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Sample records for cancer treatment-related lymphedema

  1. Bioimpedance to screen for abdominal fat in patients with breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Guerreiro Godoy, Maria; Silva, Edivandra Buzato; de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira

    2016-07-28

    One of the dreaded complications after the treatment of breast cancer is lymphedema. Therapies used in the treatment of breast cancer such as surgery, radiotherapy, hormone therapy and chemotherapy may be adversely affected by obesity. The objective of this study was to use bioimpedance to assess abdominal fat in women with breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema and suggest this as a screening method. Forty-five female patients with clinical diagnosis of breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema were evaluated in this quantitative cross-sectional study. A control group, composed of 38 patients with varicose veins and women attending a social support group, was matched for age and body mass index (BMI). All participants were submitted to a bioimpedance evaluation (In Body S 10), with particular attention being paid to abdominal fat and their BMI. The unpaired t -test, Fisher Exact test and Mann-Whitney test were used for statistical analysis and an alpha error of 5%. There was no significant difference (p -value = 0.23) in the mean BMI between the study group (27.79 kg∕m2) and the control group (28.80 kg∕m2). The mean abdominal circumference, a measure of abdominal fat, of the women in the study group was 130.54 cm2 and for the control group it was 102.24 cm2 (p -value = 0.0037). Thus the study group had more abdominal fat (p -value = 0.0003). Moreover, on comparing obese patients in the two groups, the study group had more abdominal fat (p -value = 0.02). However, no significant difference was observed comparing non-obese patients (p -value = 0.6). The comparison of obese patients with non-obese patients in the control group identifies an association between obesity and abdominal fat (p -value abdominal fat than the general population with bioimpedance.

  2. Efficacy of complete decongestive therapy and manual lymphatic drainage on treatment-related lymphedema in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, Rashmi; Dufan, Tarek; Russell, Catherine; Guenther, Wanda; Nugent, Zoan; Sun Xuyan; Cooke, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of combined decongestive therapy and manual lymphatic drainage in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. Methods and Materials: The data from 250 patients were reviewed. The pre- and posttreatment volumetric measurements were compared, and the correlation with age, body mass index, and type of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy was determined. The Spearman correlation coefficients and Wilcoxon two-sample test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 250 patients, 138 were included in the final analysis. The mean age at presentation was 54.3 years. Patients were stratified on the basis of the treatment modality used for breast cancer management. Lymphedema was managed with combined decongestive therapy in 55%, manual lymphatic drainage alone in 32%, and the home program in 13%. The mean pretreatment volume of the affected and normal arms was 2929 and 2531 mL. At the end of 1 year, the posttreatment volume of the affected arm was 2741 mL. The absolute volume of the affected arm was reduced by a mean of 188 mL (p < 0.0001). The type of surgery (p = 0.0142), age (p = 0.0354), and body mass index (p < 0.0001) were related to the severity of lymphedema. Conclusion: Combined decongestive therapy and manual lymphatic drainage with exercises were associated with a significant reduction in the lymphedema volume

  3. Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swenson, Karen K

    2006-01-01

    .... Cases will be identified in the physical therapy or cancer centers. Controls will be identified using the oncology registry and include patients with breast cancer surgery who have not developed lymphedema...

  4. Upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Jbali, B.; Daoud, J.; Guermazi, M.; Frikha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To study the frequency and risk factors for upper limb lymphedema through a series of patients treated for breast cancer. Patients and methods. - It is a retrospective study about 222 patients treated for breast cancer during the period between February 1993 and December 2003 in Sfax hospitals. Average age was 51 years (27-92 years). Tumour was T2 in 59% of cases. All patients had surgery with lymph node dissection. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent histological type (80% of cases), with predominant SBR II grade (62%). The mean number of removed lymph nodes was 12 (2-33). Axillary lymph node metastasis was detected in 124 patients. Radiotherapy was delivered in 200 patients, including axillary irradiation in 30 cases. The mean follow-up was 68 months (12-120). Results. - Lymphedema appeared in 23% of cases (51 patients), 14 months after surgery (mean period). Lymphedema affected the brachium in 17% of cases, the forearm in 12% of cases and all upper limb in 71% of cases. Fifty percent of patients had rehabilitation. However, improvement of lymphedema was obtained in 18 cases. Parameters predicting lymphedema were studied. Significant risk factors were obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. The type of surgery, axillary irradiation and shoulder abduction deficit did not predict lymphedema. Conclusion. - Lymphedema of the arm is a frequent consequence of breast cancer treatment. The risk of lymphedema is correlated with obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. (authors)

  5. Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Walk to Fight Lymphedema & Lymphatic Diseases About Us Mission History Your Investment Partners and Supporting Members LE&RN ... Archive Walk to Fight Lymphedema & Lymphatic Diseases About Us Mission History Your Investment Partners and Supporting Members LE&RN ...

  6. Financial cost of lymphedema borne by women with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Kalfa, Senia; Koelmeyer, Louise; Parkinson, Bonny; Mackie, Helen; Viveros, Hector; Gollan, Paul; Taksa, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective Our study examines the financial cost of lymphedema following a diagnosis of breast cancer and addresses a significant knowledge gap regarding the additional impact of lymphedema on breast cancer survivors. Methods An online national survey was conducted with 361 women who had either breast cancer without lymphedema (BC) (group 1, n = 209) or breast cancer with lymphedema (BC+LE) (group 2, n = 152). Participant recruitment was supported by the Breast Cancer Network Australia and the Australasian Lymphology Association. Results Both breast cancer and lymphedema result in significant out‐of‐pocket financial costs borne by women. Of patients with BC+LE, 80% indicated that their breast cancer diagnosis had affected them financially compared with 67% in the BC group (P < .020). For patients with lymphedema, over half (56%) indicated that this specific additional diagnosis to their breast cancer affected them financially and that costs increased with lymphedema severity. The cost of compression garments formed a large proportion of these costs (40.1%). The average number of attendances to a therapist each year was 5.8 (range, 0‐45). Twenty‐five patients (16.4%) had an episode of cellulitis in the past year. The incidence of cellulitis was 7.7% in 91 patients with subclinical or mild lymphedema compared with 29.5% of 61 patients with more extensive lymphedema (P < .001). The average out‐of‐pocket financial cost of lymphedema care borne by women was A$977 per annum, ranging from A$207 for subclinical lymphedema to over A$1400 for moderate or severe lymphedema. Conclusions This study identifies an additional detrimental effect of lymphedema on women in terms of financial costs. PMID:27479170

  7. Symptom report in detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu MR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mei R Fu,1 Deborah Axelrod,2,3 Charles M Cleland,1 Zeyuan Qiu,4 Amber A Guth,2,3 Robin Kleinman,2 Joan Scagliola,2 Judith Haber1 1College of Nursing, New York University, 2Department of Surgery, NYU School of Medicine, 3NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY, 4Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, USA Abstract: Breast cancer-related lymphedema is a syndrome of abnormal swelling coupled with multiple symptoms resulting from obstruction or disruption of the lymphatic system associated with cancer treatment. Research has demonstrated that with increased number of symptoms reported, breast cancer survivors' limb volume increased. Lymphedema symptoms in the affected limb may indicate a latent stage of lymphedema in which changes cannot be detected by objective measures. The latent stage of lymphedema may exist months or years before overt swelling occurs. Symptom report may play an important role in detecting lymphedema in clinical practice. The purposes of this study were to: 1 examine the validity, sensitivity, and specificity of symptoms for detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema and 2 determine the best clinical cutoff point for the count of symptoms that maximized the sum of sensitivity and specificity. Data were collected from 250 women, including healthy female adults, breast cancer survivors with lymphedema, and those at risk for lymphedema. Lymphedema symptoms were assessed using a reliable and valid instrument. Validity, sensitivity, and specificity were evaluated using logistic regression, analysis of variance, and areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. Count of lymphedema symptoms was able to differentiate healthy adults from breast cancer survivors with lymphedema and those at risk for lymphedema. A diagnostic cutoff of three symptoms discriminated breast cancer survivors with lymphedema from healthy women with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 97

  8. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rossing, Mary A; Malone, Kathleen E

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study, we will assess whether modifiable factors, including body weight, physical activity, smoking and breast reconstruction, influence risk of arm lymphedema among women treated for breast cancer...

  9. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rossing, Mary

    2003-01-01

    .... In this study, we will assess whether modifiable factors, including body weight, physical activity, smoking and breast reconstruction, influence risk of arm Lymphedema among women treated for breast cancer...

  10. Lymphedema (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by cancer is rarely treated with surgery . Massage therapy Massage therapy (manual therapy) for lymphedema should begin with ... trained in treating lymphedema. In this type of massage, the soft tissues of the body are lightly ...

  11. Seroma indicates increased risk of lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jørgensen, Mads Gustaf; Haugaard, Karen

    2017-01-01

    in one of the largest retrospective cohort studies. Material and methods We included all patients with unilateral breast cancer treated in the period of 2008-2014. Data regarding treatment and breast cancer characteristics were retrieved from the national breast cancer registry. Data regarding lymphedema...

  12. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Implications for Family Leisure Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radina, M. Elise

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 20% of breast cancer survivors face the chronic condition of breast cancer-related lymphedema. This study explored the ways in which women with this condition experienced changes in their participation in family leisure as one indicator of family functioning. Participants (N = 27) were interviewed regarding lifestyles before and after…

  13. Risk factors for self-reported arm lymphedema among female breast cancer survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togawa, Kayo; Ma, Huiyan; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Neuhouser, Marian L; Imayama, Ikuyo; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Alfano, Catherine M; McTiernan, Anne; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Bernstein, Leslie

    2014-08-22

    Lymphedema is a potentially debilitating condition that occurs among breast cancer survivors. This study examines the incidence of self-reported lymphedema, timing of lymphedema onset, and associations between sociodemographic, clinical and lifestyle factors and lymphedema risk across racial-ethnic groups using data from a multicenter, multiethnic prospective cohort study of breast cancer survivors, the Health, Eating, Activity and Lifestyle Study. A total of 666 women diagnosed with breast cancer staged as in situ, localized or regional disease at ages 35 to 64 years were recruited through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries in New Mexico (non-Hispanic white and Hispanic white), Los Angeles County (black), and Western Washington (non-Hispanic white) and followed for a median of 10.2 years. We evaluated sociodemographic factors, breast cancer- and treatment-related factors, comorbidities, body mass index (BMI), hormonal factors, and lifestyle factors in relation to self-reported lymphedema by fitting Cox proportional hazards models, estimating hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Over the follow-up period, 190 women (29%) reported lymphedema. The median time from breast cancer diagnosis to onset of lymphedema was 10.5 months (range: 0.5 to 134.9 months). Factors independently associated with lymphedema were total/modified radical mastectomy (versus partial/less than total mastectomy; HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.85), chemotherapy (versus no chemotherapy; HR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.09 to 2.02), no lymph nodes removed (versus ≥10 lymph nodes removed; HR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.33), pre-diagnostic BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (versus BMI race/ethnicity showed that hypertension and chemotherapy were lymphedema risk factors only for black women. Breast cancer patients who have undergone extensive surgery or extensive lymph node dissection, or who have a higher BMI should be closely monitored for detection and treatment of lymphedema. Further

  14. Effect of physical therapy on breast cancer related lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambour, Mette; Tange, Berit; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical therapy treatment of patients with lymphedema includes treatment based on the principles of 'Complete Decongestive Therapy' (CDT). CDT consists of the following components; skin care, manual lymphatic drainage, bandaging and exercises. The scientific evidence regarding what...... trial. A total of 160 breast cancer patients with arm lymphedema will be recruited from 3 hospitals and randomized into one of two treatment groups A: Complete Decongestive Therapy including manual drainage or B: Complete Decongestive Therapy without manual lymphatic drainage. The intervention period...... type of treatment is most effective is sparse. The objective of this study is to investigate whether CDT is equally effective if it includes manual lymphatic drainage or not in the treatment of arm lymphedema among patients with breast cancer. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized, single-blind, equivalence...

  15. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jie, E-mail: jie.deng@vanderbilt.edu [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Ridner, Sheila H. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Dietrich, Mary S. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A. [Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients {>=}3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  16. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armer, Jane M; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W; Zagar, Eris A; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  17. The effect of prophylactic lymphovenous anastomosis and shunts for preventing cancer-related lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads G; Toyserkani, Navid M; Sørensen, Jens A

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lymphedema is one of the most dreaded side effects to any cancer treatment involving lymphadenectomy. Progressed lymphedema is adversely complex and currently there is no widely acknowledged curative treatment. Therefore recent focus has shifted to risk reduction and prevention. It has...... with prophylactic LVA had a significant reduction in lymphedema incidence (Relative risk: 0.33, 95%CI: 0.19 to 0.56) when compared to patients receiving no prophylactic treatment (P 

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for development of lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, S.V.S.; Ray, S.; Kar, M.; Asthana, S.; Rath, G.K.; Shukla, N.K.; Raina, V.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early detection and multimodality therapy has resulted in an overall improvement of survival among breast cancer patients. Despite a significant shift in the treatment approach from radical mastectomy to breast conservation a significant number of patients develop lymphedema. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for development of lymphedema. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Retrospective analysis for prevalence of lymphedema in a tertiary care regional cancer centre. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three hundred treated breast cancer patients with a minimum follow up of one year were evaluated for the prevalence and risk factors for lymphedema. Lymphedema was assessed using a serial circumferential measurement method. More than 3 cm difference in circumference is considered as clinical significant lymphedema. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed for evaluating the risk factors by using the Chi square test and Cox logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of clinically significant lymphedema was 33.5 % and 17.2 % had severe lymphedema. The prevalence of lymphedema was 13.4 % in patients treated with surgery only where as the prevalence was 42.4% in patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Stage of the disease, body surface area> 1.5 m 2 , presence of co-morbid conditions, post operative radiotherapy and anthracycline based chemotherapy were significant risk factors in univariate analysis where as axillary irradiation and presence of co-morbid conditions have emerged as independent risk factors in multivariate analysis (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Post treatment lymphedema continues to be a significant problem following breast cancer therapy. Presence of co-morbid conditions and axillary radiation significantly increases the risk of lymphedema. A combination of axillary dissection and axillary radiation should be avoided whenever feasible to avoid lymphedema. (author)

  19. Lymphedema as a Cancer Treatment Side Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  20. Quantitative Lymphoscintigraphy to Predict the Possibility of Lymphedema Development After Breast Cancer Surgery: Retrospective Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Lee, Ju Kang; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Heung Kyu; Park, Ki Deok

    2017-12-01

    To predict the probability of lymphedema development in breast cancer patients in the early post-operation stage, we investigated the ability of quantitative lymphoscintigraphic assessment. This retrospective study included 201 patients without lymphedema after unilateral breast cancer surgery. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed between 4 and 8 weeks after surgery to evaluate the lymphatic system in the early postoperative stage. Quantitative lymphoscintigraphy was performed using four methods: ratio of radiopharmaceutical clearance rate of the affected to normal hand; ratio of radioactivity of the affected to normal hand; ratio of radiopharmaceutical uptake rate of the affected to normal axilla (RUA); and ratio of radioactivity of the affected to normal axilla (RRA). During a 1-year follow-up, patients with a circumferential interlimb difference of 2 cm at any measurement location and a 200-mL interlimb volume difference were diagnosed with lymphedema. We investigated the difference in quantitative lymphoscintigraphic assessment between the non-lymphedema and lymphedema groups. Quantitative lymphoscintigraphic assessment revealed that the RUA and RRA were significantly lower in the lymphedema group than in the non-lymphedema group. After adjusting the model for all significant variables (body mass index, N-stage, T-stage, type of surgery, and type of lymph node surgery), RRA was associated with lymphedema (odds ratio=0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.04-0.46; p=0.001). In patients in the early postoperative stage after unilateral breast cancer surgery, quantitative lymphoscintigraphic assessment can be used to predict the probability of developing lymphedema.

  1. Analysis of factors related to arm weakness in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daegu; Hwang, Ji Hye; Chu, Inho; Chang, Hyun Ju; Shim, Young Hun; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ratio of significant weakness in the affected arm of breast cancer-related lymphedema patients to their unaffected side. Another purpose was to identify factors related to arm weakness and physical function in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. Consecutive patients (n = 80) attended a single evaluation session following their outpatient lymphedema clinic visit. Possible independent factors (i.e., lymphedema, pain, psychological, educational, and behavioral) were evaluated. Handgrip strength was used to assess upper extremity muscle strength and the disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire was used to assess upper extremity physical function. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using factors that had significant differences between the handgrip weakness and non-weakness groups. Out of the 80 patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema, 29 patients (36.3 %) had significant weakness in the affected arm. Weakness of the arm with lymphedema was not related to lymphedema itself, but was related to the fear of using the affected limb (odds ratio = 1.76, 95 % confidence interval = 1.30-2.37). Fears of using the affected limb and depression significantly contributed to the variance in DASH scores. Appropriate physical and psychological interventions, including providing accurate information and reassurance of physical activity safety, are necessary to prevent arm weakness and physical dysfunction in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

  2. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jie; Ridner, Sheila H.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients ≥3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  3. Factors associated with external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Ridner, Sheila H; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A; Sinard, Robert J; Cmelak, Anthony J; Murphy, Barbara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The sample included 81 patients ≥3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Upper extremity lymphedema: presence and effect on functioning five years after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Cheryl L; Madsen, Richard; Wanchai, Ausanee; Stewart, Bob R; Armer, Jane M

    2013-11-01

    Our goal was to explore the effects of lymphedema on long-term adjustment among breast cancer survivors, in terms of functioning in important life environments. Limb volume measurements and psychosocial survey data were collected from women shortly after undergoing surgical intervention for breast cancer and annually thereafter. A subset of these women were selected for the current study because they had preoperative limb volume measurement data, which is best suited to determine presence and severity of lymphedema. Our final sample of 61 women had both the arm measurements (preoperative and 5-year) and survey data (baseline and 5-year) needed for this study, which comprises a secondary cross-sectional analysis of longitudinal data. A correlational approach was used to explore associations among lymphedema (presence, severity, and whether the participant met the criteria for lymphedema at any assessment point since their treatment for breast cancer) and outcome variables (physical functioning, vocational functioning, social functioning, domestic functioning, and sexual functioning). Each of the three measures of lymphedema was significantly correlated with domestic functioning, but not with functioning in other common environments. Long-term breast cancer survivors are at risk for developing secondary conditions, such as lymphedema, to which they must learn to adjust and adapt. Lymphedema may increase risk for compromised functioning in everyday environments, a problem which lies at the heart of rehabilitation. Breast cancer survivorship, therefore, fits well within the scope of a rehabilitation framework. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by cancer is rarely treated with surgery . Massage therapy Massage therapy (manual therapy) for lymphedema should begin with ... trained in treating lymphedema. In this type of massage, the soft tissues of the body are lightly ...

  6. A randomized controlled trial of expressive writing in breast cancer survivors with lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl, Stephanie J; Dietrich, Mary S; Wallston, Kenneth A; Ridner, Sheila H

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer survivors who develop lymphedema report poorer quality of life (QoL) than those without lymphedema. Expressive writing is a potential intervention to address QoL. Adult women (N = 107) with breast cancer and chronic Stage II lymphedema were randomised to writing about thoughts and feelings specific to lymphedema and its treatment (intervention) or about daily activities (control) for four, 20-min sessions. Outcome measures were several indicators of QoL assessed at baseline, one, three, and six months post-intervention (total scores and subscales of Upper Limb Lymphedema 27 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast). Hypothesised moderators of change in QoL were dispositional optimism, avoidant behaviours, and time since lymphedema diagnosis. There was no statistically significant intent-to-treat main effects of expressive writing on QoL. Statistically significant moderating effects on change in different indicators of QoL were observed for all three moderators. Expressive writing was more effective for improving QoL in women who were higher on optimism, lower on avoidance and had less time since a lymphedema diagnosis. These results provide further evidence that there are subsets of individuals for whom expressive writing is more effective. Future research may investigate targeting expressive writing based on identified moderators.

  7. Physical activity and lower limb lymphedema among uterine cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C; John, Gabriella M; Segal, Saya; Chu, Christina S; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2013-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) is known to provide physical and mental health benefits to uterine cancer survivors. However, it is unknown if PA is associated with lower limb lymphedema (LLL), an accumulation of protein-rich fluid in the lower limbs. Therefore, we sought to examine the association between PA and LLL in uterine cancer survivors, with a focus on walking. We conducted a cross-sectional study using mailed surveys among uterine cancer survivors who received care at a university-based cancer center. We asked about PA, walking, and LLL symptoms using validated self-report questionnaires. PA was calculated using MET-hours per week, and walking was calculated using blocks per day. The response rate to our survey was 43%. Among the 213 uterine cancer survivors in our survey, 36% were classified as having LLL. Compared with participants who reported trend = 0.003). Stratified analyses suggested the association between PA and LLL existed only among women with body mass index (BMI) trend = 0.007) compared with women with BMI ≥ 30 kg · m (P trend = 0.47). Compared with participants who reported trend trend = 0.007) and women with BMI ≥ 30 kg · m (P trend = 0.03). Participation in higher levels of PA or walking is associated with reduced proportions of LLL in dose-response fashion. These findings should be interpreted as preliminary and should be investigated in future studies.

  8. Impairment of Lymph Drainage in Subfascial Compartment of Forearm in Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    STANTON, A.W.B.; MELLOR, R.H.; COOK, G.J.; SVENSSON, W.E.; PETERS, A.M.; LEVICK, J.R.; MORTIMER, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: In arm lymphedema secondary to axillary surgery and radiotherapy (breast cancer-related lymphedema), the swelling is largely epifascial and lymph flow per unit epifascial volume is impaired. The subfascial muscle compartment is not measurably swollen despite the iatrogenic damage to its axillary drainage pathway, but this could be due to its low compliance. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that subfascial lymph drainage too is impaired.

  9. Usability of advanced pneumatic compression to treat cancer-related head and neck lymphedema: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Ryan, Shelly; Hartman, James M

    2018-01-01

    This functional usability study assessed ease of use, fit, comfort, and potential clinical benefits of advanced pneumatic compression treatment of cancer-related head and neck lymphedema. Patient-reported comfort and other treatment aspects were evaluated and multiple face and neck measurements were obtained on 44 patients with head and neck lymphedema before and after 1 treatment session to assess usability and treatment-related lymphedema changes. A majority of the patients (82%) reported the treatment was comfortable; most patients (61%) reported feeling better after treatment, and 93% reported that they would be likely to use this therapy at home. One treatment produced overall small but highly statistically significant reductions in composite metrics (mean ± SD) of the face (82.5 ± 4.3 cm vs 80.9 ± 4.1 cm; P < .001) and neck (120.4 ± 12.2 cm vs 119.2 ± 12.1 cm; P < .001) with no adverse events. Results found the treatment to be safe, easy to use, and well tolerated while demonstrating edema reduction after a single initial treatment. © 2017 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Risk of secondary lymphedema in breast cancer survivors is related to serum phospholipid fatty acid desaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Eunjung; Yim, Seung Yun; Do, Hyun Ju; Lim, Jae-Young; Yang, Eun Joo; Shin, Min-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Min

    2016-09-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common irreversible side effect of breast cancer surgery. We investigated if risk of secondary lymphedema in breast cancer survivors was related to changes in serum phospholipid fatty acid composition. Study subjects were voluntarily recruited into the following three groups: breast cancer survivors who had sentinel lymph node biopsy without lymphedema (SLNB), those who had auxillary lymph node dissection without lymphedema (ALND), and those who had ALND with lymphedema (ALND + LE). Body mass index (BMI), serum lipid profiles, bioimpedance data with single-frequency bioimpedance analysis (SFBIA), and serum phospholipid compositions were analyzed and compared among the groups. BMI, serum total cholesterol (total-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and SFBIA ratios increased only in the ALND + LE. High polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high C20:4 to C18:2 n-6 PUFAs (arachidonic acid [AA]/linoleic acid [LA]) was detected in the ALND and ALND + LE groups compared to SLNB. The ALND + LE group showed increased activity indices for delta 6 desaturase (D6D) and D5D and increased ratio of AA to eicosapentaenoic acid (AA/EPA) compared to the ALND and SLNB groups. Correlation and regression analysis indicated that D6D, D5D, and AA/EPA were associated with SFBIA ratios. We demonstrated that breast cancer survivors with lymphedema had elevated total PUFAs, fatty acid desaturase activity indices, and AA/EPA in serum phospholipids. Our findings suggested that desaturation extent of fatty acid composition might be related to the risk of secondary lymphedema in breast cancer survivors.

  11. Acupotomy and venesection in Upper Limb Lymphedema and Peripheral neuropathy following Breast Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun-ha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of acupotomy and venesection in a patient with peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery. Methods: From 17th August, 2009 to 29th August 2009, 1 female patient with peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery was treated with general oriental medicine therapy(acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy with venesection. Results: The patient's chief complaints- Lt hand numbness, Lt arm edema, Lt. wrist flexion limitation - were notably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acupotomy and venesection therapy has significant effect in improving symptoms of peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery, as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  12. Upper extremity function and quality of life in patients with breast cancer related lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojinović-Rodić Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Upper limb lymphedema is one of the most frequent chronic complications after breast cancer treatment with a significant impact on the upper extremity function and quality of life (QoL. The aim of this study was to estimate health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with breast-cancer-related lymphedema and its correlation with upper limb function and the size of edema. Methods. The cross-sectional study included 54 breast-cancer-related lymphedema patients. The quality of life was evaluated by the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36. Upper limb function was assessed by the Quick Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (Quick DASH. The size of lymphedema was determined by the arm circumference. Results. The higher HRQoL score was assessed for mental health (47.0 ± 12.2 than for physical one (42.2 ± 7.5. The highest values of SF-36 were found in the domains of Mental Health (67.7 ± 22.9 and Social Function (70.1 ± 23.1. The lowest scores were registered in the domains of Role Physical (46.9 ± 39.1 and General Health (49.3 ± 20.1. Upper extremity function statistically significantly correlated with the domains Role Physical, Bodily Pain and Physical Composite Summary and also, with the domain Role Emotional (p 0.05. Conclusions. Physical disability in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema influences quality of life more than mental health. Upper limb function has a significant impact on quality of life, not only on the physical, but also on the mental component. The presence of breast-cancer-related lymphedema certainly affects upper limb function and quality of life, but in this study no significant correlation between the size of edema and quality of life was found.

  13. Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Management of Breast-Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Fakhari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast-cancer-related lymphedema is a significant morbidity mostly observed following primary treatments for breast cancer (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy (1. Multiple complications might accompany lymphedema including cosmetic deformity, psychological disorders, consistent pain, and consequently decreased quality of life. Treatment  mostly focuses on reducing edema and its subsequent pain; however, no definite treatment has been hitherto introduced (2. Surgical approaches in the management of lymphedema are efficient including physiologic methods (e.g. flap interposition, lymph transfer, and lymphatic bypass and reductive techniques (e.g. liposuction (3. While the former mostly targets at reducing lymphedema through restoring lymphatic drainage, the latter aims at removing fibrofatty tissues which contribute to lymph stasis. Microsurgical variation of lymphatic bypass has gained popularity, in which the accumulated lymph in the lymphedematous limb is redirected. Non-surgical approaches are also practiced in most cases. Comprehensive decongestive therapy, consisting of skin care, exercise, special bandaging and massage, is the most frequently used non-surgical approach efficacy of which could be enhanced in combination with self-management strategies (4. Recently newer techniques have been introduced to tackle lymphedema and its associated pain. Manual lymph drainage, stellate ganglion block, acupuncture, deep oscillation, and pneumatic compression have been efficiently used in several studies. Moreover, significant short-term progress has been reported following other modalities such as low-level laser therapy (5. The complexity of breast-cancer-related lymphedema and its complications necessitates a multidisciplinary approach with the primary goal of easing the burden of the disease on the breast cancer patients. In addition, developing special guidelines encompassing these multidisciplinary approaches and providing educational and

  14. Risk factors for breast cancer-related upper extremity lymphedema: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yuhuan; Guo Qi; Liu Fenghua; Zhu Yaqun; Tian Ye

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To systematically evaluate the risk factors for upper extremity lymphedema after breast cancer treatment and the strength of their associations. Methods: PubMed, Ovid, EMbase, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify clinical trials published up to December 2012. The quality of included studies was assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale;data analysis was performed by Stata 10.0 and RevMan 5.2; the strength of associations between risk factors and breast cancer-related upper extremity lymphedema was described as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Twenty-two studies involving 10106 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The risk factors for upper extremity lymphedema after breast cancer treatment mainly included axillary lymph node dissection (OR=2.72, 95% CI=1.06-6.99, P=0.038), hypertension (OR=1.84, 95% CI=1.38-2.44, P=0.000), body mass index (OR=1.68, 95% CI=1.22-2.32, P=0.001), and radiotherapy (OR=1.65, 95% CI=1.20-2.25, P=0.002), while no significant associations were found for such factors as chemotherapy, age, number of positive lymph nodes, and number of dissected lymph nodes. Conclusions: The incidence of upper extremity lymphedema is high among patients with breast cancer after treatment, and axillary lymph node dissection, hypertension,body mass index, and radiotherapy are the main risk factors for lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. (authors)

  15. Treatment related impairments in arm and shoulder in patients with breast cancer: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine T Hidding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women in the developed world. As a result of breast cancer treatment, many patients suffer from serious complaints in their arm and shoulder, leading to limitations in activities of daily living and participation. In this systematic literature review we present an overview of the adverse effects of the integrated breast cancer treatment related to impairment in functions and structures in the upper extremity and upper body and limitations in daily activities. Patients at highest risk were defined. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic literature search using the databases of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane from 2000 to October 2012, according to the PRISMA guidelines. Included were studies with patients with stage I-III breast cancer, treated with surgery and additional treatments (radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. The following health outcomes were extracted: reduced joint mobility, reduced muscle strength, pain, lymphedema and limitations in daily activities. Outcomes were divided in within the first 12 months and >12 months post-operatively. Patients treated with ALND are at the highest risk of developing impairments of the arm and shoulder. Reduced ROM and muscle strength, pain, lymphedema and decreased degree of activities in daily living were reported most frequently in relation to ALND. Lumpectomy was related to a decline in the level of activities of daily living. Radiotherapy and hormonal therapy were the main risk factors for pain. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated with ALND require special attention to detect and consequently address impairments in the arm and shoulder. Patients with pain should be monitored carefully, because pain limits the degree of daily activities. Future research has to describe a complete overview of the medical treatment and analyze outcome in relation to the treatment. Utilization of uniform validated measurement

  16. Treatment related impairments in arm and shoulder in patients with breast cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Janine T; Beurskens, Carien H G; van der Wees, Philip J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women in the developed world. As a result of breast cancer treatment, many patients suffer from serious complaints in their arm and shoulder, leading to limitations in activities of daily living and participation. In this systematic literature review we present an overview of the adverse effects of the integrated breast cancer treatment related to impairment in functions and structures in the upper extremity and upper body and limitations in daily activities. Patients at highest risk were defined. We conducted a systematic literature search using the databases of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane from 2000 to October 2012, according to the PRISMA guidelines. Included were studies with patients with stage I-III breast cancer, treated with surgery and additional treatments (radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy). The following health outcomes were extracted: reduced joint mobility, reduced muscle strength, pain, lymphedema and limitations in daily activities. Outcomes were divided in within the first 12 months and >12 months post-operatively. Patients treated with ALND are at the highest risk of developing impairments of the arm and shoulder. Reduced ROM and muscle strength, pain, lymphedema and decreased degree of activities in daily living were reported most frequently in relation to ALND. Lumpectomy was related to a decline in the level of activities of daily living. Radiotherapy and hormonal therapy were the main risk factors for pain. Patients treated with ALND require special attention to detect and consequently address impairments in the arm and shoulder. Patients with pain should be monitored carefully, because pain limits the degree of daily activities. Future research has to describe a complete overview of the medical treatment and analyze outcome in relation to the treatment. Utilization of uniform validated measurement instruments has to be encouraged.

  17. Classification of treatment-related mortality in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Sarah; Pole, Jason D; Gibson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Treatment-related mortality is an important outcome in paediatric cancer clinical trials. An international group of experts in supportive care in paediatric cancer developed a consensus-based definition of treatment-related mortality and a cause-of-death attribution system. The reliability and va...

  18. Pilot Study: The Effectiveness of Complex Decongestive Therapy for Lymphedema in Palliative Care Patients with Advanced Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cobbe, Sinead

    2017-12-05

    Complex decongestive therapy (CDT) is a regimen of physical treatment for lymphedema. Its effectiveness is unknown in advanced cancer patients. This study evaluates effectiveness of CDT in this population.

  19. Usability and feasibility of health IT interventions to enhance Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei R. Fu, PhD, RN, FAAN

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This usability study provided evidence on breast cancer survivor's acceptance and highly positive evaluation of TOLF's usability as well as feasibility of using technologically-driven delivery model to enhance self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management.

  20. Effects of Clinical Pilates Exercises on Patients Developing Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şener, Hülya Özlem; Malkoç, Mehtap; Ergin, Gülbin; Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzşen, Tuğba

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of clinical Pilates exercises with those of the standard lymphedema exercises on lymphedema developing after breast cancer treatment. The study comprised 60 female patients with a mean age of 53.2±7.7 years who developed lymphedema after having breast cancer treatment. The patients were randomized into two groups: the clinical Pilates exercise group (n=30), and the control group (n=30). Before, and at the 8th week of treatment, the following parameters were measured: the severity of lymphedema, limb circumferences, body image using the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale, quality of life with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-BR23), and upper extremity function using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) outcome measure. Both groups performed one-hour exercises three days a week for 8 weeks. After treatment, the symptoms recovered significantly in both groups. Reductions in the severity of lymphedema, improvements in the social appearance anxiety scale scores, quality of life scores, and upper extremity functions scores in the clinical Pilates exercise group were greater than those in the control group. Clinical Pilates exercises were determined to be more effective on the symptoms of patients with lymphedema than were standard lymphedema exercises. Clinical Pilates exercises could be considered a safe model and would contribute to treatment programs.

  1. The Impact of Radiation Therapy on the Risk of Lymphedema After Treatment for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Miller, Cynthia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N.; Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean A. [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment can be an irreversible condition with a negative impact on quality of life. The goal of this study was to identify radiation therapy-related risk factors for lymphedema. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively performed arm volume measurements on 1476 breast cancer patients at our institution using a Perometer. Treating each breast individually, 1099 of 1501 patients (73%) received radiation therapy. Arm measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase occurring >3 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate risk factors for lymphedema. Results: At a median follow-up time of 25.4 months (range, 3.4-82.6 months), the 2-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was 6.8%. Cumulative incidence by radiation therapy type was as follows: 3.0% no radiation therapy, 3.1% breast or chest wall alone, 21.9% supraclavicular (SC), and 21.1% SC and posterior axillary boost (PAB). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for regional lymph node radiation (RLNR) (SC ± PAB) was 1.7 (P=.025) compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. There was no difference in lymphedema risk between SC and SC + PAB (P=.96). Other independent risk factors included early postoperative swelling (P<.0001), higher body mass index (P<.0001), greater number of lymph nodes dissected (P=.018), and axillary lymph node dissection (P=.0001). Conclusions: In a large cohort of breast cancer patients prospectively screened for lymphedema, RLNR significantly increased the risk of lymphedema compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. When considering use of RLNR, clinicians should weigh the potential benefit of RLNR for control of disease against the increased risk of lymphedema.

  2. Lower limb lymphedema: experiences and perceptions of cancer patients in the late palliative stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Marianne; Strang, Peter; Friedrichsen, Maria J; Johansson, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Lower limb lymphedema (LLL) is a common but neglected problem in palliative cancer patients. No studies have focused on these patients' experiences of lymphedema. The aims of this study were to explore patients' experiences regarding LLL and how they manage to deal with this in the late palliative stage. Thirteen patients with cancer-related LLL were included to satisfy a maximum variation sampling strategy. Interviews were analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method. LLL influenced the patients' thoughts about the future. Body image was often strongly influenced. Interactions with other persons were perceived as both positive and negative, and a range of coping strategies were expressed. LLL can exert a considerable influence on the physical experiences and the psychosocial situation of cancer patients in palliative care. Areas in need of increased education, attention, and further research are highlighted.

  3. Tc-99m-Human Serum Albumin Transit Time as a Measure of Arm Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid M; Hvidsten, Svend; Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh

    2017-01-01

    34-68 years, with unilateral arm lymphedema following breast cancer treatment underwent bilateral lymphoscintigraphy using intradermal injection in both hands of technetium-99m-labeled human serum albumin and sequential 5 min imaging for 5 hours. The mean transit time (MTT) in the arms was calculated...... based on time activity curves generated from injection site and arm regions. Visual lymphedema scoring was performed based on dermal backflow and lymph node presence. Excess arm volume was calculated from circumference measurements. RESULTS: The MTT (mean ± SD) was significantly longer in the lymphedema...

  4. Exercise barriers self-efficacy: development and validation of a subcale for individuals with cancer-related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Jena; Janda, Monika; Box, Robyn; Rogers, Laura; Hayes, Sandi

    2015-03-18

    No tool exists to measure self-efficacy for overcoming lymphedema-related exercise barriers in individuals with cancer-related lymphedema. However, an existing scale measures confidence to overcome general exercise barriers in cancer survivors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop, validate and assess the reliability of a subscale, to be used in conjunction with the general barriers scale, for determining exercise barriers self-efficacy in individuals facing lymphedema-related exercise barriers. A lymphedema-specific exercise barriers self-efficacy subscale was developed and validated using a cohort of 106 cancer survivors with cancer-related lymphedema, from Brisbane, Australia. An initial ten-item lymphedema-specific barrier subscale was developed and tested, with participant feedback and principal components analysis results used to guide development of the final version. Validity and test-retest reliability analyses were conducted on the final subscale. The final lymphedema-specific subscale contained five items. Principal components analysis revealed these items loaded highly (>0.75) on a separate factor when tested with a well-established nine-item general barriers scale. The final five-item subscale demonstrated good construct and criterion validity, high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.93) and test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.67, p exercise barriers self-efficacy in individuals with cancer-related lymphedema. This scale can be used in conjunction with an existing general exercise barriers scale to enhance exercise adherence in this understudied patient group.

  5. Effects of Kinesio Taping on breast cancer-related lymphedema: A meta-analysis in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasawara, Karina Tamy; Mapa, Jéssica Monique Rossetti; Ferreira, Vilma; Added, Marco Aurélio Nemitalla; Shiwa, Silvia Regina; Carvas, Nelson; Batista, Patricia Andrade

    2018-05-01

    Lymphedema is known as a secondary complication of breast cancer treatment, caused by reduction on lymphatic flow and lymph accumulation on interstitial space. The Kinesio Taping (KT) has become an alternative treatment for lymphedema volume reduction. The objective of the study was to evaluate the literature through a systematic review on KT effects on lymphedema related to breast cancer. Search strategies were performed by the following keywords: "Kinesio Taping," "Athletic Tape," "Cancer," "Neoplasm," "Lymphedema," and "Mastectomy" with derivations and different combinations. The following databases were accessed: SCIELO, LILACS, MEDLINE via PubMed, and PEDro, between 2009 and 2016. Studies published in English, Portuguese, and Spanish were considered for inclusion. The studies' methodological quality was assessed by the PEDro scale. Seven studies were identified by the search strategy and eligibility. All of them showed positive effect in reducing lymphedema (perimeter or volume) before versus after treatment. However, with no effects comparing the KT versus control group or others treatments (standardized mean difference = 0.04, confidence interval 95%: -0.24; 0.33), the average score of the PEDro scale was 4.71 points. KT was effective on postmastectomy lymphedema related to breast cancer; however, it is not more efficient than other treatments.

  6. Evaluation of kinesthetic sense and hand function in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzsen, Tugba

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the functional ability and kinesthetic sense of the hands of women with breast cancer-related lymphedema. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-seven women experiencing lymphedema after breast surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were included. The patients were divided into two groups: women with hand edema (HE+, n = 29) and without hand edema (HE-, n = 28) after breast cancer treatment. Arm edema severity, hand size, functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hand, and daily living skills were evaluated. [Results] The mean age of the patients was 55.8 years. In both groups, functional mobility, kinesthetic sense, and daily living skills decreased significantly with increasing edema severity. However, there was no significant difference between groups with respect to functional mobility or daily living skills. The kinesthetic sense of the hand was better in the HE- group than the HE+ group. There was a significant negative relationship between the severity of edema and hand function. [Conclusion] Breast cancer-related lymphedema can negatively impact women's functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hands as well as daily living skills.

  7. Lower limb lymphedema in gynecological cancer survivors--effect on daily life functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunberger, Gail; Lindquist, Helene; Waldenström, Ann-Charlotte; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    Lower limb lymphedema (LLL) is a common condition after pelvic cancer treatment but few studies have evaluated its effect on the quality of life and its consequences on daily life activities among gynecological cancer survivors. We identified a cohort of 789 eligible women, treated with pelvic radiotherapy alone or as part of combined treatment of gynecological cancer, from 1991 to 2003 at two departments of gynecological oncology in Sweden. As a preparatory study, we conducted in-depth interviews with gynecological cancer survivors and constructed a study-specific questionnaire which we validated face-to-face. The questionnaire covered physical symptoms originating in the pelvis, demographic, psychological, and quality of life factors. In relation to the lymph system, 19 questions were asked. Six hundred sixteen (78 %) gynecological cancer survivors answered the questionnaire and participated in the study. Thirty-six percent (218/606) of the cancer survivors reported LLL. Overall quality of life was significantly lower among cancer survivors with LLL. They were also less satisfied with their sleep, more worried about recurrence of cancer, and more likely to interpret symptoms from the body as recurrence. Cancer survivors reported that LLL kept them from physical activity (45 %) and house work (29 %) and affected their ability to partake in social activities (27 %) or to meet friends (20 %). Lower limb lymphedema has a negative impact on quality of life among gynecological cancer survivors, affecting sleep and daily life activities, yet only a few seek professional help.

  8. Bioelectrical impedance for detecting and monitoring lymphedema in patients with breast cancer. Preliminary results of the florence nightingale breast study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan Iyigun, Zeynep; Selamoglu, Derya; Alco, Gul; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Cetin; Agacayak, Filiz; Elbüken, Filiz; Bozdogan, Atilla; Ilgun, Serkan; Guler Uysal, Fusun; Ozmen, Vahit

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bioimpedance spectroscopy for the follow-up of patients with lymphedema in Turkey and its benefits in the diagnosis of stage 0, 1, and 2 lymphedema in patients who are under treatment for breast cancer. Thirty-seven female patients with breast cancer who underwent surgical procedures in our Breast Health Centre were followed up for lymphedema using bioimpedance, and clinical measurements were taken for a minimum period of 1 year at 3-month intervals. Patients who had been monitored regularly between November, 2011, and September, 2013, were enrolled to the study. In total, 8 patients developed lymphedema with an overall rate of 21.6%. Among the 8 patients who developed lymphedema, 4 had Stage 2, 1 had Stage 1, and 3 had Stage 0 lymphedema. Stage 0 lymphedema could not be detected with clinical measurements. During the patients' 1-year follow-up period using measurements of bioimpedance, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the occurrence of lymphedema and the disease characteristics. including the number of the extracted and remaining lymph nodes and the region of radiotherapy (p=0.042, p=0.024, p=0.040). Bioimpedance analysis seems to be a practical and reliable method for the early diagnosis of lymphedema. It is believed that regular monitoring of patients in the high-risk group using bioimpedance analyses increases the ability to treat lymphedema.

  9. Study Regarding the Effectiveness of Manual Lymphatic Drainage in the Case of Patients with Breast Cancer that Present Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru MIOC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is defined as a persistent increase of tissue volume caused by the blocked or absent lymphatic drainage. The purpose of this study is to analyse the effectiveness of lymphatic drainage in the treatment of lymphedema after a mastectomy, with the aim of reducing the volume of the lymphedema and improving overall symptomatology, as well as providing information regarding the impact of this treatment on quality-of-life and the physical limitations of these patients. With these objectives in mind, a series of articles evaluating the effectiveness of manual lymphatic drainage in the case of patients with breast cancer and lymphedema have been studied. The parameters under observation were: duration of lymphedema reduction and improved symptomatology (pain, a feeling of swelling of the upper limb, functional limitation, and patient dissatisfaction towards their body image. Following this analysis, one can conclude that the association of manual lymphatic drainage to physical exercise and physiotherapy has produced changes in the volume of the limb affected by the lymphedema; however, its isolated use has not resulted in significant changes.

  10. Prevalence of lymphedema in women undergoing treatment for breast cancer in a referral center in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva Daniella MF

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphedema is a highly prevalent condition in women who have undergone treatment for breast cancer. Lymphedema negatively affects the quality of life. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lymphedema and associated factors in women treated for breast cancer in the municipality of Juiz de Fora. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study that evaluated 250 women who were being treated for breast cancer. Pre-screening of the sample by analysis of medical records was performed to select women who met the inclusion criteria as follows: women who had an operation more than 6 months ago; absence of active disease, locoregional or distant; the absence of functional change in the affected limb before surgery, which could lead to swelling of the limb; and simulating or masking symptoms of lymphedema, such as bursitis, tendonitis, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Women with bilateral breast cancer, absence of axillary intervention (partial or complete axillary dissection and/or SLN biopsy, active disease in the region, or lympho-venous alteration of the limb before surgery were excluded. Data were collected from the medical records of the selected cases, and they subsequently underwent an interview and a physical assessment. Results The prevalence of lymphedema was 44.8%. There were medical records on the presence of this condition in 5.4% of cases. With regard to shoulder joint mobility, restrictions on abduction movements, internal and external rotation, and anterior shoulder adduction were significantly associated with lymphedema. Variables, including the presence of seroma, vascular changes, time elapsed after surgery, episodes of redness in the extremities, and cuticle removal from the hand with pliers were considered as major associated factors for lymphedema (p Conclusions The prevalence of 44.8% for lymphedema found in this study is considered to be relevant because it is a morbidity that

  11. Tissue dielectric constant and circumference measurement in the follow-up of treatment-related changes in lower-limb lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugral, Alper; Viren, Tuomas; Bakar, Yesim

    2018-02-01

    Lymphedema of lower limbs is a chronic condition that requires life-long management. Therapeutic effect of complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) is most often followed by circumference measurements (CM). However, the CM measurements are not specific to interstitial tissue fluid and have problems in sensitivity and objectivity. The aim of present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of CDP with a new tissue water specific measurement technique, in patients with lower limb lymphedema (LLL). A total of 17 patients with unilateral LLL (11 primary, 6 secondary lymphedema) were recruited in this study. CDP was applied for 5 days a week for 4 weeks. CM measurement of both limbs was performed at nine sites along limb by tape measure. Percentage skin water content (PWC) of thigh, calf and ankle was measured in affected lymphedema limb and contralateral limb with MoistureMeterD Compact (MMDC) device. Inter-limb PWC ratio was calculated by dividing affected side's PWC value with PWC of contralateral limb. Patients were asked to fullfill the Lymph Quality of Life Questionnaire. Significant reduction of circumference after CDP was detected at all nine measurement sites along lower limb (Pwater at thigh, calf and ankle measurement sites after CDP (Plimb PWC ratios demonstrated significant reduction of edema between affected and contraletral limbs post-treatment (Plimb PWC ratios were meaningful tools to follow the effect of therapautic intervention. Compared with CM measurements the TDC technique offered easier, quicker, objective and more practical measurements for routine assessments of LLL.

  12. Correlates of Lymphedema in Women with Breast Cancer: a Case Control Study in Shiraz, Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Behnam; Sayar, Negin; Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Zakeri, Zeinab; Talei, Asra; Rostami, Sara; Khademi, Sahar; Sabzi Sarvestani, Amene; Sekhavati, Eghbal

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the burden of breast cancer (BC) continues to increase. BC related lymphedema (BCRL) is currently non curable and as a life time risk it affects at least 25% of BC patients. Knowing more about BCRL and appropriate control of its modifiable risk factors can improve quality of life (QOL) of the affected patients. In this case control study to detect factors, 400 women with BCRL (as the case group) and 283 patients with BC without lymphedema (as the control group) that were referred to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences affiliated BC clinic center were assessed. The data were analyzed in SPSS. The mean age of the case group was 52.3±11.0 years and of the control group was 50.1±10.9 years. In patients with BCRL, 203(50.7%) had left (Lt) side BC and in non- lymphedema group 151 (53.3%) had Lt side BC. Out of all BCRL patients, 204 (51%) had lymphedema in all parts of their affected upper extremities, 100 (25%) had swelling in the arm and forearm and 23 (5.7%) had edema in both the upper extremity and trunk. Edema, heaviness, concern about changing body image, pain and paresthesia were the most common signs/symptoms among patients with BCRL. In BCRL patients, the difference of circumference between the affected upper limb and non-affected limb was 4.4±2.5 cm and the difference in volume displacement was 528.7±374.4 milliliters. Multiple variable analysis showed that moderate to severe activity (OR; odds ratio =14, 95% CI: 2.6-73.3 ), invasiveness of BC (OR =13.7, 95% CI: 7.3-25.6), modified radical mastectomy (OR=4.3, 95% CI: 2.3-7.9), BMI =>25 (OR=4.2, 95% CI: 2-8.7), radiotherapy (OR=3.9, 95% CI: 1.8-8.2 ), past history of limb damage (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) and the number of excised lymph nodes (OR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.09) were the significant predictors of lymphedema in women with BC. Modifiable risk factors of BCRL such as non-guided moderate to severe physical activity, high BMI and trauma to the limb should be controlled as early as possible in

  13. Standardized Method for Quantification of Developing Lymphedema in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancukiewicz, Marek; Russell, Tara A.; Otoole, Jean; Specht, Michelle; Singer, Marybeth; Kelada, Alexandra; Murphy, Colleen D.; Pogachar, Jessica; Gioioso, Valeria; Patel, Megha; Skolny, Melissa; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a simple and practical formula for quantifying breast cancer-related lymphedema, accounting for both the asymmetry of upper extremities' volumes and their temporal changes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed bilateral perometer measurements of the upper extremity in a series of 677 women who prospectively underwent lymphedema screening during treatment for unilateral breast cancer at Massachusetts General Hospital between August 2005 and November 2008. Four sources of variation were analyzed: between repeated measurements on the same arm at the same session; between both arms at baseline (preoperative) visit; in follow-up measurements; and between patients. Effects of hand dominance, time since diagnosis and surgery, age, weight, and body mass index were also analyzed. Results: The statistical distribution of variation of measurements suggests that the ratio of volume ratios is most appropriate for quantification of both asymmetry and temporal changes. Therefore, we present the formula for relative volume change (RVC): RVC = (A 2 U 1 )/(U 2 A 1 ) - 1, where A 1 , A 2 are arm volumes on the side of the treated breast at two different time points, and U 1 , U 2 are volumes on the contralateral side. Relative volume change is not significantly associated with hand dominance, age, or time since diagnosis. Baseline weight correlates (p = 0.0074) with higher RVC; however, baseline body mass index or weight changes over time do not. Conclusions: We propose the use of the RVC formula to assess the presence and course of breast cancer-related lymphedema in clinical practice and research.

  14. Composing hope through collage: A community-based intervention for cancer survivors living with lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roanne Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary lymphedema after cancer may result in distress, yet few interventions exist to support coping skills in this population. As part of a community-based intervention, we piloted the use of creative practices to promote active orientations to hope. A total of 19 participants completed the workshops; 11 collaged. The main themes address the collage processes as well as their content. The former addresses sub-themes such as selecting/composing. The latter includes sub-themes related to movement depicted in the collages. Collages and their associated discussions concretized hoping as an active and accessible process for participants living with two chronic illnesses.

  15. Streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome due to Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis in breast cancer-related lymphedema: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumazaki, Makoto; Saito, Fumi; Ogata, Hideaki; Yoshida, Miho; Kubota, Yorichika; Magoshi, Syunsuke; Kaneko, Hironori

    2017-07-14

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema often causes cellulitis and is one of the most common complications after breast cancer surgery. Streptococci are the major pathogens underlying such cellulitis. Among the streptococci, the importance of the Lancefield groups C and G is underappreciated; most cases involve Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. Despite having a relatively weak toxicity compared with group A streptococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis is associated with a mortality rate that is as high as that of group A streptococci in cases of invasive infection because Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis mainly affects elderly individuals who already have various comorbidities. An 83-year-old Japanese woman with breast cancer-related lymphedema in her left upper limb was referred to our hospital with high fever and acute pain with erythema in her left arm. She showed septic shock with disseminated intravascular coagulation. Blood culture showed positive results for Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis, confirming a diagnosis of streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome. She survived after successful intensive care. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis-induced streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome in a patient with breast cancer-related lymphedema. Breast cancer-related lymphedema is a common problem, and we must pay attention to invasive streptococcal soft tissue infections, particularly in elderly patients with chronic disease.

  16. Shoulder Pain after Fall, Septic Shock, and Pyomyositis Associated with Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Kitayama

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a symptom of pyomyositis, sepsis usually follows local inflammation signs. Here, we report pyomyositis with lymphedema of upper extremity in which septic shock and poor local findings initially presented during chemotherapy for breast cancer. Case Report: An 80-year-old woman presented with chronic right shoulder pain during chemotherapy for the recurrent disease. She had a history of postmastectomy lymphedema, diabetes mellitus, and repeated hyaluronic acid injections to the shoulder joint. The pain suddenly worsened with septic shock and no apparent local signs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed myonecrosis, and no pus was yielded by ultrasound-guided needle aspiration. After 2 weeks of recovery by conservative medical management, surgical drainage was performed. Late formulated massive intramuscular pus showed severe neutrophil infiltration and myonecrosis. Conclusion: Pyomyositis can develop into septic shock with poor local signs. Myelosuppression after chemotherapy can cause myonecrosis without macroabscess, and magnetic resonance imaging was useful for the diagnosis of this condition. When unspecified local pain appears during cancer chemotherapy we should consider this disease, too.

  17. Low level laser therapy (photobiomodulation) for the management of breast cancer-related lymphedema: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, G. David; Liu, Lizhou; Chapple, Cathy; Petrich, Simone; Anders, Juanita J.; Tumilty, Steve

    2018-04-01

    Breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL) is prevalent among breast cancer survivors, and may be painful and disfiguring with associated psychological impact. Previous research shows increasing use of low level laser therapy (LLLT), now commonly referred to as photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy for managing BCRL, in countries including the United States and Australia. However, conclusions were limited by the paucity, heterogeneity, and poor quality of previous studies. LLLT (PBM) has been barely used in clinical practice in New Zealand, and no clinical studies on LLLT (PBM) for BCRL have been conducted in this country. In order to promote this potentially useful treatment modality for BCRL patients, the Laser Lymphedema Trial Team at the University of Otago conducted a program to assess the effectiveness of LLLT (PBM) in management of BCRL. The program comprises three phases including a systematic review (completed), a feasibility study (completed), and a full-scale randomized controlled trial (proposed). This current paper provides an update on the program. Based upon the systematic review, LLLT (PBM) is considered a potentially effective treatment approach for women with BCRL; the review also indicated the need for further research including exploration of the relevance of dosage and other LLLT (PBM) parameters. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is feasible to conduct a fully powered RCT to definitively test the effectiveness of the additional use of LLLT (PBM) in the management of BCRL, and 114 participants will be needed at baseline in the main study. Currently, the full-scale RCT is under preparation.

