WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer treatment studies

  1. Dosimetry studies during breast cancer radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. O. M.

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies indicated that breast cancer is wildly spread especially in women as compared to men. It is increased after an age of thirty five years in women so it is important to study the effect of exposure to the radiation on the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer. In this work the scattered doses for the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer were measured and also the probability of inducing cancer in it is also discussed. The study was performed for a group of patients composed of twenty five females. Also the backscattered doses to the intact breast were measured for thirteen female patients. During the treatment using gamma rays from Co-60 source the two tangential fields (lateral and medial) were selected for the measurements. The results of exposure to gamma radiation for the lateral and medial fields showed that the mean scattered and backscattered doses to the intact breast were (241.26 cGY,47.49 cGY) and (371.6 cGY,385.4 cGY), respectively. Beside that the somatic risk of induced cancer to the intact breast was found to be (6 .1X10 -3 ,1.2X10 -3 ) and (9.29X10 -3 , 9.63X10 -3 ), respectively. From the results obtained it was concluded that the intact breast received small amounts of radiation doses which may lead to breast cancer for the healthy breast. The recommendations from the present study are to take care of radiation protection to the patient, and also to take care of the patient treatment conditions like temperature, pressure and humidity during the radiation exposure.(Author)

  2. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body's ability to fight ...

  3. A study of the treatment of oral multiple primary cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takayuki; Kamata, Shin-etsu; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The subjects were 30 multiple primary cancers (out of 2,169 oral squamous cell carcinoma including lip cancers), which were treated at the Division of Head and Neck, Cancer Institute Hospital. Seven synchronous carcinomas and 23 metachronous cases were seen. The most common site of the primary cancer was the tongue. Surgical treatment was performed for the first treatment in 5 cases of the 7 synchronous cancers. On the other hand, radical treatment was performed in 11 cases of the 23 metachronous cancers. Fourteen of the 18 cases were treated by surgical treatment and controlled. It is suggested that surgical treatment is the most effective for oral multiple primary cancers. (author)

  4. Retrospective study of thyroid cancer treatment: aims and data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosmikova, K.; Hermanska, J.; Jirsa, L.; Karny, M.; Samal, M.

    1998-01-01

    Although opinions preferring individual administration of activity in the treatment of thyroid cancer with 131 I predominate, sufficient quantitative arguments in favor of this approach are unavailable as yet. Therefore, a retrospective study involving statistical processing was proposed with the aim to evaluate the relations between available data of the patients and success of treatment. Ideally, recommendations regarding activity to be administered in dependence on the biophysical status of the patient should emerge from the study

  5. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... can be addressed as quickly as possible. Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  6. Clinicopathological studies on three preoperative combined treatments for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yuji; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Iizuka, Ryouji; Hagiwara, Akeo; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Toshio

    1995-01-01

    To prevent postoperative local recurrence of rectal cancer, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and 5-fluorouracil suppository (2,000-2,500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of patients receiving combined treatments. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.54 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that in the surgery alone group. No systemic side effects nor severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer were beneficial to survival and local control. (author)

  7. Co-morbidity and treatment outcomes of elderly pharyngeal cancer patients : A matched control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Thomas T. A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Plaat, Boudewijn; Wedman, Jan; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Halmos, Gyorgy

    2011-01-01

    Treatment choice in elderly pharyngeal cancer patient is disputed. This study was aimed to asses association of co-morbidity, complications and survival in different treatment modalities of pharyngeal cancer patients. Retrospective analysis of pharyngeal cancer patients, diagnosed between 1997 and

  8. A study of light ion accelerators for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.

    1997-07-01

    This review addresses several issues, such as possible advantages of light ion therapy compared to protons and conventional radiation, the complexity of such a system and its possible adaptation to a hospital environment, and the question of cost-effectiveness compared to other modalities for cancer treatment or to other life saving procedures. Characteristics and effects of different types of radiation on cells and organisms will be briefly described; this will include conventional radiation, protons and light ions. The status of proton and light ion cancer therapy will then be described, with more emphasis on the latter; on the basis of existing experience the criteria for the use of light ions will be listed and areas of possible medical applications suggested. Requirements and parameters of ion beams for cancer treatment will then be defined, including ion species, energy and intensity, as well as parameters of the beam when delivered to the target (scanning, time structure, energy spread). Possible accelerator designs for light ions will be considered, including linear accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons and their basic features given; this will be followed by a review of existing and planned facilities for light ions. On the basis of these considerations a tentative design for a dedicated light ion facility will be suggested, a facility that would be hospital based, satisfying the clinical requirements, simple to operate and reliable, concluding with its cost-effectiveness in comparison with other modalities for treatment of cancer

  9. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  10. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  11. Lived experiences of breast cancer survivors after diagnosis, treatment and beyond: qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Faustine; Jeanetta, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The number of breast cancer survivors has increased since 1990 due to advances in biomedical technology that lead to an increase in early diagnosis and treatment. Research on survivorship has focused on the psychological and treatment aspects of the disease. The goal of this study was focused on exploring the lived experiences of breast cancer survivors from diagnosis, treatment and beyond. Objective To understand the lived experiences of women who are breast cancer surviv...

  12. Working during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000834.htm Working during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Many people continue to work throughout their cancer treatment. Cancer, or the side effects of treatment, may ...

  13. After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Better Home Your Health Resources Healthcare Management After Cancer Treatment After Cancer Treatment Share Print From the day you were diagnosed ... of the questions you may have after your cancer treatment ends. Path to well being Will I need ...

  14. Responses to fertility treatment among patients with cancer: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinko, A V; Farland, L V; Missmer, S A; Srouji, S S; Racowsky, C; Ginsburg, E S

    2018-01-01

    Cancer treatments have significant negative impacts on female fertility, but the impact of cancer itself on fertility remains to be clarified. While some studies have shown that compared with healthy women, those with cancer require higher doses of gonadotropins resulting in decreased oocyte yields, others have shown comparable oocyte yields between the two groups. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether there is an association between any cancer and/or type of cancer, and response to ovarian stimulation for egg and embryo banking. In this retrospective cohort study, ovarian stimulation cycles performed from June 2007 through October 2014 at a single academic medical center were reviewed to identify those undertaken for women with cancer undergoing fertility preservation ( n  = 147) or women with no cancer undergoing their first cycle due to male factor infertility ( n  = 664). Of the 147 women undergoing fertility preservation, 105 had local cancer (Stage I-III solid malignancies) and 42 had systemic cancer (hematologic or Stage IV solid malignancies). Response to ovarian stimulation was compared among these two groups and women with no cancer. Adjusting for age and BMI, women with systemic cancer had lower baseline antral follicle counts (AFC) than women with no cancer or local cancer. Women with systemic cancer required higher doses of FSH than women with no cancer or local cancer, and they had higher oocyte to AFC ratios than women with no cancer or local cancer, but greater odds of cycle cancellation as compared to women with no cancer or local cancer. No significant differences were observed among the three groups for duration of stimulation, number of oocytes and mature oocytes retrieved, or number of embryos created. Women with cancer achieve similar oocyte and embryo yields as women with no cancer, although those with systemic cancer require higher FSH doses and are at greater risk of cycle cancellation.

  15. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer--a population-based study on behalf of Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroman, N.; Jensen, M.B.; Wohlfahrt, J.

    2008-01-01

    , 10 236 women with primary breast cancer aged 45 years or less at the time of diagnosis were followed for 95 616 person years. Among these, 371 women experienced pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer. In a multivariate analysis that included age at diagnosis, stage of disease, and pregnancy...... history prior to diagnosis, women who had a full-term pregnancy subsequent to breast cancer treatment were found to have a reduced risk of dying (relative risk: 0.73; 95% confidence interval: 0.54-0.99) compared with other women with breast cancer. The effect was not significantly modified by age...... at diagnosis, tumour size, nodal status, or pregnancy history before diagnosis of breast cancer. Neither spontaneous abortions nor induced abortions subsequent to breast cancer treatment had a negative impact on prognosis. CONCLUSION: In line with our previous study, but based on more than twice the patient...

  17. Encounters in cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1...... by this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization....

  18. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers.

  19. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers

  20. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  1. A comparative study of cancer patients with short and long sick-leave after primary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbergsson, Saevar Berg; Torp, Steffen; Fløtten, Tone; Fosså, Sophie D; Nielsen, Roy; Dahl, Alv A

    2011-04-01

    Sick-leave after primary cancer treatment has hardly been studied. This study compares Norwegian cancer patients (CPs) with shorter (≤8 months) and longer (≥9 months) sick-leave after primary cancer treatment. Our aim was to characterize factors associated with these two types of sick-leave in order to identify possible factors for interventions by which long-term sick-leaves may be avoided. A mailed questionnaire was completed by a sample of Norwegian CPs 15 to 39 months after primary treatment of the ten most common invasive types of cancer. The groups with shorter (n=359) and longer (n=481) sick-leaves (SSL vs LSL) were compared with each other by self-reported information as to socio-demographic and cancer-related variables, health, quality of life, work ability, work situation and supportive interventions. The LSL consisted of 78% females, and 76% of them had breast or gynaecological cancer. A higher proportion of patients with low level of education, economical problems, treated with chemotherapy, hormones and multimodal treatment belonged to LSL compared to SSL. Significantly more LSL had recurrences of cancer, co-morbidity, regular use of medication, and poorer self-rated health, quality of life and work ability. Compared to SSL, more LSL reported needs for and offers of supportive care such as physiotherapy, physical activities and psychosocial support. A multivariate regression analysis showed that reduced work ability, changes in employment due to cancer, lack of support from supervisors at work, and having had combined treatment were significantly associated with being LSL. Longer sick-leave after primary cancer treatment is associated with combined cancer treatment, lack of support from supervisors and reduced overall work ability. Interventions and counselling related to the work place and reduced work ability could be of value for prevention of long-term sick-leaves.

  2. Cancer treatment - preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation - preventing infection; Bone marrow transplant - preventing infection; Cancer treatment - immunosuppression ... this is a short-lived side effect of cancer treatment. Your provider may give you medicines to help ...

  3. Reducing time-to-treatment in underserved Latinas with breast cancer: the Six Cities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie; Perez-Stable, Eliseo; Penedo, Frank; Talavera, Gregory; Carrillo, J Emilio; Fernández, María; Holden, Alan; Munoz, Edgar; San Miguel, Sandra; Gallion, Kipling

    2014-03-01

    The interaction of clinical and patient-level challenges following a breast cancer diagnosis can be a significant source of health care disparities. Failure to address specific cultural features that create or exacerbate barriers can lead to less-than optimal navigation results, specifically in Hispanic/Latino women. To address these disparities, the study leaders in San Antonio, Texas, and 5 other regional partners of the federally-funded Redes En Acción: The National Latino Cancer Research Network developed a culturally-tailored patient navigation intervention model for Latinas with breast cancer. Compared with control patients, a higher percentage of navigated subjects initiated treatment within 30 days (69.0% versus 46.3%, P = .029) and 60 days (97.6% versus 73.1%, P = .001) following their cancer diagnosis. Time from cancer diagnosis to first treatment was lower in the navigated group (mean, 22.22 days; median, 23.00 days) than controls (mean, 48.30 days; median, 33.00 days). These results were independent of cancer stage at diagnosis and numerous characteristics of cancer clinics and individual participants. Successful application of patient navigation increased the percentage of Latinas initiating breast cancer treatment within 30 and 60 days of diagnosis. This was achieved through navigator provision of services such as accompaniment to appointments, transportation arrangements, patient telephone support, patient-family telephone support, Spanish-English language translation, and assistance with insurance paperwork. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  4. Cancer treatment decision-making processes for older patients with complex needs: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Jackie; Hughes, Jane; Farrington, Naomi; Richardson, Alison

    2015-12-14

    Although older people can experience complex health and social care needs alongside a primary cancer diagnosis, little is understood about how cancer treatment decisions are made for this population. This study aimed to investigate how cancer treatment decisions are formulated for older people with complex health and social care needs and the factors that shape these processes. Qualitative study involving semistructured interviews and non-participant observations. Framework approach used for data analysis. Breast and colorectal cancer services in five English NHS hospital trusts. Interviews: purposive sample of 22 clinicians directly involved in a face-to-face clinical role with patients regarding cancer treatment and care, maximising variation across clinical roles, tumour types and trusts. purposive sample of five cancer multidisciplinary meetings, maximising variation across location, team size and tumour type. The initial stages of cancer treatment decision-making are team-based, medically dominated and focused on the cancer. For patients with complex health and social care needs that extend beyond cancer pathology, later and less visible stages in the decision-making process are more haphazard and may result in less effective and workable treatment plans, as individual clinicians struggle to devise and deliver these plans without breaching time-based targets. Service targets that focus resources solely on the presenting disease can disadvantage older patients with complex health and social care needs that extend beyond this primary diagnosis. Care should be taken to ensure time-based targets do not disincentivise thorough and timely assessment that can lead to the formulation of treatment plans tailored to individual needs and circumstances. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Participation of Asian-American women in cancer treatment research: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tung T; Somkin, Carol P; Ma, Yifei; Fung, Lei-Chun; Nguyen, Thoa

    2005-01-01

    Few Asian-American women participate in cancer treatment trials. In a pilot study to assess barriers to participation, we mailed surveys to 132 oncologists and interviewed 19 Asian-American women with cancer from Northern California. Forty-four oncologists responded. They reported as barriers language problems, lack of culturally relevant cancer information, and complex protocols. Most stated that they informed Asian-American women about treatment trials. Only four women interviewed knew about trials. Other patient-identified barriers were fear of side effects, language problems, competing needs, and fear of experimentation. Family decision making was a barrier for both oncologists and patients. Compared to non-Asian oncologists, more Asian oncologists have referred Asian-American women to industry trials and identified barriers similar to patients' reports. Our findings indicate that Asian-American women need to be informed about cancer treatment trials, linguistic barriers should be addressed, and future research should evaluate cultural barriers such as family decision making.

  6. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenberg, Eduardo E

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca's pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca's known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca's possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  7. Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT Study: design of a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wit G Ardine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a major problem of cancer patients. Thirty percent of cancer survivors report serious fatigue three years after finishing treatment. There is evidence that physical exercise during cancer treatment reduces fatigue. This may also lead to an improvement of quality of life. Such findings may result in a decrease of healthcare related expenditures and societal costs due to sick leave. However, no studies are known that investigated these hypotheses. Therefore, the primary aim of our study is to assess the effect of exercise during cancer treatment on reducing complaints of fatigue and on reducing health service utilisation and sick leave. Methods/Design The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment study is a multicentre randomised controlled trial in 150 breast and 150 colon cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment. Participants will be randomised to an exercise or a control group. In addition to the usual care, the exercise group will participate in an 18-week supervised group exercise programme. The control group will be asked to maintain their habitual physical activity pattern. Study endpoints will be assessed after 18 weeks (short term and after 9 months (long term. Validated questionnaires will be used. Primary outcome: fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory and Fatigue Quality List and cost-effectiveness, health service utilisation and sick leave. Secondary outcome: health related quality of life (European Organisation Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life questionnaire-C30, Short Form 36 healthy survey, impact on functioning and autonomy (Impact on functioning and autonomy questionnaire, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, physical fitness (aerobic peak capacity, muscle strength, body composition and cognitive-behavioural aspects. To register health service utilisation and sick leave, participants will keep diaries including the EuroQuol-5D. Physical activity level

  8. Lived experiences of breast cancer survivors after diagnosis, treatment and beyond: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Faustine; Jeanetta, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    The number of breast cancer survivors has increased since 1990 due to advances in biomedical technology that lead to an increase in early diagnosis and treatment. Research on survivorship has focused on the psychological and treatment aspects of the disease. The goal of this study was focused on exploring the lived experiences of breast cancer survivors from diagnosis, treatment and beyond. To understand the lived experiences of women who are breast cancer survivors. A purposive sampling strategy was used to recruit participants from two Missouri cancer centres. A total of 15 women breast cancer survivors were interviewed. Three major themes emerged that described the lived experiences of the women. These were factors from the diagnosis and treatment management impacting survivorship, relationship and support system and implication of survivorship. Participants noted that coping with the diagnosis and treatment was a stressful journey and required lots of adjustment and changes. Some developed various techniques such as journaling their activities which provided comfort. In addition, support from family was shared as the key which gave them strength and courage through the different stages of treatment. However, they found it difficult to articulate what survivorship meant. Using in-depth interview techniques, this study shed light on the experiences of women who were diagnosed with breast cancer and have completed treatment. They acknowledged frustration with their diagnosis and body changes. Support received from family and friends helped them cope through their treatment. However, they felt abandoned once the treatment phase was over and were uncertain what survivorhood meant to them. © 2015 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Metastatic breast cancer: do current treatments improve quality of life? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Amado

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: In metastatic breast cancer cases, the currently available therapeutic approaches provide minimal improvement in survival. As such, quality of life (QOL becomes one of the main objectives of treatment. It is not known whether current treatments derived from trials improve QOL. The aim was to evaluate changes in QOL among metastatic breast cancer patients receiving treatment derived from trials. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective observational QOL survey in a tertiary cancer center. METHODS: To evaluate the influence of current treatments on patients' QOL, the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36 and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied on three occasions: before starting treatment and at the 6th and 12th weeks, to consecutive metastatic breast cancer patients over a one-year period. RESULTS: We found an improvement in QOL in the sample evaluated (n = 40, expressed by changes in the overall SF-36 score (p = 0.002 and the BDI (p = 0.004. Taken individually, the SF-36 components Pain, Social Functioning and Mental Health also improved significantly. Patients with worse initial performance status and secondary symptoms displayed greater improvement than those with better initial performance status and asymptomatic disease (p < 0.001. Patients who received more than one type of therapy showed larger gains than those given only one type (p = 0.038. CONCLUSIONS: In our environment, current metastatic breast cancer treatments can improve QOL, especially among symptomatic patients and those with low performance status.

  10. Cancer treatment - early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premature menopause; Ovarian insufficiency - cancer ... Cancer treatments that can cause early menopause include: Surgery. Having both ovaries removed causes menopause to happen right away. If you are age 50 or younger, your provider may ...

  11. Radiotherapy treatment results of bladder cancer: study of 458 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vara Santos, J.; Torre Tomas, A. de la; Romero Fernandez, J.; Regueiro Otero, C.; Clavo Varas, B.; Magallan Sebastian, R.; Valcarcel Sancho, F.; Polo Tolosana, E.; Aragon de la Cruz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1964 to 1990, 458 patients diagnosed of bladder cancer have been treated with radical radiotherapy in our department. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial survival rates were 37% and 27% respectively. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial local control rates, evaluated in 404 patients, were 41% and 38%. In regard to survival, T stage (p=0.013), advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p>0.0001), and squamous differentiation (p<0.0001), reached statistical significance as adverse prognostic factors. In 248 patients, with invasive transitional carcinoma, radical radiotherapy alone was used. In this group of patients, T stage (p=0.006) and advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p=0.0002) were adverse prognostic factors for survival. Our results suggest that radical radiotherapy must be considered and alternative to surgery in management of bladder cancer. On the basis of prognostic factors evidenced in this series a subgroup of patients with low probability of survival when treated with exclusive radiotherapy are defined. This patients must be included in clinical research protocols. (Author) 44 refs

  12. Time intervals from first symptom to treatment of cancer: a cohort study of 2,212 newly diagnosed cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolowski Ineta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delay in diagnosis of cancer may worsen prognosis. The aim of this study is to explore patient-, general practitioner (GP- and system-related delay in the interval from first cancer symptom to diagnosis and treatment, and to analyse the extent to which delays differ by cancer type. Methods Population-based cohort study conducted in 2004-05 in the County of Aarhus, Denmark (640,000 inhabitants. Data were collected from administrative registries and questionnaires completed by GPs on 2,212 cancer patients newly diagnosed during a 1-year period. Median delay (in days with interquartile interval (IQI was the main outcome measure. Results Median total delay was 98 days (IQI 57-168. Most of the total delay stemmed from patient (median 21 days (7-56 and system delay (median 55 days (32-93. Median GP delay was 0 (0-2 days. Total delay was shortest among patients with ovarian (median 60 days (45-112 and breast cancer (median 65 days (39-106 and longest among patients with prostate (median 130 days (89-254 and bladder cancer (median 134 days (93-181. Conclusion System delay accounted for a substantial part of the total delay experienced by cancer patients. This points to a need for shortening clinical pathways if possible. A long patient delay calls for research into patient awareness of cancer. For all delay components, special focus should be given to the 4th quartile of patients with the longest time intervals and we need research into the quality of the diagnostic work-up process. We found large variations in delay for different types of cancer. Improvements should therefore target both the population at large and the specific needs associated with individual cancer types and their symptoms.

  13. Treatment decision making and adjustment to breast cancer: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, A L; Estes, M A; Estes, N C; Cameron, C L; Danoff-Burg, S; Irving, L M

    1998-04-01

    This study monitored women (N = 76) with breast cancer from diagnosis through 1 year, and tested constructs from subjective expected utility theory with regard to their ability to predict patients' choice of surgical treatment as well as psychological distress and well-being over time. Women's positive expectancies for the consequences of treatment generally were maintained in favorable perceptions of outcome in several realms (i.e., physician agreement, likelihood of cancer cure or recurrence, self-evaluation, likelihood of additional treatment, partner support for option, attractiveness to partner). Assessed before the surgical decision-making appointment, women's expectancies for consequences of the treatment options, along with age, correctly classified 94% of the sample with regard to election of mastectomy versus breast-conserving procedures. Calculated from the point of decision making to 3 months later, expectancy disconfirmations and value discrepancies concerning particular treatment consequences predicted psychological adjustment 3 months and 1 year after diagnosis.

  14. Auricular point acupressure as an adjunct analgesic treatment for cancer patients: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao Hsing; Chien, Lung-Chang; Chiang, Yi Chien; Ren, Dianxu; Suen, Lorna Kwai-Ping

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed (1) to examine the feasibility of an auricular point acupressure (APA) research protocol in terms of recruitment and for the assessment and management of pain and (2) to examine the potential APA analgesic effects for cancer patients. This study was a repeated-measures one-group design. Participants were recruited from the cancer center follow-up clinic affiliated with a large university hospital in the northeastern United States. Participants included 50 patients aged 55-87 years with a diagnosis of cancer. Participants received 7 days of APA treatment for their pain. After appropriate acupoints were identified, vaccaria seeds were carefully taped onto each selected auricular point on each ear. The study recruitment and retention rates were 92% and 91%, respectively. Importantly, the study found preliminary evidence for the analgesic effects of APA for cancer pain management. For example, by the end of the 7-day study, APA reduced pain intensity more than 55% for "worst pain" and about 57% for "average pain" and "pain intensity." Moreover, the use of pain medication was reduced during the APA treatment (e.g., 78% of patients [n = 39] took less pain medication than before the treatment). APA appears to be highly acceptable to patients with cancer-related pain. However, without a placebo control, we cannot draw conclusive evidence for the analgesic effect of APA for cancer patients. A sham group must be added to future studies to differentiate the true effects of APA from the possible psychological effects of the APA treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Essential role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Novel study concepts and established treatment recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobiasch, Sophie; Goerig, Nicole L.; Fietkau, Rainer; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors and the incidence has increased over the last 6 years. In the majority of cases the disease is already in an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis where surgery, the only curative treatment, is no longer an option and explains the still abysmal overall survival. The role of radiation therapy as treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer is controversially discussed although radiation oncology has emerged as a central pillar in the combined oncological treatment. The present manuscript gives an overview of advanced radiotherapeutic strategies in the context of chemotherapy and surgery according to the current American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines in comparison with the German guidelines and to elucidate the role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Advanced modern radiotherapeutic techniques in combination with individualized high-precision radiation concepts are new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer in a multimodal setting with tolerable side effects. Several clinical studies together with experimental approaches are in process, to deliver further evidence and ultimately allow true personalized medicine. (orig.) [de

  16. The social experiences of cancer patients under treatment: a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tempelaar, R.; de Haes, J. C.; de Ruiter, J. H.; Bakker, D.; van den Heuvel, W. J.; van Nieuwenhuijzen, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    As part of a larger study on the quality of life of cancer patients under treatment, the positive and negative experiences in social interaction have been examined as compared to those of a control group (nonpatients, n = 201). Two patient groups were included: 109 patients who had recently

  17. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, A.W.; Abrantes, J.A.; Jonsson, S.; Bruijn, P. de; Kuip, E.J.M.; Falcao, A.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Mathijssen, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the

  18. Text Messaging (SMS) Helping Cancer Care in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Treatment: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Timóteo Matthies; Dos Santos Machado, Karina; Fernandes, Vanessa Pellegrini; Madruga, Samanta Winck; Noguez, Patrícia Tuerlinckx; Barcelos, Camila Rose Guadalupe; Santin, Mateus Madail; Petrarca, Cristiane Rios; Dumith, Samuel Carvalho

    2017-10-09

    Cancer treatment is an extremely stressful life experience that is accompanied by a range of psychological, social, physical, and practical difficulties. Cancer patients need to receive information that helps them to better understand the disease, assists them in decision-making, and helps them deal with treatment. Patients are interested in receiving such information. The degree of satisfaction with the information received has been associated with positive health outcomes, specifically regarding quality of life, severity of side effects, and psychological well-being. This study investigates a method of guiding cancer patients, in relation to outpatient chemotherapy treatment, using SMS (short message service) text messaging. A smartphone application called cHEmotHErApp was developed, and its primary function is to send out SMS text messages with guidance for self-care and emotional support for oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. Thus, the main objective of this study is to evaluate the acceptance and perception of patients of the receipt of these SMS messages, as well as to evaluate the possible benefits reported by the participants. Adult patients diagnosed with cancer, who started the first outpatient chemotherapy treatment scheme between August and November 2016 at the School Hospital (HE) of the Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel), were invited to participate in this pilot study. In total, 14 cancer patients were adherent to this study. Each of these patients received a daily text message on their cell phone with some guidance on encouraging self-care and emotional support. Patients reported that, because of the SMS text messages they received, they felt more confident in their treatment, felt more supported and encouraged, and that the text messages facilitated self-care. In addition, patients reported that the SMS text messages they received helped them to take better care of themselves and to continue further treatment.

  19. Participation rate of cancer patients in treatment decisions: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khammarnia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Cancer is one of the most common diseases and the second reason of death in Iran. Giving decision making authority to patients is one of the fundamental principles of the protection of patients. Patients have rights as consumers of health care services that nurses, physician and other health professionals are responsible for maintaining and protecting it. This study aimed to determine cancer patients’ involvement in treatment decisions making. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out as descriptive-analytic with practical purpose in 2017 in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. The study population included 1,000 patients who had cancer that whom 450 patients were selected by simple random sampling. To measure patient participation in treatment decisions, was used of Levente Kristona standard questionnaire. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire was confirmed (coefficient = 0.82. For data analysis used of software spss21 with descriptive statistics and chi-square tests Results: among the patients, 197 men (53% and 177 women (47% with a mean age of 31 years were examined. The results of this study showed that the score of mean participation in treatment decisions among the cancer patients was 30 ± 12 and it was in low level. The patients’ participation in treatment decisions had a significant relationship with education level (P = 0.027, however, it was not statistical significant with gender, age, income, occupation and type of cancer and other demographic variables (P> 0.05. Conclusion: In general, that patients' participation in clinical decision making is weak and low. Since patients’ participation in clinical decisions could affect the quality of treatment decisions, therefore, health care providers should attention more to this fact. Also, culturalizating and education according to patients’ knowledge and use of treatment techniques are recommended for clinical decision making promotion

  20. Prevalence and Treatment Management of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Results of the French Candidoscope Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gligorov, Joseph; Bastit, Laurent; Gervais, Honorine; Henni, Mehdi; Kahila, Widad; Lepille, Daniel; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Sasso, Giuseppe; Varette, Charles; Azria, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pharmaco-epidemiological study was to evaluate the prevalence of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Signs and symptoms of OPC were noted for all patients. Antifungal therapeutic management was recorded in OPC patients. Patients receiving local antifungal treatments were monitored until the end of treatment. Results: Enrolled in the study were 2,042 patients with solid tumor and/or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and/or another systemic cancer treatment and/or radiotherapy. The overall prevalence of OPC was 9.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.4%-11.0%] in this population. It was most frequent in patients treated with combined chemoradiotherapy (22.0%) or with more than two cytotoxic agents (16.9%). Local antifungal treatments were prescribed in 75.0% of OPC patients as recommended by guidelines. The compliance to treatment was higher in patients receiving once-daily miconazole mucoadhesive buccal tablet (MBT; 88.2%) than in those treated with several daily mouthwashes of amphotericin B (40%) or nystatin (18.8%). Conclusion: OPC prevalence in treated cancer patients was high. Local treatments were usually prescribed as per guidelines. Compliance to local treatments was better with once-daily drugs.

  1. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo E Schenberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. Methods: An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. Results: At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca’s pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. Conclusion: The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca’s known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca’s possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  2. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  3. Waiting time disparities in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment: a population-based study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinié, F; Leux, C; Delafosse, P; Ayrault-Piault, S; Arveux, P; Woronoff, A S; Guizard, A V; Velten, M; Ganry, O; Bara, S; Daubisse-Marliac, L; Tretarre, B

    2013-10-01

    Waiting times are key indicators of a health's system performance, but are not routinely available in France. We studied waiting times for diagnosis and treatment according to patients' characteristics, tumours' characteristics and medical management options in a sample of 1494 breast cancers recorded in population-based registries. The median waiting time from the first imaging detection to the treatment initiation was 34 days. Older age, co-morbidity, smaller size of tumour, detection by organised screening, biopsy, increasing number of specimens removed, multidisciplinary consulting meetings and surgery as initial treatment were related to increased waiting times in multivariate models. Many of these factors were related to good practices guidelines. However, the strong influence of organised screening programme and the disparity of waiting times according to geographical areas were of concern. Better scheduling of diagnostic tests and treatment propositions should improve waiting times in the management of breast cancer in France. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Breast cancer patients' presentation for oncological treatment: a single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkuolie, Akinbolaji Andrew; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu Chiduziem; Olasehinde, Olalekan; Arowolo, Olukayode Adeolu; Babalola, Rereloluwa Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries' breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer patients from catchment area of an oncology service hospital in Nigeria between 2007 and 2013. Patients' demographics, breast cancer burden and health care giver presentation variables were analysed for causal factors of seeking medical help and what determines commencement of effective oncological treatment. Forty-six patients were enrolled, 19.6% of them presented primarily to oncologist while 80.4% presented secondarily for oncological treatment. There is a significant difference in presentation time for oncological treatment (t = -3.56, df = 42.90, p = 0.001) between primary (M =11.56 ± 5.21 weeks) and secondary presentation (M= 52.56 ± 10.27weeks). Tumor burden of those that presented secondarily were significantly more advanced (U = 78.5, p = 0.011) and, univariate analysis reveals that: patients' matrimonial setting, breast cancer awareness and mode of discovery of breast symptoms are patient related factors that determines their choice of health care providers and, determinant of effective oncological treatment is patient first contact health care provider. Patients' bio-characteristics that determine their choice of health care provider should be incorporated into community breast cancer sensitization drives. Additionally, there is a need for a government agency assign the task of accrediting and defining scope of enterprise of health care institutions and their health care providers in our pluralist health system.

  5. Breast cancer patients’ presentation for oncological treatment: a single centre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkuolie, Akinbolaji Andrew; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu Chiduziem; Olasehinde, Olalekan; Arowolo, Olukayode Adeolu; Babalola, Rereloluwa Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries’ breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Methods Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer patients from catchment area of an oncology service hospital in Nigeria between 2007 and 2013. Patients’ demographics, breast cancer burden and health care giver presentation variables were analysed for causal factors of seeking medical help and what determines commencement of effective oncological treatment. Results Forty-six patients were enrolled, 19.6% of them presented primarily to oncologist while 80.4% presented secondarily for oncological treatment. There is a significant difference in presentation time for oncological treatment (t = -3.56, df = 42.90, p = 0.001) between primary (M =11.56 ± 5.21 weeks) and secondary presentation (M= 52.56 ± 10.27weeks). Tumor burden of those that presented secondarily were significantly more advanced (U = 78.5, p = 0.011) and, univariate analysis reveals that: patients’ matrimonial setting, breast cancer awareness and mode of discovery of breast symptoms are patient related factors that determines their choice of health care providers and, determinant of effective oncological treatment is patient first contact health care provider. Conclusion Patients’ bio-characteristics that determine their choice of health care provider should be incorporated into community breast cancer sensitization drives. Additionally, there is a need for a government agency assign the task of accrediting and defining scope of enterprise of health care institutions and their health care providers in our pluralist health system. PMID:27642404

  6. Pilot study of psilocybin treatment for anxiety in patients with advanced-stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Charles S; Danforth, Alicia L; Chopra, Gurpreet S; Hagerty, Marycie; McKay, Charles R; Halberstadt, Adam L; Greer, George R

    2011-01-01

    Researchers conducted extensive investigations of hallucinogens in the 1950s and 1960s. By the early 1970s, however, political and cultural pressures forced the cessation of all projects. This investigation reexamines a potentially promising clinical application of hallucinogens in the treatment of anxiety reactive to advanced-stage cancer. To explore the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in patients with advanced-stage cancer and reactive anxiety. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety, with subjects acting as their own control, using a moderate dose (0.2 mg/kg) of psilocybin. A clinical research unit within a large public sector academic medical center. Twelve adults with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. In addition to monitoring safety and subjective experience before and during experimental treatment sessions, follow-up data including results from the Beck Depression Inventory, Profile of Mood States, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were collected unblinded for 6 months after treatment. Safe physiological and psychological responses were documented during treatment sessions. There were no clinically significant adverse events with psilocybin. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait anxiety subscale demonstrated a significant reduction in anxiety at 1 and 3 months after treatment. The Beck Depression Inventory revealed an improvement of mood that reached significance at 6 months; the Profile of Mood States identified mood improvement after treatment with psilocybin that approached but did not reach significance. This study established the feasibility and safety of administering moderate doses of psilocybin to patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. Some of the data revealed a positive trend toward improved mood and anxiety. These results support the need for more research in this long-neglected field. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00302744.

  7. Cancer survivors' perspectives and experience on western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine treatment and rehabilitation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Wei; Yang, Zhi-Qi; Liu, Cong; Chen, Si-Jia; Shen, Qian; Zhang, Tian-Rui; Partike, Nancy S; Yuan, Zheng-Ping; Yu, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the People's Republic of China, both western medicine (WM) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) are the main treatment and rehabilitation options for cancer patients. This study aimed to explore cancer survivors' perspectives and experience of treatment and rehabilitation, in order to promote patient-centered activities of treatment and rehabilitation. Using a qualitative research approach, 68 cancer survivors were recruited from eight community cancer rehabilitation organizations in Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Eight focus group interviews were conducted. All these interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the data were analyzed by theme analysis. WM was the main choice in treatment phase though study participants noted more side effects. TCM was primarily used in the recovery phase. The lack of communication between doctors and cancer patients appears to affect treatment adherence and impair the doctor-patient relationship. WM was expensive for diagnostic procedures and treatment, while the cumulative costs of frequent use of TCM in the long rehabilitation period were also high. Both treatment options created significant perceived economic burden on patients. Conflicting information about dietary supplements tended to make cancer survivors confused. Improving the communication between doctors and cancer patients helps to ameliorate cancer patient adherence and the effect of treatments. It is essential to educate cancer patients about the effect and cost of both WM and traditional TCM. Meanwhile, marketing management and guidance to consumers regarding use of dietary supplements in the cancer rehabilitation field are also necessary.

  8. Cancer treatment: what's ahead?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.

    2005-01-01

    Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are standard modalities for cancer treatment. Biological therapy (immunotherapy, biotherapy, or biological response modifier therapy) is a comparatively novel addition to this armamentarium. Biological therapies use the body's immune system, either directly or indirectly, to fight cancer or to lessen the side effects that may be caused by some cancer treatments. Biological therapeutic agents include interferons, interleukins, colony-simulating factors, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and nonspecific immunomodulating agents. A promising form of cancer treatment is immunotherapy. Immunotherapy for cancer is essentially the stimulation of the immune system through a variety of reagents such as vaccines, infusion of T-cells, or cytokines. These reagents act through one of several mechanisms including stimulating the anti-tumour response, decreasing suppressor mechanisms, altering tumour cells to increase their immunogenicity and making them more susceptible to immunologic defenses, and improving tolerance to cytotoxic agents or radiotherapy. This review describes some novel approaches in the immunotherapy in cancer. (author)

  9. POSITIVE study: physical exercise program in non-operable lung cancer patients undergoing palliative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskemann, Joachim; Hummler, Simone; Diepold, Christina; Keil, Melanie; Abel, Ulrich; Steindorf, Karen; Beckhove, Philipp; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steins, Martin; Thomas, Michael

    2016-07-19

    Patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or small cell lung cancer (SCLC) often experience multidimensional impairments, affecting quality of life during their course of disease. In lung cancer patients with operable disease, several studies have shown that exercise has a positive impact on quality of life and physical functioning. There is limited evidence regarding efficacy for advanced lung cancer patients undergoing palliative treatment. Therefore, the POSITIVE study aims to evaluate the benefit of a 24-week exercise intervention during palliative treatment in a randomized controlled setting. The POSITIVE study is a randomized, controlled trial investigating the effects of a 24-week exercise intervention during palliative treatment on quality of life, physical performance and immune function in advanced, non-operable lung cancer patients. 250 patients will be recruited in the Clinic for Thoracic Diseases in Heidelberg, enrolment begun in November 2013. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed NSCLC (stage IIIa, IIIb, IV) or SCLC (Limited Disease-SCLC, Extensive Disease-SCLC) not amenable to surgery. Patients are randomized into two groups. Both groups receive weekly care management phone calls (CMPCs) with the goal to assess symptoms and side effects. Additionally, one group receives a combined resistance and endurance training (3x/week). Primary endpoints are quality of life assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for patients with lung cancer (FACT-L, subcategory Physical Well-Being) and General Fatigue measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Secondary endpoints are physical performance (maximal voluntary isometric contraction, 6-min walk distance), psychosocial (depression and anxiety) and immunological parameters and overall survival. The aim of the POSITIVE trial is the evaluation of effects of a 24-week structured and guided exercise intervention during palliative treatment stages

  10. Studies for the application of boron neutron capture therapy to the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagrosa, A.; Carpano, M.; Perona, M.; Thomasz, L.; Nievas, S.; Cabrini, R.; Juvenal, G.; Pisarev, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these studies was to evaluate the possibility of treating differentiated thyroid cancer by BNCT. These carcinomas are well controlled with surgery followed by therapy with 131 I; however, some patients do not respond to this treatment. BPA uptake was analyzed both in vitro and in nude mice implanted with cell lines of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The boron intracellular concentration in the different cell lines and the biodistribution studies showed the selectivity of the BPA uptake by this kind of tumor.

  11. In vitro study of combined cilengitide and radiation treatment in breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautenschlaeger, Tim; Perry, James; Peereboom, David; Li, Bin; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Huebner, Alexander; Meng, Wei; White, Julia; Chakravarti, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis from breast cancer poses a major clinical challenge. Integrins play a role in regulating adhesion, growth, motility, and survival, and have been shown to be critical for metastatic growth in the brain in preclinical models. Cilengitide, an αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin inhibitor, has previously been studied as an anti-cancer drug in various tumor types. Previous studies have shown additive effects of cilengitide and radiation in lung cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. The ability of cilengitide to enhance the effects of radiation was examined preclinically in the setting of breast cancer to assess its possible efficacy in the setting of brain metastasis from breast cancer. Our panel of breast cells was composed of four cell lines: T-47D (ER/PR+, Her2-, luminal A), MCF-7 (ER/PR+, Her2-, luminal A), MDA-MB-231 (TNBC, basal B), MDA-MB-468 (TNBC, basal A). The presence of cilengitide targets, β3 and β5 integrin, was first determined. Cell detachment was determined by cell counting, cell proliferation was determined by MTS proliferation assay, and apoptosis was measured by Annexin V staining and flow cytometry. The efficacy of cilengitide treatment alone was analyzed, followed by assessment of combined cilengitide and radiation treatment. Integrin β3 knockdown was performed, followed by cilengitide and radiation treatment to test for incomplete target inhibition by cilengitide, in high β3 expressing cells. We observed that all cell lines examined expressed both β3 and β5 integrin and that cilengitide was able to induce cell detachment and reduced proliferation in our panel. Annexin V assays revealed that a portion of these effects was due to cilengitide-induced apoptosis. Combined treatment with cilengitide and radiation served to further reduce proliferation compared to either treatment alone. Following β3 integrin knockdown, radiosensitization in combination with cilengitide was observed in a previously non-responsive cell line (MDA-MB-231

  12. Locally advanced prostate cancer: a population-based study of treatment patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Elkin, Elena B; Yee, David S; Feifer, Andrew; Ehdaie, Behfar; Jacks, Lindsay M; Atoria, Coral L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Scher, Howard I; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2012-05-01

    Study Type--Therapy (practice patterns). Level of Evidence 2b. What's known on the subject? And what does the study add? The treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer varies widely even though there is level one evidence supporting the use of multimodality therapy as compared with monotherapy. This study defines treatment patterns of locally advanced prostate cancer within the United States and identifies predicators of who receives multimodality therapy rather than monotherapy. • To identify treatment patterns and predictors of receiving multimodality therapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC). • The cohort comprised patients ≥66 years with clinical stage T3 or T4 non-metastatic prostate cancer diagnosed between 1998 and 2005 identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry records linked with Medicare claims. • Treatments were classified as radical prostatectomy (RP), radiation therapy (RT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) received within 6 and 24 months of diagnosis. • We assessed trends over time and used multivariable logistic regression to identify predictors of multimodality treatment. • Within the first 6 months of diagnosis, 1060 of 3095 patients (34%) were treated with a combination of RT and ADT, 1486 (48%) received monotherapy (RT alone, ADT alone or RP alone), and 461 (15%) received no active treatment. • The proportion of patients who received RP increased, exceeding 10% in 2005. • Use of combined RT and ADT and use of ADT alone fluctuated throughout the study period. • In all 6% of patients received RT alone in 2005. • Multimodality therapy was less common in patients who were older, African American, unmarried, who lived in the south, and who had co-morbidities or stage T4 disease. • Treatment of LAPC varies widely, and treatment patterns shifted during the study period. • The slightly increased use of multimodality therapy since 2003 is encouraging, but

  13. Treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronetskij, I.B.

    1990-01-01

    Peculiarities of thyroid cancer, producing direct influence on selection of treatment procedure are enumerated. It is shown that surgical treatment is the determining way of treatment, which is supplemented with hormonotherapy in case of differentiated forms of the tumor. In case of anaplasia cancer, sarcomas, propagation of tumor beyond the limits of the organ, inoperable processes, treatment of recurrences and functional inactivity of bone metastases the remote control gamma-therapy should be performed. Therapy by radioactive iodine is shown for the treatment of remote iodine-concentrating metastases for devitalization of residual thyroid tissue after thyroidectomy

  14. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer treatment: Results of the patterns of care study in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ah Ram; Park, Won [Division for Urologic Cancer, Korean Radiation Oncology Group, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe treatment patterns of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer in Korea. A questionnaire about radiation treatment technique and principles in 2013 was sent to 83 radiation oncologists and data from 57 hospitals were collected analyzed to find patterns of RT for prostate cancer patients in Korea. The number of patients with prostate cancer treated with definitive RT ranged from 1 to 72 per hospital in 2013. RT doses and target volumes increased according to risk groups but the range of radiation doses was wide (60 to 81.4 Gy) and the fraction size was diverse (1.8 to 5 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used for definitive treatment in 93.8% of hospitals. Hormonal therapy was integrated with radiation for intermediate (63.2%) and high risk patients (77.2%). Adjuvant RT after radical prostatectomy was performed in 46 hospitals (80.7%). Indications of adjuvant RT included positive resection margin, seminal vesicle invasion, and capsular invasion. The total dose for adjuvant RT ranged from 50 to 72 Gy in 24–39 fractions. Salvage RT was delivered with findings of consecutive elevations in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA level over 0.2 ng/mL, or clinical recurrence. The total radiation doses ranged from 50 to 80 Gy with a range of 1.8 to 2.5 Gy per fraction for salvage RT. This nationwide patterns of care study suggests that variable radiation techniques and a diverse range of dose fractionation schemes are applied for prostate cancer treatment in Korea. Standard guidelines for RT in prostate cancer need to be developed.

  15. Essential role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Novel study concepts and established treatment recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobiasch, Sophie [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Goerig, Nicole L.; Fietkau, Rainer [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Neuherberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors and the incidence has increased over the last 6 years. In the majority of cases the disease is already in an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis where surgery, the only curative treatment, is no longer an option and explains the still abysmal overall survival. The role of radiation therapy as treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer is controversially discussed although radiation oncology has emerged as a central pillar in the combined oncological treatment. The present manuscript gives an overview of advanced radiotherapeutic strategies in the context of chemotherapy and surgery according to the current American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines in comparison with the German guidelines and to elucidate the role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Advanced modern radiotherapeutic techniques in combination with individualized high-precision radiation concepts are new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer in a multimodal setting with tolerable side effects. Several clinical studies together with experimental approaches are in process, to deliver further evidence and ultimately allow true personalized medicine. (orig.) [German] Das Pankreaskarzinom gehoert zu den aggressivsten menschlichen Tumoren und verzeichnete in den letzten 6 Jahren eine steigende Inzidenz. Die Diagnose wird meist erst im fortgeschrittenen Stadium gestellt; dies schliesst haeufig eine primaer kurative Intervention mithilfe der chirurgischen Resektion aus und bedingt die hohe Mortalitaet. Obwohl die Strahlentherapie im multimodalen Therapieansatz des Pankreaskarzinoms eine zentrale Saeule darstellt, wird die Rolle der Strahlentherapie in der Literatur kontrovers diskutiert. Der vorliegende Beitrag bietet eine Uebersicht moderner Bestrahlungsstrategien im interdisziplinaeren Konzept gemaess der Leitlinien der American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) im Vergleich zu den

  16. Observational study to analyze patterns of treatment of breakthrough dyspnea in cancer patients in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Luis; Delgado-Mingorance, Ignacio; Nabal-Vicuña, María; Jiménez-López, Antonio Javier; Cabezón-Álvarez, Ana; Soler-López, Begoña

    2018-06-12

    Although breakthrough dyspnea is very frequent in cancer patients, there are no precise recommendations for treating it. The main objective of this study was to analyze what treatments are used in clinical practice for the management of breakthrough dyspnea in cancer patients in Spain and the secondary objectives were to describe the characteristics of cancer patients with breakthrough dyspnea and the attributes of the disorder. Cancer patients over 18 years of age, with breakthrough dyspnea and a Karnofsky performance score of ≥30, who were treated at departments of oncology in institutes across Spain were included in this cross-sectional observational study. The characteristics of breakthrough dyspnea, history of treatment, anthropometric variables, Mahler dyspnea index, Borg scale, Edmonton Symptoms Assessment Scale, and patient satisfaction with current breakthrough dyspnea treatment were assessed. The mean age of the 149 included patients was 66 years (95% confidence interval: 64.3 to 67.9), and 53 were females (35.6%). The mean breakthrough dyspnea intensity was 5.85 (95% confidence interval 5.48 to 6.22, Borg scale). A total of 55.1% of the first-choice treatments consisted of opioids, followed by oxygen (17.3%). A total of 119 patients (79.9%) received monotherapy for breakthrough dyspnea. Patients presenting with basal dyspnea received oxygen in a greater proportion of cases (21.1% vs 7.4%; p = 0.07). Patients with predictable dyspnea received a greater proportion of opioids (70.9% vs 44.4%; p = 0.01). Opioids constitute first-line therapy for breakthrough dyspnea in routine clinical practice, though the scientific evidence supporting their use is scarce. Further information derived from controlled clinical trials is needed regarding the comparative efficacy of the different treatments in order to justify their use.

