2) followed by 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fx/33 days without daily cisplatin: 26 pts. Group III: RT: 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fx/33 days or 60 Gy/3 Gy/20 fx/26 days: 49 pts. The 1, 2, and 5 year actuarial overall survival (OS) were 46%, 24%, and 15%, respectively. At multivariate analysis the only factor with a significantly positive influence on OS was treatment with chemo-radiation (P = 0.024) (1-, 2-, and 5-yr OS 56%, 30% and 22% respectively). The incidence of local recurrence was 36%, the incidence of distant metastases 46%. Late complications grade 3 were seen in 21 pts and grade 4 in 4 patients. One patient had a lethal complication (oesophageal). For 32 patients insufficient data were available to assess late complications. In this study we were able to reproduce the results of EORTC trial 08972/22973 in a non-selected patient population outside of the setting of a randomised trial. Radiotherapy (66 Gy/24 fx/33 days) combined with either concomitant daily low dose cisplatin or with two neo-adjuvant courses of gemcitabin and cisplatin are effective treatments for patients with locally advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. The concomitant schedule is also suitable for elderly people with co-morbidity

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy in primary rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the results of several studies intraoperative radiotherapy seems to influence local control for primary rectal cancer in UICC-Stage II / III positively, though recommendations in therapy cannot be given as studies of high evidence level do not exist. As IORT is rarely available and makes patient recruitment difficult, prospective randomised trials have not been carried out yet. This emphasizes the importance of non-randomised trials for an evaluation of IORT. A comparison of 21 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who had been treated with intraoperative radiation therapy and 21 similar cases without an application of IORT could not show any significant improvements in prognosis (recurrences, metastases and disease-specific survival). Nevertheless the employment of intraoperative radiation showed a trend in improvement of local control. This hast been shown by several other studies before. Thus the application of IORT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is considered a useful part in multimodal treatment and should further be evaluated in specialized centres. In case-control studies 1:1-matching leads to a good comparability of groups and renders conclusions of high internal validity possible. To gain a sufficient power, this type of trials should however primarily be carried out by centres with a high number of cases.

  17. How PET is changing the management of cancer with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information from PET scanning is transforming the management of many malignancies and the impact of PET is likely to increase further as new indications are recognised. PET is of particular value in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. These patients rarely undergo invasive surgical staging and therefore imaging is crucial in determining the extent of disease before treatment. More accurate staging with PET means that futile aggressive RT or chcmoRT can be avoided in patients with incurable extensive disease. FDG-PET is of proven value in the staging of common metabolically-active malignancies treated with radiotherapy. These include lung cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphomas and oesophageal carcinoma. It has been shown that PET can improve the selection of patients for radical surgery or radiotherapy in lung cancer and that PET-based staging more accurately predicts survival than conventional staging. For those patients that remain eligible for definitive RT after PET. treatment can be more accurately targeted at the tumour and involved regional nodes. The value of PET for treatment planning is enhanced significantly when PET and CT scans are acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner. Fused PET-CT images can be imported into the radiotherapy planning computer and used to accurately target tumour with the best beam arrangement. After treatment, response may be hard to assess with structural imaging. PET-rcsponse to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts survival in NSCLC more accurately than CT response. However, PET has much more potential than imaging with FDG alone can realise. Markers such as FLT can be used to image proliferation in tumours, misonidazole or FAZA can be used to image hypoxia and labeled metabolites of anti-cancer drugs such as 5-FU can be used to study pharmacokinetics. New combinations of radiation and drugs may emerge that can be selected based on biological characteristics of

  18. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  19. Long-term results of ipsilateral radiotherapy for tonsil cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryoolk; Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of ipsilateral radiotherapy for the patient with well lateralized tonsil cancer: not cross midline and <1 cm of tumor invasion into the soft palate or base of tongue. From 2003 to 2011, twenty patients with well lateralized tonsil cancer underwent ipsilateral radiotherapy. Nineteen patients had T1-T2 tumors, and one patient had T3 tumor; twelve patients had N0-N2a disease and eight patients had N2b disease. Primary surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed in fourteen patients: four of these patients received chemotherapy. Four patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The remaining two patients received induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and definitive CCRT, respectively. No patient underwent radiotherapy alone. We analyzed the pattern of failure and complications. The median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 11 to 106 months) for surviving patients. One patient had local failure at tumor bed. There was no regional failure in contralateral neck, even in N2b disease. At five-year, local progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and progression-free survival rates were 95%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. One patient with treatment failure died, and the five-year overall survival rate was 95%. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia was found in one patient at least 6 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Ipsilateral radiotherapy is a reasonable treatment option for well lateralized tonsil cancer. Low rate of chronic xerostomia can be expected by sparing contralateral major salivary glands.

  20. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. Methods From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84% or without (16% chemotherapy. Results The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  1. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT) for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84%) or without (16%) chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings

  2. Study of effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments in prostate cancer; Estudio de los efectos de las protesis metalicas en tratamientos radioterapicos en irradiacion pelvica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, P.; Mateos, J. C.; Herrador, M.; Ortiz, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    In this work it is described the problems related to the radiotherapy treatments of patients with prostate cancer and hip implants Analyze the effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments and present the methods to overcome the problems that arise in these situations. Our patients are student in a TAC Philips with a range of Hounsfield number of-1000 to 4000. The planning and measurement of CT numbers are done in a RTP ADAC Pinnacle that have a maximum of 32767 CT units. The metallic implants more frequently used, titanium, stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, generate CT numbers from 2000 to 3000, and cause saturation effects. This problem may be solved with modern scanners that use the extended CT range. It is an algorithm that expand the usual range by a factor of 10. An alternative solution to this problem can be used if the prostheses are able to scan to select the window parameters that allow an automatic region of interest (roi) definition that match to the dimensions of the implants. Finally it is assigned the electronic/physical densities to the created roi's. The clinical dosimetry of patients with prostheses have been done defining the usual regions of interests (target volume and risk organs) in first place. Finally the prostheses are outlined using the window parameters previously measured and assigned the electronic or physical densities. The attenuation of the implant may then be calculated accurately. The presence of implants in the treatment fields originate artifacts in the TAC images of patients and underdosage of target volume that range between 12% and 30% in function of material an energy used. It is necessary the application of methods that correct the dose behind the implant, if it is not possible to prevent the incidence of the treatment beams over the prostheses. (Author)

  3. Second cancers in children treated with modern radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: The scattered radiation from the treatment volume might be more significant for children than for adults and, as a consequence, modern radiotherapy treatment techniques such as IMRT and passive proton therapy could potentially increase the number of secondary cancers. In this report, secondary cancer risk resulting from new treatment technologies was estimated for an adult prostate patient and a child. Material and methods: The organ equivalent dose (OED) concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau and a linear dose-response curve was applied to dose distributions of an adult prostate patient and a child with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate. Conformal radiotherapy, IMRT with 6 MV photons and proton therapy were planned. OED (cancer risk) was estimated for the whole body, the rectum and the bladder. In addition, relative cumulative risk was calculated. Results: Secondary cancer risk in the adult is not more than 15% it increased when IMRT or passive proton therapy was compared to conventional treatment planning. In the child, risk remains practically constant or was even reduced for proton therapy. The cumulative risk in the child relative to that in the adult can be as large as 10-15. Conclusions: By a comparison between an adult patient and a child treated for a disease of the prostate, it was shown that modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy (active and passive) do not increase the risk for secondary cancers

  4. Clinical treatment of lumbodorsal radiotherapy ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize our experience in the treatment of 12 cases of severe lumbodorsal radio-therapy ulcers. Methods: Of the 12 cases, 4 were male and 8 female. The youngest patient was 29 and the oldest was 67 years old. Their injuries were mainly resulted from radiotherapy for costal metastasis of breast cancer, carcinoma of uterus and dorsal skin carcinoma or scar induced by 60Co γ-rays, deep X-rays or superficial accelerator electrons. Their local accumulative dose was 60-120 Gy. Palliative debridement was performed with partial excision of the ribs and spinous process. And then the defects were repaired with local skin flap in 2 cases, parascapular skin flap in 1 case and island musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle in 9 cases. Results: All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted on the wounds of the 12 cases survived (100%). Grade A healing was achieved in 11 cases of ulcer (91.7%) and grade B healing in 1 cases (8.3%). All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted survived and the ulcers never recurred. Conclusion: Severe lumbodorsal radiotherapy injury often results in complications. The authors performed palliative excision and repaired by transferring an axial skin flap or a musculocutaneous flap with good blood circulation selected in accordance with the principles of plastic surgery, which can effectively improve blood circulation and promote wound healing. Reverse musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle is an especially good material for reconstruction. It has axial blood vessel and proper thickness. It is broad and can be rotated with great range and the donor site can be sutured directly

  5. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penn, I.

    1982-02-01

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility.

  6. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility

  7. Cognitive function after radiotherapy for supratentorial low-grade glioma: A North Central Cancer Treatment Group prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of cranial radiotherapy (RT) on cognitive function in patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Twenty adult patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma were treated with 50.4 Gy (10 patients) or 64.8 Gy (10 patients) localized RT. The patients then were evaluated with an extensive battery of psychometric tests at baseline (before RT) and at approximately 18-month intervals for as long as 5 years after completing RT. To allow patients to serve as their own controls, cognitive performance was evaluated as change in scores over time. All patients underwent at least two evaluations. Results: Baseline test scores were below average compared with age-specific norms. At the second evaluation, the groups' mean test scores were higher than their initial performances on all psychometric measures, although the improvement was not statistically significant. No changes in cognitive performance were seen during the evaluation period when test scores were analyzed by age, treatment, tumor location, tumor type, or extent of resection. Conclusions: Cognitive function was stable after RT in these patients evaluated prospectively during 3 years of follow-up. Slight improvements in some cognitive areas are consistent with practice effects attributable to increased familiarity with test procedures and content

  8. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

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    Brunet, J. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Alonso, C. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Llanos, M. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lacasta, A. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Fuentes, J. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Mendoza, L.A. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Badia, J.M. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Delgado, E. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Ojeda, B. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    Radiotherapy has been standard therapy for locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is being studied to improve responses and survival. We report a phase II study in locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer (FIGO stages III and IV A) using chemotherapy with bleomycin, methotrexate and cisplatin (BMP) followed by radical radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients, 31 in stage III and 4 in stage IV A, 3 complete responses (CR) and 22 partial responses (PR) were achieved after chemotherapy treatment. Thirty-one patients completed radiotherapy; 19 achieved CR and 4 PR. Five-year actuarial survival for the entire group was 45% (95% confidence interval, 37-53%) with a median survival of 56 months. Patients with CR had a significantly better survival: The 5-year actuarial survival was 74% (95% CI, 59-89%). Recurrence developed at 4 to 19 patients. The most frequent side-effects were nausea and vomiting. Myelosuppression and impaired renal function also occurred. There was no evidence of radiotherapy toxicity enhancement. The stage and Karnofsky index were significant prognostic factors. It is concluded that MBP chemotherapy in advanced cervical cancer is effective and, followed by radiotherapy, allows a good control of this tumor. The group of patients with complete response have a low rate of recurrences and a long survival chance. (orig.).

  9. Breast radiotherapy: an Australasian survey of current treatment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the dissemination of evidence-based quality assurance guidelines, the Australian National Breast Cancer Centre Radiation Oncology Group conducted a process survey of breast radiotherapy treatment delivery throughout Australia. A process survey was conducted in August/September 1998. This survey comprised questions enquiring about treatment positioning, immobilization devices used, planning strategies, simulation and dose computation methods, treatment prescribing and quality assurance. The survey was sent to 123 Australian fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) and to the six directors of New Zealand radiation oncology departments. Fifty-eight questionnaires were returned of which 38 were received from individuals and 20 represented a reply from a department with a routine breast radiotherapy protocol (representing an average of 4.5 radiation oncologists per reply). The study identified great consistency between departments with respect to dose and fractionation for breast tangents. The study also identified some areas of treatment planning and delivery that varied between individuals or departments. These mainly reflected a lack of evidence in some areas of radiotherapy treatment delivery. The circulation of quality assurance guidelines will perhaps improve consistency of radiotherapy techniques in which studies have identified that technique changes improve outcome. This study identified that these areas include the taking of simulation and port films and the use of off-axis dosimetry. Further studies are required for areas of radiotherapy treatment delivery that have little evidence for or against their implementation. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govaert Stephanie LA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemoradiotherapy (IMRT in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods and materials Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy or combined with (sequential or concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI after one year and 56% (±14% after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11% after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013 with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly combined with chemotherapy.

  11. Radiotherapy for TXN2M0 pyriform sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively analyzed 31 patients with TxN2M0 pyriform sinus cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy with or without neck dissection. According to the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) staging system, the numbers of patients were T1, 4; T2, 5; T3, 11; and T4, 5. There were 27 male and 4 female patients. The ages ranged from 36 to 86 years, with a median of 64 years. Five-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 38.7% and 34.4%, respectively. The local control rate after radiotherapy, and after salvage surgery, was 29.0% and 45.0%, respectively. Although the control rate of the neck lymph nodes treated by radiotherapy alone was 26.7%, in contrast, that by surgery was 68.8%. Treatment by radiotherapy with neck dissection to selected T1-3N2 patients with pyriform sinus cancer, for voice preservation, would be an alternative treatment to the surgery that is now standard treatment. (author)

  12. Radiotherapy for prevention and therapy of gynecomastia due to antiandrogen treatment in prostate cancer patients. A patterns-of-care-study

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    Neu, Burkhard; Sautter, Verena; Melcher, Ute; Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Momm, Felix [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Gynecomastia is a frequent side effect of antiandrogen therapy for prostate cancer and may compromise quality of life. Although it has been successfully treated with radiotherapy (RT) for decades, the priority of RT as a preferred treatment option has recently been disputed as tamoxifen was also demonstrated to be effective. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of indications, frequency, and technique of RT in daily practice in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. On behalf of the DEGRO-AG GCG-BD (German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy of Benign Diseases) a standardized questionnaire was sent to 294 RT institutions. The questionnaires inquired about patient numbers, indications, RT technique, dose, and - if available - treatment results. Moreover, the participants were asked whether they were interested in participating in a prospective study. From a total of 294 institutions, 146 replies were received, of which 141 offered RT for gynecomastia. Seven of those reported prophylactic RT only, whereas 129 perform both preventive and symptomatic RT. In 110 of 137departments, a maximum of 20 patients were treated per year. Electron beams (76%) were used most often, while 24% of patients received photon beams or orthovolt x-rays. Total doses were up to 20 Gy for prophylactic and up to 40 Gy for therapeutic RT. Results were reported by 19 departments: prevention of gynecomastia was observed in 60-100% of patients. Only 13 institutions observed side effects. Prophylactic and symptomatic RT is widely used in the German-speaking countries, but patient numbers are small. The clinical results indicate that RT is a highly effective and well-tolerated treatment.