  18. Active exercises utilizing a facilitating device in the treatment of lymphedema resulting from breast cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Fátima Guerreiro Godoy, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the reduction in volume of arm lymphedema secondary to breast cancer therapy utilizing an exercise facilitating device. Twenty-one women with arm lymphedema resulting from the surgical and radiotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer were randomly selected. Evaluation was made by water-displacement volumetry before and after each session. The patients were submitted to a series of active exercises using a facilitating device for four 12-minute sessions with intervals of 3 minutes between sessions in the sitting position with alignment of the spinal column. The lymphedematous arm was maintained under compression using a cotton-polyester sleeve. The active exercising device used was a mobile flexion bar fixed on a metal base at a height of 30 cm from the tabletop and at a distance of 10 cm from the patient’s body. The paired t-test was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (p-value ≤0.05 being considered significant. The initial mean volume of the arms was 2,089.9 and the final volume was 2,023.0 mL with a mean loss of 66.9 mL (p-value <0.001. In conclusion, active exercises utilizing facilitating devices can contribute to a reduction in size of lymphedematous limbs.

  19. Quality of life of women with lymphedema after surgery for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marislei Sanches Panobianco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the quality of life of 20 women with post-mastectomy lymphedema due to breast cancer, using the Flanagan’s Adapted Quality of Life Scale (1 and the Visual Analogue Scale (2, with data collection from July to December 2009 in the countryside of the state of São Paulo. It was observed a lower quality of life concerning participation in recreational and work activities, and better quality of life was related to relationship with friends; listening to music, reading, watching TV and going to the movies. Cronbach's alpha of Scale 1 was 0.86 and the average of Scale 2 was 6.26. Overall, the scales showed satisfactory results of quality of life, but low values showed factors that must be worked out, such as participation in sports, work and learning activities. Thus, lymphedema interferes with the quality of life, indicating a need for early intervention in order to help women achieve better quality of life.

  20. Lymphedema of the arm and breast in irradiated breast cancer patients: risks in an era of dramatically changing axillary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Laronga, Christine; Wilson, Lori; Elkins, David

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess risk for lymphedema of the breast and arm in radiotherapy patients in an era of less extensive axillary surgery. Breast cancer patients treated for cure were reviewed, with a minimum follow-up of 1.5 years from the end of treatment. Clinical, surgical, and radiation-related variables were tested for statistical association with arm and breast lymphedema using regression analyses, t-tests, and chi-squared analyses. Between January 1998 and June 2001, 240 women received radiation for localized breast cancer in our center. The incidence of lymphedema of the ipsilateral breast, arm, and combined (breast and arm) was 9.6%, 7.6%, and 1.8%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 27 months. For breast edema, t-test and multivariate analysis showed body mass index (BMI) to be significant (p = 0.043, p = 0.0038), as was chi-squared and multivariate testing for site of tumor in the breast (p = 0.0043, p = 0.0035). For arm edema, t-test and multivariate analyses showed the number of nodes removed to be significant (p = 0.0040, p = 0.0458); the size of the tumor was also significant by multivariate analyses (p = 0.0027). Tumor size appeared significant because a number of very large cancers failed locally and caused cancer-related obstructive lymphedema. In our center, even modern, limited level 1-2 axillary dissection and tangential irradiation carries the risk of arm lymphedema that would argue in favor of sentinel node biopsy. For breast edema, disruption of draining lymphatics by surgery and radiation with boost to the upper outer quadrant increased risk, especially for the obese. Fortunately both breast and arm edema benefited from manual lymphatic drainage.

  1. Treatment-related neuroendocrine prostate cancer resulting in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sundhar; Eisenberg, Adva; Foo, Wen Chi; Freedman, Jennifer; Armstrong, Andrew J; Moss, Larry G; Harrison, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of a paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) resulting from treatment-related neuroendocrine prostate cancer - a highly aggressive and difficult disease to treat. A 51-year-old man was started on androgen deprivation therapy after presenting with metastatic prostate cancer, characterized by diffuse osseous metastasis. Shortly thereafter, he developed progressive disease with biopsy proven neuroendocrine prostate cancer as well as symptoms of increased skin pigmentation, hypokalemia, hypertension, hyperglycemia and profound weakness, consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome. Molecular analysis of the patient's tumor through RNA sequencing showed high expression of several genes including CHGA, ASCL1, CALCA, HES6, PCSK1, CALCB and INSM1 confirming his neuroendocrine phenotype; elevated POMC expression was found, supporting the diagnosis of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Psychosocial factors associated with adherence for self-management behaviors in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorso, Jessica; Sherman, Kerry A; Koelmeyer, Louise; Mackie, Helen; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive and affective psychosocial factors have been found to underlie adherence to preventive behaviors in women at risk of developing lymphedema following treatment for breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine if these factors are associated with adherence to self-management behaviors for women diagnosed with breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Women with BCRL were recruited through a community-based breast cancer organization and three Australian lymphedema treatment clinics. Participants completed an online questionnaire assessing demographics, medical history, adherence to self-management behaviors, psychosocial variables (personal control, treatment control, consequences, distress, and self-regulation of affect), and knowledge about lymphedema self-management. A total of 166 women participated in the study. Participants reported adhering to a mean of five out of seven behaviors, with 19.5% of participants adhering to all seven behaviors. Adherence to individual behaviors ranged from 65% (self-lymphatic drainage) to 98.2% (skin care). Greater knowledge about lymphedema was significantly correlated with higher adherence. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis indicated that only medical history factors (time since diagnosis and having undergone hormone replacement therapy) predicted a significant amount of the variance in adherence. These findings highlight the importance of patient knowledge for optimal adherence to a self-management regimen. In addition, medical history factors may identify if a patient is at risk of nonadherence. The lack of association of adherence with other psychosocial factors considered in this study indicates that factors underlying adherence in affected women differ considerably from those factors prompting preventive behavior adherence in the at-risk population.

  3. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  4. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  5. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2–65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  6. Regional Distribution of Epifascial Swelling and Epifascial Lymph Drainage Rate Constants in Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    MODI, STEPHANIE; STANTON, ANTHONY W. B.; MELLOR, RUSSELL H.; MICHAEL PETERS, A.; RODNEY LEVICK, J.; MORTIMER, PETER S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The view that breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a simple, direct mechanical result of axillary lymphatic obstruction (‘stopcock’ mechanism) appears incomplete, because parts of the swollen limb (e.g., hand) can remain nonswollen. The lymph drainage rate constant (k) falls in the swollen forearm but not in the spared hand, indicating regional differences in lymphatic function. Here the generality of the hypothesis that regional epifascial lymphatic failure underlies region...

  7. Race/ethnicity, genetic ancestry, and breast cancer-related lymphedema in the Pathways Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Yao, Song; Lee, Valerie S; Roh, Janise M; Zhu, Qianqian; Ergas, Isaac J; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yali; Kutner, Susan E; Quesenberry, Charles P; Ambrosone, Christine B; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a serious chronic condition after breast cancer (BC) surgery and treatment. It is unclear if BCRL risk varies by race/ethnicity. In a multiethnic prospective cohort study of 2953 BC patients, we examined the association of self-reported BCRL status with self-reported race/ethnicity and estimated genetic ancestry. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, with follow-up starting 6 months post-BC diagnosis. Estimates were further stratified by body mass index (BMI). By 48 months of follow-up, 342 (11.6 %) women reported having BCRL. Younger age at BC diagnosis, higher BMI at baseline, and lower physical activity were associated with greater BCRL risk. African American (AA) women had a 2-fold increased risk of BCRL compared with White women (HR = 2.04; 95 % CI 1.35-3.08). African genetic ancestry was also associated with an increased risk (HR = 2.50; 95 % CI 1.43, 4.36). Both risks were attenuated but remained elevated after adjusting for known risk factors and became more pronounced when restricted to the nonobese women (adjusted HR = 2.31 for AA and HR = 3.70 for African ancestry, both p ancestry data, with a potential ancestry-obesity interaction.

  8. Efficacy of night-time compression for breast cancer related lymphedema (LYNC): protocol for a multi-centre, randomized controlled efficacy trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeely, Margaret L.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Webster, Marc; Kuusk, Urve; Tracey, Karen; Mackey, John

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema is a prevalent long-term effect of breast cancer treatment that is associated with reduced quality of life. More recent observational data suggest that the addition of night-time compression to day-time use of a compression garment results in better long-term control of arm lymphedema. The primary objectives of the randomized controlled phase of the trial are to determine the efficacy of night-time compression on arm lymphedema volume maintenance and quality of life in breast cancer survivors who have completed intensive reduction treatment for their lymphedema. The study will be a parallel 3-arm, multi-centre randomized fast-track trial. A total of 120 women with breast cancer related lymphedema will be recruited from 3 centres in Canada and randomized to group 1: Day-time compression garment alone or Group 2: Day-time compression garment + night-time compression bandaging or Group 3: Day-time compression garment + use of a night-time compression system garment. The duration of the primary intervention period will be 12 weeks. The follow-up period after the intervention (weeks 13 to 24) will follow a longitudinal observational design. The primary outcome variables: differences from baseline to week 12 in arm volume and quality of life (Lymphoedema Functioning, Disability and Health Questionnaire: Lymph-ICF). Secondary outcomes include bioimpedance analysis, sleep disturbance and self-efficacy. All measurements are standardized and will be performed prior to randomization, and at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24. The use of night-time compression as a self-management strategy for chronic breast cancer related lymphedema is seen as an innovative approach to improve long-term control over the condition. This trial aims to advance the knowledge on self-management strategies for lymphedema

  9. Clinical effectiveness of decongestive treatments on excess arm volume and patient-centered outcomes in women with early breast cancer-related arm lymphedema: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Eunice; Ream, Emma; Taylor, Cath; Bick, Debra

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the effect of decongestive lymphedema treatment on excess arm volume or patient-centered outcomes in women presenting within either 12 months or a mean nine months of developing arm lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Introduction: Lymphedema is a common consequence of breast cancer treatment requiring life-long treatment to reduce symptoms and prevent complications. Currently, evidence to inform the optimal decongestive lymphedema treatment package is lacking. Inclusion criteria: The review included studies on women who received lymphedema treatment within either 12 months or a mean of nine months of developing unilateral breast cancer-related arm lymphedema. The intervention was any decongestive lymphedema treatment delivered with the purpose of reducing arm lymphedema, compared to another form of lymphedema treatment (whether self or practitioner-administered), placebo or no treatment. The clinical outcome was excess arm volume; patient-centered outcomes were health-related quality of life, arm heaviness, arm function, patient-perceived benefit and satisfaction with treatment. Experimental study designs were eligible, including randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental, prospective and retrospective before and after studies were considered. Methods: A three-step search strategy was utilized to find published and unpublished studies. The search identified studies published from the inception of each database to July 6, 2016. Reference lists were scanned to identify further eligible studies. Studies were critically appraised using appropriate standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Details describing each study and treatment results regarding outcomes of interest were extracted from papers included in the review using appropriate standardized data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Due to heterogeneity in included studies, results for similar

  10. The effects of complex exercise on shoulder range of motion and pain for women with breast cancer-related lymphedema: a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyuck

    2017-07-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of complex exercise on shoulder range of motion and pain for women with breast cancer-related lymphedema. 69 women participated in this study and then they were randomly allocated to complex exercise group (n = 35) or the conventional decongestive therapy group (n = 34). All subjects received 8 sessions for 4 weeks. To identify the effects on shoulder range of motion and pain, goniometer and visual analog scale were used, respectively. The outcome measurements were performed before and after the 4 week intervention. After 4 weeks, complex exercise group had greater improvements in shoulder range of motion and pain compared with the conventional decongestive therapy group (p women with breast cancer-related lymphedema. Complex exercise would be useful to improve shoulder range of motion and pain of the women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

  11. Incidence and risk factors for lower limb lymphedema after gynecologic cancer surgery with initiation of periodic complex decongestive physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deura, Imari; Shimada, Muneaki; Hirashita, Keiko; Sugimura, Maki; Sato, Seiya; Sato, Shinya; Oishi, Tetsuro; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Harada, Tasuku; Kigawa, Junzo

    2015-06-01

    Lower limb lymphedema (LLL) is one of the most frequent postoperative complications of retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy for gynecologic cancer. LLL often impairs quality of life, activities of daily living, sleep, and sex in patients with gynecologic cancer. We conducted this study to evaluate the incidence and risk factors for LLL after gynecologic cancer surgery in patients who received assessment and periodic complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). We retrospectively reviewed 126 cases of gynecologic cancer that underwent surgery involving retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy at Tottori University Hospital between 2009 and 2012. All patients received physical examinations to detect LLL and underwent CDP by nurse specialists within several months after surgery. The International Society of Lymphology staging of lymphedema severity was used as the diagnostic criteria. Of 126 patients, 57 (45.2%) had LLL, comprising 45 and 12 patients with stage 1 and stage 2 LLL, respectively. No patient had stage 3 LLL. LLL was present in 37 (29.4%) patients at the initial physical examination. Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and age ≥ 55 years were independent risk factors for ≥ stage 2 LLL. To minimize the incidence of ≥ stage 2 LLL, gynecologic oncologists should be vigilant for this condition in patients who are ≥ 55 years and in those who undergo adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Patients should be advised to have a physical assessment for LLL and to receive education about CDP immediately after surgery involving retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy for gynecologic cancer.

  12. Factors Associated With the Development of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema After Whole-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Baschnagel, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ghilezan, Mihai [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont School of Medicine, Oakland University, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Riutta, Justin; Dekhne, Nayana; Balaraman, Savitha [Beaumont Cancer Institute, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont School of Medicine, Oakland University, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Mitchell, Christina; Wallace, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Beaumont Cancer Institute, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont School of Medicine, Oakland University, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the rates of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) in patients undergoing whole-breast irradiation as part of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and to identify clinical, pathologic, and treatment factors associated with its development. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,861 patients with breast cancer were treated at William Beaumont Hospital with whole-breast irradiation as part of their BCT from January 1980 to February 2006, with 1,497 patients available for analysis. Determination of BCRL was based on clinical assessment. Differences in clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics between patients with BCRL and those without BCRL were evaluated, and the actuarial rates of BCRL by regional irradiation technique were determined. Results: The actuarial rate of any BCRL was 7.4% for the entire cohort and 9.9%, 14.7%, and 8.3% for patients receiving a supraclavicular field, posterior axillary boost, and internal mammary irradiation, respectively. BCRL was more likely to develop in patients with advanced nodal status (11.4% vs. 6.3%, p = 0.001), those who had a greater number of lymph nodes removed (14 nodes) (9.5% vs. 6.0%, p = 0.01), those who had extracapsular extension (13.4% vs. 6.9%, p = 0.009), those with Grade II/III disease (10.8% vs. 2.9%, p < 0.001), and those who received adjuvant chemotherapy (10.5% vs. 6.7%, p = 0.02). Regional irradiation showed small increases in the rates of BCRL (p = not significant). Conclusions: These results suggest that clinically detectable BCRL will develop after traditional BCT in up to 10% of patients. High-risk subgroups include patients with advanced nodal status, those with more nodes removed, and those who receive chemotherapy, with patients receiving regional irradiation showing a trend toward increased rates.

  13. Drug Reduces Cancer Treatment-Related Joint Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cancer Currents blog post about a clinical trial demonstrating that duloxetine (Cymbalta®) may reduce joint pain caused by aromatase inhibitors in women being treated for early-stage breast cancer.

  14. Establishing and Sustaining a Prospective Screening Program for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema at the Massachusetts General Hospital: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Brunelle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within the infrastructure of our institution. It is our hope that by sharing our history other centers can learn from our mistakes and successes to better design their own prospective screening program to best serve their patient population.

  15. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence dose/time-dependence and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  16. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images ‘spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research. PMID:25197263

  17. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-08-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images 'spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research.

  18. Scoring of treatment-related late effects in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livsey, Jacqueline E.; Routledge, Jacqueline; Burns, Meriel; Swindell, Rick; Davidson, Susan E.; Cowan, Richard A.; Logue, John P.; Wylie, James P.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the correlation between different general and organ specific quality of life and morbidity scoring methods in a cohort of men treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Men who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (50 Gy in 16 fractions over 21 days) for localized prostate cancer more than 3 years previously and who had no evidence of recurrent disease were invited to take part in the study. A total of 101 of 135 invited patients agreed and completed LENT/SOMA, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index, and 36 item RAND Health survey questionnaires. Results: The patients had comparable results with other published series with respect to the UCLA and SF-36 indices. There was significant correlation between the corresponding parts of the UCLA and LENT/SOMA scales (P<0.0005). However, for the same symptoms, a patient tended to score lower (worse) on the UCLA scale in comparison to LENT/SOMA. The relationship between the average LENT/SOMA score and maximum score was also not straightforward with each set of data revealing different information. Conclusions: The LENT/SOMA questions were, in the main, more wide-ranging and informative than the UCLA index. It is helpful to give both the overall and maximum LENT/SOMA scores to most efficiently use all of the data. There may need to be a further LENT/SOMA question to allow both symptoms of tenesmus and faecal urgency to be fully addressed

  19. Neoadjuvant twice daily chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer: Treatment-related mortality and long-term outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart E. Samuels, MD, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Neoadjuvant twice-daily chemoradiation for esophageal cancer is a safe and effective alternative to daily fractionation with low treatment-related mortality and long-term outcomes similar to standard fractionation courses.

  20. Study Regarding the Effectiveness of Manual Lymphatic Drainage in the Case of Patients with Breast Cancer that Present Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru MIOC; Corina PANTEA

    2013-01-01

    Lymphedema is defined as a persistent increase of tissue volume caused by the blocked or absent lymphatic drainage. The purpose of this study is to analyse the effectiveness of lymphatic drainage in the treatment of lymphedema after a mastectomy, with the aim of reducing the volume of the lymphedema and improving overall symptomatology, as well as providing information regarding the impact of this treatment on quality-of-life and the physical limitations of these patients. With these objectiv...

  1. THE REHABILITATION MANAGEMENT OF LYMPHEDEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OJOGA Florina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is an important pathology for rehabilitation medecine, especially for the patients who underwent a mastectomy for breast cancer. His frequency is higher when mastectomy is combined with lymph node disection and irradiation of the lymph nodes. Symptoms include heaviness, numbness, pain, stiffness and weakness in the affected limb. Complications of lymphedema include infections such as cellulitis, erysipelas and lymphangitis. Treatment must be instituted as soon as possible and preventive measures are essential. The rehabilitation treatment consists of skin care measures, manual lymphatic massage, elastic compression of the affected limb and kinetotherapy.

  2. Safety of weightlifting among women with or at risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema: musculoskeletal injuries and health care use in a weightlifting rehabilitation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C; Troxel, Andrea B; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    It has been noted that only 14% of all clinical trials are translated into practice. The objective of this paper is to promote translation of an efficacious rehabilitative exercise program for breast cancer survivors by clarifying for clinicians the safety profile of participants (e.g., rates of musculoskeletal injury and referral to medical professionals), and to use this evidence to make recommendations on the appropriate training of health and fitness staff who would be capable of safely, effectively, and sustainably delivering the program. Breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema were randomized to twice-weekly weightlifting or standard care for 1 year. An injury survey and health care evaluation were administered after 1 year and in 3-month intervals, respectively. The cumulative incidence and rate of injury were higher in the weightlifting than in the control group. The injury rates were 2.3 and 0.3 per 1,000 bouts of weightlifting among breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema, respectively. Among breast cancer survivors with or at risk for lymphedema, 20.9% in the weightlifting group had an encounter with a health care provider that required cessation or dose modification of weightlifting. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of weightlifting, musculoskeletal injuries and other health problems did occur. Therefore, for the successful translation of this rehabilitative intervention into clinical practice, health and fitness professionals working with breast cancer survivors need the knowledge, skills, and abilities that clarify their scope of practice to address these health care needs.

  3. Illustrating the (in)visible: Understanding the impact of loss in adults living with secondary lymphedema after cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roanne; Hamilton, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Life with a disability is often riddled with paradoxes, one of which is being visibly marked, while personal experiences, losses, and challenges remain hidden. Our article draws attention to this paradox among people who live with secondary lymphedema after cancer (SLC). SLC is a relatively unfamiliar chronic condition within medical and lay discourses of cancer, which proves challenging for the many cancer survivors who are in search of information and understanding. Thirteen men and women with SLC were recruited from two research sites (Fredericton, NB, and Ottawa, ON, Canada) to participate in semi-structured interviews about the physical and psychosocial aspects of SLC. Using a methodology of interpretive description, our analysis of participant interviews reveals the complex ways in which men and women felt both visible and invisible within various contexts. We discuss three majors themes: (in)visibility and appearance related to material losses; (in)visibility and action connected to visible losses in function, as well as invisible struggles to care for oneself; and the loss of present and future well-being, as SLC renders some limitations visible while potentially obscuring a hopeful future indefinitely. Our research indicates that timely diagnosis of SLC would be an immediate first step in recognizing the physical and emotional dimensions of the condition. To accomplish this, increased awareness is needed. To enhance quality of life for those living with SLC, the development of new resources and psychosocial supports is also required. PMID:25148936

  4. Voices from the Shadows: Living with Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridner, Sheila H.; Bonner, Candace M.; Deng, Jie; Sinclair, Vaughn G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer survivors with lymphedema face a lifetime of stressful physical and emotional symptoms and challenging self-care demands. An in-depth understanding of the perceptions and feelings surrounding life with lymphedema is critical to developing effective supportive care approaches. Objective To explore perceptions and feelings related to lymphedema in breast cancer survivors. Method The expressive writings of 39 individuals were evaluated for this descriptive qualitative study. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results Qualitative analyses produced four major themes: (1) marginalization and minimization; (2) multiplying losses; (3) yearning to return to normal; (4) uplifting resources. Sub-themes for each major theme were also identified. Conclusion The lymphedema experiences of breast cancer survivors reveal perceptions of marginalization from healthcare providers who are not well informed about lymphedema management and minimize its impact. Multiple distressing losses confront these patients on a daily basis, including body image disturbances, loss of functionality and control over time, permanent uncertainty, and adverse effects on relationships. The daily challenges of lymphedema often result in cumulative frustration and resentment that contribute to failure to perform self-care. Normalcy has been lost, never to return. These women find solace, encouragement and hope to meet the challenges of lymphedema through support from others and their spiritual beliefs. Implication for Practice Healthcare providers need greater awareness of the physical and psychosocial effects of lymphedema in breast cancer survivors. Nurses have unique opportunities to serve as advocates for reducing perceived marginalization and promoting effective self-care and other activities that promote psychological well-being and reduce physical deterioration. PMID:21558848

  5. Survivorship and the chronic cancer patient: Patterns in treatment-related effects, follow-up care, and use of survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Melissa A; Vachani, Carolyn C; Bach, Christina; Hampshire, Margaret K; Arnold-Korzeniowski, Karen; Metz, James M; Hill-Kayser, Christine E

    2017-11-01

    The survivorship needs of patients living with chronic cancer (CC) and their use of survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been overlooked and underappreciated. A convenience sample of 39,088 SCPs completed for cancer survivors with an Internet-based SCP tool was examined; it included 5847 CC survivors (15%; CC was defined as chronic leukemia and/or recurrent/metastatic cancer of another nature). Patient-reported treatment effects and follow-up care patterns were compared between CC survivors and survivors treated with curative intent (CI). Responses from a follow-up survey regarding SCP satisfaction and use were reviewed. CC survivors had greater odds of experiencing multiple treatment-related effects than survivors treated with CI; these effects included fatigue, cognitive changes, dyspnea, peripheral neuropathy, lymphedema, and erectile dysfunction. Nearly half of CC survivors were managed by an oncologist alone, and they were less likely than CI patients to be comanaged by a primary care provider and an oncologist. Fewer SCPs were generated by health care providers (HCPs) for CC survivors versus CI survivors. A smaller proportion of CC users versus CI users rated their experience and satisfaction with the SCP tool as very good or excellent, and CC users were less likely to share the HCP summary with their health care team. A substantial number of CC survivors, often considered incurable but treatable, seek survivorship support. Tools to facilitate participation, communication, and coordination of care are valuable for these patients, and future iterations of SCPs should be designed to address the particular circumstances of living with CC. Cancer 2017;123:4268-4276. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Fatores associados ao linfedema em pacientes com câncer de mama Associated factors of lymphedema in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Marta Ferreira de Paiva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar a prevalência e os fatores associados ao linfedema em pacientes com câncer de mama. MÉTODOS: este estudo de corte transversal incluiu 250 mulheres com mais de seis meses de tratamento para o câncer de mama, que compareceram ao Ambulatório de Mastologia e Oncologia para consulta de seguimento em um Centro de Referência em Oncologia, em Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais. Elas foram entrevistadas e submetidas à avaliação física. Foram colhidos dados de prontuário relacionados ao tratamento da neoplasia, à intervenção axilar e ao tumor. Diagnosticou-se linfedema quando a diferença entre os membros superiores foi maior ou igual a 2 cm pela perimetria. Os grupos de mulheres com e sem linfedema foram comparados em relação aos possíveis fatores de risco, e as medidas de tendência central, dispersão e prevalência foram obtidas admitindo o nível de significância de 95%. RESULTADOS: Cento e doze mulheres (44,8% apresentaram linfedema. Foi encontrada diferença significativa entre os grupos de mulheres com e sem linfedema em relação à mediana de linfonodos retirados (p=0,02; apresentação de trombose linfática superficial no braço homolateral à cirurgia (pPURPOSE: to determine the prevalence of lymphedema and its associated factors in breast cancer patients. METHODS: Two hundred and fifty women that had undergone more than six months of breast cancer treatment and were being treated at an oncology reference hospital in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil. They were interviewed and submitted to physical evaluation. Data from the patients' medical records regarding the treatment of breast cancer, the extent of axillary intervention and the tumor were analyzed. Lymphedema was diagnosed when the difference between both upper limbs was 2 cm or more by perimetry. The groups of women with and without lymphedema were compared regarding the possible risk factors, and central tendency, dispersion, and prevalence were

  7. Risk of treatment-related esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, L M; Gilbert, E S; Hall, P

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer may expose the esophagus to ionizing radiation, but no study has evaluated esophageal cancer risk after breast cancer associated with radiation dose or systemic therapy use.......Radiotherapy for breast cancer may expose the esophagus to ionizing radiation, but no study has evaluated esophageal cancer risk after breast cancer associated with radiation dose or systemic therapy use....

  8. Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chelsea; Sandler, Dale P; Weinberg, Clarice R; Houck, Kevin; Chunduri, Minal; Hodgson, M Elizabeth; Sabatino, Susan A; White, Mary C; Rodriguez, Juan L; Nichols, Hazel B

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify demographic and treatment-related factors associated with health-promoting behavior changes after a breast cancer diagnosis. Changes in health behaviors were also evaluated according to weight, exercise, diet and alcohol consumption patterns before breast cancer diagnosis. We examined self-reported behavior changes among 1415 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the NIEHS Sister Study cohort. Women reported changes in exercising, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol, smoking, getting enough sleep, spending time with family and friends, and participating in breast cancer awareness events. On average, women were 3.7 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. Overall, 20-36% reported positive changes in exercise, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, or alcohol consumption. However, 17% exercised less. With each 5-year increase in diagnosis age, women were 11-16% less likely to report positive change in each of these behaviors (OR = 0.84-0.89; p exercise, eating healthy foods, efforts to maintain a healthy weight, alcohol consumption, sleep patterns, or time spent with family or friends. Many women reported no change in cancer survivorship guideline-supported behaviors after diagnosis. Positive changes were more common among younger women or those who underwent chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Ravi A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Miller, Cynthia L. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Warren, Laura E.G. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE.

  10. Heavy resistance training and lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomquist, Kira; Karlsmark, Tonny; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge regarding progressive resistance training during adjuvant chemotherapy and the risk of developing breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Furthermore, no studies have investigated the safety of resistance training with heavy loads (> 80% 1 repetition maximum......) in this population. 'Body and Cancer' is a six-week, nine-hour weekly, supervised, multimodal exercise intervention utilizing progressive resistance training with heavy loads for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of BCRL in former participants......, and identify associations between progressive resistance training with heavy loads, and the development of BCRL. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a descriptive study. POPULATION: Women treated for breast cancer (n = 149), who had participated in the 'Body and Cancer' exercise intervention between 1 January 2010...

  11. Physical Therapy Intervention to Augment Outcomes Of Lymph Node Transfer Surgery for a Breast Cancer Survivor with Secondary Upper Extremity Lymphedema: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKey, Katelyn P; Alappattu, Meryl J

    Lymphedema is an incurable complication of breast cancer treatment that affects roughly 20 percent of women. It is often managed via complete decongestive therapy, which includes manual lymph drainage, therapeutic compression, skin care, and exercise. Lymph node transfer is a new and expensive surgical intervention that uses one's own lymph nodes and implants them in the affected upper extremity. Previous research has investigated augmenting lymph node transfer surgery with complete decongestive therapy, but there is a lack of evidence regarding the success of focusing lymph drainage against the normal pressure gradient toward a surgical flap located on the wrist. The patient's main motivation for the surgical intervention was to alleviate her daily burden of complete decongestive therapy. The purpose of this case report was to compare the methods and results of pre-surgical complete decongestive physical therapy to a post-operation modified approach that directed lymph fluid away from the major lymphatic ducts and instead toward a surgical flap on the wrist of a patient with lymphedema. A 65-year-old female presented with secondary upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Her circumferential measurements and L-Dex score corroborated this diagnosis, and she had functional deficits in upper extremity range of motion. She was seen for 10 visits of traditional complete decongestive therapy prior to her lymph node transfer surgery and 24 treatments of modified complete decongestive therapy over the course of six months following surgery. At six months, the patient had minor improvements in the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, range of motion, and upper extremity strength. However, her circumferential measurements and L-Dex scores showed a meaningful increase in limb girth. The patient's smallest upper extremity volumes were documented before the operation after two

  12. Effects of malnutrition on treatment-related morbidity and survival of children with cancer in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribnow, Allison K; Ortiz, Roberta; Báez, Luis Fulgencio; Mendieta, Luvy; Luna-Fineman, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    Most children with cancer live in resource-limited countries where malnutrition is often prevalent. We identified the relationship between malnutrition and treatment-related morbidity (TRM), abandonment of therapy, and survival of children with cancer in Nicaragua to better inform targeted nutritional interventions. We conducted a retrospective review of patients aged 6 months to 18 years with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), Wilms tumor, Hodgkin lymphoma, or Burkitt lymphoma (BL) who were treated between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2007 at Children's Hospital Manuel de Jesus Rivera in Managua, Nicaragua. Statistical analysis examined the relations among nutritional status and cancer type, risk category, TRM, and event-free survival (EFS). Sixty-seven percent of patients (189/282) were malnourished at diagnosis. Malnutrition was highest among patients with Wilms tumor (85.7%), BL (75%), and AML (74.3%). A total of 92.2% of patients (225/244) experienced morbidity during the first 90 days. Malnutrition was associated with severe infection (P = 0.033). Severely malnourished patients had ≥grade 3 TRM on more days (P = 0.023) and were more likely to experience severe TRM on >50% of days (P = 0.032; OR, 3.27 [95% CI, 1.05-10.16]). Malnourished patients had inferior median EFS (2.25 vs. 5.58 years; P = 0.049), and abandoned therapy more frequently (P = 0.015). In Nicaragua, pediatric oncology patients with malnutrition at diagnosis experienced increased TRM, abandoned therapy more frequently, and had inferior EFS. Standardized nutritional evaluation of patients with newly diagnosed cancer and targeted provision of nutritional support are essential to decrease TRM and improve outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Catechol-O-methyltransferase genotype modulates cancer treatment-related cognitive deficits in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Brent J; Rawson, Kerri Sharp; Walsh, Erin; Jim, Heather S L; Hughes, Tiffany F; Iser, Lindsay; Andrykowski, Michael A; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2011-04-01

    Recent attention has focused on the negative effects of chemotherapy on the cognitive performance of cancer survivors. The current study examined modification of this risk by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype based on evidence in adult populations that the presence of a Val allele is associated with poorer cognitive performance. Breast cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy (n = 58), and/or chemotherapy (n = 72), and 204 healthy controls (HCs) completed tests of cognitive performance and provided saliva for COMT genotyping. COMT genotype was divided into Val carriers (Val+; Val/Val, Val/Met) or COMT-Met homozygote carriers (Met; Met/Met). COMT-Val+ carriers performed more poorly on tests of attention, verbal fluency, and motor speed relative to COMT-Met homozygotes. Moreover, COMT-Val+ carriers treated with chemotherapy performed more poorly on tests of attention relative to HC group members who were also Val+ carriers. The results suggest that persons treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer who also possess the COMT-Val gene are susceptible to negative effects on their cognitive health. This research is important because it strives to understand the factors that predispose some cancer survivors to more negative quality-of-life outcomes. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  14. Concurrent AURKA and MYCN Gene Amplifications Are Harbingers of Lethal TreatmentRelated Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Mosquera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC, also referred to as anaplastic prostate cancer, is a lethal tumor that most commonly arises in late stages of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCA with predilection to metastasize to visceral organs. In the current study, we explore for evidence that Aurora kinase A (AURKA and N-myc (MYCN gene abnormalities are harbingers of treatment-related NEPC (t-NEPC. We studied primary prostate tissue from 15 hormone naïve PCAs, 51 castration-resistant prostate cancers, and 15 metastatic tumors from 72 patients at different stages of disease progression to t-NEPC, some with multiple specimens. Histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed and correlated with clinical variables. AURKA amplification was identified in overall 65% of PCAs (hormone naïve and treated from patients that developed t-NEPC and in 86% of metastases. Concurrent amplification of MYCN was present in 70% of primary PCAs, 69% of treated PCAs, and 83% of metastases. In contrast, in an unselected PCA cohort, AURKA and MYCN amplifications were identified in only 5% of 169 cases. When metastatic t-NEPC was compared to primary PCA from the same patients, there was 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement, 100% concordance of AURKA amplification, and 60% concordance of MYCN amplification. In tumors with mixed features, there was also 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement and 94% concordance of AURKA and MYCN co-amplification between areas of NEPC and adenocarcinoma. AURKA and MYCN amplifications may be prognostic and predictive biomarkers, as they are harbingers of tumors at risk of progressing to t-NEPC after hormonal therapy.

  15. Race or Resource? BMI, Race, and Other Social Factors as Risk Factors for Interlimb Differences among Overweight Breast Cancer Survivors with Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine T. Dean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High BMI is a risk factor for upper body breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL onset. Black cancer survivors are more likely to have high BMI than White cancer survivors. While observational analyses suggest up to 2.2 times increased risk of BCRL onset for Black breast cancer survivors, no studies have explored race or other social factors that may affect BCRL severity, operationalized by interlimb volume difference (ILD. Materials and Methods. ILD was measured by perometry for 296 overweight (25 > BMI 6 months from treatment in the WISER Survivor trial. Multivariable linear regression examined associations between social and physical factors and ILD. Results. Neither Black race (−0.26, p=0.89 nor BMI (0.22, p=0.10 was associated with ILD. Attending college (−4.89, p=0.03 was the strongest factor associated with ILD, followed by having more lymph nodes removed (4.75, p=0.01, >25% BCRL care adherence (4.10, p=0.01, and years since treatment (0.55, p<0.001. Discussion. Neither race nor BMI was associated with ILD among overweight cancer survivors. Education, a proxy for resource level, was the strongest factor associated with greater ILD. Tailoring physical activity and weight loss interventions designed to address BCRL severity by resource rather than race should be considered.

  16. Ethnodrama: An Innovative Knowledge Translation Tool in the Management of Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Shahid; Quinlan, Elizabeth; McMullen, Linda; Thomas, Roanne; Fichtner, Pam; Block, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lymphedema can cause significant physical impairment and quality-of-life issues. Yet there is a gap in knowledge about lymphedema among breast cancer survivors (BCS), and health care professionals (HCP). Ethnodrama is an innovative knowledge translation strategy that uses theatrical performances for dissemination of research results. We evaluated the impact of live ethnodrama on HCP' and BCS' awareness and attitudes in relation to impact of lymphedema on BCS' lives. Methods: Ethno...

  17. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurred during postoperative radiotherapy in a cancer patient with preexisting lymphedema and chronic illness -case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong; Kim, Dong Min [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    A case is reported of a man with malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) in right thigh who developed streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during postoperative radiotherapy. Before radiotherapy, a patient complained wax and wane lymphedema following wide excision of tumor mass which was confirmed as MFH. He took some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) for about one month. He suffered preexisting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, diabetes and well-controlled hypertension. The patient received conventional radiotherapy to right thigh with a total dose of 32.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day. At last radiotherapy fraction, cutaneous erythematous inflammation was suddenly developed at his affected thigh. At that time, he also complained of oliguria, fever and chills. The patient was consulted to internal medicine for adequate evaluation and management. The patient was diagnosed as suggested septic shock and admitted without delay. At admission, he showed hypotension, oliguria, constipation, abnormal renal and liver function. As a result of blood culture, Streptococcus pyogenes was detected. The patient was diagnosed to STSS. He was treated with adequate intravenous antibiotics and fluid support. STSS is one of oncologic emergencies and requires immediate medical intervention to prevent loss of life. In this patient, underlying HCV infection, postoperative lymphedema, prolonged NSAID medication, and radiotherapy may have been multiple precipitating factors of STSS.

  18. The effectiveness of a clinical and home-based physical activity program and simple lymphatic drainage in the prevention of breast cancer-related lymphedema: A prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez, Ayşe Arıkan; Kapucu, Sevgisun

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a clinical and home-based, nurse-led physical activity program (PAP) and simple lymphatic drainage (SLD) in the prevention of breast cancer-related lymphedema. A total of 52 breast cancer patients were randomized to either a PAP and SLD program (n = 25) or a control group (n = 27). Patients in both groups were also provided training for lymphedema. The PAP and SLD were administered through home visits by the investigators, twice a week for six weeks, in the intervention group. The control group did not undergo intervention. The circumference of the upper extremity, symptom severity, and physical function were measured in both groups. The upper extremity circumference increased by about two times from the baseline, in the control group, especially in the sixth week (p breast cancer surgery, starting from before surgery and continuing until after, to prevent breast cancer-related lymphedema. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lymphedema Risk Reduction Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Question Corner (68) Research (38) Insurance (46) Inspirational Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (174) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) FOLLOW US! Sign up for our mailing list. twitter Facebook LinkedIn Copyright ©2018 National Lymphedema Network ...

  20. Management of treatment-related toxicities in advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Marcia S; Bible, Keith C; Chow, Laura Q M; Gilbert, Jill; Grande, Carolyn; Worden, Francis; Haddad, Robert

    2018-04-22

    Progress in the treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) has resulted from the approval of 2 drugs within the past 5 years, vandetanib and cabozantinib. These multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) possess overlapping specificities for multiple kinase targets implicated in the progression of MTC. Both drugs are associated with toxicities, including hypertension, hemorrhage/perforation, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal events, several dermatologic events, and hypothyroidism. In addition, vandetanib is uniquely associated with QTc prolongation through interaction with myocardial potassium channels, and cabozantinib is uniquely associated with hand-foot skin reaction. Treatment-related toxicities occur frequently and can be severe or life-threatening, and patients undergoing long-term treatment will likely experience adverse events (AEs). Here we offer specific practical recommendations for managing AEs commonly occurring with vandetanib and cabozantinib. The recommended approach relies on early recognition and palliation of symptoms, dose interruption, and dose reduction as necessary in order for the patient to maintain the highest tolerable dose for as long as possible and optimal quality of life. Treatment guidelines do not specify a recommended sequence for treating with vandetanib and cabozantinib; however, most patients will receive both drugs during their lifetime. The choice for first-line therapy is individualized after a risk-benefit assessment and depends on physician preference and patient-related factors, such as comorbid conditions. Because most generalist practices may not be familiar with the intricacies of agents such as vandetanib and cabozantinib, we commend that patients with advanced MTC be managed and treated by a thyroid cancer specialist with coordination of care within a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Lymphedema secondary to filariasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.C.; Humphrey, G.B.; Basmadjian, G.

    1985-01-01

    A 1-year-old immunodeficient boy developed brawny edema of the left foot. Lymphoscintigraphy revealed no evidence of left inguinal activity following pedal injection of Tc-99m-Sn phosphate. Over the next two months, the patient developed lymphedema on the right and repeat scintigraphy demonstrated no movement of isotope from the dorsum of either foot. Subsequent studies identified microfilaria in a nocturnal blood smear, which were thought to represent Brugia beaveri acquired by mosquito transmission in Oklahoma

  2. Fatores de risco para linfedema após câncer de mama: uma revisão da literatura Risk factors of arm lymphedema after breast cancer: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Bergmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O linfedema representa uma das principais seqüelas do câncer de mama. Esta revisão da literatura visou discutir os principais fatores associados ao linfedema após o tratamento do câncer de mama. Foram selecionados 26 artigos publicados entre janeiro de 2000 e março de 2008 nas bases Medline e Lilacs, utilizando os descritores breast neoplasms, lymphedema, upper extremity, arm e risk factors. Sua revisão permitiu discutir os fatores relacionados ao linfedema, quanto a: clínica e paciente (tabagismo, escolaridade, etnia, comorbidades, hipertensão arterial, diabetes melito, menopausa, idade, peso corporal, índice de massa corporal, atividade física, membro dominante, restrição articular, infecção, seroma e trauma no membro superior; tratamento do câncer de mama (cirurgia, reconstrução mamária, número de linfonodos retirados, nível da linfadenectomia axilar, radioterapia, quimioterapia, hormonioterapia e tempo transcorrido após o tratamento; tumor (tamanho, grau, localização, comprometimento dos linfonodos axilares e estadiamento. A revisão feita indica que a linfadenectomia axilar, a radioterapia em cadeias de drenagem e a obesidade são fatores preponderantes do risco para desenvolvimento do linfedema.Arm lymphedema is one of the most frequent sequelae of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this literature review was to discuss main risk factors of lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. The search in Medline and Lilacs databases, by means of key words breast neoplasms, lymphedema, upper extremity, arm, and risk factors, allowed selecting 26 studies published between January, 2000, and March, 2008. This review discusses factors linked to: clinic and the patient (smoking, education level, race/ethnicity, comorbidity, hypertension, diabetes, menopause, age, weight, body mass index, physical activity, handedness, impaired range of motion, infection, seroma and arm injuries; breast cancer treatment (type of surgery

  3. The association of long-term treatment-related side effects with cancer-specific and general quality of life among prostate cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kimberly M; Kelly, Scott P; Luta, George; Tomko, Catherine; Miller, Anthony B; Taylor, Kathryn L

    2014-08-01

    To examine the association between treatment-related side effects and cancer-specific and general quality of life (QOL) among long-term prostate cancer survivors. Within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, we conducted telephone interviews with prostate cancer survivors (N = 518) who were 5-10 years after diagnosis. We assessed demographic and clinical information, sexual, urinary, and bowel treatment-related side effects (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite), cancer-specific QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--total score), and general QOL (the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12's physical and mental subscales). Participants were aged 74.6 years on average, primarily White (88.4%), and married (81.7%). Pearson correlation coefficients between the 3 treatment-related side effect domains (urinary, sexual, and bowel) and QOL ranged between 0.14 and 0.42 (P functioning and greater bowel side effects were independently associated with poorer cancer-specific QOL (P functions were also associated with poorer general QOL on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12's physical component summary and mental component summary (P side effects demonstrated the strongest association with all QOL outcomes. Treatment-related side effects persisted for up to 10 years after diagnosis and continued to be associated with men's QOL. These results suggest that each of the treatment-related side effects was independently associated with cancer-specific QOL. Compared with the other Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite domains, bowel side effects had the strongest association with cancer-specific and general QOL. These associations emphasize the tremendous impact that bowel side effects continue to have for men many years after their initial diagnosis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Treatment related impairments in arm and shoulder in patients with breast cancer: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, J.T.; Beurskens, C.H.G.; Wees, P.J. van der; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women in the developed world. As a result of breast cancer treatment, many patients suffer from serious complaints in their arm and shoulder, leading to limitations in activities of daily living and participation. In this systematic

  5. Treatment related impairments in arm and shoulder in patients with breast cancer: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, Janine T.; Beurskens, Carien H. G.; van der Wees, Philip J.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women in the developed world. As a result of breast cancer treatment, many patients suffer from serious complaints in their arm and shoulder, leading to limitations in activities of daily living and participation. In this systematic literature

  6. Rural Disparities in Treatment-Related Financial Hardship and Adherence to Surveillance Colonoscopy in Diverse Colorectal Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Jean A; Banegas, Matthew P; Wiggins, Charles L; Chiu, Vi K; Rajput, Ashwani; Kinney, Anita Y

    2018-03-28

    Cancer survivors increasingly report financial hardship as a consequence of the high cost of cancer care, yet the financial experience of rural cancer survivors remains largely unstudied. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential rural disparities in the likelihood of financial hardship and nonadherence to surveillance colonoscopy. Individuals diagnosed with localized or regional colorectal cancer (CRC) between 2004-2012 were ascertained by the population-based New Mexico Tumor Registry. Participants completed a mailed questionnaire or telephone survey about their CRC survivorship experience, including treatment-related financial hardship and receipt of surveillance colonoscopy. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Compared to urban CRC survivors (n=168), rural CRC survivors (n=109) were slightly older, more likely to be married (65% v. 59%) and have an annual income financial hardship (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.06-3.28) and nonadherence to surveillance colonoscopy guidelines (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.07-4.85). In addition, financial hardship was independently associated with nonadherence to surveillance colonoscopy (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.01-4.85). Substantial rural disparities in the likelihood of financial hardship and nonadherence to surveillance colonoscopy exist. Treatment-related financial hardship among rural CRC survivors may negatively impact adherence to guideline recommended follow-up care. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Risk Factors Affecting Breast Cancer-related Lymphedema: Serial Body Weight Change During Neoadjuvant Anthracycline Plus Cyclophosphamide Followed by Taxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungmin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Yu, Jonghan; Paik, Hyun-June; Ryu, Jai Min; Kim, Isaac; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Kang, Eunyoung; Yang, Eun Joo

    2018-02-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the risk of lymphedema (LE) according to the clinicopathologic factors and to investigate the serial change in body weight during neoadjuvant anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide followed by taxane and its correlation with the incidence of LE. We performed a retrospective 2-center study of 406 patients who had undergone neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by surgery from 2007 to 2014. The regimen included 4 cycles of anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide, followed by 4 cycles of taxane. We investigated the presence and degree of LE using a telephone questionnaire assessment. Weight changes were calculated at each cycle of NAC, and the baseline and preoperative body weights were used to calculate the rate of change to account for the change in weight before and after NAC. Of the 406 patients, 270 answered the questionnaires, of whom 97 (35.9%) experienced LE. The increase in body weight was significant during the 4 cycles of taxane, but the change in weight was not significant during the 4 cycles of anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide. The change in body weight was most significant just after the fourth cycle of taxane (P weight was not a significant factor for the incidence of LE. Because a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 was an independent factor of LE occurrence on multivariate analysis, patients with a preoperative BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 should be closely monitored for LE given their increased risk, and monitoring and education should be initiated before surgery and continued throughout the course of NAC. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impact of Exercise on Cancer Mortality, Recurrence, and Treatment-Related Adverse Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; Zopf, Eva M; Zhang, Xiaochen; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2017-01-01

    The combination of an increasing number of new cancer cases and improving survival rates has led to a large and rapidly growing population with unique health-care requirements. Exercise has been proposed as a strategy to help address the issues faced by cancer patients. Supported by a growing body of research, major health organizations commonly identify the importance of incorporating exercise in cancer care and advise patients to be physically active. This systematic review comprehensively summarizes the available epidemiologic and randomized controlled trial evidence investigating the role of exercise in the management of cancer. Literature searches focused on determining the potential impact of exercise on 1) cancer mortality and recurrence and 2) adverse effects of cancer and its treatment. A total of 100 studies were reviewed involving thousands of individual patients whose exercise behavior was assessed following the diagnosis of any type of cancer. Compared with patients who performed no/less exercise, patients who exercised following a diagnosis of cancer were observed to have a lower relative risk of cancer mortality and recurrence and experienced fewer/less severe adverse effects. The findings of this review support the view that exercise is an important adjunct therapy in the management of cancer. Implications on cancer care policy and practice are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Measurement Properties of Instruments for Measuring of Lymphedema: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Janine T; Viehoff, Peter B; Beurskens, Carien H G; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; van der Wees, Philip J

    2016-12-01

    Lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment, resulting in swelling and subjective symptoms. Reliable and valid measurement of this side effect of medical treatment is important. The purpose of this study was to provide best evidence regarding which measurement instruments are most appropriate in measuring lymphedema in its different stages. The PubMed and Web of Science databases were used, and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. Clinical studies on measurement instruments assessing lymphedema were reviewed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) scoring instrument for quality assessment. Data on reliability, concurrent validity, convergent validity, sensitivity, specificity, applicability, and costs were extracted. Pooled data showed good intrarater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) (.89) for bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) in the lower extremities and high intrarater and interrater ICCs for water volumetry, tape measurement, and perometry (.98-.99) in the upper extremities. In the upper extremities, the standard error of measurement was 3.6% (σ=0.7%) for water volumetry, 5.6% (σ=2.1%) for perometry, and 6.6% (σ=2.6%) for tape measurement. Sensitivity of tape measurement in the upper extremities, using different cutoff points, varied from 0.73 to 0.90, and specificity values varied from 0.72 to 0.78. No uniform definition of lymphedema was available, and a gold standard as a reference test was lacking. Items concerning risk of bias were study design, patient selection, description of lymphedema, blinding of test outcomes, and number of included participants. Measurement instruments with evidence for good reliability and validity were BIS, water volumetry, tape measurement, and perometry, where BIS can detect alterations in extracellular fluid in stage 1 lymphedema and the other measurement instruments can detect alterations in volume

  10. The Effect of Yoga on Arm Volume, Strength, and Range of Motion in Women at Risk for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Melissa; Lee, Jeannette Q; Peled, Anne; Zerzan, Sarah; Irwin, Chetan; Chesney, Margaret A; Serrurier, Katherine; Sbitany, Hani; Dhruva, Anand; Sacks, Devorah; Smoot, Betty

    2018-02-01

    To assess the feasibility, safety, and initial estimates of efficacy of a yoga program in postoperative care for women at high risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Single-group pretest-post-test design. Patients were recruited from the University of California, San Francisco Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center. Twenty-one women were enrolled in the study. Women were >18 years of age, had undergone surgical treatment for breast cancer, and were at high risk for BCRL. The women participated in an Ashtanga yoga intervention for 8 weeks. Sessions consisted of once/week instructor-led practice and once/week home practice. Particular attention was given to poses that emphasized upper body strength and flexibility, while avoiding significant time with the upper extremity (UE) in a dependent position. UE volume was assessed through circumferential forearm measurement, which was converted to volume using the formula for a truncated cone. Range of motion (ROM) was assessed for the shoulders, elbows, and wrists, using a standard goniometer. UE strength was assessed for shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist flexion, and grip using a dynamometer. Twenty women completed the yoga intervention, with 17 returning for final assessment. Mean age was 52 (±9.1) years and body mass index was 24.8 (±5.1) kg/m 2 . Postintervention, mean volume in the at-risk UE was slightly reduced (p = 0.397). ROM for shoulder flexion (p yoga is feasible and safe for women who are at risk for BCRL and may result in small improvements in shoulder ROM and UE strength.

  11. Surgical treatment of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modolin, Miguel; Mitre, Anuar Ibrahim; da Silva, José Carlos Faes; Cintra, Wilson; Quagliano, Ana Paula; Arap, Sami; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2006-08-01

    Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum, regardless of its etiology, is determined by reduced lymphatic flow with subsequent enlargement of the penis and scrotum. The clinical course of this condition is characterized by extreme discomfort for patients, with limitation of local hygiene, ambulation, sexual intercourse, and voiding in the standing position. The purpose of the present study is to present the experience and results of the treatment of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum by removing affected tissues and correcting the penoscrotal region. Seventeen patients with lymphedema of the penis and scrotum were treated with a modified Charles procedure, which consists of the excision of the affected skin followed by scrotoplasty and midline suture simulating the scrotal raphe. The penis is covered with a split-thickness skin graft by means of a zigzag suture on its ventral surface. Regression of symptoms and improvement of previous clinical conditions were verified in the follow-up which ranged from 6 months to 6 years. One patient who had undergone lymphadenectomy with radiation therapy due to penile cancer had recurrent scrotum lymphedema. The modified Charles procedure for the treatment of penoscrotal lymphedema is easily reproducible and allows better local hygiene, easier ambulation, voiding in the standing position, resuming sexual intercourse, and finally, better cosmetic results in the affected area with remarkable improvement in quality of life.

  12. Treatment-related amenorrhea and sexual functioning in young breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Shoshana M; Tamimi, Rulla M; Gelber, Shari; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Bober, Sharon L; Kereakoglow, Sandra; Borges, Virginia F; Come, Steven E; Schapira, Lidia; Partridge, Ann H

    2014-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a known complication of adjuvant therapy for breast cancer and an important determinant of quality of life. However, few studies have explored how treatment and other factors affect sexual functioning in young breast cancer survivors. Four hundred sixty-one premenopausal women with stage 0 through III breast cancer were surveyed an average of 1 year after diagnosis as part of a prospective cohort study of women who were aged ≤40 years at diagnosis. Sexual interest and dysfunction were assessed using the Cancer Rehabilitation Evaluation System (CARES). Mean CARES scores were compared and multiple regression models were fit to assess treatment and a range of menopausal and somatic symptoms in relation to sexual functioning. Mean CARES sexual interest and dysfunction scores were both highest (indicating poorer functioning) among women who received chemotherapy and were amenorrheic from treatment. After accounting for menopausal and somatic symptoms, treatment-associated amenorrhea remained associated with decreased interest but was no longer an independent predictor of dysfunction. In the multivariable analysis, independent predictors of dysfunction included vaginal pain symptoms, poorer body image, and fatigue. Sexual interest was associated with vaginal pain symptoms, body image, and weight problems. Factors associated with decreased sexual functioning in young breast cancer survivors can often be ameliorated. The current findings have implications for premenopausal women with other types of cancer who might be experiencing amenorrhea because of chemotherapy or surgery. Increased awareness and early intervention is essential to help improve sexual functioning and associated quality of life for all young cancer survivors. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  13. The effect of cigarette smoking on cancer treatment-related side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppone, Luke J; Mustian, Karen M; Morrow, Gary R; Dozier, Ann M; Ossip, Deborah J; Janelsins, Michelle C; Sprod, Lisa K; McIntosh, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has long been implicated in cancer development and survival. However, few studies have investigated the impact of smoking on symptom burden in cancer survivors during treatment and at survivorship stage. This study examines the influence of cigarette smoking on side effects among 947 cancer patients during and 6 months following treatment. Patients diagnosed with cancer and scheduled to receive chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy reported on current smoking status (yes, no) and total symptom burden [the sum of 12 common symptoms (fatigue, hair loss, memory, nausea, depression, sleep, pain, concentration, hot flashes, weight loss, skin problems, and dyspnea) scored on an 11-point scale ranging from 0 = "not present" to 10 = "as bad as you can imagine"] during treatment and at 6-month follow-up. The adjusted mean total symptom burden by smoking status was determined by analysis of covariance controlling for age, gender, race, education, occupation, treatment, cancer site, and Karnofsky performance score. During treatment, smokers (S) had a significantly higher total symptom burden than nonsmokers (NS) (S = 46.3 vs. NS = 41.2; p < 0.05). At 6-month follow-up, smokers continued to report a higher total symptom burden than nonsmokers (S = 27.7 vs. NS = 21.9; p < 0.05). Participants who quit smoking before treatment levels had a total symptom burden similar to nonsmokers. Smoking was associated with an increased symptom burden during and following treatments for cancer. Targeted cessation efforts for smokers to decrease symptom burden may limit the likelihood of treatment interruptions and increase quality of life following treatment.