  17. Coping with side effects from cancer treatment in daily life from the perspective of cancer patients: A qualitative empirical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birgith; Koktved, Dorte Pallesen; Nielsen, Lene Lyngø

    Aim The aim of this paper is to deepen our understanding of how patients cope with side effects from cancer treatment in daily life. Background Patients receiving cancer treatment experience acute side effects and need individualized information and guidance in order to manage treatment......-related adverse events in everyday life. However development in cancer treatment and the societal demands for efficiency may limit the possibility for individualized support. Methods Nine patients were interviewed from March to July 2009 to explore the patients’ experience of coping with side effects in daily...

  18. Municipal return to work management in cancer survivors undergoing cancer treatment: a protocol on a controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Christina M; Labriola, Merete; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Momsen, Anne-Mette H; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2015-07-29

    Cancer survivors are often left on their own to deal with the challenges of resuming work during or after cancer treatment, mainly due to unclear agreements between stakeholders responsible for occupational rehabilitation. Social inequality exists in cancer risk, survival probability and continues with regard to the chance of being able to return to work. The aim is to apply an early, individually tailored occupational rehabilitation intervention to cancer survivors in two municipalities parallel with cancer treatment focusing on enhancing readiness for return to work. In a controlled trial municipal job consultants use acceptance and commitment therapy dialogue and individual-placement-and-support-inspired tools with cancer survivors to engage them in behaviour changes toward readiness for return to work. The workplace is involved in the return to work process. Patients referred to surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy at the Oncology Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark for the diagnoses; breast, colon-rectal, head and neck, thyroid gland, testicular, ovarian or cervix cancer are eligible for the study. Patients must be residents in the municipalities of Silkeborg or Randers, 18-60 years of age and have a permanent or temporary employment (with at least 6 months left of their contract) at inclusion. Patients, for whom the treating physician considers occupational rehabilitation to be unethical, or who are not reading or talking Danish are excluded. The control group has identical inclusion and exclusion criteria except for municipality of residence. Return to work is the primary outcome and is indentified in a social transfer payment register. Effect is assessed as relative cumulative incidences within 52 weeks and will be analysed in generalised linear regression models using the pseudo values method. As a secondary outcome; co-morbidity and socio-economic status is analysed as effect modifiers of the intervention effect on return to work. The

  19. Thymoquinone as a Potential Adjuvant Therapy for Cancer Treatment: Evidence from Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G.M. Mostofa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thymoquinone (TQ, the main bioactive component of Nigella sativa, has been found to exhibit anticancer effects in numerous preclinical studies. Due to its multitargeting nature, TQ interferes in a wide range of tumorigenic processes and counteracts carcinogenesis, malignant growth, invasion, migration, and angiogenesis. Moreover, TQ can specifically sensitize tumor cells toward conventional cancer treatments (e.g., radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy and simultaneously minimize therapy-associated toxic effects in normal cells. In this review, we summarized the adjuvant potential of TQ as observed in various in vitro and in vivo animal models and discussed the pharmacological properties of TQ to rationalize its supplementary role in potentiating the efficacy of standard therapeutic modalities namely surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Altogether, we suggest further comprehensive evaluation of TQ in preclinical and clinical levels to delineate its implied utility as a novel complementary adjuvant therapy for cancer treatment.

  20. Integrative medicine for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000932.htm Integrative medicine for cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... help relieve common side effects of cancer or cancer treatment, such as fatigue, anxiety, pain, and nausea. Some ...

  1. How to study optimal timing of PET/CT for monitoring of cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Fischer, Barbara Malene Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The use of PET/CT for monitoring treatment response in cancer patients after chemo- or radiotherapy is a very promising approach to optimize cancer treatment. However, the timing of the PET/CT-based evaluation of reduction in viable tumor tissue is a crucial question. We investigated how...

  2. Time to treatment as a quality metric in lung cancer: Staging studies, time to treatment, and patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Liao, Kai-Ping; Swisher, Stephen G.; Blumenschein, George R.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt staging and treatment are crucial for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We determined if predictors of treatment delay after diagnosis were associated with prognosis. Materials and methods: Medicare claims from 28,732 patients diagnosed with NSCLC in 2004–2007 were used to establish the diagnosis-to-treatment interval (ideally ⩽35 days) and identify staging studies during that interval. Factors associated with delay were identified with multivariate logistic regression, and associations between delay and survival by stage were tested with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: Median diagnosis-to-treatment interval was 27 days. Receipt of PET was associated with delays (57.4% of patients with PET delayed [n = 6646/11,583] versus 22.8% of those without [n = 3908/17,149]; adjusted OR = 4.48, 95% CI 4.23–4.74, p < 0.001). Median diagnosis-to-PET interval was 15 days; PET-to-clinic, 5 days; and clinic-to-treatment, 12 days. Diagnosis-to-treatment intervals <35 days were associated with improved survival for patients with localized disease and those with distant disease surviving ⩾1 year but not for patients with distant disease surviving <1 year. Conclusion: Delays between diagnosing and treating NSCLC are common and associated with use of PET for staging. Reducing time to treatment may improve survival for patients with manageable disease at diagnosis

  3. A prospective study on the neurological complications of breast cancer and its treatment: Updated analysis three years after cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Filipa; Pereira, Susana; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel; Lunet, Nuno

    2016-10-01

    To quantify the prevalence of neurological complications among breast cancer patients at one and three years after diagnosis, and to identify factors associated with neuropathic pain (NP) and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Prospective cohort study including 475 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer, recruited among those proposed for surgical treatment (Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Porto). Patients underwent a neurological evaluation and had their cognitive function assesses with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, before treatment and at one and three years after enrollment. We estimated the prevalence of each neurological complication, and odds ratios (OR), adjusted for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, to identify factors associated with NP and CIPN. More than half of the patients [54.7%, 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 50.2-59.2] presented at least one neurological complication, at one or at three years after cancer diagnosis. Between the first and the third year of follow-up, there was an increase in the prevalence of NP (from 21.1% to 23.6%), cognitive impairment (from 7.2% to 8.2%), cerebrovascular disease (from 0.6% to 1.5%) and brain metastasis (from 0.0% to 0.6%). The prevalence of CIPN decreased from 14.1% to 12.6%. Axillary lymph node dissection was associated with NP at one year (OR = 2.75, 95%CI: 1.34-5.63) and chemotherapy with NP at three years (OR = 2.10, 95%CI: 1.20-3.67). Taxane-based chemotherapy was strongly associated with prevalence of CIPN at one and three years. Neurological complications are frequent even three years after cancer diagnosis and NP remained the major contributor to the burden of these conditions among survivors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Treatment of triple-negative breast cancer with Chinese herbal medicine: A prospective cohort study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hui; Peng, Nan; Yu, Mingwei; Sun, Xu; Ma, Yunfei; Yang, Guowang; Wang, Xiaomin

    2017-11-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is featured with the biological properties of strong aggressive behaviors, rapid disease progression, high risk of recurrence and metastasis, and low disease free survival. Patients with this tumor are insensitive to the endocrine therapy and target treatment for HER-2; therefore, chemotherapy is often used as routine treatment in clinical. Because of the fact that a considerable number of patients seek for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) treatment after operation and chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy, it is thus need to evaluate the correlation between Chinese herbal medicine treatment and prognosis. This is a multicenter, prospective cohort study started in March 2016 in Beijing. A simple of 220 participants diagnosed with TNBC were recruited from nine hospitals and are followed up every 3 to 6 months till March 2020. Detailed information of participants includes personal information, history of cancer, quality of life, symptoms of traditional Chinese medicine and fatigue status is taken face-to-face at baseline. The study has received ethical approval from the Research Ethical Committee of Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated to Capital Medical University (No.2016BL-014-01). Articles summarizing the primary results and ancillary analyses will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-OOC-16008246.

  5. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    control probability based on Poisson statistics model, and normal tissue complication probabilities based on Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, were efficient to estimate the radiobiological outcomes of the treatments by taking into account of the dose-volume effects in the organs. Furthermore, a novel technique of spatial DVH analysis was also found to be useful to determine the primary cause of the complications in the critical organs in the treatments. The study also showed that the 3DCRT and IMRT techniques offer the promising results in the XRT treatment of the left-breast and the prostate cancer patients respectively. Unfortunately, several organs such as salivary glands and larynx, and esophagus, were found to be significantly vulnerable to the radiation toxicity in the treatment of the head and neck (HN), and left-lung cancer patients respectively. The radiobiological outcomes were also found to be consistent with the clinical results of the IMRT based treatments of a significant number of the HN cancer patients.

  6. An observational study of cancer treatment-induced dental abnormalities in paediatric cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaberi Das

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Dental abnormalities such as microdontia, over-retention of deciduous teeth and hypoplasia were the major findings. Close dental follow-up should be advised to paediatric cancer survivors and their parents during therapy and upon completion of the therapy.

  7. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  8. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000827.htm Cancer treatment - dealing with pain To use the sharing features ... test, can cause pain. Treatment. Many types of cancer treatments can cause pain, including chemotherapy , radiation , and surgery. ...

  9. Fast track multi-discipline treatment (FTMDT trial versus conventional treatment in colorectal cancer--the design of a prospective randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiao-Jiao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laparoscopy-assisted surgery, fast-track perioperative treatment are both increasingly used in colorectal cancer treatment, for their short-time benefits of enhanced recovery and short hospital stays. However, the benefits of the integration of the Laparoscopy-assisted surgery, fast-track perioperative treatment, and even with the Xelox chemotherapy, are still unknown. In this study, the three treatments integration is defined as "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment Model" for colorectal cancer and this model extends the benefits to the whole treatment process of colorectal cancer. The main purpose of the study is to explore the feasibility of "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment" model in treatment of colorectal cancer. Methods The trial is a prospective randomized controlled study with 2 × 2 balanced factorial design. Patients eligible for the study will be randomized to 4 groups: (I Laparoscopic surgery with fast track perioperative treatment and Xelox chemotherapy; (II Open surgery with fast track perioperative treatment and Xelox chemotherapy; (III Laparoscopic surgery with conventional perioperative treatment and mFolfox6 chemotherapy; (IV Open surgery with conventional perioperative treatment and mFolfox6 chemotherapy. The primary endpoint of this study is the hospital stays. The secondary endpoints are the quality of life, chemotherapy related adverse events, surgical complications and hospitalization costs. Totally, 340 patients will be enrolled with 85 patients in each group. Conclusions The study initiates a new treatment model "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment" for colorectal cancer, and will provide feasibility evidence on the new model "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment" for patients with colorectal cancer. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01080547

  10. Apatinib plus icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer after icotinib treatment failure: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jianping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiangru; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-01-01

    Jianping Xu, Xiaoyan Liu, Sheng Yang, Xiangru Zhang, Yuankai Shi Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing Key Laboratory of Clinical Study on Anticancer Molecular Targeted Drugs, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Treatment failure frequently occurs in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who resp...

  11. {sup 131}I treatment for thyroid cancer and risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism: a cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chien-Mu [Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Taipei (China); Doyle, Pat [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London (United Kingdom); Tsan, Yu-Tse [National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Taipei (China); Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Taichung (China); Chung Shan Medical University, School of Medicine, Taichung (China); Lee, Chang-Hsing [Ton Yen General Hospital, Department of Occupational Medicine, Hsinchu County (China); Wang, Jung-Der [National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Taipei (China); National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine, Department of Public Health, Tainan (China); Chen, Pau-Chung [National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Department of Public Health, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Taipei (China); Collaboration: Health Data Analysis in Taiwan (hDATa) Research Group

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the association between {sup 131}I therapy for thyroid cancer and risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism. This was a nationwide population-based cohort study of patients with thyroid cancer diagnosed during the period 1997-2008. The data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research dataset. The cumulative {sup 131}I dose in each patient was calculated. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a proportional hazards model to estimate the effect of {sup 131}I therapy on the risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism in the cohort. A total of 8,946 patients with thyroid cancer were eligible for the final analysis. Among these patients, 8 developed primary hyperparathyroidism during the follow-up period that represented 38,248 person-years giving an incidence rate of 20.9 per 10{sup 5} person-years. {sup 131}I was used in the treatment of 6,153 patients (68.8 %) with a median cumulative dose of 3.7 GBq. The adjusted HRs were 0.21 (95% CI 0.02-1.86) and 0.46 (95% CI 0.10-2.10) for those receiving a cumulative {sup 131}I dose of 0.1-3.6 GBq and ≥3.7 GBq, respectively, compared to no therapy. The risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism did not increase with increasing {sup 131}I dose (test for trend p = 0.51). No interaction was found between {sup 131}I dose and age (p = 0.94) or {sup 131}I dose and sex (p = 0.99). {sup 131}I treatment for thyroid cancer did not increase risk of primary hyperparathyroidism during a 10-year follow-up in this study population. Further research with a longer follow-up period is needed to assess late adverse effects beyond 10 years. (orig.)

  12. 131I treatment for thyroid cancer and risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism: a cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chien-Mu; Doyle, Pat; Tsan, Yu-Tse; Lee, Chang-Hsing; Wang, Jung-Der; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between 131 I therapy for thyroid cancer and risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism. This was a nationwide population-based cohort study of patients with thyroid cancer diagnosed during the period 1997-2008. The data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research dataset. The cumulative 131 I dose in each patient was calculated. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a proportional hazards model to estimate the effect of 131 I therapy on the risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism in the cohort. A total of 8,946 patients with thyroid cancer were eligible for the final analysis. Among these patients, 8 developed primary hyperparathyroidism during the follow-up period that represented 38,248 person-years giving an incidence rate of 20.9 per 10 5 person-years. 131 I was used in the treatment of 6,153 patients (68.8 %) with a median cumulative dose of 3.7 GBq. The adjusted HRs were 0.21 (95% CI 0.02-1.86) and 0.46 (95% CI 0.10-2.10) for those receiving a cumulative 131 I dose of 0.1-3.6 GBq and ≥3.7 GBq, respectively, compared to no therapy. The risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism did not increase with increasing 131 I dose (test for trend p = 0.51). No interaction was found between 131 I dose and age (p = 0.94) or 131 I dose and sex (p = 0.99). 131 I treatment for thyroid cancer did not increase risk of primary hyperparathyroidism during a 10-year follow-up in this study population. Further research with a longer follow-up period is needed to assess late adverse effects beyond 10 years. (orig.)

  13. 131I treatment for thyroid cancer and risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Mu; Doyle, Pat; Tsan, Yu-Tse; Lee, Chang-Hsing; Wang, Jung-Der; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the association between (131)I therapy for thyroid cancer and risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism. This was a nationwide population-based cohort study of patients with thyroid cancer diagnosed during the period 1997-2008. The data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research dataset. The cumulative (131)I dose in each patient was calculated. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a proportional hazards model to estimate the effect of (131)I therapy on the risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism in the cohort. A total of 8,946 patients with thyroid cancer were eligible for the final analysis. Among these patients, 8 developed primary hyperparathyroidism during the follow-up period that represented 38,248 person-years giving an incidence rate of 20.9 per 10(5) person-years. (131)I was used in the treatment of 6,153 patients (68.8%) with a median cumulative dose of 3.7 GBq. The adjusted HRs were 0.21 (95% CI 0.02-1.86) and 0.46 (95% CI 0.10-2.10) for those receiving a cumulative (131)I dose of 0.1-3.6 GBq and ≥3.7 GBq, respectively, compared to no therapy. The risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism did not increase with increasing (131)I dose (test for trend p = 0.51). No interaction was found between (131)I dose and age (p = 0.94) or (131)I dose and sex (p = 0.99). (131)I treatment for thyroid cancer did not increase risk of primary hyperparathyroidism during a 10-year follow-up in this study population. Further research with a longer follow-up period is needed to assess late adverse effects beyond 10 years.

  14. NIH mouse study finds gut microorganisms may determine cancer treatment outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    An intact gut commensal microbiota, which is a population of microorganisms living in the intestine, is required for optimal response to cancer therapy, according to a mouse study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

  15. Combination chemotherapy with Regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment: A single center, retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Chen, Chou-Chen; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Background Regorafenib has been demonstrated as effective in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination use with chemotherapy has not been reported. We examined the efficacy and safety of adding chemotherapy to Regorafenib for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer(mCRC) patients. Methods We recruited mCRC patients at our institute who received either regorafenib monotherapy or regorafenib in combination with other chemotherapies. All patients had received chemo and target therapies and presented with disease progression before regorafenib treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Findings Between September1, 2015 and May 31, 2017, 100 mCRC patients at our institute received regorafenib treatment. 39 patients were excluded due to poor performance, lack of timely treatment, or inadequate clinical data. A total of 34 patients received regorafenib combined with other chemotherapies, and 27 patients received regorafenib alone. Median follow up time was 10.4 and 6.1 months, respectively. The primary end point of median OS was higher in the combination group than in the single use group (20.9m vs 10.3m, p = 0.015). The most frequent adverse events were hand-foot skin reactions(16[47.1%]vs 12[44.4%]), fatigue(6[17.6%] vs 7[25.9%]), gastrointestinal discomfort (7[20.6%] vs 6[22.2%]), neutropenia (4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%]), diarrhea(4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%]), and mucositis(5[14.7%] vs 1[3.7%]). Conclusion The present study showed the efficacy and side effects of regorafenib combination treatment. Superiority in median OS and median PFS was noted in the combination group. The sampling difference between the study and observation groups effects justifies the comparison. Further clinical evidence of combination therapy efficacy is pending future studies. PMID:29304109

  16. Combination chemotherapy with Regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment: A single center, retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available Regorafenib has been demonstrated as effective in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination use with chemotherapy has not been reported. We examined the efficacy and safety of adding chemotherapy to Regorafenib for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer(mCRC patients.We recruited mCRC patients at our institute who received either regorafenib monotherapy or regorafenib in combination with other chemotherapies. All patients had received chemo and target therapies and presented with disease progression before regorafenib treatment. The primary end point was overall survival.Between September1, 2015 and May 31, 2017, 100 mCRC patients at our institute received regorafenib treatment. 39 patients were excluded due to poor performance, lack of timely treatment, or inadequate clinical data. A total of 34 patients received regorafenib combined with other chemotherapies, and 27 patients received regorafenib alone. Median follow up time was 10.4 and 6.1 months, respectively. The primary end point of median OS was higher in the combination group than in the single use group (20.9m vs 10.3m, p = 0.015. The most frequent adverse events were hand-foot skin reactions(16[47.1%]vs 12[44.4%], fatigue(6[17.6%] vs 7[25.9%], gastrointestinal discomfort (7[20.6%] vs 6[22.2%], neutropenia (4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%], diarrhea(4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%], and mucositis(5[14.7%] vs 1[3.7%].The present study showed the efficacy and side effects of regorafenib combination treatment. Superiority in median OS and median PFS was noted in the combination group. The sampling difference between the study and observation groups effects justifies the comparison. Further clinical evidence of combination therapy efficacy is pending future studies.

  17. Combination chemotherapy with Regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment: A single center, retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Chen, Chou-Chen; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Chou-Pin

    2018-01-01

    Regorafenib has been demonstrated as effective in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination use with chemotherapy has not been reported. We examined the efficacy and safety of adding chemotherapy to Regorafenib for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer(mCRC) patients. We recruited mCRC patients at our institute who received either regorafenib monotherapy or regorafenib in combination with other chemotherapies. All patients had received chemo and target therapies and presented with disease progression before regorafenib treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Between September1, 2015 and May 31, 2017, 100 mCRC patients at our institute received regorafenib treatment. 39 patients were excluded due to poor performance, lack of timely treatment, or inadequate clinical data. A total of 34 patients received regorafenib combined with other chemotherapies, and 27 patients received regorafenib alone. Median follow up time was 10.4 and 6.1 months, respectively. The primary end point of median OS was higher in the combination group than in the single use group (20.9m vs 10.3m, p = 0.015). The most frequent adverse events were hand-foot skin reactions(16[47.1%]vs 12[44.4%]), fatigue(6[17.6%] vs 7[25.9%]), gastrointestinal discomfort (7[20.6%] vs 6[22.2%]), neutropenia (4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%]), diarrhea(4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%]), and mucositis(5[14.7%] vs 1[3.7%]). The present study showed the efficacy and side effects of regorafenib combination treatment. Superiority in median OS and median PFS was noted in the combination group. The sampling difference between the study and observation groups effects justifies the comparison. Further clinical evidence of combination therapy efficacy is pending future studies.

  18. Compromised local control due to treatment interruptions and late treatment breaks in early glottic cancer: Population-based outcomes study supporting need for intensified treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groome, Patti A.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Mackillop, William J.; Jackson, Lynda D.; Schulze, Karleen M.Math.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Warde, Padraig R.; Schneider, Ken M.; Mackenzie, Robert G.; Hodson, D. Ian; Hammond, J. Alex; Gulavita, Sunil P.P.; Eapen, Libni J.; Dixon, Peter F. M.B.; Bissett, Randy J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This population-based study describes the treatment of early glottic cancer in Ontario, Canada and assesses whether treatment variations were associated with treatment effectiveness. Methods and Materials: We studied 491 T1N0 and 213 T2N0 patients. Data abstracted from charts included age, sex, stage, treatment details, disease control, and survival. Results: The total dose ranged from 50 to 70 Gy, and the daily dose ranged from 1.9 to 2.8 Gy. In 90%, treatment duration was between 25 and 50 days. Field sizes, field reductions, beam arrangement, and beam energy varied. Late treatment breaks occurred in 13.6% of T1N0 and 27.1% of T2N0 cases. Local control was comparable to other reports for T1N0 (82% at 5 years), but was only 63.2% in T2N0. Variables associated with local failure in T1N0 were age less than 49 years (relative risk [RR], 3.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-6.90) and >3 treatment interruption days (RR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.00-5.91). In T2N0, these were field reduction (RR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.23-4.42) and late treatment breaks (RR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.09-4.41). Conclusion: Some aspects of treatment for early glottic cancer were associated with worse local control. Problems with protracted treatment are of particular concern, underscoring the need for randomized studies to intensify radiotherapy

  19. Coping with side effects from cancer treatment in daily life from the perspective of cancer patients: A qualitative empirical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birgith; Koktved, Dorte Pallesen; Nielsen, Lene Lyngø

    Aim The aim of this paper is to deepen our understanding of how patients cope with side effects from cancer treatment in daily life. Background Patients receiving cancer treatment experience acute side effects and need individualized information and guidance in order to manage treatment......-related adverse events in everyday life. However development in cancer treatment and the societal demands for efficiency may limit the possibility for individualized support. Methods Nine patients were interviewed from March to July 2009 to explore the patients’ experience of coping with side effects in daily...... their identity but the side effects can control the daily life. Patients do not always possess the knowledge of how to handle the side effects and adaptation to the institutional efficiency can lead to lack of confidence and feelings of responsibility and guilt concerning coping with these side effects...

  20. Self-Reorientation Following Colorectal Cancer Treatment - A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ann-Caroline B; Axelsson, Malin; Berndtsson, Ina; Brink, Eva

    2015-01-01

    After colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment, people reorganize life in ways that are consistent with their understanding of the illness and their expectations for recovery. Incapacities and abilities that have been lost can initiate a need to reorient the self. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have explicitly focused on the concept of self-reorientation after CRC treatment. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore self-reorientation in the early recovery phase after CRC surgery. Grounded theory analysis was undertaken, using the method presented by Charmaz. The present results explained self-reorientation as the individual attempting to achieve congruence in self-perception. A congruent self-perception meant bringing together the perceived self and the self that was mirrored in the near environs. The results showed that societal beliefs and personal explanations are essential elements of self-reorientation, and that it is therefore important to make them visible.

  1. Developing an Integrative Treatment Program for Cancer-Related Fatigue Using Stakeholder Engagement - A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canella, Claudia; Mikolasek, Michael; Rostock, Matthias; Beyer, Jörg; Guckenberger, Matthias; Jenewein, Josef; Linka, Esther; Six, Claudia; Stoll, Sarah; Stupp, Roger; Witt, Claudia M

    2017-11-01

    Although cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has gained increased attention in the past decade, it remains difficult to treat. An integrative approach combining conventional and complementary medicine interventions seems highly promising. Treatment programs are more likely to be effective if the needs and interests of the people involved are well represented. This can be achieved through stakeholder engagement. The aim of the study was to develop an integrative CRF treatment program using stakeholder engagement and to compare it to an expert version. In a qualitative study, a total of 22 stakeholders (4 oncologists, 1 radiation-oncologist, 1 psycho-oncologist, 5 nurses/nurse experts, 9 patients, 1 patient family member, 1 representative of a local Swiss Cancer League) were interviewed either face-to-face or in a focus group setting. For data analysis, qualitative content analysis was used. With stakeholder engagement, the integrative CRF treatment program was adapted to usual care using a prioritizing approach and allowing more patient choice. Unlike the expert version, in which all intervention options were on the same level, the stakeholder engagement process resulted in a program with 3 different levels. The first level includes mandatory nonpharmacological interventions, the second includes nonpharmacological choice-based interventions, and the third includes pharmacological interventions for severe CRF. The resulting stakeholder based integrative CRF treatment program was implemented as clinical practice guideline at our clinic (Institute for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, University Hospital Zurich). Through the stakeholder engagement approach, we integrated the needs and preferences of people who are directly affected by CRF. This resulted in an integrative CRF treatment program with graded recommendations for interventions and therefore potentially greater sustainability in a usual care setting.

  2. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY ON PREDICTION OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN CERVICAL CANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. RUBINA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT is the choice of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancers; however, tumors exhibit diverse response to treatment. Early prediction of tumor response leads to individualizing treatment regimen. Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST, the current modality of tumor response assessment, is often subjective and carried out at the first visit after treatment, which is about four months. Hence, there is a need for better predictive tool for radioresponse. Optical spectroscopic techniques, sensitive to molecular alteration, are being pursued as potential diagnostic tools. Present pilot study aims to explore the fiber-optic-based Raman spectroscopy approach in prediction of tumor response to CCRT, before taking up extensive in vivo studies. Ex vivo Raman spectra were acquired from biopsies collected from 11 normal (148 spectra, 16 tumor (201 spectra and 13 complete response (151 CR spectra, one partial response (8 PR spectra and one nonresponder (8 NR spectra subjects. Data was analyzed using principal component linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV. Findings suggest that normal tissues can be efficiently classified from both pre- and post-treated tumor biopsies, while there is an overlap between pre- and post-CCRT tumor tissues. Spectra of CR, PR and NR tissues were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA and a tendency of classification was observed, corroborating previous studies. Thus, this study further supports the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy in prediction of tumor radioresponse and prospective noninvasive in vivo applications.

  3. Treatment of intractable cancer by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1981-07-01

    Intraoperative irradiation, thermotherapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and neutron brachytherapy were used for locally advanced cancer and value and limitations of these therapies were discussed. Intraoperative irradiation was mainly used for cancers of the gastro-intestinal tract. In stage I gastric cancers, no difference in the five-year survival rates was found between the groups with and without intraoperative irradiation. In gastric cancers of stage II or more, intraoperative irradiation had a favourable effect. Thermotherapy was applied to superficial radio-resistant cancer by the use of a thermal system of microwave- and radio-frequency heating. This treatment induced disappearance of approximately 50% of tumor. For the treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizer, studies of phase I and II with Misonidazole were conducted; from these results, the protocol was made for phase III study of esophagus cancer, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, uterus cancer, and brain cancer. Brachytherapy using /sup 252/Cf was also developed for locally advanced cancer.

  4. Cytologic studies in relation to the effect of treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Minoru; Horai, Takeshi

    1982-01-01

    We investigated whether certain cytologic characteristics of small cell carcinoma could be correlated with response to chemotherapy. The cancer cells in the good response group more frequently showed finely granula chromatin evenly distributed through the nuclei. The cancer cells in the noresponse group predominantly showed deeply stained nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin distributed evenly or pale nuclei with unevenly distributed chromatin. These findings may be an indicator to predict the degree of response to chemotherapy. Cytologic grading of irradiatic changes reported by Shibata et al. may be useful for judging the effect of treatment of lung cancer. We introduce three cases of lung cancer in this paper and reported the correlation of morphologic changes of cancer cells and the effect of treatment of those cases. (J.P.N.)

  5. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  7. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000032.htm Dry mouth during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you ...

  8. Safe drinking during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000060.htm Drinking water safely during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. During and right after your cancer treatment, your body may not be able to protect ...

  9. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  10. Eribulin in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Swami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Halichondrin B is a complex, natural, polyether macrolide derived from marine sponges. Eribulin is a structurally-simplified, synthetic, macrocyclic ketone analogue of Halichondrin B. Eribulin was approved by United States Food and Drug Administration in 2010 as a third-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients who have previously been treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. It has a unique microtubule dynamics inhibitory action. Phase III studies have either been completed or are currently ongoing in breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Phase I and II studies in multiple cancers and various combinations are currently ongoing. This article reviews the available information on eribulin with respect to its clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, metabolism, preclinical studies, and with special focus on clinical trials.

  11. Alternative Cancer Treatments: 10 Options to Consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative cancer treatments: 10 options to consider Alternative cancer treatments can't cure your cancer, but they may provide some ... that may help them, including complementary and alternative cancer treatments. If cancer makes you feel as if you ...

  12. Patients' perceptions of the side-effects of prostate cancer treatment--a qualitative interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, Ida Joanna; Hak, Tony; de Koning, Harry J.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2006-01-01

    Primary prostate cancer treatment often results in suboptimal urinary, bowel and/or sexual function. These effects are not inevitable. After treatment patients typically report high health related quality of life (QoL) scores. This discrepancy between disease-specific and generic results raises the

  13. Semiquantitative visual approach to scoring lung cancer treatment response using computed tomography: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Ronald H; Kumar, Prasanna; Loud, Peter; Klippenstein, Donald; Raczyk, Cheryl; Tan, Wei; Lu, Jenny; Ramnath, Nithya

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to compare a newly developed semiquantitative visual scoring (SVS) method with the current standard, the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) method, in the categorization of treatment response and reader agreement for patients with metastatic lung cancer followed by computed tomography. The 18 subjects (5 women and 13 men; mean age, 62.8 years) were from an institutional review board-approved phase 2 study that evaluated a second-line chemotherapy regimen for metastatic (stages III and IV) non-small cell lung cancer. Four radiologists, blinded to the patient outcome and each other's reads, evaluated the change in the patients' tumor burden from the baseline to the first restaging computed tomographic scan using either the RECIST or the SVS method. We compared the numbers of patients placed into the partial response, the stable disease (SD), and the progressive disease (PD) categories (Fisher exact test) and observer agreement (kappa statistic). Requiring the concordance of 3 of the 4 readers resulted in the RECIST placing 17 (100%) of 17 patients in the SD category compared with the SVS placing 9 (60%) of 15 patients in the partial response, 5 (33%) of the 15 patients in the SD, and 1 (6.7%) of the 15 patients in the PD categories (P < 0.0001). Interobserver agreement was higher among the readers using the SVS method (kappa, 0.54; P < 0.0001) compared with that of the readers using the RECIST method (kappa, -0.01; P = 0.5378). Using the SVS method, the readers more finely discriminated between the patient response categories with superior agreement compared with the RECIST method, which could potentially result in large differences in early treatment decisions for advanced lung cancer.

  14. Dynamic re-immunization of off-treatment childhood cancer survivors: An implementation feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Han

    Full Text Available There are no universally approved re-vaccination guidelines for non-transplant pediatric cancer survivors. We hypothesized that by utilizing a response-based re-vaccination schedule, we could tailor vaccine schedules in off-treatment cancer survivors. Pre-vaccination antibody levels were obtained in 7 patients at an average of 20 days after the end of treatment date. In those without protective antibody levels, we administered vaccines 3 months after completion of treatment. Revaccinating patients 3 months after the end of treatment date resulted in protective antibody levels for most vaccines. We showed, on a preliminary basis, that vaccinating non-transplanted pediatric cancer survivors can be dynamically implemented in children with recovering immune function.

  15. Cancer survivors’ perspectives and experience on western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine treatment and rehabilitation: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ji-Wei Wang,1 Zhi-Qi Yang,1 Cong Liu,1 Si-Jia Chen,1 Qian Shen,1 Tian-Rui Zhang,1 Nancy S Partike,2 Zheng-Ping Yuan,3 Jin-Ming Yu1 1School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Public Health, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, USA; 3Shanghai Cancer Rehabilitation Club, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: In the People’s Republic of China, both western medicine (WM and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM are the main treatment and rehabilitation options for cancer patients. This study aimed to explore cancer survivors’ perspectives and experience of treatment and rehabilitation, in order to promote patient-centered activities of treatment and rehabilitation.Methods: Using a qualitative research approach, 68 cancer survivors were recruited from eight community cancer rehabilitation organizations in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. Eight focus group interviews were conducted. All these interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the data were analyzed by theme analysis.Results: WM was the main choice in treatment phase though study participants noted more side effects. TCM was primarily used in the recovery phase. The lack of communication between doctors and cancer patients appears to affect treatment adherence and impair the doctor–patient relationship. WM was expensive for diagnostic procedures and treatment, while the cumulative costs of frequent use of TCM in the long rehabilitation period were also high. Both treatment options created significant perceived economic burden on patients. Conflicting information about dietary supplements tended to make cancer survivors confused.Conclusion: Improving the communication between doctors and cancer patients helps to ameliorate cancer patient adherence and the effect of treatments. It is essential to educate cancer patients about the effect and cost of both WM and traditional TCM

  16. Early versus delayed endocrine treatment of pN1-3 M0 prostate cancer without local treatment of the primary tumor: results of European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer 30846--a phase III study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, Fritz H.; Kurth, Karl Heinz; Fosså, Sophie D.; Hoekstra, Wytze; Karthaus, Peter P. M.; Debois, Muriel; Collette, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    The timing of endocrine treatment for prostate cancer remains controversial. The issue is addressed in protocol 30846 of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer for patients with lymph node positive cancer without local treatment of the primary tumor. A total of 302 patients

  17. Treatment profile and complications associated with cryotherapy for localized prostate cancer: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Calpurnyia B.; Jang, Thomas L.; Shao, Yu-Hsuan; Kabadi, Shaum; Moore, Dirk F.; Lu-Yao, Grace L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment patterns and 3 to 12-month complication rates associated with receiving prostate cryotherapy in a population-based study. Men > 65 years diagnosed with incident localized prostate cancer in Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) - Medicare linked database from 2004 to 2005 were identified. A total of 21,344 men were included in the study, of which 380 were treated initially with cryotherapy. Recipients of cryotherapy versus aggressive forms of prostate therapy (i.e. radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy) were more likely to be older, have one co-morbidity, low income, live in the South, and be diagnosed with indolent cancer. Complication rates increased from 3 to 12 months following cryotherapy. By the twelfth month, the rates for urinary incontinence, lower urinary tract obstruction, erectile dysfunction, and bowel bleeding reached 9.8%, 28.7%, 20.1%, and 3.3%, respectively. Diagnoses of hydronephrosis, urinary fistula, or bowel fistula were not evident. The rates of corrective invasive procedures for lower urinary tract obstruction and erectile dysfunction were both cryotherapy were modest; however, diagnoses for lower urinary tract obstruction and erectile dysfunction were common. PMID:21519347

  18. Dosimetry study on the conventional and three dimensional conformal radiation treatment planning protocols for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yong; He Yuxiang; Han Shukui; Wu Hao; Gong Jian; Xu Bo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose distribution of clinical target volume (CTV), in normal tissues and organs for patients with rectal cancer on the conventional radiotherapy (2D) and three dimension- al conformal radiation treatment (3DCRT). Methods: The CT image data of 36 rectal cancer patients treated with 3DCRT were studied. The CTV, small bowel, colon, bladder, pelvic bone marrow, and femoral head and neck were contoured on consecutive axial slices of CT images. Two 3DCRT and three conventional treatment planning protocols were simulated using three dimensional treatment planning system (CMS Focus 2.31), were defined as 3D-3, 3D-4, 2D-2, 2D-3, 2D-4. The difference of five treatment planning protocols on the CTV and normal structure by analysis of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: The D 95 and V 95 of these five protocols all exceeded 97%. The conformity index(CI) of 3D was obviously larger than that of 2D protocol. The dose inhomogeneity(DI) in 4 DCRT was less than that of 3 DCRT. The 3D as compared with the 2D, significantly reduced the mean dose of 45 Gy to the small bowel and colon. The 3D-3 as compared with the 2D-3, the 3D-4 as compared with the 2D-4, the mean dose of small bowel and colon was reduced by 28.5% and 25.7%, respectively. The 3D-3 as compared with the 2D-2, the 3D-3 as compared with the 2D-3 and the 3D4 as compared with the 2D-4, the percentage volume of small bowel and colon which received 45 Gy was reduced by 80.8% , 51.1% and 54.7% , respectively. Either the mean dose, or the percentage volume receiving 35 Gy and 45 Gy to the pelvic bone and bladder, the 3D planning protocols had advanage over the 2D planning protocols. The V 45 of bladder in 2D-2 planning proto- col was the highest in all planning protocols, exceeding 98%, but the highest V 45 of bladder was only 50% in the other planning protocols. Conclusions: Even though the difference in pelvic CTV of rectal cancer patients between the conventional radiotherapy and 3

  19. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author)

  20. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yuji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author).

  1. Preclinical studies of vascular acting photosensitizer bacteriopheophorbide for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Luck, David; Beckers, Jill; Huang, Zheng

    2004-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with vascular acting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad), is investigated as an alternative modality for the total ablation of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate is used as the animal model. Interstitial PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the IV infused photosensitizer drug. The prostate and its adjacent tissues were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. At one-week post PDT, the animals recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis. Prostate lesions could be detected by MRI scan as early as 48 h post PDT. Maximum lesion size of 1.5 cm3 and 2.9 cm3 could be achieved at 50 J/cm and 100 J/cm, respectively, with interstitial treatment using a single 1-cm diffuser fiber, suggesting the Tookad-PDT is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. Pharmacokinetic studies show that the photosensitizer is cleared rapidly from the circulation. In conclusion, the novel photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat localized prostate cancer.

  2. Phase II study on paclitaxel in patients with recurrent, metastatic or locally advanced vulvar cancer not amenable to surgery or radiotherapy: a study of the EORTC-GCG (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer--Gynaecological Cancer Group)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, P. O.; van der Velden, J.; Vergote, I.; Guerra, C.; Scarabeli, C.; Coens, C.; Demonty, G.; Reed, N.

    2009-01-01

    No standard treatment options are available for patients with advanced, recurrent or metastatic vulvar carcinoma not amenable for locoregional treatment. In this phase II study, patients with advanced vulvar cancer received paclitaxel (Taxol) every 3 weeks for up to 10 cycles. Primary objective was

  3. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  4. Brain cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszow, S.

    1998-01-01

    As soon as 1936 an American physicist proposed to treat certain forms of cancer by using the nuclear reaction: n + 10 B → 7 Li + 4 He where the alpha particles produced could destroy the DNA of surrounding cells. From 1951 to 1961 62 patients underwent this treatment for brain cancer. The results were unsatisfactory: the neutrons were not energetic enough to enter brain tissues deeply and were accompanied by strongly damaging gamma radiation. In Netherlands an installation using the high flux reactor of Petten has been set up. A highly focused neutron beam of about 10 keV with reduced gamma radiation is produced. The first step is to determine the limit exposure and the maximal permissible concentration of boron. (A.C.)

  5. Screening for Circulating Tumour Cells Allows Early Detection of Cancer and Monitoring of Treatment Effectiveness: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Karin; Eng, Peter; Sali, Avni

    2017-08-27

    Background: Circulating-Tumour-Cells (CTC) provide a blood biomarker for early carcinogenesis, cancer progression and treatment effectiveness. An increase in CTCs is associated with cancer progression, a CTC decrease with cancer containment or remission. Several technologies have been developed to identify CTC, including the validated Isolation-by-Size-of-Epithelial-Tumour (ISET, Rarecells) technology, combining blood filtration and microscopy using standard histo-pathological criteria. Methods: This observational study compared CTC count to cancer status and cancer risk, by monitoring treatment effectiveness in cancer patients and by screening for CTC in asymptomatic patients with risk factors, including family history of cancer. Results: Between Sept-2014 and Dec-2016 we undertook 600 CTC tests (542 patients), including 50% screening requests of patients without cancer diagnosis but with risk factors. CTC were detected in all cancer patients (n=277, 100%), and in half of the asymptomatic patients screened (50%, 132 out-of 265 patients). Follow-up tests including scans, scheduled within 1-10 months of positive CTC tests, found early cancerous lesions in 20% of screened patients. In 50% of male patients with CTC and normal PSA (prostate-specific-antigen) levels, PSMA-PET scans revealed increased uptake in the prostate, indicative of early prostate cancer. Other types of cancers detected by CTC screening and subsequent scans included early breast, ovarian, lung, or renal cancer. Patients with CTC were advised on integrative approaches including immune-stimulating and anti-carcinogenic nutritional therapies. CTC repeat tests were available in 10% of patients with detected CTC (40 outof 409 patients, n=98 CTC tests) to assess treatment effectiveness, suggesting nutritional therapies to be beneficial in reducing CTC count. Conclusions: CTC screening provided a highly sensitive biomarker for the early detection of cancer, with higher CTC counts being associated with

  6. Treatment Decision Regret Among Long-Term Survivors of Localized Prostate Cancer: Results From the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Richard M; Lo, Mary; Clark, Jack A; Albertsen, Peter C; Barry, Michael J; Goodman, Michael; Penson, David F; Stanford, Janet L; Stroup, Antoinette M; Hamilton, Ann S

    2017-07-10

    Purpose To determine the demographic, clinical, decision-making, and quality-of-life factors that are associated with treatment decision regret among long-term survivors of localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods We evaluated men who were age ≤ 75 years when diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between October 1994 and October 1995 in one of six SEER tumor registries and who completed a 15-year follow-up survey. The survey obtained demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical data and measured treatment decision regret, informed decision making, general- and disease-specific quality of life, health worry, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concern, and outlook on life. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with regret. Results We surveyed 934 participants, 69.3% of known survivors. Among the cohort, 59.1% had low-risk tumor characteristics (PSA decision regret: 8.2% of those whose disease was managed conservatively, 15.0% of those who received surgery, and 16.6% of those who underwent radiotherapy. Factors associated with regret on multivariable analysis included reporting moderate or big sexual function bother (reported by 39.0%; OR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.51 to 5.0), moderate or big bowel function bother (reported by 7.7%; OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.15), and PSA concern (mean score 52.8; OR, 1.01 per point change; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.02). Increasing age at diagnosis and report of having made an informed treatment decision were inversely associated with regret. Conclusion Regret was a relatively infrequently reported outcome among long-term survivors of localized prostate cancer; however, our results suggest that better informing men about treatment options, in particular, conservative treatment, might help mitigate long-term regret. These findings are timely for men with low-risk cancers who are being encouraged to consider active surveillance.

  7. Severe Pelvic Floor Symptoms After Cervical Cancer Treatment Are Predominantly Associated With Mental and Physical Well-Being and Body Image A Cross-Sectional Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazewinkel, Menke H.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Velden, Jacobus van der; Burger, Matthé P. M.; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between demographic, disease-related, and psychological variables and severe distress from pelvic floor symptoms (PFSs) after cervical cancer treatment. Methods: This study was cross-sectional and questionnaire based. We included patients with cervical cancer

  8. Factors associated with online media attention to research: a cohort study of articles evaluating cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Romana; Ravaud, Philippe; Baron, Gabriel; Ghosn, Lina; Boutron, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    New metrics have been developed to assess the impact of research and provide an indication of online media attention and data dissemination. We aimed to describe online media attention of articles evaluating cancer treatments and identify the factors associated with high online media attention. We systematically searched MEDLINE via PubMed on March 1, 2015 for articles published during the first 6 months of 2014 in oncology and medical journals with a diverse range of impact factors, from 3.9 to 54.4, and selected a sample of articles evaluating a cancer treatment regardless of study design. Altmetric Explorer was used to identify online media attention of selected articles. The primary outcome was media attention an article received online as measured by Altmetric score (i.e., number of mentions in online news outlets, science blogs and social media). Regression analysis was performed to investigate the factors associated with high media attention, and regression coefficients represent the logarithm of ratio of mean (RoM) values of Altmetric score per unit change in the covariate. Among 792 articles, 218 (27.5%) received no online media attention (Altmetric score = 0). The median [Q1-Q3] Altmetric score was 2.0 [0.0-8.0], range 0.0-428.0. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with high Altmetric score were presence of a press release (RoM = 10.14, 95%CI [4.91-20.96]), open access to the article (RoM = 1.48, 95%CI [1.02-2.16]), and journal impact factor (RoM = 1.10, 95%CI [1.07-1.12]. As compared with observational studies, systematic reviews were not associated with high Altmetric score (RoM = 1.46, 95%CI [0.74-2.86]; P  = 0.27), nor were RCTs (RoM = 0.65, 95%CI [0.41-1.02]; P  = 0.059) and phase I/II non-RCTs (RoM = 0.58, 95%CI [0.33-1.05]; P  = 0.07). The articles with abstract conclusions favouring study treatments were not associated with high Altmetric score (RoM = 0.97, 95%CI [0.60-1.58]; P  = 0

  9. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: Results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. Oosten (Astrid); J.A. Abrantes (João A.); S. Jönsson (Siv); P. de Bruijn (Peter); E.J.M. Kuip (Evelien); A. Falcão (Amílcar); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we

  10. Redefining radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer with single dose ablative treatment : a study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charaghvandi, R K; van Asselen, B; Philippens, M E P; Verkooijen, H M; van Gils, C H; van Diest, P J; Pijnappel, R M; Hobbelink, M G G; Witkamp, A J; van Dalen, T; van der Wall, E; van Heijst, T C; Koelemij, R; van Vulpen, M; van den Bongard, H J G D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A shift towards less burdening and more patient friendly treatments for breast cancer is currently ongoing. In low-risk patients with early-stage disease, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an alternative for whole breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery.

  11. Life after prostate cancer treatment: a mixed methods study of the experiences of men with sexual dysfunction and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Jeffrey A; Sufrin, Nat; Lapin, Brittany R; Petkewicz, Jacqueline; Tenfelde, Sandi

    2017-06-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men and sexual dysfunction is the most frequently reported long-term side effect of prostate cancer surgery or radiation. The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of men with sexual dysfunction and their partners following prostate cancer treatment. Men with sexual dysfunction from either surgical removal or radiation therapy 1-5 years after treatment were interviewed, as well as their partners. A mixed method design was used to determine the lived experience of men with sexual dysfunction. Open-ended questions guided the interviews. Twenty seven men completed the study with a mean age of 61 years (SD = 8.0; range = 44-77 years). Nine partners also participated. The majority of men (92.6%) had surgery. The average time from treatment to the interview was 23.5 months (SD = 11.7). Themes were frustration with sexual dysfunction, importance of support and understanding from others, depression and anxiety related to sexual dysfunction, importance of intimacy with partner, factors that impact treatment satisfaction, and education and comprehensive information about sex. Prostate cancer survivors and partners need accurate information about sexual side effects before during and after treatment. Men and partners required individualized help and guidance to manage sexual dysfunction. Support and understanding from partners, family, and others was also identified as an important aspect of healing and adjustment after prostate cancer treatment. Prostate cancer education/support groups played a key role in helping men and partners gain advocacy, education, and support. Psychological problems such as depression and anxiety need to be identified and addressed in men after prostate cancer treatment. Men and partners need assistance in understanding and navigating their way through intimacy to move forward with connectedness in their relationship. Satisfaction with treatment and with providers is

  12. Treatment-associated subsequent neoplasms among long-term survivors of childhood cancer: the experience of the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, Leslie L.