  13. Postoperative radiotherapy of patients with cervical cancer - analysis of indications and evaluation of treatment results in the case of incomplete information about prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of study: To evaluate treatment results of radical and simple hysterectomy of patients with cervical cancer who received adjuvant radiotherapy as well as to evaluate the influence of prognostic factors on treatment results. Material and methods: The analysis included 86 patients with squamous cell carcinoma after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy from 2000 to 2003. Thirty-one patients had radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy of the pelvis, of whom 24 patients (77.4%) were in stage IB, four (12.9%) in stage IIA and three (9.7%) in stage IIB. A simple hysterectomy was performed in 55 patients (63.9%), of whom 51 patients (92.7%) were in stage IB, four patients (7.3%) in stage IIA. Results: Five-year patient survival rates treated with radical and simple hysterectomy in stage I were comparable (79.1% and 80.4%). The ratio in stage II was 50.0% and 75.0% respectively. A significant difference in survival of patients (p < 0.05) with features N(-) (88.7%) was noticed, which is in contrast to patients with metastases in lymph nodes (50.3%). In the case of simultaneous absence of metastasis in lymph nodes and absence of parametria involvement or absence of invasion into the lymphovascular space, survival was 90.2% and 93.4% respectively, while in the case of absence of all these factors it was 100%. Conclusions: The high proportion of patients after simple hysterectomy (63.9%) instead of radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy means that surgeons failed to follow standard surgical procedures. The 5-year observation results indicate that patients after radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy did not have better treatment results when compared with patients after simple hysterectomy. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, 1042 cases where reviewed in School Dentistry - Osaka Univ. Seven hundred and fifteen were male and three hundred and twenty-seven were female. Ora cancer was affected more male than female patients, with mean age of 582 years old. The tongue was the most common anatomic localization of oral cancer. In tongue, the use of external radiotherapy y combined with brachytherapy and brachytherapy isolated presented better results than chemotherapy combined with external radiotherapy. In buccal mucosa, there was not differences in the treatment's results using external radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. In tongue's floor and upper and jaw gingiva the combined treatment with chemotherapy and external radiotherapy presented better results than isolated external radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Effect of combined treatment with salvage radiotherapy plus androgen suppression on quality of life in patients with recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the effect of salvage radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence or PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a phase II study. Quality of life was prospectively assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-Item Version 3.0 with the added prostate cancer-specific module at baseline and predefined follow-up visits. Results: Patients experienced a significant increase in bowel dysfunction (23%) by the end of RT (p < 0.0001). This bowel dysfunction improved after RT but remained slightly elevated (5-10%) throughout the 2-year AS period. This extent of residual bowel dysfunction would be considered of minimal clinical importance. A similar, but less pronounced, pattern of change did occur for urinary dysfunction. Erectile function showed no change during RT, but had an abrupt decline (10%) with initiation of AS that was of moderate clinical significance (p < 0.01). None of the other QOL domains demonstrated a persistent, significant change from baseline that would be considered of major clinical significance. Conclusion: The combined treatment with salvage RT plus 2-year AS had relatively minor long-term effects on QOL

  16. Radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to compare treatment outcomes for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB cervical carcinoma patients receiving radical surgery followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy. Medical records of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients treated between July 2008 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 148 patients underwent radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (surgery-based group). These patients were compared with 290 patients that received radical radiotherapy alone (RT-based group). Recurrence rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), local control rates, and treatment-related complications were compared for these two groups. Similar rates of recurrence (16.89% vs. 12.41%, p = 0.200), PFS (log-rank, p = 0.211), OS (log-rank, p = 0.347), and local control rates (log-rank, p = 0.668) were observed for the surgery-based group and the RT-based group, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of acute grade 3–4 gastrointestinal reactions and late grade 3–4 lower limb lymphedema were significantly higher for the surgery-based group versus the RT-based group. Cox multivariate analyses found no significant difference in survival outcome between the two groups, and tumor diameter and histopathology were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS. Radical radiotherapy was associated with fewer treatment-related complications and achieved comparable survival outcomes for patients with FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer compared to radical hysterectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy

  17. Guidance of treatment decisions in risk-adapted primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging: a single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate is considered to be the most precise noninvasive staging modality for localized prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) dynamic sequences have recently been shown to further increase the accuracy of staging relative to morphological imaging alone. Correct radiological staging, particularly the detection of extraprostatic disease extension, is of paramount importance for target volume definition and dose prescription in highly-conformal curative radiotherapy (RT); in addition, it may affect the risk-adapted duration of additional antihormonal therapy. The purpose of our study was to analyze the impact of mpMRI-based tumor staging in patients undergoing primary RT for prostate cancer. A total of 122 patients admitted for primary RT for prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed regarding initial clinical and computed tomography-based staging in comparison with mpMRI staging. Both tumor stage shifts and overall risk group shifts, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and the Gleason score, were assessed. Potential risk factors for upstaging were tested in a multivariate analysis. Finally, the impact of mpMRI-based staging shift on prostate RT and antihormonal therapy was evaluated. Overall, tumor stage shift occurred in 55.7% of patients after mpMRI. Upstaging was most prominent in patients showing high-risk serum PSA levels (73%), but was also substantial in patients presenting with low-risk PSA levels (50%) and low-risk Gleason scores (45.2%). Risk group changes occurred in 28.7% of the patients with consequent treatment adaptations regarding target volume delineation and duration of androgen deprivation therapy. High PSA levels were found to be a significant risk factor for tumor upstaging and newly diagnosed seminal vesicle infiltration assessed using mpMRI. Our findings suggest that mpMRI of the prostate leads to substantial tumor upstaging, and can considerably affect treatment decisions in all

  18. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhiro Yamada; Koji Okihara; Tsuyoshi Iwata; Koji Masui; Kazumi Kamoi; Kei Yamada; Tsuneharu Miki

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatm...

  19. Using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to evaluate the location reliability of the highest–skin dose area detected by treatment planning in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute skin reaction during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer is an inevitable process, and its severity is related to the skin dose. A high–skin dose area can be speculated based on the isodose distribution shown on a treatment planning. To determine whether treatment planning can reflect high–skin dose location, 80 patients were collected and their skin doses in different areas were measured using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to locate the highest–skin dose area in each patient. We determined whether the skin dose is consistent with the highest-dose area estimated by the treatment planning of the same patient. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests revealed that these 2 methods yielded more consistent results when the highest-dose spots were located in the axillary and breast areas but not in the inframammary area. We suggest that skin doses shown on the treatment planning might be a reliable and simple alternative method for estimating the highest skin doses in some areas

  20. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon

  1. Pre-Radiotherapy dental evaluation criteria and treatment needs of oral side effects after head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this review is to present pre-radiotherapy evaluation criteria and the main needs for treatment of these patients after the radiation therapy. Were revised articles in English, Spanish and Portuguese language between 1995 and 2009 indexed in Pubmed and Scielo. The keywords were oral cancer and radiotherapy, complications in head and neck radiotherapy, oral pre-radiotherapy evaluation.The adverse complications of radiotherapy in head and neck area could be temporary or late. The late effects, such as radiation caries and osteorradionecrosis could be directly associated with the fact that previous dental evaluation was not performed and can severely affect the post-operatory quality of life. The participation of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team and dental evaluation of the patients that will receive radiotherapy in the head and neck area are of vital importance to improve the post-operatory quality of life of these patients

  2. Evaluation of quality of life and psychological response in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the quality of life (QOL) and mental condition of patients being treated for cancer is now recognized. In this study, we evaluated QOL and mental condition in patients with cancer before and after radiotherapy. The subjects were 170 patients who had undergone radiotherapy. The examination of QOL was performed using the quality of life questionnaire for cancer patients treated with anticancer drugs (QOL-ACD), and mental condition (anxiety and depression) was examined using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). These examinations were performed at the start of radiotherapy and immediately after radiotherapy. The QOL score was slightly higher in all patients after the completion of radiotherapy than before the start of radiotherapy. In the palliative radiotherapy group, QOL score was significantly improved by treatment. Anxiety and depression were improved after radiotherapy. There was a correlation between the degrees of improvement of the HADS and QOL score. We could treat cancer patients by radiotherapy without reducing their QOL, and improvement in QOL was significant in the palliative radiotherapy group. Mental condition was also improved after radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Contribution of radiotherapy to the treatment of malignant tumors, 3. Combined drugs and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niibe, Hideo; Takahashi, Iku; Tamaki, Yoshio (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of cytotoxic agent, hormone, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protector combined with radiation therapy in cancer management were analysed. The results were as follows: 1) An increase in response was seen in 25% or more of tumor nodules given radiotherapy combined with misonidazole, anoxic cell sensitizer, compared with radiotherpy alone. But the drug was also found to be neurotoxic and peripheral neuropathy. 2) Evidence has been given that Amifostine may protect the mucosal damage from radiation when Amifostine prior to irradiation was administrated to patients with tumor in the head and neck or in the pelvis. 3) There were no difference between five year survival of radiotherapy alone and with chemotherapy for patients with stage I Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy following radiotherapy for patients with stage II was more effective treatment method than radiotherapy alone. 4) Radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer was performed to control only primary site. The success rates of local control were over 80%. The near future holds extensive promise for a combination of radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormone therapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protectors. All of these when used in the appropriate circumstances may yield significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio and in the long-tern control of tumors.

  4. High dose rate fractionated interstitial radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Takayuki; Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School] [and others

    1996-12-01

    From January 1993 through June 1996, thirteen advanced prostate cancer cases were treated with high dose rate interstitial radiotherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance combined with or without external radiotherapy. Among eight cases eligible for local control, only one case relapsed so far. One perineal skin necrosis and one total incontinence were experienced in the patients treated with non-standard protocol dose. No apparent side effects were found in standard treatment patients. In addition with markedly increased tumor dose local control rate can be improved. (author)

  5. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, T. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Itami, J. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Kotaka, K. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Toriyama, M. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    1996-08-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Von 1974 bis 1992 wurden 37 zuvor nicht behandelte Patienten mit T3-Larynxkarzinomen (15 supraglottisch, 22 glottisch) primaer kurativ bestrahlt und, wenn erforderlich, einer Salvage-Operation unterzogen. Die Zwei-Jahres-Kontrollrate bei alleiniger Strahlentherapie, die Rate der Stimmerhaltung sowie die unter Einschluss der Operation erreichbare lokale Kontrollrate bei supraglottischen T3-Larynxkarzinomen betrugen 33%, 33% und 60%. Bei glottischen T3-Karzinomen wurden jeweils 32%, 23% und 77% erreicht. Die Fuenf-Jahres-Ueberlebensrate betrug 47% bei supraglottischen T3-Karzinomen und 77% bei den glottischen Karzinomen. Im Fall von supraglottischen Karzinomen erreichte keiner der vier Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung eine lokale Kontrolle durch alleinige Strahlentherapie. Die lokoregionale rezidivfreie Zeit war bei den Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung oder Tracheostomie vor Einleitung der

  6. Long-Term Improvement in Treatment Outcome After Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Locoregionally Advanced Cervix Cancer: An Update of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The local failure rate in patients with locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is 41-72% after radiotherapy (RT) alone, whereas local control is a prerequisite for cure. The Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial showed that combining RT with hyperthermia (HT) improved 3-year local control rates of 41-61%, as we reported earlier. In this study, we evaluate long-term results of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial after 12 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1996, a total of 114 women with locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma were randomly assigned to RT or RT + HT. The RT was applied to a median total dose of 68 Gy. The HT was given once weekly. The primary end point was local control. Secondary end points were overall survival and late toxicity. Results: At the 12-year follow-up, local control remained better in the RT + HT group (37% vs. 56%; p = 0.01). Survival was persistently better after 12 years: 20% (RT) and 37% (RT + HT; p = 0.03). World Health Organization (WHO) performance status was a significant prognostic factor for local control. The WHO performance status, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and tumor diameter were significant for survival. The benefit of HT remained significant after correction for these factors. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Grade 3 or higher radiation-induced late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: For locoregionally advanced cervical cancer, the addition of HT to RT resulted in long-term major improvement in local control and survival without increasing late toxicity. This combined treatment should be considered for patients who are unfit to receive chemotherapy. For other patients, the optimal treatment strategy is the subject of ongoing research

  7. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M., E-mail: stefanic@cae.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Regional de Referencia con Patrones Secundarios para Dosimetria - CNEA, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon 15, B1802AYA Ezeiza (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  8. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  9. Second malignancies after radiotherapy for testicular seminoma: 2 cases; Seconds cancers apres radiotherapie pour seminome testiculaire: a propos de deux cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Lorchel, F.; Bontemps, P.; Bosset, J.F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2006-05-15

    Orchidectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy of retroperitoneal paraaortic and ipsilateral iliac nodes is the standard treatment for localized testicular seminoma (I, IIA, IIB). Post therapeutic follow-up allows to detect local relapse and radio-induced second cancer. Nevertheless, evaluation of risk of second malignancy still remains difficult. We report 2 cases of rectal cancer after radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. (authors)

  10. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  11. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H [IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  12. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer: Advantages of Target Volume Reduction Using Image-Guided Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define setup variations in the radiation treatment (RT) of anal cancer and to report the advantages of image-guided RT (IGRT) in terms of reduction of target volume and treatment-related side effects. Methods and Materials: Twelve consecutive patients with anal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation by use of helical tomotherapy from March 2007 to November 2008 were selected. With patients immobilized and positioned in place, megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans were performed before each treatment and were automatically registered to planning CT scans. Patients were shifted per the registration data and treated. A total of 365 MVCT scans were analyzed. The primary site received a median dose of 55 Gy. To evaluate the potential dosimetric advantage(s) of IGRT, cases were replanned according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0529, with and without adding recommended setup variations from the current study. Results: Significant setup variations were observed throughout the course of RT. The standard deviations for systematic setup correction in the anterior–posterior (AP), lateral, and superior–inferior (SI) directions and roll rotation were 1.1, 3.6, and 3.2 mm, and 0.3°, respectively. The average random setup variations were 3.8, 5.5, and 2.9 mm, and 0.5°, respectively. Without daily IGRT, margins of 4.9, 11.1, and 8.5 mm in the AP, lateral, and SI directions would have been needed to ensure that the planning target volume (PTV) received ≥95% of the prescribed dose. Conversely, daily IGRT required no extra margins on PTV and resulted in a significant reduction of V15 and V45 of intestine and V10 of pelvic bone marrow. Favorable toxicities were observed, except for acute hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup variations and thereby reduce PTV margins in the treatment of anal cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IGRT provided favorable toxicities, except for

  13. A strategy for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) on linear accelerators and its impact on treatment margins for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer, the consideration of various systematic error types leads to wide treatment margins compromising normal tissue tolerance. We investigated if systematic set-up errors can be reduced by a set of initial image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) sessions. 27 patients received daily IGRT resulting in a set of 882 cone-beam computed tomographies (CBCTs). After matching to bony structures, we analyzed the dimensions of remaining systematic errors from zero up to six initial IGRT sessions and aimed at a restriction of daily IGRT for 10% of all patients. For threshold definition, we determined the standard deviations (SD) of the shift corrections and selected patients out of this range for daily image guidance. To calculate total treatment margins, we demanded for a cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) coverage of at least 95% of the specified dose in 90% of all patients. The gain of accuracy was largest during the first three IGRTs. In order to match precision and workload criteria, thresholds for the SD of the corrections of 3.5 mm, 2.0 mm and 4.5 mm in the left-right (L-R), cranial-caudal (C-C), and anterior-posterior (A-P) direction, respectively, were identified. Including all other error types, the total margins added to the CTV amounted to 8.6 mm in L-R, 10.4 mm in C-C, and 14.4 mm in A-P direction. Only initially performed IGRT might be helpful for eliminating gross systematic errors especially after virtual simulation. However, even with daily IGRT performance, a substantial PTV margin reduction is only achievable by matching internal markers instead of bony anatomical structures. (orig.)