  14. Measurement Properties of Instruments for Measuring of Lymphedema: Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, J.T.; Viehoff, P.B.; Beurskens, C.H.G.; Laarhoven, H.W. van; Sanden, M.W. van der; Wees, P.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment, resulting in swelling and subjective symptoms. Reliable and valid measurement of this side effect of medical treatment is important. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to provide best evidence regarding which measurement

  15. Treatment-related cardiovascular late effects and exercise training countermeasures in testicular germ cell cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Bandak, Mikkel; Campbell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of testicular germ cell cancer constitutes a major success story in modern oncology. Today, the vast majority of patients are cured by a therapeutic strategy using one or more highly effective components including surgery (orchiectomy), radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy...

  16. Treatment-related survival associations of claudin-2 expression in fibroblasts of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezheyeuski, Artur; Strell, Carina; Hrynchyk, Ina

    2018-01-01

    Claudin-2 is a trans-membrane protein—component of tight junctions in epithelial cells. Elevated claudin-2 expression has been reported in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression patterns of claudin-2 in human CRC samples and analyze its association...... with clinical characteristics and treatment outcome. TMAs of primary tumors from two cohorts of metastatic CRC (mCRC) were used. Claudin-2 IHC staining was evaluated in a semi-quantitative manner in different regions and cell types. Claudin-2 expression was also analyzed by immunofluorescence in primary...... cultures of human CRC cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Initial analyses identified previously unrecognized expression patterns of claudin-2 in CAFs of human CRC. Claudin-2 expression in CAFs of the invasive margin was associated with shorter progression-free survival. Subgroup analyses demonstrated...

  17. Risk factors for treatment-related adverse events in cancer-bearing dogs receiving piroxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichstadt, L R; Moore, G E; Childress, M O

    2017-12-01

    Piroxicam has antitumour effects in dogs with cancer, although side effects may limit its use. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively identify factors predisposing cancer-bearing dogs to adverse events (AEs) following piroxicam therapy. Medical records of dogs presented to the Purdue Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed, and 137 dogs met the criteria for study inclusion. Toxic effects of piroxicam in these dogs were graded according to an established system. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the extent to which certain factors affected the risk for AEs. Age [odds ratio (OR) 1.250, P = 0.009; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.057-1.479] and concurrent use of gastroprotectant medications (OR 2.612, P = 0.025; 95% CI 1.127-6.056) significantly increased the risk for gastrointestinal AEs. The results of this study may help inform the risk versus benefit calculation for clinicians considering the use of piroxicam to treat dogs with cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prospective Lymphedema Surveillance in a Clinic Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Chance-Hetzler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The potential impact of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE is quite extensive, yet it often remains under-diagnosed until the later stages. This project examines the effectiveness of prospective surveillance in post-surgical breast cancer patients. A retrospective analysis of 49 out of 100 patients enrolled in a longitudinal prospective study at a Midwestern breast center evaluates: (1 time required for completion of bilateral limb measurements and Lymphedema Breast Cancer Questionnaire (LBCQ; (2 referral to LE management with limb volume increase (LVI and/or LBCQ symptoms; and (3 cost of LE management at lower LVI (≥5%–≤10% versus traditional (≥10%. Findings revealed a visit timeframe mean of 40.3 min (range = 25–60; 43.6% of visits were ≤30-min timeframe. Visit and measurement times decreased as clinic staff gained measurement experience; measurement time mean was 17.9 min (range = 16.9–18.9. LBCQ symptoms and LVI were significantly (p < 0.001 correlated to LE referral; six of the nine patients referred (67% displayed both LBCQ symptoms/LVI. Visits with no symptoms reported did not result in referral, demonstrating the importance of using both indicators when assessing early LE. Lower threshold referral provides compelling evidence of potential cost savings over traditional threshold referral with reported costs of: $3755.00 and $6353.00, respectively (40.9% savings.

  19. Treatment related changes of the serum epidermal growth factor receptor in advanced colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, K G; Aalund Olsen, Dorte; Brandslund, I

    2009-01-01

    ) in rectal cancer patients and third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan (CETIRI) in advanced disease, to elucidate the predictive or prognostic value in these settings. METHODS: We included 126 healthy controls and 118 patients with chemorefractory mCRC treated with cetuximab (initial 400/m(2) mg...... followed by weekly 250mg/m(2)) and irinotecan (350 mg/m(2) q3w). Response was evaluated according to RECIST. Furthermore, 114 patients with locally advanced rectal tumours were treated with CRT (60 Gy/30 fractions and concomitant uftoral (300 mg/m(2))/leukovorin (22.5 mg) on treatment days, followed...... by surgery 8 weeks post-treatment and pathological tumour regression evaluation. Pre-treatment and consecutive samples were drawn at each visit. sEGFR was measured by ELISA. Median statistics and Kaplain-Mayer curves with log-rank testing for comparison of survival rates were performed. RESULTS: There were...

  20. Practices in management of cancer treatment-related cardiovascular toxicity: A cardio-oncology survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovenaux, Ludovic; Cautela, Jennifer; Resseguier, Noemie; Pibarot, Michele; Taouqi, Myriam; Orabona, Morgane; Pinto, Johan; Peyrol, Michael; Barraud, Jeremie; Laine, Marc; Bonello, Laurent; Paganelli, Franck; Barlesi, Fabrice; Thuny, Franck

    2017-08-15

    Cardiovascular toxicity has become a challenging issue during cancer therapy. Nonetheless, there is a lack of consensual guidelines for their management. We aimed to determine the current practices of oncologists regarding cardiovascular toxicity related to anthracyclines, trastuzumab and angiogenic inhibitors and to gather their opinions on the development of cardio-oncology programs. A cross-sectional declarative study was submitted to French oncologists in the form of an individual, structured questionnaire. A total of 303 oncologists responded to the survey. Ninety-nine percent of oncologists prescribed cardiotoxic therapies, including anthracyclines (83%), trastuzumab (51%) and other angiogenic inhibitors (64%). The method adopted for managing cardiovascular toxicity was based on guidelines from expert oncology societies for only 35% of oncologists. None was aware of recommendations from expert cardiology societies. Prescription of pre-, peri- and post-therapy cardiovascular assessment was inconsistent and significantly less frequent for all classes of angiogenic inhibitors than for anthracyclines and trastuzumab (Poncology programs development. Practices of oncologists are disparate in the field of cardiovascular toxicity. This finding underlines the complexity of managing many different situations and the need for distribution of formal guidelines from oncology and cardiology expert societies. The development of personalized cardio-oncology programs seems essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality of life, urogynecological morbidity, and lymphedema after radical vaginal trachelectomy for early-stage cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøding, Ligita Paskeviciute; Ottosen, Christian; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Radical vaginal trachelectomy (RVT) offers a possibility for future childbearing for young women with early-stage cervical cancer. However, the literature on quality of life and self-reported morbidity in patients undergoing RVT is scarce. The aim of this study was to prospectively...

  2. Three cases of thyroid cancer following the diagnosis of testicular cancer: treatment-related complication or genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulou, Pavlina; Bowers, Sarah Pauline; Gibson, Sarah; White, Jeff; Reed, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that the incidence of second primary thyroid cancer in subjects diagnosed and treated for testicular cancer is raised. This finding is strongly associated to treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy and it is explained by their mutagenic effect. On the other hand, inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes inducing both testicular and thyroid cancers denote that these tumours might share common genomic aberrations. We herein present our experience with three cases of metachronous development of thyroid cancer after diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer in our tertiary cancer centre. Our case report contributes to the limited available literature on such findings and aims to raise awareness of the cancer physicians treating these particular tumour types. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Intensive treatment of leg lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy Jose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite of all the problems caused by lymphedema, this disease continues to affect millions of people worldwide. Thus, the identification of the most efficacious forms of treatment is necessary. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel intensive outpatient treatment for leg lymphedema. Methods: Twenty-three legs of 19 patients were evaluated in a prospective randomized study. The inclusion criteria were patients with Grade II and III lymphedema, where the difference, measured by volumetry, between the affected limb below the knee and the healthy limb was greater than 1.5 kg. Intensive treatment was carried out for 6- to 8-h sessions in the outpatient clinic. Analysis of variance was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (P-value < 0.05 being considered significant. Results: All limbs had significant reductions in size with the final mean loss being 81.1% of the volume of edema. The greatest losses occurred in the first week (P-value < 0.001. Losses of more than 90% of the lymphedema occurred in 9 (39.13% patients; losses of more than 80% in 13 (56.52%, losses of more than 70% in 17 (73.91% and losses of more than 50% were recorded for 95.65% of the patients; only 1 patient lost less than 50% (37.9% of the edema. Conclusion: The intensive treatment of lymphedema in the outpatient clinic can produce significant reductions in the volume of edema over a short period of time and can be recommended for any grade of lymphedema, in particular the more advanced degrees.

  4. A randomized cross-over trial to detect differences in arm volume after low- and heavy-load resistance exercise among patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer at risk for arm lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomquist, Kira; Hayes, Sandi; Adamsen, Lis

    2016-01-01

    changes after resistance exercise with heavy loads in this population. The purpose of this study is to determine acute changes in arm volume after a session of low- and heavy-load resistance exercise among women undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer at risk for arm lymphedema. METHODS....../DESIGN: This is a randomized cross-over trial. PARTICIPANTS: Women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer who have undergone axillary lymph node dissection will be recruited from rehabilitation centers in the Copenhagen area. INTERVENTION: Participants will be randomly assigned to engage in a low- (two sets of 15...... was calculated based on changes in L-Dex scores between baseline and 72-hours post exercise sessions. DISCUSSION: Findings from this study are relevant for exercise prescription guidelines, as well as recommendations regarding participating in activities of daily living for women following surgery for breast...

  5. Isolated primary lymphedema tarda of the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Farzaneh; Ravari, Hasan; Kazemzadeh, Gholamhossein; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2013-03-01

    Primary lymphedema tarda is considered as a congenital disease with late presentation. Primary lymphedema tarda usually affects lower limbs, and primary lymphedema tarda of the upper limbs usually accompanies lower limb lymphedema. In the current case report, we present an 80-year-old male patient with isolated left upper limb swelling that lymphoscintigraphy imaging proved to be lymphedema.

  6. Ethnodrama: An Innovative Knowledge Translation Tool in the Management of Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Quinlan, Elizabeth; McMullen, Linda; Thomas, Roanne; Fichtner, Pam; Block, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema can cause significant physical impairment and quality-of-life issues. Yet there is a gap in knowledge about lymphedema among breast cancer survivors (BCS), and health care professionals (HCP). Ethnodrama is an innovative knowledge translation strategy that uses theatrical performances for dissemination of research results. We evaluated the impact of live ethnodrama on HCP' and BCS' awareness and attitudes in relation to impact of lymphedema on BCS' lives. Ethnodrama performances were developed by script writers and a theatre director in collaboration with the investigators and BCS using data from published research and pre-performances workshops. Six interactive live performances were given to audiences of BCS, HCP, and community members in four cities across Canada. After watching these live performances, members of the audiences were asked to complete a paper-based questionnaire regarding their knowledge of lymphedema, and their attitudes and practices toward lymphedema. Of 238 audience members who participated in the survey, 55 (23%) were BCS and 85 (37.5%) were HCP. Most members rated the performances as very effective in changing their (84%) or other people's (93%) understanding of lymphedema; 96% reported being motivated to seek additional information on lymphedema, and 72% of HCP anticipated changes in their practices related to lymphedema screening. Overall no significant differences were noted in responses to ethnodrama between BCS and HCP. Open-ended responses were supportive of the findings from the closed-ended questions. Our results indicate that ethnodrama performances effectively convey information and positively affecting changes in HCP' and BCS' attitudes toward lymphedema.

  7. Risk factors and a prediction model for lower limb lymphedema following lymphadenectomy in gynecologic cancer: a hospital-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kenji; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Yanagisawa, Manami; Kawata, Akira; Akiba, Naoya; Suzuki, Kensuke; Naritaka, Kazutoshi

    2017-07-25

    Lower limb lymphedema (LLL) is a chronic and incapacitating condition afflicting patients who undergo lymphadenectomy for gynecologic cancer. This study aimed to identify risk factors for LLL and to develop a prediction model for its occurrence. Pelvic lymphadenectomy (PLA) with or without para-aortic lymphadenectomy (PALA) was performed on 366 patients with gynecologic malignancies at Yaizu City Hospital between April 2002 and July 2014; we retrospectively analyzed 264 eligible patients. The intervals between surgery and diagnosis of LLL were calculated; the prevalence and risk factors were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods. We developed a prediction model with which patients were scored and classified as low-risk or high-risk. The cumulative incidence of LLL was 23.1% at 1 year, 32.8% at 3 years, and 47.7% at 10 years post-surgery. LLL developed after a median 13.5 months. Using regression analysis, body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m 2 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.616; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.030-2.535), PLA + PALA (HR, 2.323; 95% CI, 1.126-4.794), postoperative radiation therapy (HR, 2.469; 95% CI, 1.148-5.310), and lymphocyst formation (HR, 1.718; 95% CI, 1.120-2.635) were found to be independently associated with LLL; age, type of cancer, number of lymph nodes, retroperitoneal suture, chemotherapy, lymph node metastasis, herbal medicine, self-management education, or infection were not associated with LLL. The predictive score was based on the 4 associated variables; patients were classified as high-risk (scores 3-6) and low-risk (scores 0-2). LLL incidence was significantly greater in the high-risk group than in the low-risk group (HR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.440-3.324). The cumulative incidence at 5 years was 52.1% [95% CI, 42.9-62.1%] for the high-risk group and 28.9% [95% CI, 21.1-38.7%] for the low-risk group. The area under the receiver operator characteristics curve for the prediction model was 0.631 at 1 year, 0

  8. Identifying MRI markers to evaluate early treatment-related changes post-laser ablation for cancer pain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Danish, Shabbar; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) has recently emerged as a new treatment modality for cancer pain management that targets the cingulum (pain center in the brain), and has shown promise over radio-frequency (RF) based ablation which is reported to provide temporary relief. One of the major advantages enjoyed by LITT is its compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), allowing for high resolution in vivo imaging to be used in LITT procedures. Since laser ablation for pain management is currently exploratory and is only performed at a few centers worldwide, its short-, and long-term effects on the cingulum are currently unknown. Traditionally treatment effects are evaluated by monitoring changes in volume of the ablation zone post-treatment. However, this is sub-optimal since it involves evaluating a single global parameter (volume) to detect changes pre-, and post-MRI. Additionally, the qualitative observations of LITT-related changes on multi-parametric MRI (MPMRI) do not specifically address differentiation between the appearance of treatment related changes (edema, necrosis) from recurrence of the disease (pain recurrence). In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on MP-MRI to capture early treatment related changes on a per-voxel basis by extracting quantitative relationships that may allow for an in-depth understanding of tissue response to LITT on MRI, subtle changes that may not be appreciable on original MR intensities. The second objective of this work is to investigate the efficacy of different MRI protocols in accurately capturing treatment related changes within and outside the ablation zone post-LITT. A retrospective cohort of studies comprising pre- and 24-hour post-LITT 3 Tesla T1-weighted (T1w), T2w, T2-GRE, and T2-FLAIR acquisitions was considered. Our scheme involved (1) inter-protocol as well as inter-acquisition affine registration of pre- and post-LITT MRI, (2) quantitation of MRI parameters

  9. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Tanhaeivash

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg. Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases.

  10. Patient compliance with a health care provider referral for an occupational therapy lymphedema consult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Sally A; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P; Madanat, Hala; Madlensky, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Limited information exists on breast cancer patients' compliance to attend outpatient appointments with an occupational therapy (OT) lymphedema specialist. The objectives of this study were (1) to examine patient compliance with a health care provider referral for an OT lymphedema consult and (2) to identify potential barriers to compliance. A retrospective chart review of female breast cancer patients at the UC San Diego Health System was conducted. Electronic medical records were queried for breast cancer patients, who received a health care provider referral for an OT lymphedema consult between June 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011. Descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact chi-square tests were used to examine how specific participant characteristics were associated with attending an OT appointment. A total of 210 female patients received an OT referral from a health care provider related to their breast cancer diagnosis. Forty-three (20.5%) patients did not attend an OT appointment. Non-attenders were more likely to have had fewer lymph nodes removed (Pcancer patients attended recommended OT lymphedema consults, a substantial number of women might benefit from further education about OT for lymphedema prevention following breast cancer treatment. Further research to understand barriers to attendance is recommended, particularly among women with only sentinel nodes removed.

  11. Stewart-Treves Syndrome on the Lower Extremity Associated to Idiopathic Chronic Lymphedema Visualized on FDG PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittain, Jane Maestri; Nymark, Tine; Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe

    2017-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are highly malignant and rare tumors of vascular or lymphatic endothelial cell origin with a poor prognosis. Lymphangiosarcoma associated with chronic lymphedema is known as Stewart-Treves syndrome. Stewart-Treves syndrome is primarily described in patients with lymphedema of an upper...... extremity occurring after breast cancer surgery including radical axillary lymph node dissection and subsequent radiotherapy. It is rarely described in the presence of idiopathic chronic lymphedema of the lower extremities. We present a case of lymphangiosarcoma visualized on F-FDG PET/CT, where Stewart...

  12. The prevention of the primary lymphedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, K.; Lebloch, D.; Bendova, M.

    1998-01-01

    The endangered familiar members of the ailing with the primary lymphedema are clinically examined (anamnesis, physical examination of the extremities and biochemical examination) and by radionuclide lymphography of the extremities. For the proved latent stadium of the lymphedema the complex of preventive therapy is recommended. (authors)

  13. Surgical-site infection following lymph node excision indicates susceptibility for lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Gustaf; Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Thomsen, Jørn Bo

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cancer-related lymphedema is a common complication following lymph node excision. Prevention of lymphedema is essential, as treatment options are limited. Known risk factors are firmly anchored to the cancer treatment itself; however potentially preventable factors...... such as seroma and surgical-site infection (SSI) have yet to be asserted. METHODS: All malignant melanoma patients treated with sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) and/or complete lymph node dissection (CLND) in the axilla or groin between January 2008 and December 2014 were retrospectively identified. Identified...

  14. Treatment-Related Predictive and Prognostic Factors in Trimodality Approach in Stage IIIA/N2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremić, Branislav; Casas, Francesc; Dubinsky, Pavol; Gomez-Caamano, Antonio; Čihorić, Nikola; Videtic, Gregory; Igrutinovic, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    While there are no established pretreatment predictive and prognostic factors in patients with stage IIIA/pN2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) indicating a benefit to surgery as a part of trimodality approach, little is known about treatment-related predictive and prognostic factors in this setting. A literature search was conducted to identify possible treatment-related predictive and prognostic factors for patients for whom trimodality approach was reported on. Overall survival was the primary endpoint of this study. Of 30 identified studies, there were two phase II studies, 5 "prospective" studies, and 23 retrospective studies. No study was found which specifically looked at treatment-related predictive factors of improved outcomes in trimodality treatment. Of potential treatment-related prognostic factors, the least frequently analyzed factors among 30 available studies were overall pathologic stage after preoperative treatment and UICC downstaging. Evaluation of treatment response before surgery and by pathologic tumor stage after induction therapy were analyzed in slightly more than 40% of studies and found not to influence survival. More frequently studied factors-resection status, degree of tumor regression, and pathologic nodal stage after induction therapy as well as the most frequently studied factor, the treatment (in almost 75% studies)-showed no discernible impact on survival, due to conflicting results. Currently, it is impossible to identify any treatment-related predictive or prognostic factors for selecting surgery in the treatment of patients with stage IIIA/pN2 NSCLC.

  15. Do single and partnered women with gynecologic cancer differ in types and intensities of illness- and treatment-related psychosocial concerns? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Janet M; Mah, Kenneth; Fyles, Anthony; Winton, Susan; Greenwood, Sarah; DePetrillo, Denny; Devins, Gerald M

    2007-09-01

    We compared the psychosocial and psychosexual concerns of single and partnered women with gynecologic cancer, since relationship status and psychosocial context are known to affect sexuality, a life domain commonly affected by this cancer. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 49 women (68% response), with ovarian (n=31), endometrial (n=12), and cervical (n=6) cancer, responded to a 72-item self-report Cancer Concerns Questionnaire and additional psychosocial questionnaires. Single (n=13) and partnered women (n=36) similarly reported prognosis as their highest concern, but single women (26% of the sample) reported that communication with the treatment team, treatment side effects, and prognosis were of greater salience to them than did partnered women. The latter group had greater sexuality and partner relationship concerns. These preliminary findings suggest that relationship status, whether partnered or single, influences current psychosocial concerns among women with gynecologic cancer, despite similar levels of illness- and treatment-related intrusions on important life domains.

  16. Localized lymphedema (elephantiasis): a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Song; Tran, Tien Anh; Jones, David M; Meyer, Dale R; Ross, Jeffrey S; Fisher, Hugh A; Carlson, John Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Lymphedema typically affects a whole limb. Rarely, lymphedema can present as a circumscribed plaque or an isolated skin tumor. To describe the clinical and pathologic characteristics and etiologic factors of localized lymphedema. Case-control study of skin biopsy and excision specimens histologically diagnosed with lymphedema and presenting as a localized skin tumor identified during a 4-year period. We identified 24 cases of localized lymphedema presenting as solitary large polyps (11), solid or papillomatous plaques (7), pendulous swellings (4), or tumors mimicking sarcoma (2). Patients were 18 females and 6 males with a mean age of 41 years (range 16-74). Anogenital involvement was most frequent (75%)--mostly vulva (58%), followed by eyelid (13%), thigh (8%) and breast (4%). Causative factors included injury due to trauma, surgery or childbirth (54%), chronic inflammatory disease (rosacea, Crohn's disease) (8%), and bacterial cellulitis (12%). Eighty-five percent of these patients were either overweight (50%) or obese (35%). Compared with a series of 80 patients with diffuse lymphedema, localized lymphedema patients were significantly younger (41 vs. 62 years old, p = 0.0001), had no history of cancer treatment (0% vs. 18%, p = 0.03), and had an injury to the affected site (54% vs. 6%, p = 0.0001). Histologically, all cases exhibited dermal edema, fibroplasia, dilated lymphatic vessels, uniformly distributed stromal cells and varying degrees of papillated epidermal hyperplasia, inflammatory infiltrates and hyperkeratosis. Tumor size significantly and positively correlated with history of cellulitis, obesity, dense inflammatory infiltrates containing abundant plasma cells, and lymphoid follicles (p elephantiasis.

  17. A natural pharma standard supplement formulation to control treatment-related toxicity and oxidative stress in genitourinary cancer: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, A; Belcaro, G; Dugall, M; Luzzi, R; Hosoi, M; Feragalli, B; Cotellese, R; Cosentino, V; Cosentino, M; Eggenhoffner, R; Pellizzato, M; Fratter, A; Giacomelli, L

    2017-09-01

    Oncological treatments are associated with toxicities that may decrease compliance to treatment in most genitourinary cancer patients. Supplementation with pharmaceutical-standardized supplement may be a supplementary method to control the side effects after chemo- and radiotherapy and the increased oxidative stress associated to treatments. This registry study evaluated a natural combination of supplements containing curcumin, cordyceps, and astaxanthin (Oncotris™) used as supplementary management in genitourinary cancer patients who had undergone oncological therapy. Patients with genitourinary cancers (prostate or bladder malignancies) who had undergone and completed cancer treatments (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or intravesical immunotherapy with increased oxidative stress and residual symptoms) were recruited in this registry, supplement study. Registry subjects (n = 61) freely decided to follow either a standard management (SM) (control group = 35) or SM plus oral daily supplementation (supplement group = 26). Evaluation of severity of treatment-related residual side effects, blood count test, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and plasma free radicals (oxidative stress) were performed at inclusion and at the end of the observational period (6 weeks). Two patients dropped out during the registry. Therefore, the analysis included 59 participants: 26 individuals in the supplementation group and 33 in the control group. In the supplement group, the intensity of signs and symptoms (treatment-related) and residual side effects significantly decreased at 6 weeks: minimal changes were observed in controls. Supplementation with Oncotris™ was associated with a significant improvement in blood cell count and with a decreased level of plasmatic PSA and oxidative stress. Naturally-derived supplements, specifically Oncotris™ (patent pending), could support the body to overcome the treatment-related toxicities - and the relative oxidative stress in cancer patients.

  18. "You're naked, you're vulnerable": Sexual well-being and body image of women with lower limb lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Caleb J; Sherman, Kerry A; Smith, Katriona M; Koelmeyer, Louise A; Mackie, Helen; Boyages, John

    2016-09-01

    Lower-limb lymphedema is an incurable illness manifesting as visible swelling enlarging the leg(s) and/or feet, buttocks, and genitals. This study used semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to explore sexual well-being among women with primary (congenital) lymphedema (n=11) or secondary lymphedema associated with gynecological cancer (n=8). Five themes (subthemes) summarized women's responses, with Attractiveness and Confidence (Publicly Unattractive, Privately Unconfident, Lymphedema or Aging?) describing women's central concern. These body image-related concerns accounted for sexual well-being in association with Partner Support (Availability of Support, Languages of Support, Fears About Support) and the degree of Functional Interruptions (Lymphedema in Context, Enduring Impacts, Overcoming Interruptions). Successful Lymphedema Coping (Control, Acceptance) and self-perceived ability to fulfill a valued Sexual Role also affected sexual well-being. Few differences between women with primary versus secondary lymphedema were evident. Lymphedema clinicians should screen for sexual concerns and have referral options available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Liquid silicone used for esthetic purposes as a potentiator for occurrence of post-radiotherapy genital lymphedema: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raíssa Quaiatti Antonelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Lymphedema consists of extracellular fluid retention caused by lymphatic obstruction. In chronic forms, fat and fibrous tissue accumulation is observed. Genital lymphedema is a rare condition in developed countries and may have primary or acquired etiology. It generally leads to urinary, sexual and social impairment. Clinical treatment usually has low effectiveness, and surgical resection is frequently indicated. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a male-to-female transgender patient who was referred for treatment of chronic genital lymphedema. She had a history of pelvic radiotherapy to treat anal cancer and of liquid silicone injections to the buttock and thigh regions for esthetic purposes. Radiological examinations showed signs both of tissue infiltration by liquid silicone and of granulomas, lymphadenopathy and lymphedema. Surgical treatment was performed on the area affected, in which lymphedematous tissue was excised from the scrotum while preserving the penis and testicles, with satisfactory results. Histopathological examination showed alterations compatible with tissue infiltration by exogenous material, along with chronic lymphedema. CONCLUSION: Genital lymphedema may be caused by an association of lesions due to liquid silicone injections and radiotherapy in the pelvic region. Cancer treatment decisions for patients who previously underwent liquid silicone injection should take this information into account, since it may represent a risk factor for radiotherapy complications.

  20. Hereditary lymphedema of the leg – A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinig, Birgit; Lotti, T.; Tchernev, Georgi; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist) when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but

  1. Readability Assessment of Patient Information about Lymphedema and Its Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Akhil K; Vargas, Christina R; Chuang, Danielle J; Lee, Bernard T

    2016-02-01

    Patient use of online resources for health information is increasing, and access to appropriately written information has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and overall outcomes. The American Medical Association and the National Institutes of Health recommend that patient materials be written at a sixth-grade reading level. In this study, the authors simulated a patient search of online educational content for lymphedema and evaluated readability. An online search for the term "lymphedema" was performed, and the first 12 hits were identified. User and location filters were disabled and sponsored results were excluded. Patient information from each site was downloaded and formatted into plain text. Readability was assessed using established tests: Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Flesch Reading Ease Index, FORCAST Readability Formula, Fry Graph, Gunning Fog Index, New Dale-Chall Formula, New Fog Count, Raygor Readability Estimate, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook Readability Formula. There were 152 patient articles downloaded; the overall mean reading level was 12.6. Individual website reading levels ranged from 9.4 (cancer.org) to 16.7 (wikipedia.org). There were 36 articles dedicated to conservative treatments for lymphedema; surgical treatment was mentioned in nine articles across four sites. The average reading level for conservative management was 12.7, compared with 15.6 for surgery (p readability, and surgeons should direct patients to sites appropriate for their level. There is limited information about surgical treatment available on the most popular sites; this information is significantly harder to read than sections on conservative measures.

  2. Mammographic, pathologic, and treatment-related factors associated with local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kini, Vijay R.; Vicini, Frank A.; Frazier, Robert; Victor, Sandra J.; Wimbish, Kathryn; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Background: We retrospectively reviewed our institution's experience treating early-stage breast cancer patients with breast conserving therapy (BCT) to determine clinical, pathologic, mammographic, and treatment-related factors associated with outcome. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 1987, 400 cases of Stage I and II breast cancer were managed with BCT at William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan. All patients underwent at least an excisional biopsy. Radiation treatment consisted of delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed to at least 60 Gy in all patients. The median follow-up in the 292 surviving patients is 118 months. Multiple clinical, pathologic, mammographic, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for an association with local recurrence and survival. Results: A total of 37 local recurrences developed in the treated breast, for a 5- and 10-year actuarial rate of 4% and 10%, respectively. On univariate analysis, patient age ≤ 35 years (25% vs. 7%, p = 0.004), and positive surgical margins (17% vs. 6%, p = 0.018) were associated with an increased risk of local recurrence at 10 years. On multivariate analysis, only age ≤ 35 years remained significant. A subset analysis of 214 patients with evaluable mammographic findings was performed. On univariate analysis, age ≤ 35 years (38% vs. 8%, p = 0.0029) and the presence of calcifications on preoperative mammography (22% vs. 6%, p = 0.0016) were associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. On multivariate analysis, both of these factors remained significant. The presence of calcifications on preoperative mammography did not affect the rates of overall survival, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival. Conclusion: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT, age ≤ 35 years and calcifications on preoperative mammography appear to be associated with an increased risk of local recurrence

  3. Could yoga practice improve treatment-related side effects and quality of life for women with breast cancer? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuanqing; Yang, Kehu; Wang, Yuliang; Zhang, Laiping; Liang, Haiqing

    2017-04-01

    To determine if yoga as a complementary and alternative therapy was associated with enhanced health and treatment-related side effects in patients with breast cancer. This systematic review examines whether yoga practice provides any measurable benefit, both physically and psychologically, for women with breast cancer. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) throughout June 2013. We evaluated the quality of the included studies by the Cochrane Handbook 5.2 standards and analyzed the data using the Stata software, version 10.0. Meta-regression and subgroup analysis were also performed to identify additional predictors of outcome and to assess heterogeneity. Sixteen RCTs with a total of 930 participants were included. Comparing yoga groups to control groups, there was a statistically significant difference in overall health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety and gastrointestinal symptoms. Meta-regression analyses revealed that the duration of yoga practice and type of control group partly explained the heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses revealed that yoga had a positive effect on anxiety only when it had been practiced for longer than 3 months. Only the wait-list control group showed an effect of yoga on physical well-being. The current evidence demonstrates that yoga practice could be effective in enhancing health and managing some treatment-related side effects for patients recovering from breast cancer. In future clinical studies, clinicians should consider the patient's wishes along with the current best evidence of the effects of yoga practice in their clinical decision-making. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Clinical and diagnostic aspects of lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keo, Hong H; Gretener, Silvia B; Staub, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Lymphedema is a chronic, progressive, and common but often unrecognized condition. The diagnosis of lymphatic disease on clinical grounds alone remains a challenge. Without proper diagnosis, therapy is often delayed, allowing disease progression. There is a need for a practical diagnostic algorithm and its imaging technique to guide clinical decision-making. The aim of this topical review is to provide a practical approach for assessing patients with suspected lymphedema and to give a critical appraisal of currently available imaging modalities that are applied in clinical practice to diagnose and map lymphatic disease.

  5. Liposuction for Advanced Lymphedema: A Multidisciplinary Approach for Complete Reduction of Arm and Leg Swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyages, John; Kastanias, Katrina; Koelmeyer, Louise A; Winch, Caleb J; Lam, Thomas C; Sherman, Kerry A; Munnoch, David Alex; Brorson, Håkan; Ngo, Quan D; Heydon-White, Asha; Magnussen, John S; Mackie, Helen

    2015-12-01

    This research describes and evaluates a liposuction surgery and multidisciplinary rehabilitation approach for advanced lymphedema of the upper and lower extremities. A prospective clinical study was conducted at an Advanced Lymphedema Assessment Clinic (ALAC) comprised of specialists in plastic surgery, rehabilitation, imaging, oncology, and allied health, at Macquarie University, Australia. Between May 2012 and 31 May 2014, a total of 104 patients attended the ALAC. Eligibility criteria for liposuction included (i) unilateral, non-pitting, International Society of Lymphology stage II/III lymphedema; (ii) limb volume difference greater than 25 %; and (iii) previously ineffective conservative therapies. Of 55 eligible patients, 21 underwent liposuction (15 arm, 6 leg) and had at least 3 months postsurgical follow-up (85.7 % cancer-related lymphedema). Liposuction was performed under general anesthesia using a published technique, and compression garments were applied intraoperatively and advised to be worn continuously thereafter. Limb volume differences, bioimpedance spectroscopy (L-Dex), and symptom and functional measurements (using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale) were taken presurgery and 4 weeks postsurgery, and then at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postsurgery. Mean presurgical limb volume difference was 45.1 % (arm 44.2 %; leg 47.3 %). This difference reduced to 3.8 % (arm 3.6 %; leg 4.3 %) by 6 months postsurgery, a mean percentage volume reduction of 89.6 % (arm 90.2 %; leg 88.2 %) [p multidisciplinary team is essential.

  6. Effect of lymphedema treatment. The interim report of prospective study at multiple facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Takako; Ogata, Minako; Satoh, Kayoko; Ashino, Yoshikazu

    2009-01-01

    We are in the process of analyzing the effect of complex physical therapy (CPT) for the patients of secondary lymphedema associated with cancer treatment. At this time, we present an interim report of the past 3 months started in March 2009. We classified the lymphedema stage into four stages based on the International Society of Lymphology criterion using the imaging diagnosis (ultrasonography (US), CT, etc.) in addition to a conventional observation. We also classified the CPT treatment period into two in accordance with water retention in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the limbs. CPT was performed by the specialist of lymphedema treatment. We used the change in volume of limbs and quality of life (QOL) evaluation by SF-36 and Skindex29 for analysis. On this report, the volume of limbs, which has lymphedema and an improvement on SF-36, did not change significantly. This may have been resulted from not having enough follow-up period and lack of few cases at each stage in the analysis. However, we confirmed that the general and emotion evaluation on Skindex29 showed a meaningful change. We are still planning to accumulate more cases and study them for further detailed analysis. (author)

  7. Otophyma: a case report and review of the literature of lymphedema (elephantiasis) of the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, J Andrew; Mazza, Jill; Kircher, Kenneth; Tran, Tien Anh

    2008-02-01

    Phymas (swellings, masses, or bulbs) are considered the end-stage of rosacea and mostly affect the nose (rhinophyma), and rarely involve the chin (gnatophyma), the cheek (metophyma), eyelids (blepharophyma), or ears (otophyma). Herein, we report the case of a 57-year-old man who developed unilateral enlargement of his left ear over 2 years. Biopsy revealed changes of rosaceous lymphedema associated with Demodex infestation. Corticosteroid and minocycline therapies resulted in partial reduction of the ear enlargement. Literature review examining for cases of lymphedema (elephantiasis) of the ear revealed that chronic inflammatory disorders (rosacea (most frequent), psoriasis, eczema), bacterial cellulitis (erysipelas), pediculosis, trauma, and primary (congenital) lymphedema can all lead to localized, lymphedematous enlargement of the ear. Depending on the severity, medical treatment directed at the inflammatory condition for mild, diffuse enlargement to surgical debulking for extensive diffuse enlargement or tumor formation can improve the signs and symptoms of otophyma. Decreased immune surveillance secondary to rosaceous lymphedema may explain why Demodex infestation is common in rosacea and support the suspicion that phymatous skin is predisposed to skin cancer development.

  8. Lymphedema during pregnancy - case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Korabiusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a period when woman’s body undergoes a lot of changes in her hormonal balance, lymphatic system, musculoskeletal system and cardiovascular system. As a result of disorders in defense mechanisms, a significant amount of liquid accumulates in spaces between tissues. A clinical manifestation of this condition is swelling located around ankles and lower legs. Sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy eating habits, excessive weight and pregnancy are also well known causes of lymphatic swelling. Comprehensive anti-swelling therapy that is used in treating lymphatic swelling in pregnant patients includes: patients’ education, manual lymphatic drainage, kinesitherapy, multilayer bandaging, skin care, drainage positions and kinesiotaping. Dissertation’s objective: Dissertation’s objective is to evaluate implementation of manual lymphatic drainage and anti-swelling kinesiotaping in pregnant woman with lymphatic swelling of lower legs. Research methods: Research methods were collected basing on: interview with a patient, medical documentation analysis and physical examination conduced before and after therapy. Research was conducted between 34th and 36th week of pregnancy. Case study: 38 year old patient in her fourth singleton pregnancy. Two prior pregnancies in 2009 and 2010 were delivered with C-section and one missed abortion in 2015 occurred. During this pregnancy patient gained over 30kg. She was diagnosed with lymphatic swelling of metatarsus, lower legs and ankles in 34th week of pregnancy. Lymphatic drainage of lower limbs and anti-swelling kinesiotaping was implemented. Results: After two weeks of therapy decrease in swelling was observed in left lower limb: in metatarsus by 8cm, in ankles by 9cm and in lower legs by 6cm. In right lower limb swelling decreased accordingly by 7cm, 10cm and 5cm. Conclusion: Anti-swelling lymphatic drainage, kinesiotherapy and kinesiotaping are effective physiotherapy methods used in treating lymphedema

  9. High-resolution 3D volumetry versus conventional measuring techniques for the assessment of experimental lymphedema in the mouse hindlimb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Florian S.; Körbel, Christina; Gassert, Laura; Müller, Andreas; Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Giovanoli, Pietro; Laschke, Matthias W.; Menger, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment characterized by chronic limb swelling with interstitial inflammation. The rodent hindlimb is a widely used model for the evaluation of novel lymphedema treatments. However, the assessment of limb volume in small animals is challenging. Recently, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been introduced for rodent limb volumetry. In the present study we evaluated the validity of microcomputed tomography (μCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in comparison to conventional measuring techniques. For this purpose, acute lymphedema was induced in the mouse hindlimb by a modified popliteal lymphadenectomy. The 4-week course of this type of lymphedema was first assessed in 6 animals. In additional 12 animals, limb volumes were analyzed by μCT, 9.4 T MRI and 30 MHz ultrasound as well as by planimetry, circumferential length and paw thickness measurements. Interobserver correlation was high for all modalities, in particular for μCT analysis (r = 0.975, p < 0.001). Importantly, caliper-measured paw thickness correlated well with μCT (r = 0.861), MRI (r = 0.821) and ultrasound (r = 0.800). Because the assessment of paw thickness represents a time- and cost-effective approach, it may be ideally suited for the quantification of rodent hindlimb lymphedema. PMID:27698469

  10. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  11. Cancer prehabilitation: an opportunity to decrease treatment-related morbidity, increase cancer treatment options, and improve physical and psychological health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Baima, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Cancer prehabilitation, a process on the continuum of care that occurs between the time of cancer diagnosis and the beginning of acute treatment, includes physical and psychological assessments that establish a baseline functional level, identifies impairments, and provides targeted interventions that improve a patient's health to reduce the incidence and the severity of current and future impairments. There is a growing body of scientific evidence that supports preparing newly diagnosed cancer patients for and optimizing their health before starting acute treatments. This is the first review of cancer prehabilitation, and the purpose was to describe early studies in the noncancer population and then the historical focus in cancer patients on aerobic conditioning and building strength and stamina through an appropriate exercise regimen. More recent research shows that opportunities exist to use other unimodal or multimodal prehabilitation interventions to decrease morbidity, improve physical and psychological health outcomes, increase the number of potential treatment options, decrease hospital readmissions, and reduce both direct and indirect healthcare costs attributed to cancer. Future research may demonstrate increased compliance with acute cancer treatment protocols and, therefore, improved survival outcomes. New studies suggest that a multimodal approach that incorporates both physical and psychological prehabilitation interventions may be more effective than a unimodal approach that addresses just one or the other. In an impairment-driven cancer rehabilitation model, identifying current and anticipating future impairments are the critical first steps in improving healthcare outcomes and decreasing costs. More research is urgently needed to evaluate the most effective prehabilitation interventions, and combinations thereof, for survivors of all types of cancer.

  12. Treatment-related death in patients with small-cell lung cancer in phase III trials over the last two decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Ochi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Treatment-related death (TRD remains a serious problem in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC, despite recent improvements in supportive care. However, few studies have formally assessed time trends in the proportion of TRD over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and pattern of TRD over time. METHODS: We examined phase 3 trials conducted between 1990 and 2010 to address the role of systemic treatment for SCLC. The time trend was assessed using linear regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 97 trials including nearly 25,000 enrolled patients were analyzed. The overall TRD proportion was 2.95%. Regarding the time trend, while it was not statistically significant, it tended to decrease, with a 0.138% decrease per year and 2.76% decrease per two decades. The most common cause of death was febrile neutropenia without any significant time trend in its incidence over the years examined (p = 0.139. However, deaths due to febrile neutropenia as well as all causes in patients treated with non-platinum chemotherapy increased significantly (p = 0.033. CONCLUSIONS: The overall TRD rate has been low, but not negligible, in phase III trials for SCLC over the past two decades.

  13. The Voice of Experience: Diet and Weight Change in Women with Breast Cancer Associate with Psychosocial and Treatment-Related Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Vivienne; Campbell, Sharon; Mccargar, Linda; Mourtzakis, Marina; Hanning, Rhona

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated relationships between psychosocial and treatment-related factors, diet, and weight change in women treated with chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Comprehensive qualitative interviews were conducted with 28 women who were within 12 months of completing chemotherapy treatment. Changes in food intake and eating patterns were universal over the course of chemotherapy, with broad variability in treatment effects and associated dietary responses linked to weight change. Increased appetite, food cravings, and intake of energy-dense comfort foods were more common among women who gained weight during treatment (n = 11). Changes in taste, nausea, and emotional distress were central in promoting these dietary responses. Women who lost weight during treatment (n = 6) tended to report more severe and persistent side effects of treatment leading to poor appetite and lower food intake, and they were more likely to live alone. While the etiology of weight change in this population is complex, this study suggests that changes in food intake related to treatment and psychosocial challenges may play an important role for some women. These findings may help to identify women who are most at risk of weight change during treatment and may inform the development of tailored dietary interventions.

  14. Treatment-Related Death during Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available Treatment related death (TRD is the worst adverse event in chemotherapy and radiotherapy for patients with cancer, the reports for TRDs were sporadically. We aimed to study TRDs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT, and determine whether high radiation dose and newer chemotherapy regimens were associated with the risk of TRD. Data from randomized clinical trials for locally advanced/unresectable NSCLC patients were analyzed. Eligible studies had to have at least one arm with CCRT. The primary endpoint was TRD. Pooled odds ratios (ORs for TRDs were calculated. In this study, a total of fifty-three trials (8940 patients were eligible. The pooled TRD rate (accounting for heterogeneity was 1.44% for all patients. In 20 trials in which comparison of TRDs between CCRT and non-CCRT was possible, the OR (95% CI of TRDs was 1.08 (0.70-1.66 (P = 0.71. Patients treated with third-generation chemotherapy and concurrent radiotherapy had an increase of TRDs compared to those with other regimens in CCRT (2.70% vs. 1.37%, OR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.09-2.07, P = 0.008. No significant difference was found in TRDs between high (≥ 66 Gy and low (< 66 Gy radiation dose during CCRT (P = 0.605. Neither consolidation (P = 0.476 nor induction chemotherapy (P = 0.175 had significant effects with increased TRDs in this study. We concluded that CCRT is not significantly associated with the risk of TRD compared to non-CCRT. The third-generation chemotherapy regimens may be a risk factor with higher TRDs in CCRT, while high dose radiation is not significantly associated with more TRDs. This observation deserves further study.

  15. Lymphedema-lymphangiectasia-mental retardation (Hennekam) syndrome: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balkom, Inge D. C.; Alders, Mariel; Allanson, Judith; Bellini, Carlo; Frank, Ulrich; de Jong, Greetje; Kolbe, Ingeborg; Lacombe, Didier; Rockson, Stan; Rowe, Peter; Wijburg, Frits; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Hennekam syndrome is an infrequently reported heritable entity characterized by lymphedema, lymphangiectasia, and developmental delay. Here we add an additional 8 patients, and compare their findings to the 16 cases from the literature. The lymphedema is usually congenital, can be markedly

  16. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Liu, Helen H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Rodhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade ≥3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in increments of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p 42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  17. Giant cell angiofibroma or localized periorbital lymphedema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael C; Chung, Catherine G; Specht, Charles S; Wilkinson, Michael; Clarke, Loren E

    2013-12-01

    Giant cell angiofibroma represents a rare soft tissue neoplasm with a predilection for the orbit. We recently encountered a mass removed from the lower eyelid of a 56-year-old female that histopathologically resembled giant cell angiofibroma. The process consisted of haphazardly arranged CD34-positive spindled and multinucleated cells within an edematous, densely vascular stroma. However, the patient had recently undergone laryngectomy and radiotherapy for a laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A similar mass had arisen on the contralateral eyelid, and both had developed several months post-therapy. Lymphedema of the orbit can present as tumor-like nodules and in some cases may share histopathologic features purported to be characteristic of giant cell angiofibroma. A relationship between giant cell angiofibroma and lymphedema has not been established, but our case suggests there may be one. The potential overlap of these two conditions should be recognized, as should other entities that may enter the differential diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Helium Neon laser therapy for post mastectomy lymphedema and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed M. Khalaf

    2012-12-08

    Dec 8, 2012 ... mastectomy lymphedema and shoulder mobility. Mohamed M. Khalaf *. ,1 .... neurological and orthopedic problems, or diabetes. The patients were ... included 15 patients who received placebo laser therapy in addition to ...

  19. Surgical treatment of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum

    OpenAIRE

    Modolin,Miguel; Mitre,Anuar Ibrahim; Silva,José Carlos Faes da; Cintra,Wilson; Quagliano,Ana Paula; Arap,Sami; Ferreira,Marcus Castro

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum, regardless of its etiology, is determined by reduced lymphatic flow with subsequent enlargement of the penis and scrotum. The clinical course of this condition is characterized by extreme discomfort for patients, with limitation of local hygiene, ambulation, sexual intercourse, and voiding in the standing position. The purpose of the present study is to present the experience and results of the treatment of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum by r...

  20. Microsurgery for groin lymphocele and lymphedema after oncologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Francesco; Dessalvi, Sara; Campisi, Corrado; Molinari, Lidia; Spinaci, Stefano; Talamo, Giuseppina; Campisi, Corradino

    2014-01-01

    Groin lymphocele (GL) is a frequent complication of inguinal lymph node dissection, and conservative treatment is not always successful. Different surgical methods have been used to treat lymphoceles arising from lymphatics injured during groin surgery. However, they all involve the closure of lymphatics merging at the lymphocele, increasing the risk of postoperative lower limb lymphedema or of worsening lymphedema if already clinically evident. We assessed the efficacy of a diagnostic and therapeutic protocol to manage inguinal lymphoceles using lymphoscintigraphy (LS) and microsurgical procedures. Sixteen GL [seven associated with leg lymphedema (LL)] were studied by LS preoperatively and treated by complete excision of lymphocele and microsurgical lymphatic-venous anastomoses between afferent lymphatics and a collateral branch of great saphenous vein. Lower limb lymphatics were identified intraoperatively using Patent Blue dye injection. Nine patients without lymphedema had complete healing of lymphocele and no appearance of lower limb postoperative lymphedema. The other seven patients with associated secondary lymphedema had complete disappearance of lymphocele and a remarkable reduction of leg volume. Four of them completely recovered without the need of any compression garment, after the first year postoperative. Inguinal lymphocele nonresponsive to conservative treatment can be advantageously studied by LS and successfully treated by microsurgical reconstructive procedures, above all if associated to LL. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Compulsive masturbation and chronic penile lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Galì, Alessandro; Marino, Silvia; Bramanti, Placido

    2012-06-01

    Chronic penile lymphedema arises from the abnormal retention of lymphatic fluid in the subcutaneous tissues and may be secondary to local and systemic medical conditions such as sexually transmitted diseases, filariasis, malignancy, local radiotherapy, and surgery. This case report aims to consider compulsive masturbation as a possible cause of chronic penile edema. A 40-year-old man was referred to our institute for behavioral disturbance, including compulsive masturbation. Neuropsychiatric evaluation showed moderate mental retardation, mild dysarthria and limb incoordination, anxiety, depressed mood, and impulse dyscontrol. Brain MRI pointed out diffuse white matter lesions. Urogenital examination revealed an uncircumcised penis with non-tender edema of the shaft and prepuce with areas of lichenification. Since the most common local and systemic causes of edema were excluded, chronic penile edema due to compulsive masturbation was diagnosed and the compulsive behavior treated with an antidepressant and low-dose neuroleptics. Compulsive masturbation should be taken into account when counselling patients with penile edema.

  2. Lymphoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of extremity lymphedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Meifang; Lu Gang; Li Fang; Tian Jian

    1994-01-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy, using 99m Tc labeled antimony sulfur colloid and 99m Tc labeled dextran, was performed on 25 patients with swelling of upper or lower extremities for diagnosis of lymphedema. Five different lymphoscintigraphic patterns were identified, that is normal (4 cases), collaterals (2 cases), mixed (13 cases), dermal backflow (4 cases) and no backflow pattern (2 cases). Eight patients underwent operations for lympho-venous anastomoses on the involved extremity. The results indicate that lymphoscintigraphy has many advantages, such as simplicity and non-invasiveness, safety and reliability, being able to differentiate properties of extremity edema, to provide the information of morphologic changes and dynamically display lymphatic drainage and obstructive extent in the lymphatic system. The procedure is valuable for determination of the treatment modalities and the selection of patient for lymphatic microsurgery

  3. A Scintigraphic Method for Quantitation of Lymphatic Function in Arm Lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidsten, Svend; Toyserkani, Navid M; Sørensen, Jens A

    2018-01-01

    ) measure of lymph fluid passing through the arm. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eleven patients, aged 34-68 years, with unilateral arm lymphedema following breast cancer treatment underwent simultaneous bilateral lymphoscintigraphy using intradermal injection of 99mTc-labeled human serum albumin (HSA). Imaging...... was performed at 30-45 minute intervals for 5 hours. Time activity curves from each injection site and each arm region were recorded. The input into the arm region was obtained as the (minus) time derivative of the injection site activity curve. In the proposed model the arm activity curve was considered...

  4. Evaluation of Clinical Manifestations in Patients with Severe Lymphedema with and without CCBE1 Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alders, M.; Mendola, A.; Adès, L.; Al Gazali, L.; Bellini, C.; Dallapiccola, B.; Edery, P.; Frank, U.; Hornshuh, F.; Huisman, S. A.; Jagadeesh, S.; Kayserili, H.; Keng, W. T.; Lev, D.; Prada, C. E.; Sampson, J. R.; Schmidtke, J.; Shashi, V.; van Bever, Y.; van der Aa, N.; Verhagen, J. M.; Verheij, J. B.; Vikkula, M.; Hennekam, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The lymphedema-lymphangiectasia-intellectual disability (Hennekam) syndrome (HS) is characterised by a widespread congenital lymph vessel dysplasia manifesting as congenital lymphedema of the limbs and intestinal lymphangiectasia, accompanied by unusual facial morphology, variable intellectual

  5. Arm Volumetry Versus Upper Extremity Lymphedema Index: Validity of Upper Extremity Lymphedema Index for Body-Type Corrected Arm Volume Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nana; Yamamoto, Takumi; Hayashi, Nobuko; Hayashi, Akitatsu; Iida, Takuya; Koshima, Isao

    2016-06-01

    Volumetry, measurement of extremity volume, is a commonly used method for upper extremity lymphedema (UEL) evaluation. However, comparison between different patients with different physiques is difficult with volumetry, because body-type difference greatly affects arm volume. Seventy arms of 35 participants who had no history of arm edema or breast cancer were evaluated. Arm volume was calculated using a summed truncated cone model, and UEL index was calculated using circumferences and body mass index (BMI). Examinees' BMI was classified into 3 groups, namely, low BMI (BMI, 25 kg/m). Arm volume and UEL index were compared with corresponding BMI groups. Mean (SD) arm volume was 1090.9 (205.5) mL, and UEL index 96.9 (5.6). There were significant differences in arm volume between BMI groups [low BMI vs middle BMI vs high BMI, 945.2 (107.4) vs 1045.2 (87.5) vs 1443.1 (244.4) mL, P 0.5]. Arm volume significantly increased with increase of BMI, whereas UEL index stayed constant regardless of BMI. Upper extremity lymphedema index would allow better body-type corrected arm volume evaluation compared with arm volumetry.