    2009-01-01

    With improvements in survival among individuals diagnosed and treated for cancer there is an increasing recognition of the risk of long-term adverse effects of therapy. Second neoplasms represent one of the more serious late effects of treatment and are associated with a substantial level of morbidity and mortality. Survivors of childhood cancers, because of their potential longevity, are at particular risk for this adverse outcome. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a large cohort consisting of adult survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed and treated between 1970 and 1986. The CCSS has provided important data to quantify radiation-associated risk for subsequent cancers including neoplasms of the breast, thyroid and central nervous system. (orig.)

  13. Treatment-associated subsequent neoplasms among long-term survivors of childhood cancer: the experience of the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, Leslie L. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2009-02-15

    With improvements in survival among individuals diagnosed and treated for cancer there is an increasing recognition of the risk of long-term adverse effects of therapy. Second neoplasms represent one of the more serious late effects of treatment and are associated with a substantial level of morbidity and mortality. Survivors of childhood cancers, because of their potential longevity, are at particular risk for this adverse outcome. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a large cohort consisting of adult survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed and treated between 1970 and 1986. The CCSS has provided important data to quantify radiation-associated risk for subsequent cancers including neoplasms of the breast, thyroid and central nervous system. (orig.)

  14. Return to work after early-stage breast cancer : A cohort study into the effects of treatment and cancer-related symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balak, Fulya; Roelen, Corne A. M.; Koopmans, Petra C.; ten Berge, Elike E.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    Introduction Earlier diagnosis and better treatment have increased the survival rates of cancer patients. This warrants research on return to work of cancer survivors. What is the return to work rate following early-stage breast cancer? What is the effect of the type of treatment and cancer-related

  15. Prospective descriptive study of the toxicity of CAPOX plan in systemic treatment of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghazarian, M; Larranaga, J; Reyes, G; Heinzen, S; Ferrero, L; Lasalvia, E; Echague, P; Estevez, F; Citrin, E; Viola, A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the incorporation of new cytostatic drugs to treat colorectal cancer (CRC) and adjuvant objective is to treat the disease or disseminated contributed to decrease the reoccurrence and increased overall patient survive and thus the advent of various toxicity profiles according to the scheme used. To describe the clinical and para clinical toxicity of one of the schemes more chemotherapy used for the treatment of RCC at the National Cancer Institute (INCA). METHODOLOGY: Longitudinal prospective study. An analysis was made after consideration of the direction of INCA medical records of 27 patients with CRC assisted at the service of such chemotherapy Institution in the June / 2008 - Dec / 2009. He had the free and informed consent of the patients to participate in the study, disguising personal data to protect your privacy. They are proceeded to complete the notebook data collection in order to determine the toxicity of CAPOX plan. Results: 27 patients, 11 females and 16 males were included with a 58 median age. In terms of tumor topography, 10 were right colon level 10 to level the left colon and 7 rectum level. 55.5% were stage III, stage IV 29.6% and 14.8% stage II. The 27 patients included CAPOX plan received the standard dose with a median cycles of 7. The clinical toxicities more frequent were: sensory neuropathy (66.6%), diarrhea (48.1%), hand-foot syndrome (44.4%), nausea (37%), Vomiting (29.6%), mucositis (11.1%) observed less frequently: conjunctival irritation, hyperpigmentation skin, pharynx larynx dysesthesia, alopecia, and fatigue stress angina. Concerning the haematological toxicity It emphasizes that all patients had a decrease in platelet count during treatment with 44.4% of grade 1 thrombocytopenia, was 62.9% of anemia, leucopenia and 33.3% to 37.0% of neutropenia. Single one patient had mild elevation of serum creatinine. Liver enzyme toxicity occurred in 37% TGO level - GGT, 29.6% in the TGP; 29.6% in the FA and 66.6% of patients

  16. Treatment systems guidelines for primary rectal cancer from the 1996 patterns of care study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.; Coia, Lawrence; Haller, Daniel; Hoffman, John; John, Madhu; Landry, Jerome; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Willett, Christopher; Mahon, Irene; Owen, Jean; Hanks, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Rectal Cancer Committee was formed to develop consensus recommendations for patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis. Methods and Materials: The Committee was composed of a multidisciplinary group of oncologists, and clinical scenarios were chosen to address most of the major treatment controversies in the combined modality treatment of rectal cancer. A literature search was then conducted and the major articles were identified. A modified Delphi technique was used to arrive at consensus. Serial surveys were conducted by distributing questionnaires to the Committee members to consolidate expert opinion. Voting was conducted using a scoring system and opinions were unified to the highest degree possible. Results: Consensus voting was performed for 4 clinical scenarios. Acceptability ratings for treatment were grouped into 3 broad categories: not acceptable, acceptable, and most acceptable. Based on the treatment options, a decision tree was developed that reflects the consensus of the committee. Conclusion: These options may help guide treatment decisions in rectal cancer

  17. In vitro and in vivo studies of gadolinium-159 liposomes in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Daniel Cristian Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil, estimates of new cancer cases, valid for the years 2010 and 2011 show that the disease will be responsible for the deaths of about 500,000 people. As an alternative therapy the radiotherapy technique, widely used in treating various types of tumors, act indiscriminate tumoral and healthy cells. Seeking to minimize these effects, nano structured carriers containing radioisotopes, such as liposomes, have been studied with the aim of improving the specificity of action of ionizing radiation, delivering and retaining adequate amounts of radioactive material in tumor cells, leading them to death. In this context, the present study, we prepared liposomes stealth pH-sensitive metal complex containing the radioactive 159 Gd-DTPA-BMA ( 159 Gd-SpHL) aiming to study in vitro and in vivo its effects in cancer treatment. The vesicles showed encapsulation rate of about 20%, average diameter of 100 nm and low release kinetics of radioactivity in biological media. The formulation was characterized through physic-chemical and morphological studies and the results revealed a low polydispersity index and negative Zeta potential. We studied in vitro and in vivo its action against the cells of Ehrlich tumor models and RT2 (rat glioma). The results of in vitro studies showed that the complex has significant radioactive cytotoxicity against the cells of two of the three models studied and that, being encapsulated in liposomes, the cytotoxicity was greatly enhanced. Additionally, we investigated the involvement of caspase-3 protein in Ehrlich and RT2 cell death. The results suggest that the main mechanism involved in the cytotoxic action of radioactive complex is related to apoptosis. The results of in vivo studies showed that liposomes containing 159 Gd-DTPA-BMA accumulated significantly in Ehrlich solid tumor in mice. Aiming to improve this uptake, we prepared pH-sensitive liposomes coated with folate containing the same radioactive complex ( 159 Gd-FTSpHL). The results

  18. The Effects of Prostate Cancer Treatment on the Sexual Behavior of Gay and Bisexual Men: Key Results from the "Restore" Study | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker | "The Effects of Prostate Cancer Treatment on the Sexual Behavior of Gay and Bisexual Men: Key Results from the 'Restore' Study" will be presented by B.R. Simon Rosser, PhD, MPH, Professor of the Division of Epidemiology & Community Health and Director of HIV/STI Intervention & Prevention Studies at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health in Minneapolis,

  19. Coping with changes and uncertainty: A qualitative study of young adult cancer patients' challenges and coping strategies during treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Nataskja-Elena Kersting; Larsen, Torill Marie Bogsnes; Hauken, May Aasebø

    2017-07-31

    Young adult cancer patients (YACPs), aged 18-35 years when diagnosed with cancer, are in a vulnerable transitioning period from adolescence to adulthood, where cancer adds a tremendous burden. However, YACPs' challenges and coping strategies are under-researched. The objective of this study was to explore what challenges YACP experience during their treatment, and what coping strategies they applied to them. We conducted a qualitative study with a phenomenological-hermeneutic design, including retrospective, semi-structured interviews of 16 YACPs who had undergone cancer treatment. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and interpreted applying the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS). We found "coping with changes and uncertainty" as overarching topic for YACPs' challenges, particularly related to five themes, including (1) receiving the diagnosis, (2) encountering the healthcare system, (3) living with cancer, (4) dealing with the impact of the treatment and (5) reactions from the social network. YACPs' coping strategies applied to these challenges varied broadly and ranged from maladaptive strategies, such as neglecting the situation, to conducive emotional or instrumental approaches to manage their challenges. The findings call for age-specific needs assessments, information and support for YACPs, and their families in order to facilitate YACPs' coping during their treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosten, Astrid W; Abrantes, João A; Jönsson, Siv; de Bruijn, Peter; Kuip, Evelien J M; Falcão, Amílcar; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2016-04-01

    Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl. Furthermore, we evaluated rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route. Fifty-two patients treated with subcutaneous and/or transdermal fentanyl for moderate to severe cancer-related pain participated. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. For rotations from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, a 1:1 dose conversion ratio was used while the subcutaneous infusion was continued for 12 h (with a 50 % tapering after 6 h). A 6-h scheme with 50 % tapering after 3 h was simulated using the final model. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and separate first-order absorption processes for each route adequately described the data. The estimated apparent clearance of fentanyl was 49.6 L/h; the absorption rate constant for subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl was 0.0358 and 0.0135 h(-1), respectively. Moderate to large inter-individual and inter-occasion variability was found. Around rotation from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, measured and simulated plasma fentanyl concentrations rose and increasing side effects were observed. We describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl in one patient cohort and report several findings that are relevant for clinical practice. Further research is warranted to study the optimal scheme for rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route.

  1. Radiation-Related New Primary Solid Cancers in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: Comparative Radiation Dose Response and Modification of Treatment Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inskip, Peter D.; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Veiga, Lene; Bhatti, Parveen; Ronckers, Cécile; Rajaraman, Preetha; Boukheris, Houda; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan; Hammond, Sue; Henderson, Tara O.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The majority of childhood cancer patients now achieve long-term survival, but the treatments that cured their malignancy often put them at risk of adverse health outcomes years later. New cancers are among the most serious of these late effects. The aims of this review are to compare and contrast radiation dose–response relationships for new solid cancers in a large cohort of childhood cancer survivors and to discuss interactions among treatment and host factors. Methods: This review is based on previously published site-specific analyses for subsequent primary cancers of the brain, breast, thyroid gland, bone and soft tissue, salivary glands, and skin among 12,268 5-year childhood cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Analyses included tumor site–specific, individual radiation dose reconstruction based on radiation therapy records. Radiation-related second cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic or Poisson regression models for excess relative risk (ERR). Results: Linear dose–response relationships over a wide range of radiation dose (0-50 Gy) were seen for all cancer sites except the thyroid gland. The steepest slopes occurred for sarcoma, meningioma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer (ERR/Gy > 1.00), with glioma and cancers of the breast and salivary glands forming a second group (ERR/Gy = 0.27-0.36). The relative risk for thyroid cancer increased up to 15-20 Gy and then decreased with increasing dose. The risk of thyroid cancer also was positively associated with chemotherapy, but the chemotherapy effect was not seen among those who also received very high doses of radiation to the thyroid. The excess risk of radiation-related breast cancer was sharply reduced among women who received 5 Gy or more to the ovaries. Conclusions: The results suggest that the effect of high-dose irradiation is consistent with a linear dose–response for most organs, but they also reveal important organ-specific and host

  2. Radiation-Related New Primary Solid Cancers in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: Comparative Radiation Dose Response and Modification of Treatment Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inskip, Peter D., E-mail: inskippeter@gmail.com [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Sigurdson, Alice J.; Veiga, Lene [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bhatti, Parveen [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Ronckers, Cécile [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rajaraman, Preetha [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Boukheris, Houda [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); The University of Oran School of Medicine (Algeria); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hammond, Sue [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Children' s Hospital and Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Henderson, Tara O. [University of Chicago Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Chicago, Illinois (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    Objectives: The majority of childhood cancer patients now achieve long-term survival, but the treatments that cured their malignancy often put them at risk of adverse health outcomes years later. New cancers are among the most serious of these late effects. The aims of this review are to compare and contrast radiation dose–response relationships for new solid cancers in a large cohort of childhood cancer survivors and to discuss interactions among treatment and host factors. Methods: This review is based on previously published site-specific analyses for subsequent primary cancers of the brain, breast, thyroid gland, bone and soft tissue, salivary glands, and skin among 12,268 5-year childhood cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Analyses included tumor site–specific, individual radiation dose reconstruction based on radiation therapy records. Radiation-related second cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic or Poisson regression models for excess relative risk (ERR). Results: Linear dose–response relationships over a wide range of radiation dose (0-50 Gy) were seen for all cancer sites except the thyroid gland. The steepest slopes occurred for sarcoma, meningioma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer (ERR/Gy > 1.00), with glioma and cancers of the breast and salivary glands forming a second group (ERR/Gy = 0.27-0.36). The relative risk for thyroid cancer increased up to 15-20 Gy and then decreased with increasing dose. The risk of thyroid cancer also was positively associated with chemotherapy, but the chemotherapy effect was not seen among those who also received very high doses of radiation to the thyroid. The excess risk of radiation-related breast cancer was sharply reduced among women who received 5 Gy or more to the ovaries. Conclusions: The results suggest that the effect of high-dose irradiation is consistent with a linear dose–response for most organs, but they also reveal important organ-specific and host

  3. Qualitative study of men's perceptions of why treatment delays occur in the UK for those with testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Alison; Ziebland, Sue; McPherson, Ann

    2004-01-01

    Many studies (but not all) have shown that for men with testicular cancer a longer treatment delay is associated with additional treatments, greater morbidity, and shorter survival. This paper explores patients' perspectives on why treatment delays occur. Qualitative study using narrative interviews Interviews in patient's homes throughout the United Kingdom (UK). Interviews with a maximum variation sample of 45 men with testicular cancer, recruited through general practitioners (GPs), urologists, support groups, and charities. Those who sought help relatively quickly responded to symptoms, had heard about testicular cancer in the media, had seen leaflets in GPs' surgeries, or knew others with this disease. Men delayed because they did not recognise signs and symptoms; feared appearing weak, a hypochondriac, or lacking in masculinity; recalled past illness or painful examinations; were embarrassed; feared the consequences of treatment; or lacked time to consult their doctors. Beliefs about symptoms and pessimistic associations with cancer also led to delay. Treatment delays also resulted from misdiagnosis or waiting lists. Whether or not men should be taught to examine themselves routinely to check for testicular cancer is much debated. This study suggests that it is important that men are aware of the normal shape and feel of their testicles, and may benefit from information about signs and symptoms of testicular cancer and the excellent cure rate. Information, provided in surgeries where men feel welcome, might encourage men to seek help promptly when a problem arises. Our study also suggests that GPs may need to accept a low threshold for ultrasound investigation of testicular symptoms and that the ultrasound service needs to be improved. These measures may further reduce mortality and morbidity.

  4. Study to determine whether intraoperative frozen section biopsy improves surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Giovanni; Brenta, Federica; Malovini, Alberto; Musumarra, Gaetano; Scevola, Silvia; Faga, Angela

    2013-03-01

    Skin cancers are the most common types of cancer and their incidence has shown an increase of ∼4 to 8% per year over the last 40 years. The majority of skin cancers (∼97%) are non-melanoma skin cancers, mainly represented by basal cell (80%) and squamous cell carcinomas (20%). The use of intra-operative frozen section remains controversial in the surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, being commonly considered an optional tool, the reliability and effectiveness of which remain questionable. A large retrospective study was conducted to examine 670 surgical excisions of non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck in 481 patients over a period of nine years, between May, 2002 and December, 2011, at the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit of the University of Pavia, Salvatore Maugeri Research and Care Institute, Pavia, Italy. Results demonstrated the paradoxical ineffectiveness of an intra-operative frozen section biopsy in pursuing higher rates of radical excision in non-melanoma skin cancers. Nevertheless, a more detailed analysis on the use of frozen sections focusing on the various anatomical sites of the body demonstrated a reverse trend in the eyelids and canthi, where a higher success rate (87.50 vs. 69.77%) in the surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers was obtained with the use of an intra-operative frozen section biopsy. Results of the present study suggested that intra-operative frozen section biopsy be routinely used in the surgical treatment of nonmelanoma skin tumors involving the eyelids and canthi.

  5. Evaluation of the willingness-to-pay for cancer treatment in Korean metastatic breast cancer patients: a multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Do-Youn; Crawford, Bruce; Kim, Sung-Bae; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; McDonald, Jeffrey; Lee, Sang Yoon; Ko, Su-Kyoung; Ro, Jungsil

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the inherent value of breast cancer therapy a willingness-to-pay (WTP) study was conducted in Korean patients with metastatic breast cancer. Patients were prospectively enrolled from four study centers and completed quality of life questionnaires to reflect their status pre-cancer and their current health status. Clinical and socioeconomic data were collected to characterize the population and utilize during modeling. Patients' WTP for breast cancer treatment was assessed using an open-ended question following three rounds of bidding to better hone in on their maximal WTP, starting with one of three randomly assigned start bids. Predictors of patient WTP was evaluated using linear regression models. Associations between WTP and other parameters were evaluated with correlations. Korean metastatic breast cancer patients were WTP an average of KRW 8 696 329 (US$7555) per month to return to their pre-cancer health state, with those who were recently diagnosed as WTP the most (KRW 12 955 000 [$11 254]). WTP was closely associated with the patient's education level, income, personal financial difficulties, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and their experience of arm symptoms. The results suggest that patients are WTP significant amounts per month for treatment. Breast cancer patients are heavily burdened physically, mentally and financially, and the present study indicated this significant financial burden by disclosing its relationship with WTP. Providing a better understanding of the inherent value of treatment will allow Koreans to better evaluate treatment in the coming era of personalized medicine. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The conservative treatment of the breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami, L.

    1982-01-01

    Despite major achievements in the medical field, the survival rate of patients with breast cancer has not changed over the last 50 years. Certain treatments once taken as definitive are now being reviewed. The therapeutic evolution of breast cancer is studied and emphasis is given to new treatment modalities, particularly the conservative ones. (Author) [pt

  7. Study on the preparation of 166Ho-patch for a skin cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Kim, K. H.; Han, K. H.; Park, E. W.; Shin, B. C.; Park, K. B.; Lee, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive patch containing holmium-166 has been developed for skin cancer treatment, and then applied to animal model and patients with malignant skin cancer. 165Ho-Patch prepared by dissolving polyurethane and 165 Ho(NO 3 ) 3 ·5H 2 O in mixing solvent of DMF and THF and casting on aluminium dish was irradiated in ''HANARO'' reactor ( Φth = 1.25 X 1013 n/cm 2 '·sec, power = 15 MW), which results in preparing 166 Ho-Patch emitting β energy of Max. 1.86 MeV (51 %), 1.78 MeV (48 %), mean 0.67 MeV and low γ energy. The 166 Ho-Patch specially designed was applied to the superficial skin cancers. Their efficacy and safety have been investigated for several months. Radioactive patch was ready to prepare by post-irradiation without special danger by radioactive material. Skin tumor could be successfully treated with 166 Ho-Patch in animal model and patients. In animal model and patients, the world's first noninvasive 166Ho-Patch readily prepared by post-irradiation proved to be safe and effective in treatment for skin cancer

  8. Neoadjuvant docetaxel treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer: a clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Zhou, Ming; Reuther, Alwyn M; Dreicer, Robert; Klein, Eric A

    2007-09-15

    staining patterns were compared between PBx and RP specimens using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, only p53 expression (P = .017) and Bcl-2 expression (P = .014) were found to be increased significantly after neoadjuvant docetaxel treatment. However, after performing the Bonferroni adjustment, these differences were no longer significant (P > .005). Ki-67, ApopTag, beta-tubulin I, and beta-tubulin III expression levels also were increased after treatment; however, the differences were not found to be statistically significant. The expression levels of AMACR, p27, p21, and cyclin D1 were comparable in pretreatment and posttreatment specimens. The current results indicated that, although it will require longer follow-up studies and larger numbers of patients to ascertain the value of neoadjuvant treatment, the negative findings of the current study may explain the lack of clinical response in patients who received neoadjuvant docetaxel for PCa. Although the results were subject to interpretation limits based on the study size, the increased expression of p53 and Bcl-2 that was detected after treatment using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test suggested that the apoptotic pathway may be an important target for this drug, and further investigation is warranted. (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  9. A treatment planning study comparing helical tomotherapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for the treatment of anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kurian Jones; Syme, Alasdair; Small, Cormac; Warkentin, Heather; Quon, Harvey; Ghosh, Sunita; Field, Colin; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Patel, Samir; Usmani, Nawaid; Severin, Diane; Nijjar, Tirath; Fallone, Gino; Pedersen, John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A planning study to compare helical tomotherapy (HT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for the treatment of anal canal cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen (8 males and 8 females) patients with anal cancer previously treated radically were identified. HT and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric comparisons of the plans were performed. The planning goals were to deliver 54 Gy to the tumor (PTV 54Gy ) and 48 Gy to the nodes at risk (PTV Node ) in 30 fractions. Results: PTVs: HT plans were more homogeneous for both men and women. Male patients: HT vs. IMRT: D max : 55.87 ± 0.58 vs. 59.17 ± 3.24 (p = 0.036); D min : 52.91 ± 0.36 vs. 44.09 ± 6.84 (p = 0.012); female patients: HT vs. IMRT: D max : 56.14 ± 0.71 vs. 59.47 ± 0.81 (p = 0.012); D min : 52.36 ± 0.87 vs. 50.97 ± 1.42 (p = 0.028). OARs: In general, HT plans delivered a lower dose to the peritoneal cavity, external genitalia and the bladder and IMRT plans resulted in greater sparing of the pelvic bones (iliac crest/femur) for both men and women. Iliac crest/femur: the difference was significant only for the mean V10 Gy of iliac crest in women (p ≤ 0.012). External genitalia: HT plans achieved better sparing in women compared to men (p ≤ 0.046). For men, the mean doses were 18.96 ± 3.17 and 15.72 ± 3.21 for the HT and IMRT plan, respectively (p ≤ 0.017). Skin: both techniques achieved comparable sparing of the non-target skin (p = NS). Conclusions: HT and IMRT techniques achieved comparable target dose coverage and organ sparing, whereas HT plans were more homogeneous for both men and women.

  10. [Treatments for Pancreatic Cancer with Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Junji

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer, adenocarcinoma, generally rapidly progresses, and if a metastatic lesion is detected, chemotherapy is applied even in solitary metastasis. However, surgical resection for solitary metastasis have been reported to achieve long survival in some pancreatic cancer patients. In a prospective study of surgery for hepatic and lymph node oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer, long survival of 5 years or more was reported around 10%. Furthermore, longer survival and fewer rerecurrence were achieved with surgery in lung metastasis than in liver metastasis and loco-regional recurrence. Although there has been no establishment of concept or no consensus of treatment strategy for oligometastasis in pancreatic cancer, some patients with pancreatic cancer have long disease-free survival by surgery for oligometastasis. A population of pancreatic cancer patients who have benefits of surgery for oligometastasis should be identified, and it is necessary to establish treatments for oligometastasis as standard treatments in pancreatic cancer.

  11. The Medical Necessity for Medicinal Cannabis: Prospective, Observational Study Evaluating the Treatment in Cancer Patients on Supportive or Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Bar-Sela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cancer patients using cannabis report better influence from the plant extract than from synthetic products. However, almost all the research conducted to date has been performed with synthetic products. We followed patients with a medicinal cannabis license to evaluate the advantages and side effects of using cannabis by cancer patients. Methods. The study included two interviews based on questionnaires regarding symptoms and side effects, the first held on the day the license was issued and the second 6–8 weeks later. Cancer symptoms and cannabis side effects were documented on scales from 0 to 4 following the CTCAE. The distress thermometer was used also. Results. Of the 211 patients who had a first interview, only 131 had the second interview, 25 of whom stopped treatment after less than a week. All cancer or anticancer treatment-related symptoms showed significant improvement (P<0.001. No significant side effects except for memory lessening in patients with prolonged cannabis use (P=0.002 were noted. Conclusion. The positive effects of cannabis on various cancer-related symptoms are tempered by reliance on self-reporting for many of the variables. Although studies with a control group are missing, the improvement in symptoms should push the use of cannabis in palliative treatment of oncology patients.

  12. The medical necessity for medicinal cannabis: prospective, observational study evaluating the treatment in cancer patients on supportive or palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Vorobeichik, Marina; Drawsheh, Saher; Omer, Anat; Goldberg, Victoria; Muller, Ella

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cancer patients using cannabis report better influence from the plant extract than from synthetic products. However, almost all the research conducted to date has been performed with synthetic products. We followed patients with a medicinal cannabis license to evaluate the advantages and side effects of using cannabis by cancer patients. Methods. The study included two interviews based on questionnaires regarding symptoms and side effects, the first held on the day the license was issued and the second 6-8 weeks later. Cancer symptoms and cannabis side effects were documented on scales from 0 to 4 following the CTCAE. The distress thermometer was used also. Results. Of the 211 patients who had a first interview, only 131 had the second interview, 25 of whom stopped treatment after less than a week. All cancer or anticancer treatment-related symptoms showed significant improvement (P cannabis use (P = 0.002) were noted. Conclusion. The positive effects of cannabis on various cancer-related symptoms are tempered by reliance on self-reporting for many of the variables. Although studies with a control group are missing, the improvement in symptoms should push the use of cannabis in palliative treatment of oncology patients.

  13. Complete Neoadjuvant Treatment for Rectal Cancer: The Brown University Oncology Group CONTRE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kimberly; Safran, Howard; Sikov, William; Vrees, Matthew; Klipfel, Adam; Shah, Nishit; Schechter, Steven; Oldenburg, Nicklas; Pricolo, Victor; Rosati, Kayla; Dipetrillo, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Following preoperative chemoradiation and surgery, many patients with stage II to III rectal cancer are unable to tolerate full-dose adjuvant chemotherapy. BrUOG R-224 was designed to assess the impact of COmplete Neoadjuvant Treatment for REctal cancer (CONTRE), primary chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation and surgery, on treatment delivery, toxicities, and pathologic response at surgery. Patients with clinical stage II to III (T3 to T4 and/or N1 to N2) rectal cancer received 8 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 followed by capecitabine 825 mg/m bid concurrent with 50.4 Gy intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Surgery was performed 6 to 10 weeks after chemoradiation. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled between August 2010 and June 2013. Median age was 61 years (30 to 79 y); 7 patients (18%) were clinical stage II and 32 (82%) stage III. Thirty-six patients (92%) received all 8 cycles of mFOLFOX6, of whom 35 completed subsequent chemoradiation; thus 89% of patients received CONTRE as planned. No unexpected toxicities were reported. All patients had resolution of bleeding and improvement of obstructive symptoms, with no complications requiring surgical intervention. Pathologic complete response (ypT0N0) was demonstrated in 13 patients (33%; 95% CI, 18.24%-47.76%). CONTRE seems to be a well-tolerated alternative to the current standard treatment sequence. Evaluating its impact on long-term outcomes would require a large randomized trial, but using pathologic response as an endpoint, it could serve as a platform for assessing the addition of novel agents to preoperative treatment in stage II to III rectal cancer.

  14. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer: part 2. Final evaluation of the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, P.O.; Damber, J.E.; Hagerman, I.

    2008-01-01

    To compare parenteral estrogen therapy in the form of high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) with combined androgen deprivation (CAD) in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases. The aim of the study was to compare anticancer efficacy and adverse events...

  15. Hyperdosed radiotherapy in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machidon, Vasile; Jovmir, Vasile; Stanislav, Anastasia; Scurtu, Elena; Gazibar, Valeria; Lungu, Viorica

    2010-01-01

    The results of 328 patients with metastasizing breast cancer (BCM) are presented in the article. The distant metastases development in 4,5 % from the lot, which received the neoadjuvant treatment, is a high assurance in argumentation of preoperative hyperdosed X-ray therapy in breast cancer treatment. 15,8% from 100% - that is the significance of hyper dosed X-ray therapy versus classic X-ray therapy used preoperative in case of metastasizing breast cancer. The obtained data can not deny the efficacy of hyperdosed X-ray therapy in preoperative treatment of breast cancer. The hyperdosed X-ray therapy in the present moment remains current in the treatment of breast cancer and different localized cancers. (authors)

  16. Is clarithromycin a potential treatment for cachexia in people with lung cancer? A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Sarah; Crosby, Vincent; Potter, Vanessa; Hennig, Ivo; Baldwin, David; Ndlovu, Mehluli; Paradine, Sharon; Wilcock, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Clarithromycin may improve cachexia and survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but adequately controlled data are lacking. This study was undertaken primarily to inform the feasibility and scale of a phase III trial. Eligible consenting patients with stage IV NSCLC and cachexia were to be randomized to receive either clarithromycin 250mg twice daily or placebo for eight weeks. Aspects of trial feasibility recorded included numbers eligible, approached and recruited, together with adherence and completion of treatment and assessments. Over 6 months, none of 125 patients identified fulfilled the entry criteria. The commonest reasons for ineligibility were the use of an excluded concurrent drug (45, 36%), brain metastases (22, 18%), poor performance status (21, 17%) and current chemotherapy (15, 12%). A phase III trial of clarithromycin using these entry criteria is not feasible in this setting. Other macrolides that have a lower risk of a drug-drug interaction may be more practical to pursue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Infertility, infertility treatment, and achievement of pregnancy in female survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Sara E.; Najita, Julie S.; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Diller, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have documented decreased pregnancy rates and early menopause in female cancer survivors; however, infertility rates and reproductive interventions have not been studied. This study investigates infertility and time to pregnancy among female childhood cancer survivors, and analyzes treatment characteristics associated with infertility and subsequent pregnancy. Methods The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) is a cohort study including five-year cancer survivors from 26 institutions who were infertility, medical treatment for infertility, the time to first pregnancy in survivors and siblings, and the risk of infertility in survivors by demographic, disease, and treatment variables were analyzed. Findings Survivors had an increased risk of clinical infertility (>1 year of attempts at conception without success) compared to siblings which was most pronounced at early reproductive ages (≤24 years Relative Risk (RR)=2·92, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1·18–7·20; 25–29 years RR=1·61, 95% CI 1·05–2·48; 30–39 years RR=1·37, 95% CI 1·11–1·69). Despite being equally likely to seek treatment for infertility, survivors were less likely to be prescribed medication for treatment of infertility (RR=0·57, 95% CI 0·46–0·70). Increasing doses of uterine radiation and alkylating agent chemotherapy were most strongly associated with infertility. Although survivors had an increased time to pregnancy interval (p=0·032), 64·2% (292/455) with infertility achieved a pregnancy. Interpretation A more comprehensive understanding of infertility after cancer is critical for counseling and decision-making regarding future attempts at conception as well as fertility preservation. PMID:23856401

  18. Treatment of early breast cancer, a long-term follow-up study: the GOCS experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturbe, Julián; Zwenger, Ariel; Leone, José Pablo; Verdera, Palmira Perez; Vallejo, Carlos; Romero, Alberto; Perez, Juán; Machiavelli, Mario; Leone, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Most cases of breast cancer are diagnosed at early stage of disease; therefore, treatment is oriented to increase the disease-free interval (DFI) and overall survival (OS). The prognosis, in comparison with other malignancies, has improved in the last decades as a result of mammographic screening. The aim of the study was to report the incidence of local and distant recurrence, DFI and OS in patients (pts) with stage I and stage II breast cancer over a period of 26 years divided into three groups. From January 1978 to December 2004, 927 women with early breast cancer (EBC) were included, 350 were stage I and 577 Stage II (AJCC 2002). Patients were divided according to the year of diagnosis into three periods of 10 years: Group A (1978-1987) 135 pts, Group B (1988-1997) 412 pts, and Group C (1998-2004) 380 pts. DFI was analyzed from the date of initial diagnosis to the date of local or distant recurrence. OS was estimated from the date of initial diagnosis to the last follow-up or date of death. Median age was 51 years (28-92). Conservative surgery was performed in 69% of pts, adjuvant radiation therapy in 78%, adjuvant chemotherapy in 29%, and adjuvant hormone therapy in 18%. The median follow-up was 8.4 years (0.3-30). The mean tumor size in Group A was 2.7 cm, in Group B 2.2 cm, and in Group C 1.94 cm (p = 0.0001). The percentage of pts with stage I increased from 13% in Group A to 38% in Group B and to 47% in Group C (p = 0.0001). Local recurrence was documented in 5% of all pts, whereas 28% developed metastatic disease. The DFI and OS showed a statistically significant difference among the three groups (p = 0.005). DFI rate at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years was 71%, 67%, 65%, 65%, and 64%, respectively. OS at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years was 82%, 62%, 49%, 39%, and 28%, respectively. Factors that had an effect in OS demonstrated by the multivariate regression analysis were: Tumor size, ER status, and nodal involvement (p < 0.001). Clinical outcomes in EBC in our

  19. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  20. Cryosurgery in Cancer Treatment: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  1. A pilot study to assess the level of depression and the coping strategies adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitumoni Konwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer, the second most common cause of death, has become a major health problem. Depression is the most common psychological problem encountered in patients with cancer. The coping skills adopted may affect the mental health of patients. Therefore, this research is undertaken to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by the patients diagnosed with cancer. Materials and methods: A descriptive study to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl was carried out from April to May 2014 with 30 convenient samples. Depression was assessed by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS developed by Zigmond and Snaith in 1983. Coping strategy adopted by patients were assessed by revised version of the Ways of Coping Checklist developed by Folkman and Lazarus in 1985. Results: Findings of the study showed that depression was universal to all the cancer patients. Majority of cancer patients (66.5% had moderate depression while 13.26% of the cancer patients had severe depression, and only 6.7% of them reported to have low depression. The most effective coping strategy adopted was reappraisal, followed by distancing. There is significant correlation between depression and reappraisal (r=-0.538, p<0.002, and also with depression and acceptance (r=-0.415, p<0.022 strategies. Conclusion: As depression is universal to all cancer patients, use of appropriate coping strategy is very essential to improve their quality of life. The recognition of coping strategies by health team may enable appropriate information and interventions to be provided at optimal times for each individual.

  2. Fertility effects of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Donald E; Hacker, Neville

    2003-01-01

    Cancer sufferers are a subfertile group, and most treatments have the potential to adversely affect gonadal function. As cancer treatment becomes more effective and survival rates improve there are more cancer survivors in the reproductive age group for whom parenting is an important consideration. This article outlines the effects on fertility of cancer treatments and techniques to minimise the risk of infertility. The overall prospects for younger cancer sufferers to either retain their fertility or have genetic offspring is now better than ever before, due to advances in assisted reproductive technology, the appropriate use of fertility sparing surgery and other techniques to reduce the toxicity of therapy on the reproductive organs. These advances raise new moral and ethical concerns that must be considered before advising cancer sufferers of the options for preserving reproductive capacity.

  3. Quality of life in cancer patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment with LMWH for venous thromboembolism: the QUAVITEC study on behalf of the Groupe Francophone Thrombose et Cancer (GFTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Dominique; Cajfinger, Francis; Falvo, Nicolas; Berremili, Toufek; Couturaud, Francis; Bensaoula, Okba; Védrine, Lionel; Bensalha, Hocine; Bonnet, Isabelle; Péré-Vergé, Denis; Coudurier, Marie; Li, Veronique; Rafii, Hanadi; Benzidia, Ilham; Connors, Jean M; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu

    2018-06-05

    Clinical guidelines recommend at least 3-months low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) treatment for established venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients. However, no study has analyzed the impact of 3-6 months of LMWH therapy on quality-of-life (QoL) in cancer patients. Among 400 cancer patients included at M0, 88.8% received long-term LMWH. Using a random-effects linear regression model with time as covariate, QoL scores in the MOS SF-36 (Global HRQoL, 1.3-fold per month [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-1.79], p < 0.0001) and EORTC QLQ-C30 (global health status/qol, 2.25-fold per month [95% CI 1.63-2.88]; p < 0.0001) questionnaires significantly improved over the 6-month study period in patients treated with LMWH, while VEINES-QOL scores did not change. In the MOS SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-C30, the following factors were associated with change in QoL: symptomatic VTE, cancer dissemination and histological type. Factors pertaining to reduced mobility were also identified as significant predictors of QoL outcomes, including being bedridden in the MOS SF-36 and ECOG score ≥ 2 in the EORTC QLQ-C30. Presence of acute infection and not undergoing anti-angiogenic therapy were additional factors associated with QoL improvement in the EORTC QLQ-C30. QUAVITEC, a prospective, longitudinal, multicenter study, recruited all consecutive eligible adult cancer patients with objectively confirmed VTE between February 2011 and 2012. Patients were asked to answer three QoL questionnaires at anticoagulant treatment initiation (M0) and at 3 (M3) and 6 (M6)-month follow-ups. QUAVITEC is the first study to show that QoL was improved in cancer patients receiving long-term LMWH treatment for established VTE.

  4. Intravenous Mistletoe Treatment in Integrative Cancer Care: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Procedures, Concepts, and Observations of Expert Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Gunver S; Mussler, Milena; Fuchs, Dieter; Kiene, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mistletoe therapy (MT) is widely used in patient-centered integrative cancer care. The objective of this study was to explore the concepts, procedures, and observations of expert doctors, with a focus on intravenous MT. Method. A qualitative interview study was conducted with 35 highly experienced doctors specialized in integrative and anthroposophic medicine. Structured qualitative content analysis was applied. For triangulation, the results were compared with external evidence that was systematically collected, reviewed, and presented. Results. Doctors perform individualized patient assessments that lead to multimodal treatment approaches. The underlying goal is to help patients to live with and overcome disease. Mistletoe infusions are a means of accomplishing this goal. They are applied to stabilize disease, achieve responsiveness, induce fever, improve quality of life, and improve the tolerability of conventional cancer treatments. The doctors reported long-term disease stability and improvements in patients' general condition, vitality, strength, thermal comfort, appetite, sleep, pain from bone metastases, dyspnea in pulmonary lymphangitis carcinomatosa, fatigue, and cachexia; chemotherapy was better tolerated. Also patients' emotional and mental condition was reported to have improved. Conclusion. Individualized integrative cancer treatment including MT aims to help cancer patients to live well with their disease. Further research should investigate the reported observations.

  5. Intravenous Mistletoe Treatment in Integrative Cancer Care: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Procedures, Concepts, and Observations of Expert Doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunver S. Kienle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mistletoe therapy (MT is widely used in patient-centered integrative cancer care. The objective of this study was to explore the concepts, procedures, and observations of expert doctors, with a focus on intravenous MT. Method. A qualitative interview study was conducted with 35 highly experienced doctors specialized in integrative and anthroposophic medicine. Structured qualitative content analysis was applied. For triangulation, the results were compared with external evidence that was systematically collected, reviewed, and presented. Results. Doctors perform individualized patient assessments that lead to multimodal treatment approaches. The underlying goal is to help patients to live with and overcome disease. Mistletoe infusions are a means of accomplishing this goal. They are applied to stabilize disease, achieve responsiveness, induce fever, improve quality of life, and improve the tolerability of conventional cancer treatments. The doctors reported long-term disease stability and improvements in patients’ general condition, vitality, strength, thermal comfort, appetite, sleep, pain from bone metastases, dyspnea in pulmonary lymphangitis carcinomatosa, fatigue, and cachexia; chemotherapy was better tolerated. Also patients’ emotional and mental condition was reported to have improved. Conclusion. Individualized integrative cancer treatment including MT aims to help cancer patients to live well with their disease. Further research should investigate the reported observations.

  6. A study of the plan dosimetric evaluation on the rectal cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyun Hak; An, Beom Seok; Kim, Dae Il; Lee, Yang Hoon; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In order to minimize the dose of femoral head as an appropriate treatment plan for rectal cancer radiation therapy, we compare and evaluate the usefulness of 3-field 3D conformal radiation therapy(below 3fCRT), which is a universal treatment method, and 5-field 3D conformal radiation therapy(below 5fCRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). The 10 cases of rectal cancer that treated with 21EX were enrolled. Those cases were planned by Eclipse(Ver. 10.0.42, Varian, USA), PRO3(Progressive Resolution Optimizer 10.0.28) and AAA(Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Ver. 10.0.28). 3fCRT and 5fCRT plan has 0 degrees, 270 degrees, 90 degrees and 0 degrees, 95 degrees, 45 degrees, 315 degrees, 265 degrees gantry angle, respectively. VMAT plan parameters consisted of 15MV coplanar 360 degrees 1 arac. Treatment prescription was employed delivering 54Gy to recum in 30 fractions. To minimize the dose difference that shows up randomly on optimizing, VMAT plans were optimized and calculated twice, and normalized to the target V100%=95%. The indexes of evaluation are D of Both femoral head and aceta fossa, total MU, H.I.(Homogeneity index) and C.I.(Conformity index) of the PTV. All VMAT plans were verified by gamma test with portal dosimetry using EPID. D of Rt. femoral head was 53.08 Gy, 50.27 Gy, and 30.92 Gy, respectively, in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. Likewise, Lt. Femoral head showed average 53.68 Gy, 51.01 Gy and 29.23 Gy in the same order. D of Rt. aceta fossa was 54.86 Gy, 52.40 Gy, 30.37 Gy, respectively, in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. Likewise, Lt. Femoral head showed average 53.68 Gy, 51.01 Gy and 29.23 Gy in the same order. The maximum dose of both femoral head and aceta fossa was higher in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. C.I. showed the lowest VMAT treatment plan with an average of 1.64, 1.48, and 0.99 in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. There was no significant difference on H

  7. Cervical cancer treatment costs and cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in Vietnam: a PRIME modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Minh, Hoang; My, Nguyen Thi Tuyet; Jit, Mark

    2017-05-15

    Cervical cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer mortality among women in South Vietnam and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in North Vietnam. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has the potential to substantially decrease this burden. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that a cost-effectiveness analysis of HPV vaccination is conducted before nationwide introduction. The Papillomavirus Rapid Interface for Modeling and Economics (PRIME) model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccine introduction. A costing study based on expert panel discussions, interviews and hospital case note reviews was conducted to explore the cost of cervical cancer care. The cost of cervical cancer treatment ranged from US$368 - 11400 depending on the type of hospital and treatment involved. Under Gavi-negotiated prices of US$4.55, HPV vaccination is likely to be very cost-effective with an incremental cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted in the range US$780 - 1120. However, under list prices for Cervarix and Gardasil in Vietnam, the incremental cost per DALY averted for HPV vaccination can exceed US$8000. HPV vaccine introduction appears to be economically attractive only if Vietnam is able to procure the vaccine at Gavi prices. This highlights the importance of initiating a nationwide vaccination programme while such prices are still available.

  8. Evaluation of Nutritional Status of Cancer Patients during Treatment by Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment: a Hospital-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dibyendu; Kannan, Ravi; Tapkire, Ritesh; Nath, Soumitra

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience malnutrition. Cancer and cancer therapy effects nutritional status through alterations in the metabolic system and reduction in food intake. In the present study, fifty seven cancer patients were selected as subjects from the oncology ward of Cachar Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Silchar, India. Evaluation of nutritional status of cancer patients during treatment was carried out by scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA). The findings of PG-SGA showed that 15.8% (9) were well nourished, 31.6% (18) were moderately or suspected of being malnourished and 52.6% (30) were severely malnourished. The prevalence of malnutrition was highest in lip/oral (33.33%) cancer patients. The study showed that the prevalence of malnutrition (84.2%) was high in cancer patients during treatment.

  9. An evidence-based treatment algorithm for colorectal polyp cancers: results from the Scottish Screen-detected Polyp Cancer Study (SSPoCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, C H; Ventham, N T; Mansouri, D; Wilson, M; Ramsay, G; Mackay, C D; Parnaby, C N; Smith, D; On, J; Speake, D; McFarlane, G; Neo, Y N; Aitken, E; Forrest, C; Knight, K; McKay, A; Nair, H; Mulholland, C; Robertson, J H; Carey, F A; Steele, Rjc

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal polyp cancers present clinicians with a treatment dilemma. Decisions regarding whether to offer segmental resection or endoscopic surveillance are often taken without reference to good quality evidence. The aim of this study was to develop a treatment algorithm for patients with screen-detected polyp cancers. This national cohort study included all patients with a polyp cancer identified through the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme between 2000 and 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess the impact of clinical, endoscopic and pathological variables on the rate of adverse events (residual tumour in patients undergoing segmental resection or cancer-related death or disease recurrence in any patient). These data were used to develop a clinically relevant treatment algorithm. 485 patients with polyp cancers were included. 186/485 (38%) underwent segmental resection and residual tumour was identified in 41/186 (22%). The only factor associated with an increased risk of residual tumour in the bowel wall was incomplete excision of the original polyp (OR 5.61, p=0.001), while only lymphovascular invasion was associated with an increased risk of lymph node metastases (OR 5.95, p=0.002). When patients undergoing segmental resection or endoscopic surveillance were considered together, the risk of adverse events was significantly higher in patients with incomplete excision (OR 10.23, p<0.001) or lymphovascular invasion (OR 2.65, p=0.023). A policy of surveillance is adequate for the majority of patients with screen-detected colorectal polyp cancers. Consideration of segmental resection should be reserved for those with incomplete excision or evidence of lymphovascular invasion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Diagnosis, clinical staging, and treatment of breast cancer: a retrospective multiyear study of a large controlled population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta, Antonio P; Chernicoff, Helen O; Trinh, Jennifer B; Parker, Robert G

    2004-04-01

    This study compares diagnosis, staging, and treatment of newly diagnosed breast cancer cases over a several-year period. The study design was a retrospective, multiyear comparison between new breast cancer cases diagnosed in 1995 (n = 827) and 1997 (n = 815). Cases were identified through claims data, and medical record abstraction was used to verify each case and to identify clinical staging and type of treatment. All medical records were reviewed by one physician to maximize internal reliability. Both cohorts were predominantly 40 and older, white, married, and postmenopausal. The latter cohort (1997) had a higher proportion of women aged 70 to 79 and a lower proportion of women aged 40 to 49. In both cohorts, women age 40 and older were likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at the time of mammographic screening, while women younger than 40 were more likely to be diagnosed by clinical breast examination. In logistic regression analyses, controlling for confounding factors such as age, undergoing mammographic screening increased the likelihood of having a low cancer stage at diagnosis by more than three and a half times. Mammographic screening was statistically significantly positively associated with having eligibility for breast-conserving treatment (BCT); however, although an increase in BCT eligibility was observed, actual use of BCT did not change. Mammography leads to a lower clinical stage as well as a greater likelihood of BCT eligibility at time of breast cancer diagnosis, but may not have a substantial effect on treatment choice (lumpectomy vs. mastectomy). Between 1995 and 1997, a trend was observed toward downstaging of disease at diagnosis; further research is warranted to observe whether this trend continues over time.