  14. Palliative chemotherapy followed by consolidation radiotherapy in patients with advanced and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer not suitable for radical treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hany Eldeeb; Philip Gamileri; Ghoi Mak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This is a retrospective study to assess the effectiveness of consolidation radiotherapy (CRT) following palliative chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are not suitable for radical treatment. Methods: This study involved retrospective analysis of a prospective database of Northampton Oncology Centre from January 2005 to December 2010,63 patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC treated at the oncology centre were enrolled. Patients were either treated with high dose (39/36 Gy /13-12 fractions, group 1) or low dose (20 Gy / 5 fractions, group 2) CRT or those were not offered any CRT (group 3). Results: There was no significant difference between the three groups as regard age, sex, performance status, comorbidities or chemotherapy given. However there was a statistically significant difference as regard the stage P = 0.009 with more stage IV patients at group Ⅱ and Ⅲ compared to group l. The mean survival for the three groups was 27 months, 14 months &15 months, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement of survival in patients treated with high dose palliative CRT compared to the other two groups (P = 0.006). In multivariate analysis only the radiotherapy dose remains as the only statistical significant factor affecting the survival with hazard ratio 0.372 and confidence interval (0.147-0.726). Conclusion: Despite the limitation of our retrospective study, it is worth considering CRT approach for patients with advanced and metastatic NSCLC - not suitable for radical treatment - who have not progressed on chemotherapy.

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SABR) for the treatment of primary non-small cell lung cancer; Systematic review and comparison with a surgical cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To assess the efficacy of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through a systematic review of all relevant publications from 2006 to the present compared to controls treated with surgery. In the absence of Grade I evidence, the objective outcome data should form the basis for planning future studies and commissioning SABR services. Materials and methods: Standard systematic review methodology extracting patient and disease characteristics, treatment and outcome data from published articles reporting patient data from populations of 20 or more Stage I NSCLC patients treated with SABR with a median follow up of minimum of 1 year. The individual outcome measures were corrected for stage and summary weighted outcome data were compared to outcome data from a large International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) cohort matched for stage of disease with survival as the principal endpoint and local control (local progression free survival – local PFS) as the secondary endpoint. Results: Forty-five reports containing 3771 patients treated with SABR for NSCLC were identified that fulfilled the selection criteria; both survival and staging data were reported in 3171 patients. The 2 year survival of the 3201 patients with localized stage I NSCLC treated with SABR was 70% (95% CI: 67–72%) with a 2 year local control of 91% (95% CI: 90–93%). This was compared to a 68% (95% CI: 66–70) 2 year survival of 2038 stage I patients treated with surgery. There was no survival or local PFS difference with different radiotherapy technologies used for SABR. Conclusions: Systematic review of a large cohort of patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SABR suggests that survival outcome in the short and medium term is equivalent to surgery for this population of patients regardless of co-morbidity. As selection bias cannot be assessed from the published reports and treatment related

  16. Radiotherapy for asymptomatic brain metastasis in epidermal growth factor receptor mutant non-small cell lung cancer without prior tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment: a retrospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastasis (BM) harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation shows good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This study is to assess the appropriate timing of brain radiotherapy (RT) for asymptomatic BM in EGFR mutant NSCLC patients. There were 628 patients diagnosed with EGFR mutant NSCLC between October 2005 and December 2011. Treatment outcomes had been retrospectively evaluated in 96 patients with asymptomatic BM without prior TKI treatment. 39 patients received first-line brain RT, 23 patients received delayed brain RT, and 34 patients did not receive brain RT. With a median follow-up of 26 months, the 2-year OS was 40.6 %. Univariate analyses revealed that ECOG performance status (p = 0.006), other distant metastases (p = 0.002) and first line systemic treatment (p = 0.032) were significantly associated with overall survival (OS). Multivariate analyses revealed that other sites of distant metastases (p = 0.030) were prognostic factor. The timing of brain RT was not significantly related to OS (p = 0.246). The 2-year BM progression-free survival (PFS) was 26.9 %. Brain RT as first-line therapy failed to demonstrate a significant association with BM PFS (p = 0.643). First-line brain RT failed to improve long-term survival in TKI-naïve EGFR mutant NSCLC patients with asymptomatic BM. Prospective studies are needed to validate these clinical findings

  17. The impact of radiotherapy in the treatment of desmoid tumours. An international survey of 110 patients. A study of the Rare Cancer Network

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer Robert; Lombriser Norbert; Streuli Hans K; Thum Peter; Storme Guy; Kirschner Michael J; Villà Salvador; Fridrich Katrin; Landmann Christine; Beauvois Sylvie; Hochstetter Arthur Von; Spahr Martin O; Baumert Brigitta G; Ries Gerhard; Bleher Ernst-Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A multi-centre study to assess the value of combined surgical resection and radiotherapy for the treatment of desmoid tumours. Patients and methods One hundred and ten patients from several European countries qualified for this study. Pathology slides of all patients were reviewed by an independent pathologist. Sixty-eight patients received post-operative radiotherapy and 42 surgery only. Median follow-up was 6 years (1 to 44). The progression-free survival time (PFS) and pro...

  18. Design and implementation of a rotational radiotherapy technique for breast cancer treatment and their comparison with 3-D-Crt irradiation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is one of oncological diseases worldwide, as well in Mexico, which causes even more deaths than cervical cancer; this condition is the second death cause in women aged 30-54 years and threatens all socio-economic groups. The treatment is highly dependent on the stage which is detected and based on protocols that include a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This paper studies the main irradiation technique for patients with mastectomy, breast full cycle (irradiation of the chest well and supraclavicular nodes) in their mode Three Dimensional - Conformal Radiation Therapy (3-D-Crt), and compared with the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) technique proposed in this paper. In both techniques the prescription was 50 Gy divided into 25 fractions. The techniques were applied in three female patients (being an initial study) with disease of the left side, the target volume and organs at risk were delineated by the medical treating radiation oncologist, the planning system used was Eclipse version 10; for quantitative comparison of both plans indexes of homogeneity were used, con formality, the target volume coverage and normal tissue, sub factors and overdosing, the conformation number and coverage quality. They were evaluated and compared the media, maximum and minimum dose of the organs at risk, based on the fact that the coverage of the target volume, dose gradient and dose at risk organs are acceptable (prescription dose greater that 90% coverage, gradient less that 20% and organs at risk in accordance with the Quantec limitations for both versions). (Author)

  19. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  20. Effects of Treatment Intensification on Acute Local Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Prospective Observational Study Validating CTCAE, Version 3.0, Scoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the incidence and severity of acute local toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy (CHT), using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE v3.0), scoring system. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2006, 149 patients with head and neck cancer treated with RT at our center were prospectively evaluated for local toxicity during treatment. On a weekly basis, patients were monitored and eight toxicity items were recorded according to the CTCAE v3.0 scoring system. Of the 149 patients, 48 (32%) were treated with RT alone (conventional fractionation), 82 (55%) with concomitant CHT and conventional fractionation RT, and 20 (13%) with accelerated-fractionation RT and CHT. Results: Severe (Grade 3-4) adverse events were recorded in 28% (mucositis), 33% (dysphagia), 40% (pain), and 12% (skin) of patients. Multivariate analysis showed CHT to be the most relevant factor independently predicting for worse toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia, weight loss, salivary changes). In contrast, previous surgery, RT acceleration and older age, female gender, and younger age, respectively, predicted for a worse outcome of mucositis, weight loss, pain, and dermatitis. The T-score method confirmed that conventional RT alone is in the 'low-burden' class (T-score = 0.6) and suggests that concurrent CHT and conventional fractionation RT is in the 'high-burden' class (T-score = 1.15). Combined CHT and accelerated-fractionation RT had the highest T-score at 1.9. Conclusions: The CTCAE v3.0 proved to be a reliable tool to quantify acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with various treatment intensities. The effect of CHT and RT acceleration on the acute toxicity burden was clinically relevant

  1. Long term results of hypo-fractionated mammary radiotherapy as exclusive treatment of elderly patients suffering from a beast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discuss the results obtained on 29 elderly patients exclusively treated between 1995 and 1999 by mammary irradiation (32.5 Gy) in 5 fractions over 5 weeks, and then with a lower additional irradiation (13 Gy) in two fractions. They discuss the efficiency of this hypo-fractionated radiotherapy without breast conserving surgery. Short communication

  2. The impact of radiotherapy in the treatment of desmoid tumours. An international survey of 110 patients. A study of the Rare Cancer Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Robert

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A multi-centre study to assess the value of combined surgical resection and radiotherapy for the treatment of desmoid tumours. Patients and methods One hundred and ten patients from several European countries qualified for this study. Pathology slides of all patients were reviewed by an independent pathologist. Sixty-eight patients received post-operative radiotherapy and 42 surgery only. Median follow-up was 6 years (1 to 44. The progression-free survival time (PFS and prognostic factors were analysed. Results The combined treatment with radiotherapy showed a significantly longer progression-free survival than surgical resection alone (p smaller than 0.001. Extremities could be preserved in all patients treated with combined surgery and radiotherapy for tumours located in the limb, whereas amputation was necessary for 23% of patients treated with surgery alone. A comparison of PFS for tumour locations proved the abdominal wall to be a positive prognostic factor and a localization in the extremities to be a negative prognostic factor. Additional irradiation, a fraction size larger than or equal to 2 Gy and a total dose larger than 50 Gy to the tumour were found to be positive prognostic factors with a significantly lower risk for a recurrence in the univariate analysis. This analysis revealed radiotherapy at recurrence as a significantly worse prognostic factor compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. The addition of radiotherapy to the treatment concept was a positive prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved the PFS compared to surgery alone. Therefore it should always be considered after a non-radical tumour resection and should be given preferably in an adjuvant setting. It is effective in limb preservation and for preserving the function of joints in situations where surgery alone would result in deficits, which is especially important in young patients.

  3. The impact of radiotherapy in the treatment of desmoid tumours. An international survey of 110 patients. A study of the Rare Cancer Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-centre study to assess the value of combined surgical resection and radiotherapy for the treatment of desmoid tumours. One hundred and ten patients from several European countries qualified for this study. Pathology slides of all patients were reviewed by an independent pathologist. Sixty-eight patients received post-operative radiotherapy and 42 surgery only. Median follow-up was 6 years (1 to 44). The progression-free survival time (PFS) and prognostic factors were analysed. The combined treatment with radiotherapy showed a significantly longer progression-free survival than surgical resection alone (p smaller than 0.001). Extremities could be preserved in all patients treated with combined surgery and radiotherapy for tumours located in the limb, whereas amputation was necessary for 23% of patients treated with surgery alone. A comparison of PFS for tumour locations proved the abdominal wall to be a positive prognostic factor and a localization in the extremities to be a negative prognostic factor. Additional irradiation, a fraction size larger than or equal to 2 Gy and a total dose larger than 50 Gy to the tumour were found to be positive prognostic factors with a significantly lower risk for a recurrence in the univariate analysis. This analysis revealed radiotherapy at recurrence as a significantly worse prognostic factor compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. The addition of radiotherapy to the treatment concept was a positive prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved the PFS compared to surgery alone. Therefore it should always be considered after a non-radical tumour resection and should be given preferably in an adjuvant setting. It is effective in limb preservation and for preserving the function of joints in situations where surgery alone would result in deficits, which is especially important in young patients

  4. Inhalative steroids as an individual treatment in symptomatic lung cancer patients with radiation pneumonitis grade II after radiotherapy – a single-centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess efficacy of our single-centre experience with inhalative steroids (IS) in lung cancer patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade II. Between 05/09 and 07/10, 24 patients (female, n = 8; male, n = 16) with lung cancer (non-small cell lung carcinoma [NSCLC]: n = 19; small cell lung cancer [SCLC]: n = 3; unknown histology: n = 2) and good performance status (ECOG ≤1) received definitive radiotherapy to the primary tumour site and involved lymph nodes with concurrent chemotherapy (n = 18), sequential chemotherapy (n = 2) or radiation only (n = 4) and developed symptomatic RP grade II during follow-up. No patient presented with oxygen requiring RP grade III. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range: 50–82 years). Nine patients suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before treatment, and 18 patients had a smoking history (median pack years: 48). The mean lung dose was 15.5 Gy (range: 3.0–23.1 Gy). All patients were treated with IS. If a patient’s clinical symptoms did not significantly improve within two weeks of IS therapy initiation, their treatment was switched to oral prednisolone. All 24 patients were initially treated with a high dose IS (budesonide 800 μg 1-0-1) for 14 days. Of the patients, 18 showed a significant improvement of clinical symptoms and 6 patients did not show significant improvement of clinical symptoms and were classified as non-responders to IS. Their treatment was switched to oral steroids after two weeks (starting with oral prednisolone, 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight; at least 50 mg per day). All of these patients responded to the prednisolone. None of non-responders presented with increased symptoms of RP and required oxygen and / or hospitalization (RP grade III). The median follow-up after IS treatment initiation was 18 months (range: 4–66 months). The median duration of IS treatment and prednisolone treatment was 8.2 months (range: 3.0–48.3 months) and 11.4 months (range: 5.0–44

  5. Imediate and long term therapeutic results from association of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in head neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A analysis of 922 cases of head and neck cancer observed from March of 1977 to March of 1987 is presented. The actual position of the combined treatment of radiotherapy and chemotherapy is reported. (author)

  6. Radiotherapy in patients with distant metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study evaluates frequency of and indications for disease-related radiotherapy in the palliative breast cancer (BC) situation and analyzes in which phase of the palliative disease course radiotherapy was applied. 340 patients who developed distant metastatic disease (DMD) and died (i.e. patients with completed disease courses) were analyzed. 165 patients (48.5%) received palliative radiotherapy (255 series, 337 planning target volumes) as a part of palliative care. The most common sites for radiotherapy were the bone (217 volumes, 64.4% of all radiated volumes) and the brain (57 volumes, 16.9%). 127 series (49.8%) were performed in the first third of the metastatic disease survival (MDS) period; 84 series (32.8%) were performed in the last third. The median survival after radiotherapy was 10 months. Patients who had received radiation were younger compared to those who had no radiation (61 vs. 68 years, p < 0.001) and had an improved MDS (26 vs. 14 months, p < 0.001). Compared to rapidly progressive disease courses with short survival times, in cases where effective systemic therapy achieved a longer MDS (≥24 months), radiotherapy was significantly more often a part of the multimodal palliative therapy (52.1% vs. 37.1%, p = 0.006). In a cohort of BC patients with DMD, nearly one half of the patients received radiotherapy during the palliative disease course. In a palliative therapy approach, which increasingly allows for treatment according to the principles of a chronic disease, radiotherapy has a clearly established role in the therapy concept

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Strategies for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Selek, Uğur; Bölükbaşı, Yasemin; Welsh, James W.; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care in patients with advanced inoperable stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) has been a trusted method for a long time and has well-known drawbacks, most of which could be improved by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). IMRT is not currently the standard treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, but almost all patients could benefit to a degree in organ at risk sparing, dose coverage confor...