  6. Treatment-related differences in health related quality of life and disease specific symptoms among colon cancer survivors : Results from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, S.; Vissers, P.A.J.; Maas, H.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; van Erning, F.N.; Mols, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare health related quality of life (HRQoL) and disease-specific symptoms between colon cancer patients treated with surgery only (SU) and surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy (SU + adjCT). Results were stratified for those aged <70 and ⩾70 years. HRQoL of

  7. Transnodal Lymphangiography in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Genital Lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F. M., E-mail: gomez_fermun@gva.es; Martinez-Rodrigo, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L. [Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Servicio de Radiologia (Spain); Santos, E. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology (United States); Forner, I. [Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Servicio de Medicina Fisica y Rehabilitacion (Spain); Lloret, M.; Perez-Enguix, D.; Garcia-Marcos, R. [Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Servicio de Radiologia (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To report the success of groin nodal lymphography in the diagnosis and treatment of genital lymphedema. Methods and Materials: We present one female (8 years old [patient no. 1]) and two male (69 and [patient no. 2] 31 years old [patient no. 3], respectively) patients with genital lymphedema in whom conservative treatment failed. The girl also had lymphorrhagia. Genital lymphedema was caused by radical cystectomy (patient no. 2), lymphatic hyperplasia (patient no. 1), and idiopathic lymphangitis (patient no. 3). All of them underwent ultrasound-guided bilateral groin lymph node puncture. Afterward, 4-8 ml Lipiodol Ultra-Fluide (Guerbet) were injected at a rate of 0.2 ml/s. Lipiodol progression was assessed by fluoroscopy. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed immediately after and again at 24 h after the procedure to confirm the leak. The follow-up period was 15, 13, and 9 months, respectively. Technical success was considered as bilateral pelvic and abdominal filling of lymphatic vessels. Therapeutic success was considered as improvement or disappearance of genital lymphedema and/or lymphorrhagia. Results: Lipiodol leak to the scrotum was observed in patients no. 2 and 3. Lymphaticopelvic fistula and genital lymphatic hyperplasia were seen in patient no. 1. Genital lymphedema diminished within 1 week and almost disappeared in two cases (patients no. 1 and 3) or significantly improved (patient no. 2). lymphorrhagia also resolved in patient no. 1. No recurrence or worsening was detected during follow-up. Conclusion: Therapeutic lymphangiography by lymph node injection seems to be effective to treat genital lymphedema. Lymph node puncture lymphangiography is feasible and less cumbersome than pedal lymphangiography.

  8. Transnodal Lymphangiography in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Genital Lymphedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, F. M.; Martínez-Rodrigo, J.; Martí-Bonmatí, L.; Santos, E.; Forner, I.; Lloret, M.; Pérez-Enguix, D.; García-Marcos, R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the success of groin nodal lymphography in the diagnosis and treatment of genital lymphedema. Methods and Materials: We present one female (8 years old [patient no. 1]) and two male (69 and [patient no. 2] 31 years old [patient no. 3], respectively) patients with genital lymphedema in whom conservative treatment failed. The girl also had lymphorrhagia. Genital lymphedema was caused by radical cystectomy (patient no. 2), lymphatic hyperplasia (patient no. 1), and idiopathic lymphangitis (patient no. 3). All of them underwent ultrasound-guided bilateral groin lymph node puncture. Afterward, 4–8 ml Lipiodol Ultra-Fluide (Guerbet) were injected at a rate of 0.2 ml/s. Lipiodol progression was assessed by fluoroscopy. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed immediately after and again at 24 h after the procedure to confirm the leak. The follow-up period was 15, 13, and 9 months, respectively. Technical success was considered as bilateral pelvic and abdominal filling of lymphatic vessels. Therapeutic success was considered as improvement or disappearance of genital lymphedema and/or lymphorrhagia. Results: Lipiodol leak to the scrotum was observed in patients no. 2 and 3. Lymphaticopelvic fistula and genital lymphatic hyperplasia were seen in patient no. 1. Genital lymphedema diminished within 1 week and almost disappeared in two cases (patients no. 1 and 3) or significantly improved (patient no. 2). lymphorrhagia also resolved in patient no. 1. No recurrence or worsening was detected during follow-up. Conclusion: Therapeutic lymphangiography by lymph node injection seems to be effective to treat genital lymphedema. Lymph node puncture lymphangiography is feasible and less cumbersome than pedal lymphangiography.

  9. The use of bioimpedance analysis to evaluate lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anne G; Janz, Brian A; Slavin, Sumner A; Borud, Loren J

    2007-05-01

    Lymphedema, a chronic disfiguring condition resulting from lymphatic dysfunction or disruption, can be difficult to accurately diagnose and manage. Of particular challenge is identifying the presence of clinically significant limb swelling through simple and noninvasive methods. Many historical and currently used techniques for documenting differences in limb volume, including volume displacement and circumferential measurements, have proven difficult and unreliable. Bioimpedance spectroscopy analysis, a technology that uses resistance to electrical current in comparing the composition of fluid compartments within the body, has been considered as a cost-effective and reproducible alternative for evaluating patients with suspected lymphedema. All patients were recruited through the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Lymphedema Clinic. A total of 15 patients (mean age: 55.2 years) with upper-extremity or lower-extremity lymphedema as documented by lymphoscintigraphy underwent bioimpedance spectroscopy analysis using an Impedimed SFB7 device. Seven healthy medical students and surgical residents (mean age: 26.9 years) were selected to serve as normal controls. All study participants underwent analysis of both limbs, which allowed participants to act as their own controls. The multifrequency bioimpedance device documented impedance values for each limb, with lower values correlating with higher levels of accumulated protein-rich edematous fluid. The average ratio of impedance to current flow of the affected limb to the unaffected limb in lymphedema patients was 0.9 (range: 0.67 to 1.01). In the control group, the average impedance ratio of the participant's dominant limb to their nondominant limb was 0.99 (range: 0.95 to 1.02) (P = 0.01). Bioimpedance spectroscopy can be used as a reliable and accurate tool for documenting the presence of lymphedema in patients with either upper- or lower-extremity swelling. Measurement with the device is quick and simple and results

  10. Giant lymphedema of the penis and scrotum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Franklin; García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés; Ocampo-Flórez, Ginna Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum is a rare entity characterized by enlargement of the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the genital region due to lymphatic drainage impairment. This clinical condition is more frequent in tropical countries due to a higher incidence of filariasis, which, in turn, is the main etiology. We describe the case of a 33-year-old man with large lymphedema of the scrotum and penis due to an acute and chronic inflammatory process, foreign body granuloma, and marked hyalinization. Four consecutive surgical interventions were necessary to remove the great part of the affected tissue, which enabled satisfactory results and improved the patient's quality of life.

  11. Giant lymphedema of the penis and scrotum: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Vives, Franklin; Garc?a-Perdomo, Herney Andr?s; Ocampo-Fl?rez, Ginna Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum is a rare entity characterized by enlargement of the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the genital region due to lymphatic drainage impairment. This clinical condition is more frequent in tropical countries due to a higher incidence of filariasis, which, in turn, is the main etiology. We describe the case of a 33-year-old man with large lymphedema of the scrotum and penis due to an acute and chronic inflammatory process, foreign body granuloma, and marked hya...

  12. Treatment-related serious adverse events and fatal adverse events with regorafenib in cancer patients: a meta-analysis of phase 3 randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Meihui; Li, Feifei; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Jingdong

    2017-12-01

    Regorafenib (Stivarga) is an oral small-molecule multikinase inhibitor commonly used against a variety of cancers. We performed a meta-analysis of all phase 3 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of regorafenib to quantify the increased risk of SAEs and FAEs. We carried out a systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception to February 2017 without any restrictions. Eligibility criteria included phase 3 RCTs of tumors comparing regorafenib, alone or in combination with non-targeted chemotherapy (regorafenib arm) versus placebo or non-targeted chemotherapy (control arm). Data on SAEs and FAEs were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the overall incidence, relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of four phase 3 RCTs involving 1736 cancer patients met the eligibility criteria and were included. The overall incidence of SAEs and FAEs with regorafenib were 0.23 (95%CI, 0.05-0.40) and 0.02 (95%CI, 0.01-0.03), respectively. Compared with control, the summary RR of developing a regorafenib-related SAE was 1.60 (95%CI, 0.95-2.68, P=0.07), the summary RR of developing a regorafenib-related FAE was 1.71 (95%CI, 0.69-4.24, P=0.25). No evidence was found for the association between regorafenib and higher risk of SAEs and FAEs. This association varied significantly with cancer types (P=0.02) for SAEs but no evidence of heterogeneity was found for FAEs. This meta-analysis demonstrates no evidence for the association between regorafenib and higher risk of SAEs and FAEs. This analysis will be important when considering the trade-off of regorafenib treatment during clinical decision-making.

  13. Women with breast cancer report substantially more disease- and treatment-related side or late effects than registered by clinical oncologists: a cross-sectional study of a standard follow-up program in an oncological department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Mai-Britt Bjørklund; Grau, Cai; Zachariae, Robert; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-08-01

    Follow-up after breast cancer treatment is standard due to the risk of development of new primary cancers and recurrent disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a standard follow-up program in an oncological department by assessing: (1) Symptoms or signs of new primary cancer or recurrent disease, (2) Disease- and treatment-related physical and psychosocial side or late effects, and (3) relevant actions by oncology staff. In a cross-sectional study, 194 women who came for follow-up visit after treatment for primary surgery were included. The clinical oncologists registered symptoms and signs of recurrent disease or new primary cancer. Side or late effects were both assessed by patient and the clinical oncologists. Loco-regional or distant signs of recurrent disease were suspected in eight (5%) patients. Further examinations revealed no disease recurrence. Most patients (93%) reported some degree of side or late effects. Statistically significant more side or late effects were reported by the women (average: 6.9) than registered by the clinical oncologists (average: 2.4), p effects were hot flushes (35%), fatigue (32%), and sleep disturbance (31%). None of the scheduled or additional visits resulted in detection of recurrent disease. Furthermore, the majority of patients reported side or late effects. Statistically significant more women reported side or late effects than registered by the clinical oncologists. This suggests the need for rethinking of the follow-up programs with more emphasis upon side or late effects of the treatment.

  14. The effect of aerobic exercise on treatment-related acute toxicity in men receiving radical external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, G; Windsor, P M; McCowan, C

    2010-09-01

    We retrospectively analysed acute radiation toxicity data for patients who had participated in a randomised controlled study in our centre in order to assess the impact of aerobic exercise on acute rectal and bladder morbidity during treatment. Data from 65 of 66 patients were analysed: 33 allocated into a control group (standard advice) and 33 into an exercise group (aerobic walking for 30 min at least three times per week) during 4 weeks of external beam radiotherapy; one patient in the exercise group withdrew after randomisation before starting radiotherapy. There was a trend towards less severe acute rectal toxicity in the exercise group with a statistically significant difference in mean toxicity scores over the 4 weeks of radiotherapy (P=0.004), with no significant difference in bladder toxicity scores between the two groups (P=0.123). The lack of an association for severity of bladder toxicity could be attributed to the confounding effect of lower urinary tract symptoms from their prostate cancer. Keeping active and being asked to adhere to a well-defined exercise schedule appears to reduce the severity of rectal toxicity during radiotherapy to the prostate.

  15. Patterns of Failure and Treatment-Related Toxicity in Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients Treated Using Extended Field Radiotherapy With Curative Intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Barkati, Maroie; Narayan, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in cervical cancer patients who had metastatic disease in common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent, using extended field radiotherapy (EFRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study involving 39 patients treated from January 1996 to June 2007, using EFRT with concurrent chemotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. EFRT consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Radiation to involved nodes was boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. Primary tumor radiation was boosted to a dose of 80 Gy using brachytherapy. Results: Overall, 30 patients (77%) have relapsed. The 5-year OS rate was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11-44). The 5-year DFS rate was 19.4% (95% CI, 8-35). Only 3 patients (7.5%) experienced treatment failure exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 patients underwent salvage treatment. Grade 3 to 4 acute bone marrow and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in 10 (26%) and 7 (18%) patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemotherapy and EFRT treatment was well tolerated. Most patients showed failure at multiple sites and outside the treatment field. Only 3/39 patients had failures exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 underwent salvage treatment.

  16. Lymphedema Fat Graft: An Ideal Filler for Facial Rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Nicoli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is a chronic disorder characterized by lymph stasis in the subcutaneous tissue. Lymphatic fluid contains several components including hyaluronic acid and has many important properties. Over the past few years, significant research has been performed to identify an ideal tissue to implant as a filler. Because of its unique composition, fat harvested from the lymphedema tissue is an interesting topic for investigation and has significant potential for application as a filler, particularly in facial rejuvenation. Over a 36-month period, we treated and assessed 8 patients with lymphedematous limbs who concurrently underwent facial rejuvenation with lymphedema fat (LF. We conducted a pre- and post-operative satisfaction questionnaire survey and a histological assessment of the harvested LF fat. The overall mean general appearance score at an average of 6 months after the procedure was 7.2±0.5, demonstrating great improvement. Patients reported significant improvement in their skin texture with a reading of 8.5±0.7 and an improvement in their self-esteem. This study demonstrates that LF as an ideal autologous injectable filler is clinically applicable and easily available in patients with lymphedema. We recommend the further study and clinical use of this tissue as it exhibits important properties and qualities for future applications and research.

  17. Lymphatic compensation during the postoperative period after breast cancer treatment with axillary dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Maia Freire de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer causes physical and psychological morbidity and compromises quality of life. The objective of this literature review was to study lymphatic compensation after surgery for breast cancer and the factors that influence this process, with a view to understanding the etiopathogenesis of lymphedema. Articles indexed on Pubmed published from 1985 to 2012 were reviewed. According to the literature, lymphangiogenesis reduces damage to lymph vessels; there is little evidence that Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is elevated in women with lymphedema; lymphovenous communications can be observed 60 days after surgery; women without lymphedema have acquired alternative mechanisms for removal of proteins from the interstitial space; and active exercise stimulates lymphatic and venous pumping. Health professionals should teach these patients about the risk factors for lymphedema. The effects of lymphangiogenesis, proteolysis and lymphovenous communications on development of lymphedema should be studied, since these events are intimately related.

  18. Treatment-Related Morbidity in Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With and Without Image Guidance Using Implanted Fiducial Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jasmeet; Greer, Peter B.; White, Martin A.; Parker, Joel; Patterson, Jackie; Tang, Colin I.; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Christopher; Denham, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of rectal and urinary dysfunctional symptoms using image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with fiducials and magnetic resonance planning for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation stages of IGRT between September 2008 and March 2010, 367 consecutive patients were treated with prostatic irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with and without IGRT (non-IGRT). In November 2010, these men were asked to report their bowel and bladder symptoms using a postal questionnaire. The proportions of patients with moderate to severe symptoms in these groups were compared using logistic regression models adjusted for tumor and treatment characteristic variables. Results: Of the 282 respondents, the 154 selected for IGRT had higher stage tumors, received higher prescribed doses, and had larger volumes of rectum receiving high dosage than did the 128 selected for non-IGRT. The follow-up duration was 8 to 26 months. Compared with the non-IGRT group, improvement was noted in all dysfunctional rectal symptoms using IGRT. In multivariable analyses, IGRT improved rectal pain (odds ratio [OR] 0.07 [0.009-0.7], P=.02), urgency (OR 0.27 [0.11-0.63], P=<.01), diarrhea (OR 0.009 [0.02-0.35], P<.01), and change in bowel habits (OR 0.18 [0.06-0.52], P<.010). No correlation was observed between rectal symptom levels and dose-volume histogram data. Urinary dysfunctional symptoms were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions: In comparison with men selected for non-IGRT, a significant reduction of bowel dysfunctional symptoms was confirmed in men selected for IGRT, even though they had larger volumes of rectum treated to higher doses

  19. Is radioactive iodine-131 treatment related to the occurrence of non-synchronous second primary malignancy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Marcelo Cruzick de; Momesso, Denise P.; Vieira Neto, Leonardo; Vaisman, Mario; Vaisman, Fernanda; Corbo, Rossana; Martins, Rosangela Aparecida Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Much controversy relates to the risk of non-synchronous second primary malignancies (NSSPM) after radioactive iodine treatment (RAI-131) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. This study evaluated the relationship between RAI-131 and NSSPM in DTC survivors with long-term follow-up. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 413 DTC cases was performed; 252 received RAI-131 and 161 were treated with thyroidectomy alone. Exclusion criteria were: prior or synchronous non-thyroidal malignancies (within the first year), familial syndromes associated to multiple neoplasms, ionizing radiation exposure or second tumors with unknown histopathology. Results: During a mean follow-up of 11.0 ± 7.5 years, 17 (4.1%) patients developed solid NSSPM. Patients with NSSPM were older than those without (p = 0.02). RAI-131 and I-131 cumulative activity were similar in patients with and without NSSPM (p = 0.18 and p = 0.78, respectively). Incidence of NSSPM was 5.2% in patients with RAI-131 treatment and 2.5% in those without RAI-131 (p = 0.18). Using multivariate analysis, RAI-131 was not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence (p = 0.35); age was the only independent predictor (p = 0.04). Under log rank statistical analysis, after 10 years of follow-up, it was observed a tendency of lower NSSPM-free survival among patients that received RAI-131 treatment (0.96 vs. 0.87; p = 0.06), what was not affected by age at DTC diagnosis. Conclusion: In our cohort of DTC survivors, with a long-term follow-up period, RAI-131 treatment and I-131 cumulative dose were not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence. A tendency of premature NSSPM occurrence among patients treated with RAI-131 was observed, suggesting an anticipating oncogenic effect by interaction with other risk factors. (author)

  20. Is radioactive iodine-{sup 131} treatment related to the occurrence of non-synchronous second primary malignancy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Marcelo Cruzick de; Momesso, Denise P.; Vieira Neto, Leonardo; Vaisman, Mario, E-mail: dmomesso@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia; Vaisman, Fernanda; Corbo, Rossana [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia; Martins, Rosangela Aparecida Gomes [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Pesquisa

    2016-02-15

    Objective: Much controversy relates to the risk of non-synchronous second primary malignancies (NSSPM) after radioactive iodine treatment (RAI-131) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. This study evaluated the relationship between RAI-131 and NSSPM in DTC survivors with long-term follow-up. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 413 DTC cases was performed; 252 received RAI-131 and 161 were treated with thyroidectomy alone. Exclusion criteria were: prior or synchronous non-thyroidal malignancies (within the first year), familial syndromes associated to multiple neoplasms, ionizing radiation exposure or second tumors with unknown histopathology. Results: During a mean follow-up of 11.0 ± 7.5 years, 17 (4.1%) patients developed solid NSSPM. Patients with NSSPM were older than those without (p = 0.02). RAI-131 and I-131 cumulative activity were similar in patients with and without NSSPM (p = 0.18 and p = 0.78, respectively). Incidence of NSSPM was 5.2% in patients with RAI-131 treatment and 2.5% in those without RAI-131 (p = 0.18). Using multivariate analysis, RAI-131 was not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence (p = 0.35); age was the only independent predictor (p = 0.04). Under log rank statistical analysis, after 10 years of follow-up, it was observed a tendency of lower NSSPM-free survival among patients that received RAI-131 treatment (0.96 vs. 0.87; p = 0.06), what was not affected by age at DTC diagnosis. Conclusion: In our cohort of DTC survivors, with a long-term follow-up period, RAI-131 treatment and I-131 cumulative dose were not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence. A tendency of premature NSSPM occurrence among patients treated with RAI-131 was observed, suggesting an anticipating oncogenic effect by interaction with other risk factors. (author)

  1. Cancer rehabilitation with a focus on evidence-based outpatient physical and occupational therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Gilchrist, Laura S

    2011-05-01

    Cancer rehabilitation is an important part of survivorship as a distinct phase of treatment. Although cancer rehabilitation may involve many disciplines, this article specifically covers evidence-based treatment in physical and occupational therapy. Patients may need physical and occupational therapy services for a variety of cancer-related or cancer-treatment-related problems, including pain, fatigue, deconditioning, and difficulty with gait. They may also have problems resuming their previous level of function, which can impact on activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, return to previous home and community activity levels, and return to work. This review discusses the role of physical and occupational therapy in helping cancer patients improve pain and musculoskeletal issues, deconditioning and endurance effects, fatigue, balance and falls, and lymphedema and psychosocial problems.

  2. [Limb lymphedema as a first manifestation of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursier, V; Vignes, S

    2004-05-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is characterized by protein-losing enteropathy occurring more frequently in childhood. Chronic diarrhea and diffuse edema are the main clinical manifestations. Peripheral lymphedema may also be associated. Lymphedema is usually present at the time of diagnosis or appears later in the course of the disease. We report the observation of a 31-year-old man suffering from an upper, lower limb and genital lymphedema many years before diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia was established. Lower limb lymphoscintigraphy confirmed lymphedema and duodenal biopsies lymphangiectasia. Hypoproteinemia, lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia were also noted. Treatment of lymphedema included low stretch bandaging and elastic stocking. No dietary management with a low-fat diet was added. Search for primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with biological parameters would be useful when primary lymphedema is present. Especially since primary intestinal lymphangiectasia may be complicated by occurrence of B cell lymphoma.

  3. Mutations in the VEGFR3 signaling pathway explain 36% of familial lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendola, A; Schlögel, M J; Ghalamkarpour, A

    2013-01-01

    Lymphedema is caused by dysfunction of lymphatic vessels, leading to disabling swelling that occurs mostly on the extremities. Lymphedema can be either primary (congenital) or secondary (acquired). Familial primary lymphedema commonly segregates in an autosomal dominant or recessive manner. It can...... of these putative genes. We screened 78 index patients from families with inherited lymphedema for mutations in FLT4, GJC2, FOXC2, SOX18, GATA2, CCBE1, and PTPN14. Altogether, we discovered 28 mutations explaining 36% of the cases. Additionally, 149 patients with sporadic primary lymphedema were screened for FLT4......, FOXC2, SOX18, CCBE1, and PTPN14. Twelve mutations were found that explain 8% of the cases. Still unidentified is the genetic cause of primary lymphedema in 64% of patients with a family history and 92% of sporadic cases. Identification of those genes is important for understanding of etiopathogenesis...

  4. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Mallik, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  5. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass, increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, exercise, physical well-being

  6. Immune proteins and other biochemical constituents of peripheral lymph in patients with malignancy and postirradiation lymphedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, W.L.; Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo. Lab. of Hematology and Lymphology); Loe, K.; Engeset, A.

    1978-01-01

    Concentrations of immunoglobulins and complement proteins were studied in a group of 33 patients with localized tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. Generally, low levels have been found, in many cases below the lowest limit of the control group. The reductions in concentration were more pronounced in patients with lympho-proliferative disorders than with solid tumors. The most reduced were lgM, Clg and total complement hemolytic activity. In a group of 8 patients with lymphedema of lower extremity complicating therapy for uterine cancer an increase of IgM and IgA and decrease in hemolytic activity were found. This indicates the existence of a chronic inflammatory process typical for tissues deprived in lymphatic outflow. (orig.) [de

  7. [Exudative enteropathy in congenital lymphedema-lymphangiectasia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heruth, M; Müller, P; Liebscher, L; Kurze, G; Richter, T

    2006-01-01

    Congenital peripheral elephantiasiformic alterations are very rare in paediatric patients. In a patient with lymphangiectasia-lymphedema syndrome we demonstrate over a 8-year follow-up that not only cosmetic and social indications for surgical treatments but also internal care become important during the course. We report on a boy with congenital lymphedemas of the extremities and the genital region, which were several times surgically treated. The patient became symptomatic firstly with tetanic cramps caused by malabsorption syndrome due to intestinal lymphangiectasia at the age of 6 years. Synopsis of clinical and laboratory findings and the patient's course are pointing to a mild Hennekam syndrome with still unknown aetiology. The boy developed adequately with permanent oral substitution of electrolytes and vitamins, protein-rich diet, supplementation of medium-chain fatty acids and compressing bandages. Infusions of human albumin to correct persistent hypalbuminemia as well as cytostatic treatment with cyclophosphamide as a formal trial were ineffective and are not advisable, therefore.

  8. Imaging findings of adiposis dolorosa vs. massive localized lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M.; Bernard, Stephanie A.; Bennett, Jennifer [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Walker, Eric A. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum's disease) is a condition of benign, painful subcutaneous lipomatous lesions associated with weakness, endocrine and lipid abnormalities, and mental disturbances. There is little information documenting the cross-sectional imaging findings that differentiate it from lipomatous and neoplastic soft tissue masses, or massive localized lymphedema. The purpose of this study was to provide a radiological case series of adiposis dolorosa. A 10-year retrospective review of the picture archiving and communications system was performed. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed images to confirm and document imaging features, location, size, and patient demographics. Medical records were reviewed to characterize patients into three groups: one group met at least three of the four criteria of Dercum's syndrome, the second group met less than three criteria, and the third group had clinical diagnosis of cellulitis of the lower extremity. Seventeen cases (25 masses) of adiposis dolorosa were found, nine cases of which met at least three criteria of Dercum's syndrome. All cases in the first two groups demonstrated skin thickening and lymphedema of subcutaneous fat, which was fluid attenuation on CT and low or intermediate T1-weighted and high STIR/T2-weighted MR signal. Two cases with pathology showed mild fatty infiltration with fibrous septa, and the third case showed massive localized lymphedema. The third group of ten cellulitis patients demonstrated non-mass-like subcutaneous edema with similar CT attenuation and MR signal characteristics to the first two groups, but differed by the presence of post-contrast enhancement and non-mass-like appearance in 90 %. Imaging findings of adiposis dolorosa and massive localized lymphedema overlap, as do the symptoms and pathological features. Due to the mass-like engorgement of the soft tissues and pain, patients will often undergo imaging to exclude neoplasm or infection. Knowledge of these

  9. Adaptive Immune Responses Regulate the Pathophysiology of Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    A, Hennig B (2000) Effect of complex decongestive physiotherapy on gene expression for the inflammatory response in peripheral lymphedema. Lymphology...pharmacologic antagonism of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in a mouse model of scleroderma. Arthritis Rheum 63: 1405-1415. 51. Romani L, Mencacci A, Grohmann...severe disease in collagen-induced arthritis . Arthritis Rheum 48: 1452-1460. 29. Nakamura K, Radhakrishnan K, Wong YM, Rockson SG (2009) Anti

  10. Readability, complexity, and suitability analysis of online lymphedema resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bao Ngoc N; Singh, Mansher; Lee, Bernard T; Rudd, Rima; Singhal, Dhruv

    2017-06-01

    Over 72% of Americans use online health information to assist in health care decision-making. Previous studies of lymphedema literature have focused only on reading level of patient-oriented materials online. Findings indicate they are too advanced for most patients to comprehend. This, more comprehensive study, expands the previous analysis to include critical elements of health materials beyond readability using assessment tools to report on the complexity and density of data as well as text design, vocabulary, and organization. The top 10 highest ranked websites on lymphedema were identified using the most popular search engine (Google). Website content was analyzed for readability, complexity, and suitability using Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, PMOSE/iKIRSCH, and Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM), respectively. PMOSE/iKIRSCH and SAM were performed by two independent raters. Fleiss' kappa score was calculated to ensure inter-rater reliability. Online lymphedema literature had a reading grade level of 14.0 (SMOG). Overall complexity score was 6.7 (PMOSE/iKIRSCH) corresponding to "low" complexity and requiring a 8th-12th grade education. Fleiss' kappa score was 80% (P = 0.04, "substantial" agreement). Overall suitability score was 45% (SAM) correlating to the lowest level of "adequate" suitability. Fleiss' kappa score was 76% (P = 0.06, "substantial" agreement). Online resources for lymphedema are above the recommended levels for readability and complexity. The suitability level is barely adequate for the intended audience. Overall, these materials are too sophisticated for the average American adult, whose literacy skills are well documented. Further efforts to revise these materials are needed to improve patient comprehension and understanding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of a community-based lymphedema management program on episodes of Adenolymphangitis (ADLA and lymphedema progression--Odisha State, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Mues

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema management programs have been shown to decrease episodes of adenolymphangitis (ADLA, but the impact on lymphedema progression and of program compliance have not been thoroughly explored. Our objectives were to determine the rate of ADLA episodes and lymphedema progression over time for patients enrolled in a community-based lymphedema management program. We explored the association between program compliance and ADLA episodes as well as lymphedema progression.A lymphedema management program was implemented in Odisha State, India from 2007-2010 by the non-governmental organization, Church's Auxiliary for Social Action, in consultation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A cohort of patients was followed over 24 months. The crude 30-day rate of ADLA episodes decreased from 0.35 episodes per person-month at baseline to 0.23 at 24 months. Over the study period, the percentage of patients who progressed to more severe lymphedema decreased (P-value  = 0.0004, while those whose lymphedema regressed increased over time (P-value<0.0001. Overall compliance to lymphedema management, lagged one time point, appeared to have little to no association with the frequency of ADLA episodes among those without entry lesions (RR = 0.87 (0.69, 1.10 and was associated with an increased rate (RR = 1.44 (1.11, 1.86 among those with entry lesions. Lagging compliance two time points, it was associated with a decrease in the rate of ADLA episodes among those with entry lesions (RR = 0.77 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.99 and was somewhat associated among those without entry lesions (RR = 0.83 (95% CI: 0.64, 1.06. Compliance to soap was associated with a decreased rate of ADLA episodes among those without inter-digital entry lesions.These results indicate that a community-based lymphedema management program is beneficial for lymphedema patients for both ADLA episodes and lymphedema. It is one of the first studies to demonstrate an association between program

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of fluorescence microlymphography for detecting limb lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keo, H H; Husmann, M; Groechenig, E; Willenberg, T; Gretener, S B

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescence microlymphography (FML) is a minimally invasive technique for visualization of the cutaneous lymphatic network. The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and safety of FML in patients with unilateral lymphedema. This was a cross sectional study. Patients with unilateral leg swelling were assessed and compared with the unaffected contralateral limb. FML was performed in all index legs and the contralateral leg by injecting 0.1 mL of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran intradermally in both limbs at the same level. The most prominent swelling of the affected limb was the anatomical reference. The spread of the dye in the lymphatic capillaries of the skin was measured in all dimensions by epiluminator intravital microscopy and the maximum dye spread value 10 min after injection was used for statistical analysis. The contralateral leg served as control. Test accuracy and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess threshold values that best predict lymphedema. Between March 2008 and February 2014 seventy patients with unilateral chronic leg swelling were clinically diagnosed with lymphedema. The median age was 45 (IQR 27-56) years. Of those, 46 (65.7%) were female and 71.4% had primary and 28.6% secondary lymphedema. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio, and positive and negative predictive value were 94.3%, 78.6%, 4.40, 0.07, 81.5%, and 93.2% for the 12 mm cut off level and 91.4%, 85.7%, 6.40, 0.10, 86.5%, and 90.9% for the 14 mm cut off level, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.83-0.95). No major adverse events were observed. FML is an almost atraumatic and safe technique for detecting lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. In this series the greatest accuracy was observed at a cut off level of ≥14 mm maximum spread. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. VEGF-C gene therapy augments postnatal lymphangiogenesis and ameliorates secondary lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-sup; Murayama, Toshinori; Gravereaux, Edwin; Tkebuchava, Tengiz; Silver, Marcy; Curry, Cynthia; Wecker, Andrea; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Hu, Chun Song; Kearney, Marianne; Ashare, Alan; Jackson, David G.; Kubo, Hajime; Isner, Jeffrey M.; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Although lymphedema is a common clinical condition, treatment for this disabling condition remains limited and largely ineffective. Recently, it has been reported that overexpression of VEGF-C correlates with increased lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis). However, the effect of VEGF-C–induced lymphangiogenesis on lymphedema has yet to be demonstrated. Here we investigated the impact of local transfer of naked plasmid DNA encoding human VEGF-C (phVEGF-C) on two animal models of lymphedema: one in the rabbit ear and the other in the mouse tail. In a rabbit model, following local phVEGF-C gene transfer, VEGFR-3 expression was significantly increased. This gene transfer led to a decrease in thickness and volume of lymphedema, improvement of lymphatic function demonstrated by serial lymphoscintigraphy, and finally, attenuation of the fibrofatty changes of the skin, the final consequences of lymphedema. The favorable effect of phVEGF-C on lymphedema was reconfirmed in a mouse tail model. Immunohistochemical analysis using lymphatic-specific markers: VEGFR-3, lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1, together with the proliferation marker Ki-67 Ab revealed that phVEGF-C transfection potently induced new lymphatic vessel growth. This study, we believe for the first time, documents that gene transfer of phVEGF-C resolves lymphedema through direct augmentation of lymphangiogenesis. This novel therapeutic strategy may merit clinical investigation in patients with lymphedema. PMID:12618526

  14. Far-Infrared Radiation Thermotherapy Improves Tissue Fibrosis in Chronic Extremity Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ning Fei; Sadigh, Parviz; Evans, Verity Joyce; Zhou, Huihong; Gao, Weiqing; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-09-29

    Fibrosis can enhance the exacerbation of lymphedema, which becomes obvious in late stage II-III lymphedema. However, whether far-infrared radiation thermotherapy (FIRT) can cure lymphedema fibrosis is still lack of research. This research was to investigate the therapeutic effect of FIRT on tissue fibrosis in the treatment of Late stage II-III lymphedema. Patients accepted only FIRT for a total of 20 sessions. The treatment session duration was 2 hours, and a stable machine temperature of 42°C was maintained throughout treatments. Clinical evaluation and laboratory evaluation were conducted before and after FIRT. Clinical outcome measures included circumference of affected extremity, skin elasticity, ultrasound, patients' subjective assessment, and quality of life (QOL). Laboratory outcome measures included serum and local lymphedema tissue fluid concentrations of fibrosis associated cytokines, tissue growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-18, and caspase-1. Between 2015 and 2016, clinical evaluation of 64 patients with late stage II-III lymphedema was conducted. From this group, 12 cases (18.75%) underwent simultaneous laboratory evaluation. Circumferences of affected extremities improved significantly following treatment (p pain, discomfort, and numbness (p effective treatment for lymphedema tissue fibrosis; it reduces the concentration of fibrosis cytokines in local lymphedema tissues. Consequently, this treatment can reduce the density of fibrosed tissue in the affected extremity, increase skin elasticity, significantly improve clinical symptoms, and improve QOL of patients.

  15. Physiotherapy treatments for breast cancer-related lymphedema: a literature review Tratamientos fisioterapéuticos para el linfedema después de la cirugía de cáncer de seno: una revisión de literatura Tratamentos fisioterapêuticos para o linfedema pós-câncer de mama: uma revisão de literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Fernanda Braz da Silva Leal

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most frequent cancer among women. Surgery is part of the therapeutic process to prevent metastases, but it can also cause some complications, including lymphedema. Physiotherapy contributes to its treatment, using different techniques that have been developed over the years. This systematic literature review aims to present physiotherapy modalities applied for lymphedema therapy. The literature review was conducted using textbooks and Lilacs, Pubmed and Scielo databases, from 1951 to 2009. Physiotherapy resources used for lymphedema treatment include complex decongestive therapy (CDT, pneumatic compression (PC, high voltage electrical stimulation (HVES and laser therapy. The analyzed literature shows that better results are obtained with combined techniques. CDT is the most used protocol, and its association with PC has demonstrated efficacy. The new techniques HVES and laser present satisfactory results.El cáncer de seno es el segundo tipo de cáncer más común entre las mujeres. La cirugía es parte del proceso terapéutico en la prevención de la diseminación de la enfermedad, sin embargo, puede ser causa de algunas complicaciones como el linfedema. La fisioterapia contribuye para su tratamiento con diferentes técnicas que vienen siendo desarrolladas a lo largo de los años. El objetivo de esta revisión sistemática de la literatura es presentar las modalidades fisioterapéuticas aplicadas en el tratamiento del linfedema. La revisión bibliográfica fue efectuada en libros textos y en las bases de datos LILACS, PubMed y SciELO, en el período de 1951 a 2009. Entre los recursos fisioterapéuticos utilizados en el tratamiento del linfedema están la terapia compleja descongestiva (TCD, compresión neumática (CN, estimulación eléctrica de alto voltaje (EVA y láserterapia. Los trabajos analizados muestran que los resultados son mejores con las técnicas combinadas. La TCD es el protocolo más utilizado, y su

  16. No evidence of benefit from class-II compression stockings in the prevention of lower-limb lymphedema after inguinal lymph node dissection: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuiver, M M; de Rooij, J D; Lucas, C; Nieweg, O E; Horenblas, S; van Geel, A N; van Beurden, M; Aaronson, N K

    2013-09-01

    Graduated compression stockings have been advocated for prevention of lymphedema after inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND) although scientific evidence of their efficacy in preventing lymphedema is lacking. The primary objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of class II compression stockings for the prevention of lymphedema in cancer patients following ILND. Secondary objectives were to investigate the influence of stockings on the occurrence of wound complications and genital edema, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and body image. Eighty patients (45 with melanoma, 35 with urogenital tumors) who underwent ILND at two specialized cancer centers were randomly allocated to class II compression stocking use for six months or to a usual care control group. Lymphedema of the leg and genital area, wound complications, HRQoL, and body image were assessed at regular intervals prior to and up to 12 months after ILND. No significant differences were observed between groups in the incidence of edema, median time to the occurrence of edema, incidence of genital edema, frequency of complications, HRQoL, or body image. Based on the results of the current study, routine prescription of class II graduated compression stockings after ILND should be questioned and alternative prevention strategies should be considered.

  17. Cell therapy for the treatment of lower limb lymphedema. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicoechea Diaz, Pedro; Hernandez Ramirez, Porfirio; Artaza Sanz, Heriberto

    2010-01-01

    Although lymphedema is a common disabling disease causing significant morbidity for affected patients, treatment for this condition remains limited and largely ineffective. Some reported data suggest that some bone-marrow derived cells may play a role in lymphangiogenesis. It appears that blood vessels and lymphatic vessels might use the same population of cells for vasculogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Therefore, adult stem cell therapy could be a new useful strategy for the treatment of lymphedema. We report a resolution of a severe lower limb bilateral lymphedema after implantation of autologous adult stem cells derived from bone marrow. As far as we know, this is the first reported case with chronic lower limb lymphedema treated successfully with autologous cell therapy. This procedure is a low-cost, relatively simple and easy to perform option that opens new ways for the treatment of lymphedema

  18. Development of a Tissue-Engineered Lymphatic Graft Using Nanocomposite Polymer for the Treatment of Secondary Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanapathy, Muholan; Kalaskar, Deepak; Mosahebi, Afshin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2016-03-01

    Damage of the lymphatic vessels, commonly due to surgical resection for cancer treatment, leads to secondary lymphedema. Tissue engineering approach offers a possible solution to reconstruct this damage with the use of lymphatic graft to re-establish the lymphatic flow, hence preventing lymphedema. The aim of this study is to develop a tissue-engineered lymphatic graft using nanocomposite polymer and human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLECs). A nanocomposite polymer, the polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane-poly(carbonate-urea)urethane (POSS-PCU), which has enhanced mechanical, chemical, and physical characteristics, was used to develop the lymphatic graft. POSS-PCU has been used clinically for the world's first synthetic trachea, lacrimal duct, and is currently undergoing clinical trial for coronary artery bypass graft. Two designs and fabrication methods were used to manufacture the conduits. The fabrication method, the mechanical and physical properties, as well as the hydraulic conductivity were tested. This is followed by in vitro cell culture analysis to test the cytocompatibility of HDLEC with the polymer surface. Using the casted extrusion method, the nanocomposite lymphatic graft demonstrates desirable mechanical property and hydraulic conductivity to re-establish the lymphatic flow. The conduit has high tensile strength (casted: 74.86 ± 5.74 MPa vs. coagulated: 31.33 ± 3.71 MPa; P nanocomposite polymer. It displays excellent mechanical property and cytocompatibility to HDLECs, offering much promise for clinical applications and as a new treatment option for secondary lymphedema. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Re-analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziaja, Ellen L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Hollander, Jay; Matter, Richard C.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate specific antigen (PSA) has been established as the most important prognostic factor for prostate cancer. We reviewed our experience treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to evaluate if previously defined clinical and treatment related prognostic factors remain valid when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Methods and Materials: Between 1/87 and 12/91, 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58 - 70.4 Gy) using a 4 field or arc technique. Pre- and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤ 1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment completion. After achieving nadir, if 2 consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Patients (pts) were divided into 3 groups according to total number of days on treatment: ≤ 49 days (≤ 7 weeks)- 21 pts; 50-63 days (8-9 weeks)- 429 pts; and ≥ 64 days (≥ 9 weeks)- 15 pts. Patients were also divided into groups with respect to the method of diagnosis: TURP (81 pts), or other means (399 pts). Patients were further divided into 2 groups: 1) if they had ever had a pre-treatment TURP (170 pts) or 2) if they had not (310 pts). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to boost technique: bilateral arcs (459 pts) or 4 field box (21 pts). Patients were also divided into groups according to total RT dose: ≤ 70 Gy (421 pts) or > 70 Gy (59 pts). Patients were further subdivided into 3 dose groups: 70 Gy (59 pts). Results: Median follow-up is 48 months (range 3 - 112 months). No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), or treatment time divided into

  20. An analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience in treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if previously analyzed clinical and treatment related prognostic factors affected outcome when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Materials and methods: Between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991, 470 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with external beam RT using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment. After achieving nadir, if two consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Prognostic factors, including the total number of days in treatment, the method of diagnosis, a history of any pretreatment transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the type of boost were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months. No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), history of any pretreatment TURP, history of diagnosis by TURP, or boost techniques. Patients diagnosed by TURP had a significant improvement in the overall rate of biochemical control (P < 0.03) compared to transrectal/transperineal biopsy. The 5-year actuarial rates were 58 versus 39%, respectively. This improvement was not evident when pretreatment PSA, T stage, or Gleason score were controlled for. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with outcome. When analysis was limited to a more favorable group of patients (T1/T2 tumors, pretreatment PSA ≤20 ng/ml and Gleason score <7), none of these variables were significantly predictive of biochemical control when controlling for pretreatment PSA, T stage and Gleason score. Conclusions: No significant effect of treatment time, overall time, pretreatment

  1. Safety of Weightlifting Among Women with or at Risk for Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema: Musculoskeletal Injuries and Health Care Use in a Weightlifting Rehabilitation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C.; Troxel, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. It has been noted that only 14% of all clinical trials are translated into practice. The objective of this paper is to promote translation of an efficacious rehabilitative exercise program for breast cancer survivors by clarifying for clinicians the safety profile of participants (e.g., rates of musculoskeletal injury and referral to medical professionals), and to use this evidence to make recommendations on the appropriate training of health and fitness staff who would be capable of safely, effectively, and sustainably delivering the program. Methods. Breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema were randomized to twice-weekly weightlifting or standard care for 1 year. An injury survey and health care evaluation were administered after 1 year and in 3-month intervals, respectively. Results. The cumulative incidence and rate of injury were higher in the weightlifting than in the control group. The injury rates were 2.3 and 0.3 per 1,000 bouts of weightlifting among breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema, respectively. Among breast cancer survivors with or at risk for lymphedema, 20.9% in the weightlifting group had an encounter with a health care provider that required cessation or dose modification of weightlifting. Conclusion. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of weightlifting, musculoskeletal injuries and other health problems did occur. Therefore, for the successful translation of this rehabilitative intervention into clinical practice, health and fitness professionals working with breast cancer survivors need the knowledge, skills, and abilities that clarify their scope of practice to address these health care needs. PMID:22752068

  2. Pilates and Dance to Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-12

    Breast Cancer; Quality of Life; Lymphedema; Fatigue; Depressive Symptoms; Body Image; Self Esteem; Optimism; Sexual Function Disturbances; Stress; Sleep Disturbance; Pain; Muscular Weakness; Postural Balance; Range of Motion; Cardiorespiratory Fitness

  3. Evaluating the Burden of Lymphedema Due to Lymphatic Filariasis in 2005 in Khurda District, Odisha State, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Walsh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over 1.1 billion people worldwide are at risk for lymphatic filariasis (LF, and the global burden of LF-associated lymphedema is estimated at 16 million affected people, yet country-specific estimates are poor.A house-to-house morbidity census was conducted to assess the burden and severity of lymphedema in a population of 1,298,576 persons living in the LF-endemic district of Khurda in Odisha State, India. The burden of lymphedema in Khurda is widespread geographically, and 1.3% (17,036 of the total population report lymphedema. 51.3% of the patients reporting lymphedema were female, mean age 49.4 years (1-99. Early lymphedema (Dreyer stages 1 & 2 was reported in two-thirds of the patients. Poisson regression analysis was conducted in order to determine risk factors for advanced lymphedema (Dreyer stages 4-7. Increasing age was significantly associated with advanced lymphedema, and persons 70 years and older had a prevalence three times greater than individuals ages 15-29 (aPR: 3.21, 95% CI 2.45, 4.21. The number of adenolymphangitis (ADL episodes reported in the previous year was also significantly associated with advanced lymphedema (aPR 4.65, 95% CI 2.97-7.30. This analysis is one of the first to look at potential risk factors for advanced lymphedema using morbidity census data from an entire district in Odisha State, India.These data highlight the magnitude of lymphedema in LF-endemic areas and emphasize the need to develop robust estimates of numbers of individuals with lymphedema in order to identify the extent of lymphedema management services needed in these regions.

  4. Accurate Prediction of Submental Lymph Nodes Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Lymphedema Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora-Ortiz Asuncion, MD

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions:. The preoperative MRI is a useful tool for the detection of mean 7.2 submental lymph nodes. Mean 72.2% of submental lymph nodes can be successfully transferred for extremity lymphedema with optimal functional recovery.

  5. Volume and Tissue Composition Changes Measured with Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Melanoma-Related Limb Lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjorup, Caroline A; Hendel, Helle W; Zerahn, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstracts Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the volume, fat mass, and lean mass in both upper and lower limbs measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in melanoma patients with melanoma-related limb lymphedema. METHODS AND RESULTS: Four hundred thirty...... lymphedema was diagnosed on the basis of history and characteristic physical findings on the clinical examination. The inter-limb differences in volume, fat mass, and lean mass measured with DXA were categorized as none/mild, moderate, or severe according to reference values (taking handedness into account......, and the majority of lymphedemas were categorized as mild. The increase in the volume of limbs with lymphedema was primarily due to an increase in fat mass. CONCLUSION: There is a high prevalence of melanoma-related limb lymphedema. The increase in volume in the limb with lymphedema is primarily due to an increase...

  6. VEGF-C gene therapy augments postnatal lymphangiogenesis and ameliorates secondary lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Young-sup; Murayama, Toshinori; Gravereaux, Edwin; Tkebuchava, Tengiz; Silver, Marcy; Curry, Cynthia; Wecker, Andrea; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Hu, Chun Song; Kearney, Marianne; Ashare, Alan; Jackson, David G.; Kubo, Hajime; Isner, Jeffrey M.; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Although lymphedema is a common clinical condition, treatment for this disabling condition remains limited and largely ineffective. Recently, it has been reported that overexpression of VEGF-C correlates with increased lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis). However, the effect of VEGF-C–induced lymphangiogenesis on lymphedema has yet to be demonstrated. Here we investigated the impact of local transfer of naked plasmid DNA encoding human VEGF-C (phVEGF-C) on two animal models of lymphed...

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of fluorescence microlymphography for detecting lymphedema of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keo, Hong H; Schilling, Marianne; Büchel, Roland; Gröchenig, Ernst; Engelberger, Rolf P; Willenberg, Torsten; Baumgartner, Iris; Gretener, Silvia B

    2013-06-01

    Fluorescence microlymphography (FML) is used to visualize the lymphatic capillaries. A maximum spread of the fluorescence dye of ≥ 12 mm has been suggested for the diagnosis of lymphedema. However, data on sensitivity and specificity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of FML for diagnosing lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. Patients with lower extremity swelling were clinically assessed and separated into lymphedema and non-lymphatic edema groups. FML was studied in all affected legs and the maximum spread of lymphatic capillaries was measured. Test accuracy and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess possible threshold values that predict lymphedema. Between March 2008 and August 2011 a total of 171 patients (184 legs) with a median age of 43.5 (IQR 24, 54) years were assessed. Of those, 94 (51.1%) legs were diagnosed with lymphedema. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio and positive and negative predictive value were 87%, 64%, 2.45, 0.20, 72% and 83% for the 12-mm cut-off level and 79%, 83%, 4.72, 0.26, 83% and 79% for the 14-mm cut-off level, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.88). Sensitivity was higher in the secondary versus primary lymphedema (95.0% vs 74.3%, p = 0.045). No major adverse events were observed. In conclusion, FML is a simple and safe technique for detecting lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. A cut-off level of ≥ 14-mm maximum spread has a high sensitivity and high specificity of detecting lymphedema and should be chosen.

  8. FILAR I AL LYMPHEDEMA LOWER LIMB DEBULKING 34 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baburao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There are various treatment options in the management of filarial lymphedema of the lower extremities. The end point, regardless of the method adopted is a reduction of the girth of the limb, prevention of future increases in limb girth, prevention of recurrent episodes of streptococcal cellulitis; more important the treatment method used should not lead to any secondary problems that may far out shadow the primary co Majority of the methods adopted are mainly of the secondary prevention kind; very few of the procedures to date cure the disease condition. A few of the methods have been historically found to be more effective than the others; this may be real or apparent as the methodology of - reporting swelling in the lower limb may not have been consistent and there are too many variables to consider. This study seeks to evaluate the efficacy of one such treatment protocol for the management of filarial lymphedema of the lower limb 80 patients were admitted for filarial lymphedema of the lower limbs from 2005 to 2015 Of these 42 patients underwent surgical treatment; operative records for 8 of these patients was insufficient to analyse; among the remaining 34 patients 19 patients were unavailable for review. This left us a patient population of 15 for the final analysis . The surgical treatment of all of the 15 patients was identical, after preop preparation by using compression ba n dages to soften the edema along with a period of bed rest debulking of excess skin and subcutaneous tissue and primary closure was done. The intro operative application of Esmarch bandages helped in expelling fluid from the tissues and this ensured that closure was obtained with no tension at the margins. Patients were kept for at least 5 days post op before discharge; the routine use of compression crepe bandages postop along with bed rest ensured that we did not have a single case of skin necrosis or wound disruption in the postop period. All patients were given

  9. Surgical treatment of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum Tratamento cirúrgico do linfedema peno-escrotal

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    Miguel Modolin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum, regardless of its etiology, is determined by reduced lymphatic flow with subsequent enlargement of the penis and scrotum. The clinical course of this condition is characterized by extreme discomfort for patients, with limitation of local hygiene, ambulation, sexual intercourse, and voiding in the standing position. The purpose of the present study is to present the experience and results of the treatment of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum by removing affected tissues and correcting the penoscrotal region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventeen patients with lymphedema of the penis and scrotum were treated with a modified Charles procedure, which consists of the excision of the affected skin followed by scrotoplasty and midline suture simulating the scrotal raphe. The penis is covered with a split-thickness skin graft by means of a zigzag suture on its ventral surface. RESULTS: Regression of symptoms and improvement of previous clinical conditions were verified in the follow-up which ranged from 6 months to 6 years. One patient who had undergone lymphadenectomy with radiation therapy due to penile cancer had recurrent scrotum lymphedema. CONCLUSIONS: The modified Charles procedure for the treatment of penoscrotal lymphedema is easily reproducible and allows better local hygiene, easier ambulation, voiding in the standing position, resuming sexual intercourse, and finally, better cosmetic results in the affected area with remarkable improvement in quality of life.INTRODUÇÃO: O linfedema peno-escrotal, independentemente da etiologia, é determinado pela redução do fluxo linfático com conseqüente aumento do volume do escroto e pênis. A evolução clínica da doença é caracterizada com extremo desconforto ao paciente, limitando a higiene local, a deambulação, o intercurso sexual e a micção em posição ortostática. OBJETIVO: Apresentar a experiência e resultados no tratamento da patologia com

  10. Efficacy and safety of far infrared radiation in lymphedema treatment: clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ning Fei; Feng, Shao Qing; Tong, Yun; Zhang, Ju Fang; Constantinides, Joannis; Lazzeri, Davide; Grassetti, Luca; Nicoli, Fabio; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-04-01

    Swelling is the most common symptom of extremities lymphedema. Clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis were conducted after far infrared radiation (FIR) treatment on the main four components of lymphedema: fluid, fat, protein, and hyaluronan. Far infrared radiation is a kind of hyperthermia therapy with several and additional benefits as well as promoting microcirculation flow and improving collateral lymph circumfluence. Although FIR therapy has been applied for several years on thousands of lymphedema patients, there are still few studies that have reported the biological effects of FIR on lymphatic tissue. In this research, we investigate the effects of far infrared rays on the major components of lymphatic tissue. Then, we explore the effectiveness and safety of FIR as a promising treatment modality of lymphedema. A total of 32 patients affected by lymphedema in stage II and III were treated between January 2015 and January 2016 at our department. After therapy, a significant decrease of limb circumference measurements was noted and improving of quality of life was registered. Laboratory examination showed the treatment can also decrease the deposition of fluid, fat, hyaluronan, and protein, improving the swelling condition. We believe FIR treatment could be considered as both an alternative monotherapy and a useful adjunctive to the conservative or surgical lymphedema procedures. Furthermore, the real and significant biological effects of FIR represent possible future applications in wide range of the medical field.

  11. Dynamic analysis of muscular lymphokinetic activities in the treatment of lymphedema of the upper limbs - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p233

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    Maria de Fátima Guerreiro Godoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the resting and working pressures associated to a restrain mechanism, in patients suffering from lymphedema of the upper limbs, postbreast cancer treatment, whilst performing occupational and day-to-day self-care activities. Six female patients under treatment of lymphedema due to surgical, radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer, in the age group between 32 and 76 years (mean 54 years old, ± 31.11 were selected. A compression sleeve of “gorgurão” (cotton-polyester material was applied as a restrain mechanism. The occupational and daily personal care activities evaluated were those common to all participants. These activities included washingup, cooking in a small pan, sweeping the floor using the affected arm, brushing the teeth, brushing the hair, washing small items of clothes, ironing clothes and making the bed. For statistical analysis, mean and standard deviation between resting pressures and minimum and maximum working pressures were determined. The two-tailed student t-test and variance analysis were used for repeated measurements. The Bonferroni limit was used in the analysis of the variables to calculate the alpha error, with a value of 5%, considered statistically significant. All of the analyzed activities associated to the “gorgurão” compression sleeve generated both resting and working pressures (p <0.005. In conclusion, the occupational daily life tasks used in the present study generate resting and working pressures and can be used as a form of treatment of the lymphedema.

  12. The effect of pain on physical functioning after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Christensen, Karl Bang; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: Persistent postsurgical pain, musculoskeletal pain, sensory disturbances and lymphedema are major clinical problems after treatment for breast cancer. However, there is little evidence on how these sequelae affects physical function. The aim was to develop and validate a procedure...