  11. Perceptions of support among Swedish parents of children after end of successful cancer treatment: a prospective, longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkola, Laura; Hovén, Emma; Cernvall, Martin; von Essen, Louise; Grönqvist, Helena

    2017-12-01

    Most children survive childhood cancer, however parenting a child diagnosed with cancer is a major challenge. The main aim of the current study was to describe Swedish parents' need, opportunity and benefit of support from healthcare professionals and significant others after end of a child's successful cancer treatment. Data was collected from approximately one week after end of successful treatment/six months after transplantation (T4, n = 212) up to five years thereafter (T7, n = 137). Parents answered questions via telephone about need, opportunity and benefit of talking to psychologists, social workers, partners and friends. The proportion reporting need of support from healthcare professionals varied between 73% (mothers' need of support from social workers, T4) and 7% (fathers' need of support from psychologists/social workers, T7). Need of support from significant others varied between 99% (mothers' and fathers' need of support from partners, T4) and 27% (fathers' need of support from friends, T7). The proportion reporting need of support decreased over time (p friends at T5 (p parent perceive support from healthcare professionals as beneficial. More parents should get access to psychosocial support services after end of a child's cancer treatment/transplantation.

  12. A study of an effective sunitinib–chemotherapeutic combination regimen for bladder cancer treatment using a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dah-Shyong Yu

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Combination of the tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor sunitinib with gemcitabine chemotherapy synergistically enhances tumor cytotoxicity and may provide a new treatment modality for advanced bladder cancer.

  13. Cancer odor in the blood of ovarian cancer patients: a retrospective study of detection by dogs during treatment, 3 and 6 months afterward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, György; Andersson, Håkan; Nemes, Szilárd

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades it has been noted that trained dogs can detect specific odor molecules emitted by cancer cells. We have shown that the same odor can also be detected in the patient’s blood with high sensitivity and specificity by trained dogs. In the present study, we examined how the ability of dogs to detect this smell was affected by treatment to reduce tumor burden, including surgery and five courses of chemotherapy. In Series I, one drop of plasma from each of 42 ovarian cancer patients (taken between the fifth and sixth courses of chemotherapy) and 210 samples from healthy controls were examined by two trained dogs. All 42 patients in Series I had clinical complete responses, all except two had normal CA-125 values and all were declared healthy after primary treatment. In Series II, the dogs examined blood taken from a new subset of 10 patients at 3 and 6 months after the last (sixth) course of chemotherapy. In Series I, the dogs showed high sensitivity (97%) and specificity (99%), for detecting viable cancer cells or molecular cancer markers in the patients’ plasma. Indeed, 29 of 42 patients died within 5 years. In Series II, the dogs indicated positive samples from three of the 10 patients at both the 3- and 6-month follow-up. All three patients had recurrences, and two died 3–4 years after the end of treatment. This was one of the most important findings of this study. Seven patients were still alive in January 2013. Although our study was based on a limited number of selected patients, it clearly suggests that canine detection gave us a very good assessment of the prognosis of the study patients. Being able to detect a marker based on the specific cancer odor in the blood would enhance primary diagnosis and enable earlier relapse diagnosis, consequently increasing survival

  14. Cancer odor in the blood of ovarian cancer patients: a retrospective study of detection by dogs during treatment, 3 and 6 months afterward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, György; Andersson, Håkan; Nemes, Szilárd

    2013-08-26

    In recent decades it has been noted that trained dogs can detect specific odor molecules emitted by cancer cells. We have shown that the same odor can also be detected in the patient's blood with high sensitivity and specificity by trained dogs. In the present study, we examined how the ability of dogs to detect this smell was affected by treatment to reduce tumor burden, including surgery and five courses of chemotherapy. In Series I, one drop of plasma from each of 42 ovarian cancer patients (taken between the fifth and sixth courses of chemotherapy) and 210 samples from healthy controls were examined by two trained dogs. All 42 patients in Series I had clinical complete responses, all except two had normal CA-125 values and all were declared healthy after primary treatment. In Series II, the dogs examined blood taken from a new subset of 10 patients at 3 and 6 months after the last (sixth) course of chemotherapy. In Series I, the dogs showed high sensitivity (97%) and specificity (99%), for detecting viable cancer cells or molecular cancer markers in the patients' plasma. Indeed, 29 of 42 patients died within 5 years. In Series II, the dogs indicated positive samples from three of the 10 patients at both the 3- and 6-month follow-up. All three patients had recurrences, and two died 3-4 years after the end of treatment. This was one of the most important findings of this study. Seven patients were still alive in January 2013. Although our study was based on a limited number of selected patients, it clearly suggests that canine detection gave us a very good assessment of the prognosis of the study patients. Being able to detect a marker based on the specific cancer odor in the blood would enhance primary diagnosis and enable earlier relapse diagnosis, consequently increasing survival.

  15. Advances in breast cancer treatment and prevention: preclinical studies on aromatase inhibitors and new selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiff, Rachel; Chamness, Gary C; Brown, Powel H

    2003-01-01

    Intensive basic and clinical research over the past 20 years has yielded crucial molecular understanding into how estrogen and the estrogen receptor act to regulate breast cancer and has led to the development of more effective, less toxic, and safer hormonal therapy agents for breast cancer management and prevention. Selective potent aromatase inhibitors are now challenging the hitherto gold standard of hormonal therapy, the selective estrogen-receptor modulator tamoxifen. Furthermore, new selective estrogen-receptor modulators such as arzoxifene, currently under clinical development, offer the possibility of selecting one with a more ideal pharmacological profile for treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Two recent studies in preclinical model systems that evaluate mechanisms of action of these new drugs and suggestions about their optimal clinical use are discussed

  16. Outcome of cervix uteri cancer patients: Clinical treatment results and toxicity profile in a retrospective study from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mohamed E; Bahadur, Yasir A; Hassouna, Ashraf H; Fawzy, Ehab E; Nasr, Azza M; Sadiq, Bakr B; Dada, Reyad; Sait, Khalid H; Anfinan, Nisrin M

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the survival outcome, pattern of failure and prognostic factors in cervix uteri cancer patients. We reviewed the data of 60 patients with stages IB-IVA cancer who were treated between January 2004 and December 2010. Most patients (n = 50; 83%) had squamous cell carcinoma. Stage IIB was the most common presentation (n = 41; 68%). Forty-seven patients (78%) received Cisplatin concurrent with radiotherapy (CRT). The 2- and 4-year overall survival (OS) was 82% and 79%, respectively. Prolongation of the overall treatment time (OAT) for greater than 56 days, advanced stage and pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) levels (cervix uteri cancer patients and the prognostic factors are comparable to those of previous reports. Orthogonal brachytherapy planning and vaginal infiltration negatively predicted relapse. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Survived but feeling vulnerable and insecure: a qualitative study of the mental preparation for RTW after breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiedtke Corine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvements in treatment have resulted in an increasing number of cancer survivors potentially being able to return to work after medical treatment. In this paper we focus on the considerations regarding return to work (RTW of breast cancer absentees in the Belgian context and how these considerations are related to reactions from their social environment. Methods A qualitative study was performed to understand the RTW considerations of Belgian breast cancer absentees who had undergone breast cancer surgery in 2006. Twenty-two participants (mean age 46 were included and interviewed between May 2008 and August 2009 in their personal environment. An in-depth analysis (Grounded Theory took place using the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven (Quagol. Results Before the actual RTW, breast cancer employees try to build an image of the future resumption of work based on medical grounds and their knowledge of the workplace. Four matters are considered prior to RTW: (i women want to leave the sick role and wish to keep their job; (ii they consider whether working is worth the effort; (iii they reflect on their capability; and (iv they have doubts about being accepted in the workplace after returning. These inner thoughts are both product and input for the interaction with the social environment. The whole process is coloured by uncertainty and vulnerability. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that mental preparation for RTW is not a linear process of improvement. It shows a detailed picture of four types of considerations made by breast cancer survivors before they actually resume work. Vulnerability appears to be an overarching theme during mental preparation. As the social environment plays an important role, people from that environment must become more aware of their influence on decreasing or increasing a woman’s vulnerability while preparing for RTW.

  18. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with

  19. Treatment-associated leukemia following testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travis, LB; Andersson, M; Gospodarowicz, M; van Leeuwen, FE; Bergfeldt, K; Lynch, CF; Curtis, RE; Kohler, BA; Wiklund, T; Storm, H; Holowaty, E; Hall, P; Pukkala, E; Sleijfer, DT; Clarke, EA; Boice, JD; Stovall, M; Gilbert, E

    2000-01-01

    Background: Men with testicular cancer are at an increased risk of leukemia, but the relationship to prior treatments is not well characterized. The purpose of our study was to describe the risk of leukemia following radiotherapy and chemotherapy for testicular cancer. Methods: Within a

  20. Patterns of care study of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer in Japan. Influence of age on parameters of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1998-01-01

    In Japan, the elderly population is growing rapidly, and therefore, so is the number of cancer patients who are not good candidates for aggressive surgery or chemotherapy. Radiation therapy offers excellent potential for the treatment of such patients, with minimal invasion and functional preservation. A Patterns of Care Study (PCS) examined the parameters of treatments used for patients with esophageal cancer to determine nationwide variations by age. From July 1996 through February 1997, external nationwide PCS audits were performed for 29 institutions. Medical charts were reviewed for 455 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer treated between 1992 and 1994. The parameters of treatments used for these patients were compared between those aged ≥75 years (elderly; n=113) and those aged <75 years (younger; n=342). Surgery was used in 49% of the younger group and in 17% of the elderly group (p<0.0001) while chemotherapy was used in 48% of the younger and 24% of the older group (p<0.0001). The ratio of non-surgery group with radiation therapy increased significantly from 49% to 82% (p<0.0001). Approximately 70% of the non-surgery patients received an external radiation dose of more than 60 Gy, even in the elderly (p=0.3001). Preliminary results showed no significant difference in survival between the two age groups (p=0.5559). The use of radiation therapy in elderly people with esophageal cancer has increased markedly. The PCS provided important information about variations in radiotherapy parameters in patients with esophageal cancer in relation to age. Such information should be useful for future prospective studies of the elderly. (author)

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above the waist. Tiny tubules in the kidneys filter and clean the blood . They take out waste ... to bladder cancer. Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals, or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment ...

  2. Fatigue states after cancer treatment occur both in association with, and independent of, mood disorder: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Tracey

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent fatigue is recognised as one of the most common, ongoing symptoms reported by patients following cancer treatment and may have profound effects on the quality of life. However, recent cross-sectional studies also highlight the close relationship between cancer related fatigue (CRF and diagnoses of depression or anxiety disorder. There is currently limited information about the relationships between these conditions over time. We sought to examine the longitudinal relationships between fatigue and mood disorder in women treated with adjuvant therapy for early stage breast cancer. Methods Women who had recently completed adjuvant therapy for Stage I or II breast cancer (n = 212 were sent a questionnaire with established case thresholds for clinically-significant fatigue and psychological disorder, as well as a questionnaire assessing disability. Potentially relevant variables linked to fatigue states, including age, treatment modality, menopausal status, and hematological indices were recorded. The illness outcomes were assessed over 48 months of follow-up. Results The 176 women who responded to the questionnaire (84% had a mean age of 55 (range 24–83 years and had completed adjuvant treatment on average 10 (range 4.7 – 16.3 months previously. Radiotherapy had been administered, either alone (50% of women or in combination with chemotherapy (36%. Responses from 87 women (48% indicated a significant fatigue state (termed here post-cancer fatigue; PCF, and from 59 women (33% responses indicated significant psychological distress. Thirty-four women (19% were cases of fatigue alone (i.e. unaccompanied by psychological disorder, whereas 52 (30% were cases of both disorders. Multivariate analysis did not reveal any association between demographic, clinical or laboratory variables, and caseness for PCF. Self-reported functional disability was significantly associated with fatigue. Follow-up at 24, 36 and 48 months

  3. PSYCHOSEXUAL FUNCTIONING AFTER TREATMENT FOR CANCER OF THE CERVIX - A COMPARATIVE AND LONGITUDINAL-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHULTZ, WCMW; VANDEWIEL, HBM; BOUMA, J

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-six couples participated in a 2-year longitudinal study of sexual functioning before and after treatment for carcinoma of the cervix. Sexual functioning was measured on admission prior to their treatment and at 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up and made operational in terms of current sexual

  4. The value of routine follow-up after treatment for head and neck cancer. A national DAHANCA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Anja; Vedtofte, Thomas; Lynggaard, Charlotte Duch

    BACKGROUND: The post-treatment follow-up is well-integrated in the oncologic care tradition, based on the risk of developing recurrent disease or new primary tumors in treated patients. Furthermore, follow-up serves as an opportunity to monitor treatment effects and to provide clinical care of side...... effects. In this study we measured the activity and effectiveness of routine follow-up in head and neck cancer and assessed the value of follow-up from the perspectives of both physicians and the patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During a period of six weeks a prospective national cross section cohort...

  5. Radioimmunoassay method suitable for analysis of salivary cortisol in patients with breast cancer in treatment by teletherapy - a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Kellen Verena S.; Santos, Jane Lima dos

    2011-01-01

    Determination of salivary cortisol using radioimmunoassay and the relationship between stress levels were investigated before and after of the psychological intervention of 21 patients during teletherapy treatment of breast cancer. The benefits of psychological intervention during cancer treatment has been observed in some studies and evidence show that the patient's emotional state directly influences adherence to treatment, good prognosis and under stress. Thus, in present study 21 patients aged 50-70 years, females in the treatment of breast cancer at the Radiotherapy Service of Santa Casa de Misericordia in Belo Horizonte, were divided randomly into two groups: control (without psychological intervention) and Group TCC (with psychological intervention). Salivary cortisol concentrations are reportedly about 5.10% of those in serum, the levels has been used as an objective marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and avoided the confounding effects of venepuncture stress on cortisol levels. The assessment of cortisol in saliva has proven a valid and reliable measure of unbound steroid in the circulation. The salivary cortisol measured by radioimmunoassay in control patients and TCC showed no significant differences. The radioimmunoassay method show be suitable for analysis of salivary cortisol because allows measure low detection limits and have high sensibility. The values of TCC group and Control group were higher than reference values, except for one patient of the control group. At the beginning of treatment, both groups were homogeneous for Teletherapy. Both the TCC group as the control group had . 80% of participants in phase with stress. It was observed in the TCC group after radiotherapy showing a reversal 60% of participants without stress. The data show that cognitive-behavioral therapy has benefits for the control of psychological stress and enhance relevance of the psychologist to provide reduction or stress control during

  6. Radioimmunoassay method suitable for analysis of salivary cortisol in patients with breast cancer in treatment by teletherapy - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Kellen Verena S. [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Pampulha, MG (Brazil); Santos, Jane Lima dos [Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Determination of salivary cortisol using radioimmunoassay and the relationship between stress levels were investigated before and after of the psychological intervention of 21 patients during teletherapy treatment of breast cancer. The benefits of psychological intervention during cancer treatment has been observed in some studies and evidence show that the patient's emotional state directly influences adherence to treatment, good prognosis and under stress. Thus, in present study 21 patients aged 50-70 years, females in the treatment of breast cancer at the Radiotherapy Service of Santa Casa de Misericordia in Belo Horizonte, were divided randomly into two groups: control (without psychological intervention) and Group TCC (with psychological intervention). Salivary cortisol concentrations are reportedly about 5.10% of those in serum, the levels has been used as an objective marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and avoided the confounding effects of venepuncture stress on cortisol levels. The assessment of cortisol in saliva has proven a valid and reliable measure of unbound steroid in the circulation. The salivary cortisol measured by radioimmunoassay in control patients and TCC showed no significant differences. The radioimmunoassay method show be suitable for analysis of salivary cortisol because allows measure low detection limits and have high sensibility. The values of TCC group and Control group were higher than reference values, except for one patient of the control group. At the beginning of treatment, both groups were homogeneous for Teletherapy. Both the TCC group as the control group had . 80% of participants in phase with stress. It was observed in the TCC group after radiotherapy showing a reversal 60% of participants without stress. The data show that cognitive-behavioral therapy has benefits for the control of psychological stress and enhance relevance of the psychologist to provide reduction or stress control during

  7. In vitro and in vivo studies of pirarubicin-loaded SWNT for the treatment of bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gang; He, Yunfeng; Wu, Xiaohou; Zhang, Yao [Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Luo, Chunli [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Jing, Peng [Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-07-13

    Intravesical chemotherapy is an important part of the treatment for superficial bladder cancer. However, the response to it is limited and its side effects are extensive. Functional single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have shown promise for tumor-targeted accumulation and low toxicity. In the present study, we performed in vivo and in vitro investigations to determine whether SWNT-based drug delivery could induce high tumor depression in rat bladder cancer and could decrease the side effects of pirarubicin (tetrahydropyranyl-adriamycin, THP). We modified SWNT with phospholipid-branched polyethylene glycol and constructed an SWNT-THP conjugate via a cleavable ester bond. The cytotoxicity of SWNT-THP against the human bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 was evaluated in vitro. Rat bladder cancer in situ models constructed by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea intravesical installation (1 g/L, 2 mg/rat once every 2 weeks for 8 weeks) were used for in vivo evaluation of the cytotoxicity of SWNT and SWNT-THP. Specific side effects in the THP group including urinary frequency (N = 12), macroscopic hematuria (N = 1), and vomiting (N = 7) were identified; however, no side effects were observed with SWNT-THP treatment. Flow cytometry was used to assess the cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that SWNT alone did not yield significant tumor depression compared to saline (1.74 ± 0.56 and 1.23 ± 0.42%) in vitro. SWNT-THP exhibited higher tumor depression than THP-saline in vitro (74.35 ± 2.56 and 51.24 ± 1.45%) and in vivo (52.46 ± 2.41 and 96.85 ± 0.85%). The present findings indicate that SWNT delivery of THP for the treatment of bladder cancer leads to minimal side effects without loss of therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, this nanotechnology may play a crucial role in the improvement of intravesical treatment of bladder cancer. Key words: Single-walled carbon nanotubes; Bladder cancer; Drug vehicle; THP; Intravesical chemotherapy.

  8. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Liu Yueping; Wang Weihu; Song Yongwen; Li Tao; Li Ning; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m 2 /day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m 2 , daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles

  9. Icotinib is an active treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Quan; Liu, Yiqian; Liu, Ping; Yin, Yongmei; Guo, Renhua; Lu, Kaihua; Gu, Yanhong; Liu, Lianke; Wang, Jinghua; Wang, Zhaoxia; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Shu, Yongqian; Zhu, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Icotinib hydrochloride is a novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This retrospective analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of icotinib on patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 82 consecutive patients treated with icotinib as first (n = 24) or second/third line (n = 58) treatment at three hospitals in Nanjing were enrolled into our retrospective research. The Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate the tumor responses and the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Median PFS was 4.0 months (95% CI 2.311-5.689). Median OS was 11.0 months (95% CI 8.537-13.463) in this cohort. Median PFS for first and second/third line were 7.0 months (95% CI 2.151-11.8) and 3.0 months (95% CI 1.042-4.958), respectively. Median OS for first and second/third line were 13.0 months (95% CI 10.305-15.695) and 10.0 months (95% CI 7.295-12.70), respectively. In patients with EGFR mutation (n = 19), icotinib significantly reduced the risk of progression (HR 0.36, 95% CI 0.18-0.70, p = 0.003) and death (HR 0.10, 95% CI 0.02-0.42, p = 0.002) compared with those EGFR status unknown (n = 63). The most common adverse events were acne-like rash (39.0%) and diarrhea (20.7%). Icotinib is active in the treatment of patients with NSCLC both in first or second/third line, especially in those patients harbouring EGFR mutations, with an acceptable adverse event profile.

  10. Icotinib is an active treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Chen

    Full Text Available Icotinib hydrochloride is a novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This retrospective analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of icotinib on patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC.82 consecutive patients treated with icotinib as first (n = 24 or second/third line (n = 58 treatment at three hospitals in Nanjing were enrolled into our retrospective research. The Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST was used to evaluate the tumor responses and the progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS was evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier method.Median PFS was 4.0 months (95% CI 2.311-5.689. Median OS was 11.0 months (95% CI 8.537-13.463 in this cohort. Median PFS for first and second/third line were 7.0 months (95% CI 2.151-11.8 and 3.0 months (95% CI 1.042-4.958, respectively. Median OS for first and second/third line were 13.0 months (95% CI 10.305-15.695 and 10.0 months (95% CI 7.295-12.70, respectively. In patients with EGFR mutation (n = 19, icotinib significantly reduced the risk of progression (HR 0.36, 95% CI 0.18-0.70, p = 0.003 and death (HR 0.10, 95% CI 0.02-0.42, p = 0.002 compared with those EGFR status unknown (n = 63. The most common adverse events were acne-like rash (39.0% and diarrhea (20.7%.Icotinib is active in the treatment of patients with NSCLC both in first or second/third line, especially in those patients harbouring EGFR mutations, with an acceptable adverse event profile.

  11. Stage migration after introduction of sentinel lymph node dissection in breast cancer treatment in Denmark: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Balslev, Eva

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the size and therapeutic consequences of stage migration after introduction of sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in breast cancer treatment in Denmark.......To estimate the size and therapeutic consequences of stage migration after introduction of sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in breast cancer treatment in Denmark....

  12. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  14. A prospective cohort study of treatment decision-making for prostate cancer following participation in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Lauren M; Cullen, Jennifer; Elsamanoudi, Sally; Kim, Daniel J; Hudak, Jane; Colston, Maryellen; Travis, Judith; Kuo, Huai-Ching; Porter, Christopher R; Rosner, Inger L

    2016-05-01

    Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) are presented with several treatment options of similar efficacy but varying side effects. Understanding how and why patients make their treatment decisions, as well as the effect of treatment choice on long-term outcomes, is critical to ensuring effective, patient-centered care. This study examined treatment decision-making in a racially diverse, equal-access, contemporary cohort of patients with PCa counseled on treatment options at a multidisciplinary clinic. A prospective cohort study was initiated at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (formerly Walter Reed Army Medical Center) in 2006. Newly diagnosed patients with PCa were enrolled before attending a multidisciplinary clinic. Patients completed surveys preclinic and postclinic to assess treatment preferences, reasons for treatment choice, and decisional regret. As of January 2014, 925 patients with PCa enrolled in this study. Surgery (54%), external radiation (20%), and active surveillance (12%) were the most common primary treatments for patients with low- and intermediate-risk PCa, whereas patients with high-risk PCa chose surgery (34%) or external radiation with neoadjuvant hormones (57%). Treatment choice differed by age at diagnosis, race, comorbidity status, and calendar year in both univariable and multivariable analyses. Patients preferred to play an active role in the decision-making process and cited doctors at the clinic as the most helpful source of treatment-related information. Almost all patients reported satisfaction with their decision. This is one of the first prospective cohort studies to examine treatment decision-making in an equal-access, multidisciplinary clinic setting. Studies of this cohort would aid in understanding and improving the PCa decision-making process. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  16. An ecological study of skin biopsies and skin cancer treatment procedures in the United States Medicare population, 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David M; Morgan, Frederick C; Besaw, Robert J; Schmults, Chrysalyne D

    2018-01-01

    Analyses of skin cancer procedures adjusted for population changes are needed. To describe trends in skin cancer-related biopsies and procedures in Medicare beneficiaries. An ecological study of Medicare claims for skin biopsies and skin cancer procedures in 2000 to 2015. Biopsies increased 142%, and skin cancer procedures increased 56%. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) utilization increased on the head/neck, hands/feet, and genitalia (increasing from 11% to 27% of all treatment procedures) but was low on the trunk/extremities (increasing from 1% to 4%). Adjusted for increased Medicare enrollment (+36%) between 2000 and 2015, the number of biopsies and MMS procedures performed per 1000 beneficiaries increased (from 56 to 99 and from 5 to 15, respectively), whereas the number of excisions and destructions changed minimally (from 18 to 16 and from 19 to 18, respectively). Growth in biopsies and MMS procedures slowed between each time period studied: 4.3 additional biopsies per year and 0.9 additional MMS procedures per year per 1000 beneficiaries between 2000 and 2007, 2.2 and 0.5 more between 2008 and 2011, and 0.5 and 0.3 more between 2012 and 2015, respectively. Medicare claims-level data do not provide patient-level or nonsurgical treatment information. The increased number of skin cancer procedures performed was largely the result of Medicare population growth over time. MMS utilization increased primarily on high- and medium-risk and functionally and cosmetically significant locations where tissue sparing and maximizing cure are critical. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Treatment of testicular cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Boyle, Helen; Culine, Stéphane; Fizazi, Karim; Fléchon, Aude; Massard, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Germ-cell tumours (GCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young men. Since the late 1970s, disseminated GCT have been a paradigm for curable metastatic cancer and metastatic GCTs are highly curable with cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of residual masses. Patients' prognosis is currently assessed using the International Germ-Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC) and used to adapt the burden of chemotherapy. Approximately 20% of patients still do not achieve cure after first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and need salvage chemotherapy (high dose or standard dose chemotherapy). Clinical stage I testicular cancer is the most common presentation and different strategies are proposed: adjuvant therapies, surgery or surveillance. During the last three decades, clinical trials and strong international collaborations lead to the development of a consensus in the management of GCTs.

  18. BRCA Mutation Frequency and Patterns of Treatment Response in BRCA Mutation–Positive Women With Ovarian Cancer: A Report From the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Meldrum, Cliff; deFazio, Anna; Emmanuel, Catherine; George, Joshy; Dobrovic, Alexander; Birrer, Michael J.; Webb, Penelope M.; Stewart, Colin; Friedlander, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in women with ovarian cancer is unclear; reports vary from 3% to 27%. The impact of germ-line mutation on response requires further investigation to understand its impact on treatment planning and clinical trial design. Patients and Methods Women with nonmucinous ovarian carcinoma (n = 1,001) enrolled onto a population-based, case-control study were screened for point mutations and large deletions in both genes. Survival outcomes and responses to multiple lines of chemotherapy were assessed. Results Germ-line mutations were found in 14.1% of patients overall, including 16.6% of serous cancer patients (high-grade serous, 22.6%); 44% had no reported family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Patients carrying germ-line mutations had improved rates of progression-free and overall survival. In the relapse setting, patients carrying mutations more frequently responded to both platin- and nonplatin-based regimens than mutation-negative patients, even in patients with early relapse after primary treatment. Mutation-negative patients who responded to multiple cycles of platin-based treatment were more likely to carry somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. Conclusion BRCA mutation status has a major influence on survival in ovarian cancer patients and should be an additional stratification factor in clinical trials. Treatment outcomes in BRCA1/2 carriers challenge conventional definitions of platin resistance, and mutation status may be able to contribute to decision making and systemic therapy selection in the relapse setting. Our data, together with the advent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor trials, supports the recommendation that germ-line BRCA1/2 testing should be offered to all women diagnosed with nonmucinous, ovarian carcinoma, regardless of family history. PMID:22711857

  19. Bevacizumab for the treatment of nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer in Portugal: a retrospective, multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevinho, Fernanda; Soares, Marta; Azevedo, Isabel; Queiroga, Henrique; Parente, Bárbara; Brito, Ulisses; Teixeira, Encarnação; Sotto-Mayor, Renato; Araújo, António

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. In patients with nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage IIIB/IV treatment with chemotherapy plus bevacizumab led to significant improvements in progression-free and median overall survival (OS). To report the experience of five Portuguese centers in treating patients with nonsquamous NSCLC in stage IIIB or IV with bevacizumab and chemotherapy regarding survival and toxicity outcomes. This was a retrospective, multicenter study on patients with nonsquamous stage IIIB/IV NSCLC treated with bevacizumab and chemotherapy from November 2007 to August 2010 through special use permits. We reviewed the medical records, registry of demographic characteristics, treatments provided, treatment responses, adverse events, and dates of death. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS statistics software. Median OS and event-free survival (EFS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. From an eligible population of 41 patients, 37 participants were registered. Study participants were predominantly male (78.4%) with a median age of 53 years (29–75 years). In total, 83.8% patients had stage IV disease (TNM, 6th Ed.). The OS was 21.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.6–30.5] and median EFS was 9.4 months (95% CI9: 7.1–11.7). Hematologic toxicity grade 3/4 occurred in 35.1% of patients, and nonhematologic toxicity in 24.3% patients. One fatal thromboembolic event was recorded (2.7%). The results of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC obtained from the daily clinical practice of the centers involved in this study were similar to those of published clinical trials. Collaboration between the different Portuguese centers is crucial for this kind of study

  20. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, M; Li, X Allen

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher T pot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer. This set of parameters is consistent with in vitro

  1. Antimatter cancer treatment

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Noorden, Richard

    2006-01-01

    "The idea that antimatter beams could treat cancer might seem ridiculous. But researchers working at Cerns particle accelerator laboratory in Geneva don't think so. They have just reported a successful first experiment into the biological effects of antiprotons radiation on living cells."

  2. Outcome of ovarian preservation during surgical treatment for endometrial cancer: A Taiwanese Gynecologic Oncology Group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hei-Yu Lau

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Preservation of bilateral ovaries does not increase cancer-related mortality. A more conservative approach to surgical staging may be considered in premenopausal women with early-stage endometrial cancer without risk factors.

  3. Reduced hypothalamic blood flow after radiation treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer: SPECT studies in 34 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chieng, P.U.; Huang, T.S.; Chang, C.C.; Chong, P.N.; Tien, R.D.; Su, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effect of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic blood flow, the authors performed 44 regional cerebral blood flow studies with 99mTc hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) single-photon emission CT (SPECT) on four normal volunteers and 34 patients with pathologically proved nasopharyngeal cancer. Twenty-three men and 15 women, 30-65 years old, were divided into four study groups: group 1 served as a control and consisted of four normal volunteers and six patients studied prior to cranial irradiation; group 2 patients had cranial irradiation half a year before the SPECT study (n = 12, one from group 1); group 3 patients were irradiated 1 year before the study (n = 13, three from group 1 and two from group 2); and group 4 patients were irradiated at least 5 years before SPECT imaging (n = 9). Six patients were studied twice. Quantification of the 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT studies was done separately by three radiologists to obtain the hypothalamus/occipital (H/O) and hypothalamus/parasagittal (H/P) ratios. Endocrinologic studies were performed in all cases and the hypothalamus-thyrotroph-thyroid, hypothalamus-gonadotroph-testis (ovary), hypothalamus-lactotroph, hypothalamus-somatotroph, and hypothalamus-corticotroph-adrenal axes were evaluated separately. They determined that regional hypothalamic blood flow was reduced after cranial irradiation in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer. The H/O ratio of groups 3 and 4 did not differ from that of group 2 (one-half year after cranial irradiation). The H/O ratio was significantly reduced 6 months and 1 year after cranial irradiation; mean ± SD = 0.5801 ± 0.0829 (p less than .025), 0.5725 ± 0.0791 (p less than .01) versus 0.6477 ± 0.0458 before cranial irradiation, respectively

  4. Apatinib plus icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer after icotinib treatment failure: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Jianping Xu, Xiaoyan Liu, Sheng Yang, Xiangru Zhang, Yuankai Shi Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing Key Laboratory of Clinical Study on Anticancer Molecular Targeted Drugs, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Treatment failure frequently occurs in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC who respond to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors initially. This retrospective study tried to investigate the efficacy and safety of apatinib plus icotinib in patients with advanced NSCLC after icotinib treatment failure.Patients and methods: This study comprised 27 patients with advanced NSCLC who had progressed after icotinib monotherapy. Initially, patients received oral icotinib (125 mg, tid alone. When the disease progressed, they received icotinib plus apatinib (500 mg, qd, orally. Treatment was continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or consent withdrawal.Results: Followed up to December 2016, the median time of combined therapy was 7.47 months, and eight of 27 patients were dead. The median overall survival was not reached, and median progression-free survival (PFS was 5.33 months (95% CI, 3.63–7.03 months. Moreover, the objective response rate (ORR was 11.1%, and the disease control rate (DCR was 81.5%. A total of 14 patients received combined therapy as the second-line treatment, and the ORR and DCR were 7.1% and 78.6%, respectively; 13 patients received drugs as the third- or later-line treatment, with an ORR and a DCR of 15.4% and 84.6%, respectively. In addition, 11 patients experienced icotinib monotherapy failure within 6 months with median PFS of 7.37 months, and 16 patients had progression after 6 months with median PFS of 2.60 months. The common drug-related toxic effects were hypertension (44.4% and fatigue (37.0%.Conclusion: Apatinib plus

  5. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-08-12

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action.

  6. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action. PMID:27529277

  7. Study to determine whether intraoperative frozen section biopsy improves surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer

    OpenAIRE

    NICOLETTI, GIOVANNI; BRENTA, FEDERICA; MALOVINI, ALBERTO; MUSUMARRA, GAETANO; SCEVOLA, SILVIA; FAGA, ANGELA

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancers are the most common types of cancer and their incidence has shown an increase of ∼4 to 8% per year over the last 40 years. The majority of skin cancers (∼97%) are non-melanoma skin cancers, mainly represented by basal cell (80%) and squamous cell carcinomas (20%). The use of intra-operative frozen section remains controversial in the surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, being commonly considered an optional tool, the reliability and effectiveness of which remain questi...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  9. Can weight gain be prevented in women receiving treatment for breast cancer? A systematic review of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Z O; Reeves, M M

    2017-11-01

    Obesity and weight gain have been associated with poor disease-specific and health-related outcomes in women with breast cancer. This review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of weight gain prevention interventions among women with breast cancer. Completed and ongoing trials evaluating a behaviourally based dietary intervention with or without physical activity and with a focus on weight gain prevention during treatment for breast cancer were reviewed. Weight change and body composition data were extracted. Within-group weight change of ±1 kg and between-group (intervention versus control) weight difference of ≥2 kg were defined as successful weight gain prevention. Five completed trials (seven intervention arms) and five ongoing trials were identified. Completed trials exclusively recruited premenopausal or premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Within-group weight gain was prevented in two intervention arms, two arms achieved weight loss and three arms reported weight gain. Of the five comparisons with control groups, two reported significant differences in weight change between groups. Ongoing trials will provide further evidence on longer-term outcomes, cost-effectiveness and blood markers. This small but growing number of studies provides preliminary and promising evidence that weight gain can be prevented in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  10. Survivorship care and support following treatment for breast cancer: a multi-ethnic comparative qualitative study of women's experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Charlotte; Scanlon, Karen; Scott, Emma; Ream, Emma; Harding, Seeromanie; Armes, Jo

    2016-08-18

    As the number of breast cancer survivors continues to rise, Western populations become more ethnically and socially diverse and healthcare resources become ever-more stretched, follow-up that focuses on monitoring for recurrence is no longer viable. New models of survivorship care need to ensure they support self-management and are culturally appropriate across diverse populations. This study explored experiences and expectations of a multi-ethnic sample of women with breast cancer regarding post-treatment care, in order to understand potential barriers to receiving care and inform new models of survivorship care. A phenomenological qualitative research design was employed. In-depth interviews were conducted with women from diverse socio-demographic backgrounds in England, who completed treatment for breast cancer in the 12 months prior to the study. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis. Sixty-six women participated and reported expectations and needs were unmet at follow-up. Whilst there were more commonalities in experiences, discernible differences, particularly by ethnicity and age, were identified relating to three key themes: emotional responses on transition to follow-up; challenges communicating with healthcare professionals at follow-up; and challenges finding and accessing information and support services to address unmet needs. There are cultural differences in the way healthcare professionals and women communicate, not necessarily differences in their post-treatment needs. We do not know if new models of care meet survivors' needs, or if they are appropriate for everyone. Further testing and potential cultural and linguistic adaptation of models of care is necessary to ensure their appropriateness and acceptability to survivors from different backgrounds. New ways of providing survivorship care mean survivors will need to be better prepared for the post-treatment period and the role they will have to play in managing their symptoms and care.

  11. Yokukansan for the treatment of preoperative anxiety and postoperative delirium in colorectal cancer patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Saho; Inoguchi, Hironobu; Hirayama, Takatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka J; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Ochiai, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Shunsuke; Shida, Dai; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Shimizu, Ken

    2017-09-01

    Yokukansan (YKS), a Japanese traditional herbal medicine for neurosis and insomnia, is speculated to be useful for perioperative psychiatric symptoms in cancer patients, but there exists little empirical evidence. This study provides preliminary data about the efficacy, feasibility, and side effects of YKS for the treatment of preoperative anxiety and postoperative delirium in cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of colorectal cancer patients who took YKS for preoperative anxiety, evaluating the following: (1) patient characteristics, (2) feasibility of taking YKS, (3) changes in preoperative anxiety based on the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale and Edmonton Symptom Assessment System-revised (ESAS-r-anxiety), (4) incidence of postoperative delirium and (5) YKS-related side effects. We reviewed 19 medical records. There was a significant difference between ESAS-r-anxiety scores (P = 0.028) before and after taking YKS, but no difference between CGI scores (P = 0.056). The incidence of postoperative delirium was 5.2% (95% CI = 0.0-14.5). One patient could not complete the course of YKS during the perioperative administration period, but there were no side effects of Grade 2 or worse according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4. Cancer patients could safely take YKS before surgery. There was a significant improvement in preoperative anxiety after taking YKS, and the incident rate of postoperative delirium was lower than in previous studies. These results suggest that YKS may be useful for perioperative psychiatric symptoms in cancer patients. Further well-designed studies are needed to substantiate our results. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  13. Unproven methods in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, S P

    1993-07-01

    The nature-based and nontoxic image makes application of unproven methods in oncology attractive in contrast to application of a mechanized scientific medicine. The application frequency of these treatments ranges from 10% to greater than 60%. Increasingly, the promoters try to create a scientific impression through a pseudologic cancer theory, a harmless diagnostic test, and a holistic treatment of every cancer. Of the big variety of unproven methods, which are summarized in 11 groups in this review, the following are discussed: anthroposophic and other mistletoe preparations; homeopathy; Maharishi Ayur-Veda; unproven anticancer diets; orthomolecular medicine, including ascorbic acid; and methods supposedly stimulating unspecific and specific defense mechanisms. In conclusion, physicians should beware of and have knowledge of currently used unproven cancer treatments for epidemiologic, social, economic, and scientific reasons.

  14. Microwaves for breast cancer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Abdelhamid Elkayal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is potentially an effective method for the treatment of cancer, especially breast cancer tumors. One of the most attractive attributes of hyperthermia is the possibility of providing therapeutic benefit noninvasively, minimizing side effects. To be effective, a hyperthermia treatment must selectively heat the cancerous tissue, elevating the temperature in the tumor without exposing healthy tissue to excessive temperature elevations. In this paper, a suggested simple model of Annular Phased Array (APA using eight half wavelength linear dipoles is presented. New software (COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS is used to calculate the temperature distribution inside a model of a three layered breast (skin, breast tissue, and tumor. In addition, the effect of changing the amplitude and phases of the array elements on the temperature distributions and the conditions on the values of the phases are demonstrated in order to achieve the objective of hyperthermia for breast tumor treatment.

  15. Comorbidity and age affect treatment policy for cervical cancer: a population-based study in the south of The Netherlands, 1995-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, M.A.; Siesling, Sabine; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Lybeert, M.L.M.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of age and comorbidity on the choice of treatment modalities and prognosis for patients with cervical cancer. METHODS: All patients with cervical cancer newly diagnosed between 1995 and 2004 (n=775) were selected from the population-based

  16. Psychosocial and cultural reasons for delay in seeking help and nonadherence to treatment in Indonesian women with breast cancer: A qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iskandarsyah, A.; Klerk, C.D.; Suardi, D.R.; Soemitro, M.P.; Sadarjoen, S.S.; Passchier, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore reasons for delay in seeking medical help and nonadherence to treatment in Indonesian women with breast cancer. Method: Semistructured interviews were conducted by purposive sampling, using a consecutive sample of 50 breast cancer patients who were

  17. Exeresis and Brachytherapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Recurrence After Conservative Treatment for Breast Cancer: Results of a Ten-Year Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guix, Benjamin; Lejarcegui, Jose Antonio; Tello, Jose Ignacio; Zanon, Gabriel; Henriquez, Ivan; Finestres, Fernando; Martinez, Antonio; Fernandez-Ibiza, Jaume; Quinzanos, Luis; Palombo, Pau; Encinas, Xavier; Guix, Ines

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term results of a pilot study assessing excision and brachytherapy as salvage treatment for local recurrence after conservative treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between December 1990 and March 2001, 36 patients with breast-only recurrence less than 3 cm in diameter after conservative treatment for Stage I or II breast carcinoma were treated with local excision followed by high-dose rate brachytherapy implants (30 Gy in 12 fractions over a period of 5 days). No patient was lost to follow-up. Special attention was paid to local, regional, or distant recurrences; survival; cosmesis; and early and late side effects. Results: All patients completed treatment. During follow-up (range, 1-13 years), 8 patients presented metastases (2 regional and 6 distant) as their first site of failure, 1 had a differed local recurrence, and 1 died of the disease. Actuarial results at 10 years were as follows: local control, 89.4%; disease-free survival, 64.4%; and survival, 96.7%. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in 90.4%. No patient had Grade 3 or 4 early or late complications. Of the 11 patients followed up for at least 10 years, all but 1 still had their breast in place at the 10-year stage. Conclusions: High-dose rate brachytherapy is a safe, effective treatment for small-size, low-risk local recurrence after local excision in conservatively treated patients. The dose of 30 Gy of high-dose rate brachytherapy (12 fractions over a period of 5 days twice daily) was well tolerated. The excellent results support the use of breast preservation as salvage treatment in selected patients with local recurrence after conservative treatment for breast cancer.

  18. Current Challenges in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Guedes, Cristiano; Ponce, Santiago; Ferrer, Irene; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we highlight the current concepts and discuss some of the current challenges and future prospects in cancer therapy. We frequently use the example of lung cancer. We conducted a nonsystematic PubMed search, selecting the most comprehensive and relevant research articles, clinical trials, translational papers, and review articles on precision oncology and immuno-oncology. Papers were prioritized and selected based on their originality and potential clinical applicability. Two major revolutions have changed cancer treatment paradigms in the past few years: targeting actionable alterations in oncogene-driven cancers and immuno-oncology. Important challenges are still ongoing in both fields of cancer therapy. On the one hand, druggable genomic alterations are diverse and represent only small subsets of patients in certain tumor types, which limits testing their clinical impact in biomarker-driven clinical trials. Next-generation sequencing technologies are increasingly being implemented for molecular prescreening in clinical research, but issues regarding clinical interpretation of large genomic data make their wide clinical use difficult. Further, dealing with tumor heterogeneity and acquired resistance is probably the main limitation for the success of precision oncology. On the other hand, long-term survival benefits with immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-programmed death cell protein-1/programmed death cell ligand-1[PD-1/L1] and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 monoclonal antibodies) are restricted to a minority of patients, and no predictive markers are yet robustly validated that could help us recognize these subsets and optimize treatment delivery and selection. To achieve long-term survival benefits, drug combinations targeting several molecular alterations or cancer hallmarks might be needed. This will probably be one of the most challenging but promising precision cancer treatment strategies in the future. Targeting single molecular

  19. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following rare disorders that are inherited (passed down from parent to child): Familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome . Treatment with radiation therapy may increase the risk of ...

  20. Thyroid Cancer Treatment Choice: A pilot study of a tool to facilitate conversations with patients with papillary microcarcinomas considering treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Juan P; Moon, Jae Hoon; Zeuren, Rebecca; Kong, Sung Hye; Kim, Yeo Koon; Iñiguez-Ariza, Nicole M; Choi, June Young; Lee, Kyu Eun; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hargraves, Ian; Bernet, Victor; Montori, Victor; Park, Young Joo; Tuttle, R Michael

    2018-06-15

    The 2015 American Thyroid Association guidelines recognize active surveillance as an alternative to immediate surgery in patients with papillary microcarcinomas (PMCs). As a way to incorporate active surveillance as one of the management options for patients with PMCs, we describe the development and initial testing of a tool to support conversations between clinicians and patients with PMCs considering treatment options. Thyroid Cancer Treatment Choice was developed using an iterative process based on the principles of interaction, design and participatory action research. To evaluate the impact of the tool on treatment choice, a prospective study was conducted in two thyroid cancer clinics in Seongnam-si and Seoul, South Korea: both clinics had the expertise to offer active surveillance as well as immediate surgery. One clinic was trained in the use of the conversation aid, while the other clinic continued to care for patients without access to the conversation aid. Between May 2016 and April 2017, 278 patients mostly women (n=220, 79%) were included in the study; 152 (53%) received care at the clinic using the conversation aid. Age, gender, and mean tumor size [6.6 mm (SD 1.6) and 6.5 mm (SD 1.9)] distributions were similar across clinics. Overall, 233 (84%) patients opted for active surveillance and 53 (16%) for thyroid surgery. Patients in the conversation aid group were more likely to choose active surveillance than the patients seen in the usual care clinic [relative risk (RR) = 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04 - 1.29]. Of all patients opting for active surveillance, more patients in the conversation aid group had thyroid cancer nodules > 5 mm than in the usual care group (81% vs. 67% P = 0.013). Thyroid Cancer Treatment Choice is an evidence-based tool that supports the presentation of treatment options for PMCs. Pilot testing suggests that this conversation tool increases acceptance of active surveillance, suggesting that this option is an

  1. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, Sylvie; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  2. Multicenter clinical study for evaluation of efficacy and safety of transdermal fentanyl matrix patch in treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain in 474 chinese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-Lin; Song, Guo-Hong; Liu, Duan-Qi; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Kui-Feng; Zang, Ai-Hua; Cheng, Ying; Cao, Guo-Chun; Liang, Jun; Ma, Xue-Zhen; Ding, Xin; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei-Lian; Hu, Zuo-Wei; Feng, Gang; Huang, Jiang-Jin; Zheng, Xiao; Jiao, Shun-Chang; Wu, Rong; Ren, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Although a new matrix formulation fentanyl has been used throughout the world for cancer pain management, few data about its efficacy and clinical outcomes associated with its use in Chinese patients have been obtained. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of the new system in Chinese patients with moderate to severe cancer pain. A total of 474 patients with moderate to severe cancer pain were enrolled in this study and were treated with the new transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (TDF) up to 2 weeks. All the patients were asked to record pain intensity, side effects, quality of life (QOL), adherence and global satisfaction. The initial dose of fentanyl was 25 μg/h titrated with opioid or according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Transdermal fentanyl was changed every three days. After 2 weeks. The mean pain intensity of the 459 evaluated patients decreased significantly from 5.63±1.26 to 2.03±1.46 (P<0.0001). The total remission rate was 91.29%, of which moderate remission rate 53.16%, obvious remission rate 25.49% and complete remission rate 12.64%. The rate of adverse events was 33.75%, 18.78% of which were moderate and 3.80% were severe. The most frequent adverse events were constipation and nausea. No fatal events were observed. The quality of life was remarkably improved after the treatment (P<0.0001). The new TDF is effective and safe in treating patients with moderate to severe cancer pain, and can significantly improve the quality of life.