  8. Oral ketamine for radiotherapy in children with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children coming for radiotherapy under sedation usually get repeated injections, which cause distress to both the child and the parents. A prospective study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of oral ketamine for sedation for radiotherapy (RT) in children with cancer. Ten children who received 49 sittings of RT were given 8-15 mg/kg body weight of oral ketamine. The onset time, recovery time, efficacy of sedation and incidence of abnormal movements were compared with another group of 8 children, who received intramuscular ketamine in the dose of 6 mg/kg for a total of 28 sittings of RT. Onset time and recovery time were significantly longer in oral ketamine group as compared to the intramuscular group (p<0.001). Limb movements in patients receiving oral ketamine necessitated further supplement of sedation and interruption of RT. These drawbacks discourage use of oral ketamine as a good sedative for radiotherapy treatment in paediatric oncology patients. (author)

  9. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study

  10. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainsbury Richard

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. Methods 35,354 women resident in South East England and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1992 and 2001 who received radiotherapy within six months of diagnosis were identified from the Thames Cancer Registry. Time to radiotherapy was measured from either the date of diagnosis or the start of the previous treatment, whichever was shorter. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to examine whether patients received radiotherapy within 60 days of their diagnosis or previous treatment. Results The adjusted proportions of patients receiving radiotherapy within 60 days varied significantly between different cancer networks (range: 43% to 81%, and decreased from 68% in 1992 to 33% in 2001. After adjustment there was no association between deprivation of area of residence, age or stage and radiotherapy wait. Median time waited to radiotherapy increased over the study period whether measured from the start of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery or the date of diagnosis. Conclusion This study covered a period of time before the investment following the Cancer Plan of 2000. Results are consistent with other findings suggesting variation between cancer networks and increasing waits over time. Further studies should examine different methods of measuring waiting time, the causes and consequences of waits for radiotherapy and the effect of current initiatives and investments.

  11. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. 35,354 women resident in South East England and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1992 and 2001 who received radiotherapy within six months of diagnosis were identified from the Thames Cancer Registry. Time to radiotherapy was measured from either the date of diagnosis or the start of the previous treatment, whichever was shorter. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to examine whether patients received radiotherapy within 60 days of their diagnosis or previous treatment. The adjusted proportions of patients receiving radiotherapy within 60 days varied significantly between different cancer networks (range: 43% to 81%), and decreased from 68% in 1992 to 33% in 2001. After adjustment there was no association between deprivation of area of residence, age or stage and radiotherapy wait. Median time waited to radiotherapy increased over the study period whether measured from the start of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery or the date of diagnosis. This study covered a period of time before the investment following the Cancer Plan of 2000. Results are consistent with other findings suggesting variation between cancer networks and increasing waits over time. Further studies should examine different methods of measuring waiting time, the causes and consequences of waits for radiotherapy and the effect of current initiatives and investments

  12. Radiotherapy, a therapeutic procedure in constant progression in cancer treatment; Radioterapia, un procedimiento terapeutico en progresion constante en el tratamiento oncologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, J. A.; Calin Lorca, A.; Herranz Crespo, R.

    2016-08-01

    Radiation oncology or radiotherapy is an eminently clinical specialty, prevention, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognostic assessment of neoplasms, based on ionizing radiation. Modern technology (advances in diagnostic imaging, evolution of computing, massive improvements and incorporating different systems of tracking and tracing in linear accelerators) allows treatment to be more and more accurate, less harmful to the patient and consequently more effective. (Author)

  13. Correction of some cardiovascular disorders at radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study involved 43 patients aged 31-62. The study was performed during combined treatment of cancer of left breast and included ECG and tetrapolar rheography. Therapy with calcium antagonists which is started in the middle of the distant radiotherapy course prevents the changes in the cardiovascular system in 95% of cases and allows to improve the quality of life which is especially important for the patients who have already had various (especially ischemic) cardiac disturbances

  14. Prostate cancer: variables to keep in mind at the moment to decide the external radiotherapy dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to evaluate forecast factors and other variables in the decision of the final dose for prostate cancer treatment with 3D conformal radiotherapy techniques of modulated intensity. To determine the optimal dose, direct and indirect variables related to the disease should be considered. Also the equipment and the radiotherapy technique will impact on this decision

  15. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max;

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  16. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant partial bladder boost schedule in radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer, coupling a limited boost volume with shortening of the overall treatment time. Methods and materials: Between 1994 and 1999, 50 patients with a T2-T4 N0M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder received radiotherapy delivered in a short overall treatment time with a concomitant boost technique. With this technique a dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions was administered to the small pelvis with a concomitant boost limited to the bladder tumor area plus margin of 15 Gy in fractions of 0.75 Gy. The total tumor dose was 55 Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks. Toxicity was scored according to EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria. Results: The feasibility of the treatment was good. Severe acute toxicity ≥G3 was observed in seven patients (14%). Severe late toxicity ≥G3 was observed in six patients (13%). Thirty-seven patients (74%) showed a complete and five (10 %) a partial remission after treatment. The actuarial 3-year freedom of local progression was 55%. Conclusion: In external radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer a concomitant boost technique coupling a partial bladder boost with shortening of the overall treatment time provides a high probability of local control with acceptable toxicity

  17. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  18. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of ≤40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high (≥89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79–95% at 1 year and 43–70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45–86% at 1 year and 31–66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  19. External beam radiotherapy plus single-fraction high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) plus high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) as a boost in patients (pts) with intermediate or high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and materials: From 2002 to July 2012, 377 pts with a diagnosis of intermediate or high-risk prostate cancer were treated with EBRT plus HDRB. Median patient age was 66 years (range, 41–86). Most patients (347 pts; 92%) were classified as high-risk (stage T2c–T3, or PSA > 20 ng/mL, or GS ⩾ 8), with 30 patients (8%) considered intermediate risk. All patients underwent EBRT at a prescribed dose of 60.0 Gy (range, 45–70 Gy) to the prostate and seminal vesicles. A total of 120 pts (31%) received a dose of 46 Gy (45–50 Gy) to the true pelvis. All pts received a single-fraction 9 Gy (9–15 Gy) HDR boost. Most patients (353; 94%) were prescribed complete androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates were calculated. In the case of BRFS, patients with <26 months of follow-up (n = 106) were excluded to minimize the impact of ADT. Results: The median follow-up for the entire sample was 50 months (range, 12–126), with 5-year actuarial OS and CSS, respectively, of 88% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84–92) and 98% (95% CI: 97–99). The 5-year BRFS was 91% (95% CI: 87–95) in the 271 pts with ⩾26 months (median, 60 months) of follow-up. Late toxicity included grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal toxicity in 17 (4.6%) and 6 pts (1.6%), respectively, as well as grades 2 and 3 genitourinary toxicity in 46 (12.2%) and 3 pts (0.8%), respectively. Conclusion: These long-term outcomes confirm that EBRT plus a single-fraction HDRB boost provides good results in treatment-related toxicity and biochemical control. In addition to the excellent clinical results, this fractionation schedule reduces physician workload, treatment-related expenses, patient discomfort and risks

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  1. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin WANG; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescrip...

  2. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  3. Application of CT perfusion imaging in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of CT perfusion imaging in evaluation of therapeutic effect and prognosis in radiotherapy for lung cancer. Methods: Fifty-one cases of lung cancer who were unable or refused to be operated on, 36 males and 15 females, aged 37-80, underwent CT perfusion imaging, 29 of which only before radiotherapy and 22 before and after radiotherapy twice. The images were collected by cine dynamic scanning (5 mm/4 slices) and input into the GE AW4.0 workstation for data processing. The slice positions of CT imaging were determined according to the largest tumor size in CT scan. Regions of interest of tumor were drawn at the region corresponding to the original images of CT perfusion. Radiotherapy was performed after CT perfusion imaging. Relevant parameters, including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface (PS) were calculated. The treatment response after radiotherapy was evaluated by RECIST. At 2 -4 weeks after the treatment, CT examination was conducted once more. Results: The tests of the 51 patients showed that the BV was 13.6 ml·100 g-1, the BF was 129.5 ml·min-1 ·100 g-1, the MTT was 9.1 s, and the PS was 10.0 ml· min-1· 100 g-1 before radiotherapy. The tests of the 22 of the 51 patients showed that the values of BV and BF after radiotherapy were 7.6 ml· 100 g-1 and 97.8 ml·min-1· 100 g-1, respectively, both lower than those before radiotherapy (11.2 and 108.7 ml·min-1·100 g-1, respectively), however, both not significantly (t=1.28, 0.40, P>0.05); and the values of MTT and PS after radiotherapy were 8.9 s and 7.8 ml·min-1· 100 g-1, respectively, both not significantly higher than those before radiotherapy (7.2 s and 6.8 ml· min-1· 100 g-1, respectively, t=-1.15, -0.57, P>0.05). The mean area of tumor after radiotherapy was 1189.6 mm2, significantly less than that before radiotherapy (1920.3 mm2, t=3.98, P<0.05). The MTT of the SCLC patients was 12.9 s, significantly longer than

  4. Treatment of left sided breast cancer for a patient with funnel chest: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs. 3D-CRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This case study presents a rare case of left-sided breast cancer in a patient with funnel chest, which is a technical challenge for radiation therapy planning. To identify the best treatment technique for this case, 3 techniques were compared: conventional tangential fields (3D conformal radiotherapy [3D-CRT]), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The plans were created for a SynergyS® (Elekta, Ltd, Crawley, UK) linear accelerator with a BeamModulator™ head and 6-MV photons. The planning system was Oncentra Masterplan® v3.3 SP1 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, Netherlands). Calculations were performed with collapsed cone algorithm. Dose prescription was 50.4 Gy to the average of the planning target volume (PTV). PTV coverage and homogeneity was comparable for all techniques. VMAT allowed reducing dose to the ipsilateral organs at risk (OAR) and the contralateral breast compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT: The volume of the left lung receiving 20 Gy was 19.3% for VMAT, 26.1% for IMRT, and 32.4% for 3D-CRT. In the heart, a D15% of 9.7 Gy could be achieved with VMAT compared with 14 Gy for IMRT and 46 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral breast, D15% was 6.4 Gy for VMAT, 8.8 Gy for IMRT, and 10.2 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral lung, however, the lowest dose was achieved with 3D-CRT with D10% of 1.7 Gy for 3D-CRT, and 6.7 Gy for both IMRT and VMAT. The lowest number of monitor units (MU) per 1.8-Gy fraction was required by 3D-CRT (192 MU) followed by VMAT (518 MU) and IMRT (727 MU). Treatment time was similar for 3D-CRT (3 min) and VMAT (4 min) but substantially increased for IMRT (13 min). VMAT is considered the best treatment option for the presented case of a patient with funnel chest. It allows reducing dose in most OAR without compromising target coverage, keeping delivery time well below 5 minutes

  5. Quality control in radiotherapy treatment: Radiation induced myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct injury of the spinal cord has been reported many times, particularly in cases of overexposures with radiotherapy of neoplasm that occurred outside the Central Nervous System. Permanent damage to the spinal cord is the most feared complication of radiation therapy treatments and one of the relatively common causes of litigation for medical malpractice in the context of cancer treatment. We have learned from clinical experience, data from randomized trials and animal experimentation, the dose tolerance as well as the interfraction interval for hyperfractionation regimes. We are still lacking precious clinical information, in particular the dose tolerance in combined modality treatments that represent the vast majority of modern treatments. (author)

  6. Risk of second primary lung cancer in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Several epidemiological studies have reported increased risks of second lung cancers after breast cancer irradiation. In this study we assessed the effects of the delivered radiation dose to the lung and the risk of second primary lung cancer. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study of second lung cancer in a population based cohort of 23,627 early breast cancer patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy from 1982 to 2007. The cohort included 151 cases diagnosed with second primary lung cancer and 443 controls. Individual dose-reconstructions were performed and the delivered dose to the center of the second lung tumor and the comparable location for the controls were estimated, based on the patient specific radiotherapy charts. Results: The median age at breast cancer diagnosis was 54 years (range 34–74). The median time from breast cancer treatment to second lung cancer diagnosis was 12 years (range 1–26 years). 91% of the cases were categorized as ever smokers vs. 40% among the controls. For patients diagnosed with a second primary lung cancer five or more years after breast cancer treatment the rate of lung cancer increased linearly with 8.5% per Gray (95% confidence interval = 3.1–23.3%; p < 0.001). This rate was enhanced for ever smokers with an excess rate of 17.3% per Gray (95% CI = 4.5–54%; p < 0.005). Conclusions: Second lung cancer after radiotherapy for early breast cancer is associated with the delivered dose to the lung. Although the absolute risk is relative low, the growing number of long-time survivors after breast cancer treatment highlights the need for advances in normal tissue sparing radiation techniques

  7. The Relationship between Expression of p70s6k with Radiotherapy Response in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kurnia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many important prognostic factors in advanced stage cervical cancer primary treated with radiotherapy. Besides clinical factors, many biomarkers have been studied in relation with radiotherapy response. The p70s6k is a biomarker which plays a significant role in cell proliferation. Increased levels of p70s6k are also associated with drug resistance in cancer. In the present study, the relationship between the expression level of p70s6k before treatment and the radiotherapy response in cervical cancer was determined. Immunohistochemical staining of p70s6k, MIB-1, and p53 was conducted in microscopic slide from 21 cancer tissue biopsies before treatment with radiotherapy. After the treatment had completed early radiotherapy response was observed by pelvic control method. The results showed that p70s6k is partly highly expressed (61.9%, 13/21 and partly low expressed (38.1%, 8/21 in the cancer cells. They also show that there is no statistically significant differences on AgNOR mean, MIB-1, and p53 indices in the different degrees of p70s6k expression (p≥0.05. Higher expression levels of p70s6k is more strongly associated with good radiotherapy response compared to lower ones (p=0.05. In conclusion, the level of p70s6k expression before treatment has an association with radiotherapy response.