  13. Dermal collagen and lipid deposition correlate with tissue swelling and hydraulic conductivity in murine primary lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Joseph M; Markhus, Carl Erik; Gyenge, Christina C; Alitalo, Kari; Wiig, Helge; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-03-01

    Primary lymphedema is a congenital pathology of dysfunctional lymphatic drainage characterized by swelling of the limbs, thickening of the dermis, and fluid and lipid accumulation in the underlying tissue. Two mouse models of primary lymphedema, the Chy mouse and the K14-VEGFR-3-Ig mouse, both lack dermal lymphatic capillaries and exhibit a lymphedematous phenotype attributable to disrupted VEGFR-3 signaling. Here we show that the differences in edematous tissue composition between these two models correlated with drastic differences in hydraulic conductivity. The skin of Chy mice possessed significantly higher levels of collagen and fat, whereas K14-VEGFR-3-Ig mouse skin composition was relatively normal, as compared with their respective wild-type controls. Functionally, this resulted in a greatly increased dermal hydraulic conductivity in K14-VEGFR3-Ig, but not Chy, mice. Our data suggest that lymphedema associated with increased collagen and lipid accumulation counteracts an increased hydraulic conductivity associated with dermal swelling, which in turn further limits interstitial transport and swelling. Without lipid and collagen accumulation, hydraulic conductivity is increased and overall swelling is minimized. These opposing tissue responses to primary lymphedema imply that tissue remodeling--predominantly collagen and fat deposition--may dictate tissue swelling and govern interstitial transport in lymphedema.

  14. The effect of mechanical lymph drainage accompanied with heat on lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, Valente Flávia; de Fátima, Guerreiro Godoy Maria; Maria, Pereira de Godoy José

    2011-11-01

    Thermotherapy has been indicated by some researchers as a treatment for lymphedema. A study comparing temperatures demonstrated that a temperature of 40°C significantly increased the transportation of lymph compared to other temperatures assessed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible benefits of mechanical lymph drainage accompanied with heat in the treatment of lymphedema of the lower limbs. In a cross-over randomized study, the effect of heat on lymph drainage was evaluated in the treatment of leg lymphedema. The study, performed in the Godoy Clinic in São Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil, involved seven patients (two males and five females) with leg lymphedema. The patients' ages ranged from 18 to 79 years old with a mean of 48.5 years. The subjects underwent a total of 38 assessments including 19 evaluations of mechanical lymph drainage alone and 19 combined with thermotherapy. Heat was applied using an electric blanket which was wrapped around the legs of the patients. The volume of legs was evaluated by water plethysmography before and after treatment sessions. The paired t-test was used for statistical analysis with an alpha error of p = 0.05 being considered as acceptable. No statistically significant differences were evidenced between mechanical lymph drainage alone and lymph drainage combined with thermotherapy. There was no obvious synergic effect in the immediate post-treatment period when heat was combined with mechanical lymph drainage in the treatment of lymphedema.

  15. Refractory lymphedema of the hand: an unusual presentation of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection

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    Ali Majdzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV infection of the hand resulting in lymphatic complications such as lymphangitis and lymphedema is exceedingly uncommon. Although these complications typically resolve in 21 days, they can be persistent and may not resolve even with antiviral use, thereby mimicking dyshidrotic eczema or a bacterial event and often being misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated as such. We report a case of frequently recurring HSV infection of the hand over a long period of time resulting in refractory lymphedema which did not resolve with antiviral treatment. We further endeavor to raise awareness about this highly unusual presentation of HSV infection. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted for similar cases using PubMed and Medline. Case Report: This is the first reported case with nearly a decade-long interval between the onset of primary HSV infection and the development of chronic lymphedema. Although valacyclovir significantly reduced the episodic aggravation of the lymphedema, it did not entirely resolve it. Similar cases of persistent lymphedema also included a long history of untreated and recurrent HSV infection of the hand, suggesting that this lymphatic outcome may be circumvented by prompt treatment with antivirals. Conclusion: This case report not only presents a highly uncommon lymphatic manifestation and unusual timeline of exacerbation of the very common HSV infection, but also highlights the importance and benefits of early initiation of antiviral therapy and the prevention of reactivation.

  16. Feasibility study of axillary reverse mapping lymphoscintigraphy in carcinoma breast: A concept toward preventing lymphedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Sunny J.; Satish, C.; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Subramanyam, Padma; Vijaykumar, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    In the surgery of breast cancer, axillary reverse mapping (ARM) is the identification and preservation of arm draining lymph node (ARM node) during an axillary dissection. The assumption is that the ARM node is different from node draining breast and is unlikely to be involved even in the patients with axillary nodal metastases. If we can identify and preserve ARM node using lymphoscintigraphy; morbidity of lymphedema, as seen with axillary dissection, may be avoided. Pathologically proven 50 breast cancer patients undergoing initial surgery (cTx-4, cN0-2, and Mx-0) were included in this study. Less than 37 MBq, 0.5 ml in equally divided doses of filtered 99mTc sulfur colloid was injected intradermally into the second and third web spaces. ARM nodes in the axilla were identified with the help of Gamma Probe intraoperatively; however, their location was noted with the reference to specific anatomical landmarks and sent for histopathological examination after excision. The ARM node was successfully identified in 47/50 cases (sensitivity - 94%). In 40 out of 47 cases (85%), the location of the ARM node was found to lateral to the subscapular pedicle, above the second intercostobrachial nerve and just below the axillary vein. Of the 47 patients in whom ARM node/s were identified, metastasis was noted in 5 of them (10%). Four out of these 5 patients had the pN3 disease. ARM node exists, and it is feasible to identify ARM node using radio isotope technique with an excellent sensitivity. ARM node seems to have a fairly constant location in more than 80% cases. It is involved with metastasis (10% cases) only when there are multiple lymph nodal metastases in the axilla

  17. Forensic investigation of medical treatment related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Joseph E; Ranson, David L; O'Brien, Adam; Charles, Amanda; Young, Carmel

    2009-04-01

    Patients suffer preventable harm from their medical treatment. The traditional approaches to investigating medical treatment related deaths are the 'hospital mortality audit' and legal or coroners investigation. The aim is to describe how the patient safety movement in the late 1990s is changing traditional approaches to the investigation. The prevention of medical treatment related death involves an investigation as one of five major stages. These are Stage I Preparedness; Stage II Recognition and reporting; Stage III Investigation and analysis; Stage IV Findings and recommendations; and Stage V Response. The influence of the patient safety approach is considered at each stage with a particular focus on Stage I. It is at this stage that the concepts of clinical governance, culture and systems of care have a major influence on the nature of an investigation. The genesis of the modern forensic investigation into medical treatment related deaths in Victoria, Australia is described. The formation of the Clinical Liaison Service incorporates concepts from the patient safety approach with clinical staff to transform the traditional Coroner's investigation. Benefits of a modern forensic investigation include improving appropriateness of cases proceeding to investigation and a focus on prevention. Achieving a reduction in medical treatment related death requires substantial shifts towards an approach consistent with the patient safety.

  18. Genetic parameters for chronic progressive lymphedema in Belgian Draught Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, K; Janssens, S; Peeters, L M; Foqué, N; Gasthuys, F; Oosterlinck, M; Buys, N

    2014-12-01

    Genetic parameters for chronic progressive lymphedema (CPL)-associated traits in Belgian Draught Horses were estimated, using a multitrait animal model. Clinical scores of CPL in the four limbs/horse (CPLclin ), skinfold thickness and hair samples (hair diameter) were studied. Due to CPLclin uncertainty in younger horses (progressive CPL character), a restricted data set (D_3+) was formed, excluding records from horses under 3 years from the complete data set (D_full). Age, gender, coat colour and limb hair pigmentation were included as fixed, permanent environment and date of recording as random effects. Higher CPLclin certainty (D_3+) increased heritability coefficients of, and genetic correlations between traits, with CPLclin heritabilities (SE) for the respective data sets: 0.11 (0.06) and 0.26 (0.05). A large proportion of the CPLclin variance was attributed to the permanent environmental effect in D_full, but less in D_3+. Date of recording explained a proportion of variance from 0.09 ± 0.03 to 0.61 ± 0.08. Additive genetic correlations between CPLclin and both skinfold thickness and hair diameter showed the latter two traits cannot be used as a direct diagnostic aid for CPL. Due to the relatively low heritability of CPLclin , selection should focus on estimated breeding values (from repeated clinical examinations) to reduce CPL occurrence in the Belgian Draught Horse. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  20. Impact of community-based lymphedema management on perceived disability among patients with lymphatic filariasis in Orissa State, India.

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    Philip J Budge

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis (LF infects approximately 120 million people worldwide. As many as 40 million have symptoms of LF disease, including lymphedema, elephantiasis, and hydrocele. India constitutes approximately 45% of the world's burden of LF. The Indian NGO Church's Auxiliary for Social Action (CASA has been conducting a community-based lymphedema management program in Orissa State since 2007 that aims to reduce the morbidity associated with lymphedema and elephantiasis. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the effects of this program on lymphedema patients' perceived disability.For this prospective cohort study, 370 patients ≥14 years of age, who reported lymphedema lasting more than three months in one or both legs, were recruited from villages in the Bolagarh sub-district, Khurda District, Orissa, India. The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II was administered to participants at baseline (July, 2009, and then at regular intervals through 24 months (July, 2011, to assess patients' perceived disability. Disability scores decreased significantly (p<0.0001 from baseline to 24 months. Multivariable analysis using mixed effects modeling found that employment and time in the program were significantly associated with lower disability scores after two years of program involvement. Older age, female gender, the presence of other chronic health conditions, moderate (Stage 3 or advanced (Stage 4-7 lymphedema, reporting an adenolymphangitis (ADL episode during the previous 30 days, and the presence of inter-digital lesions were associated with higher disability scores. Patients with moderate or advanced lymphedema experienced greater improvements in perceived disability over time. Patients participating in the program for at least 12 months also reported losing 2.5 fewer work days per month (p<0.001 due to their lymphedema, compared to baseline.These results indicate that community-based lymphedema management programs

  1. Autosomal recessive intestinal lymphangiectasia and lymphedema, with facial anomalies and mental retardation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Geerdink, R. A.; Hamel, B. C.; Hennekam, F. A.; Kraus, P.; Rammeloo, J. A.; Tillemans, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    We report on two male and two female relatives with intestinal lymphangiectasia; severe lymphedema of limbs, genitalia, and face; facial anomalies; seizures; mild growth retardation; and moderate mental retardation. Main facial anomalies are a flat face, flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, small

  2. Diabetic foot ulcers in conjunction with lower limb lymphedema: pathophysiology and treatment procedures

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    Kanapathy M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Muholan Kanapathy,1 Mark J Portou,1,2 Janice Tsui,1,2 Toby Richards1,21Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, 2Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs are complex, chronic, and progressive wounds, and have a significant impact on morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. A particular aspect of DFU that has not been reviewed extensively thus far is its management in conjunction with peripheral limb edema. Peripheral limb edema is a feature of diabetes that has been identified as a significant risk factor for amputation in patients with DFU. Three major etiological factors in development of lymphedema with concurrent DFU are diabetic microangiopathy, failure of autonomic regulation, and recurrent infection. This review outlines the pathophysiology of lymphedema formation in patients with DFU and highlights the cellular and immune components of impaired wound healing in lymphedematous DFU. We then discuss the principles of management of DFU in conjunction with lymphedema.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcer, lymphedema, chronic wound, wound management

  3. MR imaging, proton MR spectroscopy, ultrasonographic, histologic findings in patients with chronic lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumiere, E; Leduc, O; Fourcade, S; Becker, C; Garbar, C; Demeure, R; Wilputte, F; Leduc, A; Delcour, C

    2007-12-01

    Lymphedema is a progressive disease with multiple alterations occurring in the dermis. We undertook this study using high-frequency ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance imaging, proton MR spectroscopy and histology to examine structural changes occurring in the subcutaneous tissue and precisely describe the nature of intralobular changes in chronic lymphedema. Four cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue biopsies from patients with chronic lymphedema during lymphonodal transplantation were studied. We performed US with a 13.5 MHz transducer, TSE T1 and TSE T2 magnetic resonance images with and without fat-suppression, MR Chemical Shift Imaging Spectroscopy and histological evaluation on these biopsies. We found that normal subcutaneous septa are seen as hyperechogenic lines in US and hyposignal lines in MRI and that hyperechogenic subcutis in US can be due to interlobular and intralobular water accumulation and/or to interlobular and intralobular fibrosis. Our study also confirms the usefulness of MR spectroscopy to assess water or fat content of soft tissue. Thus, multiple imaging modalities may be necessary to precisely delineate the nature of tissue alterations in chronic lymphedema.

  4. Chylous pleural effusion associated with primary lymphedema and lymphangioma-like malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresser, P.; Kromhout, J. G.; Reekers, J. A.; Verhage, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a patient with a chylous pleural effusion associated with primary lymphedema of his right leg and abdominal wall. On evaluation a generalized, severe hypoplasia of the lymphatic system turned out to be associated with hyperplastic, lymphangioma-like malformations

  5. Recurrent furunculosis as a cause of isolated penile lymphedema: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood Suneet

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated lymphedema of the penis is extremely rare: combined involvement of the scrotum and penis is the norm. Furunculosis as a cause is not, to our knowledge, previously reported. We present a case of isolated penile lymphedema that responded to excision of lymphedematous tissue and reconstruction with flaps. Case presentation A 32-year-old Arab man presented with a three-year history of a gradually increasing, painless penile swelling. Our patient's main complaint was non-erectile sexual dysfunction. The swelling was preceded by at least three prior episodes of severe furunculosis at the penile root. He had no other contributory past medical or family history. On examination there was gross penile enlargement, maximally at the mid shaft, associated with thickened skin at the sites of prior furunculosis. The glans and scrotum were normal. Both testes were palpable. Serology for filariasis, and urinary tract ultrasound and computed tomography scan were normal. The clinical diagnosis was lymphedema following recurrent penile furunculosis. At operation the lymphedematous tissues were removed. Closure of the penile shaft was accomplished by bilateral advancement of flaps from both ends of the penis. He resumed normal sexual activity one month after surgery. At 12 months, he had a good cosmetic result, with no signs of recurrence. Conclusions Furunculosis at the penile root may result in lymphedema confined to the penile shaft, sparing the scrotum. Excision of abnormal tissue and cover with a skin flap gave excellent cosmetic results, and allowed satisfactory sexual activity.

  6. Lymphedema and employability - Review and results of a survey of Austrian experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Markus; Schoberwalter, Dieter; Cenik, Fadime; Keilani, Mohammad; Crevenna, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Literature about lymphedema and its influence on the ability to work and employability is limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the opinion of Austrian experts on factors influencing the ability to work and employability in patients suffering from lymphedema. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of 6 questions was sent to 12 Austrian lymphedema experts with 6 different specializations from May to August 2016. These experts were asked about suitable and unsuitable professions, the possible influence of lymphedema on the ability to work and employability as well as about existing and additional measures to improve the return to work. The reply rate was 100% (12 out of 12). All experts agreed that lymphedema can restrict the ability to work and employability. The leading reason for limited ability to work and employability was restricted mobility or function of the affected limb along with time-consuming therapeutic modalities, pain and psychological stress. The most suitable job named was teacher and the most unsuitable job named was cook. As easements for return to work, early rehabilitation, self-management, coping strategies, patient education, employer's goodwill and employer's cooperation were reported. Furthermore, experts stressed the need for an adjustment of the legal framework as well as low-barrier and more therapy offers. Adjusted work demands seem to be of greater importance to support the ability to work and employability than recommendations for specific job profiles alone. Experts suggest an adjustment of the legal framework for affected patients, claiming a right for early rehabilitation as well as for life-long therapy. Even though some clinically useful conclusions may be drawn from this article, further research in the field is warranted.

  7. ASCENDE-RT: An Analysis of Treatment-Related Morbidity for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost with a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodda, Sree; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Keyes, Mira; Halperin, Ross; Pai, Howard; McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme; Morton, Gerard; Hamm, Jeremy; Murray, Nevin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and erectile dysfunction in a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for high- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: ASCENDE-RT (Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy) enrolled 398 men, median age 68 years, who were then randomized to either a standard arm that included 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. At clinic visits, investigators recorded GU and GI morbidity and information on urinary continence, catheter use, and erectile function. Exclusion of 15 who received nonprotocol treatment and correction of 14 crossover events left 195 men who actually received a DE-EBRT boost and 188, an LDR-PB boost. Median follow-up was 6.5 years. Results: The LDR-PB boost increased the risk of needing temporary catheterization and/or requiring incontinence pads. At 5 years the cumulative incidence of grade 3 GU events was 18.4% for LDR-PB, versus 5.2% for DE-EBRT (P<.001). Compared with the cumulative incidence, the 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GU morbidity was substantially lower for both arms (8.6% vs 2.2%, P=.058). The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade 3 GI events was 8.1% for LDR-PB, versus 3.2% for DE-EBRT (P=.124). The 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GI toxicity was lower than the cumulative incidence for both arms (1.0% vs 2.2%, respectively). Among men reporting adequate baseline erections, 45% of LDR-PB patients reported similar erectile function at 5 years, versus 37% after DE-EBRT (P=.30). Conclusions: The incidence of acute and late GU morbidity was higher after LDR-PB boost, and there was a nonsignificant trend for worse GI morbidity. No differences in the frequency of

  8. ASCENDE-RT: An Analysis of Treatment-Related Morbidity for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost with a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodda, Sree [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keyes, Mira [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Halperin, Ross [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Pai, Howard [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morton, Gerard [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Murray, Nevin [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To report the genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and erectile dysfunction in a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for high- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: ASCENDE-RT (Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy) enrolled 398 men, median age 68 years, who were then randomized to either a standard arm that included 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. At clinic visits, investigators recorded GU and GI morbidity and information on urinary continence, catheter use, and erectile function. Exclusion of 15 who received nonprotocol treatment and correction of 14 crossover events left 195 men who actually received a DE-EBRT boost and 188, an LDR-PB boost. Median follow-up was 6.5 years. Results: The LDR-PB boost increased the risk of needing temporary catheterization and/or requiring incontinence pads. At 5 years the cumulative incidence of grade 3 GU events was 18.4% for LDR-PB, versus 5.2% for DE-EBRT (P<.001). Compared with the cumulative incidence, the 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GU morbidity was substantially lower for both arms (8.6% vs 2.2%, P=.058). The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade 3 GI events was 8.1% for LDR-PB, versus 3.2% for DE-EBRT (P=.124). The 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GI toxicity was lower than the cumulative incidence for both arms (1.0% vs 2.2%, respectively). Among men reporting adequate baseline erections, 45% of LDR-PB patients reported similar erectile function at 5 years, versus 37% after DE-EBRT (P=.30). Conclusions: The incidence of acute and late GU morbidity was higher after LDR-PB boost, and there was a nonsignificant trend for worse GI morbidity. No differences in the frequency of

  9. [What physiotherapeutic method for the treatment of post-mastectomy lymphedema is the most effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushina, T I

    We have undertaken the search for the publications of interest in the following databases: Scopus, Web of Science, MedLine, The Cochrane Library, CyberLeninka, and Russian science citation index. In addition, we evaluated the effectiveness of the physical agents and procedures having different mechanisms of action of the known factors responsible for the development of post-mastectomy lymphedema. Such agents and procedures include self-massage, manual lymphatic drainage, therapeutic physical exercises, compression bandaging, wearing elastic compression garments, Kinesio Tex taping, pneumatic compression, ultrasonic, electrostatic, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, electrical muscle stimulation, microcurrent and low-intensity laser therapy. These methods and products were used by the authors of selected publications either separately or in the combined modes taking into consideration the significant differences between effects of the application of individual techniques. The results of the treatment are presented for different time periods, either in absolute units (cm or ml) in the majority of the cases or in relative units (%) only in part of them without information concerning the statistical significance of the results obtained. There is thus far neither the universal classification of post-mastectomy lymphedema nor the generally accepted approaches to its diagnostics and treatment. Therefore, it is impossible to give an unambiguous answer as regards the effectiveness of one or another method for the diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The author of the present article observed 172 patients at the age of 56.8±9.7 years suffering from late grade I-IV lymphedema treated with the use of local low-intensity low-frequency electric and magnetic therapy in the combination with pneumatic compression applied during 15 days. The results of the treatment were evaluated using water and impedance plethysmography. Within 4 weeks after the onset of therapy, the

  10. Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa or "mossy foot lesions" in lymphedema praecox: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Amy L; Husain, Jugnoo; Deheer, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa is a rare disorder that results from chronic obstructive lymphedema. It is characterized clinically by deforming, nonpitting edema; malodorous hyperkeratosis with generalized lichenification; cobblestoned papules; and verrucous changes, that often result in extreme enlargement of the involved body part. Although elephantiasis nostras verrucosa is striking in clinical appearance, biopsy reveals only moderately abnormal findings: pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia with dilated lymphatic spaces in the dermis, accompanied by chronic inflammation and fibroblast proliferation. The term elephantiasis nostras (nostras means "from our region") has traditionally been used to differentiate temperate zone disease from the classic disease process, elephantiasis tropica, which is defined by chronic filarial lymphatic obstruction caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, Wuchereria malayi, or Wuchereria pacifica. We present a case report of elephantiasis nostras verrucosa arising as a result of lymphedema praecox.

  11. [Current wound care in patients with elephantiasis--third-stage lymphedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek; Slana, Ana; Leskovec, Nada Kecelj

    2012-10-01

    Lymphedema resulting from fluid accumulation due to impairment in the lymphatic system drainage leads to enlargement of the body part involved. If left untreated, in its third stage it results in elephantiasis. Elephantiasis is frequently accompanied by papillomatosis and lymphocutaneous fistulas with lymphorrhoea, erosions and ulcers, frequently with the loss of function in the respective part of the body. Unlike other chronic wounds, wound healing in lymphedema is highly dependent on the use of combined therapies because local treatment with modern supportive dressings and compression therapy with adhesive and non-adhesive short-stretch systems is only part of the complete treatment. This treatment also includes sub-bandage foamy materials, kinesitherapy with tapes (kinesiotaping), intermittent local application of high-pressure oxygen, breathing exercise, and manual lymph drainage and exercises.

  12. Quantitative lymphoscintigraphy in post-mastectomy lymphedema: correlation with circumferential measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Sang Eun; Kim, Byung Tae; Hwang, Jee Hea; Lee, Byung Boong [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    An objective measure for the severity and progression is important for the management of lymphedema. To evaluate the usefulness of lympho-scintigraphy in this regard, we compared various quantitative indices from upper extremity lymphoscintigraphy with circumferential measurements, before and after physiotheraphy. Upper extremity lymphoscintigraphy was performed in 38 patients with unilateral postmastectomy lymphedema. Tc-99m antimony sulfide colloid (37 MBq) was injected s.c. into the second and third interdigital spaces. The injection sites were imaged immediately after injection. After standardized exercise for 15 min, upper extremity images were acquired 30 min, 1 hr and 2 hr after injection. The clearance of the injection site (CL), and % uptake in regional lymph nodes (%LN) and soft tissue of the extremity (i.e., the degree of dermal backflow) (%EXT) compared to the initial injection site were calculated. Circumference of each extremity was measured at 7 levels; the severity of lymphedema was expressed as the percentage difference of total circumferential difference (TCD) between healthy and edematous extremities compared to the total circumference of healthy extremity (%TCD). In 19 patients who received physiotherapy, the therapeutic effect was measured by % decrease of TCD (%DTCD) before and after therapy (Raines. et al., 1977). The quantitative indices calculated in the image at 2 hr p.i. had better correlation with either %TCD or %DTCD than those from earlier images (Table). The CL, %LN and %EXT of edematous extremity had a significant correlation with TCD. The %EXT was correlated best with either TCD or %DTCD. The results suggest that the %EXT which corresponds to the degree of dermal backflow may be a simple and useful quantitative index for evaluating the severity and progression in lymphedema and predicting the effect of therapy.

  13. Quantitative lymphoscintigraphy in post-mastectomy lymphedema: correlation with circumferential measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Sang Eun; Kim, Byung Tae; Hwang, Jee Hea; Lee, Byung Boong

    1997-01-01

    An objective measure for the severity and progression is important for the management of lymphedema. To evaluate the usefulness of lympho-scintigraphy in this regard, we compared various quantitative indices from upper extremity lymphoscintigraphy with circumferential measurements, before and after physiotheraphy. Upper extremity lymphoscintigraphy was performed in 38 patients with unilateral postmastectomy lymphedema. Tc-99m antimony sulfide colloid (37 MBq) was injected s.c. into the second and third interdigital spaces. The injection sites were imaged immediately after injection. After standardized exercise for 15 min, upper extremity images were acquired 30 min, 1 hr and 2 hr after injection. The clearance of the injection site (CL), and % uptake in regional lymph nodes (%LN) and soft tissue of the extremity (i.e., the degree of dermal backflow) (%EXT) compared to the initial injection site were calculated. Circumference of each extremity was measured at 7 levels; the severity of lymphedema was expressed as the percentage difference of total circumferential difference (TCD) between healthy and edematous extremities compared to the total circumference of healthy extremity (%TCD). In 19 patients who received physiotherapy, the therapeutic effect was measured by % decrease of TCD (%DTCD) before and after therapy (Raines. et al., 1977). The quantitative indices calculated in the image at 2 hr p.i. had better correlation with either %TCD or %DTCD than those from earlier images (Table). The CL, %LN and %EXT of edematous extremity had a significant correlation with TCD. The %EXT was correlated best with either TCD or %DTCD. The results suggest that the %EXT which corresponds to the degree of dermal backflow may be a simple and useful quantitative index for evaluating the severity and progression in lymphedema and predicting the effect of therapy

  14. Acute Truncal Lymphedema Secondary to Axillary Metastatic Melanoma Presenting Like Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley J. E. Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are reported cases of diphencyprone used in treating cutaneous metastases of melanoma. Here, we report a patient with previous primary melanoma on his left back treated with surgical excision and lymphadenectomy, followed by radiotherapy for the recurrent tumor on the primary site. Despite radiotherapy and treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib, in-transit metastases have developed and topical diphencyprone was applied to these metastases. Six weeks later, the patient developed fever and a spreading erythematous tender indurated plaque covering the left side of the body including axillae, back, and flank, clinically suggestive of cellulitis. Systemic antibiotic therapy did not improve the condition and a biopsy showed sparse lymphocytic infiltrate. With the diagnosis of possible acute lymphedema, a CT scan was requested that showed significant axillary lymph node metastasis. The fever was considered secondary to dabrafenib and trametinib therapy. This case highlights that, in patients with lymphadenectomy, atypical forms of lymphedema on the body may appear. Truncal lymphedema is an infrequent event.

  15. [Treatment and prevention of cancer treatment related oral mucositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Esquide, Gonzalo; Nervi, Bruno; Vargas, Alex; Maíz, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    One of the most common and troublesome complications of modern intensive anticancer treatments is oral mucositis. The purpose of this review is to summarize current evidence and clinical guidelines regarding its prevention and therapy. The use of keratinocyte growth factor-1, supplementary glutamine and other recently developed treatment modalities are discussed. The injury of the oral mucosa caused by antineoplastic agents promotes the local expression of multiple pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic molecules and eventually leads to the development of ulcers. Such lesions predispose patients to several infectious and nutritional complications. Also, they lead to modification of treatment schedules, potentially affecting overall prognosis. Local cryotherapy with ice chips and phototherapy with low energy laser may be useful as preventive measures. Mouthwashes with allopurinol and phototherapy with low energy laser can be used as treatment. In radiotherapy, special radiation administration techniques should be used to minimize mucosal injury. Pain control should always be optimized, with the use of patient controlled analgesia and topical use of morphine. Supplemental glutamine should not be used outside of research protocols. Lastly, thorough attention should be paid to general care and hygiene measures.

  16. Excision of Elephantiasis Nostras Verrucosa Lesions in a Patient With Hereditary Lymphedema: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Austin A; Pagan, Carlos A; Small, Kevin; Otterburn, David M

    2015-01-01

    Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa (ENV) is a rare cutaneous sequela of chronic lymphedema. Treatment of ENV remains poorly elucidated but has historically involved conservative management aimed at relieving the underlying lymphedema, with a few cases managed by surgical intervention. We report a case of a 27-year-old male with primary lymphedema complicated by large painful ENV lesions on his left foot that we excised surgically with good functional and cosmetic results as validated by the patient. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of ENV with a pedunculated morphology and the presence of a deep invasive stalk. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-14

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  18. Poor survival of treatment-related acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugut, A.I.; Nieves, J.; Murray, T.; Tsai, Weiyann; Robinson, E.

    1990-01-01

    Population-based data on more than 1 million patients registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Program of the National Cancer Institute, 1973-1984, were analyzed to determine the survival of patients with de novo acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) and following a first primary tumor treated (with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy) or untreated. Cases that occurred within 12 months of the first malignant neoplasm were excluded. Survival was estimated using Cox proportional-hazards modeling, with age, sex, and specific type of ANLL as covariates. The 6,271 patients with de novo ANLL had an estimated 12-month survival of 30%, while the 107 patients with treatment-related ANLL had an estimated 12-month survival of 10%. The authors conclude that ANLL that occurs after chemotherapy or radiation therapy is biologically more aggressive and/or resistant to therapy than spontaneous ANLL. This provides a rationale for current studies on treatment-induced cellular changes and on more aggressive therapy for these patients

  19. It is possible: availability of lymphedema case management in each health facility in Togo. Program description, evaluation, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Els; Dorkenoo, Ameyo M; Datagni, Michael; Cantey, Paul T; Morgah, Kodjo; Harvey, Kira; Ziperstein, Joshua; Drexler, Naomi; Chapleau, Gina; Sodahlon, Yao

    2013-07-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a vector-borne parasitic disease that can clinically manifest as disabling lymphedema. Although the LF elimination program aims to reduce disability and to interrupt transmission, there has been a scarcity of disease morbidity management programs, particularly on a national scale. This report describes the implementation of the first nationwide LF lymphedema management program. The program, which was initiated in Togo in 2007, focuses on patient behavioral change. Its goal is two-fold: to achieve a sustainable program on a national-scale, and to serve as a model for other countries. The program has five major components: 1) train at least one health staff in lymphedema care in each health facility in Togo; 2) inform people with a swollen leg that care is available at their dispensary; 3) train patients on self-care; 4) provide a support system to motivate patients to continue self-care by training community health workers or family members and providing in home follow-up; and 5) integrate lymphedema management into the curriculum for medical staff. The program achieved the inclusion of lymphedema management in the routine healthcare package. The evaluation after three years estimated that 79% of persons with a swollen leg in Togo were enrolled in the program. The adherence rate to the proposed World Health Organization treatment of washing, exercise, and leg elevation was more than 70% after three years of the program, resulting in a stabilization of the lymphedema stage and a slight decrease in reported acute attacks among program participants. Health staff and patients consider the program successful in reaching and educating the patients. After the external funding ended, the morbidity management program is maintained through routine Ministry of Health activities.

  20. Flap Lymphedema after Successful Reconstruction of the Chronic Inguinal Wound with a Vertical Rectus Abdominis Flap (VRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Kulahci

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of extensive and complex wounds represents a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeon. The reconstructive options to provide cover-age following debridment of these complicated wounds are local, distant flaps, or freetissue transfer. Vertical rectus abdominis flaps have been used succes-sully to repair defects in the groin, hip, perineal, trunk, and breast regions. We encountered flap lymphedema after successful reconstruction of the chronic in-guinal wound with a vertical rectus abdominis (VRAM flap. As far as were able to ascertain, there is no report in the literature related to flap lymphedema.

  1. Impact of an educational program on the quality of life of patients with lymphedema: A preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaise, Sophie; Satger, Bernadette; Pernod, Gilles; Richaud, Cécile; Villemur, Béatrice; Carpentier, Patrick H

    2017-09-01

    We report on the preliminary evaluation of a well-designed program, Living with Lymphedema. This longitudinal cohort study assessed patients' quality of life using questionnaires. Our main objective was to evaluate the satisfaction of the patients and their adherence to the program. This was done using a specific questionnaire of satisfaction as well as by noting patients' adherence to the program (number of patients attending all three consultations). The secondary objective was to assess the effect of the program on the patient's quality of life. The assessment criteria were the evolution of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and EuroQol questionnaire scores between the first (C1) and third (C3) consultations. The Living with Lymphedema program targeted all patients with lymphedema in the Grenoble (France) conurbation and within the GRANTED health care network that includes vascular medicine specialists, primary care physicians, physical therapists, and dietitians in the Alpine region of France. All studied patients were ambulatory patients. The GRANTED network took care only of the educational aspect of the disease. All patients with primary or secondary lymphedema were offered the Living with Lymphedema program, whatever their age and the location of the lymphedema (upper or lower limbs). The collection of patient data conformed to the ethical and administrative regulations of the regional health authority. Grenoble Institutional Review Board (CPP Sud-Est V; No. 5891) approval for the study was specifically obtained for this evaluation on December 24, 2012. The program was built around one-to-one consultations, group workshops, and more specialized appointments. It was complementary to the routine medical care received by the patient (not evaluated in this study). It proposed three individual "educational" consultations, seven group workshops, and two specialized consultations with a dietitian. All the consultations or workshops were

  2. Interstitial MR lymphangiography in patients with lower extremity lymphedema: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qing; Xu Jianrong; Liu Ningfei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of interstitial MR lymphangiography (MRL) with subcutaneous injection of a commercially available, non-ionic, extracellular paramagnetic contrast agent, to visualize lymphatic vessels in patients with primary lymphedema. Methods: Forty lower extremities in 31 patients with clinically advanced stages of primary lymphedema were examined with magnetic resonance lymphangiography. A 1 ml mixed liquor of gadobenate dimeglumine and mepivacainhydrochloride were injected subcutaneously into the dorsal aspect of both feet. For MRL, a 3D fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo T 1 -weighted images with a fat saturation technique (T 1 high resolution isotropic volume excitation, THRIVE) were performed after subcutaneous application of the contrast material. To outline lymphatic vessels, source images were used to reconstruct images of MIP. The SNR and CNR of enhanced lymphatic vessels and veins were measured and calculated respectively. The significance of the differences of the data comparisons was assessed using an unpaired student t test. Results: Of the 40 lower extremities, the beaded appearance of dilated lymphatic vessels was detected in 36 lower legs (90.0%) and 17 upper legs (42.5%). The numbers of the dilated lymphatic vessels displayed in all segments of lower extremities added up to 365 and its mean diameter was (3.4±0.1) mm on MRL MIP image. The average SNR and CNR were 257±130, 207±113 in the dilated lymphatic vessels and 218±129, 152±113 in the vein respectively, which was statistically significant (SNR t=-2.649, CNR t=-3.404, P<0.01). Contrast enhancement was observed in 30/40 inguinal lymph node groups (75.0%). In 26 lower extremities (65.0%) collateral vessels with dermal back-flow areas between lymphatic vessels were seen. Conclusions: As a novel tool to image the pathologically modified lymphatic vessels in patients with clinically advanced stage of primary lymphedema, magnetic resonance lymphangiography is a safe

  3. Reference Values for Assessment of Unilateral Limb Lymphedema with Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjorup, Caroline A; Hendel, Helle W; Klausen, Tobias W

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The clinical assessment of unilateral limb lymphedema is commonly based on measurements of interlimb volume differences. Reference values for interlimb percentage differences of the volume, fat mass, and lean mass measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan are, however...... is calculated as follows: ("Limb-of-interest"-contralateral)/contralateral × 100. The interlimb percentage differences for the limb-of-interest were stratified to upper (according to handedness) and lower limbs and categorized as none/mild, moderate, or severe, respectively, based on whether the value is below...

  4. Preventable and mitigable adverse events in cancer care: Measuring risk and harm across the continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Pfister, David; Classen, David; Atoria, Coral L; Killen, Aileen; Epstein, Andrew S; Anderson, Christopher; Fortier, Elizabeth; Weingart, Saul N

    2017-12-01

    Patient safety is a critical concern in clinical oncology, but the ability to measure adverse events (AEs) across cancer care is limited by a narrow focus on treatment-related toxicities. The objective of this study was to assess the nature and extent of AEs among cancer patients across inpatient and outpatient settings. This was a retrospective cohort study of 400 adult patients selected by stratified random sampling who had breast (n = 128), colorectal (n = 136), or lung cancer (n = 136) treated at a comprehensive cancer center in 2012. Candidate AEs, or injuries due to medical care, were identified by trained nurse reviewers over the course of 1 year from medical records and safety-reporting databases. Physicians determined the AE harm severity and the likelihood of preventability and harm mitigation. The 400-patient sample represented 133,358 days of follow-up. Three hundred four AEs were identified for an overall rate of 2.3 events per 1000 patient days (91.2 per 1000 inpatient days and 0.9 per 1000 outpatient days). Thirty-four percent of the patients had 1 or more AEs (95% confidence interval, 29%-39%), and 16% of the patients had 1 or more preventable or mitigable AEs (95% confidence interval, 13%-20%). The AE rate for patients with breast cancer was lower than the rate for patients with colorectal or lung cancer (P ≤ .001). The preventable or mitigable AE rate was 0.9 per 1000 patient days. Six percent of AEs and 4% of preventable AEs resulted in serious harm. Examples included lymphedema, abscess, and renal failure. A heavy burden of AEs, including preventable or mitigable events, has been identified. Future research should examine risk factors and improvement strategies for reducing their burden. Cancer 2017;123:4728-4736. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  5. Filarial lymphedema is characterized by antigen-specific Th1 and th17 proinflammatory responses and a lack of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subash Babu

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients.To elucidate the role of CD4(+ T cell subsets in the development of lymphatic pathology, we examined specific sets of cytokines in individuals with filarial lymphedema in response to parasite antigen (BmA and compared them with responses from asymptomatic infected individuals. We also examined expression patterns of Toll-like receptors (TLR1-10 and Nod-like receptors (Nod1, Nod2, and NALP3 in response to BmA. BmA induced significantly higher production of Th1-type cytokines-IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha-in patients with lymphedema compared with asymptomatic individuals. Notably, expression of the Th17 family of cytokines-IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-23-was also significantly upregulated by BmA stimulation in lymphedema patients. In contrast, expression of Foxp3, GITR, TGFbeta, and CTLA-4, known to be expressed by regulatory T cells, was significantly impaired in patients with lymphedema. BmA also induced significantly higher expression of TLR2, 4, 7, and 9 as well Nod1 and 2 mRNA in patients with lymphedema compared with asymptomatic controls.Our findings implicate increased Th1/Th17 responses and decreased regulatory T cells as well as regulation of Toll- and Nod-like receptors in pathogenesis of filarial lymphedema.

  6. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, osteopetrosis, lymphedema, and immunodeficiency in an infant with multiple opportunistic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Valerie M; Lofgren, Sabra M; Mann, Julianne A; Austin, Jared P; Nolt, Dawn; Shereck, Evan B; Davila-Saldana, Blachy; Zonana, Jonathan; Krol, Alfons L

    2014-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, lymphedema, hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, and immunodeficiency (OL-HED-ID) is a rare X-linked disorder with only three reported prior cases in the English-language literature. We describe a case of OL-HED-ID in a male infant who initially presented with congenital lymphedema, leukocytosis, and thrombocytopenia of unknown etiology at 7 days of age. He subsequently developed gram-negative sepsis and multiple opportunistic infections including high-level cytomegalovirus viremia and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. The infant was noted to have mildly xerotic skin, fine sparse hair, and periorbital wrinkling, all features suggestive of ectodermal dysplasia. Skeletal imaging showed findings consistent with osteopetrosis, and immunologic investigation revealed hypogammaglobulinemia and mixed T- and B-cell dysfunction. Genetic testing revealed a novel mutation in the nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-KB) essential modulator (NEMO) gene, confirming the diagnosis of OL-HED-ID. Mutations in the NEMO gene have been reported in association with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (HED-ID), OL-HED-ID, and incontinentia pigmenti. In this case, we report a novel mutation in the NEMO gene associated with OL-HED-ID. This article highlights the dermatologic manifestations of a rare disorder, OL-HED-ID, and underscores the importance of early recognition and prompt intervention to prevent life-threatening infections. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Debulking surgery for elephantiasis nostras with large ectatic podoplanin-negative lymphatic vessels in patients with lipo-lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit; Schönlebe, Jaqueline; Nowak, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Elephantiasis nostras is a rare complication in advanced lipo-lymphedema. While lipedema can be treated by liposuction and lymphedema by decongestive lymphatic therapy, elephantiasis nostras may need debulking surgery. We present 2 cases of advanced lipo-lymphedema complicated by elephantiasis nostras. After tumescent microcannular laser-assisted liposuction both patients underwent a debulking surgery with a modification of Auchincloss-Kim's technique. Histologic examination of the tissue specimen was performed. The surgical treatment was well tolerated and primary healing was uneventful. After primary wound healing and ambulation of the patients, a delayed ulceration with lymphorrhea developed. It was treated by surgical necrectomy and vacuum-assisted closure leading to complete healing. Mobility of the leg was much improved. Histologic examination revealed massive ectatic lymphatic vessels nonreactive for podoplanin. Debulking surgery can be an adjuvant technique for elephantiasis nostras in advanced lipo-lymphedema. Although delayed postoperative wound healing problems were observed, necrectomy and vacuum-assisted closure achieved a complete healing. Histologic data suggest that the ectatic lymphatic vessels in these patients resemble finding in podoplanin knockout mice. The findings would explain the limitations of decongestive lymphatic therapy and tumescent liposuction in such patients and their predisposition to relapsing erysipelas.

  8. Increasing compliance with mass drug administration programs for lymphatic filariasis in India through education and lymphedema management programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Cantey

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 45% of people living at risk for lymphatic filariasis (LF worldwide live in India. India has faced challenges obtaining the needed levels of compliance with its mass drug administration (MDA program to interrupt LF transmission, which utilizes diethylcarbamazine (DEC or DEC plus albendazole. Previously identified predictors of and barriers to compliance with the MDA program were used to refine a pre-MDA educational campaign. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of these refinements and of a lymphedema morbidity management program on MDA compliance.A randomized, 30-cluster survey was performed in each of 3 areas: the community-based pre-MDA education plus community-based lymphedema management education (Com-MDA+LM area, the community-based pre-MDA education (Com-MDA area, and the Indian standard pre-MDA education (MDA-only area. Compliance with the MDA program was 90.2% in Com-MDA+LM, 75.0% in Com-MDA, and 52.9% in the MDA-only areas (p<0.0001. Identified barriers to adherence included: 1 fear of side effects and 2 lack of recognition of one's personal benefit from adherence. Multivariable predictors of adherence amenable to educational intervention were: 1 knowing about the MDA in advance of its occurrence, 2 knowing everyone is at risk for LF, 3 knowing that the MDA was for LF, and 4 knowing at least one component of the lymphedema management techniques taught in the lymphedema management program.This study confirmed previously identified predictors of and barriers to compliance with India's MDA program for LF. More importantly, it showed that targeting these predictors and barriers in a timely and clear pre-MDA educational campaign can increase compliance with MDA programs, and it demonstrated, for the first time, that lymphedema management programs may also increase compliance with MDA programs.

  9. Clinical significance of a proposed lymphoscintigrpahic functional grade system in patients with extremity lymphedema of stage i

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joan Young; Hwang, Ji Hye; Kim, Dong Ik; Cho, Young Seok; Lee, Su Jin; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yeam Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae

    2005-01-01

    We proposed a new lymphoscintigrpahic functional grade (LGr) system in extremity lymphedema, and investigated the association between the LGr and a long-term response to physical therapy in patients with extremity lymphedema of stage I. The subjects were 20 patients with unilateral extremity lymphedema of stage I, who underwent pre-treatment extremity lymphoscintigraphy using Tc-99m antimony sulfur colloid, and were treated by complex decongestive physical therapy (CDPT). A proposed lymphoscintigrpahic functional grade system consisted of LGr 0 to LGr 4 according to the ilioinguinal nodal uptake, amount of dermal backflow, and uptake pattern of main and collateral lymphatics : LGr 0 = normal, LGr 1 = decreased lymphatic function without dermal backflow, LGr 2 = decreased lymphatic function with dermal backflow, LGr 3 = non - visualization of main lymphatics with dermal backflow, and LGr 4 = no significant lymphatic transport from injection site. LGr 2 was divided into 2A and 2B based on the amount of dermal backflow. A physician who is a lymphedema specialist determined the long-term outcome to CDPT with normalized response (NR), good response (GR) and poor response (PR) based on the change of edema volume reduction, skin status and occurrence of dermatolymphangioadenitis after the clinical follow-up for more than 1 year. Therapeutic responses were NR in 2 patients. GR in 9 patients and PR in 9 patients. Baseline LGrs were 1 in 7 patients, 2A in 4 patients, 2B in 5 patients, 3 in 2 patients, and 4 in 2 patients. There was a significant relationship between therapeutic response and LGr (p=0.003). In other words, 10 of 11 patients (91%) with LGr 1 or 2A showed NR. or GR. On the contrary, 8 of 9 patients (89%) with LGr 2B, 3 or 4 showed PR. Patients with unilateral extremity lymphedema of stage I had different lymphoscintigrpahic functional grades. This grade system may be useful to predict the response to physical therapy in such patients

  10. Clinical significance of a proposed lymphoscintigrpahic functional grade system in patients with extremity lymphedema of stage i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joan Young; Hwang, Ji Hye; Kim, Dong Ik; Cho, Young Seok; Lee, Su Jin; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yeam Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We proposed a new lymphoscintigrpahic functional grade (LGr) system in extremity lymphedema, and investigated the association between the LGr and a long-term response to physical therapy in patients with extremity lymphedema of stage I. The subjects were 20 patients with unilateral extremity lymphedema of stage I, who underwent pre-treatment extremity lymphoscintigraphy using Tc-99m antimony sulfur colloid, and were treated by complex decongestive physical therapy (CDPT). A proposed lymphoscintigrpahic functional grade system consisted of LGr 0 to LGr 4 according to the ilioinguinal nodal uptake, amount of dermal backflow, and uptake pattern of main and collateral lymphatics : LGr 0 = normal, LGr 1 = decreased lymphatic function without dermal backflow, LGr 2 = decreased lymphatic function with dermal backflow, LGr 3 = non - visualization of main lymphatics with dermal backflow, and LGr 4 = no significant lymphatic transport from injection site. LGr 2 was divided into 2A and 2B based on the amount of dermal backflow. A physician who is a lymphedema specialist determined the long-term outcome to CDPT with normalized response (NR), good response (GR) and poor response (PR) based on the change of edema volume reduction, skin status and occurrence of dermatolymphangioadenitis after the clinical follow-up for more than 1 year. Therapeutic responses were NR in 2 patients. GR in 9 patients and PR in 9 patients. Baseline LGrs were 1 in 7 patients, 2A in 4 patients, 2B in 5 patients, 3 in 2 patients, and 4 in 2 patients. There was a significant relationship between therapeutic response and LGr (p=0.003). In other words, 10 of 11 patients (91%) with LGr 1 or 2A showed NR. or GR. On the contrary, 8 of 9 patients (89%) with LGr 2B, 3 or 4 showed PR. Patients with unilateral extremity lymphedema of stage I had different lymphoscintigrpahic functional grades. This grade system may be useful to predict the response to physical therapy in such patients.

  11. A multimodal physical therapy approach to the management of a patient with temporomandibular dysfunction and head and neck lymphedema: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Patricia; Feinberg, Lauren; Morris, John

    2015-02-01

    There is a paucity of research that investigates therapeutic interventions of patients with concurrent head and neck lymphedema and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). The purpose of this case report is to describe the management and outcomes of a patient with head and neck lymphedema and TMD using a multimodal physical therapy approach. A 74-year-old male with a past medical history of head and neck lymphedema and TMD was referred to physical therapy with chief complaints of inability to open his mouth in order to eat solid food, increased neck lymphedema, temporomadibular joint pain, and inability to speak for prolonged periods of time. The patient was treated for three visits over 4 weeks. Treatment included complete decongestive therapy (CDT), manual therapy, therapeutic exercise, and a home exercise program. Upon discharge, the patient had improved mandibular depression, decreased head and neck lymphedema, improved deep neck flexor endurance, decreased pain, and improved function on the Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS). Utilization of a multimodal physical therapy approach to treat a patient with a complex presentation yielded positive outcomes. Further research on outcomes and treatment approaches in patients with TMD and head and neck lymphedema is warranted.

  12. Hypofractionated irradiation of infra-supraclavicular lymph nodes after axillary dissection in patients with breast cancer post-conservative surgery: impact on late toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenzi, Marina; Blandino, Gladys; Vidili, Maria Giuseppina; Aloi, Deborah; Configliacco, Elena; Verzanini, Elisa; Tornari, Elena; Cavagnetto, Francesca; Corvò, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyse the impact of mild hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) of infra-supraclavicular lymph nodes after axillary dissection on late toxicity. From 2007 to 2012, 100 females affected by breast cancer (pT1- T4, pN1-3, pMx) were treated with conservative surgery, Axillary Node Dissection (AND) and loco-regional radiotherapy (whole breast plus infra-supraclavicular fossa). Axillary lymph nodes metastases were confirmed in all women. The median age at diagnosis was 60 years (range 34–83). Tumors were classified according to molecular characteristics: luminal-A 59 pts (59 %), luminal-B 24 pts (24 %), basal-like 10 pts (10 %), Her-2 like 7 pts (7 %). 82 pts (82 %) received hormonal therapy, 9 pts (9 %) neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, 81pts (81 %) adjuvant chemotherapy. All patients received a mild hypofractionated RT: 46 Gy in 20 fractions 4 times a week to whole breast and infra-supraclavicular fossa plus an additional weekly dose of 1,2 Gy to the lumpectomy area. The disease control and treatment related toxicity were analysed in follow-up visits. The extent of lymphedema was analysed by experts in Oncological Rehabilitation. Within a median follow-up of 50 months (range 19–82), 6 (6 %) pts died, 1 pt (1 %) had local progression disease, 2 pts (2 %) developed distant metastasis and 1 subject (1 %) presented both. In all patients the acute toxicity was mainly represented by erythema and patchy moist desquamation. At the end of radiotherapy 27 pts (27 %) presented lymphedema, but only 10 cases (10 %) seemed to be correlated to radiotherapy. None of the patients showed a severe damage to the brachial plexus, and the described cases of paresthesias could not definitely be attributed to RT. We did not observe symptomatic pneumonitis. Irradiation of infra-supraclavicular nodes with a mild hypofractionated schedule can be a safe and effective treatment without evidence of a significant increase of lymphedema appearance radiotherapy related

  13. Supportive care after curative treatment for breast cancer (survivorship care): resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Patricia A; Yip, Cheng Har; Gralow, Julie R; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Albain, Kathy S; Andersen, Barbara L; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; de Azambuja, Evandro; El Saghir, Nagi S; Kaur, Ranjit; McTiernan, Anne; Partridge, Ann H; Rowland, Julia H; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Vargo, Mary M; Thompson, Beti; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors may experience long-term treatment complications, must live with the risk of cancer recurrence, and often experience psychosocial complications that require supportive care services. In low- and middle-income settings, supportive care services are frequently limited, and program development for survivorship care and long-term follow-up has not been well addressed. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert panel identified nine key resources recommended for appropriate survivorship care, and developed resource-stratified recommendations to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services for breast cancer survivors after curative treatment, using available resources. Key recommendations include health professional education that focuses on the management of physical and psychosocial long-term treatment complications. Patient education can help survivors transition from a provider-intense cancer treatment program to a post-treatment provider partnership and self-management program, and should include: education on recognizing disease recurrence or metastases; management of treatment-related sequelae, and psychosocial complications; and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Increasing community awareness of survivorship issues was also identified as an important part of supportive care programs. Other recommendations include screening and management of psychosocial distress; management of long-term treatment-related complications including lymphedema, fatigue, insomnia, pain, and women's health issues; and monitoring survivors for recurrences or development of second primary malignancies. Where possible, breast cancer survivors should implement healthy lifestyle modifications, including physical activity, and maintain a healthy weight. Health professionals should provide well-documented patient care records that can follow a patient as they transition from active treatment

  14. Qualitative and quantitative lymphoscintigraphy in the evaluation of lower limbs lymphedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalia, Roberta Maria; Martins, Glaucia Ribeiro P.; Barbosa, Rodolfo; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Siqueira, Cristiano Ferrari

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the efficiency of qualitative and quantitative lymphoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of the lower extremity lymphedema. Seventy-seven patients had been studied, most of then (85.7%) were female. Patients' ages ranged from 18 to 82 years. All patients underwent a bilateral lymphoscintigraphy. Images were recorded with a dual-detector instrument in the whole-body scanning mode. Feet and inguinal static views were acquired within 15 minutes and three hours after radiopharmaceutical injection. Two nuclear doctors evaluated the lymphoscintigrams qualitatively. Quantitative studies of the radiopharmaceutical absorption and the lymph node chain uptake were also obtained. Of the 154 evaluated members, 21.44% (n = 33) were classified as normal, 61.68% (n = 95) as mildly altered and 16.88% (n = 26) much altered. Quantitation of lymphatic chain uptake may be a more sensitive approach to the diagnosis of lymphatic impairment than the qualitative analysis. (author)

  15. Ultrasonographic, quantitative comparison of lower extremity lymphedema versus normal control. Technical note with case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lôbo de Carvalho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of tissue by ultrasonography (CATUS is a modern-day research endeavor intended to improve visual perception and image quantification. Visual perception increases with color. Quantification focuses on pixel echo brightnesses. A previously presented case report demonstrated reappearance of lymphatic channels a few days after manual drainage. Ultrasonographic images (US of lymphatic leg and foot were quantitated and compared to a normal extremity based on proportions of pixels in specific brightness intervals. Anatomy evaluated included control- subcutaneous and lymphatic compartments. US with 256 brightness levels were obtained at the proximal, mid and distal leg and foot. Control and lymphatic Gray Scale Medians (GSM and histograms were compared using t-test and Chi-square statistics. Average GSM was 97±9 (SD (82-114, n=12 images for control, greater than 51±15 (24-69, n=12 for lymphedematous leg/foot (P99% of pixels with brightness in the muscle-fiber range (41-196, in contrast to 62% for the lymphatic extremity (P<0.001. Lymphedema averaged 7%, 3%, 15% and 14% of pixels in blood, blood/fat, fat and fat/muscle-like regions (0-4, 5-7, 8-26, 27- 40 brightness intervals. Such regions were visually interpreted as lymphatic channels or lakes. Visual perception by colorization is subjective, but most people perceives details better, for example, during the day than at night. Furthermore, US images have 16 times more shades of gray, 256, than that perceived by the human visual system, 16 on average. Colorization improved perception of lymphatic channels and lakes by transforming blood echoes into red and lymphatic liquid with echoes similar to fat into yellow. Pixel proportions in low brightness intervals were higher in the lymphatic than in the normal extremity. Lymphedema severity was quantified. The CATUS technique may be used to monitor treatment effects or disease evolution.