  3. Clinicopathologic characteristics, laboratory parameters, treatment protocols, and outcomes of pancreatic cancer: a retrospective cohort study of 1433 patients in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuisheng Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The prognosis of people with pancreatic cancer is extremely unfavorable. However, the prognostic factors remain largely undefined. We aimed to perform comprehensive analyses of clinicopathologic characteristics, laboratory parameters, and treatment protocols for exploring their role as prognostic factors of pancreatic cancer. Methods Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and hospitalized at the China National Cancer Center between April 2006 and May 2016 were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. Clinicopathologic characteristics, laboratory parameters, and treatment protocols were compared among patients at different stages of the disease. The association between these factors and overall survival (OS was analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model. Results The present study included 1,433 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer. Median OS was 10.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8–11.3 months, with 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of 43.7%, 14.8%, and 8.8%, respectively. Cox multivariate analysis findings identified the following factors as independent predictors of OS: gender (female vs male, hazard ratio 0.72, 95% CI [0.54–0.95]; elevated total bilirubin (TBil; 1.82, 1.34–2.47; elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9; 1.72, 1.17–2.54; tumor being located in pancreatic body and tail (1.52, 1.10–2.10; advanced T stage (T3-4 vs T1-2, 1.62, 1.15–2.27; lymph node metastasis (1.57, 1.20–2.07; distant metastasis (1.59, 1.12–2.27; the presence of surgical resection (0.53, 0.34–0.81; and the presence of systemic chemotherapy (0.62, 0.45–0.82. Conclusions Being male, elevated TBil and carcinoembryonic antigen, tumor being located in pancreatic body and tail, advanced T stage, lymph node and distant metastasis, the absence of surgical resection, and the absence of systematic chemotherapy were associated with worse OS in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  4. Willingness to accept chemotherapy and attitudes towards costs of cancer treatment; A multisite survey study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, E.F. van; Coskunturk, M.; Zuur, A.T.; Palen, J. van der; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Wymenga, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the past years, interest in patient treatment preferences is growing. Our objectives were: (1) to assess and compare the minimal required benefit for patients with cancer, patients without cancer and healthcare professionals to make chemotherapy acceptable and (2) to obtain insight

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... only hormone therapy after a hysterectomy . Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Aromatase inhibitors . Less exposure of breast ...

  8. Linked symptom monitoring and depression treatment programmes for specialist cancer services: protocol for a mixed-methods implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanat, Marta; Walker, Jane; Burke, Katy; Sevdalis, Nick; Richardson, Alison; Mulick, Amy; Frost, Chris; Sharpe, Michael

    2017-07-02

    There is growing awareness that cancer services need to address patients' well-being as well as treating their cancer. We developed systematic approaches to (1) monitoring patients' symptoms including depression using a 'Symptom Monitoring Service' and (2) providing treatment for those with major depression using a programme called 'Depression Care for People with Cancer'. Used together, these two programmes were found to be highly effective and cost-effective in clinical trials. The overall aims of this project are to: (1) study the process of introducing these programmes into routine clinical care in a large cancer service, (2) identify the challenges associated with implementation and how these are overcome, (3) determine their effectiveness in a routine non-research setting and (4) describe patients' and clinicians' experience of the programmes. This is a mixed-methods longitudinal implementation study. We will study the process of implementation in three phases (April 2016-December 2018): 'Pre-implementation' (setting up of the new programmes), 'Early Implementation' (implementation of the programmes in a small number of clinics) and 'Implementation and Maintenance' (implementation in the majority of clinics). We will use the following methods of data collection: (1) contemporaneous logs of the implementation process, (2) interviews with healthcare professionals and managers, (3) interviews with patients and (4) routinely collected clinical data. The study has been reviewed by a joint committee of Oxford University Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust Research and Development Department and the University of Oxford's Clinical Trials and Research Governance Department and judged to be service evaluation, not requiring ethics committee approval. The findings of this study will guide the scaling up implementation of the programmes across the UK and will enable us to construct an implementation toolkit. We will disseminate our findings in

  9. Clinical treatment planning in gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Damsker, J.I.; Karlsson, U.L.; Amendola, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment planning in gynecologic cancer is a complicated and difficult procedure. It requires an adequate preoperative assessment of the true extent of the patient's disease process and oftentimes this can be achieved not only by conventional studies but must employ surgical exploratory techniques in order to truly define the extent of the disease. However, with contemporary sophisticated treatment planning techniques that are now available in most contemporary departments of radiation oncology, radiation therapy is reemerging as an important and major treatment technique in the management of patients with gynecologic cancer

  10. Quality of life impact of treatments for localized prostate cancer: Cohort study with a 5 year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montse; Guedea, Ferran; Suárez, José Francisco; Paula, Belén de; Macías, Víctor; Mariño, Alfonso; Hervás, Asunción; Herruzo, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess long-term quality of life (QoL) impact of treatments in localized prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Material and methods: Observational, prospective cohort study with pre-treatment QoL evaluation and follow-up until five years after treatment. 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited in 2003–2005. QoL was measured by the EPIC questionnaire, with urinary irritative–obstructive, incontinence, bowel, sexual, and hormonal scores (ranging 0–100). Results: Brachytherapy’s QoL impact was restricted to the urinary domain, Generalized Estimating Equation models showed score changes at five years of −12.0 (95% CI = −15.0, −9.0) in incontinence and −5.3 (95% CI = −7.5, −3.1) in irritative–obstructive scales. Compared to brachytherapy, radical prostatectomy fared +3.3 (95% CI = +0.0, +6.5) points better in irritative–obstructive but −17.1 (95% CI = −22.7, −11.5) worse in incontinence. Sexual deterioration was observed in radical prostatectomy (−19.1; 95% CI = −25.1, −13.1) and external radiotherapy groups (−7.5; 95% CI = −12.5, −2.5). Conclusions: Brachytherapy is the treatment causing the least impact on QoL except for moderate urinary irritative–obstructive symptoms. Our study provides novel long-term valuable information for clinical decision making, supporting brachytherapy as a possible alternative to radical prostatectomy for patients seeking an attempted curative treatment, while limiting the risk for urinary incontinence and sexual impact on QoL

  11. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  12. Banking on Fatherhood: Pilot Studies of a Computerized Educational Tool on Sperm Banking before Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, Eric; Martinetti, Paul; Sui, Dawen; Schover, Leslie R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We conducted pilot studies of the feasibility and efficacy of an interactive, computerized educational tool, Banking on Fatherhood (BOF METHODS Two small randomized trials were conducted, with 20 male cancer patients eligible to bank sperm in Study 1 and 19 oncology fellows or residents in Study 2. In each trial, half of subjects viewed BOF before completing questionnaires, and half viewed it afterwards. Outcome measures included a knowledge test in both trials and a decisional conflict scale in the patient trial. All participants, plus a panel of ten experts, ultimately viewed BOF and completed a form evaluating its usability and value. RESULTS Patients who completed questionnaires after viewing BOF had significantly less decisional conflict about banking sperm than those who had not viewed it(P = 0.0065), but knowledge scores were not significantly different between groups. Physicians who filled out questionnaires after viewing BOF scored significantly higher on the Knowledge Test (P banking. Research with larger groups is needed to validate its effectiveness. PMID:19061198

  13. Electron microscopic studies on experimental skin cancer after combination treatment with X-ray, hematoporphyrin oligomer and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Keiichi; Ishiguro, Kazumori; Takaishi, Kimiko; Hatcho, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Shigemori

    1992-01-01

    The effect of combination treatment with X-ray, hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) and caffeine (Caf) was compared electron microscopically with that of a single use of these treatments. In experimental skin cancer, ultrastructural changes of nuclei and cytoplasm of tumor cells after combination treatment with HpO, X-ray and Caf showed more remarkable changes than in single X-ray irradiation and in HpO and X-ray irradiation. It is concluded that the combination treatment of HpO, X-ray and Caf is useful to the skin cancers in clinical practice. (author)

  14. Electron microscopic studies on experimental skin cancer after combination treatment with X-ray, hematoporphyrin oligomer and caffeine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Keiichi; Ishiguro, Kazumori; Takaishi, Kimiko; Hatcho, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Shigemori (Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka (Japan))

    1992-05-01

    The effect of combination treatment with X-ray, hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) and caffeine (Caf) was compared electron microscopically with that of a single use of these treatments. In experimental skin cancer, ultrastructural changes of nuclei and cytoplasm of tumor cells after combination treatment with HpO, X-ray and Caf showed more remarkable changes than in single X-ray irradiation and in HpO and X-ray irradiation. It is concluded that the combination treatment of HpO, X-ray and Caf is useful to the skin cancers in clinical practice. (author).

  15. Patterns of Obesity and Lymph Fluid Level during the First Year of Breast Cancer Treatment: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei R. Fu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the risk factors for developing lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. We prospectively enrolled 140 women and followed the participants for 12 months after surgery to investigate patterns of obesity and lymph fluid level in the first year of cancer treatment. Electrical bioimpedance devices were used to measure weight, BMI, and percent of body fat as well as lymph fluid level. General instructions were given to the participants on maintaining pre-surgery weight. Among the 140 participants, 136 completed the study with 2.9% attrition. More than 60% of the participants were obese (30.8% or overweight (32.4%, while only two participants were underweight and about 35% had normal weight. This pattern of obesity and overweight was consistent at 4–8 weeks and 12 months post-surgery. At 12 months post-surgery, the majority of the women (72.1% maintained pre-surgery weight and 15.4% had >5% weight loss; 12.5% of the women increase >5% of their weight. Significantly more patients in the obesity group had lymphedema defined by L-Dex ratio >7.1 than those in the normal/underweight and overweight group at pre-surgery and 4–8 weeks post-surgery. There was a trend of more patients in the obesity group had L-Dex ratio >7.1 at 12 months post-surgery. Obesity and overweight remain among women at the time of cancer diagnosis and the patterns of obesity and overweight continue during the first year of treatment. General instructions on having nutrition-balanced and portion-appropriate diet and physical activities daily or weekly can be effective to maintain pre-surgery weight.

  16. Patterns of Obesity and Lymph Fluid Level during the First Year of Breast Cancer Treatment: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Fletcher, Jason; Qiu, Jeanna M.; Scagliola, Joan; Kleinman, Robin; Ryan, Caitlin E.; Chan, Nicholas; Haber, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the risk factors for developing lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. We prospectively enrolled 140 women and followed the participants for 12 months after surgery to investigate patterns of obesity and lymph fluid level in the first year of cancer treatment. Electrical bioimpedance devices were used to measure weight, BMI, and percent of body fat as well as lymph fluid level. General instructions were given to the participants on maintaining pre-surgery weight. Among the 140 participants, 136 completed the study with 2.9% attrition. More than 60% of the participants were obese (30.8%) or overweight (32.4%), while only two participants were underweight and about 35% had normal weight. This pattern of obesity and overweight was consistent at 4–8 weeks and 12 months post-surgery. At 12 months post-surgery, the majority of the women (72.1%) maintained pre-surgery weight and 15.4% had >5% weight loss; 12.5% of the women increase >5% of their weight. Significantly more patients in the obesity group had lymphedema defined by L-Dex ratio >7.1 than those in the normal/underweight and overweight group at pre-surgery and 4–8 weeks post-surgery. There was a trend of more patients in the obesity group had L-Dex ratio >7.1 at 12 months post-surgery. Obesity and overweight remain among women at the time of cancer diagnosis and the patterns of obesity and overweight continue during the first year of treatment. General instructions on having nutrition-balanced and portion-appropriate diet and physical activities daily or weekly can be effective to maintain pre-surgery weight. PMID:26404383

  17. Product Development Studies on Sonocrystallized Curcumin for the Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashif Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin suffers from the limitation of poor solubility and low dissolution that can lead to limited applications. The investigation was aimed to substantiate the potentiality of melt sonocrystallized gastroretentive tablets of curcumin. Melt sonocrystallized curcumin (MSC CMN was developed and its therapeutic potential was validated by in vitro cytotoxicity studies against Human oral cancer cell line KB. MSC curcumin was then formulated as floating tablet and evaluated. MSC form of CMN exhibited 2.36-fold and 2.40-fold solubility enhancement in distilled water and phosphate buffer, pH 4.5, respectively, better flow properties and intrinsic dissolution rate (0.242 ± 1.42 and 0.195 ± 1.26 mg/cm2/min in comparison to its original form. The GI50 value of MSC CMN was found to be less than 10, specifying inhibition of growth more effectively at its least concentration by 50%. The gastroretentive-floating tablet (Formulation F4 displayed controlled drug release (96.22% ± 1.43% for over 12 h. The present study revealed melt sonocrystallization can be used to produce particles with superior biopharmaceutical properties without the use of organic solvents or the addition of other excipients, and amenable to formulation in to a pharmaceutical dosage form.

  18. Global DNA methylation is altered by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer and may predict response to treatment - A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, J S

    2014-07-28

    In rectal cancer, not all tumours display a response to neoadjuvant treatment. An accurate predictor of response does not exist to guide patient-specific treatment. DNA methylation is a distinctive molecular pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis. Whether DNA methylation is altered by neoadjuvant treatment and a potential response predictor is unknown. We aimed to determine whether DNA methylation is altered by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and to determine its role in predicting response to treatment.

  19. Friendship relations from the perspective of children with experience of cancer treatment: a focus group study with a salutogenic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einberg, Eva-Lena; Svedberg, Petra; Enskär, Karin; Nygren, Jens M

    2015-01-01

    Friendships are significant to child development and health but diseases such as cancer can interrupt the contact with friends. The purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of friendship from the perspective of children undergoing cancer treatment, in order to build knowledge that can be used in a health promotion intervention for these children. Fifteen children between 8 and 12 years of age participated in focus groups, where a mixture of informative and creative techniques were used. The focus group discussions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in three generic categories, "Common interests and experiences," "Mutual empathic actions." and "Mutual trust and understanding," incorporating seven subcategories. Based on children's descriptions from a salutogenic perspective, friendship emerged as An equal and mutual commitment that evolves over time and with interactions face-to-face and digitally, a child perspective on friendship should be central to the development of health promotion interventions designed to support friendship relations of children treated for cancer. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  20. Hyoid Displacement in Post-Treatment Cancer Patients: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Yihe; Yang, Zhenyu; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia after head and neck cancer treatment is a health care issue; in some cases, the cause of death is not cancer but, rather, the passage of food or liquid into the lungs. Hyoid displacement is known to be important to safe swallowing function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate hyoid displacement after cancer treatment.…

  1. Studies of metronidazole radiosensitizing effect in radiation treatment of patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, P.Yu.; Daryalova, S.L.; Pelevina, I.I.; Karakulov, R.K.; Zel'vin, B.M.; Kiseleva, E.S.; Kvasov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical observations of 26 patients with tongue, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer receiving telegammatherapy by dynamic dose fractionation scheme in combination with metronidazole (MZ), and of 38 patients from the control group treated using the identical schedule without MZ suggest that MZ favors increasing radiation damage in tumors in those sites without changing the character or intensifying early radiation reactions. After oral administration of MZ in single doses of 5-6 g/m 2 it reached its maximum in the blood serum within 2-4 h. When the total dose of 30-60 g of MZ was used, a marked toxic effect manifest in gastrointestinal symptoms was observed in 33.3% of patients. MZ has a negative effect on liver functions; however, changes in biochemical tests were reversible and within normal values. Simultaneous studies of biopsy material from 22 patients (11 from each group) in terms of proliferation activity showed that oral cavity tumors contain a significant portion of proliferating cells which notably decrease in the course of radiation therapy. The decrease is marked to a greater extent after irradiation in combination with MZ. (author)

  2. SU-F-J-225: Histology Study of MR Guided Pulsed Focused Ultrasound On Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated significant tumor growth delay in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. The temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level using the DAB analysis software. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality may synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better therapeutic result.

  3. SU-F-J-225: Histology Study of MR Guided Pulsed Focused Ultrasound On Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated significant tumor growth delay in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. The temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level using the DAB analysis software. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality may synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better therapeutic result.

  4. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  5. Breast cancer: Diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariel, I.M.; Clearly, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This is a publication about the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer with an appeal for unified reporting of end results. Nine chapters cover historical reviews, risk factors, pathology-receptors-immunology, detection and diagnosis, treatment of the potentially curable patient, and treatment of the patient with advanced disease. The three concluding chapters discuss reconstruction, special clinical situations, and support for the patient. The role of radiation therapy is presented well. The current status of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and combined therapies is also addressed by authoritative authors

  6. A randomized study of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy with and without mitomycin C in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzat, M.; Shouman, T.; Zaza, K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally...... advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (1) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). Results: The 2-year overall....... Key Words: Head and Neck cancer , Radiotherapy , Altered fractionation , Mitomycin C....

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Oncology overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiological diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Biopsy and cytology in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Pathology and morphology of pancreatic cancer; Staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancer; Biological and immunological markers in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer; Drug therapy of pancreatic cancer; Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer; Selected studies on the epidemiology of pancreatic cancer; Clinical correlates and syndromes associated with pancreatic neoplasia

  8. Coping with Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment KidsHealth / For Parents / Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment What's in this article? Hair Loss Skin Problems ...

  9. Linked symptom monitoring and depression treatment programmes for specialist cancer services: protocol for a mixed-methods implementation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jane; Burke, Katy; Sevdalis, Nick; Richardson, Alison; Mulick, Amy; Frost, Chris; Sharpe, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There is growing awareness that cancer services need to address patients’ well-being as well as treating their cancer. We developed systematic approaches to (1) monitoring patients’ symptoms including depression using a ‘Symptom Monitoring Service’ and (2) providing treatment for those with major depression using a programme called ‘Depression Care for People with Cancer’. Used together, these two programmes were found to be highly effective and cost-effective in clinical trials. The overall aims of this project are to: (1) study the process of introducing these programmes into routine clinical care in a large cancer service, (2) identify the challenges associated with implementation and how these are overcome, (3) determine their effectiveness in a routine non-research setting and (4) describe patients’ and clinicians’ experience of the programmes. Methods and analysis This is a mixed-methods longitudinal implementation study. We will study the process of implementation in three phases (April 2016–December 2018): ‘Pre-implementation’ (setting up of the new programmes), ‘Early Implementation’ (implementation of the programmes in a small number of clinics) and ‘Implementation and Maintenance’ (implementation in the majority of clinics). We will use the following methods of data collection: (1) contemporaneous logs of the implementation process, (2) interviews with healthcare professionals and managers, (3) interviews with patients and (4) routinely collected clinical data. Ethics and dissemination The study has been reviewed by a joint committee of Oxford University Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust Research and Development Department and the University of Oxford’s Clinical Trials and Research Governance Department and judged to be service evaluation, not requiring ethics committee approval. The findings of this study will guide the scaling up implementation of the programmes across the UK and will enable

  10. Treatment and survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer Stage IIIA diagnosed in 1989-1994: a study in the region of the Comprehensive Cancer Centre East, The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Festen, J.; Kleijn, E.M.H.A. de; Kramer, G.W.P.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the treatment policy and survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical stage IIIA in daily practice. We selected 212 patients, who had been diagnosed between 1989 and 1994 and registered by the Cancer Registry, Comprehensive

  11. The construction and testing of the EORTC colorectal cancer-specific quality of life questionnaire module (QLQ-CR38). European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Study Group on Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M. A.; te Velde, A.; Aaronson, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the current study were to construct a colorectal cancer-specific quality of life (QL) questionnaire module to be used in conjunction with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and to test its reliability and validity in The Netherlands.

  12. Venlafaxine versus clonidine for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer patients : a double-blind, randomized cross-over study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Ciska; Mom, Constantijne H.; Willemse, Pax H. B.; Boezen, H. Marike; Maurer, J. Marina; Wymenga, A. N. Machteld; de Jong, Robert S.; Nieboer, Peter; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Mourits, Marian J. E.

    Purpose Breast cancer patients with treatment-induced menopause experience frequent and severe hot flashes (HF). We compared venlafaxine and clonidine for the treatment of HF with regard to side effects, efficacy, quality of life and sexual functioning. Methods In a double-blind, cross-over study,

  13. Apatinib plus icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer after icotinib treatment failure: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiangru; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-01-01

    Treatment failure frequently occurs in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who respond to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors initially. This retrospective study tried to investigate the efficacy and safety of apatinib plus icotinib in patients with advanced NSCLC after icotinib treatment failure. This study comprised 27 patients with advanced NSCLC who had progressed after icotinib monotherapy. Initially, patients received oral icotinib (125 mg, tid) alone. When the disease progressed, they received icotinib plus apatinib (500 mg, qd, orally). Treatment was continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or consent withdrawal. Followed up to December 2016, the median time of combined therapy was 7.47 months, and eight of 27 patients were dead. The median overall survival was not reached, and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.33 months (95% CI, 3.63-7.03 months). Moreover, the objective response rate (ORR) was 11.1%, and the disease control rate (DCR) was 81.5%. A total of 14 patients received combined therapy as the second-line treatment, and the ORR and DCR were 7.1% and 78.6%, respectively; 13 patients received drugs as the third- or later-line treatment, with an ORR and a DCR of 15.4% and 84.6%, respectively. In addition, 11 patients experienced icotinib monotherapy failure within 6 months with median PFS of 7.37 months, and 16 patients had progression after 6 months with median PFS of 2.60 months. The common drug-related toxic effects were hypertension (44.4%) and fatigue (37.0%). Apatinib plus icotinib is efficacious in treating patients with advanced NSCLC after icotinib treatment failure, with acceptable toxic effects.

  14. A phase II study of gemcitabine in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeChevalier, T; Gottfried, M; Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, F; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Voi, M; Ponzio, A

    Gemcitabine is a novel pyrimidine nucleoside whose activity has been demonstrated on solid tumors. We report here the results of a multicentre phase II trial of gemcitabine in chemonaive patients with inoperable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gemcitabine was given weekly at a dose of 1,250

  15. Attending the breast screening programme after breast cancer treatment: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, L.; Kwast, A.; Reiding, D.; de Bock, G.H.; Otter, R.; Willemse, P.H.B.; Siesling, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the Netherlands, breast cancer patients are treated and followed at least 5 years after diagnosis. Furthermore, all women aged 50-74 are invited biennially for mammography by the nationwide screening programme. The relation between the outpatient follow-up (follow-up visits in the

  16. Zoladex and flutamide versus orchiectomy in the treatment of advanced prostatic cancer. A combined analysis of two European studies, EORTC 30853 and DAPROCA 86

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Suciu, S; Sylvester, R

    1990-01-01

    A total of 591 patients with advanced prostatic cancer have been randomized to either orchiectomy or treatment with zoladex 3.6 mg as a depot preparation combined with flutamide 250 mg tid in two European studies, EORTC protocol 30853 and DAPROCA 86. Identical design and comparable patient...... characteristics in the two studies have allowed combined analysis. A small but statistically significant difference in time to objective progression or death from prostatic cancer was found in favor of the combination treatment. However, time from objective progression to death was longer in the group initially...... allocated to orchiectomy. Thus, no difference between treatment groups in overall survival was found. As a conclusion, the combined androgen blockade was not superior to orchiectomy in the treatment of patients with advanced prostatic cancer....

  17. Links between personality, time perspective, and intention to practice physical activity during cancer treatment: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaron, Charlène; Marqueste, Tanguy; Eisinger, François; Cappiello, Maria-Antonietta; Therme, Pierre; Cury, François

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze links between personality, time perspective, and intention to practice physical activity during cancer treatment. One hundred forty-three patients participated in survey by questionnaire. Intention to practice physical activity, time perspective using Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, and personality with the Big Five Inventory were measured. Structural equation models using Lisrel were developed to examine hypothetical links between the variables. The adjusted model evidenced an excellent fit (comparative fit index = 0.92; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.076; P = .014). Results showed that intention to practice exercise was positively linked with openness to experience and negatively with present fatalist time perspective. Moreover, conscientiousness and neuroticism were found to be linked with future time perspective, which was positively related with intention to practice physical activity. The present exploratory study with patients suffering from cancer underlined the importance of considering jointly time perspective dimensions and personality factors for health behavior recommendations. Based on our results, we propose some reflections on practice to help nurses and physicians increase patient's motivation to be physically active. Taking into account patients' personality and time perspective, we would be able to propose specific awareness messages and offer short interventions to have an impact on patients' motivation to practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Biological Characteristics and Medical Treatment of Breast Cancer in Young Women—A Featured Population: Results from the NORA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pronzato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The present paper described the biological characteristics and clinical behavior of young women in the cohort NORA study Patients and Methods. From 2000–2002, patients (>3500 were enrolled at 77 Italian hospitals. Women aged ≤50 years (=1013 were stratified into age groups (≤35, 36–40, 41–45, and 46–50 years. The relationship between age and patient characteristics, cancer presentation, and treatment was analyzed. Results. Younger women more frequently had tumors with ER/PgR-negative(2=7.07; =.008, HER2 amplification (2=5.76; =.01, and high (≥10% Ki67 labelling index (2=9.53; =.002. Positive nodal status, large tumors, and elevated Ki67 all associated with the choice for chemotherapy followed by endocrine therapy in hormone receptor-positive patients (40 versus ≤40, <.0001, resp.. At multivariate analysis, after adjustment for significant clinical and pathological factors, age remains a significant prognostic variable (HR=0.93, =.0021. Conclusion. This cohort study suggests that age per sè is an important prognostic factor. The restricted role of early diagnosis and the aggressive behavior of cancer in this population make necessary the application of targeted medical strategies crucial.

  19. Biological Characteristics and Medical Treatment of Breast Cancer in Young Women-A Featured Population: Results from the Nora Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronzato, P.; Mustacchi, G.; De Matteis, A.; Di Costanzo, F.; Rulli, E.; Floriani, I; Cazzaniga, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The present paper described the biological characteristics and clinical behavior of young women in the cohort NORA study Patients and Methods. From 2000-2002, patients (N>3500) were enrolled at 77 Italian hospitals. Women aged =50 years (N=1013) were stratified into age groups (=35, 36-40, 41-45, and 46-50 years). The relationship between age and patient characteristics, cancer presentation, and treatment was analyzed. Results. Younger women more frequently had tumors with ER/PgR-negative(x 2 =7.07; P=.008), HER2 amplification (x 2 =5.76; P=.01), and high (≤10%) Ki67 labelling index (x 2 =9.53; P=.002). Positive nodal status, large tumors, and elevated Ki67 all associated with the choice for chemotherapy followed by endocrine therapy in hormone receptor-positive patients (P 40 versus =40, P<.0001, resp.). At multivariate analysis, after adjustment for significant clinical and pathological factors, age remains a significant prognostic variable (HR=0.93, P=.0021). Conclusion. This cohort study suggests that age per se is an important prognostic factor. The restricted role of early diagnosis and the aggressive behavior of cancer in this population make necessary the application of targeted medical strategies crucial. human epidermal growth factor receptor

  20. Transarterial chemoembolization plus or minus intravenous bevacizumab in the treatment of hepatocellular cancer: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britten, Carolyn D; Gomes, Antoinette S; Wainberg, Zev A; Elashoff, David; Amado, Rafael; Xin, Yan; Busuttil, Ronald W; Slamon, Dennis J; Finn, Richard S

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been observed following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) and may contribute to tumor regrowth. This pilot study examined whether intravenous (IV) bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, could inhibit neovessel formation after TACE. 30 subjects with HCC undergoing TACE at a single academic institution were randomized with a computer-generated allocation in a one to one ratio to either bevacizumab at a dose of 10 mg/kg IV every 14 days beginning 1 week prior to TACE (TACE-BEV arm) or observation (TACE-O arm). Angiography was performed with TACE at day 8, and again at weeks 10 and 14. Repeat TACE was performed at week 14 if indicated. TACE-BEV subjects were allowed to continue bevacizumab beyond week 16. TACE-O subjects were allowed to cross-over to bevacizumab at week 16 in the setting of progressive disease. The main outcome measure was a comparison of neovessel formation by serial angiography. Secondary outcome measures were progression free survival (PFS) at 16 weeks, overall survival (OS), bevacizumab safety, and an analysis of VEGF levels before and after TACE with and without bevacizumab. Among the 30 subjects enrolled, 9 of 15 randomized to the TACE-O arm and 14 of 15 randomized to the TACE-BEV arm completed all 3 angiograms. At week 14, 3 of 9 (33%) TACE-O subjects and 2 of 14 (14%) TACE-BEV subjects demonstrated neovascularity. The PFS at 16 weeks was 0.19 in the TACE-O arm and 0.79 in the TACE-BEV arm (p = 0.021). The median OS was 61 months in the TACE-O arm and 49 months in the TACE-BEV arm (p = 0.21). No life-threatening bevacizumab-related toxicities were observed. There were no substantial differences in bevacizumab pharmacokinetics compared to historical controls. Bevacizumab attenuated the increase in VEGF observed post-TACE. IV bevacizumab was well tolerated in selected HCC subjects undergoing TACE, and appeared to diminish neovessel formation

  1. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...

  2. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  3. Tailoring endocrine treatment for early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontein, Duveken Berthe Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes several important aspects of adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-sensitive, early-stage breast cancer. In our ongoing efforts to tailor treatment so as to provide the best possible care to each of our patients, we studied the influence of various

  4. Communicative skills in treatmenting cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchay, Sanaullah

    2007-01-01

    Communication within oncology is a core clinical skill but one in which few oncologists or specialist cancer nurses have received much formal training. Inadequate communication may cause much distress for patients and their families, who often want considerably more information than is usually provided. Many patients leave consultations unsure about the diagnosis and prognosis, confused about the meaning of--and need for-further diagnostic tests, unclear about the management plan and uncertain about the true therapeutic intent of treatment. Additionally, communication difficulties may impede the recruitment of patients to clinical trials, delaying the introduction of efficacious new treatments into clinics

  5. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Orešković, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established

  6. Conventional external irradiation alone as adjuvant treatment in resectable pancreatic cancer; Results of a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosset, J.F.; Pavy, J.J.; Gillet, M.; Mantuon, G.; Pelissier, E.; Schraub, S. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France))

    1992-07-01

    Between 1/85 and 1/90, 14 consecutive patients were entered into a prospective study of conventional adjuvant post-operative external beam radiotherapy after complete resection for a pancreatic adeno-carcinoma. The surgical procedure was a Whipple resection in 9 patients, a distal pancrea-tectomy in 1 patient. There were 3 T[sub 1b], 8 T[sub 2] and 3 T[sub 3] tumors (UICC 1987); nodal involvement was present in 5 cases. The radiotherapy was delivered using a 4-field box technique with a 23 x MV photon beam. All patients received a total dose of 54 Gy to the tumor bed. The mean treated volume was 900 cm[sup 3]. Acute toxicities consisted mainly of weight loss (mean: 2 kg). Two patients had a grade 2 diarrhea and 2 patients a grade 2 gastritis. Late effects were minimal and only observed in 2 patients. The overall loco-regional recurrence (LR) rate was 50%. The median disease-free survival was 12 months, and the median survival was 23 months. This post-operative conventional radiotherapy treatment gives results that are comparable to the results of GITSG-adjuvant study using a combination of split-course radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). (author). 46 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab.

  7. Combined Treatment Effects of Radiation and Immunotherapy: Studies in an Autochthonous Prostate Cancer Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Satoshi; Harris, Timothy J.; Tryggestad, Erik; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Zeng, Jing; Yen, Hung-Rong; Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Bruno, Tullia C.; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the combination of ionizing radiation and cellular immunotherapy using a preclinical autochthonous model of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Transgenic mice expressing a model antigen under a prostate-specific promoter were treated using a platform that integrates cone-beam CT imaging with 3-dimensional conformal therapy. Using this technology we investigated the immunologic and therapeutic effects of combining ionizing radiation with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer in mice bearing autochthonous prostate tumors. Results: The combination of ionizing radiation and immunotherapy resulted in a significant decrease in pathologic tumor grade and gross tumor bulk that was not evident with either single-modality therapy. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy resulted in improved overall survival in a preventive metastasis model and in the setting of established micrometastases. Mechanistically, combined therapy resulted in an increase of the ratio of effector-to-regulatory T cells for both CD4 and CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Our preclinical model establishes a potential role for the use of combined radiation-immunotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer, which warrants further exploration in a clinical setting

  8. Combined Treatment Effects of Radiation and Immunotherapy: Studies in an Autochthonous Prostate Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Satoshi [Department of Oncology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Harris, Timothy J.; Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yoshimura, Kiyoshi [Department of Oncology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yen, Hung-Rong; Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Bruno, Tullia C. [Department of Oncology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); De Marzo, Angelo M. [Department of Pathology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Urology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To optimize the combination of ionizing radiation and cellular immunotherapy using a preclinical autochthonous model of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Transgenic mice expressing a model antigen under a prostate-specific promoter were treated using a platform that integrates cone-beam CT imaging with 3-dimensional conformal therapy. Using this technology we investigated the immunologic and therapeutic effects of combining ionizing radiation with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer in mice bearing autochthonous prostate tumors. Results: The combination of ionizing radiation and immunotherapy resulted in a significant decrease in pathologic tumor grade and gross tumor bulk that was not evident with either single-modality therapy. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy resulted in improved overall survival in a preventive metastasis model and in the setting of established micrometastases. Mechanistically, combined therapy resulted in an increase of the ratio of effector-to-regulatory T cells for both CD4 and CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Our preclinical model establishes a potential role for the use of combined radiation-immunotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer, which warrants further exploration in a clinical setting.

  9. The recruitment of patients to trials in head and neck cancer: a qualitative study of the EaStER trial of treatments for early laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D W; de Salis, I; Donovan, J L; Birchall, M

    2013-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the factors contributing to poor recruitment to the EaStER trial "Early Stage glottic cancer: Endoscopic excision or Radiotherapy" feasibility study. We performed a prospective qualitative assessment of the EaStER trial at three centres to investigate barriers to recruitment and implement changes. Methods used included semi-structured interviews, focus groups and audio-recordings of recruitment encounters. First, surgeons and recruiters did not all accept the primary outcome as the rationale for the trial. Surgeons did not always adhere to the trial eligibility criteria leading to variations between centres in the numbers of "eligible" patients. Second, as both treatments were considered equally successful, recruiters and patients focused on the pragmatics of the different trial arms, favouring surgery over radiotherapy. The lack of equipoise was reflected in the way recruiters presented trial information. Third, patient views, beliefs and preferences were not fully elicited or addressed by recruiters. Fourth, in some centres, logistical issues made trial participation difficult. This qualitative research identified several major issues that explained recruitment difficulties. While there was insufficient time to address these in the EaStER trial, several factors would need to be addressed to launch further RCTs in head and neck cancer. These include the need for clear ongoing agreement among recruiting clinicians regarding details in the study protocol; an understanding of the logistical issues hindering recruitment at individual centres; and training recruiters to enable them to explain the need for randomisation and the rationale for the RCT to patients.

  10. Adherence to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) among women following primary breast cancer treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ellyn E; Schmiege, Sarah J; Cook, Paul F; Berger, Ann M; Aloia, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) has proven efficacy, yet 32%-89% of patients fail to consistently follow recommendations. This pilot study examines adherence to CBTI in breast cancer survivors with insomnia. There was a significant decline in adherence to prescribed rise time, and total time in bed, but no change in adherence to prescribed bedtime during six weekly sessions. Factors associated with higher adherence included lower fatigue and higher baseline motivation. Higher adherence was associated with worse subjective sleep quality at the beginning of CBTI and fewer nocturnal awakenings at the end of treatment. Results provide preliminary evidence supporting the impact of adherence on sleep outcomes such as fewer nocturnal awakenings. Attention to adherence as part of CBTI may yield greater sleep improvements.

  11. Cancer Survivors: Managing Your Emotions After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devise your own plan for coping with your emotions. Have an open mind and try different strategies to find out what works best for you. Coping with fear of recurrence. Cancer.Net. ... side effects of cancer treatment. Cancer.Net. http://www.cancer. ...

  12. "The only way I know how to live is to work": a qualitative study of work following treatment for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, Elizabeth A; Drudge-Coates, Lawrence; Rixon, Lorna; Eaton, Emma; Cooper, Alethea F

    2013-01-01

    For many survivors of prostate cancer, returning to work posttreatment is a realistic goal. However, little research to date has explored work among prostate cancer survivors. The focus of this study was to explore the meaning of work among prostate cancer survivors and to describe the linkages between masculinity and work following prostate cancer treatment. Fifty prostate cancer survivors who were in paid employment prior to their diagnosis completed a semistructured interview following completion of their treatment and of these, 41 also completed a 12-month follow-up interview. Framework analysis of the 91 transcripts was undertaken. The majority of the men had returned to work at the 12-month interview. Four themes were identified, and these were labeled "Work and self-identity," "Work-related implications of treatment side effects," "Disclosure of cancer," and "Perceptions of future as a cancer survivor." A degree of embarrassment and concern about residual side effects and whether these would present a challenge within the workplace was apparent among our sample and was compounded by a reluctance to disclose these. The descriptions provided by the men in this study reveal that the experience of prostate cancer can lead to challenges for both social and work-related roles. The influence of prostate cancer on men's reports of masculinity was variable, and recognition of these differences is required. In addition, some survivors of prostate cancer may require specific interventions aimed at helping them to manage disclosure of their illness, particularly within a work environment. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Study and development of phosphorus-32 source immobilized in polymer matrix for paraspinal and intracranial cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benega, Marcos Antonio Gimenes

    2015-01-01

    The latest estimates of the World Health Organization show the occurrence of 14.1 million new cases of cancer in 2012. From these cases, 8.2 million will come to death. The paraspinal and intracranial tumors, also called central nervous system cancers, are originated in the brain, cranial nerves and meninges. A new brachytherapy modality began to be used in the last decade. In this procedure, flexible, polymeric plaques carrying phosphorus-32 are placed in contact or close to the tumor for treatment. This treatment has advantages over others because it applies a high dose rate in the tumor sparing healthy tissues. The production of these plaques is not well known, although there are satisfactory results in its use for the treatment of central nervous system cancers. This work carried out initial studies for the production of this type of polymer plaques for brachytherapy. The mechanical properties and immobilization capacity of radioactive material, from two commercial resins, epoxy and polyurethane, with or without the presence of polycarbonate as substrate were evaluated. Initial tests showed the use epoxy resin as the best alternative and the first prototypes and tests with use of it were made. The use of polycarbonate as a substrate was not required on one of the methodologies, facilitating the procedure but offering a lower security barrier. The tensile tests showed that addition of acid to the epoxy resin solution changed its mechanical properties, but there was a small improvement in flexibility. Adhesion tests showed better adhesion of the resin to the textured surface of the polycarbonate. The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the acid solution added to the resin structure is sealed even with temperature rises above 100°C. The epoxy resin used has the ability to incorporate the radioactive material in the form of acid solution and remain tight after wiping and immersion in hot liquid tests According to the results, the production of these plaques

  14. Cancer-related information needs and treatment decision-making experiences of people with dementia in England: a multiple perspective qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Lorna; Farrell, Carole; Keady, John; Swarbrick, Caroline; Burgess, Lorraine; Grande, Gunn; Bellhouse, Sarah; Yorke, Janelle

    2018-04-12

    Little is known about the cancer experience and support needs of people with dementia. In particular, no evidence currently exists to demonstrate the likely complex decision-making processes for this patient group and the oncology healthcare professionals (HCP) involved in their care. The aim of this study was to explore the cancer-related information needs and decision-making experiences of patients with cancer and comorbid dementia, their informal caregivers and oncology HCPs. Cross-sectional qualitative study. Semistructured interviews were conducted face to face with participants. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed prior to thematic analysis. Patients with a diagnosis of cancer and dementia, their informal caregivers and oncology HCPs involved in their care, all recruited from a regional treatment cancer centre. Purposeful sample of 10 patients with a diagnosis of cancer-dementia, informal caregivers (n=9) and oncology HCPs (n=12). Four themes were identified: (1) leading to the initial consultation-HCPs require more detailed information on the functional impact of dementia and how it may influence cancer treatment options prior to meeting the patient; (2) communicating clinically relevant information-informal caregivers are relied on to provide patient information, advocate for the patient and support decision-making; (3) adjustments to cancer care-patients with dementia get through treatment with the help of their family and (4) following completion of cancer treatment-there are continuing information needs. Oncology HCPs discussed their need to consult specialists in dementia care to support treatment decision-making. Although patients with cancer-dementia are involved in their treatment decision-making, informal caregivers are generally crucial in supporting this process. Individual patient needs and circumstances related to their cancer must be considered in the context of dementia prognosis highlighting complexities of decision-making in this

  15. The Impact of Radiation Therapy on the Risk of Lymphedema After Treatment for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Miller, Cynthia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N.; Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean A. [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment can be an irreversible condition with a negative impact on quality of life. The goal of this study was to identify radiation therapy-related risk factors for lymphedema. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively performed arm volume measurements on 1476 breast cancer patients at our institution using a Perometer. Treating each breast individually, 1099 of 1501 patients (73%) received radiation therapy. Arm measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase occurring >3 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate risk factors for lymphedema. Results: At a median follow-up time of 25.4 months (range, 3.4-82.6 months), the 2-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was 6.8%. Cumulative incidence by radiation therapy type was as follows: 3.0% no radiation therapy, 3.1% breast or chest wall alone, 21.9% supraclavicular (SC), and 21.1% SC and posterior axillary boost (PAB). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for regional lymph node radiation (RLNR) (SC ± PAB) was 1.7 (P=.025) compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. There was no difference in lymphedema risk between SC and SC + PAB (P=.96). Other independent risk factors included early postoperative swelling (P<.0001), higher body mass index (P<.0001), greater number of lymph nodes dissected (P=.018), and axillary lymph node dissection (P=.0001). Conclusions: In a large cohort of breast cancer patients prospectively screened for lymphedema, RLNR significantly increased the risk of lymphedema compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. When considering use of RLNR, clinicians should weigh the potential benefit of RLNR for control of disease against the increased risk of lymphedema.

  16. Randomised controlled trial comparing hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlan David, Shannon; Salzillo, Sandra; Bowe, Patrick; Scuncio, Sandra; Malit, Bridget; Raker, Christina; Gass, Jennifer S; Granai, C O; Dizon, Don S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy of hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, and to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial comparing a drug with a complementary or alternative method (CAM). Design Prospective randomised trial. Setting Breast health centre of a tertiary care centre. Participants 15 women with a personal history of breast cancer or an increased risk of breast cancer who reported at least one daily hot flash. Interventions Gabapentin 900 mg daily in three divided doses (control) compared with standardised hypnotherapy. Participation lasted 8 weeks. Outcome measures The primary endpoints were the number of daily hot flashes and hot flash severity score (HFSS). The secondary endpoint was the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS). Results 27 women were randomised and 15 (56%) were considered evaluable for the primary endpoint (n=8 gabapentin, n=7 hypnotherapy). The median number of daily hot flashes at enrolment was 4.5 in the gabapentin arm and 5 in the hypnotherapy arm. HFSS scores were 7.5 in the gabapentin arm and 10 in the hypnotherapy arm. After 8 weeks, the median number of daily hot flashes was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 80% in the hypnotherapy arm. The median HFSS was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 85% in the hypnotherapy arm. HFRDIS scores improved by 51.6% in the gabapentin group and by 55.2% in the hypnotherapy group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Hypnotherapy and gabapentin demonstrate efficacy in improving hot flashes. A definitive trial evaluating traditional interventions against CAM methods is feasible, but not without challenges. Further studies aimed at defining evidence-based recommendations for CAM are necessary. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00711529). PMID:24022390

  17. Study on preparation of 166Ho-Chitosan oriented in the treatment of liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Ho Hong Quang; Duong Van Dong; Bui Van Cuong; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Nguyen Thanh Nhan; Nguyen Dinh Lam; Nguyen Thi Thu

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the process for the preparation and quality control of 166 Ho-Chitosan product. The labeling conditions of chitosan with 166 Ho radioisotope were carried out such as the concentration of chitosan, pH, temperature and reaction time to create 166 Ho-Chitosan compositions. Product quality inspection 166 Ho-Chitosan on the criteria as nuclide purity, radiochemical purity, tested for sterility and bacterial endotoxin. The results of survey showed that 166 Ho labeled with chitosan were completed in 1% acetic acid, 3 mCi: 30 mg ratio at pH = 3, marking time at room temperature for 30 minutes. The results of quality test have shown radionuclide purity ≥ 99%, radiochemical purity ≥ 98%, meeting the criteria for the aseptic and bacterial endotoxin according to IV Vietnam pharmacopoeia. From the above mentioned, 166 Ho-Chitosan compositions meet the quality criteria of the radiopharmaceuticals, therefore, it can be used in pre-clinical research and its application in clinical treatment. (author)

  18. Brain Functional Connectivity in Small Cell Lung Cancer Population after Chemotherapy Treatment: an ICA fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromis, K.; Kakkos, I.; Gkiatis, K.; Karanasiou, I. S.; Matsopoulos, G. K.

    2017-11-01

    Previous neurocognitive assessments in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) population, highlight the presence of neurocognitive impairments (mainly in attention processing and executive functioning) in this type of cancer. The majority of these studies, associate these deficits with the Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation (PCI) that patients undergo in order to avoid brain metastasis. However, there is not much evidence exploring cognitive impairments induced by chemotherapy in SCLC patients. For this reason, we aimed to investigate the underlying processes that may potentially affect cognition by examining brain functional connectivity in nineteen SCLC patients after chemotherapy treatment, while additionally including fourteen healthy participants as control group. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is a functional connectivity measure aiming to unravel the temporal correlation between brain regions, which are called brain networks. We focused on two brain networks related to the aforementioned cognitive functions, the Default Mode Network (DMN) and the Task-Positive Network (TPN). Permutation tests were performed between the two groups to assess the differences and control for familywise errors in the statistical parametric maps. ICA analysis showed functional connectivity disruptions within both of the investigated networks. These results, propose a detrimental effect of chemotherapy on brain functioning in the SCLC population.

  19. Contribution of micro-scanner in the preclinical study of hepatic and pancreatic cancer treatments in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef Azer Akladios, Cherif

    2010-01-01

    Animal experimentation is an unavoidable step in preclinical studies and relies on small animals. In vivo imaging constitutes a precious tool giving information on anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, genetic, pharmacology, while saving cell and tissue integrities of investigated animals. It opens wide the scientific perspective in the field of biological development, physiopathology of diseases, as well as in oncology, from early diagnosis to cancer treatment. This thesis had demonstrated the relevance of micro-scanner in the longitudinal follow up and the management of ortho-topic models of hepatic and pancreatic carcinoma in the rat. For both of these cancers, known to be very poorly or even non curable, there is an urgent need of research on the bases of their onco-genesis as of investigation of the resulting new therapeutic routes. The results of our thesis suggest a role for micro-CT in the preclinical evaluation of their emerging therapies. As far as animal experiment is concerned, in vivo micro-scanner imaging permits, beside a reduction in the number of experimental animals, to establish new (imaging) end-points allowing experiment ending before any sign of animal suffering. It fulfils the main requirements of animal experiment. (author) [fr

  20. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We...... then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients...... with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any...

  1. The influence of marital status on the stage at diagnosis, treatment, and survival of adult patients with gastric cancer: a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jieyun; Gan, Lu; Wu, Zhenhua; Yan, Shican; Liu, Xiyu; Guo, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Marital status was reported as a prognostic factor in many cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer (GC) hasn't been thoroughly explored. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of marital status on survival, stage, treatment, and survival in subgroups. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database and identified 16910 GC patients. These patients were categorized into married (58.44%) and unmarred (41.56%) groups. Pearson chi-sq...