  8. Inter-observer variability of clinical target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer: a multi-institutional contouring experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An observational multi-institutional study has been conducted aimed to evaluate the inter-observer variability in clinical target volume (CTV) delineation among different radiation oncologists in radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer. A multi-institutional contouring dummy-run of two different cases of pancreatic cancer treated by postoperative and preoperative radiotherapy (RT) was performed. Clinical history, diagnostics, and planning CT imaging were available on AIRO website. Participants were requested to delineate CTVs according to their skills and knowledge. Aiming to quantify interobserver variability of CTVs delineations, the total volume, craniocaudal, laterolateral, and anteroposterior diameters were calculated. Descriptive statistic was calculated. The 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) for coefficient of variation (CV) was estimated. The Dice Similarity Index (DSI) was used to evaluate the spatial overlap accuracy of the different CTVs compared with the CTVs of a national reference Centre considered as a benchmark. The mean DSI (mDSI) was calculated and reported. A total of 18 radiation oncologists from different Institutes submitted the targets. Less variability was observed for the Elective CTV rather than the Boost CTV, in both cases. The estimated CV were 28.8% (95% CI: 21.2 - 45.0%) and 20.0% (95% CI: 14.9 - 30.6%) for the Elective CTV, in adjuvant (Case 1) and neoadjuvant (Case 2) case, respectively. The mDSI value was 0.68 for the Elective CTVs in both cases (range 0.19 - 0.79 in postoperative vs range 0.35 - 0.79 in preoperative case). The mDSI was increased to 0.71 (Case 1) and 0.72 (Case 2) if the observers with a worse agreement have been excluded. On the other hand, a CV of 42.4% (95% CI: 30.1 - 72.4%) and 63.8% (95% CI: 43.9 - 119.2%) with a mDSI value of 0.44 and 0.52, were calculated for the Boost CTV in Case 1 and Case 2, respectively. The CV and mDSI obtained values for Elective CTVs showed an acceptable agreement among participants

  9. Lymphocyte subpopulations in mammary cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B- and T-lymphocytes, identified by two methods of rosette-formation with sheep erythrocytes, fall to low levels within 1 week of the start of post-operative radiotherapy for cancer of the breast. Fifty-two such patients are compared with 34 age- and disease-matched patients treated by mastectomy alone. The B-lymphopenia reverts to normal levels by 10 months while the T-lymphopenia persists for at least 2 to 4 years

  10. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy photons as a boost in patients with early-stage oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Treatment feasibility and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Tomasz; Wygoda, Andrzej; Hutnik, Marcin; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Wydmanski, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Boguslaw [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Maciejewski, Adam; Szymczyk, Cezary; Wierzgon, Janusz [Dept. of Surgery, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Orlef, Andrzej [Dept. of Physics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy photons as a boost in patients with early-stage oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 2003 and 2006, 16 patients with early-stage cancer of mobile tongue (n = 10 [63%]) or floor of the mouth (n = 6 [37%]) treated at Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Poland, were evaluated for IORT boost with the INTRABEAM {sup registered} System (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH; IORT-PRS) because of the high risk of local recurrence due to positive margins on frozen pathologic section. After tumor resection, the applicator was positioned in the tumor bed. The applicator's diameter (range: 1.5-5 cm) was selected to encompass high-risk area of tumor recurrence. The dose (5 Gy, 7 Gy, or 7.5 Gy) was applied according to tumor volume and bone proximity. External-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was provided to the tumor bed in all patients (50 Gy) and to the nodal area, when needed. Toxicity and local tumor control were assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. IORT did not increase acute mucosal reaction. Local tumor control was found in all cases. Early mucosal reaction did not exceed 3 according to the RTOG scale and healed in median time of 35 days after completion of EBRT. No late adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: This preliminary report has demonstrated the feasibility of IORT-PRS for patients with early oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. This method may be considered an alternative boost technique, although additional studies are needed to establish long-term results in a larger group of patients. (orig.)

  11. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Linda C., E-mail: Linda.watson@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Interdisciplinary Practice, Community Oncology, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Gies, Donna [Department of Radiation Oncology Nursing, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thompson, Emmanuel [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary Faculty of Science, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thomas, Bejoy [Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Psychosocial Oncology, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from

  12. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy’s questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using

  13. Treatment results and prognostic factors of early breast cancer treated with a breast conserving operation and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic factors affecting local control and survival rates for patients with early breast cancer who received breast conserving treatment (BCT) and to find out the optimal treatment according to their risk factors. From October 1994 to December 2001, 605 patients with 611 stage I and II breast cancers received BCT, and the results were analyzed retrospectively. BCT consists of breast conserving surgery and whole breast irradiation. All the patients underwent lumpectomy or quad-rantectomy. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed in 608 cases (99.5%). The radiation dose to the whole breast was 50.4 Gy over 5 weeks with a 1.8 Gy daily fraction and with boost doses of 9-14.4 Gy administered to the tumor bed. Adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in most of the patients with axillary lymph node metastasis or tumors larger than 1 cm. The median follow-up period was 47 months. Local relapse, regional relapse and distant metastasis occurred in 15 (2.5%), 16 (2.6%) and 43 patients (7.1%), respectively. The 5-year overall survival, local-relapse-free survival, distant-metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival rates were 95.3%, 97.2%, 91.3% and 88.5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age (P=0.02), number of involved axillary lymph nodes (P=0.01) and nuclear grade (P=0.01) affected the local-relapse-free survival. The factors associated with disease-free survival were the T stage (P=0.05), number of involved axillary lymph nodes (P=0.01) and nuclear grade (P=0.001). Overall survival was associated with the T stage (P=0.02), number of involved axillary lymph nodes (P=0.01) and c-erb B2 overexpression (P=0.05). Patients with more than two factors among age≤35 years, positive lymph node metastasis and high nuclear grade showed a poor 5-year local-relapse-free survival rate compared with others (P=0.001). Also, patients with more than two factors among tumor size >1 cm, positive

  14. Patterns of care for radiotherapy in vulvar cancer: a Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaffney, David K; Du Bois, Andreas; Narayan, Kailash;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to describe radiotherapeutic practice in the treatment of vulvar cancer in member study groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). METHODS: A survey was developed and distributed to representatives of the member study groups of the GCIG, targeting the use of...... radiotherapy (RT) in vulvar cancer. RESULTS: Thirty-two surveys were returned from 12 different cooperative groups. The most common indications for neoadjuvant RT include unresectable disease or International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage >/=III. For the neoadjuvant treatment of vulvar cancer...

  15. Radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 85 or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy and problems of radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 85 or older. Fifty-three patients (26 men, 27 women) who underwent radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 87 years (range; 85-99). Treatment policy was classified into curative, semi-curative (treatment field or total dose were limited due to performance status) and palliative therapy. Head-and-neck, bladder and skin cancer were the most common primary disease. The treatment was deemed curative in 27%, semi-curative in 13%, and palliative in 49%. Total dose of semi-curative therapy was almost same compared with curative therapy. The rate of treatment completion and effectiveness were not significantly different in curative therapy and semi-curative therapy. We should consider to reduce the field size to gross target volume, but to treat with substantial dose to make radiotherapy safe and effective. We must be aware that elderly patients have basically low tolerability. (author)

  16. Intense pulsed light vs. long-pulsed dye laser treatment of telangiectasia after radiotherapy for breast cancer: a randomized split-lesion trial of two different treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymann, P.; Hedelund, L.; Hædersdal, Merete

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic radiodermatitis is a common sequela of treatment for breast cancer and potentially a psychologically distressing factor for the affected women. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of treatments with a long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL) vs. intense pulsed light (IPL...... because of hypo-pigmentation of the IPL treated areas, which slowly repigmented within 1 year. Conclusions This study was based on two specific laser and IPL devices, and found the LPDL treatment to be advantageous compared with IPL due to superior vessel clearance and less pain Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6...

  17. Biological dose volume histograms during conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological data suggest that prostate cancer has a low α/β ratio. Large radiotherapy fractions may, therefore, prove more efficacious than standard radiotherapy, while radiotherapy acceleration should further improve control rates. This study describes the radiobiology of a conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy scheme for the treatment of high risk prostate cancer. Anteroposterior fields to the pelvis deliver a daily dose of 2.7 Gy, while lateral fields confined to the prostate and seminal vesicles deliver an additional daily dose of 0.7 Gy. Radiotherapy is accomplished within 19 days (15 fractions). Dose volume histograms, calculated for tissue specific α/β ratios and time factors, predict a high biological dose to the prostate and seminal vesicles (77-93 Gy). The biological dose to normal pelvic tissues is maintained at standard levels. Radiobiological dosimetry suggests that, using hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy, high biological radiation dose can be given to the prostate without overdosing normal tissues

  18. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumagalli Giorgio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of fever, dyspnea, respiratory failure and migratory, recurrent and bilateral lung opacities 4 months after radiotherapy and hormone therapy following surgery for breast cancer. Computerized tomography (CT scans showed infiltrates outside the radiation fields. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed lymphocytic alveolitis, whereas laboratory analysis demonstrated a mild systemic inflammation. Systemic steroids resulted in clinical and radiological improvement, but a disease relapse was evident at withdrawal of therapy, with definitive clinical and radiological normalization after a second cycle of therapy. This is a case of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP (previously known as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia primed by radiotherapy, as in previously reported cases. It is extremely important to be aware of the possibility of this complication, in order to optimize radiation and hormone treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Late sensorial alterations in different radiotherapy techniques for nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Raimondo, Luca; Ravera, Mattia; Moretto, Francesco; Boita, Monica; Potenza, Ilenia; Rampino, Monica; Ricardi, Umberto; Garzaro, Massimiliano

    2015-05-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) allowed a better distribution of the dose to the tumor volume, sparing surrounding structures. Aim of the study is the objective evaluation of olfactory and gustatory impairments in patients who underwent chemo-radiotherapy for NPC. Correlation between smell and taste alterations, xerostomy, and radiation technique was investigated. Thirty healthy subjects and 30 patients treated with chemo-radiation therapy for NPC, with at least a 2-years follow-up period, were evaluated. All subjects underwent symptoms evaluation, endoscopic fiber optic nasal examination, taste strips, Sniffin' sticks tests, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring system. Patients were divided in 2 groups: 2-dimensional radiotherapy/conformal 3-dimensional radiotherapy and IMRT. A higher percentage of rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, xerostomy, hyposmia, hypogeusia, mucosal hyperemia, and presence of nasopharyngeal secretions was found in irradiated subjects (P < 0.05). Concerning olfactory and gustatory scores, we demonstrated a statistically significant difference between healthy subjects and irradiated patients (P < 0.05), with lower gustatory total score in IMRT group (P < 0.01). In conclusion, chemo-radiotherapy for NPC induces long-term smell and taste impairments, which can compromise quality of life. Although based on small samples, it is also important to consider that IMRT can induce higher taste dysfunction compared with traditional techniques. PMID:25800268

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter van [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  1. Some pathoanatomical points on radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the improvement of radiotherapy for lung cancer the authors have pointed out some pathoanatomical points to be considered before the treatment of choice. Besides the well-known side effects like radiation pneumonitis and pleuritis, cavity formation within the lung with or without infection and hemorrhage, opportunistic infection of the lung or the whole body, DIC and stress ulcer in the aged are demonstrated on 6 cases. The problem of sporadic remaining of cancer cells in the periphery of the radiation field, which may be due to respiratory movement, is also picked up. (author)

  2. CBCT-based volumetric and dosimetric variation evaluation of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the anatomic and dosimetric variations of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients based on weekly cone beam CT (CBCT). Ten NPC patients treated by VMAT with weekly CBCT for setup corrections were reviewed retrospectively. Deformed volumes of targets and organs at risk (OARs) in the CBCT were compared with those in the planning CT. Delivered doses were recalculated based on weekly CBCT and compared with the planned doses. No significant volumetric changes on targets, brainstem, and spinal cord were observed. The average volumes of right and left parotid measured from the fifth CBCT were about 4.4 and 4.5 cm3 less than those from the first CBCT, respectively. There were no significant dose differences between average planned and delivered doses for targets, brainstem and spinal cord. For right parotid, the delivered mean dose was 10.5 cGy higher (p = 0.004) than the planned value per fraction, and the V26 and V32 increased by 7.5% (p = 0.002) and 7.4% (p = 0.01), respectively. For the left parotid, the D50 (dose to the 50% volume) was 8.8 cGy higher (p = 0.03) than the planned values per fraction, and the V26 increased by 8.8% (p = 0.002). Weekly CBCTs were applied directly to study the continuous volume changes and resulting dosimetric variations of targets and OARs for NPC patients undergoing VMAT. Significant volumetric and dosimetric variations were observed for parotids. Replanning after 30 Gy will benefit the protection on parotids

  3. [Securitization of the bi-site radiotherapy activity as part of the resumption of treatments in the Hospital of Epinal by the team of Alexis Vautrin Nancy Cancer Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, V; Aigle, D; Peiffert, D; Noel, A; Simon, J-M

    2009-12-01

    In February 2007, the radiation therapy department of the Jean Monnet Hospital in Epinal (France) has stopped the radiotherapy treatments after the discovery of a radiotherapy accident and bad practices leading to overexposure of patients between 1987 and 2006. The Regional Cancer Center "Centre Alexis Vautrin" in Nancy (France) was given the task of the new start of treatment activity. From February 2007 to January 2008, actions of training, updates of equipments and practices have been performed in the Epinal Hospital, guided by the quality approach, allowing the treatment of new patients in February 2008, with the radiation oncologists and the medical physicists of the Centre Alexis Vautrin, with the highest conditions of security and confidence. PMID:19692280

  4. Basic study of cancer immunity and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With respect to anti-tumor effect of radiation, antigenicity and involvement of immunity of an individual with cancer were evaluated under both conditions of natural and insufficient immunity. In animal experiments, it is clear that immunity of the host, especially the function of T-cells, has much to do with the curability of cancer by radiotherapy. In some type of human cancer, not only the histological findings in its healing process following x-ray irradiation but a number of clinical and in vitro experimental results strongly suggest the presence of antigenicity of the T-cells, although it is quite little. The experiments made in a combination of human cancer and nude mice showed a possibility of non-T cells being involved in this mechanism irrespective of whether it is specific, non-specific or not having such an important role as T-cells. There are many problems left unsolved. However, radiotherapy of cancer should be undertaken by maintaining or further improving the immunity of the body in order to obtain good results. (Ueda, J.)

  5. Solution IMRT static of a radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer with lymphangitis; Solucion IMRT estatica de un tratamiento radioterapico del cancer de mama con linfangitis carcinomatosa cutanea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puertolas Hernandez, J. R.; Iriondo Igerabide, U.; Urraca de la Serna, J. M.; Lozano Flores, F. J.; Pino Leon, C.; Larretxa Etxarri, R.

    2013-07-01

    In breast cancer, the planning of treatment with IMRT technique mode static MLC has been efficient to get a perfect union of doses in the skin between the lower limit of the supraclavicular fields and the upper limit of the tangential fields. The technique Planning requires the creation of auxiliary volumes that allow you to manage the particularities inherent to the tangential fields of breast. (Author)

  6. Practice patterns of radiotherapy in cervical cancer among member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaffney, David K; Du Bois, Andreas; Narayan, Kailash;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). METHODS AND MATERIALS: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy...... practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph node cases. Items focused on indications for radiation therapy, radiation fields, dose, use of chemotherapy, brachytherapy and others. The cooperative groups from North...... America were compared with the other groups to evaluate potential differences in radiotherapy doses. RESULTS: A total of 39 surveys were returned from 13 different cooperative groups. For the treatment of advanced cervical cancer, external beam pelvic doses and total doses to point A were 47 + 3.5 Gy...