  16. The Effect of Hygiene-Based Lymphedema Management in Lymphatic Filariasis-Endemic Areas: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Meredith E; Freeman, Matthew C; Addiss, David G

    2015-10-01

    Lymphedema of the leg and its advanced form, known as elephantiasis, are significant causes of disability and morbidity in areas endemic for lymphatic filariasis (LF), with an estimated 14 million persons affected worldwide. The twin goals of the World Health Organization's Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis include interrupting transmission of the parasitic worms that cause LF and providing care to persons who suffer from its clinical manifestations, including lymphedema-so-called morbidity management and disability prevention (MMDP). Scaling up of MMDP has been slow, in part because of a lack of consensus about the effectiveness of recommended hygiene-based interventions for clinical lymphedema. We conducted a systemic review and meta-analyses to estimate the effectiveness of hygiene-based interventions on LF-related lymphedema. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, MedCarib, Lilacs, REPIDISCA, DESASTRES, and African Index Medicus databases through March 23, 2015 with no restriction on year of publication. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they (1) were conducted in an area endemic for LF, (2) involved hygiene-based interventions to manage lymphedema, and (3) assessed lymphedema-related morbidity. For clinical outcomes for which three or more studies assessed comparable interventions for lymphedema, we conducted random-effects meta-analyses. Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and two meta-analyses were possible. To evaluate study quality, we developed a set of criteria derived from the GRADE methodology. Publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. Participation in hygiene-based lymphedema management was associated with a lower incidence of acute dermatolymphagioadenitis (ADLA), (Odds Ratio 0.32, 95% CI 0.25-0.40), as well as with a decreased percentage of patients reporting at least one episode of ADLA during follow-up (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.12-0.47). Limitations included high heterogeneity across studies

  17. The Effect of Hygiene-Based Lymphedema Management in Lymphatic Filariasis-Endemic Areas: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith E Stocks

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema of the leg and its advanced form, known as elephantiasis, are significant causes of disability and morbidity in areas endemic for lymphatic filariasis (LF, with an estimated 14 million persons affected worldwide. The twin goals of the World Health Organization's Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis include interrupting transmission of the parasitic worms that cause LF and providing care to persons who suffer from its clinical manifestations, including lymphedema-so-called morbidity management and disability prevention (MMDP. Scaling up of MMDP has been slow, in part because of a lack of consensus about the effectiveness of recommended hygiene-based interventions for clinical lymphedema.We conducted a systemic review and meta-analyses to estimate the effectiveness of hygiene-based interventions on LF-related lymphedema. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, MedCarib, Lilacs, REPIDISCA, DESASTRES, and African Index Medicus databases through March 23, 2015 with no restriction on year of publication. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they (1 were conducted in an area endemic for LF, (2 involved hygiene-based interventions to manage lymphedema, and (3 assessed lymphedema-related morbidity. For clinical outcomes for which three or more studies assessed comparable interventions for lymphedema, we conducted random-effects meta-analyses. Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and two meta-analyses were possible. To evaluate study quality, we developed a set of criteria derived from the GRADE methodology. Publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. Participation in hygiene-based lymphedema management was associated with a lower incidence of acute dermatolymphagioadenitis (ADLA, (Odds Ratio 0.32, 95% CI 0.25-0.40, as well as with a decreased percentage of patients reporting at least one episode of ADLA during follow-up (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.12-0.47. Limitations included high heterogeneity

  18. Treatment-related mortality in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is particularly challenging due to the high treatment intensity needed to induce and sustain a second remission. To improve results, it is important to understand how treatment-related toxicity impacts survival...

  19. [The application of impulse magnetic therapy for the treatment of the patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchitskaya, D B; Gerasimenko, M Yu; Aphanova, T V; Konchugova, T V

    The principal objective of the present work was to evaluate the influence of impulse magnetic therapy on the state of the microcirculatory system in the patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities. The study included 59 patients with stage of 1 and 2 lymphedema who were divided into two groups. Those comprising the first group had impulse magnetic therapy applied to their lower extremities while the patients making up the second group served as controls. All the patients were examined with the use of the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) that revealed the initially present pathological changes in the microcirculatory system of their lower extremities. The study has demonstrated that the application of impulse magnetic therapy produced a positive effect on all the constituent components of the microcirculatory blood stream of the patients suffering from lymphedema of the lower extremities. Specifically, the initially increased arteriolar tonus was decreased, the blood flow in the capillary vessels was improved, and congestive phenomena in the venular segments of the microcirculation blood stream were markedly reduced. The results of the LDF examination in the control group gave no evidence of significant changes in the patients' microcirculatory system. The results of the LDF examination of the patients of the control group suggested the absence of any appreciable changes in the microcirculatory system. The present study has demonstrated the advisability of the application of impulse magnetic therapy for the treatment of the patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities as a minimally invasive technique for the evaluation of the condition of the microcirculatory system and the objective assessment of the effectiveness of the outcomes of physiotherapy in the patients with vascular pathology.

  20. Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy using 99mTc-human serum albumin in patients with treated uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Hamamoto, Ken; Takeda, Yasunari; Matsuura, Shumpei; Kawamura, Masashi.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy was performed by subcutaneous injection of 7.4 MBq (0.2mCi) 99m Tc-human serum albumin ( 99m Tc-HSA) on 18 patients with uterine cancer treated by operation and/or irradiation. Radioactivity at the injection site was counted for 3 min at 10 min [a] and at 3 hr [b] after injection, and the clearance of 99m Tc-HSA was defined as (1-[b]/[a]) x 100(%) ([a] and [b] were corrected for decay of the isotope). The clearance in 6 legs with lymphedema was significantly more delayed than that in 16 legs without lymphedema in the patients treated with both surgery and irradiation (16.6 ± 7.7% vs 34.9 ± 9.3%: P 99m Tc-HSA is useful for evaluating patients with lymphedema and for differentiating it from edema caused by other mechanisms. (author)

  1. Hydrops fetalis and pulmonary lymphangiectasia due to FOXC2 mutation: an autosomal dominant hereditary lymphedema syndrome with variable expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, Gwendolyn; Casaer, Alexandra; Devolder, Katrien; Van Acker, Geert; Logghe, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Cornette, Luc

    2012-03-01

    Non-immune hydrops fetalis may find its origin within genetically determined lymphedema syndromes, caused by mutations in FOXC2 and SOX-18. We describe a newborn girl, diagnosed with non-immune hydrops fetalis at a gestational age of 30 weeks. Family history revealed the presence of an autosomal dominant late-onset form of lymphedema of the lower limbs in her father, associated with an aberrant implantation of the eyelashes in some individuals. The newborn, hydropic girl suffered from severe pulmonary lymphangiectasia, resulting in terminal respiratory failure at the age of 3 months. Genetic analysis in both the father and the newborn girl demonstrated a heterozygous FOXC2 mutation, i.e., c.939C>A, p.Tyr313X. Her two older sisters are currently asymptomatic and the parents decided not to test them for the FOXC2 mutation. Patients with a mutation in the FOXC2 transcription factor usually show lower limb lymphedema with onset at or after puberty, together with distichiasis. However, the eye manifestations can be very mild and easily overlooked. The association between FOXC2 mutation and neonatal hydrops resulting in terminal respiratory failure is not reported so far. Therefore, in sporadic patients diagnosed with non-immune hydrops fetalis, lymphangiogenic genes should be systematically screened for mutations. In addition, all cases of fetal edema must prompt a thorough analysis of the familial pedigree, in order to detect familial patterns and to facilitate adequate antenatal counseling.

  2. Administration of rocuronium based on real body weight versus fat-free mass in patients with lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Zhang; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Liu, Pengfei; Hu, Xiaoyun; Binjiang, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Objective To compare the clinical pharmacokinetics of rocuronium when applied according to fat-free mass versus real body weight during anesthetic induction of patients with lymphedema. Methods Sixty patients with lymphedema (age, 18-60 years; American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, I-II) undergoing elective surgery with general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups. Rocuronium was administered based on the fat-free mass in 30 patients and real body weight in 30 patients. General anesthesia was induced with propofol and remifentanil by target-controlled infusion. Intubation was attempted when the onset time (T1) (time from end of bolus injection to 100% twitch depression) reached maximal inhibition, and respiratory support with mechanical ventilation was then applied. The T1, clinical duration (time from end of bolus injection to recovery of twitch tension to 25% of control), recovery index (time from 25% to 75% of recovery of T1), and dosage were recorded. Results Complete data were recorded for 59 patients, and there were no significant differences in the general condition, intubation condition, or median duration of action of rocuronium between the two groups. However, the median T1, recovery index, and dosage of rocuronium were significantly different. Conclusion Good intubation conditions and a shortened clinical duration can be obtained for patients with lymphedema when induction with rocuronium is based on the fat-free mass.

  3. Twisting Tourniquet© Technique: introducing Schnogh, a novel device and its effectiveness in treating primary and secondary lymphedema of extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanwimalueang, Narumon; Ekataksin, Wichai; Piyaman, Parkpoom; Pattanapen, Gedsuda; Hanboon, Borimas K

    2015-01-01

    Twisting Tourniquet © or in Thai “Schnogh” is a new invention for compression therapy of lymphedema. Twisting Tourniquet © Technique (TTT) is totally noninvasive for lymphedema management. After the amazing successful evidence in the first series of 28 patients, we have conducted preliminary studies in lymphedema clinics. It was found that the combination of gradually increasing constriction force by Schnogh until desired pressure was reached and maintained for 15 min, followed by a 5-min release, doing repeatedly this compression-decompression for at least 10 sessions a day, can generate acceptable results. The aim of the study was to evaluate the scientific effectiveness and establish a treatment protocol of TTT proposed as a therapeutic approach for clinical management of lymphedema. During 2006–2013, from over 3500 patients, 647 with primary/secondary lymphedema passed inclusion criteria, 307 for upper, and 340 for lower extremity. In the 5-day course of TTT, each day patients underwent 10 sessions of a 15-min compression followed by a 5-min decompression. Vegan diet was encouraged as an adjuvant therapy. Among lymphedema patients whose spectrum of edema severity ranged from mild to gigantic, TTT yielded an average volume reduction rate (VR) at 50.2% and 55.6%, making the average edema reduction volume attained at 463 and 1856 mL for upper and lower limb, respectively. The uniformed practice by Schnogh which supports a continual compression–decompression maneuver over 3.5 h daily for five consecutive days could induce an average VR at above half of the swelling in extremities of 647 patients. Schnogh is therefore effective in clinical management of lymphedema under TTT treatment of fibroblastic interstitium

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment-related central nervous system damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, R.J.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1986-01-01

    Neurologic and neuropsychologic treatment related sequelae are increasingly encountered in children with cancer, but conventional means of neurologic investigation are insensitive to the presence and extent of damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown brain damage not demonstrable by other means of investigation. For this reason, 11 children with cancer and with nontumor-related neurologic dysfunction were studied on a 1.5 Tesla MRI unit. All had concurrent computed tomography (CT). MRI abnormalities were seen in all (100%) patients. In 10 of 11 patients, abnormalities were of greater extent on MRI than on CT. White matter changes were frequently seen on MRI without corresponding CT abnormality. Those patients with the most severe forms of neurologic compromise had the most extensive changes on MRI. Focal neurologic findings correlated well with regions of focal signal change. Milder forms of neurologic compromise occurred in patients with definite, but less extensive, periventricular and/or subcortical change on MRI. MRI is more sensitive than CT in demonstrating treatment-related neurologic damage in children with cancer, and the type of change seen on MRI seems to correlate well with the type and severity of neurologic dysfunction present

  5. Arm and shoulder morbidity in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy versus mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvold, Inger-Lise (Dept. of Cancer Rehabilitation-Physiotherapy, Rikshospitalet, Univ. of Oslo, Div. The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)); Dahl, Alv A.; Fossaa, Sophie D. (Dept. of Clinical Cancer Research, Rikshospitalet, Univ. of Oslo: Division The Norwegian Radiumhospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)); Loekkevik, Erik (Dept. of Oncology, Rikshospitalet, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)); Marit Mengshoel, Anne (Inst. of Nursing and Health Sciences, Univ. of Oslo: Medical Faculty, Oslo (Norway))

    2008-06-15

    Introduction. The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of late effects in the arm and shoulder in patients with breast cancer stage II who had radical modified mastectomy (RM) or breast-conserving therapy (BCT) followed by loco-regional adjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy/anti-oestrogen. Material and methods. All patients had axillary lymph node dissection. At a median of 47 months (range 32-87) post-surgery, 263 women (RM: n=186, BCT: n=77) were seen during an outpatient visit and had their arm and shoulder function and the presence of lymphedema assessed by a clinical examination, interview and self-rating. Volume calculation was used to measure lymphedema. Results. In the RM group 20% had developed arm lymphedema versus 8% in the BCT group (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis lymphedema was associated with a higher number of metastatic axillary lymph nodes [OR1.14, p=0.02], RM [OR 2.75, p=0.04] and increasing body mass index (BMI) [OR 1.11, p<0.01]. In the RM group 24% had a restricted range of motion in shoulder flexion compared to 7% in the BCT group (p<0.01). Shoulder pain was reported by 32% in the RM group and by 12% in the BCT group (p=0.001). Increasing observation time, RM, and increasing BMI were significantly associated with impaired arm/shoulder function. Discussion. Arm/shoulder problems including lymphedema were significantly more common after RM compared to BCT in irradiated breast cancer patients who have undergone axillary lymph node dissection. The performance of BCT should be encouraged when appropriate, to ensure a low prevalence of arm/shoulder morbidity including lymphedema

  6. Arm and shoulder morbidity in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy versus mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvold, Inger-Lise; Dahl, Alv A.; Fossaa, Sophie D.; Loekkevik, Erik; Marit Mengshoel, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of late effects in the arm and shoulder in patients with breast cancer stage II who had radical modified mastectomy (RM) or breast-conserving therapy (BCT) followed by loco-regional adjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy/anti-oestrogen. Material and methods. All patients had axillary lymph node dissection. At a median of 47 months (range 32-87) post-surgery, 263 women (RM: n=186, BCT: n=77) were seen during an outpatient visit and had their arm and shoulder function and the presence of lymphedema assessed by a clinical examination, interview and self-rating. Volume calculation was used to measure lymphedema. Results. In the RM group 20% had developed arm lymphedema versus 8% in the BCT group (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis lymphedema was associated with a higher number of metastatic axillary lymph nodes [OR1.14, p=0.02], RM [OR 2.75, p=0.04] and increasing body mass index (BMI) [OR 1.11, p<0.01]. In the RM group 24% had a restricted range of motion in shoulder flexion compared to 7% in the BCT group (p<0.01). Shoulder pain was reported by 32% in the RM group and by 12% in the BCT group (p=0.001). Increasing observation time, RM, and increasing BMI were significantly associated with impaired arm/shoulder function. Discussion. Arm/shoulder problems including lymphedema were significantly more common after RM compared to BCT in irradiated breast cancer patients who have undergone axillary lymph node dissection. The performance of BCT should be encouraged when appropriate, to ensure a low prevalence of arm/shoulder morbidity including lymphedema

  7. Mapping the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon using parasitological, serological, and clinical evidence to exclude other causes of lymphedema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebede Deribe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Podoconiosis is a non-filarial elephantiasis, which causes massive swelling of the lower legs. It was identified as a neglected tropical disease by WHO in 2011. Understanding of the geographical distribution of the disease is incomplete. As part of a global mapping of podoconiosis, this study was conducted in Cameroon to map the distribution of the disease. This mapping work will help to generate data on the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon and contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis.We used a multi-stage sampling design with stratification of the country by environmental risk of podoconiosis. We sampled 76 villages from 40 health districts from the ten Regions of Cameroon. All individuals of 15-years old or older in the village were surveyed house-to-house and screened for lymphedema. A clinical algorithm was used to reliably diagnose podoconiosis, excluding filarial-associated lymphedema. Individuals with lymphoedema were tested for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigen and specific IgG4 using the Alere Filariasis Test Strips (FTS test and the Standard Diagnostics (SD BIOLINE lymphatic filariasis IgG4 test (Wb123 respectively, in addition to thick blood films. Presence of DNA specific to W. bancrofti was checked on night blood using a qPCR technique.Overall, 10,178 individuals from 4,603 households participated in the study. In total, 83 individuals with lymphedema were identified. Of the 83 individuals with lymphedema, two were found to be FTS positive and all were negative using the Wb123 test. No microfilaria of W. bancrofti were found in the night blood of any individual with clinical lymphedema. None were found to be positive for W. bancrofti using qPCR. Of the two FTS positive cases, one was positive for Mansonella perstans DNA, while the other harbored Loa loa microfilaria. Overall, 52 people with podoconiosis were identified after applying the clinical algorithm. The overall prevalence of podoconiosis was

  8. Comparison of the effectiveness of complex decongestive therapy and compression bandaging as a method of treatment of lymphedema in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zasadzka E

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ewa Zasadzka,1 Tomasz Trzmiel,1 Maria Kleczewska,2 Mariola Pawlaczyk1 1Department of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Day Rehabilitation Center, Hospicjum Palium, Poznań, Poland Background: Lymphedema is a chronic condition which significantly lowers the quality of patient life, particularly among elderly populations, whose mobility and physical function are often reduced. Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of multi-layer compression bandaging (MCB and complex decongestive therapy (CDT, and to show that MCB is a cheaper, more accessible and less labor intensive method of treating lymphedema in elderly patients. Patients and methods: The study included 103 patients (85 women and 18 men aged ≥60 years, with unilateral lower limb lymphedema. The subjects were divided into two groups: 50 treated with CDT and 53 with MCB. Pre- and post-treatment BMI, and average and maximum circumference of the edematous extremities were analyzed. Results: Reduction in swelling in both groups was achieved after 15 interventions. Both therapies demonstrated similar efficacy in reducing limb volume and circumference, but MCB showed greater efficacy in reducing the maximum circumference. Conclusion: Compression bandaging is a vital component of CDT. Maximum lymphedema reduction during therapy and maintaining its effect cannot be achieved without it. It also demonstrates its effectiveness as an independent method, which can reduce therapy cost and accessibility. Keywords: lymphedema, elderly, therapy, compression bandaging

  9. Treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema with adipose-derived regenerative cells and fat grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    2017-01-01

    reported outcome and safety. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02592213). During follow-up, a small volume reduction was noted but was not significant. Five patients reduced their use of conservative management. Patient-reported outcomes improved significantly over time. ADRCs were well...

  10. Microvascular filtration is increased in the forearms of patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Simonsen, Lene; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2013-01-01

    -enhanced ultrasound; venous occlusion strain-gauge plethysmography; lower-body negative pressure; noninvasive blood pressure measurements; and skin (99m)Tc-pertechnetate clearance technique. Measurements were performed bilaterally and simultaneously in the forearms, enabling use of the nonedematous forearm...... relative microvascular volume, forearm blood flow, skin blood flow, or central or local sympathetic vascular reflexes. Forearm microvascular filtration is increased in patients with BCRL, and more so in the edematous arm. The vascular sympathetic control mechanisms seem to be preserved. We propose...... with unilateral BCRL, the following aspects of upper extremity peripheral circulation were examined: muscle relative microvascular volume; capillary filtration coefficient; central and local sympathetic vascular reflexes; skin blood flow; and forearm blood flow. These were studied via real-time, contrast...

  11. Lower limb gigantism, lymphedema, and painful varicosities following a thigh vascular access graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Mathuram Thiyagarajan, Umasankar; Akoh, Jacob A

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are associated with greater morbidity than autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), but their use is indicated when AVF formation is not possible. This report adds to the literature a case of lower limb gigantism, painful varicosities, and lymphedema following long-term use of AVG in the upper thigh. The patient's past medical history included renal transplantation on the same side well before the AVG was inserted and right leg deep vein thrombosis. Suspicion of AVG thrombosis was excluded by Doppler ultrasound, which demonstrated an access flow of 1700 mL/min. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis did not identify the cause of her symptoms. Whereas functional incompetence of the iliac vein valve might be responsible for the varicosities, the extent of hypertrophy in this case raises the suspicion of lymphatic blockage possibly secondary to groin dissection undertaken at the time of graft insertion, in addition to the previous dissection at the time of transplantation. This case highlights the need for minimal groin dissection during AVG insertion, particularly in patients with a history of previous abdominopelvic surgery. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  12. Influence of adjuvant irradiation on the development of late arm lymphedema and impaired shoulder mobility after mastectomy for carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryttov, N.; Holm, N.V.; Qvist, N.; Blichert-Toft, M.; Odense Univ. Hospital

    1988-01-01

    The influence of postoperative radiation therapy on development of late arm lymphedema and shoulder joint disability following mastectomy was evaluated from a series of 57 women with operable carcinoma of the breast. The patients were divided into three groups. Common for all three groups was mastectomy and partial axillary dissection. In addition one group received postoperative irradiation plus systemic therapy and another group systemic therapy alone. The incidence of late arm lymphedema/impaired shoulder mobility was 11%/4% in the group of patients undergoing surgery alone, 46%/38% in the group of patients receiving adjuvant irradiation and 6%/12% in the group of patients receiving adjuvant systemic therapy. It is concluded that adjuvant irradiation to the axilla in patients with metastatic lymph nodes highly increases the risk of late physical sequelae following modified radical mastectomy. Adjuvant systemic therapy can be administered to high risk patients without increasing the risk of late arm lymphedema and shoulder disability. (orig.)

  13. Complementary, alternative, and other noncomplete decongestive therapy treatment methods in the management of lymphedema: a systematic search and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrick, Julia R; Poage, Ellen; Wanchai, Ausanee; Stewart, Bob R; Cormier, Janice N; Armer, Jane M

    2014-03-01

    (1) To provide a critical analysis of the contemporary published research that pertains to complementary, alternative, and other noncomplete decongestive therapies for treatment of lymphedema (LE), and (2) to provide practical applications of that evidence to improve care of patients with or at risk for LE. TYPE: This study meets the defining criteria as a systematic search and review because it includes varied study types. All studies that met the inclusion criteria were evaluated for weight of evidence and value. The systematic search and review includes articles published in the contemporary literature (2004-2012). Publications published from 2004-2011 were retrieved from 11 major medical indices by using search terms for LE and management approaches. Literature archives were examined through 2012. Data extraction included study design, objectives pertaining to LE, number and characteristics of participants, interventions, and outcomes. Study strengths and weaknesses were summarized. Study evidence was categorized according to the Oncology Nursing Society Putting Evidence into Practice level-of-evidence guidelines after achieving consensus among the authors. No authors participated in development of nor benefitted from the review of these modality methods or devices. Extracted data from 85 studies were reviewed in 4 subcategories: botanical, pharmaceutical, physical agent modality, and modalities of contemporary value. After review, 47 articles were excluded, which left 16 articles on botanicals and pharmaceuticals and 22 articles for physical agent modality and/or modalities of contemporary value. Pharmaceuticals were later excluded. The authors concluded that botanicals had generated sufficient studies to support a second, more specific systematic review; thus, botanicals are reported elsewhere. It was found that limited high-level evidence was available for all categories. Well-constructed randomized controlled trials related specifically to LE were limited

  14. Treatment-related fluctuation in Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavukkarasu Thivakaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is usually a monophasic illness but relapses occur. A 55-year-old female with hypertension and vitiligo presented with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. She improved with immunoglobulin treatment started on day 6 of illness, but relapsed on day 14 warranting repeat immunoglobulin therapy. Thereafter recovery was complete. Her relapse was due to treatment-related fluctuation (TRF. TRF is improvement in the GBS disability scale of at least one grade after completion of immunotherapy followed by worsening of the disability scale of at least one grade within the first 2 months after disease onset. Recurrent GBS and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were excluded. During the peak of the illness ANA titres were transiently high. The presence of other medical conditions, predominant proximal weakness and the absence of preceding diarrhea are predictors for TRF seen in this patient. Early treatment and evidence of ongoing immune activation have contributed toward TRF.

  15. The effect of relaxation techniques on edema, anxiety and depression in post-mastectomy lymphedema patients undergoing comprehensive decongestive therapy: A clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Bahareh; Mirzakhany, Navid; Angooti Oshnari, Leila; Irani, Ashkan; Hosseinzadeh, Samaneh; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Haghighat, Shahpar

    2018-01-01

    Lymphedema is sometimes accompanied by high degrees of anxiety and depression. This study aimed to assess the effects of relaxation techniques on the level of edema, anxiety and depression in women undergoing Comprehensive Decongestive Therapy (CDT). This clinical trial compared two treatment methods in 31 women with post-mastectomy lymphedema, including 15 cases who received CDT and 16 who received RCDT (Relaxation plus CDT). The edema volume, anxiety and depression scores were compared at the first and last sessions of the first phase of the treatment and six weeks afterwards. The edema, anxiety and depression scores were 63.6%, 54.1% and 65.5% in the RCDT group and 60.7%, 31.4% and 35.2% in the CDT group. There were significant differences between the two groups in terms of the reduction in depression (p = 0.024) and anxiety (p = 0.011) scores throughout the study. This significant relationship was due to the differences in the depression score in the 3rd and 9th weeks of the study between the two groups. Similarly, anxiety levels differed significantly between the two groups at the 9th week of the study (P = 0.013). Relaxation techniques reduced the anxiety and depression scores and the volume of edema in the patients with lymphedema. The addition of this intervention to the therapeutic package for lymphedema patients requires further studies in terms of cost-effectiveness.

  16. Therapeutic Effects of Saireito (Chai-Ling-Tang, a Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, on Lymphedema Caused by Radiotherapy: A Case Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Nagai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of radiotherapy machines and technologies, a proportion of patients suffer from radiation-induced lymphedema. Saireito (SRT is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that has been used for treating edema and inflammation in conditions such as nephritic disease. This study investigated the effect of SRT on lymphedema caused by radiotherapy. Four patients were treated with SRT at a dose of 9 g/day. The severity of lymphedema was evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 and Numerical Rating Scale before and after SRT treatment. After the treatment with SRT, 2 of 4 patients (50% showed apparent improvement in lymphedema. One of the cases had difficulty in wearing the custom-made thermoplastic cast, but after SRT administration, he could wear the mask easily. One case decided to stop taking SRT 3 days after initiation because cough and fever appeared. In conclusion, it is important to control the side effects of radiotherapy, which leads to improved tumor control rates. Prospective randomized studies are necessary to confirm the findings of this case series study.

  17. Elephantiasis, elastin, and chronic wound healing: 19th century and contemporary viewpoints relevant to hypotheses concerning lymphedema, leprosy, erysipelas, and psoriasis--review and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, T J

    2009-03-01

    Both wound healing and lymphedema have fibrosis of the skin in common. They also share destruction of elastin by elastases from neutrophils as a significant feature. These are not new observations, and the writings of Unna and Kaposi are recalled. The contemporary observations on elastin by Gerli and his team are discussed in the light of these much earlier opinions.

  18. Physical therapy methods in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucherova, T. Ya.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Tuzikov, S. A.; Vusik, M. V.; Doroshenko, A. V.; Velikaya, V. V.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of the effective use of magnetic laser therapy in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients were presented. The effect of magnetic-laser therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced reactions in the patients with head and neck cancer and in the patients with breast cancer was analyzed. High efficiency of lymphedema and lymphorrhea treatment in the postoperative period in the patients with breast cancer was proved. The results of rehabilitation of the patients with gastric cancer after surgical treatment were presented. These data indicate a high effectiveness of different physical methods of treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients.

  19. Complications after modified radical mastectomy in early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatty, I.; Shaharyar; Ibrahim, M.; Chaudhry, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of complications, particularly the lymphedema of the arm, after modified radical mastectomy in early breast cancer patients who have not been given post-operative radiotherapy to axilla. Design: Hospital based descriptive study. Results: Median age of these patients was 47 years with a range of 25-58 years. Majority of these patients were stage II (84%) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent type of cancer (88%). Fifty-six percent of these patients had high grade tumors. None of the patients received radiotherapy to axilla after modified radical mastectomy. Early complications documented from history and medical record revealed that seroma formation was the most frequent early complication seen after modified radical mastectomy (20%). Frequent late complications included anterior chest tightness (56%), shoulder dysfunction (36%), lymphedema (26%) and sensory loss (22%). Shoulder dysfunction included limited range of movement in all 18 patients. Gross multiple restrictions were seen in 11 (61.11%) of these patients. Conclusion: It is concluded from this study that lymphedema and shoulder dysfunction are the two major complications in patients of early breast cancer who have undergone modified radical mastectomy without post-operative axillary radiation. (author)

  20. Influência da fisioterapia complexa descongestiva associada à ingestão de triglicerídeos de cadeia média no tratamento do linfedema de membro superior Influence of complex descongestive physical therapy associated with intake of medium-chain triglycerides for treating upper-limb lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Oliveira

    2008-02-01

    divided into two groups: the Control Group (n= 5, which underwent physical therapy treatment consisting of CDP (classical massage, manual lymphatic drainage, compression taping and skincare three times a week, for four weeks; and the MCT Group (n= 5, which underwent the same physical therapy protocol with the addition of daily diet therapy consisting of intake of MCT, for four weeks. RESULTS: At the end of the intervention, analysis of the circumference and volume measurements showed significant differences between the groups (< 0.05, with a greater reduction in lymphedema in the MCT Group. There were no significant differences in the skin fold measurements or whole-body water content. The feeling of heaviness in the arms after the intervention was significantly less in the MCT Group (< 0.05, compared with before the intervention. CONCLUSION: Physical therapy treatment together with diet therapy with intake of MCT in women with upper-limb lymphedema following surgery and breast cancer treatment was effective in reverting this condition.

  1. Effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S; Segal, Roanne J; Mackey, John R; Gelmon, Karen; Reid, Robert D; Friedenreich, Christine M; Ladha, Aliya B; Proulx, Caroline; Vallance, Jeffrey K H; Lane, Kirstin; Yasui, Yutaka; McKenzie, Donald C

    2007-10-01

    Breast cancer chemotherapy may cause unfavorable changes in physical functioning, body composition, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life (QOL). We evaluated the relative merits of aerobic and resistance exercise in blunting these effects. We conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial in Canada between 2003 and 2005 that randomly assigned 242 breast cancer patients initiating adjuvant chemotherapy to usual care (n = 82), supervised resistance exercise (n = 82), or supervised aerobic exercise (n = 78) for the duration of their chemotherapy (median, 17 weeks; 95% CI, 9 to 24 weeks). Our primary end point was cancer-specific QOL assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia scale. Secondary end points were fatigue, psychosocial functioning, physical fitness, body composition, chemotherapy completion rate, and lymphedema. The follow-up assessment rate for our primary end point was 92.1%, and adherence to the supervised exercise was 70.2%. Unadjusted and adjusted mixed-model analyses indicated that aerobic exercise was superior to usual care for improving self-esteem (P = .015), aerobic fitness (P = .006), and percent body fat (adjusted P = .076). Resistance exercise was superior to usual care for improving self-esteem (P = .018), muscular strength (P exercise groups but did not reach statistical significance. Exercise did not cause lymphedema or adverse events. Neither aerobic nor resistance exercise significantly improved cancer-specific QOL in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, but they did improve self-esteem, physical fitness, body composition, and chemotherapy completion rate without causing lymphedema or significant adverse events.

  2. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding a Doctor Treatment Options Side Effects Managing Prostate Cancer Treatment Related Side Effects Clinical Trials Patient Resources Guides Videos Prostate Cancer FAQs Information by Stage Newly Diagnosed with Prostate ...

  3. The effect of pain on physical functioning after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Christensen, Karl Bang; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: Persistent postsurgical pain, musculoskeletal pain, sensory disturbances and lymphedema are major clinical problems after treatment for breast cancer. However, there is little evidence on how these sequelae affects physical function. The aim was to develop and validate a procedure...... specific tool for assessing the impact of pain and other sequelae on physical function after breast cancer treatment. METHODS:: Literature review, patient and expert interviews were used to identify dimensions of physical function and sequelae. A questionnaire was developed and tested using cognitive......, lymphedema and other causes. Convergent validity was assessed using the "Quick-disability of arm, shoulder and hand" scale (Q-DASH). RESULTS:: About half of the patients reported decreased physical function. All 5 scales displayed good fit, unidimensionality, monotonicity, local independence, and lack...

  4. Verrucous lesions arising in lymphedema and diabetic neuropathy: Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa or verrucous skin lesions on the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Eri; Asai, Jun; Okuzawa, Yasutaro; Hanada, Keiji; Nomiyama, Tomoko; Takenaka, Hideya; Katoh, Norito

    2016-03-01

    Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy (VSLDN) develop in areas with sensory loss in diabetic patients. Although various types of chronic stimulation, such as pressure or friction, are considered an important factor in the development of such lesions, the precise pathogenesis of VSLDN remains obscure, and there is currently no established treatment for this disease. Here, we present a case of VSLDN on the dorsum of the right foot. However, because lymphedema was also observed at the same site, this lesion could also be diagnosed as elephantiasis nostras verrucosa arising in diabetic neuropathy. The lesion was successfully treated with a combination of elastic stocking and mixed killed bacterial suspension and hydrocortisone ointment, which suggested that VSLDN might have been exacerbated by the pre-existing lymphedema. Because various types of chronic stimulation can trigger VSLDN, treatment plans should be devised on a case-by-case basis. Therefore, it is important to investigate the presence of factors that can induce or exacerbate chronic inflammatory stimulation, such as lymphedema in our case, in each patient with VSLDN. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Hypertension as risk factor for radiation induced side-effects in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, F.K.; Rhomberg, W.; Doringer, W.

    1992-01-01

    130 breast cancer patients were retrospectively evaluated for side-effects to estimate the influence of arterial hypertension. All were treated with mastecomy and irradiation (telecobalt). 79 patients had normal blood pressure, 51 showed arterial hypertension. Hypertension proved to be the strongest endogeneous factor for the development of side-effects. In contrast to the patients with normal blood pressure those with hypertension showed significant more arm lymphedema (p [de

  6. Microsurgery guided by sequential preoperative lymphography using {sup 68}Ga-NEB PET and MRI in patients with lower-limb lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Xiao; Gao, Chao; Yang, Elan [Peking Union Medical College Hospital Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Plastic Surgery, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jingjing [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China); National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine LOMIN, Bethesda, MD (United States); Zhang, Daming; Xue, Huadan [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chi, Chongwei [Institute of Automation Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Lang, Lixin; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine LOMIN, Bethesda, MD (United States); Zhu, Zhaohui; Li, Fang [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    The popularity of contemporary microsurgical techniques in treatment of lower-limb lymphedema calls for better visualization of the lymphatic system, both preoperatively and intra-operatively. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the feasibility of a novel combination of {sup 68}Ga-NEB positron emission tomography (PET) with magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) in evaluating lymphedema and guiding surgical intervention. A total of 11 patients (F 9, M 2, age range 29-69 y) with lower-limb lymphedema classified into stage I to III were recruited. PET acquisition was performed at 30, 60 and 90 min after subcutaneous injection of the albumin-binding radiotracer {sup 68}Ga-NEB into the bilateral first web spaces of the feet. All the patients were also subjected to {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid (SC) lymphoscintigraphy for comparison. Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using sequences specialized for lymphatic vessel scans. All the patients underwent surgical interventions within a week. The surgical approach includes the use of a linear marker for edema localization and indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography with a near-infrared surgical navigation system intra-operatively. Lymph transport in lymphatic channels was clearly observed by visualization of {sup 68}Ga-NEB activity in the lymphatic vessels and within lymph nodes for all 11 patients as well as the visualization of the edema section plane with dermal backflow (DB), abnormally increased and disconnected uptake along the lymphatic channels. Preoperative {sup 68}Ga-NEB PET combined with MRL provides advantageous three-dimensional images, higher temporal resolution, significantly shorter time lapse before image acquisition after tracer injection and more accurate pathological lymphatic vessel distribution than {sup 99m}Tc-SC lymphoscintigraphy combined with MRI. This study documented an effective imaging pattern to combine {sup 68}Ga-NEB PET and MRL in patients with lower

  7. Cell therapy for the treatment of lower limb lymphedema. Case report Terapia celular en el tratamiento de linfedema de miembros inferiores. Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Goicoechea-Díaz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although lymphedema is a common disabling disease causing significant morbidity for affected patients, treatment for this condition remains limited and largely ineffective. Some reported data suggest that some bone-marrow derived cells may play a role in lymphangiogenesis. It appears that blood vessels and lymphatic vessels might use the same population of cells for vasculogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Therefore, adult stem cell therapy could be a new useful strategy for the treatment of lymphedema. We report a resolution of a severe lower limb bilateral lymphedema after implantation of autologous adult stem cells derived from bone marrow. As far as we know, this is the first reported case with chronic lower limb lymphedema treated successfully with autologous cell therapy. This procedure is a low-cost, relatively simple and easy to perform option that opens new ways for the treatment of lymphedema.Aunque el linfedema es una enfermedad crónica inhabilitante común que causa morbilidad significativa en los pacientes afectados, el tratamiento para esta enfermedad se mantiene muy limitada y en la mayor parte de los casos resulta ineficaz. Algunos datos reportados sugieren que algunas de las células madre derivadas de la medula ósea pueden intervenir en la linfangiogénesis. Al parecer, los vasos sanguíneos y los vasos linfáticos podrían usar la misma población celular para la vasculogénesis y la linfangiogénesis. Por consiguiente, la terapia con células madre adultas podría ser una nueva estrategia útil para el tratamiento de linfedema. En el presente trabajo se informa la resolución de un linfedema bilateral severo de miembros inferiores después de la implantación de células madre autólogas derivadas de la médula ósea. Hasta donde sabemos, este es el primer caso de linfedema crónico de los miembros inferiores tratado exitosamente con células madre autólogas. Este método de tratamiento es económico, relativamente simple, f

  8. Lymphoscintigraphy in breast cancer: a short review about the impact on upper limb after surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, Anke; Resende, Juliana Miranda Dutra de; Bello, Marcelo Adeodato; Oliveira, Juliana Flavia de; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Palestro, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is still associated with high mortality rates and one of the most important factors governing long survival is accurate and early diagnosis. In underdeveloped countries, this disease frequently is only detected in advanced stages; however, through mammography, many women have been diagnosed at early stages. In this context, the sentinel lymph node (SLN) technique is associated with less postoperative morbidity compared to axillary lymphadenectomy. Lymphoscintigraphy has emerged as a method for the evaluation of lymphatic drainage chains in various tumours, being both accurate and non invasive. The aim of this work is to present the main aspects which cause controversy about SLN and lymphoscintigraphy and the impact that these procedures have had on lymphedema after surgical treatment for breast cancer. A short review including papers in English, Spanish and Portuguese, available on Lilacs and Medline database, published between January, 2000 and July, 2008 was performed. The key words breast cancer, lymphoscintigraphy, SLN biopsy, lymphedema were used. Various studies have aimed to compare the incidence and prevalence of lymphedema according to the technique used; however, the population subjected to SLN is different from the one with indication for axillary lymphadenectomy regarding staging. Moreover, little is known about long term morbidity since it is a relatively new technique. In conclusion, the development of surgical techniques has permitted to minimize deformities and the current trend is that these techniques be as conservative as possible. Thus, lymphoscintigraphy plays an important role in the identification of SLN, contributing to the prevention and minimization of postoperative complications. (author)

  9. Lymphoscintigraphy in breast cancer: a short review about the impact on upper limb after surgical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Anke; Resende, Juliana Miranda Dutra de; Bello, Marcelo Adeodato; Oliveira, Juliana Flavia de; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Palestro, Christopher J. [Yeshiva University, NY (United States). Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    2008-12-15

    Breast cancer is still associated with high mortality rates and one of the most important factors governing long survival is accurate and early diagnosis. In underdeveloped countries, this disease frequently is only detected in advanced stages; however, through mammography, many women have been diagnosed at early stages. In this context, the sentinel lymph node (SLN) technique is associated with less postoperative morbidity compared to axillary lymphadenectomy. Lymphoscintigraphy has emerged as a method for the evaluation of lymphatic drainage chains in various tumours, being both accurate and non invasive. The aim of this work is to present the main aspects which cause controversy about SLN and lymphoscintigraphy and the impact that these procedures have had on lymphedema after surgical treatment for breast cancer. A short review including papers in English, Spanish and Portuguese, available on Lilacs and Medline database, published between January, 2000 and July, 2008 was performed. The key words breast cancer, lymphoscintigraphy, SLN biopsy, lymphedema were used. Various studies have aimed to compare the incidence and prevalence of lymphedema according to the technique used; however, the population subjected to SLN is different from the one with indication for axillary lymphadenectomy regarding staging. Moreover, little is known about long term morbidity since it is a relatively new technique. In conclusion, the development of surgical techniques has permitted to minimize deformities and the current trend is that these techniques be as conservative as possible. Thus, lymphoscintigraphy plays an important role in the identification of SLN, contributing to the prevention and minimization of postoperative complications. (author)

  10. Acute treatment-related diarrhea during postoperative adjuvant therapy for high-risk rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Robert C.; Martenson, James A.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Kahn, Michael J.; Krook, James E.

    1998-01-01

    treatment toxicity as an end point in cancer control or cancer therapy trials utilizing similar treatment techniques. Patients receiving 5-fluorouracil and pelvic radiotherapy compared with patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy alone and patients with a prior history of a low anterior resection compared with patients who had a prior history of an abdominoperineal resection experienced increased rates of Grades 1 through 4 acute treatment-related diarrhea, and the most important increase occurred as Grade 3 toxicity

  11. The Danish version of Lymphoedema Functioning, Disability and Health Questionnaire (Lymph-ICF) for breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Karin R; Devoogdt, Nele; Strand, Liv Inger

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To translate and culturally adapt the Lymphoedema Functioning, Disability and Health Questionnaire (Lymph-ICF) for breast cancer survivors with arm lymphedema into Danish and examine its content validity and reliability. METHODS: (1) Translation and cultural adaptation was performed in 10...... steps following international guidelines (International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcome Research); (2) cognitive interviewing (step 7) was conducted in 15 women with breast cancer related arm lymphedema to explore understandability, interpretation, and cultural relevance; (3) after adjustments...... for the domains ranged from 0.84 to 0.94. SEM values differed for the domains, 6.4 (physical function), 5.7 (mobility activities), 7.09 (life and social activities), 9.1 (mental functions), and 10.2 (household activities). CONCLUSION: The translated and adjusted Lymph-ICF DK (Denmark) is reliable and valid...

  12. The Impact of Prostate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms on Low-Income Latino Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    decir la…la…palabra cáncer para usted? Patient ID#1866: Pues…casi es básicamente “ aguas , que estás en peligro!” ¿Si? Interviewer AS: Uh huh...Participant #P1797: Si porque antes mira el comía bastante carne. Interviewer MF: Uhm. Participant #P1797: Eh bastante chile … Interviewer MF: Uhm...Participant #P1797: And quite a bit of chile … Interviewer MF: Uhm. Participant #P1797: A lot of condiments, quite a bit of fat, why should I say

  13. The Impact of Prostate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms on Low-Income Latino Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    hacerle una pregunta sobre su salud. A1. En general, ¿Usted diría que su salud es excelente, muy buena, buena, regular, o mala? 100...hizo usted su trabajo u otras actividades con el mismo cuidado que de costumbre debido a algún problema emocional, como sentirse deprimido o...problema, si es que ha tenido problemas con esto, de gotear orina o mojarse los pantalones durante las últimas 4 semanas? 100 Ningún problema

  14. Experiences of a Community-Based Lymphedema Management Program for Lymphatic Filariasis in Odisha State, India: An Analysis of Focus Group Discussions with Patients, Families, Community Members and Program Volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Cassidy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally 68 million people are infected with lymphatic filariasis (LF, 17 million of whom have lymphedema. This study explores the effects of a lymphedema management program in Odisha State, India on morbidity and psychosocial effects associated with lymphedema.Focus groups were held with patients (eight groups, separated by gender, their family members (eight groups, community members (four groups and program volunteers (four groups who had participated in a lymphedema management program for the past three years. Significant social, physical, and economic difficulties were described by patients and family members, including marriageability, social stigma, and lost workdays. However, the positive impact of the lymphedema management program was also emphasized, and many family and community members indicated that community members were accepting of patients and had some improved understanding of the etiology of the disease. Program volunteers and community members stressed the role that the program had played in educating people, though interestingly, local explanations and treatments appear to coexist with knowledge of biomedical treatments and the mosquito vector.Local and biomedical understandings of disease can co-exist and do not preclude individuals from participating in biomedical interventions, specifically lymphedema management for those with lymphatic filariasis. There is a continued need for gender-specific psychosocial support groups to address issues particular to men and women as well as a continued need for improved economic opportunities for LF-affected patients. There is an urgent need to scale up LF-related morbidity management programs to reduce the suffering of people affected by LF.

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Cancer Centre, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dörr, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle; and others

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Rai, Bhavana; Cooper, Rachel; Dörr, Wolfgang; Nout, Remi A.; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to those of

  17. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats

    2011-01-01

    -cell disease (HR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.01-3.7), Down syndrome (HR: 7.3, 95% CI: 3.6-14.9) and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in CR1 (HR: 8.0, 95% CI: 3.3-19.5) were identified as independent risk factors for TRD. CONCLUSION: Several TRDs were potentially preventable and future efforts should be directed......BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92...

  18. Late effects of breast cancer treatment and potentials for rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertz, Marianne; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2011-01-01

    include fear of recurrence, sleep disturbances, cognitive problems, fatigue, and sexual problems. Discussion. To improve rehabilitation, specific goals have to be formulated into national guidelines and high priority directed towards research into developing and testing new interventions for alleviating...... from the Nordic countries. Results. Local therapies such as breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy may cause persistent pain in the breast area, arm, and shoulder reported by 30-50% of patients after three to five years, lymphedema in 15-25% of patients, and restrictions of arm and shoulder movement...

  19. Linfedema em mulheres submetidas à cirurgia por câncer de mama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Lara Vieira Bonisson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the prevalence and to identify possible factors associated with the occurrence of lymphedema in women undergoing treatment for breast cancer. Methods: a prevalence study with 125 women. An interview and a consultation of the medical record were carried out using a questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed through logistic regression. Results: a prevalence rate of 34.4% was found. Obesity, sentinel lymph node biopsy, radiotherapy, and the presence of some treatment complications were statistically significant for the occurrence of lymphedema. Conclusion: the prevalence of lymphedema in this study was high. The variables positively related to lymphedema, considered as associated factors, were: obesity, sentinel lymph node biopsy, radiotherapy and some treatment related complications (adhesion, retraction, paraesthesia, seroma, fibrosis, infection and dehiscence.

  20. Air Travel Safety in Postoperative Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Michael; Ng, Judy; Kwong, Ava

    2018-05-17

    Air travel has long been a dilemma in post-breast cancer surgery patients. Anecdotal reports have described adverse outcomes on surgical wound, implants, and lymphedema during air travel. This review aims to evaluate the best evidence from the literature concerning the air travel safety in breast cancer patients. A comprehensive review was performed of the Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases using a predefined strategy. Retrieved studies were independently screened and rated for relevance. Data were extracted by 2 researchers. We reviewed the best evidence on air travel safety in postoperative breast cancer patients. Evidence was limited in the current literature to suggest adverse effects on postoperative mastectomy wounds and drains by high-altitude travel. Similarly, adverse effects on breast implants were limited to case reports and ex vivo experiments. A systematic review of 12 studies concluded that air travel is not associated with upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer surgery. Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) is a known complication after air travel; in addition, malignancy itself is a known risk factor for DVT. Evidence of safety to continue tamoxifen during the period of air travel is lacking in the literature. Evidence to support the use of systemic DVT prophylaxis in general postoperative breast cancer patients is also limited. Best evidence from a large retrospective study suggested that mechanical antiembolism devices and early mobilization are the only measures required. Air travel is generally safe in patients after breast cancer surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Reconstrucción en linfedema peneano y escrotal secundario a hernia inguinal bilateral gigante Reconstruction in penile and scrotal lymphedema secondary to billateral giant inguinal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fernández García

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El linfedema peneano y escrotal tiene consecuencias funcionales, estéticas, sociales y psicológicas significativas para el paciente que lo padece. Es una enfermedad infrecuente en los países desarrollados, aunque relativamente prevalente en los países tropicales. Su causa más común es la filariasis, aunque en nuestra práctica diaria se asocia más frecuentemente a cirugía, radioterapia, procesos inflamatorios y neoplásicos. Presentamos un caso singular de linfedema penoescrotal secundario a cirugía por hernia inguinal gigante bilateral que persistía un año después de la intervención. El tratamiento quirúrgico consistió en la exéresis de toda la piel linfedematosa del escroto involucrada y el uso de colgajos de piel escrotal posterior para la cobertura testicular. En un segundo tiempo quirúrgico se llevó a cabo una extirpación total de la piel del pene y del tejido subcutáneo superficial a la fascia de Buck. Empleamos injertos de piel de grosor parcial para cubrir el pene denudado. El resultado estético postoperatorio fue aceptable y los resultados funcionales y psicológicos son satisfactorios para el paciente 3 años después de la cirugía.Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum has important functional, cosmetic, social, psychological consequences for the affected patient. It is a rare disease in the developed countries, although it is relatively frequent in tropical countries. Globally, the most common cause is filariasis, although in our practice it is most frecuently associated to surgery, radiotherapy, inflammatory and neoplasic diseases. We report one rare case of penoscrotal lymphedema due to billateral giant inguinal hernia reconstrction. The lymphedema was persistent one year after the repair of the billateral hernia. The technique of reconstruction consisted of excision of all involved lymphedematous skin of the scrotum, and use of posterior scrotal flaps for testicular coverage. In a second surgical time, a total

  2. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  3. Morbidity after conventional dissection of axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Conventional axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) has recently become less radical. The treatment morbidity effects of reduced ALND aggressiveness are unknown. This article investigates the prevalence of the main complications of ALND: lymphedema, range-of-motion restriction, and arm paresthesia and pain. Methods This cross-sectional study included 200 women with invasive breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery (82.5%, n = 165) or mastectomy (17.5%, n = 35) with ALND from 2007 to 2011. Arm perimetry was used to assess lymphedema, defined as a difference >2 cm in the upper arm circumference between the nonsurgical and surgical arms. Range-of-motion restriction was assessed by evaluating the degree of arm abduction. Paresthesia was measured in the inner and proximal arm regions. Arm pain was assessed by directly questioning the patients and defined as either present or absent. Results The average (±SD) time between ALND and morbidity evaluation was 35 ± 18 months (range, 7-60 months). The average dissected lymph node number per patient was 14 ± 4 (range, 6-30 lymph nodes). Only 3.5% (n = 7) of the patients presented with lymphedema. Single-incision approaches to breast tumor and ALND (P = 0.04) and the presence of a postoperative seroma (P = 0.02) were associated with lymphedema in univariate analysis. Paresthesia was the most frequent side effect observed (53% of patients, n = 106). This complication was associated with increased age (P < 0.0001) and a larger dissected lymph node number (P = 0.01) in univariate and multivariate analysis. Additionally, 24% (n = 48) of patients had noticeable limited arm abduction. Among the patients, 27.5% (n = 55) experienced sporadic arm pain corresponding to the surgically treated armpit. In multivariate analysis, the pain risk was 1.9-fold higher in patients who underwent ALND corresponding to their dominant arm (95% CI, 1.0-3.7, P = 0

  4. Linfedema primário congênito em bovinos Red Angus Primary congenital lymphedema in Red Angus cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Targino S.A. Macêdo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Casos de linfedema congênito foram observados acometendo 12 terneiros cruza Red Angus na região Central do Rio Grande do Sul. Os terneiros afetados apresentavam graus variáveis de edema subcutâneo ao nascimento, envolvendo principalmente os membros pélvicos, mas também outras regiões do corpo. A injeção de solução a 5% de azul de metileno no espaço interdigital dos membros pélvicos de três terneiros afetados e um controle, indicaram uma interrupção no fluxo da linfa, sugerindo uma falha dos linfáticos periféricos distais em contactar os troncos centrais. Na necropsia de três terneiros afetados, edema subcutâneo foi observado de modo variável nos membros pélvicos, prepúcio e abdômen ventral. Não foi observado edema nas cavidades orgânicas. Em dois casos, observou-se hipoplasia dos linfonodos poplíteos associadas à dilatação dos vasos linfáticos. Testes de DNA demonstraram que todos os terneiros afetados nasceram de vacas inseminadas pelo mesmo touro, sugerindo uma base genética para a doença. Levando em consideração que uma pequena porcentagem de terneiros nasceram de vacas inseminadas pelo touro suspeito, é provável que um modo autossômico recessivo esteja envolvido na hereditariedade da doença.Cases of congenital lymphedema were observed affecting 12 cross Red Angus calves from the central region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Affected calves presented variable degrees of subcutaneous edema at birth, involving mainly the hind limbs but also other body regions. The injection of methylene blue dye in 5% solution into the interdigital space of the hind limbs of three affected calves and one normal control indicated an interruption of the lymph flow in the affected calves; this suggests a failure of the distal peripheral lymphatics to connect with the central trunks. At necropsy of three affected calves subcutaneous edema was variably observed in the hind limbs, prepuce and ventral abdomen. Edema

  5. Guide to Understanding Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACTH CAF CMF FAC TAC TC TCH TH THP Radiation Therapy Whole Breast Radiation Partial Breast Radiation ... Basics Treatments and Your Bone Health Bone Health Tests Improving Bone Health Medicines To Protect Bones Diet, ...

  6. National Lymphedema Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insurance Issues G-Codes and LE Sample Insurance Appeal Letter New Medicare Limits Inspirational Patients Lymph e- ... their physician/therapist regarding their own medical situation. Advertising | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use Find Treatment About ...

  7. Pain in Breast Cancer Treatment: Aggravating Factors and Coping Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fatima Guerreiro Godoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate pain in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema and the characteristics of aggravating factors and coping mechanisms. The study was conducted in the Clinica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, with a group of 46 women who had undergone surgery for the treatment of breast cancer. The following variables were evaluated: type and length of surgery; number of radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions; continued feeling of the removed breast (phantom limb, infection, intensity of pain, and factors that improve and worsen the pain. The percentage of events was used for statistical analysis. About half the participants (52.1% performed modified radical surgery, with 91.3% removing only one breast; 82.6% of the participants did not perform breast reconstruction surgery. Insignificant pain was reported by 32.60% of the women and 67.3% said they suffered pain; it was mild in 28.8% of the cases (scale 1–5, moderate in 34.8% (scale 6–9, and severe in 4.3%. The main mechanisms used to cope with pain were painkillers in 41.30% of participants, rest in 21.73%, religious ceremonies in 17.39%, and chatting with friends in 8.69%. In conclusion, many mastectomized patients with lymphedema complain of pain, but pain is often underrecognized and undertreated.