  2. Hope, quality of life, and benefit from treatment in women having chemotherapy for platinum-resistant/refractory recurrent ovarian cancer: the gynecologic cancer intergroup symptom benefit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoquist, Katrin M; Friedlander, Michael L; O'Connell, Rachel L; Voysey, Merryn; King, Madeleine T; Stockler, Martin R; Oza, Amit M; Gillies, Kim; Martyn, Julie K; Butow, Phyllis N

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy for platinum-resistant/refractory ovarian cancer is motivated by the hope of benefit. We sought to determine the relationships between: (a) trait hope, expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy, and anxiety and depression; (b) hope and perceived efficacy of chemotherapy; and (c) unfulfilled hope (where expectations for benefit are not fulfilled) and depression. Methods. Adult patients enrolled within stage 1 of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Symptom Benefit Study were included. Patient. Reported outcomes were collected from 126 women with predominantly platinum-resistant ovarian cancer at baseline, prior to the first four treatment cycles (12-16 weeks), and four weeks after completing chemotherapy or at disease progression, whichever came first. Associations were assessed with Spearman rank correlation coefficient (r) and odds ratio. Results. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy were weakly correlated with each other (r = 0.25). Trait hope, but not expectation of symptom benefit, was negatively correlated with anxiety (r = -0.43) and depression (r = -0.50). The smaller the discrepancy between perceived and expected symptom benefit, the less likely the patient was to have scores indicative of depression (odds ratio: 0.68; 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.96; p = .026). Conclusion. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy appear to be distinct and independent of the aspects of quality of life and scores for depression. Hope did not appear to affect perceived efficacy of chemotherapy in alleviating symptoms, but women whose expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy was not fulfilled were more likely to have scores indicative of depression. It may be preferable to encourage hope toward achievable goals rather than toward benefits from chemotherapy.

  3. Hope, Quality of Life, and Benefit From Treatment in Women Having Chemotherapy for Platinum-Resistant/Refractory Recurrent Ovarian Cancer: The Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Symptom Benefit Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoquist, Katrin M.; Friedlander, Michael L.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Voysey, Merryn; King, Madeleine T.; Stockler, Martin R.; Oza, Amit M.; Gillies, Kim; Martyn, Julie K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Chemotherapy for platinum-resistant/refractory ovarian cancer is motivated by the hope of benefit. We sought to determine the relationships between: (a) trait hope, expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy, and anxiety and depression; (b) hope and perceived efficacy of chemotherapy; and (c) unfulfilled hope (where expectations for benefit are not fulfilled) and depression. Methods. Adult patients enrolled within stage 1 of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Symptom Benefit Study were included. Patient. Reported outcomes were collected from 126 women with predominantly platinum-resistant ovarian cancer at baseline, prior to the first four treatment cycles (12–16 weeks), and four weeks after completing chemotherapy or at disease progression, whichever came first. Associations were assessed with Spearman rank correlation coefficient (r) and odds ratio. Results. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy were weakly correlated with each other (r = 0.25). Trait hope, but not expectation of symptom benefit, was negatively correlated with anxiety (r = −0.43) and depression (r = −0.50). The smaller the discrepancy between perceived and expected symptom benefit, the less likely the patient was to have scores indicative of depression (odds ratio: 0.68; 95% confidence interval: 0.49–0.96; p = .026). Conclusion. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy appear to be distinct and independent of the aspects of quality of life and scores for depression. Hope did not appear to affect perceived efficacy of chemotherapy in alleviating symptoms, but women whose expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy was not fulfilled were more likely to have scores indicative of depression. It may be preferable to encourage hope toward achievable goals rather than toward benefits from chemotherapy. PMID:24107972

  4. Changes in the sleep-wake rhythm, sleep quality, mood, and quality of life of patients receiving treatment for lung cancer: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Pei; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the diurnal sleep-wake rhythm of patients with lung cancer have mostly examined patients cross-sectionally, whereas the effects of lung cancer treatment over time have rarely been considered. Through long-term longitudinal tracking of patients with lung cancer, this study examined changes in their sleep-wake rhythm, sleep quality, anxiety, depressive symptoms, fatigue and quality of life (QoL) at various treatment stages. In addition, factors affecting their QoL were explored. Hierarchical linear modeling was adopted to analyze a convenience sample of 82 patients with lung cancer. The changes in their sleep-wake rhythm, sleep, mood (anxiety, depressive symptoms and fatigue) and QoL were observed at five time points: prior to treatment and at weeks 6, 12, 24 and 48 after the start of the treatment. The effects of sex, age, cancer stage, treatment type, comorbidities and time were controlled to determine the predictors of patients' QoL. The results showed that patients' sleep-wake rhythms were poor before treatments. Compared with baseline, the sleep-wake rhythms of the patients significantly improved at week 48, and anxiety significantly improved at weeks 6, 12, 24 and 48. By contrast, their fatigue became exacerbated at weeks 8 and 48. Moreover, QoL improved significantly from week 6 until the end of the treatment period. QoL was negatively affected by poor sleep quality (β = -0.69, p = 0.00) and depressive symptoms (β = -2.59, p patients with lung cancer before, during and after treatment. Health-care professionals may also need to provide such patients with health education regarding sleep hygiene and with emotional support to assist them in maintaining regular sleep-wake rhythms in order to improve their QoL.

  5. Unmet needs of women with breast cancer during and after primary treatment: A prospective study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Heymann-Horan, A.B; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Dziekanska, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    their diagnosis and throughout the disease trajectory. Material and methods. Consecutive women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, undergoing surgery at the Breast Surgery Clinic, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, between 2008 and 2009 (N = 261), completed questionnaires on their unmet needs, anxiety, physical functioning....... A total of 53% of women with breast cancer had unmet needs at some time between diagnosis and the end of primary treatment (eight months after diagnosis). A contextual understanding of unmet needs is necessary for planning cancer rehabilitation, as not only factors such as anxiety, physical functioning......Abstract Integrated plans will be required to ensure care and rehabilitation for the growing number of cancer survivors. Information is lacking, however, about the extent to which patients' rehabilitation needs are being met, and characteristics of patients who experience unmet needs after...

  6. The Electrode Modality Development in Pulsed Electric Field Treatment Facilitates Biocellular Mechanism Study and Improves Cancer Ablation Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Chao; Chen, Xinhua

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed electric field treatment is now widely used in diverse biological and medical applications: gene delivery, electrochemotherapy, and cancer therapy. This minimally invasive technique has several advantages over traditional ablation techniques, such as nonthermal elimination and blood vessel spare effect. Different electrodes are subsequently developed for a specific treatment purpose. Here, we provide a systematic review of electrode modality development in pulsed electric field treatment. For electrodes invented for experiment in vitro, sheet electrode and electrode cuvette, electrodes with high-speed fluorescence imaging system, electrodes with patch-clamp, and electrodes with confocal laser scanning microscopy are introduced. For electrodes invented for experiment in vivo, monopolar electrodes, five-needle array electrodes, single-needle bipolar electrode, parallel plate electrodes, and suction electrode are introduced. The pulsed electric field provides a promising treatment for cancer.

  7. The current status of treatment for oropharyngeal cancer in Japan. A multi-institutional retrospective observation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Akihiro; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of the treatment for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) in Japan to assist the planning of clinical trials in the future. The data for 523 patients with previously untreated OPC were obtained from 12 institutions from April 2005 to N/larch 2007. Of the 523 patients, 471 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and with curative intent were included in an analysis of the treatment and its results. Of the 471 patients with OPC treated with curative intent, 186 patients (39.5%) were treated with surgery, 118 (25.1%) with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 167 (355%) with CRT. Surgery was indicated for 60.4% of the patients with stage I, 47.8% in stage II, 29.4% in stage III, and 36.44% in stage IV. CRT was indicated for 8.3% in stage II, but the percentage increased with higher stage. The percentage of RT was around 30% among stage I-III, but in stage IV, 21.3% of the patients were indicated for RT. The median follow-up period was 4 years and 5 months. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates for the 471 patients were 85% and 69.9%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates for patients treated initially with surgery, RT and CRT were 73%, 69.1% and 65.6%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates for patients with stage I, II, III, IVA, and IVB were 78.9%. 87.3%, 69.7%, 66.6%, and 47.7%, respectively. Although this study was retrospective, we could understand the tendency of treatment choice according to various factors and treatment results. The information will be useful for planning clinical trials in the future. (author)

  8. The Electrode Modality Development in Pulsed Electric Field Treatment Facilitates Biocellular Mechanism Study and Improves Cancer Ablation Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Cen, Chao; Chen, Xinhua

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed electric field treatment is now widely used in diverse biological and medical applications: gene delivery, electrochemotherapy, and cancer therapy. This minimally invasive technique has several advantages over traditional ablation techniques, such as nonthermal elimination and blood vessel spare effect. Different electrodes are subsequently developed for a specific treatment purpose. Here, we provide a systematic review of electrode modality development in pulsed electric field treatme...

  9. Zoladex and flutamide versus orchiectomy in the treatment of advanced prostatic cancer. A combined analysis of two European studies, EORTC 30853 and DAPROCA 86

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Suciu, S; Sylvester, R

    1990-01-01

    A total of 591 patients with advanced prostatic cancer have been randomized to either orchiectomy or treatment with zoladex 3.6 mg as a depot preparation combined with flutamide 250 mg tid in two European studies, EORTC protocol 30853 and DAPROCA 86. Identical design and comparable patient...... characteristics in the two studies have allowed combined analysis. A small but statistically significant difference in time to objective progression or death from prostatic cancer was found in favor of the combination treatment. However, time from objective progression to death was longer in the group initially...

  10. Managing work and cancer treatment: Experiences among survivors of hematological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D; Siminoff, Laura A

    2018-04-16

    The current study was performed to characterize the employment status of survivors of hematological cancer who have an informal caregiver from the time of diagnosis through the first 6 months of treatment. Using a mixed methods approach, semistructured interviews with survivors of hematological cancer were conducted within 6 months of the initiation of cancer treatment. Interviews assessed cancer treatment status, barriers and facilitators to employment, financial and insurance status, and relationship with the primary caregiver. These results are part of a longitudinal study of cancer survivors and informal caregivers. A total of 171 patients were enrolled. Within 6 months of beginning cancer treatments, approximately 35% were no longer employed. Reasons to remain employed included financial need, employee benefits, and a sense of purpose and normalcy. Employer accommodations and supportive colleagues facilitated continued employment. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that having a higher household income, a desire to work, nonphysical job tasks, and congruent survivor-caregiver communication were associated with greater odds of remaining employed. Within 6 months of initiating cancer treatment, the majority of survivors of hematological cancer had maintained employment. Because of the limitations imposed by the physical stress of cancer treatments, as well as the need to maintain employment to continue receiving employee benefits to cover such treatments, survivors of hematological cancer likely would benefit from employment accommodations that are sensitive to their unique needs. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  11. Weight loss with mindful eating in African American women following treatment for breast cancer: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, SeonYoon; Zhu, Shijun; Friedmann, Erika; Kelleher, Catherine; Kozlovsky, Adriane; Macfarlane, Karen W; Tkaczuk, Katherine H R; Ryan, Alice S; Griffith, Kathleen A

    2016-04-01

    Women with higher body mass index (BMI) following breast cancer (BC) treatment are at higher risk of BC recurrence and death than women of normal weight. African American (AA) BC patients have the highest risk of BC recurrence and gain more weight after diagnosis than their white counterparts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between a mindful eating intervention and weight loss in AA women following chemotherapy for BC. A single-group 24-week longitudinal pilot study with repeated measures was conducted. AA women (N = 22, BMI = 35.13 kg/m(2), range = 27.08-47.21) with stage I-III BC who had finished active cancer treatment received a 12-week mindful eating intervention with individual dietary counseling and group mindfulness sessions, followed by bi-weekly telephone follow-up for 12 weeks. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate the effects of the intervention and of baseline mindfulness on the weight change over time. In the overall group (N = 22), MEQ scores increased over time (p = 0.001) while weight decreased over time (-0.887 kg, p = 0.015). Weight loss over time was associated with higher T1 MEQ scores (p = 0.043). Participants in the higher MEQ group (n = 11) at T1 experienced significant weight loss over time (-1.166 kg, p = 0.044), whereas those in the low MEQ (n = 11) did not lose weight. Participants who were diagnosed with stage 1 BC experienced significant weight loss over time (-7.909 kg, p = 0.014). This study suggests that a mindful weight loss program may be effective for weight reduction and maintenance in some AA women who have completed treatment for BC, particularly those diagnosed with stage 1 BC and with initially higher mindful eating behaviors. Mindful weight loss program is proposed as a promising way in which to reduce obesity-related conditions in AA BC survivors.

  12. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types ...

  17. [Oligometastasized colorectal cancer-modern treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnebösel, M; Lambertz, A; Dejong, K; Neumann, U P

    2018-06-05

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer in UICC stage IV has been improved in the last decades by improvements in interdisciplinary treatment. Treatment strategies for oligometastasized colorectal cancer are developing more and more into an individualized treatment. An overview of the current literature of modern treatment concepts in oligometastasized colorectal cancer UICC stage IV is given. Surgery still has the supreme mandate in resectable colorectal liver metastases, as neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment strategies to not provide any benefits for these patients. In marginal or non-resectable stages systemic treatment is superior in these patients depending on the prognostic parameters. Also in curative settings local treatment options should be considered as a reasonable additive tool. An interesting treatment approach for isolated liver metastases and non-resectable colorectal cancer is liver transplantation. Irrespective of new developments in treatment strategies for metastasized colorectal cancer, resection of colorectal liver metastases remains the gold standard whenever possible.

  18. Study on the toxic side effect of 131I-17-AAG treatment in ovarian cancer-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Wen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toixc side effect on bone marrow and hepatic function of 131 I-17-allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin ( 131 I-17 AAG) treatment for ovarian-cancer-bearing nude mice models. Methods: Ovarian-cancer- bearing nude mice models (n=40) were prepared with cancer cell inoculation. 131 I labelled 17 AAG originally prepared in this laboratory was used intravenously for treatment at a single dose of 3 mCi in 20 models and the remain 20 models were used as controls. Rontine bllod examination (CBC, Hgb, platalet) and liver function test (ALT, AST, ALP and r-GT) were performed in these models at lwk and 2wk after treatment. Results: CBC and Hgb in the treated models were not much different from those in controls at 2wk with the exception of a higher platalet count (P 0.05). Conclusion: Toxic side-effect of 131 I-17-AAG treatment on hematologyical and hepatic function in the models was rather mild and there was a tendency toward recovery at 2wk after treatment. (authors)

  19. Study on the usefulness of high-frequency analysis of the combined treatment of cancer with hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Youn Sang; Dong, Kyung Rae; Yeo, Hwa Yeon

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the usefulness to the high-frequency thermal therapy of cancer staging according to the TNM classification treatment, was to evaluate the effect of high frequency hyperthermia treatment approach through other means and whether other organs, according to the combined presence of transition. Targeted to receive more than a total of 1 cycle high frequency heat treatment at C hospital that performed the high-frequency hyperthermia cancer patients 92 people out stage, depending on the presence or absence of metastasis, combined hyperthermia patients for statistics before and after treatment the therapeutic effect of the therapeutic classification. Out of a total of 92 patients decrease 11 patients, stable 71 patients, with increase 10 patients, the rate of increase is the result of about 11% patients showed a decrease of about 89% is occupied by patients and a stable rate. There is strong evidence for the usefulness as a secondary therapy to maintain the quality of life, while slowing the progression of cancer by a high-frequency heat treatment

  20. Study on the usefulness of high-frequency analysis of the combined treatment of cancer with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Youn Sang; Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Hwa Yeon [Dept. of of Radiology, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In order to understand the usefulness to the high-frequency thermal therapy of cancer staging according to the TNM classification treatment, was to evaluate the effect of high frequency hyperthermia treatment approach through other means and whether other organs, according to the combined presence of transition. Targeted to receive more than a total of 1 cycle high frequency heat treatment at C hospital that performed the high-frequency hyperthermia cancer patients 92 people out stage, depending on the presence or absence of metastasis, combined hyperthermia patients for statistics before and after treatment the therapeutic effect of the therapeutic classification. Out of a total of 92 patients decrease 11 patients, stable 71 patients, with increase 10 patients, the rate of increase is the result of about 11% patients showed a decrease of about 89% is occupied by patients and a stable rate. There is strong evidence for the usefulness as a secondary therapy to maintain the quality of life, while slowing the progression of cancer by a high-frequency heat treatment.

  1. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and

  2. Breast cancer patients' presentation for oncological treatment: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries' breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Methods: Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer ...

  3. Seroma indicates increased risk of lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jørgensen, Mads Gustaf; Haugaard, Karen

    2017-01-01

    in one of the largest retrospective cohort studies. Material and methods We included all patients with unilateral breast cancer treated in the period of 2008-2014. Data regarding treatment and breast cancer characteristics were retrieved from the national breast cancer registry. Data regarding lymphedema...

  4. Cancer cachexia, mechanism and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that half of all patients with cancer eventually develop a syndrome of cachexia, with anorexia and a progressive loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle mass. Cancer cachexia is characterized by systemic inflammation, negative protein and energy balance, and an involuntary loss of lean body mass. It is an insidious syndrome that not only has a dramatic impact on patient quality of life, but also is associated with poor responses to chemotherapy and decreased survival. Cachexia is still largely an underestimated and untreated condition, despite the fact that multiple mechanisms are reported to be involved in its development, with a number of cytokines postulated to play a role in the etiology of the persistent catabolic state. Existing therapies for cachexia, including orexigenic appetite stimulants, focus on palliation of symptoms and reduction of the distress of patients and families rather than prolongation of life. Recent therapies for the cachectic syndrome involve a multidisciplinary approach. Combination therapy with diet modification and/or exercise has been added to novel pharmaceutical agents, such as Megestrol acetate, medroxyprogesterone, ghrelin, omega-3-fatty acid among others. These agents are reported to have improved survival rates as well as quality of life. In this review, we will discuss the emerging understanding of the mechanisms of cancer cachexia, the current treatment options including multidisciplinary combination therapies, as well an update on new and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25897346

  5. Does hyperbaric oxygen treatment have the potential to increase salivary flow rate and reduce xerostomia in previously irradiated head and neck cancer patients? A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Hansen, Ole Hyldegaard; von Brockdorff, Annet Schack

    2011-01-01

    in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. Eighty patients eligible for HBO treatment on the indication of prevention/treatment of osteoradionecrosis or soft tissue radiation injury were consecutively sampled, of whom 45 had hyposalivation (i.e. unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) flow rate......Irradiated head and neck cancer survivors treated in the Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO) Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, spontaneously reported improvement of radiation-induced dry mouth feeling. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate salivary flow rate and xerostomia before and after HBO...

  6. Evaluation of Therapy Management and Patient Compliance in Postmenopausal Patients with Hormone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer Receiving Letrozole Treatment: The EvaluateTM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Kellner, S.; de Waal, J.; Rezai, M.; Baier, B.; Baake, G.; Kolberg, H.-C.; Guggenberger, M.; Warm, M.; Harbeck, N.; Würstlein, R.; Deuker, J.-U.; Dall, P.; Richter, B.; Wachsmann, G.; Brucker, C.; Siebers, J. W.; Fersis, N.; Kuhn, T.; Wolf, C.; Vollert, H.-W.; Breitbach, G.-P.; Janni, W.; Landthaler, R.; Kohls, A.; Rezek, D.; Noesslet, T.; Fischer, G.; Henschen, S.; Praetz, T.; Heyl, V.; Kühn, T.; Krauß, T.; Thomssen, C.; Kümmel, S.; Hohn, A.; Tesch, H.; Mundhenke, C.; Hein, A.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C. M.; Jacob, A.; Schmidt, K.; Belleville, E.; Hadji, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Grischke, E.-M.; Beckmann, M. W.; Brucker, S. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The EvaluateTM study (Evaluation of therapy management and patient compliance in postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients receiving letrozole treatment) is a prospective, non-interventional study for the assessment of therapy management and compliance in the routine care of postmenopausal women with invasive hormone receptor-positive breast cancer receiving letrozole. The parameters for inclusion in the study are presented and discussed here. Material and Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2009 a total of 5045 patients in 310 study centers were recruited to the EvaluateTM study. Inclusion criteria were hormone receptor-positive breast cancer and adjuvant treatment or metastasis. 373 patients were excluded from the analysis for various reasons. Results: A total of 4420 patients receiving adjuvant treatment and 252 patients with metastasis receiving palliative treatment were included in the study. For 4181 patients receiving adjuvant treatment, treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole commenced immediately after surgery (upfront). Two hundred patients had initially received tamoxifen and started aromatase inhibitor treatment with letrozole at 1–5 years after diagnosis (switch), und 39 patients only commenced letrozole treatment 5–10 years after diagnosis (extended endocrine therapy). Patient and tumor characteristics were within expected ranges, as were comorbidities and concurrent medication. Conclusion: The data from the EvaluateTM study will offer a good overview of therapy management in the routine care of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Planned analyses will look at therapy compliance and patient satisfaction with how information is conveyed and the contents of the conveyed information. PMID:25568468

  7. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Suresh Ghadyalpatil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC, colorectal cancer (CRC, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, esophageal cancer (EC, and pancreatic cancer (PC. Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist , these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes.The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs need focussed

  8. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil Suresh; Supriya, Chopra; Prachi, Patil; Ashwin, Dsouza; Avanish, Saklani

    2016-01-01

    GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), esophageal cancer (EC), and pancreatic cancer (PC). Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist, these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes. The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach) to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs) need focussed attention

  9. Effect of changes in treatment practice on survival for cervical cancer: results from a population-based study in Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yoon-Jung; O’Connell, Dianne L.; Lotocki, Robert; Kliewer, Erich V.; Goldsbury, David E.; Demers, Alain A.; Canfell, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Results from clinical trials in the 1990s led to changes in the recommended treatment for the standard therapy for stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer from radiotherapy alone to chemo-radiotherapy. We conducted the first population-based study in Canada to investigate temporal treatment patterns for cervical cancer and long-term survival in relation to these changes in the treatment guidelines. Detailed information on stage and treatment for 1085 patients diagnosed with cervical cancer in 1984–2008 and identified from the population-based Manitoba Cancer Registry (MCR) in Canada was obtained from clinical chart review and the MCR. Factors associated with receiving guideline treatment were identified using logistic regression. All cause and cervical cancer specific survival were compared in patients who were and were not treated as recommended in the guidelines, using Cox proportional hazards models. The median follow-up time was 6.4 years (range: 0.05–26.5 years). The proportion of women who received guideline treatment was 79 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 76–81 %). However, the likelihood of being treated according to the guidelines over time was modified by age (p < 0.0001) and tumour stage at diagnosis (p = 0.002). Women who were treated according to the guidelines after the change in recommended clinical practice (1999–2008) had a significantly lower risk of death from all causes and from cervical cancer. This was driven by lower mortality rates in cases with stage IIB-IVA tumours (all causes of death: hazard ratio [HR] = 0.60, 95 % CI: 0.43–0.82, p = 0.002; cervical cancer related death: HR = 0.64, 95 % CI: 0.44–0.93, p = 0.02). The management of cervical cancer patients in Manitoba, Canada was in good agreement with treatment guidelines although reasons for departure from the guideline recommendations could not be examined further due to lack of data. Treatment of stage IIB-IVA cervical cancers with recommended concurrent chemo-radiotherapy, which

  10. Cost trend analysis of initial cancer treatment in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Yun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the high cost of initial cancer care, that is, care in the first year after diagnosis, limited information is available for specific categories of cancer-related costs, especially costs for specific services. This study purposed to identify causes of change in cancer treatment costs over time and to perform trend analyses of the percentage of cancer patients who had received a specific treatment type and the mean cost of care for patients who had received that treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis of trends in initial treatment costs focused on cancer-related surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and treatments other than active treatments. For each cancer-specific trend, slopes were calculated for regression models with 95% confidence intervals. Analyses of patients diagnosed in 2007 showed that the National Health Insurance (NHI system paid, on average, $10,780 for initial care of a gastric cancer patient and $10,681 for initial care of a lung cancer patient, which were inflation-adjusted increases of $6,234 and $5,522, respectively, over the 1996 care costs. During the same interval, the mean NHI payment for initial care for the five specific cancers increased significantly (p<0.05. Hospitalization costs comprised the largest portion of payments for all cancers. During 1996-2007, the use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy significantly increased in all cancer types (p<0.05. In 2007, NHI payments for initial care for these five cancers exceeded $12 billion, and gastric and lung cancers accounted for the largest share. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In addition to the growing number of NHI beneficiaries with cancer, treatment costs and the percentage of patients who undergo treatment are growing. Therefore, the NHI must accurately predict the economic burden of new chemotherapy agents and radiation therapies and may need to develop programs for stratifying patients according to their potential benefit

  11. A comprehensive study on HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancers: using the first Co-60 BEBIG Multisource Unit in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Rukhsana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The report presents an extraordinary synthesis of customer acceptance procedures (CAP, quality assurance tests (QA in the treatment of cervical cancer patients, using the first Co-60 Multisource Unit® in Bangladesh. The QA and commissioning required measurements and emergency tests verifying the functional limits of parameters acceptable for the new HDR afterloader. Acceptable limits were: 1 the deviation between specified and measured source strength: ± 3%; 2 the positional accuracy and uniformity: ± 1 mm; 3 the temporal accuracy (i.e. timer error and linearity and end error: ± 1% or 30 sec.; 4 treatment planning system (digitizer and localization software: ± 3% or 1 mm; 5 the distance from line to first dwell position and all the others: 5 mm and 10 mm (± 1 mm. Material and methods: Till February 2011, 47 patients were treated with HDR with more than 140 insertions applied. Amongst them, 12 patients were in stage IIB and IIIB, 22 were postoperative (IA and IB while the remaining 13 patients were with unknown stage. All the cases with stage IIB and IIIB received concurrent chemo-radiation and brachytherapy. Postoperative patients received EBRT (50 Gy and HDR according to the institutional protocol. CT scans were completed before HDR-plus planning with a good reproducibility (± 2% and were documented in repeating the plan for the same set up of a patient. Absorbed dose (Gy to a point P, at a distance of “r” in centimeters from a source of the Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR has been utilized for the QA of the source, where source strength measurement was accomplished. Results: All methods and analysis applicable to the QA and commissioning of Co-60 have been investigated and systematically analyzed, measured and documented before the treatment of a patient. Studies and safety requirements of this HDR remote afterloader were carried out. Acceptance and the QA were imperative to justify functionality and dependability in

  12. A comprehensive study on HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancers: using the first Co-60 BEBIG Multisource Unit in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sadiq R; Banu, Parvin A; Rukhsana, Naheed

    2011-06-01

    The report presents an extraordinary synthesis of customer acceptance procedures (CAP), quality assurance tests (QA) in the treatment of cervical cancer patients, using the first Co-60 Multisource Unit ® in Bangladesh. The QA and commissioning required measurements and emergency tests verifying the functional limits of parameters acceptable for the new HDR afterloader. Acceptable limits were: 1) the deviation between specified and measured source strength: ± 3%; 2) the positional accuracy and uniformity: ± 1 mm; 3) the temporal accuracy (i.e. timer error and linearity and end error): ± 1% or 30 sec.; 4) treatment planning system (digitizer and localization software): ± 3% or 1 mm; 5) the distance from line to first dwell position and all the others: 5 mm and 10 mm (± 1 mm). Till February 2011, 47 patients were treated with HDR with more than 140 insertions applied. Amongst them, 12 patients were in stage IIB and IIIB, 22 were postoperative (IA and IB) while the remaining 13 patients were with unknown stage. All the cases with stage IIB and IIIB received concurrent chemo-radiation and brachytherapy. Postoperative patients received EBRT (50 Gy and HDR) according to the institutional protocol. CT scans were completed before HDR-plus planning with a good reproducibility (± 2%) and were documented in repeating the plan for the same set up of a patient. Absorbed dose (Gy) to a point P, at a distance of "r" in centimeters from a source of the Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR) has been utilized for the QA of the source, where source strength measurement was accomplished. All methods and analysis applicable to the QA and commissioning of Co-60 have been investigated and systematically analyzed, measured and documented before the treatment of a patient. Studies and safety requirements of this HDR remote afterloader were carried out. Acceptance and the QA were imperative to justify functionality and dependability in delivering the treatment. Implications of these studies

  13. Gastrointestinal cancer after treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdwell, Sandra H.; Hancock, Steven L.; Varghese, Anna; Cox, Richard S.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the risk of gastrointestinal cancer following Hodgkin's disease treatment according to age at treatment, type of treatment, and anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Cases were identified from the records of 2,441 patients treated for Hodgkin's disease between 1961 and 1994. Follow-up averaged 10.9 years, representing 26,590 person-years of observation. Relative risks (RR) for gastrointestinal cancer incidence and mortality were computed by comparison with expected annualized rates for a general population matched for age, sex, and race. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers developed in 25 patients. The incidence RR was 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-3.5] and mortality RR was 3.8 (CI, 2.4-4.7). Sites associated with significantly increased risks included the stomach [RR 7.3 (CI, 3.4-13.8)], small intestine [RR 11.6 (CI, 1.9-38.3)], and pancreas [RR 3.5 (CI, 1.1-8.5)]. Risk was significantly elevated after combined modality therapy, RR 3.9 (CI, 2.2-5.6). The risk after radiotherapy alone was 2.0 (CI, 1.0-3.4), not a statistically significant elevation. The RR for gastrointestinal cancer was greatest after treatment at young age and decreased with advancing age. It was significantly elevated within 10 years after treatment [RR 2.0 (CI, 1.1-3.5)] and increased further after 20 years [RR 6.1 (CI, 2.5-12.7)]. Risk assessed by attained age paralleled risk according to age at treatment. Fifteen cases of gastrointestinal cancers arose within the irradiation fields. Conclusion: Patients treated for Hodgkin's disease are at modestly increased risk for secondary gastrointestinal cancer, especially after combined modality therapy and treatment at a young age. Risk was highest more than 20 years after treatment, but was significantly elevated within 10 years. Gastrointestinal sites with increased risk included the stomach, pancreas, and small intestine

  14. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer: results after five years of a randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarelli, M.; Raffetto, N.; Torcia, P.; Vitturini, A.; Tombolini, V.; Maurizi Enrici, R. [Istituto di radiologia Universita Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy)

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: this study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two regimens of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: from 1992 to 1997, 127 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (stage III-IV) were randomized. Sixty-six patients (group a), 42 male and 24 female, with a median age of 48 years (range 40-72) received during radiotherapy two courses (1.-6. week) of chemotherapy with carbo-platin (300 mg/m{sup 2} day 1) and etoposide (60 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3). Sixty-one patients (group b), 40 male and 21 female, with a median age of 51 years (range 42-69) received two cycles of chemotherapy with 5 FU (750 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 5) and MIT C ( 10 mg/m{sup 2} day 1). The median dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy (range 55-66 Gy) 180 cGy /d 5w. Results: the actuarial five-year survival rate(Kaplan-Meier) was 38 % for group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) and 25 % for group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.036). Toxicity group a: mucositis G III in 41 patients and G IV in 16; dysphagia G III in 46 patients and IV in 5; leukopenia in 24 patients; 28 patients required nutritional therapy. Toxicity group b: mucositis G III in 38 patients and G IV in 17; dysphagia G III in 48 patients and G IV in 3; leukopenia in 23 patients; 25 patients needed nutritional therapy. Conclusions: the data of the actuarial survival five-year rate suggest that concomitant chemotherapy in group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) is better than the concomitant chemotherapy in group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). (author)

  15. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer: results after five years of a randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarelli, M.; Raffetto, N.; Torcia, P.; Vitturini, A.; Tombolini, V.; Maurizi Enrici, R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: this study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two regimens of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: from 1992 to 1997, 127 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (stage III-IV) were randomized. Sixty-six patients (group a), 42 male and 24 female, with a median age of 48 years (range 40-72) received during radiotherapy two courses (1.-6. week) of chemotherapy with carbo-platin (300 mg/m 2 day 1) and etoposide (60 mg/m 2 days 1 to 3). Sixty-one patients (group b), 40 male and 21 female, with a median age of 51 years (range 42-69) received two cycles of chemotherapy with 5 FU (750 mg/m 2 days 1 to 5) and MIT C ( 10 mg/m 2 day 1). The median dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy (range 55-66 Gy) 180 cGy /d 5w. Results: the actuarial five-year survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 38 % for group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) and 25 % for group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.036). Toxicity group a: mucositis G III in 41 patients and G IV in 16; dysphagia G III in 46 patients and IV in 5; leukopenia in 24 patients; 28 patients required nutritional therapy. Toxicity group b: mucositis G III in 38 patients and G IV in 17; dysphagia G III in 48 patients and G IV in 3; leukopenia in 23 patients; 25 patients needed nutritional therapy. Conclusions: the data of the actuarial survival five-year rate suggest that concomitant chemotherapy in group a (CBDCA+etoposide+RT) is better than the concomitant chemotherapy in group b (5FU+MIT C+RT). (author)

  16. A phantom study on fetal dose reducing factors in pregnant patients with breast cancer during radiotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Ogretici

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to investigate the factors that reduce fetal dose in pregnant patients with breast cancer throughout their radiation treatment. Two main factors in a standard radiation oncology center are considered as the treatment planning systems (TPSs and simple shielding for intensity modulated radiation therapy technique. Materials and Methods: TPS factor was evaluated with two different planning algorithms: Anisotropic analytical algorithm and Acuros XB (external beam. To evaluate the shielding factor, a standard radiological purpose lead apron was chosen. For both studies, thermoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure the point dose, and an Alderson RANDO-phantom was used to simulate a female pregnant patient in this study. Thirteen measurement points were chosen in the 32nd slice of the phantom to cover all possible locations of a fetus up to 8th week of gestation. Results: The results show that both of the TPS algorithms are incapable of calculating the fetal doses, therefore, unable to reduce them at the planning stage. Shielding with a standard lead apron, however, showed a slight radiation protection (about 4.7% to the fetus decreasing the mean fetal dose from 84.8 mGy to 80.8 mGy, which cannot be disregarded in case of fetal irradiation. Conclusions: Using a lead apron for shielding the abdominal region of a pregnant patient during breast irradiation showed a minor advantage; however, its possible side effects (i.e., increased scattered radiation and skin dose should also be investigated further to solidify its benefits.

  17. Factors associated with initial treatment and survival for clinically localized prostate cancer: results from the CDC-NPCR Patterns of Care Study (PoC1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schymura, Maria J; Kahn, Amy R; German, Robert R; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Cress, Rosemary D; Finch, Jack L; Fulton, John P; Shen, Tiefu; Stuckart, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Despite the large number of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, there is as yet no consensus concerning appropriate treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial treatment patterns for localized prostate cancer in a population-based sample and to determine the clinical and patient characteristics associated with initial treatment and overall survival. The analysis included 3,300 patients from seven states, diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer in 1997. We examined the association of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with four treatment options: radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and watchful waiting. Diagnostic and treatment information was abstracted from medical records. Socioeconomic measures were derived from the 2000 Census based on the patient's residence at time of diagnosis. Vital status through December 31, 2002, was obtained from medical records and linkages to state vital statistics files and the National Death Index. Multiple logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards models identified factors associated with initial treatment and overall survival, respectively. Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received the following treatments: radical prostatectomy (39.7%), radiation therapy (31.4%), hormone therapy (10.3%), or watchful waiting (18.6%). After multivariable adjustment, the following variables were associated with conservative treatment (hormone therapy or watchful waiting): older age, black race, being unmarried, having public insurance, having non-screen detected cancer, having normal digital rectal exam results, PSA values above 20, low Gleason score (2-4), comorbidity, and state of residence. Among patients receiving definitive treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy), older age, being unmarried, PSA values above 10, unknown Gleason score, state of residence, as well as black race in patients under 60 years of age, were

  18. Factors associated with initial treatment and survival for clinically localized prostate cancer: results from the CDC-NPCR Patterns of Care Study (PoC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulton John P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the large number of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, there is as yet no consensus concerning appropriate treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial treatment patterns for localized prostate cancer in a population-based sample and to determine the clinical and patient characteristics associated with initial treatment and overall survival. Methods The analysis included 3,300 patients from seven states, diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer in 1997. We examined the association of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with four treatment options: radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and watchful waiting. Diagnostic and treatment information was abstracted from medical records. Socioeconomic measures were derived from the 2000 Census based on the patient's residence at time of diagnosis. Vital status through December 31, 2002, was obtained from medical records and linkages to state vital statistics files and the National Death Index. Multiple logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards models identified factors associated with initial treatment and overall survival, respectively. Results Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received the following treatments: radical prostatectomy (39.7%, radiation therapy (31.4%, hormone therapy (10.3%, or watchful waiting (18.6%. After multivariable adjustment, the following variables were associated with conservative treatment (hormone therapy or watchful waiting: older age, black race, being unmarried, having public insurance, having non-screen detected cancer, having normal digital rectal exam results, PSA values above 20, low Gleason score (2-4, comorbidity, and state of residence. Among patients receiving definitive treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, older age, being unmarried, PSA values above 10, unknown Gleason score, state of residence, as well as black

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is found early. Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer include vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by cervical cancer or by other conditions . Check with your ...

  20. Impact of diagnosis-to-treatment waiting time on survival in esophageal cancer patients – A population-based study in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.; van Rossum, P.S.N.; Leeftink, Anne Greetje; Siesling, Sabine; van Hillegersberg, R.; Ruurda, J.P.

    Background The aim of this study was to determine whether the waiting time from diagnosis to treatment with curative intent for esophageal cancer impacts oncologic outcomes. Patients and methods All patients treated by esophagectomy for esophageal carcinoma in 2005–2013 were identified from the

  1. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies : Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.L.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; de Giorgi, U.; De Wit, R.; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.; European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group; Genito-Urinary Cancers Group, The

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  2. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies: Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; De Giorgi, U.; de Wit, R; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; van Poppel, H.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  3. Population based study on sentinel node biopsy before or after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in clinically node negative breast cancer patients : Identification rate and influence on axillary treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heiden-van der Loo, M.; de Munck, L.; Sonke, G. S.; van Dalen, T.; van Diest, P. J.; van den Bongard, H. J. G. D.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Rutgers, E. J. T.

    The timing of the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) is controversial in clinically node negative patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). We studied variation in the timing of axillary staging in breast cancer patients who received NAC and the subsequent axillary treatment in The

  4. The Medical Necessity for Medicinal Cannabis: Prospective, Observational Study Evaluating the Treatment in Cancer Patients on Supportive or Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Vorobeichik, Marina; Drawsheh, Saher; Omer, Anat; Goldberg, Victoria; Muller, Ella

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cancer patients using cannabis report better influence from the plant extract than from synthetic products. However, almost all the research conducted to date has been performed with synthetic products. We followed patients with a medicinal cannabis license to evaluate the advantages and side effects of using cannabis by cancer patients. Methods. The study included two interviews based on questionnaires regarding symptoms and side effects, the first held on the day the license was...

  5. Risk of breast cancer following fertility treatment--a registry based cohort study of parous women in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, Marte Myhre; Larsen, Inger Kristin; Myklebust, Tor Åge; Robsahm, Trude Eid; Oldereid, Nan Birgitte; Omland, Anne Katerine; Vangen, Siri; Brinton, Louise Annette; Storeng, Ritsa

    2015-03-01

    Despite increasing numbers of women availing themselves of assisted reproductive technology (ART), effects on cancer risk remain unresolved. Given hormonal exposures, breast cancer risk is of particular concern. The aim of this study is to investigate breast cancer risk amongst women giving birth following ART as compared to that amongst women who gave birth without ART. Data on all women who gave birth in Norway with or without ART, between 1984 and 2010 were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). 808,834 women eligible for study were linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Cox proportional models computed hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of breast cancer between the two groups, adjusting for age, parity, age at first birth, calendar period and region of residence. In total, 8,037 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during the study period, 138 ART women and 7,899 unexposed. Total follow-up time was 12,401,121 person-years (median 16.0); median age at entry was 32.5 years (range 18.6-49.9) for ART women and 26.3 (range 10.5-54.6) for unexposed. Women exposed to ART had an elevated risk of breast cancer (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.01-1.42). Subgroup analyses gave an HR of 1.30 (95% CI 1.07-1.57) for women treated with IVF and 1.35 (95 % CI 1.07-1.71) for women with follow-up >10 years, compared with controls. Our findings of increased risk in the study population warrant continued monitoring of women treated with ART as this population advances into more typical cancer age ranges. © 2014 UICC.

  6. Long-term prognosis of young breast cancer patients (≤40 years) who did not receive adjuvant systemic treatment: protocol for the PARADIGM initiative cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dackus, Gwen Mhe; Ter Hoeve, Natalie D; Opdam, Mark; Vreuls, Willem; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Koop, Esther; Willems, Stefan M; Van Deurzen, Carolien Hm; Groen, Emilie J; Cordoba, Alicia; Bart, Jos; Mooyaart, Antien L; van den Tweel, Jan G; Zolota, Vicky; Wesseling, Jelle; Sapino, Anna; Chmielik, Ewa; Ryska, Ales; Amant, Frederic; Broeks, Annegien; Kerkhoven, Ron; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Veta, Mitko; Voogd, Adri; Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Hauptmann, Michael; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sonke, Gabe; van der Wall, Elsken; Siesling, Sabine; van Diest, Paul J; Linn, Sabine C

    2017-11-14

    Currently used tools for breast cancer prognostication and prediction may not adequately reflect a young patient's prognosis or likely treatment benefit because they were not adequately validated in young patients. Since breast cancers diagnosed at a young age are considered prognostically unfavourable, many treatment guidelines recommend adjuvant systemic treatment for all young patients. Patients cured by locoregional treatment alone are, therefore, overtreated. Lack of prognosticators for young breast cancer patients represents an unmet medical need and has led to the initiation of the PAtients with bReAst cancer DIaGnosed preMenopausally (PARADIGM) initiative. Our aim is to reduce overtreatment of women diagnosed with breast cancer aged ≤ 40 years. All young, adjuvant systemic treatment naive breast cancer patients, who had no prior malignancy and were diagnosed between 1989 and 2000, were identified using the population based Netherlands Cancer Registry (n=3525). Archival tumour tissues were retrieved through linkage with the Dutch nationwide pathology registry. Tissue slides will be digitalised and placed on an online image database platform for clinicopathological revision by an international team of breast pathologists. Immunohistochemical subtype will be assessed using tissue microarrays. Tumour RNA will be isolated and subjected to next-generation sequencing. Differences in gene expression found between patients with a favourable and those with a less favourable prognosis will be used to establish a prognostic classifier, using the triple negative patients as proof of principle. Observational data from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and left over archival patient material are used. Therefore, the Dutch law on Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO) is not applicable. The PARADIGM study received a 'non-WMO' declaration from the Medical Ethics Committee of the Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek hospital, waiving individual patient

  7. Patients' understanding of treatment goals and disease course and their relationship with optimism, hope, and quality of life: a preliminary study among advanced breast cancer outpatients before receiving palliative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Cem; Babacan, Taner; Sever, Ali R; Altundag, Kadri

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to explore advanced breast cancer patients' knowledge of treatment intent and expectation of illness course and to evaluate their relationship with optimism, hope, and quality of life (QoL). Patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 55) who were treated in the ambulatory clinic of the University of Hacettepe were included in the study. They completed Life Orientation Scale, The Hope Scale, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life questionnaires. The data regarding the knowledge of illness progression and the perceptions of therapy intent were assessed using self-administered open-ended questionnaires that were answered by the patients. The data revealed that 58.2 % of the patients had an inaccurate perception of treatment intent, believing the aim of treatment was cure, whereas only 38.2 % of the patients had a realistic expectation that their disease may remain stable or may progress over a year. In addition, the awareness of disease progression and perception of goals of treatment was significantly related to hope and optimism scores but not to QoL. A large proportion of patients diagnosed with advanced breast cancer believed that their treatment was "curative", and they would improve within a year. Findings of our study suggest that patients with inaccurate perception of treatment intent and unrealistic expectation of prognosis have higher hope and optimism scores than those who do not, but there were no significant differences in terms of global health status.

  8. Assessment of the Survival of Dental Implants in Irradiated Jaws Following Treatment of Oral Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Meenakshi Chauhan; Solanki, Swati; Pujari, Sudarshan C; Shaw, Eisha; Sharma, Swati; Anand, Abhishek; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic conditions, implants are one of the best restorative options and are increasing widely used. Therefore, we evaluated the success of dental implants in the irradiated jaws of patients following treatment of oral cancer oral cancer treated patients. Materials and Methods: Data of oral cancer treated patients was collected retrospectively from 2002 to 2008. We took 46 oral cancer treated patients in which implants were placed in irradiated jaws for rehabilitation. Results: It was found that out of 162 dental implants placed, 52 failed. Furthermore, there was no variation in the implant survival rate in between both the jaws. Radiation dose of <50 Gy units also showed significantly increased amount of implant survival rate. Conclusions: Implant survival is multifactorial and depends upon a number of factors like level of radiation exposure in that area, time gap between last radiation doses etc., Further research is required in this field to improve the esthetics and quality of life of cancer treated patients. PMID:27843270

  9. Assessment of the survival of dental implants in irradiated jaws following treatment of oral cancer: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Chauhan Rana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic conditions, implants are one of the best restorative options and are increasing widely used. Therefore, we evaluated the success of dental implants in the irradiated jaws of patients following treatment of oral cancer oral cancer treated patients. Materials and Methods: Data of oral cancer treated patients was collected retrospectively from 2002 to 2008. We took 46 oral cancer treated patients in which implants were placed in irradiated jaws for rehabilitation. Results: It was found that out of 162 dental implants placed, 52 failed. Furthermore, there was no variation in the implant survival rate in between both the jaws. Radiation dose of <50 Gy units also showed significantly increased amount of implant survival rate. Conclusions: Implant survival is multifactorial and depends upon a number of factors like level of radiation exposure in that area, time gap between last radiation doses etc., Further research is required in this field to improve the esthetics and quality of life of cancer treated patients.

  10. A natural pharma standard supplement formulation to control treatment-related toxicity and oxidative stress in genitourinary cancer: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, A; Belcaro, G; Dugall, M; Luzzi, R; Hosoi, M; Feragalli, B; Cotellese, R; Cosentino, V; Cosentino, M; Eggenhoffner, R; Pellizzato, M; Fratter, A; Giacomelli, L

    2017-09-01

    Oncological treatments are associated with toxicities that may decrease compliance to treatment in most genitourinary cancer patients. Supplementation with pharmaceutical-standardized supplement may be a supplementary method to control the side effects after chemo- and radiotherapy and the increased oxidative stress associated to treatments. This registry study evaluated a natural combination of supplements containing curcumin, cordyceps, and astaxanthin (Oncotris™) used as supplementary management in genitourinary cancer patients who had undergone oncological therapy. Patients with genitourinary cancers (prostate or bladder malignancies) who had undergone and completed cancer treatments (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or intravesical immunotherapy with increased oxidative stress and residual symptoms) were recruited in this registry, supplement study. Registry subjects (n = 61) freely decided to follow either a standard management (SM) (control group = 35) or SM plus oral daily supplementation (supplement group = 26). Evaluation of severity of treatment-related residual side effects, blood count test, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and plasma free radicals (oxidative stress) were performed at inclusion and at the end of the observational period (6 weeks). Two patients dropped out during the registry. Therefore, the analysis included 59 participants: 26 individuals in the supplementation group and 33 in the control group. In the supplement group, the intensity of signs and symptoms (treatment-related) and residual side effects significantly decreased at 6 weeks: minimal changes were observed in controls. Supplementation with Oncotris™ was associated with a significant improvement in blood cell count and with a decreased level of plasmatic PSA and oxidative stress. Naturally-derived supplements, specifically Oncotris™ (patent pending), could support the body to overcome the treatment-related toxicities - and the relative oxidative stress in cancer patients.