  7. Evolution of treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer – Success and setback in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To assess the therapeutic gains and setbacks as we evolved from the 2-dimensional radiotherapy (2DRT) to conformal 3-dimensional (3DRT) and to intensity-modulated (IMRT) era. Materials and methods: 1593 consecutive patients from 1994 to 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Evolving changes in the different era included advances in staging investigation, radiotherapy technique, dose escalation, and use of chemotherapy. Results: The 3DRT era achieved significant improvement in local failure-free rate (L-FFR), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS). Neurological damage and bone/soft tissue necrosis were significantly reduced. However, the improvement in distant failure-free rate (D-FFR) was insignificant, and more hearing impairment occurred due to chemotherapy. Significantly higher D-FFR was achieved in the IMRT era, but L-FFR did not show further improvement. 5-Year DSS increased from 78% in the 2DRT, to 81% in the 3DRT, and 85% in the IMRT era, while the corresponding neurological toxicity rate decreased from 7.4% to 3.5% and 1.8%. Conclusions: Significant improvement in survival and reduction of serious toxicity was achieved as we evolved from 2DRT to 3DRT and IMRT era; the therapeutic ratio for all T-categories improved with more conformal techniques. Improvements in tumor control were attributed not only to advances in RT technique, but also to better imaging and increasing use of potent chemotherapy. However, it should also be noted that hearing impairment significantly increased due to chemotherapy, L-FFR reached a plateau in the 3DRT era, and it is worrisome that the result for T4 remained unsatisfactory. Besides exploring for more potent chemotherapy and innovative methods, the guideline on dose constraint should be re-visited to optimize the therapeutic ratio

  8. SU-E-P-48: Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Three Different Commercial Planning Systems for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D; Chi, Z; Yang, H; Miao, M; Jing, Z [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the performances of three commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization regarding cervical cancer. Methods: For twenty cervical cancer patients, three IMRT plans were retrospectively re-planned: one with Pinnacle TPS,one with Oncentra TPS and on with Eclipse TPS. The total prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy delivered for PTV and 58.8 Gy for PTVnd by simultaneous integrated boost technique. The treatments were delivered using the Varian 23EX accelerator. All optimization schemes generated clinically acceptable plans. They were evaluated based on target coverage, homogeneity (HI) and conformity (CI). The organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed according to the percent volume under some doses and the maximum doses. The statistical method of the collected data of variance analysis was used to compare the difference among the quality of plans. Results: IMRT with Eclipse provided significant better HI, CI and all the parameters of PTV. However, the trend was not extension to the PTVnd, it was still significant better at mean dose, D50% and D98%, but plans with Oncentra showed significant better in the hight dosage volume, such as maximum dose and D2%. For the bladder wall, there were not notable difference among three groups, although Pinnacle and Oncentra systems provided a little lower dose sparing at V50Gy of bladder and rectal wall and V40Gy of bladder wall, respectively. V40Gy of rectal wall (p=0.037), small intestine (p=0.001 for V30Gy, p=0.010 for maximum dose) and V50Gy of right-femoral head (p=0.019) from Eclipse plans showed significant better than other groups. Conclusion: All SIB-IMRT plans were clinically acceptable which were generated by three commercial TPSs. The plans with Eclipse system showed advantages over the plans with Oncentra and Pinnacle system in the overwhelming majority of the dose coverage for targets and dose sparing of OARs in cervical cancer.

  9. Conservative treatment of a recto-urethral fistula due to savage HIFU for local recurrence of prostate cancer, 5 years after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Topazio, Luca; Perugia, Claudio; Finazzi-Agro, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Recto-urethral fistula is one of the most serious complications caused by high-intensity-focused ultrasound used as salvage treatment for recurrence of prostate cancer after brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We report the case of a recto-urethral fistula in a 68-year-old patient, who previously had undergone radical prostatectomy and EBRT for prostate cancer (pT3 N0 Mx). The fistula was treated conservatively by an indwelling Foley catheter, without the creation of an intest...

  10. Integrated prostate cancer centers might cause an overutilization of radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: A comparison of treatment trends in the United States and Germany from 2004 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Aim of the study was to analyze changes in primary treatment for low-risk prostate cancer across different healthcare systems. Materials and methods: We compared “Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results” data (USA) with data from four German federal epidemiological cancer registries, both from 2004 to 2011. We excluded metastatic disease and patients aged ⩾80 years. Thereof, we identified 132,506 (USA) and 54,159 (Germany) patients with low-risk according to the 2014 EAU guidelines. We tested treatment trends for statistical significance with a linear regression model. Results: Active treatment was radical prostatectomy (RP) in 36.1% vs. 66.2% and radiotherapy (RT) in 38.4% vs. 11.8%. No active treatment (NAT) was reported in 24.2% vs. 16.2% (p < 0.001 each). Through the study period the use of RP decreased from 37.1% to 34.2% in the USA (p = 0.04) and was constant at a mean of 66.2% in Germany (p = 0.8). The use of RT in the USA decreased from 42.8% to 31.8% (p < 0.001), while it was stable in Germany (p = 0.09). The NAT group grew from 18.0% to 33.2% in the USA (p < 0.001), while it was stable in Germany until 2009 (p = 0.3). From 2009 to 2011 there also was an increase of the NAT group in Germany from 15.2% to 19.4% (p = 0.001). Conclusion: In contrast to former evidence we found the relative use of RT for low-risk prostate cancer much higher in the USA compared to Germany. The implementation of integrated prostate cancer centers in the USA might explain this observation. Deferred and defensive treatment strategies showed a steady increase in the USA. This development seems delayed in Germany by several years

  11. Cause-Specific Colostomy Rates After Radiotherapy for Anal Cancer: A Danish Multicentre Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Kåre G; Nørgaard, Mette; Lundby, Lilli;

    2011-01-01

    In anal cancer, colostomy-free survival is a measure of anal sphincter preservation after treatment with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Failure to control anal cancer and complications of treatment are alternative indications for colostomy. However, no data exist on cause-specific colostomy...

  12. Dental care during and after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Devi, Seema; Singh, Nimisha

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a major health problem. Oral cancer is increasing in Indian subcontinent mainly due to lack of hygiene, tobacco use, chewing tobacco, smoking, and many other factors. Radiation therapy is the most common form of treatment along with surgery and chemotherapy. There are 2 types of complication that occurs during and after radiotherapy, that occur because of effects on normal tissue. Radiotherapy-induced effects occur on the oral mucosa salivary glands, bone, teeth, and m...

  13. Quo Vadis Radiotherapy? Technological Advances and the Rising Problems in Cancer Management

    OpenAIRE

    Barry J Allen; Eva Bezak; Loredana G. Marcu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions t...

  14. Multicriteria optimization enables less experienced planners to efficiently produce high quality treatment plans in head and neck cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate that novice dosimetry planners efficiently create clinically acceptable IMRT plans for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients using a commercially available multicriteria optimization (MCO) system. Twenty HNC patients were enrolled in this in-silico comparative planning study. Per patient, novice planners with less experience in dosimetry planning created an IMRT plan using an MCO system (RayStation). Furthermore, a conventionally planned clinical IMRT plan was available (Pinnacle3). All conventional IMRT and MCO-plans were blind-rated by two expert radiation-oncologists in HNC, using a 5-point scale (1–5 with 5 the highest score) assessment form comprising 10 questions. Additionally, plan quality was reported in terms of planning time, dosimetric and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) comparisons. Inter-rater reliability was derived using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In total, the radiation-oncologists rated 800 items on plan quality. The overall plan score indicated no differences between both planning techniques (conventional IMRT: 3.8 ± 1.2 vs. MCO: 3.6 ± 1.1, p = 0.29). The inter-rater reliability of all ratings was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.57–0.71), indicating substantial agreement between the radiation-oncologists. In 93% of cases, the scoring difference of the conventional IMRT and MCO-plans was one point or less. Furthermore, MCO-plans led to slightly higher dose uniformity in the therapeutic planning target volume, to a lower integral body dose (13.9 ± 4.5 Gy vs. 12.9 ± 4.0 Gy, p < 0.001), and to reduced dose to the contra-lateral parotid gland (28.1 ± 11.8 Gy vs. 23.0 ± 11.2 Gy, p < 0.002). Consequently, NTCP estimates for xerostomia reduced by 8.4 ± 7.4% (p < 0.003). The hands-on time of the conventional IMRT planning was approximately 205 min. The time to create an MCO-plan was on average 43 ± 12 min. MCO planning enables novice treatment planners to create high quality IMRT plans for HNC patients. Plans were

  15. Measuring side effects after radiotherapy for pharynx cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Data on side effects after radiotherapy is needed to establish the benefits and drawbacks of new treatments, but side effects are not quantified as easily as survival or local control. Side effects may be quantified using physical measures. Unfortunately, only few endpoints exist where a physical...... side effects. Using pharynx cancer as an example, the purpose of this article is to summarize the possibilities and limitations of different methods for measurement of radiotherapy-induced side effects. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep-17......Data on side effects after radiotherapy is needed to establish the benefits and drawbacks of new treatments, but side effects are not quantified as easily as survival or local control. Side effects may be quantified using physical measures. Unfortunately, only few endpoints exist where a physical...... measure is obtainable, and the case of a patient-relevant measure is even rarer. Radiotherapy is often followed by complex symptoms not easily quantifiable by the observer. Quantitative patient reported side effects can be retrieved using validated questionnaires, but this kind of data is often difficult...

  16. 肺癌放疗后复发患者用适形放疗再治疗的可行性研究%Study on the feasibility of conformal radiotherapy treatment once again on patients with recurrence lung cancer after radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单光莲

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨肺癌患者放疗后再复发时应用适形放疗的疗效。方法:选择肺癌放疗后复发患者80例,随机分为试验组及对照组。试验组给予适形放射治疗,对照组给予常规放射治疗,比较两种方法治疗效果及不良反应。结果:经过治疗,试验组总有效率高于对照组(P<0.05);治疗2年后,试验组1、2年生存率均高于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:肺癌患者放疗后再复发时采用适形放疗,可提高近期疗效,延长生存期,且不良反应与常规治疗相同。%Objective:To investigate the effect of conformal radiotherapy treatment once again on patients with recurrence lung cancer after radiotherapy.Methods:80 patients with lung cancer who recurrenced after radiotherapy were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group.Patients in the experimental group were treated with conformal radiotherapy,while patients in the control group were received conventional radiotherapy,then we compared the treatment effect and toxicity between the two groups.Results:After the treatment,the total effective rate of the experimental group was higher than that of the control group(P<0.05);after 2 years of treatment,both the 1 year survival rate and 2 years survival rate in the experimental group were higher than in the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:Conformal radiotherapy can improve the short-term effect of patients with lung cancer recurrenced after radiotherapy,and this treatment also can prolong the survival time,and its toxicity is same to the conventional treatment.

  17. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with induction and concomitant chemotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Impact of total treatment time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour cell proliferation during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can negatively influence the treatment outcome in patients with unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Accelerated and hyperfractionated RT may therefore have an advantage over conventional RT. Moreover, earlier studies have suggested improved survival with addition of cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT). We present here the results of combined treatment with induction and concomitant CT and accelerated hyperfractionated RT in a retrospective series of patients with advanced NSCLS. Between August 1990 and August 1995, 90 consecutive patients, aged 42-77 years (median 63 years), with locally advanced unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC and good performance status were referred for treatment: stage: I 23%, IIIa 37%, IIIb 40%. Patient histologies included: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 34% and large cell carcinoma 13%. The treatment consisted of two courses of CT (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m2 day 1-3 i.v.), the second course given concomitantly with RT. The total RT dose was 61.2-64.6 Gy, with two daily fractions of 1.7 Gy. A one-week interval was introduced after 40.8 Gy to reduce acute toxicity, making the total treatment time 4.5 weeks. Concerning toxicity, 33 patients had febrile neutropenia, 10 patients suffered from grade III oesophagitis and 7 patients had grade III pneumonitis. There were two possible treatment-related deaths, one due to myocardial infarction and the other due to a pneumocystis carinii infection. The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 72%, 46% and 34%, respectively; median survival was 21.3 months. Fifty-nine patients had progressive disease: 21 failed locoregionally, 29 had distant metastases and 9 patients had a combination of these. Pretreatment weight loss was the only prognostic factor found, except for stage. However, the results for stage IIIb were no different from those for stage IIIa. We conclude

  18. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzler, Thomas; Grezdo, Jozef; Bogner, Joachim; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Georg, Dietmar

    2007-04-01

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm3 tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm3 were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical target volumes

  19. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm3 tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm3 were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical target volumes

  20. Preoperative radiotherapy of maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in maxillary sinus cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for 42 patients with maxillary sinus cancer who were treated with radiation with or without surgery from April 1986 to September 1996. There were 27 male and 15 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 24 to 75 years (median 56 years). Stage distribution showed 2 in T2, 19 in T3, and 21 in T4 lesions. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 38, undifferentiated carcinoma in 1, transitional cell carcinoma in 1, and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 2 patients, All patients were treated with radiation initially with a dosage range of 50.4-70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy) before further evaluation of remnant disease. Eleven patients were given induction chemotherapy (2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) concurrently with radiotherapy. Six to eight weeks after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, computerized tomography (CT) of paranasal sinus was taken to evaluate remnant disease. If the CT finding showed remnant disease, a Caldwell-Luc procedure was done to get the specimen of suspicious lesions. A radical maxillectomy was done if the specimen was proven to contain malignancy. In contrast periodic follow-up examination was done without any radical surgery if the tissue showed only granulation tissue. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 92 months with a median 16 months. Nine (21.4%) patients showed complete response (CR) and 33 patients (78.6%) showed persistent disease (PER) to initial radiotherapy. Among the 9 CR patients, 7 patients had no evidence of disease (NED), 1 patient had local failure, and 1 patient had regional failure. Among 33 PER patients, salvage total maxillectomy was done in 10 patients, and the surgery was not feasible or refused in 23 patients. Following the salvage radical surgery, 2 patients were NED and 8 patients were PER status. Overall and disease- free survival rate at 5 years was 23.1% and 16

  1. Phase 1/2 study of valproic acid and short-course radiotherapy plus capecitabine as preoperative treatment in low-moderate risk rectal cancer-V-shoRT-R3 (Valproic acid - short RadioTherapy - rectum 3rd trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Avallone, Antonio; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Di Gennaro, Elena; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; D’Angelo, Valentina; Granata, Cinzia; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Maurea, Nicola; Maiolino, Piera; Bianco, Franco; Montano, Massimo; Silvestro, Lucrezia

    2014-01-01

    Background Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is a heterogeneous group of tumors where a risk-adapted therapeutic strategy is needed. Short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) is a more convenient option for LARC patients than preoperative long-course RT plus capecitabine. Histone-deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown activity in combination with RT and chemotherapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Valproic acid (VPA) is an anti-epileptic drug with HDACi and anticancer activity. In preclinical...