  8. The advantages of using traditional Chinese medicine as an adjunctive therapy in the whole course of cancer treatment instead of only terminal stage of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fanghua; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Aiyan; Zhang, Bo; Li, Anyuan; Wang, Zhixue; Han, Junqing

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) can play an important role in the whole course of cancer treatment such as recovery stages of post-operative, radiotherapy or chemotherapy stages instead of only terminal stage of cancer. In this review, we have summarized current evidence for using TCM as adjuvant cancer treatment in different stages of cancer lesions. Some TCMs (e.g., TJ-41, Liu-jun-zi-tang, PHY906, Coumarin, and Aescine) are capable of improving the post-operative symptoms such as fatigue, pain, appetite, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and lymphedema. Some TCMs (e.g., Ginseng, Huang-Qi, BanZhiLian, TJ-48, Huachansu injection, Shenqi fuzheng injection, and Kanglaite injection) in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy are capable of enhancing the efficacy of and diminishing the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radiotherapy. Taken together, they have great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, relieving surgery complications, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio- therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by surgery, chemo- or radio-therapeutics. They have significant effects on relieving breast cancer-related lymphedema, reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving radiation pneumonitis and gastrointestinal side effects, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating bone marrow suppression. This review of those medicines should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as an adjunctive therapy in the whole course of cancer treatment instead of only terminal stage of cancer, by providing useful information for development of more effective anti-cancer drugs and making more patients "survival with cancer" for a long time.

  9. Tonsillary carcinoma after temozolomide treatment for glioblastoma multiforme: treatment-related or dual-pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binello, E; Germano, I M

    2009-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a primary malignant brain tumor with a prognosis of typically less than 2 years. Standard treatment paradigms include surgery, radiation therapy and temozolomide. Little data exists for temozolomide recommendations after the first 6 months. We present a case of a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with surgery, radiation and chronic temozolomide for 6 years. He continues to survive glioblastoma-recurrence-free, but developed tonsillary carcinoma. This case raises the question of whether this secondary solid-organ malignancy is treatment-related or dual pathology.

  10. EORTC joint ventures in quality control: treatment-related variables and data acquisition in chemotherapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantongelen, K; Steward, W; Blackledge, G; Verweij, J; Van Oosterom, A

    1991-01-01

    In multicentre studies, non-compliance with the protocol may limit the chances of reaching a correct conclusion. A procedure to examine the administration of chemotherapy in multicentre EORTC protocols has been developed. General aspects are covered in a mailed questionnaire on the prescription of drugs with rounding up or down of dosages, local facilities for preparation and the procedure for preparation and administration. More detail is collected during a quality control site visit. Ten centres have been visited and there was significant variation between centres in the organisation of chemotherapy administration. However, more striking differences were noted between the type and quality of hospital files. The lack of systematic recording of sequence, timing and doses of chemotherapy and, in particular, treatment related toxicity, is a major difficulty limiting the effectiveness of quality control. These shortcomings emphasise the need for standardisation of some aspects of case records and a suggested check-list has been drafted.

  11. Mental health treatment-related stigma and professional help seeking among student veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Joseph M; McDermott, Ryon C; McCormick, Wesley H

    2017-11-01

    Record numbers of military veterans are enrolling at colleges/universities across the United States. Although a substantive subset might suffer from mental health problems, the majority of these students might not be amenable to utilizing services. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of treatment-related stigma in intentions to seek professional help among undergraduate student veterans at a university on the U.S. Gulf Coast. Focusing on 251 veterans and a gender-matched comparison group of 251 nonveterans, student veterans endorsed higher probabilities of seeking care from physicians (d = .77) and psychologists or other professionals (d = .67). In addition, nonveteran students had greater self-stigma about seeking help (d = -.27) but veterans had more negative beliefs about treatment efficacy (d = 1.07). When compared with veterans who did not exceed clinical thresholds, those with a probable need for treatment had more stigma (ds = .63). Multivariate analyses also revealed an inverse main effect of self-stigma on intentions to seek help from both professional categories. However, military experience differentially moderated associations between treatment-related beliefs and intentions to seek mental health services. Finally, exploratory analyses identified that student veterans were most likely to engage in therapy/counseling at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center or Clinic, Vet Center, or other noninstitutionally sponsored settings in the community (e.g., private practices, faith-based organizations). Looking ahead, these findings will inform research and the provision of services for addressing the mental health needs of this substantive subpopulation of college students in the United States. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Gambling disorder in financial markets: Clinical and treatment-related features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Chul; Choi, Sam-Wook; Ha, Juwon; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2015-12-01

    To date, few studies have examined the clinical manifestation of disordered gamblers in financial markets. This study examined the differences in the clinical and treatment-related features of gambling disorder between financial markets and horse races. Subjects who met the DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling (PG) and who sought treatment were assessed by retrospective chart review. One hundred forty-four subjects were included in this sample, which consisted of the following groups: financial markets (n = 45; 28.6%) and horse races (n = 99; 71.4%). Multiple similar manifestations were found between the groups, including severity of PG, age of PG onset, amounts of gambling debts, drinking days per week, depressive mood, duration of seeking treatment after the onset of PG, and treatment follow-up duration. However, disordered gamblers who invested in the financial market were significantly more likely to be educated (p = 0.003), live with their spouses (p = 0.007), have full-time jobs (p = 0.006), and they were more likely to participate in the first type of gambling than the horse races group (pfinancial markets group received the anti-craving medication less often than the horse races group (p = 0.04). These findings suggest that disordered gamblers in financial markets show different socio-demographic, clinical and treatment-related features compared with the horse race gamblers, despite a similar severity of gambling disorder. Understanding these differential manifestations may provide insight into prevention and treatment development for specific types of gambling.

  13. Hypofractionated regional nodal irradiation for breast cancer: Examining the data and potential for future studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Shah, Chirag; Arthur, Douglas; Khan, Atif J.; Freedman, Gary; Poppe, Matthew M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Limited data are available examining the role of hypofractionated radiation schedules in the management of women requiring regional nodal irradiation (RNI). The purpose of this review is to examine the available literature for the efficacy (where available) and toxicity of hypofractionated radiation schedules in breast cancer with RNI limited to the axilla and supraclavicular regions. Multiple randomized and prospective studies have documented the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules delivering whole breast irradiation (WBI) alone. Subsets from these randomized trials and smaller prospective/single-institution studies have documented the feasibility of hypofractionated RNI but the limited numbers prevent definitive conclusions and limited efficacy data are available. With regard to possible toxicity affecting organs at risk with RNI, key structures include the breast, skin, heart, lungs, axilla (lymphedema), and brachial plexus. Based on data from several randomized trials, hypofractionated radiation is not associated with significant changes in breast toxicity/cosmesis or cardiac toxicity; the addition of hypofractionated RNI would not be expected to change the rates of breast or cardiac toxicity. While RNI has been shown to increase rates of pulmonary toxicity, hypofractionated RNI has not been associated with more frequent pulmonary complications than standard RNI. Moving forward, future studies will have to evaluate for increased lung toxicity. With regard to lymphedema, data from randomized hypofractionated WBI trials failed to demonstrate an increase in lymphedema and smaller studies utilizing hypofractionated RNI have failed to as well. Data from head and neck cancer as well as hypofractionated breast radiation with RNI have failed to demonstrate an increase in brachial plexopathy with the exception of older trials that used much larger dose per fraction (>4 Gy/fraction) schedules. At this time, published data support the feasibility of

  14. Stomach cancer risk after treatment for hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, Lindsay M; Dores, Graça M; Curtis, Rochelle E

    2013-01-01

    Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear.......Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear....

  15. A New Method for Treatment of Lymphedema of Limbs: Standardized Manual Massage with a New Device Linforoll in Conservative and Surgical Therapy Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Zaleska, Marzanna; Michelin, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    Edema fluid in lymphedematous limbs should be evacuated to sites where it can be absorbed. It should be moved either to the hypogastrium or arm/scapular regions along tissue channels or implanted silicon channels or through lymphovenous anastomoses. For that purpose, the manual lymphatic drainage of limb is an effective method. Standardization of manual massage applied force and timing becomes necessary. A device with known pressing area and continuously showing the applied force while moving it toward the root of the limb is needed. Moreover, force could be adjusted to the stiffness of the massaged tissues that varies at different levels of the limb. Results from such a device would be repeatable and reproducible by others. In this study we present data on tissue fluid hydromechanics obtained from 20 patients with obstructive limb lymphedema during massage with a massaging roller called Linforoll. Linforoll is composed of a hand piece with roller and pressure sensor connected wireless to the computer displaying the pressure curve of the applied force. Electron microscopy studies for checking eventual tissue changes were done. Linforoll provides the possibilities of: 1) regulating the applied force according to the hydromechanic conditions of the massaged tissues; 2) standardization of massage repeatable in the same patient; 3) decrease of limb volume; 4) evident increase in tissue elasticity; 5) application as a driving force for fluid flow along the surgically implanted tubing and vessels running to the lymphovenous shunts.

  16. Risk factors for treatment related clinical fluctuations in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dutch Guillain-Barré study group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H. Visser (Leendert); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); J. Meulstee (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe risk factors for treatment related clinical fluctuations, relapses occurring after initial therapeutic induced stabilisation or improvement, were evaluated in a group of 172 patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features

  17. Detection of axillary lymph node involvement of breast cancer by Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusuwan, P.; Chakrappe-sirisuk, S.; Amornpichetkul, K.; Padhy, A.K.; Dondi, M.; Watanabe, N.

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, leading to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually around the world. Lymph node status is the most important prognostic indicator in newly diagnosed breast cancer. The presence of axillary lymph node metastases has major prognostic implications in breast cancer patients, and it is an important criterion in determining the need for adjuvant chemotherapy. There is not an accurate anatomical test for detecting axillary lymph node metastasis and clinical examination has inappropriate diagnostic values. Routine lymph node dissection is the only accepted method for therapeutic decisions but it is invasive and produces significant morbidity such as lymphedema and infections. On the other hand, an important proportion of breast cancer patients are nodenegative. Ultrasonography has also been reported to be helpful, especially in conjunction with fine needle aspiration biopsy

  18. Systematic Review of Occupational Therapy and Adult Cancer Rehabilitation: Part 1. Impact of Physical Activity and Symptom Management Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Elizabeth G; Gibson, Robert W; Arbesman, Marian; D'Amico, Mariana

    This article is the first part of a systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of cancer rehabilitation interventions within the scope of occupational therapy that address the activity and participation needs of adult cancer survivors. This article focuses on the importance of physical activity and symptom management. Strong evidence supports the use of exercise for cancer-related fatigue and indicates that lymphedema is not exacerbated by exercise. Moderate evidence supports the use of yoga to relieve anxiety and depression and indicates that exercise as a whole may contribute to a return to precancer levels of sexual activity. The results of this review support inclusion of occupational therapy in cancer rehabilitation and reveal a significant need for more research to explore ways occupational therapy can positively influence the outcomes of cancer survivors. Part 2 of the review also appears in this issue. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  19. Treatment-related fluctuations in guillain barre syndrome and the conundrum of additional cycles of plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subasree Ramakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS, worsening of weakness or disability after initial period of recovery or stabilization is described as treatment-related fluctuations (TRF. Aim: This study aims to describe the clinical characteristics and outcome of six patients with GBS and TRF. Patients and Methods: Six patients with GBS fulfilling NINCDS criteria, evaluated at a tertiary care university hospital during 2008–2017, were diagnosed to have TRF. They form the basis of this report. Results: All patients were men and their mean age was 40 years. At presentation, mean duration of illness was 15 days; the illness had plateaued in three and progressive in other three patients. Two of the four patients had variant GBS. Initially, five patients were treated with large volume plasmapheresis (LVPP and one patient with methyl prednisolone. At 17–28 days after disease onset, three patients developed new neurologic deficits (bilateral facial paresis in two; paralytic ileus in one. Other three patients with worsening of limb weakness (medical research council sum score of >5 and disability (Hughes disability grade by ≥1 fulfilled Kleyweg's criteria for TRF. All the six patients were treated with the completion of five cycles or additional cycles of LVPP. Conclusion: Awareness about TRF is essential for correct diagnosis and management of patients with GBS.

  20. Pharmacogenetic Predictors of Treatment-Related Toxicity Among Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Rochelle R; Cole, Peter D

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent and most robust pharmacogenetic predictors of treatment-related toxicity (TRT) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Multiple studies have examined the toxicities of the primary chemotherapeutic agents used to treat childhood ALL in relation to host genetic factors. However, few results have been replicated independently, largely due to cohort differences in ancestry, chemotherapy treatment protocols, and definitions of toxicities. To date, there is only one widely accepted clinical guideline for dose modification based on gene status: thiopurine dosing based on TPMT genotype. Based on recent data, it is likely that this guideline will be modified to incorporate other gene variants, such as NUDT15. We highlight genetic variants that have been consistently associated with TRT across treatment groups, as well as those that best illustrate the underlying pathophysiology of TRT. In the coming decade, we expect that survivorship care will routinely specify screening recommendations based on genetics. Furthermore, clinical trials testing protective interventions may modify inclusion criteria based on genetically determined risk of specific TRTs.

  1. Treatment-related decisional conflict in patients with depressive and anxious disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De las Cuevas C

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlos De las Cuevas,1 Ramsés Marrero,1 Casimiro Cabrera21Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology and Psychiatry, University of La Laguna, San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain; 2Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, CanadaPurpose: To determine the level of treatment-related decisional conflict in patients with emotional disorders and to establish its relationship with sociodemographic and clinical variables.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey on a convenience sample of 321 consecutive psychiatric outpatients with emotional disorders. All patients completed self-report questionnaires assessing sociodemographic and clinical variables, patients’ preference of participation in decision making, perceived decisional conflict about treatment, adherence to prescribed treatment, and satisfaction with the psychiatric care provided. Multiple correspondences analysis was used to investigate relationships of decisional conflict with the variables of interest.Results: Approximately, two-thirds of psychiatric outpatients self-reported decisional conflict regarding their treatment. Interestingly, the presence of decisional conflict did not influence significantly patients’ preferences of participation or their adherence to prescribed treatment. Patients without decisional conflict registered significantly higher satisfaction. Multiple correspondences analysis evidenced two clear profiles: patients without decisional conflict received the treatment they preferred, mainly psychotherapy or combined treatment, had been under psychiatric treatment for longer than 5 years, and self-reported high satisfaction with health care received; on the other hand, patients with decisional conflict did not receive the treatment they preferred, were treated with pharmacotherapy alone for a period of time between 1 and 5 years, and self-reported medium satisfaction with received health care.Conclusion: The high level of

  2. Development and validation of the Treatment Related Impact Measure of Weight (TRIM-Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessard Suzanne

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of prescription anti-obesity medication (AOM is becoming increasingly common as treatment options grow and become more accessible. However, AOM may not be without a wide range of potentially negative impacts on patient functioning and well being. The Treatment Related Impact Measure (TRIM-Weight is an obesity treatment-specific patient reported outcomes (PRO measure designed to assess the key impacts of prescription anti-obesity medication. This paper will present the validation findings for the TRIM-Weight. Methods The online validation battery survey was administered in four countries (the U.S., U.K., Australia, and Canada. Eligible subjects were over age eighteen, currently taking a prescription AOM and were currently or had been obese during their life. Validation analyses were conducted according to an a priori statistical analysis plan. Item level psychometric and conceptual criteria were used to refine and reduce the preliminary item pool and factor analysis to identify structural domains was performed. Reliability and validity testing was then performed and the minimally importance difference (MID explored. Results Two hundred and eight subjects completed the survey. Twenty-one of the 43 items were dropped and a five-factor structure was achieved: Daily Life, Weight Management, Treatment Burden, Experience of Side Effects, and Psychological Health. A-priori criteria for internal consistency and test-retest coefficients for the total score and all five subscales were met. All pre-specified hypotheses for convergent and known group validity were also met with the exception of the domain of Daily Life (proven in an ad hoc analysis as well as the 1/2 standard deviation threshold for the MID. Conclusion The development and validation of the TRIM-Weight has been conducted according to well-defined principles for the creation of a PRO measure. Based on the evidence to date, the TRIM-Weight can be considered a brief

  3. General health status of long-term cervical cancer survivors after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Park, Ji Eun [National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ae [National Cancer Center, Cancer Policy Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young-Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Joo [National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Myong Cheol [National Cancer Center, Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Gynecologic Cancer Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Yoon; Seo, Sang-Soo [National Cancer Center, Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joo-Young [National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the global health status of long-term cervical cancer survivors (LCCS) who survived for more than 4 years after curative radiation treatment (RT). Medical records of 562 women treated with RT in our institution between 2003 and 2010 were reviewed. Excluding 259 women who died of disease or were lost to follow-up, disease status and late morbidities were evaluated in 303 LCCS. Quality of life (QoL) was analyzed in 168 LCCS using a questionnaire from the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer, and the results were compared with an age-matched healthy Korean female population. Median follow-up was 6.8 years (range 4.1-12.5 years). There were 14 deaths (7 cancer specific) and 14 recurrences (5 local recurrences and 9 distant metastases). The median time to recurrence was 6.0 years (range 4.1-8.2 years). Grade ≥2 late toxicities were frequently observed in the bladder (19%) and small/large intestine (15%). Multivariate analysis revealed a higher rate of late toxicity in patients aged ≥51 years at diagnosis (small/large intestine: hazard ratio, HR, 2.5 [1.2-5.5]; bladder: HR 2.4 [1.3-4.5]; and bone: HR 4.3 [1.2-15.8]) than patients aged <51 years. Compared to the general population, LCCS exhibited a significantly higher rate of body image concerns, sexual dysfunction, lymphedema, and peripheral neuropathy. New recurrences occurred in 5% of LCCS and grade ≥2 treatment-related morbidities were present in 33%. A significant proportion of LCCS also showed decreased cervical-cancer-specific QoL. These results suggest the need for long-term surveillance and follow-up care for LCCS. (orig.) [German] Bewertung des allgemeinen Gesundheitsstatus bei Langzeitueberlebenden von Gebaermutterhalskrebs (LCCS), die nach Strahlenbehandlung (RT) mehr als 4 Jahre lebten. Ueberprueft wurden Krankenakten von 562 Frauen, die zwischen 2003 und 2010 in unserem Institut mit RT behandelt wurden. Ausgeschlossen wurden 259 Frauen, die aufgrund der Erkrankung

  4. Therapeutic Efficacy with Treatment-related Toxicities of 177Lu-labeled Bombesin Derivative for the Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Cho, Eun Ha; Lee, So Young

    2015-01-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) has been shown to be overexpressed in many human tumours, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, small cell lung cancer, ovarian cancers, endometrial cancers, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In particular, GRPR expression is high in 83 % of invasive primary prostatic carcinomas. These results suggest that 177 Lu-labeled bombesin derivative has promising characteristics as a novel nuclear medicine, especially for the treatment of GRPR over-expressing prostate tumors

  5. Treatment-related toxicities in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia predisposition syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.

    2016-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) do not harbor germline mutations that strongly predispose them to development of this malignancy, large syndrome registries and detailed mapping of exomes or whole genomes of familial leukaemia kindreds have revealed that 3-5% of all...... patients is important in order to adjust therapy and offer genetic counseling and cancer surveillance to mutation carriers in the family. In the coming years large genomic screening projects are expected to reveal further hitherto unrecognised familial ALL syndromes. The treatment of ALL cases harboring...... childhood ALL cases are due to such germline mutations, but the figure may be higher. Most of these syndromes are primarily characterized by their non-malignant phenotype, whereas ALL may be the dominating or even only striking manifestation of the syndrome in some families. Identification of such ALL...

  6. Treatment-related changes in serum lipids and inflammation: clinical relevance remains unclear. Analyses from the Women's Interagency HIV Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Christina M; Landay, Alan L; Hodis, Howard N; Gange, Stephen J; Norris, Philip J; Young, Mary; Anastos, Kathryn; Tien, Phyllis C; Xue, Xiaonan; Lazar, Jason; Benning, Lorie; Tracy, Russell P; Kaplan, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Summary Among 127 HIV-infected women, the magnitude of HDLc increases after HAART initiation predicted the magnitude of concurrent decreases in inflammation biomarkers. After HAART initiation, changes in LDLc and inflammation were unrelated. In the same population, predicted risk of coronary heart disease based upon levels of standard clinical risk factors was similar before and after HAART treatment. Thus, it remains unknown whether short-term treatment-related changes in standard risk factors may appreciably change risk of CVD. PMID:23435295

  7. The 2011-2016 Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) initiative: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Colditz, Graham A; Hu, Frank B; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Ahima, Rexford S; Brownson, Ross C; Carson, Kenneth R; Chavarro, Jorge E; Chodosh, Lewis A; Gehlert, Sarah; Gill, Jeff; Glanz, Karen; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Herbst, Karen Louise; Hoehner, Christine M; Hovmand, Peter S; Irwin, Melinda L; Jacobs, Linda A; James, Aimee S; Jones, Lee W; Kerr, Jacqueline; Kibel, Adam S; King, Irena B; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Natarajan, Loki; Neuhouser, Marian L; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Proctor, Enola K; Redline, Susan; Rock, Cheryl L; Rosner, Bernard; Sarwer, David B; Schwartz, J Sanford; Sears, Dorothy D; Sesso, Howard D; Stampfer, Meir J; Subramanian, S V; Taveras, Elsie M; Tchou, Julia; Thompson, Beti; Troxel, Andrea B; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Thornquist, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    Recognition of the complex, multidimensional relationship between excess adiposity and cancer control outcomes has motivated the scientific community to seek new research models and paradigms. The National Cancer Institute developed an innovative concept to establish a center grant mechanism in nutrition, energetics, and physical activity, referred to as the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative. This paper gives an overview of the 2011-2016 TREC Collaborative Network and the 15 research projects being conducted at the centers. Four academic institutions were awarded TREC center grants in 2011: Harvard University, University of California San Diego, University of Pennsylvania, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the Coordination Center. The TREC research portfolio includes three animal studies, three cohort studies, four randomized clinical trials, one cross-sectional study, and two modeling studies. Disciplines represented by TREC investigators include basic science, endocrinology, epidemiology, biostatistics, behavior, medicine, nutrition, physical activity, genetics, engineering, health economics, and computer science. Approximately 41,000 participants will be involved in these studies, including children, healthy adults, and breast and prostate cancer survivors. Outcomes include biomarkers of cancer risk, changes in weight and physical activity, persistent adverse treatment effects (e.g., lymphedema, urinary and sexual function), and breast and prostate cancer mortality. The NIH Science of Team Science group will evaluate the value added by this collaborative science. However, the most important outcome will be whether this transdisciplinary initiative improves the health of Americans at risk of cancer as well as cancer survivors.

  8. Pain in cancer survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladosievicova, B.

    2017-01-01

    Pain is a common problem among cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain. Overall prevalence of all types pain is about 40% in some cancer survivors with previous specific diagnosis. Until recently, impact of pain in cancer survivors have largely been unexamined. This complication can be predicted by type of malignancy, its therapy, time elapsed from completion of anticancer treatment and effectivity of previous pain interventions. As the purpose of this article is to update readers on more recent data about prevalence of pain in cancer survivors and common treatment-related chronic pain etiologies in patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase, previously known information about acute pain, pain in terminally ill patients. Some new studies in certain subpopulations of cancer survivors will be explored in more detail. (author)

  9. Late effects of breast cancer treatment and potentials for rehabilitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewertz, Marianne (Dept. of Oncology, Odense Univ. Hospital, Odense (Denmark)); Bonde Jensen, Anders (Inst. of Clinical Research, Univ. of Southern Denmark (Denmark))

    2011-02-15

    Background. Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant disease among women world wide. Survival has been improving leading to an increasing number of breast cancer survivors, in the US estimated to about 2.6 million. Material and methods. The literature was reviewed with focus on data from the Nordic countries. Results. Local therapies such as breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy may cause persistent pain in the breast area, arm, and shoulder reported by 30-50% of patients after three to five years, lymphedema in 15-25% of patients, and restrictions of arm and shoulder movement in 35%. Physiotherapy is the standard treatment for the latter while no pain intervention trials have been published. Chemotherapy may cause infertility and premature menopause, resulting in vasomotor symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and osteoporosis, which are similar to the side effects of endocrine treatment in postmenopausal women. Awareness of cardiotoxicity is needed since anthracyclines, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy can damage the heart. Breast cancer survivors have an increased risk of a major depression and far from all receive adequate anti-depressive treatment. Other psychological symptoms include fear of recurrence, sleep disturbances, cognitive problems, fatigue, and sexual problems. Discussion. To improve rehabilitation, specific goals have to be formulated into national guidelines and high priority directed towards research into developing and testing new interventions for alleviating symptoms and side effects experienced by breast cancer survivors

  10. Late effects of breast cancer treatment and potentials for rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewertz, Marianne; Bonde Jensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant disease among women world wide. Survival has been improving leading to an increasing number of breast cancer survivors, in the US estimated to about 2.6 million. Material and methods. The literature was reviewed with focus on data from the Nordic countries. Results. Local therapies such as breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy may cause persistent pain in the breast area, arm, and shoulder reported by 30-50% of patients after three to five years, lymphedema in 15-25% of patients, and restrictions of arm and shoulder movement in 35%. Physiotherapy is the standard treatment for the latter while no pain intervention trials have been published. Chemotherapy may cause infertility and premature menopause, resulting in vasomotor symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and osteoporosis, which are similar to the side effects of endocrine treatment in postmenopausal women. Awareness of cardiotoxicity is needed since anthracyclines, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy can damage the heart. Breast cancer survivors have an increased risk of a major depression and far from all receive adequate anti-depressive treatment. Other psychological symptoms include fear of recurrence, sleep disturbances, cognitive problems, fatigue, and sexual problems. Discussion. To improve rehabilitation, specific goals have to be formulated into national guidelines and high priority directed towards research into developing and testing new interventions for alleviating symptoms and side effects experienced by breast cancer survivors

  11. [Effects of educational program of manual lymph massage on the arm functioning and the quality of life in breast cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Sook; Kim, Sung Hyo; Kim, Sun Mi; Sun, Jeong Ju

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of EPMLM (educational program of manual lymph massage) on the arm functioning and QOL (quality of life) in breast cancer patients with lymphedema. Subjects in the experimental group (n=20) participated in EPMLM for 6 weeks from June to July, 2005. The EPMLM consisted of training of lymph massage for 2 weeks and encourage and support of self-care using lymph massage for 4 weeks. The arm functioning assessed at pre-treatment, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks using Arm functioning questionnaire. The QOL assessed at pre-treatment and 6 weeks using SF-36. The outcome data of experimental group was compared with control group (n=20). The collected data was analyzed by using SPSS 10.0 statistical program. The arm functioning of experimental group was increased from 2 weeks after (W=.224, p=.011) and statistically differenced with control group at 2 weeks (Z=-2.241, p=.024) and 6 weeks (Z=-2.453, p=.013). Physical function of QOL domain increased in experimental group (Z=-1.162, p=.050), also statistically differenced with control group (Z=-2.182, p= .030) at 6 weeks. The results suggest that the educational program of manual lymph massage can improve arm functioning and physical function of QOL domain in breast cancer patients with lymphedema.

  12. Contemporary management of advanced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Christopher J; Gourin, Christine G

    2017-10-01

    The treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer has undergone a paradigm shift in recent years, with an increase in chemoradiation for organ preservation and a decrease in primary surgery. This review will summarize the contemporary management of advanced laryngeal cancer and discuss treatment-related toxicity and strategies to improve outcomes. NA.

  13. Treatment-related stresses and anxiety-depressive symptoms among Chinese outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sing; Chiu, Alice; Tsang, Adley; Chow, Chun-Chung; Chan, Wing-Bun

    2006-12-01

    Based on focus group findings, a descriptive instrument was developed to examine the relationship among treatment-related stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, distress, and impairment of 333 Chinese outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in Hong Kong. It was found that the main stresses included fears of diabetes complications, work impairment, lifestyle adjustment, stigmatization, and discrimination. Over 1/4 of patients concealed their DM from family members in order not to make the latter worry. 28.3% felt that life was not worth living. 33.6% of patients exhibited four or more anxiety and depressive symptoms accompanied by significant distress and/or impairment. These patients were more likely to be female, of lower educational level, and unemployed. Diabetes complications, concealment of DM, and feeling of being a burden to the family predicted anxious-depressed status. The study showed that treatment-related stresses and anxiety-depressive symptoms were common and associated among Chinese diabetes outpatients in Hong Kong.

  14. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of breast cancer among Canadian women: disability and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacLean, Roanne; Hack, Tom; Kwan, Winkle; Miedema, Baukje; Tatemichi, Sue; Towers, Anna; Tilley, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Each year over 20,000 Canadian women are diagnosed with breast cancer. Many breast cancer survivors anticipate a considerable number of years of potential participation in the paid labour market, therefore, the link between breast cancer survivorship and productivity deserves serious consideration. The hypothesis guiding this study is that arm morbidities such as lymphedema, pain, and range of motion limitations are important explanatory variables in survivors' loss of productivity. The study draws from a larger longitudinal research project involving over 600 breast cancer survivors in four geographical locations across Canada. The study's regression results indicate that, after adjusting for fatigue, breast cancer stage, and geographical location, survivors with range of motion limitations and arm pain are more than two and half times as likely to lose some productivity capacity as compared to counterparts with no arm morbidity. The findings make a compelling argument for the necessity of adequate rehabilitation programs delivered at crucial times in breast cancer survivors' recovery. The study's unexpected finding that geographical location is a highly significant predictor of changes in productivity among breast cancer survivors is interpreted as a factor of the regulatory framework governing employment relationships in the four different jurisdictions.

  16. Breast cancer surgery effect over professional activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Dias

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast cancer is responsible for 25% of all cancers and is the most prevalent in the female population. Due to treatment advances and early diagnoses, survival rates have improved, however this condition impacts work absenteeism due to the productive age of these women. The main factors responsible for work absenteeism are physical complications due to surgical treatment. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of surgical breast cancer treatments on occupation, to characterize the degree of work absenteeism and to investigate the type of relation between surgical technique and absenteeism’s main causes. Method: Cross-sectional study with 74 women diagnosed with breast cancer. A semi-structured interview was used to collect information regarding surgical and clinical aspects, sociodemographic data, work behavior and physical therapy treatments. The data was organized on Microsoft Excel and analyzed by frequency and chi-squared test. The significance level considered was p ≤ 0.05. Results: Breast cancer was most common on the left side (51%, Madden modified radical mastectomy was the most common (50% and lymph node resection was present in 93.2% of cases. The most frequent post-surgery complications were pain, problems with scarring, sensitivity alterations, ROM limitation, lymphedema and seroma. Only 58% of women were treated with physical therapy and 60% withdrew from professional activities, 23% abandoned work, 26% changed their work role and 14% retired due to the disease. Conclusion: The present study suggests the existence of a direct relation between treatment and work absenteeism.

  17. Treatment Related Thoughts Based on Health Belief Model and Medication Nonadherence in Patients who Prescribed Anxiolytics and Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Meric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between treatment adherence and treatment related thoughts based on health belief model in patients who currently take medication due to depression and anxiety disorder. METHOD: The present study was performed at the Psychiatry Department of a teaching hospital. The sample of the study consisted from 112 individuals who take medications due to depression and anxiety disorder. Personal information form and an inquiry form including treatment related thoughts based on health belief model were used to collect data. Chi- Square and Percentages were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Of the patients, 58.9% were diagnosed as depression and 41.1% anxiety disorder. 60.7% stated that they had a non-adherence experience in the past. Of these non-adherent patients, 29.5% stopped to take the medication with the idea “I can do it without medication” and 14.3% stopped the medication because of the side effects. Gender, age, marital status and education level were not related to the non-adherence. Only two treatment related thoughts based on health belief concepts were significantly related to the non adherence experience. These thoughts were “If I do not take the medications properly the problems may be permanent” and “If I do not take the medications properly my illness may get worse”. Most of the patients marked “agree” options of the items under the perceived severity, self-efficacy, benefits, susceptibility and health motivation subheads. CONCLUSION: The results of this study showed that the thoughts and perceptions based on health belief concepts helps to identify and express the thoughts related to treatment adherence. These concepts can be used to describe and classify the thoughts about the treatments of patients. However, prospective and qualitative studies may be useful to clarify the influence of the health beliefs on treatment adherence. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9

  18. The Alberta moving beyond breast cancer (AMBER cohort study: a prospective study of physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courneya Kerry S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited research has examined the association between physical activity, health-related fitness, and disease outcomes in breast cancer survivors. Here, we present the rationale and design of the Alberta Moving Beyond Breast Cancer (AMBER Study, a prospective cohort study designed specifically to examine the role of physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivorship from the time of diagnosis and for the balance of life. The AMBER Study will examine the role of physical activity and health-related fitness in facilitating treatment completion, alleviating treatment side effects, hastening recovery after treatments, improving long term quality of life, and reducing the risks of disease recurrence, other chronic diseases, and premature death. Methods/Design The AMBER Study will enroll 1500 newly diagnosed, incident, stage I-IIIc breast cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada over a 5 year period. Assessments will be made at baseline (within 90 days of surgery, 1 year, and 3 years consisting of objective and self-reported measurements of physical activity, health-related fitness, blood collection, lymphedema, patient-reported outcomes, and determinants of physical activity. A final assessment at 5 years will measure patient-reported data only. The cohort members will be followed for an additional 5 years for disease outcomes. Discussion The AMBER cohort will answer key questions related to physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivors including: (1 the independent and interactive associations of physical activity and health-related fitness with disease outcomes (e.g., recurrence, breast cancer-specific mortality, overall survival, treatment completion rates, symptoms and side effects (e.g., pain, lymphedema, fatigue, neuropathy, quality of life, and psychosocial functioning (e.g., anxiety, depression, self-esteem, happiness, (2 the determinants of physical activity and

  19. Patterns of Obesity and Lymph Fluid Level during the First Year of Breast Cancer Treatment: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei R. Fu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the risk factors for developing lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. We prospectively enrolled 140 women and followed the participants for 12 months after surgery to investigate patterns of obesity and lymph fluid level in the first year of cancer treatment. Electrical bioimpedance devices were used to measure weight, BMI, and percent of body fat as well as lymph fluid level. General instructions were given to the participants on maintaining pre-surgery weight. Among the 140 participants, 136 completed the study with 2.9% attrition. More than 60% of the participants were obese (30.8% or overweight (32.4%, while only two participants were underweight and about 35% had normal weight. This pattern of obesity and overweight was consistent at 4–8 weeks and 12 months post-surgery. At 12 months post-surgery, the majority of the women (72.1% maintained pre-surgery weight and 15.4% had >5% weight loss; 12.5% of the women increase >5% of their weight. Significantly more patients in the obesity group had lymphedema defined by L-Dex ratio >7.1 than those in the normal/underweight and overweight group at pre-surgery and 4–8 weeks post-surgery. There was a trend of more patients in the obesity group had L-Dex ratio >7.1 at 12 months post-surgery. Obesity and overweight remain among women at the time of cancer diagnosis and the patterns of obesity and overweight continue during the first year of treatment. General instructions on having nutrition-balanced and portion-appropriate diet and physical activities daily or weekly can be effective to maintain pre-surgery weight.

  20. Patterns of Obesity and Lymph Fluid Level during the First Year of Breast Cancer Treatment: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Fletcher, Jason; Qiu, Jeanna M.; Scagliola, Joan; Kleinman, Robin; Ryan, Caitlin E.; Chan, Nicholas; Haber, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the risk factors for developing lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. We prospectively enrolled 140 women and followed the participants for 12 months after surgery to investigate patterns of obesity and lymph fluid level in the first year of cancer treatment. Electrical bioimpedance devices were used to measure weight, BMI, and percent of body fat as well as lymph fluid level. General instructions were given to the participants on maintaining pre-surgery weight. Among the 140 participants, 136 completed the study with 2.9% attrition. More than 60% of the participants were obese (30.8%) or overweight (32.4%), while only two participants were underweight and about 35% had normal weight. This pattern of obesity and overweight was consistent at 4–8 weeks and 12 months post-surgery. At 12 months post-surgery, the majority of the women (72.1%) maintained pre-surgery weight and 15.4% had >5% weight loss; 12.5% of the women increase >5% of their weight. Significantly more patients in the obesity group had lymphedema defined by L-Dex ratio >7.1 than those in the normal/underweight and overweight group at pre-surgery and 4–8 weeks post-surgery. There was a trend of more patients in the obesity group had L-Dex ratio >7.1 at 12 months post-surgery. Obesity and overweight remain among women at the time of cancer diagnosis and the patterns of obesity and overweight continue during the first year of treatment. General instructions on having nutrition-balanced and portion-appropriate diet and physical activities daily or weekly can be effective to maintain pre-surgery weight. PMID:26404383

  1. Translocations and deletions with breakpoint on 21q are nonrandomly associated with treatment-related acute nonlymphocytic leukemia and preleukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keldsen, N.; Philip, P.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.

    1987-01-01

    Six of 70 (8.6%) consecutive cases with therapy-related acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) or preleukemia had a translocation or deletion with a breakpoint on 21q. Such aberrations were seen in only one of 200 (0.5%) consecutive cases of de novo ANLL examined at our laboratory. The figures reflect a 17.1-fold increased incidence of 21q aberrations in therapy-related ANLL or preleukemia, compared with ANLL de novo. The difference is highly significant (p = 0.003). The increased incidence of 21q aberrations in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes was confirmed by literature studies. Band 21q22 was most often involved. Cases with t(8;21), which is strongly associated with the M2 variant of ANLL, or cases with i(21q), which is supposedly due to a centromeric misdivision, were not included in the count. It is concluded that the 21q aberrations are associated with treatment-related ANLL or preleukemia with at least the same degree of specificity as aberrations of number5 and number7. 61 references

  2. Predicting treatment related imaging changes (TRICs) after radiosurgery for brain metastases using treatment dose and conformality metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, B Frazier; Knisely, Jonathan P; Qian, Jack M; Yu, James B; Chiang, Veronica L

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-related imaging changes (TRICs) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) involves the benign transient enlargement of radiographic lesions after treatment. Identifying the radiation dose volumes and conformality metrics associated with TRICs for different post-treatment periods would be helpful and improve clinical decision making. 367 metastases in 113 patients were treated using Gamma Knife SRS between 1/1/2007-12/31/2009. Each metastasis was measured at each imaging follow-up to detect TRICs (defined as ≥ 20% increase in volume). Fluctuations in small volume lesions (less than 108 mm 3 ) were ignored given widely variable conformity indices (CI) for small volumes. The Karolinska Adverse Radiation Effect (KARE) factor, Paddick's CI, Shaw's CI, tumor volume (TV), 10 Gy (V10) and 12 Gy (V12) volumes, and prescription isodose volume (PIV) were calculated. From 0-6 months, all measures correlated with the incidence of TRICs (p<.001), except KARE, which was inversely correlated. During the 6-12 month period all measures except KARE were still correlated. Beyond 12 months, no correlation was found between any of the measures and the development of TRICs. All metrics except KARE were associated with TRICs from 0-12 months only. Additional patient and treatment factors may become dominant at greater times after SRS.

  3. Narrative skills of children treated for brain tumours: The impact of tumour and treatment related variables on microstructure and macrostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, Kimberley; Munro, Natalie; Marshall, Tara; Togher, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    The narrative skills of children with brain tumours were examined. Influence of tumour location, radiotherapy, time post-treatment and presence of hydrocephalus was also investigated, as well as associations between narrative and language abilities. Seventeen children (aged 5;6-14;11) treated for brain tumour and their matched controls completed a narrative assessment and comprehensive language testing. Audio recorded narratives were analysed for microstructure and macrostructure elements. Between-group comparisons were conducted. Narrative elements were explored in association with tumour and treatment-related variables. Correlation analysis examined relationships between narrative scores and language test performance. While significant differences were not found between two groups of children across narrative elements, sub-group comparisons revealed marginal differences in macrostructure related to tumour location and hydrocephalus. Children treated with methods other than radiotherapy showed a significant increase in number of mazes in their narratives compared to children who received radiotherapy. Strong positive correlations also existed between narrative elements and language performance. Preliminary findings highlight the importance of investigating narrative abilities as part of a comprehensive language assessment. Macrostructure should be routinely examined where children are diagnosed with either posterior fossa tumour or hydrocephalus or have undergone surgery and/or chemotherapy for brain tumour.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging patterns of treatment-related toxicity in the pediatric brain: an update and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi Espagnet, Maria Camilla; Longo, Daniela [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, IRCCS, Neuroradiology Unit, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Pasquini, Luca [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, IRCCS, Neuroradiology Unit, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Sant' Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, NESMOS Department, Rome (Italy); Napolitano, Antonio [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, IRCCS, Enterprise Risk Management, Medical Physics Department, Rome (Italy); Cacchione, Antonella; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Caruso, Roberta [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, IRCCS, Department of Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Rome (Italy); Toma, Paolo [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, IRCCS, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    Treatment-related neurotoxicity is a potentially life-threatening clinical condition that can represent a diagnostic challenge. Differentiating diagnoses between therapy-associated brain injury and recurrent disease can be difficult, and the immediate recognition of neurotoxicity is crucial to providing correct therapeutic management, ensuring damage reversibility. For these purposes, the knowledge of clinical timing and specific treatment protocols is extremely important for interpreting MRI patterns. Neuroradiologic findings are heterogeneous and sometimes overlapping, representing the compounding effect of the different treatments. Moreover, MRI patterns can be acute, subacute or delayed and involve different brain regions, depending on (1) the mechanism of action of the specific medication and (2) which brain regions are selectively vulnerable to specific toxic effects. This review illustrates the most common radiologic appearance of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and medication-associated brain injury in children, with special focus on the application of advanced MRI techniques (diffusion, perfusion and proton spectroscopy) in the diagnosis of the underlying processes leading to brain toxicity. (orig.)

  5. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but

  6. Sexual dysfunction in young women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kedde, H.; van de Wiel, H. B. M.; Schultz, W. C. M. Weijmar; Wijsen, C.

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in young women with breast cancer in the Netherlands, and to assess the relationship between sexual dysfunction, treatment methods and treatment-related complaints. Also, the interest among women with breast cancer in

  7. In a bad place: Carers of patients with head and neck cancer experiences of travelling for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfe, Myles; Keohane, Kieran; O' Brien, Katie; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Maguire, Rebecca; Hanly, Paul; O' Sullivan, Eleanor; Sharp, Linda

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effect that treatment-related commuting has on carers of patients with head and neck cancer. Semi-structured interviews, thematically analysed, with 31 carers. Treatment-related commuting had a considerable impact on carers of patients with head and neck cancer, both in practical terms (economic costs, disruption) and also in psychological terms. Many carers of patients with head and neck cancer described becoming distressed by their commute. Some carers from large urban cities appeared to have hidden commuting burdens. Some carers respond to commuting stress by 'zoning out' or becoming 'like zombies'. Treatment-related travel for head and neck cancer can have significant practical and psychological impacts. Health professionals should be aware of the impacts that commuting can have on head and neck caregivers. Health services may be able to take practical steps, such as providing subsidized parking, to address head and neck carergivers' difficulties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  9. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Cancer Statistics Cancer has a major impact on society in ... success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The Burden of Cancer in ...

  10. The Addition of SPECT/CT Lymphoscintigraphy to Breast Cancer Radiation Planning Spares Lymph Nodes Critical for Arm Drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheville, Andrea L., E-mail: Cheville.andrea@mayo.edu [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H.; Ward, Shelly B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Durski, Jolanta [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Laack, Nadia N.; Yan, Elizabeth; Schomberg, Paula J.; Garces, Yolanda I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Suman, Vera J. [Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Background: This prospective cohort study was designed to determine whether the amount of radiation delivered to the nonpathological lymph nodes (LNs) that drain the arm can be significantly reduced by integrating single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) scans into radiation treatment planning. Methods: SPECT-CT scans were acquired for the 28 patients with stage I or II breast cancer and fused with the routinely obtained radiation oncology planning CT scans. Arm-draining LNs were contoured with 0.5-cm margins automatically using a threshold of 50% maximum intensity. Two treatment plans were generated: 1 per routine clinical practice (standard; STD) and the second (modified; MOD) with treatment fields modified to minimize dose to the arm-draining LNs visible on SPECT/CT images without interfering with the dosage delivered to target tissues. Participants were treated per the MOD plans. Arm volumes were measured prior to radiation and thereafter at least three subsequent 6-month intervals. Results: Sixty-eight level I-III arm-draining LNs were identified, 57% of which were inside the STD plan fields but could be blocked in the MOD plan fields. Sixty-five percent of arm-draining LNs in the STD versus 16% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥10 Gy, and 26% in the STD versus 4% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥40 Gy. Mean LN radiation exposure was 23.6 Gy (standard deviation 18.2) with the STD and 7.7 Gy (standard deviation 11.3) with the MOD plans (P<.001). No participant developed lymphedema. Conclusions: The integration of SPECT/CT scans into breast cancer radiation treatment planning reduces unnecessary arm-draining LN radiation exposure and may lessen the risk of lymphedema.

  11. The addition of SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphy to breast cancer radiation planning spares lymph nodes critical for arm drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheville, Andrea L; Brinkmann, Debra H; Ward, Shelly B; Durski, Jolanta; Laack, Nadia N; Yan, Elizabeth; Schomberg, Paula J; Garces, Yolanda I; Suman, Vera J; Petersen, Ivy A

    2013-03-15

    This prospective cohort study was designed to determine whether the amount of radiation delivered to the nonpathological lymph nodes (LNs) that drain the arm can be significantly reduced by integrating single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) scans into radiation treatment planning. SPECT-CT scans were acquired for the 28 patients with stage I or II breast cancer and fused with the routinely obtained radiation oncology planning CT scans. Arm-draining LNs were contoured with 0.5-cm margins automatically using a threshold of 50% maximum intensity. Two treatment plans were generated: 1 per routine clinical practice (standard; STD) and the second (modified; MOD) with treatment fields modified to minimize dose to the arm-draining LNs visible on SPECT/CT images without interfering with the dosage delivered to target tissues. Participants were treated per the MOD plans. Arm volumes were measured prior to radiation and thereafter at least three subsequent 6-month intervals. Sixty-eight level I-III arm-draining LNs were identified, 57% of which were inside the STD plan fields but could be blocked in the MOD plan fields. Sixty-five percent of arm-draining LNs in the STD versus 16% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥10 Gy, and 26% in the STD versus 4% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥40 Gy. Mean LN radiation exposure was 23.6 Gy (standard deviation 18.2) with the STD and 7.7 Gy (standard deviation 11.3) with the MOD plans (P<.001). No participant developed lymphedema. The integration of SPECT/CT scans into breast cancer radiation treatment planning reduces unnecessary arm-draining LN radiation exposure and may lessen the risk of lymphedema. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence and risk of treatment-related mortality with mTOR inhibitors everolimus and temsirolimus in cancer patients: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Xiang Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two novel mammalian targets of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors everolimus and temsirolimus are now approved by regulatory agencies and have been widely investigated among various types of solid tumors, but the risk of fatal adverse events (FAEs with these drugs is not well defined. METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases for relevant trials. Eligible studies included prospective phase II and III trials evaluating everolimus and temsirolimus in patients with all malignancies and data on FAEs were available. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the summary incidence, RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity of the included studies. RESULTS: A total of 3322 patients with various advanced solid tumors from 12 trials were included. The overall incidence of mTOR inhibitors associated FAEs was 1.8% (95%CI: 1.3-2.5%, and the incidences of everolimus related FAEs were comparable to that of temsirolimus (1.7% versus 1.8%. Compared with the controls, the use of mTOR inhibitors was associated with an increased risk of FAEs, with a RR of 3.24 (95%CI: 1.21-8.67, p = 0.019. On subgroup analysis, a non-statistically significant increase in the risk of FAEs was found according to different mTOR inhibitors, tumor types or controlled therapy. No evidence of publication bias was observed. CONCLUSION: With the present evidence, the use of mTOR inhibitors seems to increase the risk of FAEs in patients with advanced solid tumors. More high quality trials are still needed to investigate this association.

  13. Reduced-intensity conditioning lowers treatment-related mortality of allogeneic stem cell transplantation for chronic lymphocytic leukemia : a population-matched analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreger, P; Brand, R; Milligan, D; Corradini, P; Finke, J; Deliliers, GL; Martino, R; Russell, N; van Biezen, A; Michallet, M; Niederwieser, D

    To elucidate whether reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) decreases treatment-related mortality (TRM) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we retrospectively compared 73 RIC cases from a recent EBMT survey with 82 patients from the EBMT

  14. Reduced glucose tolerance and insulin resistance induced by steroid treatment, relative physical inactivity, and high-calorie diet impairs the incretin effect in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K B; Vilsbøll, T; Bagger, J I

    2010-01-01

    The loss of incretin effect in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus may be secondary to impaired glucose homeostasis. We investigated whether reduced glucose tolerance and insulin resistance induced by steroid treatment, relative physical inactivity, and high-calorie diet in healthy young males...

  15. Implementing exercise in cancer care: study protocol to evaluate a community-based exercise program for people with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cormie, Prue; Lamb, Stephanie; Newton, Robert U.; Valentine, Lani; McKiernan, Sandy; Spry, Nigel; Joseph, David; Taaffe, Dennis R.; Doran, Christopher M.; Galv?o, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical research has established the efficacy of exercise in reducing treatment-related side-effects and increasing wellbeing in people with cancer. Major oncology organisations have identified the importance of incorporating exercise in comprehensive cancer care but information regarding effective approaches to translating evidence into practice is lacking. This paper describes the implementation of a community-based exercise program for people with cancer and the protocol for pr...

  16. Colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... eat may play a role in getting colon cancer. Colon cancer may be linked to a high-fat, ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer ...

  18. Patient perspectives on breast cancer treatment side effects and the prospective surveillance model for physical rehabilitation for women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Jill M; Harris, Susan R; Levangie, Pamela K; Pearl, Marcia; Guglielmino, Janine; Kraus, Valerie; Rowden, Diana

    2012-04-15

    Women's experience of breast cancer is complex, affecting all aspects of life during and after treatment. Patients' perspectives about common impairments and functional limitations secondary to breast cancer treatment, including upper extremity motion restriction, lymphedema, fatigue, weight gain, pain, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, are addressed. Women often report being uninformed regarding these side effects and surprised that they do not always disappear after treatment, but remain part of their lives. Breast cancer patients express strong, unmet needs for education, information, and intervention for these side effects. Evidence suggests that rehabilitation and exercise are effective in preventing and managing many physical side effects of breast cancer treatment. Nevertheless, few women are referred to rehabilitation during or after treatment, and fewer receive baseline assessments of impairment and function to facilitate early detection of impairment and functional limitations. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation will serve the needs of women with breast cancer by providing education and information about treatment side effects, reducing the incidence and burden of side effects through early identification and treatment, and enhancing access to timely rehabilitation. Integration of exercise as a component of the model benefits patients at every phase of survivorship, by addressing individual concerns about exercise during and after treatment and highlighting the important contribution of exercise to overall health and survival. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation can meet the evident and often expressed needs of survivors for information, guidance, and intervention--thus addressing, and potentially improving, overall quality of life for individuals diagnosed with and treated for breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  19. Effects of scheduled exercise on cancer-related fatigue in women with early breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde; Dyrstad, Sindre Mikal; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Søreide, Jon Arne; Bru, Lars Edvin

    2014-01-01

    The article was originally published in The Scientific World Journal; by Hindawi Publishing Corporation under the Creative Commons Attribution License; see http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/27182. While physical activity during cancer treatment is found beneficial for breast cancer patients, evidence indicates ambiguous findings concerning effects of scheduled exercise programs on treatment-related symptoms. This study investigated effects of a scheduled home-based exercise intervention i...

  20. The impact of comorbidity on the relationship between life stress and health-related quality of life for Chinese- and Korean-American breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Won

    2018-01-01

    The current study aimed to (1) identify the occurrence of comorbidities among Chinese- and Korean-American breast cancer survivors (BCS), (2) examine whether health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores varied with the occurrence of specific comorbidities, and (3) investigate the mediating effect of comorbidities on the relationship between life stress and HRQOL. Data were drawn from the parent study, a cross-sectional study investigating HRQOL in 86 Chinese- and 71 Korean-American BCS in Southern California. Two comorbidity-related variables, the occurrence of the specific comorbidity and the total number of comorbidities, were used to comprehensively reflect the characteristics of comorbidity. Approximately 60% of participants had at least one comorbid disease, and osteoporosis was the most prevalent comorbidity. HRQOL differences based on the occurrence of a specific comorbidity were evident for arthritis, eye/vision problems, dental and gum problems, lymphedema, and psychological difficulties. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that the nature of the outcome variable, either physical or mental HRQOL, influenced the overall patterns of the findings. For example, life stress was significantly associated with the total number of comorbidities and in turn influenced physical HRQOL. In terms of mental HRQOL, arthritis, dental and gum problems, chronic pain, heart disease, lymphedema, and psychological difficulties mediated the relationship between life stress and mental HRQOL. The current study adds to the existing literature by examining the mediating effects of comorbidity on the relationship between life stress and HRQOL. The findings support the need for health care professionals to clearly assess physical and psychological comorbidities when providing survivorship care for cancer survivors.

  1. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkatout I

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated and occurs often in elderly women without neoplastic epithelial disorders. Histology: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common malignant tumor of the vulva (95%. Clinical features: Pruritus is the most common and long-lasting reported symptom of vulvar cancer, followed by vulvar bleeding, discharge, dysuria, and pain. Therapy: The gold standard for even a small invasive carcinoma of the vulva was historically radical vulvectomy with removal of the tumor with a wide margin followed by an en bloc resection of the inguinal and often the pelvic lymph nodes. Currently, a more individualized and less radical treatment is suggested: a radical wide local excision is possible in the case of localized lesions (T1. A sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy may be performed to reduce wound complications and lymphedema. Prognosis: The survival of patients with vulvar cancer is good when convenient therapy is arranged quickly after initial diagnosis. Inguinal and/or femoral node involvement is the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Keywords: vulvar cancer, HPV infection, radical vulvectomy, groin dissection, sentinel lymph node biopsy, overall survival

  2. Background characteristics and treatment-related factors associated with treatment success or failure in a non-pharmacological intervention for dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Karen C; Gitlin, Laura N

    2017-06-01

    Non-pharmacological interventions for persons with dementia often rely on family caregivers for implementation. However, caregivers differ in their readiness to use strategies. This study examines dyadic characteristics and treatment-related mechanisms associated with treatment success (high readiness to use strategies) and failure (low readiness to use strategies) at the conclusion of the Advancing Caregiver Training (ACT) intervention. Caregiver and person with dementia characteristics and treatment-related variables (treatment participation, number and type of strategies introduced and enacted) were examined in 110 caregivers in intervention. Interventionists rated readiness (1=precontemplation; 2=contemplation; 3=preparation; 4=action) of caregivers to use strategies at the final ACT session. Univariate analyses examined dyadic characteristics, and Multiple Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA) and Analyses of Covariance (ANCOVA) examined treatment-related factors associated with readiness to use strategies at treatment completion. At treatment completion, 28.2% (N=31) scored in pre-action and 71.8% (N=79) at action. Caregivers at pre-action readiness levels were more likely than those at action to be a spouse, report greater financial difficulties and be managing fewer problem behaviors. Although both groups were introduced an equivalent number of non-pharmacological strategies, caregivers at pre-action were less likely than those at action to report enacting strategies. Certain dyadic characteristics and treatment-related factors were associated with treatment failure including financial strain and lack of strategy integration. Findings suggest that developing intervention components to address financial concerns and increase opportunities for practicing strategies and then using them between treatment sessions may be important for caregivers at risk of treatment failure.