  11. Metachronous Lung Cancer: Clinical Characteristics and Effects of Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzechonek, Adam; Błasiak, Piotr; Muszczyńska-Bernhard, Beata; Pawełczyk, Konrad; Pniewski, Grzegorz; Ornat, Maciej; Grzegrzółka, Jędrzej; Brzecka, Anna

    2018-01-01

    The occurrence of a second lung tumor after surgical removal of lung cancer usually indicates a lung cancer metastasis, but sometimes a new lesion proves to be a new primary lung cancer, i.e., metachronous lung cancer. The goal of the present study was to conduct a clinical evaluation of patients with metachronous lung cancer and lung cancer metastasis, and to compare the early and distant outcomes of surgical treatment in both cancer types. There were 26 age-matched patients with lung cancer metastases and 23 patients with metachronous lung cancers, who underwent a second lung cancer resection. We evaluated the histological type of a resected cancer, the extent of thoracosurgery, the frequency of early postoperative complications, and the probability of 5-year survival after the second operation. The findings were that metachronous lung cancer was adenocarcinoma in 52% of patients, with a different histopathological pattern from that of the primary lung cancer in 74% of patients. In both cancer groups, mechanical resections were the most common surgery type (76% of all cases), with anatomical resections such as segmentectomy, lobectomy, or pneumectomy being much rarer conducted. The incidence of early postoperative complications in metachronous lung cancer and lung cancer metastasis (30% vs. 31%, respectively) and the probability of 5-year survival after resection of either cancer tumor (60.7% vs. 50.9%, respectively) were comparable. In conclusion, patients undergoing primary lung cancer surgery require a long-term follow-up due to the risk of metastatic or metachronous lung cancer. The likelihood of metachronous lung cancer and pulmonary lung cancer metastases, the incidence of postoperative complications, and the probability of 5-year survival after resection of metachronous lung cancer or lung cancer metastasis are similar.

  12. Engineered T cells for pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katari, Usha L; Keirnan, Jacqueline M; Worth, Anna C; Hodges, Sally E; Leen, Ann M; Fisher, William E; Vera, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    Objective Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy produce marginal survival benefits in pancreatic cancer, underscoring the need for novel therapies. The aim of this study is to develop an adoptive T cell transfer approach to target tumours expressing prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a tumour-associated antigen that is frequently expressed by pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Expression of PSCA on cell lines and primary tumour samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Healthy donor- and patient-derived T cells were isolated, activated in vitro using CD3/CD28, and transduced with a retroviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting PSCA. The ability of these cells to kill tumour cells was analysed by chromium-51 (Cr51) release. Results Prostate stem cell antigen was expressed on >70% of the primary tumour samples screened. Activated, CAR-modified T cells could be readily generated in clinically relevant numbers and were specifically able to kill PSCA-expressing pancreatic cancer cell lines with no non-specific killing of PSCA-negative target cells, thus indicating the potential efficacy and safety of this approach. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen is frequently expressed on pancreatic cancer cells and can be targeted for immune-mediated destruction using CAR-modified, adoptively transferred T cells. The safety and efficacy of this approach indicate that it deserves further study and may represent a promising novel treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:21843265

  13. Systemic Treatment for Advanced Colorectal cancer : Bridging the gap between clinical studies and daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G.E.M. Razenberg (Lieke)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe studies presented in this thesis focused on the identification of genes that play a central role in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes with a deletion of the short arm (q) of chromosome 5, the del(5q) MDS. The overall goal of the projects was to gain a better

  14. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... oncology nurse and a registered dietitian. Read More "Screening For Breast Cancer" Articles #BeBrave: A life-saving test / Breast Cancer ...

  15. Study of the effect of misonidazole in conjunction with radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henk, J.M.; Adams, G.E.; Ash, D. (Medical Research Council, London (UK))

    1984-07-01

    The effect of the hypoxic cell sensitiser misonidazole as an adjuvant to radiotherapy of head and neck cancer was tested in a randomised double blind study. Patients with squamous carcinoma of the upper alimentary and respiratory tract, excluding those with early disease with good prognosis, who were deemed suitable for radical radiotherapy and fit to receive the drug were entered. Two radiotherapy regimes were employed, 10 fractions in 3 weeks to a modal tumour dose of 4000-4500 cGy, and 20 fractions in 4 weeks to a modal tumour dose of 5000-5750 cGy. Participating radiotherapists opted for one of the schemes. Misonidazole or placebo capsules were administered 4 to 5 hours before each fraction of radiotherapy to a total of 11 to 13 g/m/sup 2/. 168 patients were treated with 10 fractions and 99 with 20 fractions, between March 1979 and November 1981, when entry was stopped because of the high incidence of drug toxicity and lack of benefit. The estimated hazard ratio for local control was 0.89, indicating a slight advantage to misonidazole, statistically insignificant (p = 0.5). Peripheral neuropathy occurred in 56 patients receiving misonidazole, and was more severe when treatment was given in 10 fractions.

  16. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  17. Longitudinal study of parent caregiving self-efficacy and parent stress reactions with pediatric cancer treatment procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Felicity W. K.; Peterson, Amy M.; Uphold, Heatherlun; Albrecht, Terrance L.; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Orom, Heather; Phipps, Sean; Penner, Louis A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain/distress during pediatric cancer treatments has substantial psychosocial consequences for children and families. We examined relationships between parents’ caregiving self-efficacy, parents’ affect in response to their children’s cancer-related treatment procedures, and parents’ symptoms of post-traumatic stress at follow-up. Methods Participants were 75 pediatric cancer patients and parents. On the day of each of three procedures (i.e., port-start, lumbar puncture, or bone marrow aspiration), parents rated their self-efficacy for six caregiving goals. Parents also self-reported their negative affect (i.e., state anxiety, negative mood, and distress) in response to each procedure. Three months after the last procedure, parents reported their level of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Results Higher parent self-efficacy about keeping children calm before treatment and/or keeping children calm during the procedure was associated with lower state anxiety. Self-efficacy for keeping the child calm during procedures was significantly correlated with distress in parents at the time of procedures, and self-efficacy for keeping the child calm before procedures was significantly correlated with PTSS. All three negative affect measures significantly mediated the effects of parents’ caregiving self-efficacy for both goals on parents’ PTSS 3 months later. Conclusions Parents’ caregiving self-efficacy influences their immediate and longer-term distress reactions to their children’s treatment procedures. These findings provide a more nuanced understanding of how parents’ cognitions contribute to their ability to cope with their children’s treatment and suggest the benefit of an intervention that targets parents’ procedure-specific caregiver self-efficacy. PMID:23034930

  18. Facing Forward Series: Life After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment Coping with your feelings Going back to work and relating with friends and coworkers Show this booklet to the people who are close to you so they understand what life is like after cancer treatment. Take it with ...

  19. Multimodal treatment for resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection has been traditionally the mainstay of treatment for localized esophageal cancers. However, survival after surgery alone for advanced esophageal cancer is not satisfactory. In Japan, the development of multimodal therapy for esophageal cancers has centered mainly on systemic chemotherapy plus surgery to control distant metastasis. Based on the results of the recent Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 9907 study, preoperative chemotherapy (consisting of 5-fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin) followed by surgery has emerged as the standard treatment. In Western countries, where chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been mainly explored for patients with resectable esophageal cancers, two large controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness of preoperative chemotherapy reported conflicting results. However, a recent meta-analysis reported significant survival benefits for preoperative chemotherapy in patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. We need to find new effective preoperative chemotherapeutic regimens, including molecular target agents, with response rates higher than that of the conventional chemotherapy of 5-FU and cisplatin. However, we also must compare the survival benefits of preoperative chemotherapy with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  20. Targeting cancer cells using 3-bromopyruvate for selective cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam H Baghdadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment deserves more research efforts despite intensive conventional treatment modalities for many types of malignancies. Metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy receive a lot of global research efforts. The current advances in cancer biology may improve targeting the critical metabolic differences that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Cancer cells are highly glycolytic for energy production, exhibit the Warburg effect, establish aggressive acidic microenvironment, maintain cancer stem cells, exhibit resistance to chemotherapy, have low antioxidant systems but different ΔΨm (delta psi, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, express P-glycoprotein for multidrug resistance, upregulate glucose transporters and monocarboxylate transporters and are under high steady-state reactive oxygen species conditions. Normal cells differ in all these aspects. Lactate produced through the Warburg effect helps cancer metastasis. Targeting glycolysis reactions for energy production in cancer cells seems promising in decreasing the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. 3-bromopyruvate makes use of cancer biology in treating cancer cells, cancer stem cells and preventing metastasis in human cancer as discussed in this review. Updated advances are analyzed here, which include research analysis of background, experience, readings in the field of cancer biology, oncology and biochemistry.

  1. Ultrasound contrast-enhanced study as an imaging biomarker for anti-cancer drug treatment: preliminary study with paclitaxel in a xenograft mouse tumor model (secondary publication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Hwang, Sung Il; Jung, Hyun Sook; Kang, Mi Ra [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jong Hoe; Kong, Hoon Young [Dept. of Molecular Biology, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess tumor angiogenesis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) of human prostate cancer cells (PC3) that were implanted in mice before and after paclitaxel injection. Twelve mice were injected with human PC3. The mice were grouped into two groups; one was the paclitaxel-treated group (n=6) and the other was the control group (n=6). Before administering paclitaxel into the peritoneal cavity, baseline CEUS was performed after the administration of 500 μL (1×108 microbubbles) of contrast agent. The area under the curve (AUC) up to 50 seconds after injection was derived from the time-intensity curves. After injection of paclitaxel or saline, CEUS studies were performed at the 1-week follow-up. Changes in tumor volume and the AUC in both two groups were evaluated. After CEUS, the microvessel density (MVD) was compared between the groups. In the paclitaxel-treated group, the AUC from CEUS showed a significant decrease 1-week after paclitaxel administration (P=0.030), even though the tumor volume showed no significant changes (P=0.116). In the control group, there was no significant decrease of the AUC (P=0.173). Pathologically, there was a significant difference in MVD between both groups (P=0.002). The AUC from the time intensity curve derived from CEUS showed an early change in response to the anti-cancer drug treatment that preceded the change in tumor size. The findings of CEUS could serve as an imaging biomarker for assessing tumor responses to anti-cancer drug treatment.

  2. Chemotherapy treatment decision-making experiences of older adults with cancer, their family members, oncologists and family physicians: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, Martine T E; Sattar, Schroder; McWatters, Kara; Lee, Katherine; Kulik, Michael; MacDonald, Mary-Ellen; Jang, Raymond; Amir, Eitan; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Leighl, Natasha; Fitch, Margaret; Joshua, Anthony M; Warde, Padraig; Tourangeau, Ann E; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2017-03-01

    Although comorbidities, frailty, and functional impairment are common in older adults (OA) with cancer, little is known about how these factors are considered during the treatment decision-making process by OAs, their families, and health care providers. Our aim was to better understand the treatment decision process from all these perspectives. A mixed methods multi-perspective longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and surveys with 29 OAs aged ≥70 years with advanced prostate, breast, colorectal, or lung cancer, 24 of their family members,13 oncologists, and 15 family physicians was conducted. The sample was stratified on age (70-79 and 80+). All interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. There was no difference in the treatment decision-making experience based on age. Most OAs felt that they should have the final say in the treatment decision, but strongly valued their oncologists' opinion. "Trust in my oncologist" and "chemotherapy as the last resort to prolong life" were the most important reasons to accept treatment. Families indicated a need to improve communication between them, the patient and the specialist, particularly around goals of treatment. Comorbidity and potential side-effects did not play a major role in the treatment decision-making for patients, families, or oncologists. Family physicians reported no involvement in decisions but desired to be more involved. This first study using multiple perspectives showed neither frailty nor comorbidity played a role in the treatment decision-making process. Efforts to improve communication were identified as an opportunity that may enhance quality of care. In a mixed methods study multiple perspective study with older adults with cancer, their family members, their oncologist and their family physician we explored the treatment decision making process and found that most older adults were satisfied with their decision. Comorbidity, functional status and frailty did not impact the

  3. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical and practical substantiation of dose fractionation regimes in radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The indications and contraindications to radiotherapy, radiation reactions and complications resulting from the treatment process are considered. The preparation of patients to the application of chemoradiation treatment methods is described. The recommentations for the improvement of immediate and delayed results of treatment of esophagus cancer patients are given. 99 refs.; 15 figs

  4. Screening for second primary lung cancer after treatment of laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritoe, Savitri C; Krabbe, Paul F M; Jansen, Margriet M G; Festen, Jan; Joosten, Frank B M; Kaanders, J Hans A M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A; Verbeek, André L M; Marres, Henri A M

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: As a result of smoking, patients who have received curative treatment for laryngeal cancer run a high risk of developing lung cancer. Therefore, these patients enter a screening program that aims to detect lung cancer at an asymptomatic stage. The study evaluated whether

  5. Screening for second primary lung cancer after treatment of laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritoe, Savitri C; Krabbe, Paul F M; Jansen, Margriet M G; Festen, Jan; Joosten, Frank B M; Kaanders, J Hans A M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A; Verbeek, André L M; Marres, Henri A M

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: As a result of smoking, patients who have received curative treatment for laryngeal cancer run a high risk of developing lung cancer. Therefore, these patients enter a screening program that aims to detect lung cancer at an asymptomatic stage. The study evaluated whether

  6. Risk factors associated with treatment refusal in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Won Na; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Han, Yeji; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Su Hwan; Ryu, Yon Ju; Lee, Jin Hwa; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yookyung; Chang, Jung Hyun

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is increasing with longer life expectancy. Refusal of active treatment for cancer is prone to cause patients to experience more severe symptoms and shorten survival. The purpose of this study was to define the factors related to refusal or abandonment of active therapy in lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 617 patients from medical records from 2010 to 2014. Two groups were formed: 149 patients who refused anti-cancer treatment and allowed only palliative care were classified into the non-treatment group, while the remaining 468 who received anti-cancer treatment were classified into the treatment group. The groups differed significantly in age, employment, relationship status, number of offspring, educational status, body mass index, presence of chest and systemic symptoms, Charlson Comorbidity Index, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score, and tumor node metastasis stage ( P refusal of cancer treatment. Individual factors, such as old age, low educational status, low weight, and poor performance status can influence refusal of cancer treatment in patients with lung cancer, and should be considered prior to consultation with patients. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Active home-based cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordonaro S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sebastiano Bordonaro Fabio Raiti, Annamaria Di Mari, Calogera Lopiano, Fabrizio Romano, Vitalinda Pumo, Sebastiano Rametta Giuliano, Margherita Iacono, Eleonora Lanteri, Elena Puzzo, Sebastiano Spada, Paolo TralongoUOC Medical Oncology, RAO, ASP 8 Siracusa, ItalyBackground: Active home-based treatment represents a new model of health care. Chronic treatment requires continuous access to facilities that provide cancer care, with considerable effort, particularly economic, on the part of patients and caregivers. Oral chemotherapy could be limited as a consequence of poor compliance and adherence, especially by elderly patients.Methods: We selected 30 cancer patients referred to our department and treated with oral therapy (capecitabine, vinorelbine, imatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib, temozolomide, ibandronate. This pilot study of oral therapy in the patient’s home was undertaken by a doctor and two nurses with experience in clinical oncology. The instruments used were clinical diaries recording home visits, hospital visits, need for caregiver support, and a questionnaire specially developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC, known as the QLQ-C30 version 2.0, concerning the acceptability of oral treatment from the patient’s perspective.Results: This program decreased the need to access cancer facilities by 98.1%, promoted better quality of life for patients, as reflected in increased EORTC QLQ-C30 scores over time, allowing for greater adherence to oral treatment as a result of control of drug administration outside the hospital. This model has allowed treatment of patients with difficult access to care (elderly, disabled or otherwise needed caregivers that in the project represent the majority (78% of these.Conclusions: This model of active home care improves quality of life and adherence with oral therapy, reduces the need to visit the hospital, and consequently decreases the number of lost hours of work on

  8. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    Indications and contraindications for radiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The role of chemoradiation among esophagus cancer treatment methods is determined.Thechnical, dosimetric and clinical data are sequently delivered. Preparation of a patient for chemoradiation is described. Recommendations on their most efficient use are given

  9. Efficacy of injecting platelet concentrate combined with hyaluronic acid for the treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women with history of breast cancer: a phase 2 pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersant, Barbara; SidAhmed-Mezi, Mounia; Belkacemi, Yazid; Darmon, Franklin; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie; Werkoff, Gabrielle; Bosc, Romain; Niddam, Jeremy; Hermeziu, Oana; La Padula, Simone; Meningaud, Jean Paul

    2018-05-07

    Approximately 50% to 70% of breast cancer survivors are affected by one or more symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA). For those who cannot take hormone therapy, autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with hyaluronic acid (A-PRP-HA) may provide a new alternative therapy for the treatment of VVA in postmenopausal women with history of breast cancer. We enrolled 20 postmenopausal breast cancers survivors with VVA and a score of 15 showed a successful treatment outcome. The FSD score decreased significantly during the study, from a baseline score of 36.35 ± 2.53 pretreatment to 30.15 ± 2.47 6 months after treatment, representing improvement of 17% (P < 0.0001, respectively). No adverse events were reported. The injection of A-PRP-HA appeared to be a promising method to improve the trophicity and hydration of vaginal mucosa for the treatment of VVA in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors with contraindications to hormone therapy.

  10. How Radiation Oncologists Evaluate and Incorporate Life Expectancy Estimates Into the Treatment of Palliative Cancer Patients: A Survey-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Yolanda D.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Sullivan, Adam J.; Jones, Joshua A.; Chow, Edward; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We surveyed how radiation oncologists think about and incorporate a palliative cancer patient’s life expectancy (LE) into their treatment recommendations. Methods and Materials: A 41-item survey was e-mailed to 113 radiation oncology attending physicians and residents at radiation oncology centers within the Boston area. Physicians estimated how frequently they assessed the LE of their palliative cancer patients and rated the importance of 18 factors in formulating LE estimates. For 3 common palliative case scenarios, physicians estimated LE and reported whether they had an LE threshold below which they would modify their treatment recommendation. LE estimates were considered accurate when within the 95% confidence interval of median survival estimates from an established prognostic model. Results: Among 92 respondents (81%), the majority were male (62%), from an academic practice (75%), and an attending physician (70%). Physicians reported assessing LE in 91% of their evaluations and most frequently rated performance status (92%), overall metastatic burden (90%), presence of central nervous system metastases (75%), and primary cancer site (73%) as “very important” in assessing LE. Across the 3 cases, most (88%-97%) had LE thresholds that would alter treatment recommendations. Overall, physicians’ LE estimates were 22% accurate with 67% over the range predicted by the prognostic model. Conclusions: Physicians often incorporate LE estimates into palliative cancer care and identify important prognostic factors. Most have LE thresholds that guide their treatment recommendations. However, physicians overestimated patient survival times in most cases. Future studies focused on improving LE assessment are needed

  11. How Radiation Oncologists Evaluate and Incorporate Life Expectancy Estimates Into the Treatment of Palliative Cancer Patients: A Survey-Based Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Yolanda D., E-mail: ydtseng@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Krishnan, Monica S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sullivan, Adam J. [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Jones, Joshua A. [Harvard Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chow, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We surveyed how radiation oncologists think about and incorporate a palliative cancer patient’s life expectancy (LE) into their treatment recommendations. Methods and Materials: A 41-item survey was e-mailed to 113 radiation oncology attending physicians and residents at radiation oncology centers within the Boston area. Physicians estimated how frequently they assessed the LE of their palliative cancer patients and rated the importance of 18 factors in formulating LE estimates. For 3 common palliative case scenarios, physicians estimated LE and reported whether they had an LE threshold below which they would modify their treatment recommendation. LE estimates were considered accurate when within the 95% confidence interval of median survival estimates from an established prognostic model. Results: Among 92 respondents (81%), the majority were male (62%), from an academic practice (75%), and an attending physician (70%). Physicians reported assessing LE in 91% of their evaluations and most frequently rated performance status (92%), overall metastatic burden (90%), presence of central nervous system metastases (75%), and primary cancer site (73%) as “very important” in assessing LE. Across the 3 cases, most (88%-97%) had LE thresholds that would alter treatment recommendations. Overall, physicians’ LE estimates were 22% accurate with 67% over the range predicted by the prognostic model. Conclusions: Physicians often incorporate LE estimates into palliative cancer care and identify important prognostic factors. Most have LE thresholds that guide their treatment recommendations. However, physicians overestimated patient survival times in most cases. Future studies focused on improving LE assessment are needed.

  12. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  13. Aspirin in the Treatment of Cancer: Reductions in Metastatic Spread and in Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Published Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has been shown to reduce the incidence of cancer, but its role in the treatment of cancer is uncertain. Objectives We conducted a systematic search of the scientific literature on aspirin taken by patients following a diagnosis of cancer, together with appropriate meta-analyses. Methods Searches were completed in Medline and Embase in December 2015 using a pre-defined search strategy. References and abstracts of all the selected papers were scanned and expert colleagues were contacted for additional studies. Two reviewers applied pre-determined eligibility criteria (cross-sectional, cohort and controlled studies, and aspirin taken after a diagnosis of cancer), assessed study quality and extracted data on cancer cause-specific deaths, overall mortality and incidence of metastases. Random effects meta-analyses and planned sub-group analyses were completed separately for observational and experimental studies. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed in sensitivity analyses and appropriate omissions made. Papers were examined for any reference to bleeding and authors of the papers were contacted and questioned. Results Five reports of randomised trials were identified, together with forty two observational studies: sixteen on colorectal cancer, ten on breast and ten on prostate cancer mortality. Pooling of eleven observational reports of the effect of aspirin on cause-specific mortality from colon cancer, after the omission of one report identified on the basis of sensitivity analyses, gave a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.76 (95% CI 0.66, 0.88) with reduced heterogeneity (P = 0.04). The cause specific mortality in five reports of patients with breast cancer showed significant heterogeneity (Paspirin, and in five the effect is statistically significant. There were no significant differences between the pooled HRs for the three main cancers and after the omission of three reports already identified in sensitivity analyses heterogeneity was

  14. A screening algorithm for early detection of major depressive disorder in head and neck cancer patients post-treatment: Longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Melissa; Rosberger, Zeev; Ianovski, Lola E; Hier, Michael; Zeitouni, Anthony; Kost, Karen; Mlynarek, Alex; Black, Martin; MacDonald, Christina; Richardson, Keith; Zhang, Xun; Fuhrmann, Fabienne; Chartier, Gabrielle; Frenkiel, Saul

    2018-03-13

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify predictors of Major Depressive Disorder in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients in the immediate post-treatment period (ie, at 3 months post-diagnosis), with a focus on previously unexamined historical and contextual factors. Prospective longitudinal study of 223 consecutive adults (72% participation) newly diagnosed with a first occurrence of primary HNC, including validated psychometric measures, Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM Disorders, and medical chart reviews. The 3-month period prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder was 20.4%; with point prevalences of 6.8% upon HNC diagnosis, 14.2% at 3 months, and 22.6% lifetime. Patients most susceptible to developing Major Depressive Disorder in the immediate post-treatment period: were diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer rather than early-stage cancer (O.R. = 4.94, P = 0.04), received surgery only (O.R. = 8.73, P = 0.04), presented a lifetime history of Anxiety Disorder on SCID-I (O.R. = 6.62; P = 0.01), and indicated higher pre-treatment levels of anxiety on the HADS (O.R. = 0.45, P = 0.05). Our results outline the predominant role of anxiety upon diagnosis as a precursor to post-treatment Major Depressive Disorder, suggesting the need for identification and prophylactic treatment of anxiety upon diagnosis in head and neck cancer patients. Further investigation into pathways by which pre-treatment anxiety predisposes to post-treatment Major Depressive Disorder in this population is warranted. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Adriamycin continuous i.v. infusion for the treatment of childhood hepatic malignancies, toxicity and efficacy: a pilot study childrens cancer study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.A.; Feusner, J.; Reaman, G.; Woods, W.

    1986-01-01

    In an effort to increase the number of patients with hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma receiving the benefits of complete surgical excision, a pilot study was undertaken at a few Childrens Cancer Study Group institutions. For this purpose, repeated courses of adriamycin administered as a continuous I.V. infusion either singly or in combination with c-platinum and radiation therapy treatment was selected. The patient population consisted of a total of eleven children with primary hepatic malignancies: six children had hepatoblastoma; all six were under two years of age at diagnosis. Five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were entered to the study. Of the eleven patients, four had previously received adriamycin as an I.V. bolus. A table summarizes the patient's characteristics, the adriamycin dose they received and their responses to therapy

  16. Studies for the application of Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer (CDT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpano, Marina; Thomasz, Lisa; Perona, Marina; Juvenal, Guillermo J.; Pisarev, Mario; Dagrosa, Maria A.; Nievas, Susana I.; Pozzi, Emiliano; Thorp, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy for cancer, which it is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10 that it is a non radioactive isotope of the natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to produce an alpha particle and a nucleus of lithium-7. Both particles have a range smaller than the diameter of a cell causing cell tumor death without significant damage to the surrounding normal tissues. In previous studies we have shown that BNCT can be a possibility for the treatment of undifferentiated thyroid cancer (UTC). However, more than 80 % of patients with thyroid neoplasm present differentiated carcinoma (CDT). These carcinomas are treated by surgery followed by therapy with 131 I and mostly these forms are well controlled. But in some patients recurrence of the tumor is observed. BNCT can be an alternative for these patients in who the tumor lost the capacity to concentrate iodide. The aim of these studies was to evaluate the possibility of treating differentiated thyroid cancer by BNCT. Materials and Methods: The human cell lines of follicular (WRO) and papillary carcinomas (TPC-1) were grown in RPMI and modified DMEM medium respectively. Both supplemented with 10 % of SFB. The cell line of thyroid rat, FRTL-5, used as control normal, was cultured in DMEM/F12. The uptakes of 125 I and p-borophenylalanine BPA (6.93mM) were studied. The intracellular boron concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) at 2 hr post incubation. The NIH strain of male nude mice, aged 6 to 8 weeks and weighing 20 to 25 g were implanted (s.c) in the back right flank with different concentrations of tumor cells. The size of the tumors was measured with a caliper twice or three times a week and the volume was calculated according the following formulae: A 2 x B/2 (were A is the width and B is the length). To evaluate the BPA uptake, animals

  17. Radiotherapic treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.R.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    Patients under treatment exclusively by radiations are studied when a linear accelerator is used as a source, and 6.000 rad are supplied into the tumour area. The survival of the patients is observed during 12 months, using local control criteria, metastases evaluations as well as patients' tolerance to this kind of treatment. The results are consider good is compared with those found in the specialized literature [pt

  18. Clinical study of combined use of tomudex (raltitrexed) and xeloda (capecitabine) as first-line treatment for patients with metastasizing colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhabova, J V; Semenov, N N; Dobrova, N V; Lichinitser, M R

    2008-02-01

    We studied the efficiency of combined chemotherapy with tomudex and xeloda preparations in patients with metastasizing colorectal cancer. The treatment (240 courses) was effective in 75% patients. Time median before progression was 6.3 months, mean durations of partial remission and stabilization were 7.8 months, total survival 15.5 months, total survival after effective treatment was 18.2 months. The most prevalent manifestations of III-IV degree toxicity were neutropenia, diarrhea, and asthenia. Other symptoms of toxicity (increased transaminase level, bilirubin, nausea, vomiting) were observed in less than 3% courses. Thus, treatment with tomudex and xeloda are effective and safe for outpatient chemotherapy.

  19. Treatment results of 165 pediatric patients with non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A Rare Cancer Network study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozyar, Enis; Selek, Ugur; Laskar, Siddihartha; Uzel, Omer; Anacak, Yavuz; Ben-Arush, Miriam; Polychronopoulou, Sopiha; Akman, Fadime; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Sarihan, Suereyya; Miller, Robert C.; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Martin, Margarita; Caloglu, Murat; Scandolaro, Luciano; Szutowicz, Eva; Atahan, Ibtisam Lale

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This Rare Cancer Network (RCN) study was performed in pediatric nasopharyngeal carcinoma (PNPC) patients to evaluate the optimal dose of radiotherapy and to determine prognostic factors. Patients and Methods: The study included 165 patients with the diagnosis of PNPC treated between 1978 and 2003. The median age was 14 years. There were 3 (1.8%) patients with stage I, 1 (0.6%) with IIA, 10 (6.1%) with IIB, 60 (36.4%) with III, 44 (26.7%) with IVA, and 47 (29%) with IVB disease. While 21 (12.7%) patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone, 144 (87.3%) received chemotherapy and RT. The median follow-up time was 48 months. Results: The actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 77.4% (95% CI: 70.06-84.72), whereas the actuarial 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 68.8% (95% CI: 61.33-76.31). In multivariate analysis, unfavorable factors were age >14 years for LRC (p = 0.04); male gender for DMFS (p = 0.03); T3/T4 disease for LRFS (p = 0.01); and N3 disease for DFS (p = 0.002) and OS (p = 0.002); EBRT dose of less than 66 Gy for LRFS (p = 0.02) and LRRFS (p = 0.0028); and patients treated with RT alone for LRFS (p = 0.0001), LRRFS (p = 0.007) and DFS (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Our results support the current practice of using combined radiation and chemotherapy for optimal treatment of NPC. However, research should be encouraged in an attempt to reduce the potential for long-term sequelae in pediatric patients given their relatively favorable prognosis and potential for longevity

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb. The cancer may occur as soon as 5 years ... thyroid cancer, drugs may be given to prevent the body from making thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone that can ...

  1. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  2. A study to 3D dose measurement and evaluation for respiratory motion in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byeong Geol; Choi, Chang Heon; Yun, Il Gyu; Yang, Jin Seong; Lee, Dong Myeong; Park, Ju Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, VHS Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study aims to evaluate 3D dosimetric impact for MIP image and each phase image in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For each of 5 patients with non-small-cell pulmonary tumors, a respiration-correlated four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) study was performed . We obtain ten 3D CT images corresponding to phases of a breathing cycle. Treatment plans were generated using MIP CT image and each phases 3D CT. We performed the dose verification of the TPS with use of the Ion chamber and COMPASS. The dose distribution that were 3D reconstructed using MIP CT image compared with dose distribution on the corresponding phase of the 4D CT data. Gamma evaluation was performed to evaluate the accuracy of dose delivery for MIP CT data and 4D CT data of 5 patients. The average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 2 mm/2% about 99%. The average Homogeneity Index difference between MIP and each 3D data of patient dose was 0.03∼0.04. The average difference between PTV maximum dose was 3.30 cGy, The average different Spinal Coad dose was 3.30 cGy, The average of difference with V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 5} of Lung was -0.04%∼2.32%. The average Homogeneity Index difference between MIP and each phase 3D data of all patient was -0.03∼0.03. The average PTV maximum dose difference was minimum for 10% phase and maximum for 70% phase. The average Spain cord maximum dose difference was minimum for 0% phase and maximum for 50% phase. The average difference of V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 5} of Lung show bo certain trend. There is no tendency of dose difference between MIP with 3D CT data of each phase. But there are appreciable difference for specific phase. It is need to study about patient group which has similar tumor location and breathing motion. Then we compare with dose distribution for each phase 3D image data or MIP image data. we will determine appropriate image data for treatment plan.

  3. Management of rectal cancers in relation to treatment guidelines: a population-based study comparing Italian and French patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minicozzi, Pamela; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Faivre, Jean; Sant, Milena

    2014-07-01

    Few studies have investigated rectal cancer management at the population level. We compared how rectal cancers diagnosed in Italy (2003-2005) and France (2005) were managed, and evaluated the extent to which management adhered to European guidelines. Samples of 3938 Italian and 2287 French colorectal cancer patients were randomly extracted from 8 and 12 cancer registries respectively. Rectal cancer patients (860 Italian, 559 French) were analysed. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (ORs) of being treated with curative intent, receiving sphincter-saving surgery, and receiving preoperative radiotherapy. Similar proportions of Italian and French patients were treated with curative intent (70% vs. 67%; OR=0.92 [0.73-1.16]); the respective proportions receiving sphincter-saving surgery were 21% and 33% (OR=1.15 [0.86-1.53]). In about 50% of those treated with curative intent, ≥ 12 lymph nodes were harvested in both countries. The proportion receiving postoperative radiotherapy was higher in Italy than in France (25% vs. 11%, pguidelines. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  5. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... infectious complications (n = 170; HR 0.6 (95 per cent c.i. 0.4 to 0.9), P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis of patients who had a curative resection, including Dukes' stage, age, gender, tumour location, blood transfusion, postoperative infectious complications and treatment, ranitidine still had...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  6. Comparative study of four advanced 3d-conformal radiation therapy treatment planning techniques for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrassi, Mohamed Yassine; Bentayeb, Farida; Malisan, Maria Rosa

    2013-01-01

    For the head-and-neck cancer bilateral irradiation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most reported technique as it enables both target dose coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. However, during the last 20 years, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques have been introduced, which are tailored to improve the classic shrinking field technique, as regards both planning target volume (PTV) dose conformality and sparing of OARs, such as parotid glands and spinal cord. In this study, we tested experimentally in a sample of 13 patients, four of these advanced 3DCRT techniques, all using photon beams only and a unique isocentre, namely Bellinzona, Forward-Planned Multisegments (FPMS), ConPas, and field-in-field (FIF) techniques. Statistical analysis of the main dosimetric parameters of PTV and OARs DVHs as well as of homogeneity and conformity indexes was carried out in order to compare the performance of each technique. The results show that the PTV dose coverage is adequate for all the techniques, with the FPMS techniques providing the highest value for D95%; on the other hand, the best sparing of parotid glands is achieved using the FIF and ConPas techniques, with a mean dose of 26 Gy to parotid glands for a PTV prescription dose of 54 Gy. After taking into account both PTV coverage and parotid sparing, the best global performance was achieved by the FIF technique with results comparable to that of IMRT plans. This technique can be proposed as a valid alternative when IMRT equipment is not available or patient is not suitable for IMRT treatment. (author)

  7. Radioactive metallic stent for palliative treatment of esopageal cancer using Ho-166: an experimental study in canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, J. H.; Lee, J. D. [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wang, H. J.; Lim, H. E.; Park, C. H. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Park, K. B. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Self-expandable metallic stents are widely used for palliative treatment of esophageal cancer, however, tumor overgrowth and short survaval limit its long-term effect. The purpose of this study is to evaluate tissue response of the radiation effect in normal canine esophagus whether metallic stents coated with radioactive H-166 is effective for patients survival and preservation of stent patency longer than stents without radioactive materials. Ho-166 was incorporated within polyurethan (50{mu}) and coated over the outer surface of self-expandable metallic stents. Metallic stents with radioactivity of 4.0-7.8mCi (Group A), 1.0-1.8 mCi (Group B) and 0.5-0.7mCi (Group C) were placed in normal mid-esophagus in twelve dogs (Group A), five (Group B) and another five dogs (Group C) respectively, and the stents were tightly anchored by surgery to prevent migration. Estimated radiation dose was 6-70 Gy in Group C. Fluoroscopy confirmed stents in esophagus without migration for at least two days. The dogs were sacrified at two or three months later and histopathologic examinations were performed. In group A, mid-esophagus stricture, mucosal ulceration were found in all specimens. Severe fibrosis and degeneration of muscular propria, upper one half were found in three and complete fibrosis of esophageal wall, however, esophageal perforation was found but muscular layer was intact. In group C, no histological changes was demonstrated in three but submucosal inflammation with intact mucosa in two. In therapeutic dose level (group B), radioactive metallic stent showed radiation effect within esophageal wall without complication which might give additional palliative effect in malignant espohageal stricture.

  8. The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Institute of Oncology (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philipp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Zaucha, Renata [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University, Gdansk (Poland); Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Lagrange, Jean L. [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Oezsoy, Orhan [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHCVs-RSV, Sion (Switzerland); Nguyen, Tan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Baize, Adele [Department de Radio-Oncologie, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles (Belgium); Boujelbene, Noureddine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Collen, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Scandolaro, Luciano [Radioterapia, Azienda Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Untereiner, Michel [Centre Francois Baclesse, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Goldberg, Hadassah [Oncology Departement, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Pesce, Gianfranco A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Opedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Anacak, Yavuz [Department of Radiation Oncology, EGE University, Izmir (Turkey); Friedrich, Esther E.; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Beer, Karl T. [Radio Onkologiezentrum Biel (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38-93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2-16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

  9. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer -- Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Per Olov; Ala-Opas, Martti; Brekkan, Einar

    2002-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, interest in parenteral estrogen therapy for prostate cancer was renewed when it was found that it influenced liver metabolism only marginally and had very few cardiovascular side-effects. In this study high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) was compared to combined...

  10. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer cervix?: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirapara, Pushpendra H.; Patidar, Arvindkumar; Walke, Rahul; Jakhar, Shankar Lal; Sharma, Neeti; Kumar, H.S.; Jain, Sandeep; Kalwar, Ashok; Bardia, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is very commonly seen in most of the malignancies including cancer cervix. Anemia has long been reported to adversely affect the efficacy of radiation treatment in cervical cancer. At our center, carcinoma cervix accounts for approximately 8-10% of all malignancies. The objective of this study is to see the impact of anemia in the treatment of cancer cervix. In the present study, we collected data of treatment results of FIGO stage II and III cancer cervix patients retrospectively treated in years of 2009-10. We have tried to assess the outcome of results in patients whom haemoglobin (Hb) level < 10 gm/dl and e''10 gm/dl. Out of 200 patients of disease with baseline Hb less than 10 gm/dl, 80(40%) patients had residual disease after 4 weeks of completion of treatment. Out of 168 patients with baseline Hb more than 10 gm/dl, 42(25%) had residual disease (p-0.0012 i.e highly significant). Our study shows that there is a good disease control at local site in patients with higher pretreatment Hb level. Effect of pretreatment Hb on treatment outcome in terms of overall survival, disease free survival, and local relapse free survival along with effect on corrective measures should be studied in detail. (author)

  12. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. PMID:24623991

  13. The influence of unmet supportive care needs on anxiety and depression during cancer treatment and beyond: a longitudinal study of survivors of haematological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Devesh; White, Victoria M; Seymour, John F; Miles Prince, H; Harrison, Simon; Jefford, Michael; Winship, Ingrid; Hill, David; Bolton, Damien; Kay, Anne; Millar, Jeremy; Doo, Nicole Wong; Giles, Graham

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between patient-reported unmet needs and anxiety and depression for survivors of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and multiple myeloma (MM). In a longitudinal study design, self-reported data were collected through telephone interviews at two time points approximately 7 (T1) and 15 (T2) months post-diagnosis. The sample was recruited through the population-based Victorian Cancer Registry. At T1 and T2, the study outcomes, anxiety and depression, were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and unmet needs were measured using the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34). Questions related to social/family problems, relationship problems and financial problems were also asked. A three-step multivariable hierarchical logistic regression analysis examined the relative role of T1 anxiety and depression, T1 and T2 unmet needs and other psychosocial factors with T2 anxiety and depression. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were observed between unmet needs and psychological distress. T2 anxiety was associated with T1 anxiety (OR 4.75, 95% CI 1.86-11.09), T2 psychological needs (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.34-2.11) and with T1 social problems (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.03-5.05) in multivariate analysis. T2 depression was associated with both T1 (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.57) and T2 psychological needs (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.06-1.70), T2 physical needs (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.27-2.81) and T1 depression (OR 4.52, 95% CI 1.88-10.86). Unmet needs that manifest following diagnosis and treatment may persist into early survivorship and contribute to psychological distress. Addressing these needs during treatment may diminish the risk of current and future anxiety and depression.

  14. New treatment modalities and pharmacologic refinements for metatstatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Smorenburg (Carolien)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis the results of clinical studies with new chemotherapeutic agents and pharmacokinetic studies on taxanes in breast cancer patients are reported. In metastatic breast cancer, endocrine and cytotoxic treatment often result in objective tumor responses, associated with

  15. Treatment of the pain caused by cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao

    1979-01-01

    Relief of pain caused by cancerous invasion is one of the most important role of radiotherapy. Telecobalt has improved the palliative effects for cancer pain, because of its sufficient depth dose. Supervoltage x-ray generated from Linac has expanded indications of treatment for cancer pain by the shortening of treatment time due to high dose rate. Intraoperative electron beam therapy is useful in the case of carcinoma of the pancreas suffering severe pain. Fast neutron therapy is clearly more effective than supervoltage x-ray for pain caused by the invasion of radioresistant cancer. Pelvic angiography is useful for diagnosis of pain focus caused by illiac lymph node metastasis. (author)

  16. Outcome of Breast Cancer in Moroccan Young Women Correlated to Clinic-Pathological Features, Risk Factors and Treatment: A Comparative Study of 716 Cases in a Single Institution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Slaoui

    Full Text Available Breast cancer in young women is quite uncommon and shows more aggressive characteristics with major disparities between worldwide populations. Prognosis and outcome of breast cancer in young patients are widely studied, but still no consensus is available.We retrospectively included 716 cases of breast cancer women diagnosed in 2009 at the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat. Patients were divided into two groups according to their age: women aged ≤40 years (Group 1 and women aged >40 years (Group 2. Data were recorded from patients' medical files and analyzed using SPSS 13.0 software (IBM.Young patients represent 24.9% of all patients with breast cancer. The comparison between the two groups displayed significant differences regarding nulliparity (p = 0.001 and progesterone receptor negativity (p = 0.01. Moreover, more progression (Metastases/Relapse was registered in young women as compared to older women with breast cancer (p = 0.03. The estimated median follow-up period was 31 months. The 5-years Event-Free Survival (EFS of patients with local disease was 64.6% in young women and 71.5% in older women with breast cancer (p = 0.04. Multivariate analysis in young women showed that nulliparity (HR: 7.2; 95%CI: 1.16-44.54; p = 0.03, T3 tumors (HR: 17.39; 95%CI: 1.74-173.34; p = 0.01 and negative PgR status (HR: 19.85; 95%CI: 1.07-366.54; p = 0.04 can be considered as risk factors for poorer event free survival while hormone therapy was associated with better EFS (HR: 0.11; 95%CI: 0.00-0.75; p = 0.03. In Group 2, multivariate analysis showed that patients with inflammatory breast cancer, N+ status, absence of radiotherapy, absence of chemotherapy, and absence of hormone therapy are at increased risk of recurrence.In Morocco, breast cancer is more frequent in young women as compared to western countries. Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive and is diagnosed late, leading to an intensive treatment. Moreover, the main factors

  17. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, H.; Schell, M.; Pui, C.H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 (27.9-135.9), 23.0 (9.8-54.1), 15.1 (7.1-32.2), and 7.4 (3.2-17.0), respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones.

  18. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, H.; Schell, M.; Pui, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 [27.9-135.9], 23.0 [9.8-54.1], 15.1 [7.1-32.2], and 7.4 [3.2-17.0], respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones

  19. Transoral laser resection or radiotherapy? Patient choice in the treatment of early laryngeal cancer: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, T; Dawson, R; Sen, M; Makura, Z

    2017-06-01

    The choices made by patients offered treatment for early laryngeal cancer with radiotherapy or transoral laser resection were reviewed. A prospective review was conducted of all patients diagnosed and treated for early laryngeal carcinoma from December 2002 to September 2009 at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. A total of 209 patients with tumour stage T1 or T2 laryngeal cancer were treated; each new patient suitable for radiotherapy or transoral laser resection was seen jointly by the clinical (radiation) oncologist and head and neck surgeon, and offered the choice of treatment. Of the patients, 47.4 per cent were given a choice between radiotherapy and transoral laser resection; 51.2 per cent were advised to have radiotherapy, and there were no records for the remaining 1.4 per cent. From those given the choice, 59.6 per cent chose transoral laser resection (p < 0.02 (t-test)) and 35.4 per cent chose radiotherapy. When given the choice, a statistically significant majority of patients choose transoral laser resection rather than radiotherapy.

  20. Treatment-Planning Study of Prostate Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With a Varian Clinac Operated Without a Flattening Filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Kry, Stephen F.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using photon beams from an accelerator operated without a flattening filter; and to determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using unflattened beams for this type of treatment. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated for 10 patients with early-stage prostate cancer. For each patient, four plans were generated: with and without the flattening filter, at 6 and 18 MV. The prescription dose was 75.6 Gy to 98% of the planning target volume. The number of beams, their orientations, and optimization constraints were the same for all plans. Plans were generated with Eclipse 8.0 (Varian Medical Systems). Results: All the plans developed with unflattened beams were clinically acceptable. In terms of patient dose distributions, plans with unflattened beams were similar to the corresponding plans with flattened beams. Plans with unflattened beams required fewer monitor units (MUs) per plan: on average, by a factor of 2.0 at 6 MV and 2.6 at 18 MV, assuming that removal of the flattening filter was not followed by recalibration of MUs. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for prostate cancer can be developed with unflattened beams at both 6 and 18 MV. Dosimetrically, flattened and unflattened beams generated similar treatment plans. The plans with unflattened beams required substantially fewer MUs. The reduction in the number of MUs indicates corresponding reduction in beam-on time and in the amount of radiation outside the target

  1. Under-treatment of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Alysa

    2010-03-01

    Cancer pain remains inadequately treated, despite internationally accepted management guidelines and a myriad of treatment options. Risk factors for undertreatment are reviewed, along with possible explanations. Recent studies documenting the scope of the problem as well as investigating solutions are discussed with clinical-practice recommendations outlined. Women over 65 years of age representative of a cultural minority, with earlier stage disease, cared for at home, and with high-school education or less are at highest risk of having uncontrolled cancer pain. Optimal treatment is impeded by patients' maladaptive beliefs, nonadherence, underreporting or miscommunication with caregivers; from a healthcare provider perspective, it may be due to inadequate assessment, documentation, knowledge, and communication. Emerging data support the vital influence of lay caregivers on appropriate pain management. Although home-education programs may decrease pain and improve quality of life, there are also less intensive approaches deliverable by individuals to holistically address pain. Prospective study of barriers to both delivery and receipt of adequate pain management is needed, as the majority of published literature is based on survey studies. Treatment must be individualized based on clinical circumstances and patient wishes, with the goal of maximizing function and quality of life.

  2. Issues in cervical cancer incidence and treatment in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Mark H; Phaëton, Rébécca

    2010-09-01

    Cervical disease burden continues to be especially high in HIV-infected women, even in the era of effective antiretroviral medications. This review discusses the multiple issues surrounding HIV-associated cervical cancer. Also, the unique treatment-related issues in HIV-associated cervical cancer are addressed. The incidence of invasive cervical cancer has remained stable in industrialized nations; however, it is only estimated in developing countries secondary to a relative lack of data collection and registries. Trends in HIV-associated cervical cancer have changed in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Recent molecular pathways suggest that the natural progression of human papillomavirus infection, the causal agent in all cervical cancers, may be related to immune system dysfunction as well as HIV/human papillomavirus synergistic mechanisms. When highly active retroviral therapies are used, invasive cervical cancer treatments are impacted by concomitant drug toxicities that could potentially limit therapeutic benefit of either HAART or the standard of care treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer, concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The significance and care of the patient with invasive cervical cancer is becoming a geographically relevant phenomenon such that it may be time to re-address the global definition. Further studies in treatment issues and drug-drug interactions with cervical cancer treatments in the setting of HIV are paramount.