  2. Radiotherapy for treatment of induratio penis plastica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is shown to be an effective, low-cost and non-invasive modality for treatment of induratio penis plastica. Its efficiency could be proven especially for inflammatory stages of the disease, or as an alternative after failure of conventional treatment. A total dose of no more than 20-25 Gy was found to achieve clear improvements in two thirds of the patients treated, while avoiding at the same time cosmetically disadvantageous late effects. (orig./CB)

  3. Evaluation of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred eighteen patients with lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed to determine whether postoperative radiotherapy (RT) improves survival. Patterns of treatment failure and three year NED (no evidence of disease) survival rates were assessed according to extent of tumor spread, histology, and treatment method. Patients with hilar or mediastinal node metastases were at higher risk of local failure compared to those with negative nodes. Postoperative RT reduced local recurrence and improved 3 year survival among patients with positive nodes. However, postoperative RT did not improve survival among those with negative nodes. Our data indicated that patients with positive hilar or mediastinal nodes may require postoperative RT to improve survival

  4. Radiotherapy of the anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1976 to 1987, 58 patients presenting an anal canal epidermoid carcinoma underwent radiation therapy alone as primary treatment. There were 48 females and ten males with a mean age of 65 years ± 15.5. Tumors were staged according to the 1979 UICC-TNM classification. There were six T1 (10%), 15 T2 (26%), 28 T3 (48%) and nine T4 (16%). Inguinal lymph nodes were involved in 17 cases (29%). No chemotherapy was given. Forty one patients without node involvement were irradiated according to the Papillon Technique. Twenty seven of these patients were boosted with brachytherapy and eight through a perineal portal with a cobalt unit or an electron beam so that the mean cumulative dose to the tumor 55 Gy. Six patients had radical surgery after a poor response to initial radiation therapy. Patients with inguinal involvement were treated by a three or four fields technique with a high energy photons beam (X 25 MV). The given dose to the tumor was between 60-65 Gy in 6.5 weeks. Surgery was performed in two patients with poor regression of the tumor after initial radiotherapy. Mean follow up was 7 years. Forty nine patients (84.4%) were locally controlled. Four failures were salvaged by surgery. Twenty four patients died from cancer and the overall actuarial 3 years and 5 years survival rate were 67% and 50% respectively. Severe side effect of radiation therapy occurred in 5% of cases. Anal sphincter function was preserved in 69% of the patients. This study confirms that radiation therapy gives results comparable with those of surgery allowing the patients to avoid anorectal resection. (author). 22 refs

  5. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  6. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for recurrent small cell lung cancer brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Evaluation the Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSRT) for the patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) after the whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) failure. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 35 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with linear accelerator FSRT after the WBRT failure. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factor related to survival. Results: The following-up rate was 100%. The median following-up time was 11 months. The median over-all survival (OS) time was 10.3(1 -30) months after FSRT. Controlled extra cranial disease was the only identified significant predictor of increased median OS time (χ2 =4.02, P =0.045 ). The median OS time from the diagnosis of brain metastasis was 22 (6 - 134 ) months. 14 patients died from brain metastasis, 14 from extra-cranial progression, 1 from leptomeningeal metastases, and 3 from other causes. Local control at 6 months and 12 months was 91% and 76%, respectively. No significant late complications. New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 17% of patients at a median time of 4(2 -20) months; all patients had received previous WBRT. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was safe and effective treatment for recurrent small-cell lung carcinoma brain metastases. (authors)

  7. Fatigue and radiotherapy: (B) experience in patients 9 months following treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Smets, E. M.; Visser, M. R.; Willems-Groot, A. F.; Garssen, B.; Schuster-Uitterhoeve, A. L.; de Haes, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Little is known regarding the prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients after treatment has ended and no recurrence found. The present study examines fatigue in disease-free cancer patients after being treated with radiotherapy (n = 154). The following questions are addressed. First, how do patients describe their fatigue 9 months after radiotherapy and is this different from fatigue in a nonselective sample from the general population (n = 139)? Secondly, to what degree is fatigue ...

  8. Prevention of erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izak Faiena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With increasing scrutiny of prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis and treatment, much attention has been given to the morbidity caused by radical prostatectomy (RP and/or radiotherapy (RT. One of the most common side-effects of either treatment is erectile dysfunction (ED. [1] Approximately, 40% of patients will experience ED after RT for PCa. The post-RT ED causes significant patient dissatisfaction with cancer treatment as well as decrease in patient and partner psychosocial function. [2] To address this issue in patients undergoing RT, Pisansky et al. [3] conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a phosphodiesterase enzyme-5 inhibitor (PDE5i, tadalafil, as a preventive measure for patients undergoing RT for PCa and found no difference in erectile function between the control and treatment groups.

  9. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45 G

  10. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study

    OpenAIRE

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O’Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Methods Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct r...

  11. Japanese patterns of care study of postoperative radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. The assessment of treatment process of the 1995-2005 surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate Japanese national practice patterns for patients undergoing postoperative radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. The Japan Patterns of Care Study (JPCS) collected the data of patients who were treated postoperative radiation therapy between 1995-1997 (JPCS 95-97), 1999-2001 (JPCS 99-01) and 2003-2005 (JPCS 03-05). Over 80% of patients were treated with external beam RT (ERT). ERT dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy for over 70% of patients. The utilization rates of CT-simulation, multi-leaf collimator and over 10 MV photon energy were increased among three JPCS surveys. Positive lymph nodes, capillary lymphatic space tumor involvement and deep stromal invasion was the main reasons of adaptation of the postoperative radiotherapy. Compared with the previous 2 PCS studies, the patient who received concurrent chemoradiation was increased in JPCS 03-05 (6, 9% to 25%). (author)

  12. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xinhong Wu; Bo Luo; Shaozhong Wei; Yan Luo; Yaojun Feng; Juan Xu; Wei Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the treatment efficiency of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative (TN) phenotype breast cancer patients with brain metastases and their survival times. Materials and Methods : A total of 112 metastatic breast cancer patients treated with whole brain irradiation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were analyzed. Thirty-seven patients were of TN phenotype. Objective response rates were co...

  13. Comparing the effects of conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapies on early skin toxicity and cosmetic outcomes after breast cancer conserving surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, P; AR Sebzari; B Kalaghchi; F Amouzegar Hashemi; Z Shahabi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The high number of breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy after surgery has caused many to think about a shorter period of radiotherapy, which can significantly reduce the radiotherapy machine time, labor hours, and fewer patient visits. This study was designed to evaluate the acute skin effects and cosmetic outcomes of short course radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer in comparison with the conventional treatment method.Methods: Fifty-two patients with operable...

  14. Symptomatic vertebral hemangioma: Treatment with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aich Ranen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vertebrae are the second commonest site among skeletal locations affected by hemangioma, but only about one per cent becomes symptomatic throughout the life. Though surgery, intra vertebral injection of various sclerosing agents have been tried in treating this benign process, no general consensus regarding management has been reached. Radiotherapy is emerging as a low cost, simple, non-invasive but very effective modality of treatment of symptomatic vertebral hemangioma. Aim: This study aims to find out the role of external beam radiotherapy in alleviating the symptoms of symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas without compromising the quality of life. Materials and Methods: Seven consecutive patients with symptomatic vertebral hemangioma were treated with a fixed dose of external beam radiotherapy; and muscle power was assessed before, after treatment and during follow-up. Results: All patients showed improvement of muscle power, which increased with the passage of time. Pain relief with improvement of quality of life was obtained in all the patients. Conclusion: Effect of radiotherapy on vertebral hemangioma is dose-dependent and the dose limiting factor is the spinal cord tolerance. In the present era of IMRT, greater dose can be delivered to the parts of vertebra affected by the hemangioma without compromising the spinal cord tolerance and expected to give better results.

  15. Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Primary Radiotherapy: A Comparison of the Addition of Cetuximab or Chemotherapy and the Impact of Protocol Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The addition of platinum-based chemotherapy (ChRT) or cetuximab (ExRT) to concurrent radiotherapy (RT) has resulted in improved survival in Phase III studies for locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). However the optimal treatment regimen has not been defined. A retrospective study was performed to compare outcomes in patients who were treated definitively with ExRT or ChRT. Methods: Cetuximab with concurrent RT was used to treat 29 patients with LAHNC, all of whom had tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, or larynx. All patients were T2 to T4 and overall American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III to IVB, with a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of 60 or greater. ChRT was used to treat 103 patients with similar characteristics. Patients were evaluated for locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Median follow-up for patients alive at last contact was 83 months for those treated with ExRT and 53 months for those treated with ChRT. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent prognostic factors. Results: The LRC, DMFS, and DSS were not significantly different, with 3-year rates of 70.7%, 92.4%, and 78.6% for ExRT and 74.7%, 86.6%, and 76.5% for ChRT, respectively. The OS was significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.02), with 3-year rates of 75.9% for ExRT and 61.3% for ChRT. OS was not significant when patients who were on protocol treatments of ExRT or ChRT were compared. Also, OS was not significant when multivariate analysis was used to control for potential confounding factors. Conclusion: In our single-institution retrospective review of patients treated with ExRT or ChRT, no significant differences were found in LRC, DMFS, DSS, or OS

  16. Foetal radiation dose in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of breast cancer during pregnancy is complicated by the high risks of abortion and foetal malformation from the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A case of breast cancer during pregnancy, treated with radiotherapy, and the estimated foetal dose is reported. 8 refs., 1 fig

  17. Radiotherapy with or without mitomycin c in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: results of the IAEA multicentre randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Single agent mitomycin c (MMC) has been shown to improve the outcome of radiotherapy in single institution trials. In order to confirm these findings in a broader worldwide setting, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated a multicentre trial randomising between radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus MMC. Material and methods: Patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated with primary curative radiotherapy (66 Gy in 33 fractions with five fractions per week) ±a single injection (15 mg/m2) of MMC at the end of the first week of radiotherapy. Stratification parameters were tumour localization, T-stage, N-stage, and institution. A total of 558 patients were recruited in the trial from February 1996 to December 1999. Insufficient accrual and reporting led to the exclusion of three centres. The final study population consisted of 478 patients from seven centres. Patients had stage III (n=223) or stage IV (n=255) squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (n=230), oropharynx (n=140), hypopharynx (n=65) or larynx (n=43). Prognostic factors like age, gender, site, size, differentiation and stage were well balanced between the two arms. Results: The haematological side effects of MMC were very modest (<5% grade 3-4) and did not require any specific interventions. Furthermore, MMC did not enhance the incidence or severity of acute and late radiation side effects. Confluent mucositis and dry skin desquamation was common, occurring in 56% and 62% of patients, respectively. The overall 3-year primary locoregional tumour control, disease-specific and overall survival rates were 19, 36 and 30%, respectively. Gender, haemoglobin drop, tumour site, tumour and nodal stage were significant parameters for loco-regional tumour control. There was no significant effect of MMC on locoregional control or survival, except for the 161 N0 patients, where MMC resulted in a better loco-regional control (3-year estimate 16% vs. 29%, P=0

  18. Minimizing second cancer risk following radiotherapy: current perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary cancer risk following radiotherapy is an increasingly important topic in clinical oncology with impact on treatment decision making and on patient management. Much of the evidence that underlies our understanding of secondary cancer risks and our risk estimates are derived from large epidemiologic studies and predictive models of earlier decades with large uncertainties. The modern era is characterized by more conformal radiotherapy technologies, molecular and genetic marker approaches, genome-wide studies and risk stratifications, and sophisticated biologically based predictive models of the carcinogenesis process. Four key areas that have strong evidence toward affecting secondary cancer risks are 1) the patient age at time of radiation treatment, 2) genetic risk factors, 3) the organ and tissue site receiving radiation, and 4) the dose and volume of tissue being irradiated by a particular radiation technology. This review attempts to summarize our current understanding on the impact on secondary cancer risks for each of these known risk factors. We review the recent advances in genetic studies and carcinogenesis models that are providing insight into the biologic processes that occur from tissue irradiation to the development of a secondary malignancy. Finally, we discuss current approaches toward minimizing the risk of radiation-associated secondary malignancies, an important goal of clinical radiation oncology

  19. Effect of pelvic radiotherapy for prostrate cancer on bowel, bladder and sexual functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effects of pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer on sexual, bowel and urinary functions. Study Design: a prospective cohort study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, Lahore from July 1998 to January 2000. Patients and Method: This study included 52 patients with diagnosis of prostate cancer who were given external beam pelvic radiotherapy. The effects of pelvic radiotherapy on their sexual, bowel and bladder functions were calculated at 6, 12 and 18 months and mean composite scores for each entity were examined. Results: Decrease in sexual function (up to 35%) was most significant observation followed by bowel dysfunction (10-12%). Bladder function deranged early during radiotherapy but there was no remarkable bladder dysfunction, overall a good proportion of patients (70 - 72%) felt satisfied with their treatment by external beam radiotherapy. By lapse of time there was gradual worsening of erectile function especially after a couple of months of pelvic radiotherapy, while bowel and bladder functions improved 8-12 months post radiotherapy. Conclusion: Proper counselling of patients regarding potential side effects of pelvic radiotherapy can make them understand the outcome of treatment. (author)

  20. Concurrent Liposomal Cisplatin (Lipoplatin), 5-Fluorouracil and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Phase I/II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Liposomal drugs have a better tolerance profile and are highly accumulated in the tumor environment, properties that promise an optimal radiosensitization. We investigated the feasibility of the combination of 5-fluorouracil/lecovorin-based radio-chemotherapy with the administration of high weekly dose of a liposomal platinum formulation (LipoplatinTM). Methods and Materials: Lipoplatin was given at a dose of 120mg/m2/week, 5-fluorouracil at 400mg/m2/week (Day 1), whereas radiotherapy was given through 3.5-Gy fractions on Days 2, 3, and 4. Two groups of 6 patients received four and five consecutive cycles, respectively. Results: Minimal nephrotoxicity (18.2% Grade 1) and neutropenia (9% Grade 3) was noted. Fatigue Grade 2 appeared in 25% of cases. Abdominal discomfort was reported by 18% of patients. No liver, kidney, gastric, or intestinal severe acute or late sequellae were documented, although the median follow-up of 9 months is certainly too low to allow safe conclusions. A net improvement in the performance status (from a median of 1 to 0) was recorded 2 months after the end of therapy. The response rates assessed with computed tomography, endoscopy, and biopsies confirmed 33% (2 of 6) tumor disappearance in patients treated with four cycles, which reached 80% (4 of 5) in patients receiving five cycles. Conclusions: Lipoplatin radio-chemotherapy is feasible, with minor hematological and nonhematological toxicity. The high complete response rates obtained support the testing of Lipoplatin in the adjuvant postoperative or preoperative radio-chemotherapy setting for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  1. Radiotherapy in the management of cervical cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and fourteen elderly patients (median 75.5 years, range 70.0-85.9) consecutively referred for curative radiotherapy in the period 1987-1996 were prospectively followed with regard to tumour control and complications. The importance of age, stage (FIGO), tumour size, histology, tumour fixation, haemoglobin, concurrent disease, performance status (WHO) and type of radiotherapy were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Treatment was completed as planned in 68%, delayed in 29% and stopped prematurely in 3%. The frequency of grade 3 late complications was 11% and the actuarial probability at 5 years was 20%. Overall 5-year survival according to FIGO was 61% (I), 34% (II) and 25% (III). Cox multivariate analysis identified tumour size as independent prognostic factor for tumour control, disease-free survival and overall survival. FIGO stage was predictive for late grade 2 complications. We were unable to identify significant factors with respect to grade 3 complications. Age was not a significant parameter for any of the investigated endpoints. Elderly patients in good performance status with advanced cancer of the uterine may tolerate radical radiotherapy with acceptable morbidity and reasonable survival. Radiotherapy may also be a good alternative in early stage disease for surgically unfit elderly patients. (author)

  2. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reported is the case of a 46-year-old male with hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for early glottic cancer, T1N0M0, Stage I. Six months after 60Co irradiation 66 Gy with the radiation field size of 5 x 5 cm was given, the clinical signs of acute hypothyroidism was presented. Retrospective CT examinations proved that over 80% of the total dose was irradiated to about 10% of whole thyroid volume. Since laboratory examinations revealed high serum level of thyrogobrin antibody, we postulated immunological mechanism was associated with the onset of hypothyroidism. (author)

  3. MDM2 Inhibition Sensitizes Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy in a p53-Dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Felix Y. Feng; Yu Zhang; Vishal Kothari; Joseph R. Evans; Jackson, William C; Wei Chen; Johnson, Skyler B.; Connor Luczak; Shaomeng Wang; Hamstra, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increased murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression, independent of p53 status, is associated with increased cancer-specific mortality for men with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. We assessed MI-219, a small molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with improved pharmacokinetics over nutlin-3, for sensitization of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy, a standard treatment option for men with high-risk prostate cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of M...