  3. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Mustian, Karen M.; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J.; Kamen, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-sc...

  4. External phenome analysis enables a rational federated query strategy to detect changing rates of treatment-related complications associated with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jeremy L; Alterovitz, Gil; Bodio, Kelly; Joyce, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly useful for health services research. For relatively uncommon conditions, such as multiple myeloma (MM) and its treatment-related complications, a combination of multiple EHR sources is essential for such research. The Shared Health Research Information Network (SHRINE) enables queries for aggregate results across participating institutions. Development of a rational search strategy in SHRINE may be augmented through analysis of pre-existing databases. We developed a SHRINE query for likely non-infectious treatment-related complications of MM, based upon an analysis of the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care (MIMIC II) database. Using this query strategy, we found that the rate of likely treatment-related complications significantly increased from 2001 to 2007, by an average of 6% a year (p=0.01), across the participating SHRINE institutions. This finding is in keeping with increasingly aggressive strategies in the treatment of MM. This proof of concept demonstrates that a staged approach to federated queries, using external EHR data, can yield potentially clinically meaningful results.

  5. Health-related quality of life of young women with breast cancer. Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yfantis, Aris; Intas, George; Tolia, Maria; Nikolaou, Michail; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Lymperi, Maria; Kyrgias, George; Zografos, George; Kontos, Michalis

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present article was to investigate the health related quality of life (QoL) of young women with breast cancer. For the purposes of this article, we reviewed the literature via the electronic databases Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. Key words used were breast cancer, young women, health related quality of life, and quality of life. Young women reported fatigue, pain in the breast and hand problems with lymphedema as the most frequent physical effects of treatment. Other physical problems were the not periodic and painful menses, vaginal dryness and loss of libido. Many young women had depressive symptoms such as depressed mood, helplessness, hopelessness, sleep loss, psychomotor retardation and disorders of appetite. There were often concerns about the health monitoring and self-image, while they were anxious if they will have a baby in the future or if they can nurture the existing ones. Many problems arose in the career of young women. They faced discrimination in the labor supply and/or layoff because they were considered unable to do their job effectively. In addition, they reported isolation problems and feeling different from other women of similar age. Young women consider that their healthrelated QoL is worse compared with older women. Young women worry about their future, with particular reference to their role as mothers and especially to children-bearing. The free screening and non-exclusion of young women is particularly important for breast cancer prevention and women's well-being.

  6. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  7. Counseling interventions delivered in women with breast cancer to improve health-related quality of life: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Egidio, V; Sestili, C; Mancino, M; Sciarra, I; Cocchiara, R; Backhaus, I; Mannocci, A; De Luca, Alessandro; Frusone, Federico; Monti, Massimo; La Torre, G

    2017-10-01

    Higher survival rates for breast cancer patients have led to concerns in dealing with short- and long-term side effects. The most common complications are impairment of shoulder functions, pain, lymphedema, and dysesthesia of the injured arm; psychological consequences concern: emotional distress, anxiety, and depression, thereby, deeply impacting/affecting daily living activity, and health-related quality of life. To perform a systematic review for assessing the efficacy or effectiveness of interventions aiming at improving health-related quality of life, return to daily activity, and correct lifestyles among breast cancer patients. A literature search was conducted in December 2016 using the databases PubMed and Scopus. Search terms included: (counseling) AND (breast cancer) AND (quality of life). Articles on counseling interventions to improve quality of life, physical and psychological outcomes were included. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria. The interventions were grouped in five main areas: concerning lifestyle counseling interventions, related to combined interventions (physical activity and nutritional counseling), physical therapy, peer counseling, multidisciplinary approach, included psychological, psycho-educational interventions, and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). Exercise counseling as well as physical therapy are effective to improve shoulder mobility, healing wounds, and limb strength. Psychological therapies such as psychoeducation and CBT may help to realize a social and psychological rehabilitation. A multidisciplinary approach can help in sustaining and restoring impaired physical, psychosocial, and occupational outcomes of breast cancer patients.

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health ...

  10. Eyelid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  11. Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  12. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  13. Appendix Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  14. Interstitial gold and external beam irradiation for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boileau, M.A.; Dowling, R.A.; Gonzales, M.; Handel, P.H.; Benson, G.S.; Corriere, J.N. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We treated 65 patients with prostatic cancer confined clinically to the prostate or periprostatic area during an 8-year period. Seven patients had stage A2, 38 stage B and 20 stage C disease. All 65 patients underwent staging pelvic lymphadenectomy and implantation of gold grains into the prostate (mean dose 3,167 rad). A total of 64 patients then completed a course of external beam irradiation to a mean total tumor dose of 6,965 rad. Complications of therapy were mild and limited (less than 3 months in duration) in most patients, and they included radiation cystitis (32 per cent), diarrhea (31 per cent), extremity lymphedema (7.7 per cent) and wound infection (3 per cent). Two patients suffered urinary incontinence after therapy and 2 (3 per cent) had diarrhea more than 3 months in duration. The actuarial 5-year survival rate for all patients was 87 per cent and the 5-year survival free of disease was 72 per cent

  15. Testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 86. National Cancer Institute. PDQ testicular cancer treatment. Updated February 17, 2016. www.cancer. ...

  16. “We're All in the Same Boat”: A Review of the Benefits of Dragon Boat Racing for Women Living with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This narrative review summarizes findings from quantitative and qualitative research literature that has been published over the past 15 years since an initial, community-based pilot study first challenged the long-held medical belief that vigorous, upper-body exercise would lead to lymphedema in women who were at risk due to treatments for breast cancer. Dragon boat racing originated in China more than 2000 years ago and has become a popular recreational and competitive support around the world. From the advent of the world's first breast cancer survivor dragon boat team, Abreast in a Boat launched in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1996, there are now more than 140 breast cancer survivor dragon boat teams paddling and competing in 12 different countries. The wealth of quantitative and qualitative research that has ensued since that pilot study further supports the initial hypothesis that resistance exercise, for example, dragon boat paddling, is not only safe for women recovering from conventional breast cancer therapies but also shows that dragon boating has been embraced as a complementary exercise therapy by the cancer survivors participating in this magical sport.

  17. "We're All in the Same Boat": A Review of the Benefits of Dragon Boat Racing for Women Living with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Susan R

    2012-01-01

    This narrative review summarizes findings from quantitative and qualitative research literature that has been published over the past 15 years since an initial, community-based pilot study first challenged the long-held medical belief that vigorous, upper-body exercise would lead to lymphedema in women who were at risk due to treatments for breast cancer. Dragon boat racing originated in China more than 2000 years ago and has become a popular recreational and competitive support around the world. From the advent of the world's first breast cancer survivor dragon boat team, Abreast in a Boat launched in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1996, there are now more than 140 breast cancer survivor dragon boat teams paddling and competing in 12 different countries. The wealth of quantitative and qualitative research that has ensued since that pilot study further supports the initial hypothesis that resistance exercise, for example, dragon boat paddling, is not only safe for women recovering from conventional breast cancer therapies but also shows that dragon boating has been embraced as a complementary exercise therapy by the cancer survivors participating in this magical sport.

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  1. Breast Cancer and HIV: a South African perspective and a critical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The diagnosis of breast cancer and concurrent HIV in South Africa is common. The limited current evidence on this subject suggests that the patients thus afflicted appear to be younger, have a more advanced stage of breast cancer, have a higher treatment related complications and poorer outcomes.

  2. Medical assessment of adverse health outcomes in long-term survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, Maud M.; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; van den Bos, Cor; van der Pal, Helena J. H.; Heinen, Richard C.; Jaspers, Monique W. M.; Koning, Caro C. E.; Oldenburger, Foppe; Langeveld, Nelia E.; Hart, Augustinus A. M.; Bakker, Piet J. M.; Caron, Huib N.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Improved survival of children with cancer has been accompanied by multiple treatment-related complications. However, most studies in survivors of childhood cancer focused on only 1 late effect. OBJECTIVE: To assess the total burden of adverse health outcomes (clinical or subclinical

  3. Reproductive status in adult male long-term survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, K.; Claessens, J. J. M.; Knijnenburg, S. L.; van der Pal, H. J. H.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Caron, H. N.; Beerendonk, C. C. M.; Kremer, L. C. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the long-term effects of cancer therapies on reproductive status in adult male childhood cancer survivors, evaluated the treatment-related risk factors for hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and assessed the association between the FSH levels and the later need for assisted

  4. Reproductive status in adult male long-term survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, K.; Claessens, J.J.M.; Knijnenburg, S.L.; Pal, H.J. van der; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Caron, H.N.; Beerendonk, C.C.M.; Kremer, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study assessed the long-term effects of cancer therapies on reproductive status in adult male childhood cancer survivors, evaluated the treatment-related risk factors for hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and assessed the association between the FSH levels and the later need for

  5. Triggers of Substance Abuse Slip and Relapse During Outpatient Treatment in Methadone/Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Clinics: A Predictive Model with Emphasis on Treatment-Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Komasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Most addicts relapse in the first year of treatment especially in the first 3 - 6 months, which is the most vulnerable period. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the predictors of substance abuse slip and relapse among addicts in the first 6 months of treatment with an emphasis on treatment related factors. Methods The data of this cross-sectional study collected through assessment of 148 patients who were referred to the Methadone/Buprenorphine maintenance therapy clinics of Kermanshah city during April to September of 2015. Demographic, history, treatment checklist, comorbidity index, and medical records were used for collecting data. Data was analyzed through chi-square, t-test, and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results The mean age of total participants was 42.4 ± 11.3 years and 98% of them were male. 27% and 35.1% of the patients, respectively, had a slip and relapse during the first 6 months of treatment. After adjustment for all demographic data, it was indicated that self-employment (P = 0.037, more treatment costs (P = 0.049, previous treatment history (P = 0.027, not satisfied dose of medication (P = 0.012, and lack of medical therapy history under physicians supervision (P = 0.046 can increase the possibility of a slip significantly. Conclusions Despite the fact that prevention of re-abuse and relapse of disease includes multi-factorial approach, it seems that the treatment-related factors are as the most major factors in relapse and slip during the first 6 months of treatment. Health practitioners’ special attention to treatment related factors in addiction, especially previous treatment history as the most important predictor of relapse, are probably effective in the control and decrease of a slip and relapse.

  6. Disease-related mortality exceeds treatment-related mortality in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on second-line or later therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Edward; McGarry, Lisa; Gala, Smeet; Nieset, Christopher; Nanavaty, Merena; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Levy, Yair

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of newly-diagnosed patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) results in near-normal life expectancy. However, CP-CML patients resistant to initial TKIs face a poorer prognosis and significantly higher CML-related mortality. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate the specific causes of deaths (diseases progression versus drug-related) in CP-CML patients receiving second- or third-line therapy. We identified eight studies based on our criteria that reported causes of death. Overall, 5% of second-line and 10% of third-line patients died during the study follow-up period. For second-line, (7 studies, n=1926), mortality was attributed to disease progression for 41% of deaths, 2% to treatment-related causes, 3% were treatment-unrelated, and 50% were unspecified adverse events (AEs), not likely related to study drug. In third-line, (2 studies, n=144), 71% deaths were attributed to disease progression, 7% treatment-related AEs, 14% treatment-unrelated and 7% unspecified AEs. Annual death rates for second- and third-line therapy were significantly higher than for general population in similar age group. Our findings suggest death attributed to disease progression is approximately 10 times that due to treatment-related AEs in patients with CP-CML receiving second- or third-line therapy. Therefore, the potential benefits of effective treatment for these patients with the currently available TKIs outweigh the risks of treatment-induced AEs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types ...

  8. Importance of updating family cancer history in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Selena; Warby, Meera; Tucker, Katherine M; Wakefield, Claire E; Cohn, Richard J

    2017-10-01

    Estimates of the number of childhood cancers with a genetic basis range from 5-8.5% found in germline samples to 29% based on clinical criteria. Family history-taking practice is a fundamental first step in detecting at risk individuals and families. This study focused on Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS), a highly penetrant cancer syndrome. Reported family history in a cohort of 648 of cancer survivor cohort (CCS) was examined. Eligible CCS were: (i) aged up to 14 years at diagnosis; (ii) more than 5 years postdiagnosis; (iii) treated for a childhood cancer at the study hospitals in NSW, Australia; (iv) in remission for more than 3 years. CCS completed self-administered questionnaires. Medical records confirmed diagnosis and treatment-related information. Our findings reveal an increased cancer risk among sibling and relatives of CCS. 91% of siblings diagnosed with cancer were diagnosed under the age of 40 and about 30% diagnosed under the aged of 15 revealing a 5- (RR = 5.1; 95% CI, 3.3-7.9) and 44-fold (RR = 44.6; 95% CI, 18.4-108.3) increased risked of cancer compared with the Australian population, respectively. About 2% of CCS reported that they had been diagnosed with a genetic cancer syndrome. However, 11% of survivors described a family history pattern which met Chompret criteria for screening for TP53 mutations associated with LFS. Our data suggests that familial cancer predispositions may be initially overlooked. Aperiodic and accurate ascertainment of family cancer history of childhood cancer patients and survivors is therefore recommended.

  9. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian E Cooke

    Full Text Available Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment.

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate ... Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer ...

  11. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Screening Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer ...

  13. Treatment of early stage breast cancer by limited surgery and radical irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, A.M.; Cope, O.; Russo, R.; Wang, C.C.; Schulz, M.D.; Wang, C.; Rodkey, G.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five female patients with early stage breast cancer, i.e., Stage I and II were treated by limited surgery followed by radical radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between January, 1956 and December, 1974. Patients included those who were medically inoperable or who refused mastectomy. The 5-year survival rate was 83% and 76% for Stage I and II, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival (absolute) was 67% and 42%. Although the number of patients so treated is small, there was no significant difference in survival from the results of the radical mastectomy series at the same institution. No major complications were encountered. Seventeen of eighty-five patients developed minor problems; mostly fibrosis and minimal arm lymphedema stemmming from older orthovoltage equipment and treatment techniques. With the current availability of megavoltage equipment, improvements in techniques and dosimetry, complications should decrease. Combined limited surgery and radical radiation therapy should be considered in those patients where a radical mastectomy is not feasible because of psychological or medical problems. Since this procedure results in a cosmetically acceptable breast, radical radiation in early stage breast cancer seems a reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy

  14. A review of squamous cell vulvar cancers in Waikato region, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Prashanth Hari; Kuper-Hommel, Marion Jj

    2017-11-10

    Squamous cell vulvar cancers (SCVC) are rare. Although management guidelines have recently been published, New Zealand studies presenting "real world" outcomes are limited. Retrospective single-centre review of SCVC diagnosed between 1 January 2000 and 31 August 2015. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were reviewed. Among 47 cases reviewed, 38 were ethnically European and 9 Māori. Cases identified as Stage 1 (16), Stage 2 (5), Stage 3 (17), Stage 4 (9). For Stages 1, 2, 3 and 4, (16, 4, 17 and 6) were managed by local excision; (9, 1, 14 and 2) by node dissection and (2, 1, 3 and 5) by chemoradiotherapy respectively. Wound cellulitis (10) and lymphedema (8) were the commonest acute and late complication, respectively. Seven patients were treated with 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin, and four received weekly Cisplatin. Grade 3 toxicities seen in five cases treated with 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin versus none in the Cisplatin group. No local recurrences observed in patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with Age Adjusted Charlson Comorbid Index Score (ACCIS) <5 had better overall survival (OS) compared to scores ≥5 (60% versus 41%) with 33 months median follow-up. Five-year OS and disease-free specific survival was 73% and 94% (Stage 1), 40% and 60% (Stage 2), 44% and 59% (Stage 3) and 29% (Stage 4) respectively. We present "real world" outcomes of vulvar cancers in this older and comorbid population. Larger, prospective multi-centre studies are proposed.

  15. Quality of life in urinary bladder and prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Stefanie, 1979-

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this thesis was to describe the evolution of Health-Related Quality of Life in Spanish patients with urologic tumours; and to the examine clinical and treatment-related factors associated with changes in Health-Related Quality of Life during the first year of treatment. The EMPARO project is an observational, multicenter, prospective study on patients diagnosed with bladder cancer (n=326) and prostate cancer (n=472). Consecutive patients were enrolled in 7 Spanish hos...

  16. Validation of the FACT-B+4-UL questionnaire and exploration of its predictive value in women submitted to surgery for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade Ortega, Juan Alfonso; Millán Gómez, Ana Pilar; Ribeiro González, Marisa; Martínez Piró, Pilar; Jiménez Anula, Juan; Sánchez Andújar, María Belén

    2017-06-21

    The early detection of upper limb complications is important in women operated on for breast cancer. The "FACT-B+4-UL" questionnaire, a specific variant of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) is available among others to measure the upper limb function. The Spanish version of the upper limb subscale of the FACT-B+4 was validated in a prospective cohort of 201 women operated on for breast cancer (factor analysis, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity and sensitivity to change were determined). Its predictive capacity of subsequent lymphoedema and other complications in the upper limb was explored using logistic regression. This subscale is unifactorial and has a great internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: 0.87), its test-retest reliability and construct validity are strong (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.986; Pearson's R with "Quick DASH": 0.81) as is its sensitivity to change. It didn't predict the onset of lymphedema. Its predictive capacity for other upper limb complications is low. FACT-B+4-UL is useful in measuring upper limb disability in women surgically treated for breast cancer; but it does not predict the onset of lymphoedema and its predictive capacity for others complications in the upper limb is low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic cancer is cancer that spreads from its site of origin to another part of the body. Learn how cancer spreads, possible symptoms, common sites where cancer spreads, and how to find out about treatment options.

  18. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  19. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about cervical and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  20. Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about ovarian and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  1. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer

  2. High-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation for AL amyloidosis: recent trends in treatment-related mortality and 1-year survival at a single institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, D. C.; Andrea, N.; Berenbaum, I.; Berk, J. L.; Connors, L.; Dember, L. M.; Doros, G.; Fennessey, S.; Finn, K.; Girnius, S.; Lerner, A.; Libbey, C.; Meier-Ewert, H. K.; O’Connell, R.; O’Hara, C.; Quillen, K.; Ruberg, F. L.; Sam, F.; Segal, A.; Shelton, A.; Skinner, M.; Sloan, J. M.; Wiesman, J. F.; Sanchorawala, V.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment with high-dose melphalan chemotherapy supported by hematopoietic rescue with autologous stem cells produces high rates of hematologic responses and improvement in survival and organ function for patients with AL amyloidosis. Ongoing clinical trials explore pre-transplant induction regimens, post-transplant consolidation or maintenance approaches, and compare transplant to non-transplant regimens. To put these studies into context, we reviewed our recent experience with transplant for AL amyloidosis in the Amyloid Treatment and Research Program at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine. Over the past 10 years, there was a steady reduction in rates of treatment-related mortality and improvement in 1-year survival, now approximately 5% and 90%, respectively, based upon an intention-to-treat analysis. Median overall survival of patients treated with this approach at our center exceeds 7.5 years. PMID:21838459

  3. The effects of an individualized exercise intervention on body composition in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglini,Claudio; Bottaro,Martim; Dennehy,Carolyn; Rae,Logan; Shields,Edgar; Kirk,David; Hackney,Anthony

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Changes in metabolism have been reported in the majority of patients undergoing cancer treatment, and these are usually characterized by progressive change in body composition. The effects of aerobic exercise programs to combat the cancer and cancer treatment-related side effects, which include the negative changes in body composition, have been extensively reported in the literature. However, few resistance exercise intervention studies have hypothesized that breast ca...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer ... to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Understanding Cancer What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Understanding Cancer What Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer ... Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers ... Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s ...

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  9. Lymphedema of the limbs. Isotopic lymphograhy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, J.

    1978-01-01

    A new method, isotopic lymphography, is proposed as a simple means to estimate the real dynamics of lymphatic circulation, confirming or refuting the lymphoedema diagnosis. This simple and non-aggressive method does not require direct injection into a lymphatic and is therefore applicable whatever the state of the lymphatic circulation; labelled molecules injected into interstitial tissue are in fact drained by the lymphatic capillaries. - 0.5 ml of a sup(99m)Tc colloid solution is injected into the subcutaneous region of the first inter-digital space of each foot. - The product used is a polyvinylpyrolidone-stabilised antimony sulphate precolloid. The particle diameter is known to be an essential factor, governing tissular resorption, migration speed in the lymphatic network, impregnation of relays far from the injection point, degree of ganglionic granulopexy. In general a diameter below 50 A is desirable to avoid too much local stasis and allow the tracer to diffuse throughout the network. - The colloid is labelled with 2 to 3 mCi technetium sup(99m). Given the low activities injected and the physical characteristics of technetium sup(99m) the radiobiological risks are negligible. - The instrument used is a scintillation camera of which the detection head, placed above the two legs of the recumbent patient, explores the region between ankles and knees, then the thighs and finally the abdomen [fr

  10. Genetics Home Reference: lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... G, Jones MC, Kerstjens-Frederikse WS, Lidral AC, McDonald M, Nelson CC, Witte M, Glover TW. Clinical ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  11. A randomized trial of exercise on well-being and function following breast cancer surgery: the RESTORE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roger T; Kimmick, Gretchen G; McCoy, Thomas P; Hopkins, Judith; Levine, Edward; Miller, Gary; Ribisl, Paul; Mihalko, Shannon L

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of a moderate, tailored exercise program on health-related quality of life, physical function, and arm volume in women receiving treatment for nonmetastatic breast cancer. Women who were within 4-12 weeks of surgery for stage I-III breast cancer were randomized to center-based exercise and lymphedema education intervention or patient education. Functional assessment of cancer therapy-breast cancer (FACT-B), 6-min walk, and arm volume were performed at 3-month intervals through 18 months. Repeated measures analysis of covariance was used to model the total meters walked over time, FACT-B scores, and arm volume. Models were adjusted for baseline measurement, baseline affected arm volume, number of nodes removed, age, self-reported symptoms, baseline SF-12 mental and physical component scores, visit, and treatment group. Of the recruited 104 women, 82 completed all 18 months. Mean age (range) was 53.6 (32-82) years; 88% were Caucasian; 45% were employed full time; 44% were overweight; and 28% obese. Approximately, 46% had breast-conserving surgery; 79% had axillary node dissection; 59% received chemotherapy; and 64% received radiation. The intervention resulted in an average increase of 34.3 ml (SD = 12.8) versus patient education (p = 0.01). Changes in FACT-B scores and arm volumes were not significantly different. With this early exercise intervention after breast cancer diagnosis, a significant improvement was achieved in physical function, with no decline in health-related quality of life or detrimental effect on arm volume. Starting a supervised exercise regimen that is tailored to an individual's strength and stamina within 3 months following breast cancer surgery appears safe and may hasten improvements in physical functioning.

  12. Supportive care during treatment for breast cancer: resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fatima; Bese, Nuran; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; Ginsburg, Ophira; Grunberg, Steven M; Gralla, Richard J; Steyn, Ann; Pagani, Olivia; Partridge, Ann H; Knaul, Felicia Marie; Aapro, Matti S; Andersen, Barbara L; Thompson, Beti; Gralow, Julie R; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer patients may have unmet supportive care needs during treatment, including symptom management of treatment-related toxicities, and educational, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. Delivery of supportive care is often a low priority in low- and middle-income settings, and is also dependent on resources available. This consensus statement describes twelve key recommendations for supportive care during treatment in low- and middle-income countries, identified by an expert international panel as part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit for Supportive Care, which was held in October 2012, in Vienna, Austria. Panel recommendations are presented in a 4-tier resource-stratified table to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services during treatment to breast cancer patients, starting at a basic level of resource allocation and incrementally adding program resources as they become available. These recommendations include: health professional and patient and family education; management of treatment related toxicities, management of treatment-related symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and non-specific pain, and management of psychosocial and spiritual issues related to breast cancer treatment. Establishing supportive care during breast cancer treatment will help ensure that breast cancer patients receive comprehensive care that can help 1) improve adherence to treatment recommendations, 2) manage treatment-related toxicities and other treatment related symptoms, and 3) address the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of breast cancer and breast cancer treatments. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in endometrial cancer-Feasibility, safety and lymphatic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, Barbara; Lönnerfors, Céline; Bollino, Michele; Persson, Jan

    2018-03-01

    To compare the rate of lymphatic complications in women with endometrial cancer undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy versus a full pelvic and infrarenal paraaortic lymphadenectomy, and to examine the overall feasibility and safety of the former. A prospective study of 188 patients with endometrial cancer planned for robotic surgery. Indocyanine green was used to identify the sentinel lymph nodes. In low-risk patients the lymphadenectomy was restricted to removal of sentinel lymph nodes whereas in high-risk patients also a full lymphadenectomy was performed. The impact of the extent of the lymphadenectomy on the rate of complications was evaluated. The bilateral detection rate of sentinel lymph nodes was 96% after cervical tracer injection. No intraoperative complication was associated with the sentinel lymph node biopsy per se. Compared with hysterectomy alone, the additional average operative time for removal of sentinel lymph nodes was 33min whereas 91min were saved compared with a full pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy. Sentinel lymph node biopsy alone resulted in a lower incidence of leg lymphedema than infrarenal paraaortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy (1.3% vs 18.1%, p=0.0003). The high feasibility, the absence of intraoperative complications and the low risk of lymphatic complications supports implementing detection of sentinel lymph nodes in low-risk endometrial cancer patients. Given that available preliminary data on sensitivity and false negative rates in high-risk patients are confirmed in further studies, we also believe that the reduction in lymphatic complications and operative time strongly motivates the sentinel lymph node concept in high-risk endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Surgeon specialization and use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W.F.; Laud, Purushuttom W.; Sparapani, Rodney A.; Nattinger, Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is the standard of care for axillary staging in clinically node-negative breast cancer patients. It is not known whether SLNB rates differ by surgeon expertise. If surgeons with less breast cancer expertise are less likely to offer SLNB to clinically node-negative patients, this practice pattern could lead to unnecessary axillary lymph node dissections (ALND) and lymphedema. OBJECTIVE To explore potential measures of surgical expertise (including a novel objective specialization measure – percentage of a surgeon’s operations devoted to breast cancer determined from claims) on the use of SLNB for invasive breast cancer. DESIGN Population-based prospective cohort study. Patient, tumor, treatment and surgeon characteristics were examined. SETTING California, Florida, Illinois PARTICIPANTS Elderly (65+ years) women identified from Medicare claims as having had incident invasive breast cancer surgery in 2003. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Type of axillary surgery performed. RESULTS Of the 1,703 women treated by 863 different surgeons, 56% underwent an initial SLNB, 37% initial ALND and 6% no axillary surgery. The median annual surgeon Medicare volume of breast cancer cases was 6 (range: 1.5–57); the median surgeon percentage of breast cancer cases was 4.6% (range: 0.7%–100%). After multivariable adjustment of patient and surgeon factors, women operated on by surgeons with higher volumes and percentages of breast cancer cases had a higher likelihood of undergoing SLNB. Specifically, women were most likely to undergo SLNB if operated on by high volume surgeons (regardless of percentage) or by lower volume surgeons with a high percentage of cases devoted to breast cancer. In addition, membership in the American Society of Breast Surgeons (OR 1.98, CI 1.51–2.60) and Society of Surgical Oncology (OR 1.59, CI 1.09–2.30) were independent predictors of women undergoing an initial SLNB. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Patients treated

  15. Methods to improve rehabilitation of patients following breast cancer surgery: a review of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loh SY

    2015-03-01

    occupational outcomes. Conclusion: There is good evidence for narrowly-focused exercise rehabilitation in improving physical outcome particularly for shoulder mobility and lymphedema. There were inconclusive results for methods to improve psychosocial, cognitive, and occupational outcomes. There were no reviews on broader performance areas and lifestyle factors to enable effective living after treatment. The review suggests that comprehensiveness and effectiveness of post-operative breast cancer rehabilitation should consider patients’ self-management approaches towards lifestyle redesign, and incorporate health promotion aspects, in light of the fact that breast cancer is now taking the form of a chronic illness with longer survivorship years. Keywords: breast cancer surgery, rehabilitation methods, symptom-management, quality of life, lifestyle redesign, self-management

  16. Urological Cancers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. A total of 8829 cancers were diagnosed over the 15 year study period, 749 (8.4%) were Urological malignancies. The male to female ratio of the. Urological cancers was 10.7 to 1. Cancer of the prostate was the most common urological malignancy (54.6%), followed by cancer of the bladder (21.1%) and cancer of ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening ... What Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening ... Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid ... and where it is in your body The stage of the cancer, which refers to the size ...

  3. Cancer and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  4. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  5. Cancer and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health ... Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Coping with Your Feelings During Advanced Cancer Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  10. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening ... Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and ... of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials ... Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials ...

  14. Regional Nodal Irradiation in Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Timothy J; Olivotto, Ivo A; Parulekar, Wendy R; Ackerman, Ida; Chua, Boon H; Nabid, Abdenour; Vallis, Katherine A; White, Julia R; Rousseau, Pierre; Fortin, Andre; Pierce, Lori J; Manchul, Lee; Chafe, Susan; Nolan, Maureen C; Craighead, Peter; Bowen, Julie; McCready, David R; Pritchard, Kathleen I; Gelmon, Karen; Murray, Yvonne; Chapman, Judy-Anne W; Chen, Bingshu E; Levine, Mark N

    2015-07-23

    Most women with breast cancer who undergo breast-conserving surgery receive whole-breast irradiation. We examined whether the addition of regional nodal irradiation to whole-breast irradiation improved outcomes. We randomly assigned women with node-positive or high-risk node-negative breast cancer who were treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant systemic therapy to undergo either whole-breast irradiation plus regional nodal irradiation (including internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes) (nodal-irradiation group) or whole-breast irradiation alone (control group). The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were disease-free survival, isolated locoregional disease-free survival, and distant disease-free survival. Between March 2000 and February 2007, a total of 1832 women were assigned to the nodal-irradiation group or the control group (916 women in each group). The median follow-up was 9.5 years. At the 10-year follow-up, there was no significant between-group difference in survival, with a rate of 82.8% in the nodal-irradiation group and 81.8% in the control group (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 1.13; P=0.38). The rates of disease-free survival were 82.0% in the nodal-irradiation group and 77.0% in the control group (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.94; P=0.01). Patients in the nodal-irradiation group had higher rates of grade 2 or greater acute pneumonitis (1.2% vs. 0.2%, P=0.01) and lymphedema (8.4% vs. 4.5%, P=0.001). Among women with node-positive or high-risk node-negative breast cancer, the addition of regional nodal irradiation to whole-breast irradiation did not improve overall survival but reduced the rate of breast-cancer recurrence. (Funded by the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute and others; MA.20 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00005957.).

  15. Evaluation of treatment related fear using a newly developed fear scale for children: "Fear assessment picture scale" and its association with physiological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Nishidha; Tiwari, Shilpi; Thakur, Ruchi; Agrawal, Nikita; Shashikiran, N D; Singla, Shilpy

    2015-01-01

    Dental treatment is usually a poignant phenomenon for children. Projective scales are preferred over psychometric scales to recognize it, and to obtain the self-report from children. The aims were to evaluate treatment related fear using a newly developed fear scale for children, fear assessment picture scale (FAPS), and anxiety with colored version of modified facial affective scale (MFAS) - three faces along with physiologic responses (pulse rate and oxygen saturation) obtained by pulse oximeter before and during pulpectomy procedure. Total, 60 children of age 6-8 years who were visiting the dental hospital for the first time and needed pulpectomy treatment were selected. Children selected were of sound physical, physiological, and mental condition. Two projective scales were used; one to assess fear - FAPS and to assess anxiety - colored version of MFAS - three faces. These were co-related with the physiological responses (oxygen saturation and pulse rate) of children obtained by pulse oximeter before and during the pulpectomy procedure. Shapiro-Wilk test, McNemar's test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney test were applied in the study. The physiological responses showed association with FAPS and MFAS though not significant. However, oxygen saturation with MFAS showed a significant change between "no anxiety" and "some anxiety" as quantified by Kruskal-Wallis test value 6.287, P = 0.043 (test is easy and fast to apply on children and reduces the chair-side time.

  16. Experiência de mulheres com linfedema pós-mastectomia: significado do sofrimento vivido Experiencia de mujeres con linfedema post-mastectomía: significado del sufrimiento vivido Experience of women with post-mastectomy lymphedema: the meaning of experienced suffering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marislei Sanches Panobianco

    2008-12-01

    cotidiano y en el trabajo, alteraciones emocionales, cambios de hábitos, caracterizándose como un problema estigmatizante. Identificaron instituciones: ciencia, trabajo, servicios de salud y sociedad, que promovieron cuestionamientos, perjuicio, aislamiento, constreñimiento. La familia y el servicio de apoyo que frecuentaban fueron instituciones que posibilitaron aproximación social.Arm lymphedema affects approximately 40% of mastectomized women with axillary hollowness, increasing limb weight and volume, with subsequent professional, domestic, sexual and psychosocial problems. Current study analyzes the experience of women with post-mastectomy lymphedema and aims at understanding the meaning that foregrounds their experienced suffering. Analysis was based on an anthropological and interpretative approach, whereas data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Fourteen women, attending a rehabilitation unit for mastectomized women, where authors of current paper work, participated in the study, were selected. From the participants' point of view, characterizing a stigmatizing problem, lymphedema brings about concern with treatment and its maintenance, difficulty in daily life and work, emotional alterations, habits changes. The subjects identified institutions, such as science, place of work, health services and society, which develop negative conditions by their questioning, bias, isolation and embarrassment. The family and the support service they attended were institutions that favored social approximation.

  17. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-10-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment-related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals.

  18. Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  19. Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is the nation's leader in cancer research. Learn more about NCI's cancer research areas, key initiatives, progress made in cancer research, and resources for researchers like research tools, specimens and data.

  20. Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  1. Uterine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, ... the uterus. This type is also called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of uterine cancer include Abnormal vaginal ...

  2. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  3. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  4. Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toxins. In children, a genetic condition, such as Down syndrome , can sometimes increase the risk of cancer. Kids who have had chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer are more likely to get cancer ...

  5. Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Men, Seniors, WomenTags: cancer, gastric cancer, stomach cancer May 1, 1999 Copyright © American Academy ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  6. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... and nerves. If the cancer starts inside the eyeball it's called intraocular cancer. The most common intraocular ...

  7. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  8. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  9. Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common cancers in the United States. Cancer Home Kidney Cancer Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and ...

  10. Coping with side effects from cancer treatment in daily life from the perspective of cancer patients: A qualitative empirical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birgith; Koktved, Dorte Pallesen; Nielsen, Lene Lyngø

    Aim The aim of this paper is to deepen our understanding of how patients cope with side effects from cancer treatment in daily life. Background Patients receiving cancer treatment experience acute side effects and need individualized information and guidance in order to manage treatment......-related adverse events in everyday life. However development in cancer treatment and the societal demands for efficiency may limit the possibility for individualized support. Methods Nine patients were interviewed from March to July 2009 to explore the patients’ experience of coping with side effects in daily...

  11. Long-term prospective longitudinal evaluation of emotional distress and quality of life in cervical cancer patients who remained disease-free 2-years from diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegna, Giovanna; Petrillo, Marco; Fuoco, Gilda; Venditti, Laura; Terzano, Serena; Anchora, Luigi Pedone; Scambia, Giovanni; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2013-03-18

    A long-term prospective assessment of QoL in cervical cancer patients is still lacking. Here, we provide the first 2-years prospective, longitudinal study evaluating emotional distress and QoL in early stage (ECC) and locally advanced (LACC) cervical cancer patients who remained disease-free 2-years from diagnosis. The questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Global Health Status items of EORTC QLQ-C30 (GHS), and EORTC QLQ-CX24 (CX24) have been administered by a dedicated team of psycho-oncologists, administered at baseline, and after 3, 6, 12 and 24 months from surgery The Generalized Linear Model for repeated measure was used to analyze modifications of QoL measures over time. In both groups, an early reduction of the percentage of patients with anxiety levels ≥11 was observed at the 3-month evaluation (ECC: 25.7% at baseline Vs 14.7% after 3 months, p value=0.001; LACC: 22.2% at baseline Vs 15.4% after 3 months, p value=0.001). Despite this favorable trend, after 2 years from diagnosis, 11.9% of ECC and 15.6% of LACC patients still showed an anxiety score ≥11. No significant changes over time were observed in term of Depression levels. Focusing on QoL issues, mean GHS and Sexual Activity scores showed an improvement over time in both groups compared to baseline (GHS: 5.7% difference for ECC, p value=0.001, and 11.0% in LACC, p value=0.001; SXA: 13.9% difference for ECC, p value=0.001; and 6.1% in LACC, p value=0.008). On the other hand, Body Image mean scores were significantly impaired by chemoradiation administration in LACC patients, without long-term recovery (7.5% difference, p value=0.001). Finally, in both groups, lymphedema (LY) and menopausal symptoms (MS) showed an early worsening which persisted 2-year after surgery (LY: 19.5% difference for ECC, p value=0.014, and 27.3% in LACC, p value=0.001; MS: 14.4% difference for ECC, p value=0.004, and 16.0% in LACC, p value=0.002). Despite a significant improvement over time, elevated

  12. Cancer Disparities - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on cancer health disparities research—including factors that influence disparities, disparities-related research efforts, and diversity in the cancer research workforce—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  13. Cancer Technology - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on technologies that affect cancer research and care—including new technologies for detecting cancer, testing treatments, storing/analyzing data, and improving patient care—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  14. Evaluation of treatment related fear using a newly developed fear scale for children: "Fear assessment picture scale" and its association with physiological response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishidha Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental treatment is usually a poignant phenomenon for children. Projective scales are preferred over psychometric scales to recognize it, and to obtain the self-report from children. Aims: The aims were to evaluate treatment related fear using a newly developed fear scale for children, fear assessment picture scale (FAPS, and anxiety with colored version of modified facial affective scale (MFAS - three faces along with physiologic responses (pulse rate and oxygen saturation obtained by pulse oximeter before and during pulpectomy procedure. Settings and Design: Total, 60 children of age 6-8 years who were visiting the dental hospital for the first time and needed pulpectomy treatment were selected. Children selected were of sound physical, physiological, and mental condition. Two projective scales were used; one to assess fear - FAPS and to assess anxiety - colored version of MFAS - three faces. These were co-related with the physiological responses (oxygen saturation and pulse rate of children obtained by pulse oximeter before and during the pulpectomy procedure. Statistical Analysis Used: Shapiro-Wilk test, McNemar′s test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney test were applied in the study. Results: The physiological responses showed association with FAPS and MFAS though not significant. However, oxygen saturation with MFAS showed a significant change between "no anxiety" and "some anxiety" as quantified by Kruskal-Wallis test value 6.287, P = 0.043 (<0.05 before pulpectomy procedure. Conclusions: The FAPS can prove to be a pragmatic tool in spotting the fear among young children. This test is easy and fast to apply on children and reduces the chair-side time.

  15. Uterine Cancer: Cancer of the Uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe To receive Publications email updates Submit Uterine cancer Cancer of the uterus (uterine cancer) is cancer ... Institute . Expand all | Collapse all What is uterine cancer? Cancer is a disease in which certain body ...

  16. Cost-effectiveness of early intervention: comparison between intraluminal bronchoscopic treatment and surgical resection for T1N0 lung cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasic, A.; Brokx, HA; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Paul, RM; Postmus, P.E.; Sutedja, G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with early-stage lung cancer (ESLC) and severe comorbidities, the cost-effectiveness of early intervention may be reduced by screening and treatment-related morbidity and mortality in addition to the risk for non-cancer-related deaths. OBJECTIVES: The use of bronchoscopic

  17. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  18. Soft tissue sarcoma after treatment for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Per; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Carstensen, John; Wallgren, Arne

    1996-01-01

    In a register study all women in the West of Sweden Health Care Region with a breast cancer diagnosed between 1960 and 1980 (n = 13 490) were followed up in the Swedish Cancer Register to the end of 1988 for later occurrence of a soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Nineteen sarcomas were reported, whereas 8.7 were expected and the relative risk (RR) was 2.2 (CI 95% 1.3-3.4). The absolute risk was (1.7(10 4 )) person years (PY) in comparison with 0.8 expected. To obtain a more detailed analysis of the associations between arm lymphoedema, radiotherapy and STS development, and to control the quality of the register data, a case control study was also performed. Clinical records from the different hospitals in the region were collected for all the 19 cases as well as for three selected controls per case. The histopathology of the cases were reviewed, and one of the cases was reclassified as a malignant melanoma and excluded from further analysis. Thirteen of the cases were clustered around the treated breast area. To quantify the exposure to radiotherapy, the integral dose was estimated. The presence of lymphedema was included as a binary variable in the analysis. The exact conditional randomisation test indicated a significant correlation between the integral dose and the development of an STS (p = 0.008) and this association was still significant after stratification for arm oedema. A conditional logistic regression analysis with STS as the dependent variable and the integral dose as the explanatory variable gave an odds ratio (OR) of(5.2(100)) J (CI 95% 1.3-21.2), and if this regression was restricted only to the STS developing in the radiation fields the OR was(3.2(100)) J (CI 95% 0.8-12.9). Thus, the excess of STS in this breast cancer cohort was very low ((0.9(10 4 )) PY). However the integral dose correlates well to the development of STS and can be useful in quantifying even small risks of secondary malignancies in the breast cancer population

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials Global Cancer Research Key Initiatives The RAS Initiative Cancer Moonshot℠ Immunotherapy ...

  20. Postoperative low-pelvic irradiation for stage I-IIA cervical cancer patients with risk factors other than pelvic lymph node metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.-H.; Tsai, C.-S.; Lai, C.-H.; Chang, T.-C.; Wang, C.-C.; Lee, Steve P.; Tseng, C.-J.; Hsueh, Swei

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate whether postoperative low-pelvic radiotherapy (RT) is an appropriate treatment for node-negative, high-risk Stage I-IIA cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 228 Stage I-IIA cervical cancer patients treated by radical surgery and postoperative RT were included in this study. All patients had histopathologically negative pelvic node metastasis, but at least one of the following risk factors: parametrial involvement, positive or close resection margins, invasion depth two-thirds or greater cervical stromal thickness. Seventy-nine patients (35%) received 30-50 Gy (median 44) to whole pelvis and a boost dose to the low pelvis (whole-pelvic RT group); the other 149 patients (65%) received low-pelvic RT only (low-pelvic RT group). For both groups, the total external RT dose to the low pelvis ranged from 40 to 60 Gy (median 50). The potential factors associated with survival, small bowel (gastrointestinal) complications, and leg lymphedema were analyzed, and patients who had a relapse in the upper pelvis were identified. Results: The 5-year overall and disease-specific survival rate was 84% and 86%, respectively. After multivariate analysis, only bulky tumor (≥4 cm) and non-squamous cell carcinoma were significantly associated with survival. Parametrial involvement, lymph-vascular invasion, ≤50.4 Gy to the low pelvis, positive or close margins, and low-pelvic RT alone did not significantly affect survival. Grade I-V small bowel complications occurred in 33 patients (15%). Whole pelvic RT and >50.4 Gy to the low pelvis, but not old age and treatment technique (AP-PA vs. box), were significantly associated with gastrointestinal complications. Three patients (2%) in the low-pelvic RT group and 6 patients (8%) in the whole-pelvic RT group were found to have Grade III or higher small bowel complications (p=0.023). Thirty-one percent of patients developed lymphedema of the leg. A dose to the low pelvis >50.4 Gy

  1. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  2. Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  3. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglass, H.O.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer

  4. Diet and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic ... grade, which refers to how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope. Grade provides clues about ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood ... A to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic ...

  7. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... white women. Inflammatory breast tumors are frequently hormone receptor negative, which means they cannot be treated with ...

  8. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  9. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  10. Obesity and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... hormone therapy and for tumors that express hormone receptors . Obesity is also a risk factor for breast ...

  11. Testicular Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... undescended testicle) is a risk factor for testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... Testicular Cancer Treatment for more information about testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men ...

  12. The impact of radiotherapy dose and other treatment-related and clinical factors on control of stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in irradiated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Sachin S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Lynch, James W.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To study the effect of radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic parameters on local or in-field (IF) disease control; to identify other treatment-related and clinical factors of potential prognostic significance, and to elucidate the optimal radiotherapy dose in various clinical settings. Materials and Methods: Two hundred eighty-five patients with non-CNS presentations of Stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were treated with either radiotherapy (RT) alone (n=159) or combined modality therapy (CMT) using induction chemotherapy followed by consolidative RT (n=126). Ninety-three percent (67 of 72 patients) with low grade lymphomas (LGLs) were treated with RT alone. Ninety-two of 213 patients with intermediate/high grade lymphomas (I/HGLs) were treated with RT alone and 121 received CMT. Ninety-one patients (72%) of those receiving CMT were given four or more cycles of chemotherapy; CHOP was the regimen used most often (n=81). The RT treatment volumes included involved field (n=151), extended field (n=123), and comprehensive lymphatic irradiation (n=11). Minimum follow-up was 2 yr (median, 6.5 yr). Variables of potential prognostic significance for IF disease control, freedom from relapse (FFR), and absolute survival (AS) were evaluated by both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5, 10, and 20 yr actuarial AS rates were 73%, 46%, and 33% for patients with LGL; and 64%, 44%, and 18% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. The 5, 10, and 20 yr actuarial FFR rates were 62%, 59%, and 49% for LGLs and 66%, 57%, and 57% for I/HGLs, respectively. Significant prognostic factors identified by the multivariate analysis were age, tumor size, and histology for AS; tumor size and treatment modality (RT alone vs. CMT) for FFR; and only tumor size for IF disease control. Of the 95 total failures, only 12 were IF. Most of the failures (65%) were observed in contiguous unirradiated sites. All 4 IF failures in the LGLs occurred in patients treated

  13. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, N.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer resulting from occupational exposure is now receiving major attention, focusing on identification, regulation, and control of cancer-causing agents. Such cancer can result from exposure to chemicals and ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Extended exposure (often years) and an extended latent period of perhaps decades may intervene before tumor appearance. Although the actual extent of occupational cancer is in debate, estimates have ranged from 4 to 15 per cent of all cancer

  14. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book aims to review the occurrence and causes of occupational cancer and is aimed at assisting medical and safety staff, management and health and safety representatives. It is presented in the following chapters: 1) Epidemiological method 2) Agents causing occupationally induced cancer, including radiation 3) Occupations associated with risk of cancer 4) Aetiology of cancer 5) Control of occupationally induced cancer, research, prevention, legislation, national and international bodies, control of specific occupational carcinogens, including irradiation. (U.K.)

  15. Dealing with chemotherapy-related symptoms at home: a qualitative study in adult patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolbrandt, A.; Dierckx de Casterle, B.; Wildiers, H.; Aertgeerts, B.; Elst, E. Van der; Achterberg, T. van; Milisen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Given that chemotherapy treatments are done mostly in an outpatient setting, patients with cancer must deal with treatment-related symptoms mainly at home. Evidence suggests that they often feel left alone or unprepared to do so. This qualitative study explores how patients deal with

  16. Survey of cervical cancer survivors regarding quality of life and sexual function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The QOL and sexual function of cervical cancer survivors were lower than the general population. Treatment-related complications and sexual dysfunction significantly affected patients' QOL. Having health insurance was associated with better QOL. Sexual function was adversely affected by radiotherapy and radical hysterectomy.

  17. Circulating plasma platinum more than 10 years after cisplatin treatment for testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, JA; Meinardi, MT; Messerschmidt, J; Gelevert, T; Alt, F; Uges, DRA; Sleijfer, DT

    2000-01-01

    We have shown in patients cured from metastatic testicular cancer that up to 20 years after administration of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy, circulating platinum is still detectable in plasma. This finding may influence the development of long-term, treatment-related side-effects.

  18. Volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy vs. 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary chemoradiotherapy of anal carcinoma. Effects on treatment-related side effects and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Hanne Elisabeth; Droege, Leif Hendrik; Hennies, Steffen; Herrmann, Markus Karl; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Goettingen (Germany); Gaedcke, Jochen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of General Surgery, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced anal carcinoma. This study compared volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of treatment-related side effects and survival. From 1992-2014, 103 consecutive patients with anal carcinoma UICC stage I-III were treated. Concomitant CRT consisted of whole pelvic irradiation, including the iliac and inguinal lymph nodes, with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy per fractions) by VMAT (n = 17) or 3DCRT (n = 86) as well as two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Acute organ and hematological toxicity were assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events version 3.0. Side effects ≥ grade 3 were scored as high-grade toxicity. High-grade acute organ toxicity CTC ≥ 3 (P < 0.05), especially proctitis (P = 0.03), was significantly reduced in VMAT patients. The 2-year locoregional control (LRC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were both 100 % for VMAT patients compared with 80 and 73 % for 3DCRT patients. VMAT was shown to be a feasible technique, achieving significantly lower rates of acute organ toxicity and promising results for LRC and DFS. Future investigations will aim at assessing the advantages of VMAT with respect to late toxicity and survival after a prolonged follow-up time. (orig.) [German] Die primaere Radiochemotherapie (RCT) gilt als Standardtherapie fuer lokal fortgeschrittene Analkarzinome. In dieser Studie wurde die volumetrisch modulierte Rotationstherapie (''volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy'', VMAT) mit der klassischen dreidimensionalen konformalen Radiotherapie (3DCRT) hinsichtlich therapieassoziierter Nebenwirkungen und Ueberleben verglichen. Von 1992-2014 wurden 103 aufeinanderfolgende Patienten mit einem Analkarzinom im UICC-Stadium I-III behandelt. Die kombinierte RCT bestand aus der Bestrahlung des gesamten Beckens inklusive der iliakalen und der inguinalen

  19. Detailed methods of two home-based vegetable gardening intervention trials to improve diet, physical activity, and quality of life in two different populations of cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases, Mallory G; Frugé, Andrew D; De Los Santos, Jennifer F; Locher, Julie L; Cantor, Alan B; Smith, Kerry P; Glover, Tony A; Cohen, Harvey J; Daniel, Michael; Morrow, Casey D; Moellering, Douglas R; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-09-01

    Cancer survivors suffer from long-term adverse effects that reduce health-related quality of life (QOL) and physical functioning, creating an urgent need to develop effective, durable, and disseminable interventions. Harvest for Health, a home-based vegetable gardening intervention, holds promise for these domains. This report describes the methods and recruitment experiences from two randomized controlled feasibility trials that employ a waitlist-controlled design. Delivered in partnership with Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners, this intervention provides one-on-one mentorship of cancer survivors in planning and maintaining three seasonal vegetable gardens over 12months. The primary aim is to determine intervention feasibility and acceptability; secondary aims are to explore effects on objective and subjective measures of diet, physical activity and function, and QOL and examine participant factors associated with potential effects. One trial is conducted exclusively among 82 female breast cancer survivors residing in the Birmingham, AL metropolitan area (BBCS); another broadly throughout Alabama among 46 older cancer survivors aged >60 (ASCS). Response rates were 32.6% (BBCS) and 52.3% (ASCS). Both trials exceeded 80% of their accrual target. Leading reasons for ineligibility were removal of >10 lymph nodes (lymphedema risk factor), lack of physician approval, and unwillingness to be randomized to the waitlist. To date, recruitment and implementation of Harvest for Health appears feasible. Although both studies encountered recruitment challenges, lessons learned can inform future larger-scale studies. Vegetable gardening interventions are of interest to cancer survivors and may provide opportunities to gain life skills leading to improvements in overall health and QOL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Growth of breast cancer recurrences assessed by consecutive MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, Ingrid; Bouic-Pages, Emmanuelle; Hoa, Denis; Azria, David; Taourel, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Women with a personal history of breast cancer have a high risk of developing an ipsi- or contralateral recurrence. We aimed to compare the growth rate of primary breast cancer and recurrences in women who had undergone prior breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three hundred and sixty-two women were diagnosed with breast cancer and had undergone breast MRI at the time of diagnosis in our institution (2005 - 2009). Among them, 37 had at least one prior breast MRI with the lesion being visible but not diagnosed as cancer. A linear regression of tumour volume measured on MRI scans and time data was performed using a generalized logistic model to calculate growth rates. The primary objective was to compare the tumour growth rate of patients with either primary breast cancer (no history of breast cancer) or ipsi- or contralateral recurrences of breast cancer. Twenty women had no history of breast cancer and 17 patients were diagnosed as recurrences (7 and 10 were ipsi- and contralateral, respectively). The tumour growth rate was higher in contralateral recurrences than in ipsilateral recurrences (growth rate [10 -3 days -1 ] 3.56 vs 1.38, p < .001) or primary cancer (3.56 vs 2.09, p = 0.01). Differences in tumour growth were not significant for other patient-, tumour- or treatment-related characteristics. These findings suggest that contralateral breast cancer presents accelerated growth compared to ipsilateral recurrences or primary breast events

  1. Protocol and Recruitment Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Group Phone-Based versus Newsletter Interventions for Weight Loss Maintenance among Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Befort, Christie A.; Klemp, Jennifer R.; Fabian, Carol; Perri, Michael G.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Shireman, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and death. Women who reside in rural areas have higher obesity prevalence and suffer from breast cancer treatment-related disparities compared to urban women. The objective of this 5-year randomized controlled trial is to compare methods for delivering extended care for weight loss maintenance among rural breast cancer survivors. Group phone-based counseling via conference calls addresses access barriers, is more cost-effective than indivi...

  2. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  3. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  4. Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  5. Nasal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  6. Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  7. Thymus Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  8. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  9. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  10. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  11. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body's ability to fight ...

  12. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  13. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help you know how to prevent breast cancer. Breast implants, using antiperspirants, and wearing underwire bras do not increase the risk for breast cancer. There is also no evidence of a direct ...

  14. Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kind of kidney cancer called Wilms' tumor. The incidence of kidney cancer seems to be increasing. One ... doesn't go away Loss of appetite Unexplained weight loss Tiredness Fever, which usually comes and goes ( ...

  15. Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thick and show changes that look like cancer. Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common sign of EIN. Diagnosis and ... The most common symptom of endometrial cancer is abnormal uterine bleeding. For women who are premenopausal, this includes irregular ...

  16. Breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A collaborative article gives an overview of breast cancer in LICs, ... approach to the problem; therefore they are published as two separate ... attached to the diagnosis of breast cancer. ... Their founding statement in its early form is included.

  17. Cancer - vulva

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... freckle, which may be pink, red, white, or gray Skin thickening or lump Skin sore (ulcer) Other ... vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer Images Female perineal anatomy References Jhingran A, Russell AH, Seiden MV, et ...

  18. Cancer - penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an organ that makes up part of the male reproductive system. Causes Cancer of the penis is rare. Its ... penis; Glansectomy; Partial penectomy Images Male reproductive anatomy Male reproductive system References Heinlen JE, Culkin DJ. Cancer of the ...

  19. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  20. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The treatment of cancer using medication is called chemotherapy . Certain cancers respond well to chemo, which often can be given on an outpatient basis. Someone who is having chemotherapy may experience nausea, fatigue, hair loss, or other ...