  4. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia and tumors of the central nervous system also. Radiation-induced tumors begin to appear 5-10 years after irradiation and excess risk persists for decades, perhaps for the remainder of life. The incidence of thyroid cancer is two- to threefold higher among females than males. Most of the thyroid cancers that occur in association with irradiation are of the papillary type, for which the cure rate is high if tumors are detected early. Our Department in co-operation with Department of Children Hematology and Oncology Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital Motol monitors patients after therapy for cancer in childhood for the long term period. The monitoring is focused on detection of thyroid disorders that occur as last consequences of oncology therapy, especially early detection of nodular changes in thyroid gland and thyroid carcinogenesis. The survey presents two patients observed in our department that were diagnosed with the papillary thyroid carcinoma which occurred 15 and more years after radiotherapy for childhood cancer. After total thyroidectomy they underwent therapy with radioiodine. After radiotherapy it is necessary to pursue a long-term following and assure interdisciplinary co-operation which enables early detection of last consequences of radiotherapy, especially the most serious ones as secondary carcinogenesis

  5. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiravova, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Uk, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia and tumors of the central nervous system also. Radiation-induced tumors begin to appear 5-10 years after irradiation and excess risk persists for decades, perhaps for the remainder of life. The incidence of thyroid cancer is two- to threefold higher among females than males. Most of the thyroid cancers that occur in association with irradiation are of the papillary type, for which the cure rate is high if tumors are detected early. Our Department in co-operation with Department of Children Hematology and Oncology Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital Motol monitors patients after therapy for cancer in childhood for the long term period. The monitoring is focused on detection of thyroid disorders that occur as last consequences of oncology therapy, especially early detection of nodular changes in thyroid gland and thyroid carcinogenesis. The survey presents two patients observed in our department that were diagnosed with the papillary thyroid carcinoma which occurred 15 and more years after radiotherapy for childhood cancer. After total thyroidectomy they underwent therapy with radioiodine. After radiotherapy it is necessary to pursue a long-term following and assure interdisciplinary co-operation which enables early detection of last consequences of radiotherapy, especially the most serious ones as secondary carcinogenesis

  6. Submandibular gland-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Sites of locoregional relapse and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the patterns of locoregional relapse and survival following submandibular gland (SMG)-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and methods: Eighty patients with laryngeal (n = 15), oropharyngeal (n = 50), hypopharyngeal (n = 11) or nasopharyngeal cancer (n = 4) were treated by submandibular gland-sparing IMRT for head and neck squamous cell cancer between July 2000 and December 2008. All patients were treated by bilateral IMRT. Thirty-nine (49%) received definitive radiotherapy (RT) and 41 (51%) postoperative RT. The contralateral parotid gland (PG) and SMG were included in the dose optimization planning program with intent to keep the mean doses for PG and SMG below 23 Gy and 28-30 Gy, respectively. The ipsilateral glands were also spared when considered feasible. Results: During a median follow-up time of 51 months (range, 24-117 months) nine local recurrent tumors were observed. Four of these nine patients were salvaged by surgery with no further recurrence. All local recurrences were located within the high-dose CTVs. None of the locally recurrent cancers were located at the vicinity of the spared PGs or SMGs. No recurrent tumors were observed in the contralateral neck. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for local control at five years following IMRT was 88 % for the whole cohort and the corresponding figure for local control following salvage surgery was 94 %. The estimates for five-year overall survival and disease-specific survival were 85 % and 90 %, respectively. Conclusion. In selected head and neck cancer patients who are estimated to have a low risk of cancer recurrence at the nodal levels I-II and who are treated with SMG-sparing IMRT the risk of cancer recurrence at the vicinity of the spared salivary glands is low

  7. A practical approach on radioprotection in the radiotherapy treatment of thyroid cancer; Uma abordagem pratica sobre radioprotecao no tratamento de radioiodoterapia para cancer de tireoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Janaina D.S., E-mail: janaina.mendes@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA/HCI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kubo, Ana Luiza S.L., E-mail: analuslima@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rebelo, Ana Maria de O., E-mail: arebelo55@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    There are several protocols for the treatment and follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer. All of them gather evidence on the evolution and treatment and try to establish a treatment standard. However, there are few occasions in which this issue is addressed from the standpoint of radiological protection, as the ICRP 94 and TECDOC 1806. The focus of our work is to demonstrate that simple actions in the routine of workers in the Nuclear Medicine Service interfere positively in the radiation protection of all those involved in the patient's care, also optimizing their well being during the procedure. In the current model, the patient participates in an interview with nurses, doctors and physicists, before admission, and receives written and verbal information about the treatment procedures in order to diminish his anxiety and clarify possible doubts. In all the cases under hospital care there were no instances of high exposure (above 1mSv/month or 6 mSv/year) among the staff. With the participation of all involved, there was an escalating improvement in the reduction of complications generated by the patient's anxiety, waste decrease providing better comfort during hospital care) and minimization of occupational hazard affecting the staff in charge of the patient's room maintenance after hospital leave. (author)

  8. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment planning and target volume delineation of radiotherapy in the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer complicated by atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the impact of PET/CT on the treatment planning and target volume delineation of radiotherapy in patients with NSCLC complicated by atelectasis. Methods: Pre-treatment PET/CT scans were performed in 36 patients with pathologically proven NSCLC complicated by atelectasis of different severity undergoing curative 3D-CRT planning. Clinical staging before and after PET/CT was compared and the change of treatment plan was evaluated. The target volumes were delineated by CT and PET/CT. Results: PET/CT results changed the clinical staging in 18 (50.0%, 18/36) patients. PET/CT identified distant metastatic diseases in 11 (30.6%, 11/36) patients, thus excluding their eligibility for curative 3D-CRT. Of these 11 patients, managements were changed to palliative radiotherapy in 3 patients, chemotherapy in 7 patients and best supportive therapy in 1 patient. In the 25 patients with curative 3D-CRT, PET/CT altered the radiotherapy volume in 21 cases, including 12 with volume reduction, 7 with volume enlargement and 2 with location change. Three patients were given additional conventional radiotherapy, since PET/CT indicated supraclavicular nodal metastases. In the 3 patients with palliative 3D-CRT, 2 had target volume reduction and 1 had target volume enlargement after PET/CT. Conclusions: PET/CT may play a role in the management of patients with NSCLC complicated by atelectasis. It is also helpful for accurate delineation of target volume in 3D-CRT treatment planning. (authors)

  9. Increased survival and decreased metastasis rates with early thoracic radiotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation in combined-modality treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the relative efficacy of concurrent vs. sequential timing of thoracic radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide (VP-16) with respect to absolute survival, freedom from relapse, control of thoracic disease, and frequency and distribution of distant metastases. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in preventing CNS metastasis was also assessed. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer were treated either concurrently (29 patients) or sequentially (19 patients) with thoracic RT and chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide. Thirty-four patients (71%) received thoracic irradiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions (range, 30-55 Gy). Number of chemotherapy cycles ranged from 3 to 8; either 4 or 6 cycles were given to 36 patients (75%). Of 27 patients with a complete response at the completion of chemotherapy, 21 patients received PCI. Median follow-up was 29.3 months (range, 12-98 months). No patients were lost to follow-up. Potential prognostic variables were evaluated by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The absolute survival rate for all patients was 42% at 2 years and 32% at 5 years. The relapse-free survival rate was 35% at 2 years and 31% at 5 years. Thirty-six sites of failure were observed in 27 patients. Thoracic recurrence occurred in 9 patients (all within the RT field). The CNS was the most common site of relapse (15 patients). Multivariate analysis revealed that (1) concurrent RT and chemotherapy vs. sequential chemotherapy followed by RT and (2) disease volume were variables significantly predictive for survival. Absolute survival was 41% for patients who had early concurrent RT, beginning with either cycle 1 or 2 of chemotherapy, vs. 25% for those who had sequential treatment (p=.036). Patients having a disease volume less than one third of the thoracic width had a survival rate of 41% vs. 23% for those with

  10. Modelling beam transport and biological effectiveness to develop treatment planning for ion beam radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Grzanka, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy with carbon ions is a novel technique of cancer radiotherapy, applicable in particular to treating radioresistant tumours at difficult localisations. Therapy planning, where the medical physicist, following the medical prescription, finds the optimum distribution of cancer cells to be inactivated by their irradiation over the tumour volume, is a basic procedure of cancer radiotherapy. The main difficulty encountered in therapy planning for ion radiotherapy is to correctly account for the enhanced radiobiological effectiveness of ions in the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) region over the tumour volume. In this case, unlike in conventional radiotherapy with photon beams, achieving a uniform dose distribution over the tumour volume does not imply achieving uniform cancer cell inactivation. In this thesis, an algorithm of the basic element (kernel) of a treatment planning system (TPS) for carbon ion therapy is developed. The algorithm consists of a radiobiological part which suitably corrects for ...

  11. Analysis of health related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, one year after treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone versus EBRT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of cancer diagnosed among North American men. Most patients present with localized disease, which can be effectively treated with a variety of different modalities. These are associated with widely different acute and late effects, which can be both physical and psychological in nature. HRQoL concerns are therefore important for these patients for selecting between the different treatment options. One year after receiving radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer 117 patients with localized prostate cancer were invited to participate in a quality of life (QoL) self reported survey. 111 patients consented and participated in the survey, one year after completion of their treatment. 88 patients received EBRT and 23 received EBRT and HDRBT. QoL was compared in the two groups by using a modified version of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) survey instrument. One year after completion of treatment, there was no significant difference in overall QoL scores between the two groups of patients. For each component of the modified FACT-P survey, i.e. physical, social/family, emotional, and functional well-being; there were no statistically significant differences in the mean scores between the two groups. In prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT alone versus combined EBRT and HDRBT, there was no significant difference in the QoL scores at one year post-treatment

  12. NTCP models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: The role of dosimetric and clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this multicentre prospective study was to develop multivariable logistic regression models to make valid predictions about the risk of moderate-to-severe patient-rated xerostomia (XERM6) and sticky saliva 6 months (STICM6) after primary treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and materials: The study population was composed of 178 consecutive HNC patients treated with IMRT. All patients were included in a standard follow up programme in which acute and late side effects and quality of life were prospectively assessed, prior to, during and after treatment. The primary endpoints were XERM6 and STICM6 as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 after completing IMRT. Organs at risk (OARs) potentially involved in salivary function were delineated on planning-CT, including the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands and the minor glands in the soft palate, cheeks and lips. Patients with moderate-to-severe xerostomia or sticky saliva, respectively, at baseline were excluded. The optimal number of variables for a multivariate logistic regression model was determined using a bootstrapping method. Results: Eventually, 51.6% of the cases suffered from XERM6. The multivariate analysis showed that the mean contralateral parotid gland dose and baseline xerostomia (none vs. a bit) were the most important predictors for XERM6. For the multivariate NTCP model, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was 0.68 (95% CI 0.60–0.76) and the discrimination slope was 0.10, respectively. Calibration was good with a calibration slope of 1.0. At 6 months after IMRT, 35.6% of the cases reported STICM6. The mean contralateral submandibular gland dose, the mean sublingual dose and the mean dose to the minor salivary glands located in the soft palate were most predictive for STICM6. For this model, the AUC was 0.70 (95% CI 0.61–0.78) and the discrimination slope was 0

  13. The value of regional nodal radiotherapy (dose/volume) in the treatment of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: an RTOG analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether or not the traditional practice of including all thoracic regional nodal areas in the radiotherapy volume in the treatment of unresectable lung cancer is of any therapeutic benefit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,705 patients from four large RTOG trials (78-11, 79-17, 83-11, 84-07) were analyzed for this purpose. Each of these trials had data on dose delivered to the nodal regions and assessment of nodal borders. The nodes were separated into mediastinal, contralateral hilar, ipsilateral hilar, and supraclavicular. Each node site was assessed for progression, defined as in-field or out-of-field, at the node site. In patients with adequate nodal field borders, the results were also analyzed according to the dose delivered. RESULTS: The majority (74%) of patients were between the age of 55 to 75. Forty-six percent of patients had KPS of 60 to 80 and 52% KPS of 90 to 100. Sixty percent of patients had a weight loss of less than 5%, and 40% had a weight loss of over 5% six months prior to diagnosis. Major variations from protocol in defining field borders (unacceptable field borders) were lowest for ipsilateral hilum ((42(727))) and the highest for mediastinal borders ((158(743))). Three groups had statistically significant differences in outcome (progression) between the per protocol and the unacceptable per protocol: ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders), 14% versus 26% (p = 0.03); dose to mediastinal nodes in CALGB eligible patients, 9% versus 19% (p = 0.02); and ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders) for high-dose patients assigned to greater than or equal to 69.6 Gy, 14% versus 31% (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that inclusion of the ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes affect outcome in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer. Exclusion of the other thoracic lymph node regions did not affect outcome in this study. These findings have important implications for combined modality therapy and three

  14. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  15. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  16. Outcome analysis of salvage radiotherapy for occult cervical cancer found after simple hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to analyze the outcomes of the patients, who received salvage radiotherapy for incidentally discovered cervical cancer following simple hysterectomy, and to identify the influence of intracavitary radiotherapy on treatment outcomes. Data from 117 patients with occult cervical cancer who underwent simple hysterectomy followed by salvage radiotherapy from September 1979 to November 2010 were collected. All the patients received external beam radiotherapy with (n=45) or without (n=72) intracavitary radiotherapy. Local control, disease-free survival, overall survival and treatment-related toxicity were investigated. The median follow-up time was 75 months. The 5- and 10-year local control/disease-free survival/overall survival rates were 93/87/87% and 90/84/83%, respectively. Among 98 patients who had no residual disease and negative resection margin on surgical specimens, 32 (33%) received intracavitary radiotherapy and 66 (67%) did not. There were no differences in patient and tumor characteristics between patients treated with and without intracavitary radiotherapy. The 5-year local control rate for the non-intracavitary radiotherapy group was 93 versus 94% for the intracavitary radiotherapy group (P=0.564); the disease-free survival rate was 88 versus 94% (P=0.894); the overall survival rate was 95 versus 85% (P=0.106), respectively. Among all patients, there were 5% of Grade 3 or higher late toxicities. Patients with occult invasive cervical cancer discovered following simple hysterectomy coul