  3. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  4. Cardiac risks in multimodal breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Almost all breast cancer patients receive one or more adjuvant treatments consisting of tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, LHRH-antogonists, chemotherapy, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy. These treatments have been shown to considerably improve overall survival. As a result, long term survival for 15 and more years is achieved in more than two thirds of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Therefore, more interest in short and long term risks of adjuvant treatments has been arisen. The focus of this article is the long term cardiac risks of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients and possible interactions with chemotherapy and trastuzumab. (orig.)

  5. Cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and may be a risk factor for reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients has been well characterized, and there is growing understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation has emerged as a key biological pathway for cancer-related fatigue, with studies documenting links between markers of inflammation and fatigue before, during, and particularly after treatment. There is considerable variability in the experience of cancer-related fatigue that is not explained by disease- or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors may play an important role in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have begun to identify genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors for cancer-related fatigue. Given the multi-factorial nature of cancer-related fatigue, a variety of intervention approaches have been examined in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. Although there is currently no gold standard for treating fatigue, several of these approaches have shown beneficial effects and can be recommended to patients. This report provides a state of the science review of mechanisms, risk factors, and interventions for cancer-related fatigue, with a focus on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients. PMID:25113839

  6. Periodontal disease with treatment reduces subsequent cancer risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ing-Ming; Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Chun-Feng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between routine treatment of periodontal disease (PD) and the subsequent risks for cancers in Taiwan. Study participants were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) system database. The PD with a routine treatment cohort contained 38 902 patients. For each treatment cohort participant, two age- and sex-matched comparison (control) cohort participants were randomly selected. Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of PD with treatment on the subsequent risk of cancer. The overall risk of developing cancer was significantly lower in the treatment cohort than in the patients without treatment (adjusted Hazard ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.68-0.76). The risks of developing most gastrointestinal tract, lung, gynecological and brain malignancies were significantly lower in the treatment cohort than in the comparison cohort. In contrast, the risks of prostate and thyroid cancers were significantly higher in the treatment cohort than in the comparison cohort. Our findings suggest that PD with treatment is associated with a significantly reduced overall risk of cancer and reduced risks of certain types of cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Prostatectomy versus radiotherapy for early-stage prostate cancer (PREPaRE) study: protocol for a mixed-methods study of treatment decision-making in men with localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allan Ben; Mancuso, Pascal; Sidhom, Mark; Wong, Karen; Berry, Megan; Rincones, Orlando; Forstner, Dion; Bokey, Lesley; Girgis, Afaf

    2017-11-03

    Men diagnosed with localised prostate cancer (LPC) wanting curative treatment face a highly preference-sensitive choice between prostatectomy and radiotherapy, which offer similar cure rates but different side effects. This study aims to determine the information, decision-making needs and preferences of men with LPC choosing between robotic prostatectomy and standard external beam or stereotactic radiotherapy. This study will be conducted at a large public teaching hospital in Australia offering the choice between robotic prostatectomy and radiotherapy from early 2017. Men (20-30) diagnosed with LPC who want curative treatment and meet criteria for either treatment will be invited to participate. In this mixed-methods study, patients will complete semistructured interviews before and after attending a combined clinic in which they consult a urologist and a radiation oncologist regarding treatment and four questionnaires (one before treatment decision-making and three after) assessing demographic and clinical characteristics, involvement in decision-making, decisional conflict, satisfaction and regret. Combined clinic consultations will also be audio-recorded and clinicians will report their perceptions regarding patients' suitability for, openness to and preferences for each treatment. Qualitative data will be transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed and descriptive statistical analyses will explore quantitative decision-making outcomes, with comparison according to treatment choice. Results from this study will inform how to best support men diagnosed with LPC deciding which curative treatment option best suits their needs and may identify the need for and content required in a decision aid to support these men. All participants will provide written informed consent. Data will be rigorously managed in accordance with national legislation. Results will be disseminated via presentations to both scientific and layperson audiences and publications in peer

  8. Value of radiotherapy in the treatment ovarium cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.R.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    Thirty-one cases ovarium cancer are studied in different clinical stages and different histological kinds, which were submited to a radiotherapic treatment by the 'moving trip' and 'open field' techniques [pt

  9. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what to expect after treatment ends. Emotional effects of treatment The last day of treatment It is normal to have different feelings, emotions and fears after treatment ends. Not everyone feels ...

  11. Early breast cancer: diagnosis, treatment and survivorship.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meade, Elizabeth

    2013-01-11

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and globally remains a major public health concern. The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer continues to develop. Diagnosis is now more precise, surgery is less mutilating and women now have the option of breast conserving therapy with better cosmesis, and without sacrificing survival. Radiotherapy is more targeted and the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy is based not only on prognostic and predictive factors, but also on newer molecular profiling that will ensure that chemotherapy is given to the patients who need and respond to it. These developments all provide a more tailored approach to the treatment of breast cancer. Management now involves a multidisciplinary team approach in order to provide the highest standard of care for patients throughout their cancer journey from diagnosis through treatment and into follow-up care.

  12. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo; Shi, Yuankai

    2015-06-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies.

  13. Development of cancer treatment guidelines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Krystyna Kiel

    2011-05-26

    May 26, 2011 ... KEYWORDS. Cancer;. Therapy;. Guidelines. Contents. 1. Why develop guidelines? ... Widely available guideline resources in cancer care. ... The use of guidelines in medicine has a long history. Many .... She has a negative family history. ... The patient has 1 cm grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma.

  14. Factors related to treatment refusal in Taiwanese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ting-Yu; Wang, Chao-Hui; Lin, Yu-Fen; Chou, Shu-Lan; Wang, Ching-Ting; Juang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Yung-Chang; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates for cancer have increased dramatically in the recent 30 years in Taiwan. However, not all patients receive treatment. Treatment refusal might impair patient survival and life quality. In order to improve this situation, we proposed this study to evaluate factors that are related to refusal of treatment in cancer patients via a cancer case manager system. This study analysed data from a case management system during the period from 2010 to 2012 at a medical center in Northern Taiwan. We enrolled a total of 14,974 patients who were diagnosed with cancer. Using the PRECEDE Model as a framework, we conducted logistic regression analysis to identify independent variables that are significantly associated with refusal of therapy in cancer patients. A multivariate logistic regression model was also applied to estimate adjusted the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A total of 253 patients (1.69%) refused treatment. The multivariate logistic regression result showed that the high risk factors for refusal of treatment in cancer patient included: concerns about adverse effects (prefuse treatment have poor survival. The present study provides evidence of factors that are related to refusal of therapy and might be helpful for further application and improvement of cancer care.

  15. SU-E-T-767: Treatment Planning Study of Prostate Cancer by CyberKnife with Respect to the Urethral Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H; Mizuno, H; Sumida, I; Otani, Y; Yagi, M; Takashina, M; Suzuki, O; Yoshioka, Y; Koizumi, M; Ogawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Methods: Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. Results: With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003

  16. SU-E-T-767: Treatment Planning Study of Prostate Cancer by CyberKnife with Respect to the Urethral Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, H; Mizuno, H; Sumida, I; Otani, Y; Yagi, M; Takashina, M; Suzuki, O; Yoshioka, Y; Koizumi, M; Ogawa, K [Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Methods: Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. Results: With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003.

  17. Atezolizumab for the treatment of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Debora; Pelizzari, Giacomo; Vitale, Maria Grazia; Lisanti, Camilla; Cinausero, Marika; Iacono, Donatella; Puglisi, Fabio

    2018-04-24

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer diagnosed among women. The development of new personalized therapeutic strategies has reshaped the landscape in this field. However, BC is still the first cause of death among women. Interestingly, several preclinical studies and some clinical evidences are focused their attention on the role of immune system and immunotherapy on cancer control, also in BC. Areas covered: Usually, BC has been considered a not immunogenic tumor for its low mutational load. However, recent studies have evidenced that some subtypes, triple negative and HER-2 positive BC, are "hot" tumors, thus more immunogenic. Moreover, the presence of immune infiltrate is positively associated with favorable prognosis. Therefore, the use of immune-checkpoint inhibitors seems to be an encouraging treatment option also in BC. Among these drugs, atezolizumab is an anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody with a particular structure that reduce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against T cells, increasing quantitatively and qualitatively the effective response. Expert opinion: The use of immunotherapy is a promising option for BC. However, at the same time it still raises many doubts. Surely, the research and the validation of immune biomarkers can permit to identify patients who more benefit from these drugs. Moreover, additional studies should evaluate as to induce immunogenicity in cold tumors. Then again, the understanding of mechanism of primary and acquired resistance can help the development of novel strategies to enhance effector response, overcoming these resistances.

  18. Upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Jbali, B.; Daoud, J.; Guermazi, M.; Frikha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To study the frequency and risk factors for upper limb lymphedema through a series of patients treated for breast cancer. Patients and methods. - It is a retrospective study about 222 patients treated for breast cancer during the period between February 1993 and December 2003 in Sfax hospitals. Average age was 51 years (27-92 years). Tumour was T2 in 59% of cases. All patients had surgery with lymph node dissection. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent histological type (80% of cases), with predominant SBR II grade (62%). The mean number of removed lymph nodes was 12 (2-33). Axillary lymph node metastasis was detected in 124 patients. Radiotherapy was delivered in 200 patients, including axillary irradiation in 30 cases. The mean follow-up was 68 months (12-120). Results. - Lymphedema appeared in 23% of cases (51 patients), 14 months after surgery (mean period). Lymphedema affected the brachium in 17% of cases, the forearm in 12% of cases and all upper limb in 71% of cases. Fifty percent of patients had rehabilitation. However, improvement of lymphedema was obtained in 18 cases. Parameters predicting lymphedema were studied. Significant risk factors were obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. The type of surgery, axillary irradiation and shoulder abduction deficit did not predict lymphedema. Conclusion. - Lymphedema of the arm is a frequent consequence of breast cancer treatment. The risk of lymphedema is correlated with obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. (authors)

  19. Diagnostic and treatment manual of urological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz y Mino, Milton; Tafur, Fausto; Cornejo, Francisco; Gaibor, Jose; Bueno, Cesar; Basantes, Amparito

    2004-01-01

    This book compiles different opinions about researches, diagnosis, methods, procedures and treatment of urological cancer, which will be useful for physicians and specialists of this illness. This manual is well structured in eight chapters with references, illustrations, figures and tables about neoplasms of kidney, urinary tract, urogenital system. This document is a bibliographic revision about ecuadorian experience in urological cancer

  20. [Practice guideline 'Prostate cancer: diagnosis and treatment'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijke, T.M. de; Battermann, J.J.; Moorselaar, R.J.A. van; Jong, I.J. de; Visser, A.P.; Burgers, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    --A national, multidisciplinary practice guideline was developed concerning diagnosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Because of the lack of sufficient scientific evidence at this moment no practice guideline on screening is included. --The diagnosis of prostate cancer is made by

  1. STATIN CONTAINING COMPOSITIONS FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Metselaar, J.M.; Storm, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising statin, and especially to the use of such compositions in the treatment of cancer or in the inhibition of cancer growth. More specifically, the invention relates to a method for targeting a statin to tumor tissue.

  2. TRAILs towards improved cervical cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a life threatening disease occurring world-wide, but affecting especially women in developing countries. Standard treatment for cevical cancer varies per FIGO stage and patient related factors. In general patients with non bulky (<4 cm) FIGO stage IB and IIA are treated with a

  3. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  4. Clinico pathological presentation of tongue cancers and early cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najeeb, T.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinico pathological presentation of tongue cancers and to calculate survival rates (SR) with disease free survival rates (DFSR) and recurrence rates (RR) in different treatment modalities and to compare the results of surgery alone and radiotherapy alone in stage I and stage II disease and to calculate better option of treatment in early tongue cancers. Design: A longitudinal study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad (PIMS) from January 1987 to June 1998. Patients and Methods: Case histories of 67 patients were collected from departmental record. Clinical data included age at diagnosis, gender of patient, location of tumor, presenting symptoms and their duration, biopsy report, predominant histological pattern of tumor, nodal status, stage of tumor, treatment modality employed, tumor recurrence, metastasis and survival rates with disease-free survival rates after 2 years' follow-up. Results: Among 67 patients there were 31 males and 36 females. Mean age was 50 years (range 20 - 80 years). Sixty seven patients with primary cancer of tongue constituted 38.8% of oral cavity cancers during period of 1987 - 1998 in PIMS. Smoking, poor oro dental hygiene (POOH) and betel nuts chewing were the main risk factors. Odynophagia and painful ulcers on lateral border of tongue were the main clinical symptoms with average duration of 7 months. Regional lymph nodes were palpable in 32.8%, 5.5% was in stage I, 35.8% in stage II, 29.8% in stage III, and 28.3% was in stage IV. No patient was found to have distant metastasis. Histopathology in 94% of cases was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recurrence and survival rates were determined in 49 patients. Average time of recurrence was 12.5 months. Recurrence was 100% loco regional (LR). It was 85.7% in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone, 42.1% in patients treated with surgery alone and 31.2% in patients

  5. Breast conserving treatment in Denmark, 1989-1998. A nationwide population-based study of the Danish Breast Cancer Co-operative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertz, M.; Kempel, M.M.; During, M.

    2008-01-01

    patients in Denmark. PATIENTS AND METHODS: To evaluate the results of this treatment, we performed a nationwide population-based follow-up study of patients aged less than 75 years treated in Denmark from 1989 to 1998 based on the database of Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. RESULTS: At 15 years...... of follow-up, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival was 69% among 3 758 patients who received the recommended treatment. Within the first 10 years of follow-up, the cumulative incidences of loco-regional recurrences, distant metastases or other malignant disease, or death as a first event were 9...

  6. Randomised study of Casodex 50 MG monotherapy vs orchidectomy in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The Scandinavian Casodex Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tveter, K; Varenhorst, E

    1996-01-01

    The effect of Casodex (ICI 176,334), a new, once-daily, selective antiandrogen, given as 50 mg monotherapy, was compared with orchidectomy in a randomised, multicentre, open study in 376 patients with metastatic prostate cancer. At 3 months, PSA was reduced by 86% in the Casodex group and by 96......% in the orchidectomy group. Treatment failed in 51 patients in the orchidectomy group and 66 showed a subjective response. Treatment failed in 86 patients treated with Casodex and 40 patients showed a subjective response. Patients treated with Casodex maintained their sexual interest better than those...

  7. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  8. Barriers to information provision regarding breast cancer and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Enns, Heather J; Woodgate, Roberta L; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2017-10-01

    Women with breast cancer require information about their cancer and its treatment during the process of treatment decision-making, yet it is unclear if there are barriers to information support. This study explores the experience of making treatment decisions in breast cancer, paying particular attention to the barriers experienced to the provision of information. Using a grounded theory methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 women with invasive breast cancer exploring the experience of treatment decision-making. Data was organized using ATLAS.ti software and analyzed using constant comparisons. Analysis of the data showed that barriers to cancer and treatment information include intrapersonal and interpersonal communication challenges (emotional distress, patient-provider communication, "making it personal," access to information) which reside at different levels of the breast cancer experience (individual, dyad, group, organization). A model is provided to depict this experience. Women want information about their cancer and its treatment and experience barriers to information provision at various levels. Satisfactory information provision cannot occur without addressing barriers at every level. Utilizing interprofessional models of care may minimize existing barriers to information provision and empower patients to make satisfying treatment decisions that are consistent with their individual wishes.

  9. Longitudinal, population-based study of racial/ethnic differences in colorectal cancer survival: impact of neighborhood socioeconomic status, treatment and comorbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; O'Malley, Cynthia D; Stroup, Antoinette; Shema, Sarah J; Satariano, William A

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, if detected early, has greater than 90% 5-year survival. However, survival has been shown to vary across racial/ethnic groups in the United States, despite the availability of early detection methods. This study evaluated the joint effects of sociodemographic factors, tumor characteristics, census-based socioeconomic status (SES), treatment, and comorbidities on survival after colorectal cancer among and within racial/ethnic groups, using the SEER-Medicare database for patients diagnosed in 1992–1996, and followed through 1999. Unadjusted colorectal cancer-specific mortality rates were higher among Blacks and Hispanic males than whites (relative rates (95% confidence intervals) = 1.34 (1.26–1.42) and 1.16 (1.04–1.29), respectively), and lower among Japanese (0.78 (0.70–0.88)). These patterns were evident for all-cause mortality, although the magnitude of the disparity was larger for colorectal cancer mortality. Adjustment for stage accounted for the higher rate among Hispanic males and most of the lower rate among Japanese. Among Blacks, stage and SES accounted for about half of the higher rate relative to Whites, and within stage III colon and stages II/III rectal cancer, SES completely accounted for the small differentials in survival between Blacks and Whites. Comorbidity did not appear to explain the Black-White differentials in colorectal-specific nor all-cause mortality, beyond stage, and treatment (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy) explained a very small proportion of the Black-White difference. The fully-adjusted relative mortality rates comparing Blacks to Whites was 1.14 (1.09–1.20) for all-cause mortality and 1.21 (1.14–1.29) for colorectal cancer specific mortality. The sociodemographic, tumor, and treatment characteristics also had different impacts on mortality within racial/ethnic groups. In this comprehensive analysis, race/ethnic-specific models revealed differential effects of covariates on survival after colorectal

  10. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.; Brodin, N. P.; Bjork-Eriksson, T.

    2015-01-01

    ) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). RESULTS: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target...... or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: (18)F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11...... patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT....

  11. Anxiety, depression, traumatic stress and quality of life in colorectal cancer after different treatments: A study with Portuguese patients and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça Pereira, M; Figueiredo, Ana Paula; Fincham, Frank D

    2012-07-01

    This study examines the impact of different modes of treatment on depression, anxiety, traumatic stress and quality of life in colorectal cancer patients and their partners. The sample was comprised of 114 oncology patients and 67 partners. All patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Participants were recruited from an Oncology Hospital in the North of Portugal and had been submitted to three modes of treatment: surgery, surgery plus chemotherapy or surgery followed by radiotherapy. The results showed that patients who received only surgery, as treatment, had lower levels of depression, anxiety and traumatic stress symptoms when compared with patients who received surgery and chemotherapy or surgery plus radiotherapy. Partners of surgical patients presented lower levels of state anxiety and traumatic stress symptoms when compared with the other two groups. Patients with more depression had partners also more depressed. No relationship was found between anxiety and traumatic stress symptoms in patients and partners. Patients who received a diagnosis longer than 12 months had more traumatic stress, intrusion and hypervigilance. Patients with illness recurrence showed more traumatic symptoms. Anxiety and depression were the main predictors of patient's quality of life. Traumatic stress was a predictor of symptom distress - pain/bowel pattern. This study highlights the importance of providing psychological interventions for cancer patients and their partners. Chemotherapy patients and those diagnosed over a year, as well as their partners, are more at risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-01-01

    of the individual patient ’ s needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive...... these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a fl ow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients ’ sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space...... to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Discussion. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition...

  13. Prognosis after surgical treatment for pancreatic cancer in patients aged 80 years or older: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sho, Masayuki; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Manabu; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Satoi, Sohei; Matsumoto, Ippei; Honda, Goro; Uemura, Kenichiro; Yanagimoto, Hiroaki; Kurata, Masanao; Akahori, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Shoichi; Nagai, Minako; Nishiwada, Satoshi; Fukumoto, Takumi; Unno, Michiaki; Yamaue, Hiroki; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The optimal therapeutic strategy for very elderly pancreatic cancer patients remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of pancreatic resection in patients 80 years of age or older. A retrospective multicenter analysis of 1401 patients who had undergone pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer was performed. The patients aged ≥ 80 years (n = 99) were compared with a control group <80 years of age (n = 1302). There were no significant differences in the postoperative complications and mortality between the two groups. However, the prognosis of octogenarians was poorer than that of younger patients for both resectable and borderline resectable tumors. Importantly, there were few long-term survivors in the elderly group, especially among those with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A multivariate analysis of the prognostic factors in the very elderly patients indicated that the completion of adjuvant chemotherapy was the only significant factor. In addition, preoperative albumin level was the only independent risk factor for a failure to complete adjuvant chemotherapy. This study demonstrates that the postoperative prognosis in octogenarian patients was not good as that in younger patients possibly due to less frequent completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above the waist. Tiny tubules in the kidneys filter and clean the blood . They take out waste ... to bladder cancer. Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals, or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment ...

  15. Systemic treatment of breast cancer in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szegheoova, O.

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is increasing due to trend of postponing child-bearing to later age. Breast cancer diagnosed during lactation has different biologic behaviour and worse prognosis than when diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not constitute a negative prognostic factor per se for outcomes of breast cancer in pregnancy, therefore breast cancer should be treated while containing pregnancy. Pregnancy should not delay treatment. Therapy should follow standard procedures as closely as possible, though with different timing of treatment modalities. Experienced multidisciplinary team is crucial for achieving good treatment results and involvement of an informed patient in decision-making is a must. Properly managed treatment during pregnancy does not carry detrimental effect on development and well-being of children. (author)

  16. Cabozantinib for Initial Treatment of Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA has approved cabozantinib (Cabometyx®) as an initial treatment for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. The approval adds another tyrosine kinase inhibitor to the available options for patients with advanced kidney cancer.

  17. Treatment of advanced breast cancer. An experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnoni, G; Corcione, S; Api, P

    1984-01-01

    The Authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotherapy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  18. Impact of age and comorbidity on treatment of non-small cell lung cancer recurrence following complete resection: A nationally representative cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Melisa L.; McMurry, Timothy L.; Stukenborg, George J.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Amato-Martz, Carla; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Chang, George J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Winchester, David P.; McKellar, Daniel P.; Walter, Louise C.; Kozower, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Older patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are less likely to receive guideline-recommended treatment at diagnosis, independent of comorbidity. However, national data on treatment of postoperative recurrence are limited. We evaluated the associations between age, comorbidity, and other patient factors and treatment of postoperative NSCLC recurrence in a national cohort. Materials and Methods We randomly selected 9,001 patients with surgically resected stage I-III NSCLC in 2006–2007 from the National Cancer Data Base. Patients were followed for 5 years or until first NSCLC recurrence, new primary cancer, or death, whichever came first. Perioperative comorbidities, first recurrence, treatment of recurrence, and survival were abstracted from medical records and merged with existing registry data. Factors associated with active treatment (chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery) versus supportive care only were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Results Median age at initial diagnosis was 67; 69.7% had ≥1 comorbidity. At 5-year follow-up, 12.3% developed locoregional and 21.5% developed distant recurrence. Among patients with locoregional recurrence, 79.5% received active treatment. Older patients (OR 0.49 for age ≥75 compared with <55; 95% CI 0.27–0.88) and those with substance abuse (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.23–0.81) were less likely to receive active treatment. Women (OR 0.62; 95% CI 0.43–0.89) and patients with symptomatic recurrence (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.47–0.99) were also less likely to receive active treatment. Among those with distant recurrence, 77.3% received active treatment. Older patients (OR 0.42 for age ≥75 compared with <55; 95% CI 0.26–0.68) and those with any documented comorbidities (OR 0.59; 95% CI 0.38–0.89) were less likely to receive active treatment. Conclusion Older patients independent of comorbidity, patients with substance abuse, and women were less likely to receive active treatment for

  19. Tangential vs. defined radiotherapy in early breast cancer treatment without axillary lymph node dissection. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Universitaet Kiel, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Kiel (Germany); Temme, Nils; Foerster, Manuela; Reible, Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated low regional recurrence rates in early-stage breast cancer omitting axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in patients who have positive nodes in sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND). This finding has triggered an active discussion about the effect of radiotherapy within this approach. The purpose of this study was to analyze the dose distribution in the axilla in standard tangential radiotherapy (SRT) for breast cancer and the effects on normal tissue exposure when anatomic level I-III axillary lymph node areas are included in the tangential radiotherapy field configuration. We prospectively analyzed the dosimetric treatment plans from 51 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. We compared and analyzed the SRT and the defined radiotherapy (DRT) methods for each patient. The clinical target volume (CTV) of SRT included the breast tissue without specific contouring of lymph node areas, whereas the CTV of DRT included the level I-III lymph node areas. We evaluated the dose given in SRT covering the axillary lymph node areas of level I-III as contoured in DRT. The mean V{sub D95} {sub %} of the entire level I-III lymph node area in SRT was 50.28 % (range, 37.31-63.24 %), V{sub D45} {sub Gy} was 70.1 % (54.8-85.4 %), and V{sub D40} {sub Gy} was 83.5 % (72.3-94.8 %). A significant difference was observed between lung dose and heart toxicity in SRT vs. DRT. The V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and V{sub 30} {sub Gy} of the right and the left lung in DRT were significantly higher in DRT than in SRT (p < 0.001). The mean heart dose in SRT was significantly lower (3.93 vs. 4.72 Gy, p = 0.005). We demonstrated a relevant dose exposure of the axilla in SRT that should substantially reduce local recurrences. Furthermore, we demonstrated a significant increase in lung and heart exposure when including the axillary lymph nodes regions in the tangential radiotherapy field set-up. (orig.) [German] Aktuelle Studien zeigen

  20. Radiation Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    63 patients who were irradiated with a goal of long term control among 101 patients with esophageal cancer seen during an 11 years period between Jan, 1970 and Dec, 1980 at Yonsei Cancer Center in Seoul, Korea have retrospectively analysed. 52(82.5%) among the 63 patients were confirmed to have epidermoid carcinoma in the histology. The actuarial 3 and 5 years survival rates of 17 cased of T1, esophageal cancer were 24.7% and 20.8%. Statistically, there was no significant difference in survival rate according to tumor location (p>0.05)

  1. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta-Zaragoza O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza,1 Víctor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales,1 Carlos Pérez-Plasencia,2,3 Jonathan Salazar-León,1 Claudia Gómez-Cerón,1 Vicente Madrid-Marina11Direction of Chronic Infections and Cancer, Research Center in Infection Diseases, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; 2Oncogenomics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Tlalpan, México; 3Biomedicine Unit, FES-Iztacala UNAM, México City, MéxicoAbstract: Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%–95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development.Keywords: Cervical cancer, clinical trials, gene therapy, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, siRNAs

  2. Palbociclib: A new hope in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, R Priyadharsini

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer being one of the common cancers has high morbidity and mortality. Despite the conventional treatment, the burden of the disease increases year after year. There is a need for newer drugs that target the different mechanisms in the pathogenesis. The interaction of cyclins with cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) plays a major role in the abnormal cell cycle in cancer and it is considered to be an important target. Palbociclib is a CDK inhibitor currently approved for the treatment of breast cancer. The preclinical studies with breast cancer lines were sensitive to palbociclib and the clinical trials phase I, phase II (PALOMA 1), and phase III (PALOMA 2, 3, PENTELOPE, PEARL) showed that the drug was efficacious when combined other conventional drugs for breast cancer. Palbociclib was also been tested in various other germ cell tumors, melanoma, multiple myeloma, glioblastoma multiforme etc., The major adverse effect of the drug includes hematological toxicity mainly neutropenia, gastrointestinal adverse effects.

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Penile Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Vulvar Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  9. Decision Support and Shared Decision Making About Active Surveillance Versus Active Treatment Among Men Diagnosed with Low-Risk Prostate Cancer: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ronald E; Leader, Amy E; Censits, Jean Hoffman; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Keith, Scott W; Petrich, Anett M; Quinn, Anna M; Den, Robert B; Hurwitz, Mark D; Lallas, Costas D; Hegarty, Sarah E; Dicker, Adam P; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M; Giri, Veda N; Ayaz, Hasan; Gomella, Leonard G

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of a decision support intervention (DSI) and shared decision making (SDM) on knowledge, perceptions about treatment, and treatment choice among men diagnosed with localized low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). At a multidisciplinary clinic visit, 30 consenting men with localized low-risk PCa completed a baseline survey, had a nurse-mediated online DS session to clarify preference for active surveillance (AS) or active treatment (AT), and met with clinicians for SDM. Participants also completed a follow-up survey at 30 days. We assessed change in treatment knowledge, decisional conflict, and perceptions and identified predictors of AS. At follow-up, participants exhibited increased knowledge (p decision. Perceived support of the decision facilitated patient choice of AS.

  10. A mathematical theory of shape and neuro-fuzzy methodology-based diagnostic analysis: a comparative study on early detection and treatment planning of brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Subrata; Majumder, D Dutta

    2017-08-01

    hidden layer of 10 neurons and 2 output neurons. Of the 16-sample database, 10 datasets for training, 3 datasets for validation, and 3 datasets for testing were used in the ANN classification system. From the SSM (µ) confusion matrix, the number of output datasets of true positive, false positive, true negative and false negative was 6, 0, 10, and 0, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were each equal to 100%. The method of diagnosing brain cancer presented in this study is a successful model to assist doctors in the screening and treatment of brain cancer patients. The presented FES successfully identified the presence of brain cancer in CT and MR images using the extracted shape-based features and the use of NFS for the identification of brain cancer in the early stages. From the analysis and diagnosis of the disease, the doctors can decide the stage of cancer and take the necessary steps for more accurate treatment. Here, we have presented an investigation and comparison study of the shape-based feature extraction method with the use of NFS for classifying brain tumors as showing normal or abnormal patterns. The results have proved that the shape-based features with the use of NFS can achieve a satisfactory performance with 100% accuracy. We intend to extend this methodology for the early detection of cancer in other regions such as the prostate region and human cervix.

  11. A phase I study of combination vaccine treatment of five therapeutic epitope-peptides for metastatic colorectal cancer; safety, immunological response, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazama, Shoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Takenouchi, Hiroko; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Tsunedomi, Ryouichi; Inoue, Yuka; Tokuhisa, Yoshihiro; Iizuka, Norio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Shinozaki, Hirokazu; Kamiya, Akira; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Oka, Masaaki

    2014-03-10

    To evaluate the safety of combination vaccine treatment of multiple peptides, phase I clinical trial was conducted for patients with advanced colorectal cancer using five novel HLA-A*2402-restricted peptides, three peptides derived from oncoantigens, ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), 34 kDa-translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOMM34), and insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA binding protein 3 (KOC1), and the remaining two from angiogenesis factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGFR2. Eighteen HLA- A*2402-positive colorectal cancer patients who had failed to standard therapy were enrolled in this study. 0.5 mg, 1.0 mg or 3.0 mg each of the peptides was mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant and then subcutaneously injected at five separated sites once a week. We also examined possible effect of a single site injection of "the cocktail of 5 peptides" on the immunological responses. ELISPOT assay was performed before and after vaccinations in the schedule of every 4 weeks. The vaccine treatment using multiple peptides was well tolerated without any severe treatment-associated systemic adverse events. Dose-dependent induction of peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was observed. The single injection of "peptides cocktail" did not diminish the immunological responses. Regarding the clinical outcome, one patient achieved complete response and 6 patients revealed stable disease for 4 to 7 months. The median overall survival time (MST) was 13.5 months. Patients, in which we detected induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific to 3 or more peptides, revealed significantly better prognosis (MST; 27.8 months) than those with poorer immune responses (MST; 3.7 months) (p = 0.032). Our cancer vaccine treatment using multiple peptides is a promising approach for advanced colorectal cancer with the minimum risk of systemic adverse reactions. UMIN-CTR number UMIN000004948.

  12. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with Noncoplanar Beams for Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prosthesis-A Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Chris; Cheung, Rex Min; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2010-01-01

    Megavoltage photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is typically used in the treatment of prostate cancer at our institution. Approximately 1% to 2% of patients with prostate cancer have hip prostheses. The presence of the prosthesis usually complicates the planning process because of dose perturbation around the prosthesis, radiation attenuation through the prosthesis, and the introduction of computed tomography artifacts in the planning volume. In addition, hip prostheses are typically made of materials of high atomic number, which add uncertainty to the dosimetry of the prostate and critical organs in the planning volume. When the prosthesis is bilateral, treatment planning is further complicated because only a limited number of beam angles can be used to avoid the prostheses. In this case study, we will report the observed advantages of using noncoplanar beams in the delivery of IMRT to a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip prostheses. The treatment was planned for 75.6 Gy using a 7-field coplanar approach and a noncoplanar arrangement, with all fields avoiding entrance though the prostheses. Our results indicate that, compared with the coplanar plan, the noncoplanar plan delivers the prescribed dose to the target with a slightly better conformality and sparing of rectal tissue versus the coplanar plan.

  14. [Let Us to Know the Post-Marketing Clinical Studies and Critical Situation of Study Groups -- Now We Should Talk about How to Achieve the Safe and Most Effective Treatment for Cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Maki

    2016-04-01

    Not to leave something to be regretted in the life of patients and their family, it is important to find the best way during and after treatment for cancer. We, cancer survivors association, propose a corporated actions among patients, administration, medical stuffs, and enterprises to solve the problems of clinical studies. And we express our opinion on the present problems and to do for patients and citizens.

  15. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass, increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, exercise, physical well-being

  16. Strategy for improving the detailed examination rate for colorectal cancer screening. New approach for detailed colorectal cancer examination. Study for optimal pre-treatment for CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsushima, Toru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Nagata, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    In order to drastically improve the detailed examination rate for strategic colorectal cancer examination in Japan, it is necessary to introduce CT colonography (CTC) as a detailed examination method for colorectal cancer examination, in addition to colonoscopy (CS) which is the conventional detailed examination method. In our study, a cleansing enema/contrast solution (3% Nif-C) was prepared by adding 60 ml of a water-soluble iodine-based contrast agent (Gastrografin) and water to an oral cleansing enema agent (Niflec) in solid (powder) form to a final amount of 2000 ml. The solution was compared with a Niflec solution. In terms of patient's acceptability, more than half of the examined patients answered ''easier to drink than the Niflec solution'' or ''as easy to drink as the Niflec solution. '' Also, the Nif-C solution was comparable or superior to the Niflec solution in terms of cleansing enema effects. Regarding imaging effects essential for CTC, the CT level was found to be 200 HU or greater for any large intestine region upon CTC using the Nif-C solution. Thus, practically sufficient imaging effects were achieved. In conclusion, CTC with pretreatment involving a cleansing enema with oral administration of 3% Nif-C is superior to CS in terms of patient's acceptability. In addition, at least in view of the overseas reports on CTC, there is no particular problem in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Thus, CTC is expected to resolve various problems related to colorectal cancer examination in Japan. (author)

  17. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...... population). RAS was mutated in 46% and BRAF in 12% of the tumours. RAS and BRAF, if mutated, were negative prognostic factors. The updated analyses confirmed the finding of the primary report that cetuximab did not provide any additional benefit when added to FLOX in patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type tumours......, neither on progression-free nor overall survival. However, the outcomes in a subset of patients, which, after the first eight treatment cycles, received cetuximab alone, suggested a beneficial effect of cetuximab monotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Adding cetuximab to Nordic FLOX did not provide any clinical...

  18. Breast cancer treatment by nanophotolysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiq, Muhammad Gul Bahar

    2018-06-01

    In this work, gold nanoparticles irradiated with nanosecond short pulse laser for breast cancer treatment is studied theoretically. Nanophotolysis is involved for selective damaging of breast cancer cells. Results shows that laser fluence of 1.5 J/cm2 interact with gold nanoparticles and generates a maximum number of ions. Laser light in the visible region interacts with the gold foil. At 700 nm, 12 × 1012 ions are produced for the laser intensity of 8.89 × 107 W/cm2. Slow increase in the Coulomb explosion pressure from 0.6 × 106 Pa to 2 × 106 Pa is observed for a cluster size of range 10 nm to 20 nm. Penetration of nanobullets in tumor increases with the increase of temperature from 39.83 °C to 62.20 °C. Number of cell damaged increases by increasing the number of ions (6 × 1016 cells are damaged by 9.59 × 1020 gold ions). Findings are compared with the other experimental results and are found in excellent agreement. It is concluded from current work that nanophotolysis therapy is may be useful in future for selective damaging of breast cancer cells.

  19. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of bladder cancer depends on the stage of the cancer. Treatment options include different types of surgery (transurethral resection, radical and partial cystectomy, and urinary diversion), radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Learn more about how bladder cancer is treated.

  20. Pathological and Biological Aspects of Colorectal Cancer Treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, M.J.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    Pathological and biological aspects of colorectal cancer treatment. This thesis describes several pathological and biological aspects of colorectal cancer treatment. Different patient populations were investigated including patients with mobile rectal cancer enrolled in the Dutch TME trial, patients

  1. Prostatic sarcoma after treatment of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between radiation exposure for treatment of cancer and occurrence of a second primary cancer at the irradiated site is well known. This phenomenon is however rare in prostate. Case presentation A 75-year-old farmer was treated for rectal cancer with preoperative 45 Gy of radiotherapy and abdominoperineal resection. Four years later he developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and acute urinary retention. He underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate. Histological examination of the removed prostate tissue and immunohistochemistry revealed it to be a poorly differentiated sarcoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first reported case of radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer. Since radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the contemporary treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma, it is relevant to be aware of the potential long-term carcinogenic complications of radiotherapy of the pelvis.

  2. Early prostate cancer: particularities of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, F.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction of prostate cancer screening using PSA leads to a disproportional increase of cancer incidence. Most of those tumors are small and indolent in behavior. When diagnosed, they are usually managed by radical treatment modalities despite the growth of serious adverse events of such therapy. Active surveillance appears to be an alternative treatment approach for the majority of those patients. Author stresses on the particularities of the prostate cancer diagnosed in the PSA era. Show the importance of patient stratification and the utility of the use of nomograms in clinical praxis. The clinical importance of treatment choices based on life expectancy of patient, concomitant diseases on one side and cancer biological behavior in the other side is discussed. Critically discuss the new approach of radiation with proton beams advertising that it remains an experimental therapeutic choice. (author)

  3. Poster — Thur Eve — 69: Computational Study of DVH-guided Cancer Treatment Planning Optimization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomi, Pooyan Shirvani; Zinchenko, Yuriy [University of Calgary, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To compare methods to incorporate the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) curves into the treatment planning optimization. Method: The performance of three methods, namely, the conventional Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) model, a convex moment-based constrained optimization approach, and an unconstrained convex moment-based penalty approach, is compared using anonymized data of a prostate cancer patient. Three plans we generated using the corresponding optimization models. Four Organs at Risk (OARs) and one Tumor were involved in the treatment planning. The OARs and Tumor were discretized into total of 50,221 voxels. The number of beamlets was 943. We used commercially available optimization software Gurobi and Matlab to solve the models. Plan comparison was done by recording the model runtime followed by visual inspection of the resulting dose volume histograms. Conclusion: We demonstrate the effectiveness of the moment-based approaches to replicate the set of prescribed DVH curves. The unconstrained convex moment-based penalty approach is concluded to have the greatest potential to reduce the computational effort and holds a promise of substantial computational speed up.

  4. Sensitivity studies in Monte Carlo treatment planning for neutron brachytherapy of cervical cancer : role of boron augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralston, A.; Wallace, S.A.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common malignancy of women in the world and in the third world often presents in an advanced state. While photo radiation therapy is an established form of treatment, neutron brachytherapy with Cf-252 has proven to give superior local control in advanced cases without serious complications. This advantage arises from the reduction in radio-resistance, ascribed to hypoxia in bulky tumours, which occurs with high LET radiation. A further improvement is being sought by dose augmentation with boron neutron capture therapy. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo Neutron Photon radiation transport code MCNP is being used to investigate the effects of fat, muscle, bone and voids in the fast and thermal dose distributions. Whereas the fast neutron dose determines normal tissue tolerance, the boron neutron capture dose rate is determined by the thermal flux distribution. The neutron spectrum is sensitive to changes in hydrogen density, as occurs with muscle, fat and bone. The implications of this sensitivity are examined to determine whether detailed individual Monte Carlo calculations are required for patient clinical treatment plans. (author)

  5. Changes in Weight and Body Composition Among Women With Breast Cancer During and After Adjuvant Treatment: A Prospective Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Birgith; Delmar, Charlotte; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Carus, Andreas; Falkmer, Ursula; Groenkjaer, Mette

    Antineoplastic adjuvant treatment for breast cancer can cause changes in women's weight and body composition and influence their general health and survival. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent and patterns of change in weight and body composition after current standard adjuvant antineoplastic treatment for breast cancer. Data on weight and body composition from 95 women with breast cancer Stage I to III were obtained during 18 months on a bioelectric impedance analyzer. Changes and odds ratio (OR) were calculated by a linear mixed model and logistic regression. At 18 months, there was an increase in weight of 0.9 kg (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-1.5; P = .003) and an average positive association of 0.35 kg/cm increased waist circumference (95% CI, 0.29-0.42 kg; P body fat were observed mainly in premenopausal women receiving chemotherapy (1.4 kg; 95% CI, 0.4-2.4; P = .007). For menopausal status, OR was 2.9 (95% CI, 1.14-7.1; P = .025), and for chemotherapy, OR was 2.6 (95% CI, 1.03-6.41; P = .043). The OR for weight loss in Stage III breast cancer was 12.5 (95% CI, 1.21-128.84; P = .034) and 4.3 (CI, 1.07-17.24; P = .40) for comorbidity. Results demonstrate that weight changes in a pooled sample are overestimated. However, premenopausal women receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy show a tendency toward a body composition with increasing fat mass. A scheduled assessment of changes in weight and body composition is relevant at 18 months after treatment. To compare future studies, common measuring and cutoff points are needed.

  6. Cancer-related fatigue--mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E

    2014-10-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common adverse effects of cancer that might persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and might be a risk factor of reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in patients with cancer have been well characterized and there is growing understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation seems to have a key role in fatigue before, during, and after cancer-treatment. However, there is a considerable variability in the presentation of cancer-related fatigue, much of which is not explained by disease-related or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors might be important in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have identified genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioural risk factors associated with cancer-related fatigue. Although no current gold-standard treatment for fatigue is available, a variety of intervention approaches have shown beneficial effects in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. This Review describes the mechanisms, risk factors, and possible interventions for cancer-related fatigue, focusing on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients.

  7. Hybrid Theranostic Platforms for Cancer Nanomedical Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Julfakyan, Khachatur

    2015-10-01

    presence of monosubsituted amine in 3 position of oxadiazole to maintain activity. Moreover, gradual increase of activity was detected in increasing of the length of the diamine. Polyamine (spermidine) side chain demonstrated strongest anticancer activity, identified as lead compound and may be studied further as a good candidate for cervical cancer treatment. Finally, the remaining high activity of amino-terminated iso-phidianidines demonstrated that presence of guanidine group in termini is not necessary for high cytotoxicity. The second part of this dissertation (Chapter 3) discusses the rational design, wet protocol synthesis and complete characterization of the novel hybrid material – polydopamine coated iron-cobalt nanocubes (PDFCs). This material was loaded with anticancer model drug doxorubicin in one step procedure (PDFC-DOX) and the resulting drug-delivery vehicle was found to be successfully internalized by cervical cancer cells. The cytotoxicity test demonstrated inhibition of 50% of the cells at the concentration of 30μg/ml for PDFC-DOX. Moreover, the release was highly attenuated and pH-sensitive in acidic range. PDFC was also modified with fluorescein leading to green fluorescent nanoparticles PDFC-FITC, which demonstrated excellent intracellular molecular imaging property. PDFCs with one of the highest magnetic saturation among the materials used in biomedicine (226 emu/g based on core) showed the absence of any cytotoxicity in vitro and excellent MRI contrasting property (r2=186.44 mMs-1, higher than commercial contrast agents Ferridex® and Clio®), both in vitro and in vivo on mice. They were cleared out from the mice bodies in month without affecting their health. Due to the high density of core (8.3 g/cm3) they demonstrated ability to be contrast materials also for X-Ray CT diagnostic modality, increasing the tumor detection and visualization probability in combination with MRI. In addition to it’s diagnostic and drug-delivery modalities, PDFC was

  8. Feasibility of an expressive-disclosure group intervention for post-treatment colorectal cancer patients: results of the Healthy Expressions study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Cindy L; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Yuan, Ying; Greisinger, Anthony; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Wolff, Robert A; Barker, Trina; Baum, George; Pennebaker, James W

    2011-11-01

    Adjusting to cancer requires effective cognitive and emotional processing. Written and verbal disclosure facilitate processing and have been studied independently in cancer survivors. Combined written and verbal expression may be more effective than either alone, particularly for patients with difficult to discuss or embarrassing side effects. Thus, the authors developed and tested the efficacy of a 12-session combined written and verbal expression group program for psychologically distressed colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Forty post-treatment patients with CRC (stages I-III) identified as psychologically distressed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) were randomized to an intervention group (Healthy Expressions; n = 25) or standard care (control group; n = 15). Assessments were completed at baseline, Month 2, and Month 4 (postintervention). Primary outcomes were psychological functioning and quality of life (QOL). Most participants were women (63%), white (63%), and non-Hispanic (75%). The Healthy Expressions group demonstrated significantly greater changes in distress compared with the control group at Month 2 on the BSI Global Severity Index (GSI) and the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) scores (P psychological functioning in CRC patients who reported experiencing distress. Findings demonstrate the program's feasibility and provide strong support for conducting a larger randomized trial. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  9. Treatments for esophageal cancer. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common form of cancer worldwide. The treatments for esophageal cancer depend on its etiology. For mucosal cancer, endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection are standard, while for locally advanced cancer, esophagectomy remains the mainstay. The three most common techniques for thoracic esophagectomy are the transhiatal approach, the Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (right thoracotomy and laparotomy), and the McKeown technique (right thoracotomy followed by laparotomy and neck incision with cervical anastomosis). Surgery for carcinoma of the cervical esophagus requires an extensive procedure with laryngectomy in many cases. When the tumor is more advanced, neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is added. The theoretical advantages of adding chemotherapy to the treatment of esophageal cancer are potential tumor down-staging prior to surgery, as well as targeting micrometastases and, thus, decreasing the risk of distant metastasis. Cisplatin- and 5-fluorouracil-based regimes are used worldwide. Chemoradiotherapy is the standard for unresectable esophageal cancer and could also be considered as an option for resectable tumors. For patients who are medically or technically inoperable, concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be the standard of care. Although neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery or salvage surgery after definitive chemoradiotherapy is a practical treatment; judicious patient selection is crucial. It is important to have a thorough understanding of these therapeutic modalities to assist in this endeavor. (author)

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on the ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect the prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on the ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  12. Adherence to cancer treatment guidelines: influence of general and cancer-specific guideline characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Jong, J.D. de; Spronk, I.; Ho, V.K.; Brink, M.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Guideline adherence remains a challenge in clinical practice, despite guidelines’ ascribed potential to improve patient outcomes. We studied the level of adherence to recommendations from Dutch national cancer treatment guidelines, and the influence of general and

  13. 'One also needs a bit of trust in the doctor ... ': a qualitative interview study with pancreatic cancer patients about their perceptions and views on information and treatment decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, J; Ritter, P; Salloch, S; Uhl, W; Vollmann, J

    2013-09-01

    Information about diagnosis, treatment options and prognosis has been emphasized as a key to empower cancer patients to make treatment decisions reflecting their values. However, surveys indicate that patients' preferences regarding information and treatment decision-making differ. In this qualitative interview study, we explored pancreatic cancer patients' perceptions and preferences on information and treatment decision-making. Qualitative in-depth interviews with patients with pancreatic cancer. Purposive sampling and qualitative analysis were carried out. We identified two stages of information and treatment decision-making. Patients initially emphasize trust in their physician and indicate rather limited interest in details about surgical and medical treatment. In the latter stage of disease, patients perceive themselves more active regarding information seeking and treatment decision-making. All patients discuss their poor prognosis. Reflecting on their own situation, all patients interviewed pointed out that hope was an important driver to undergo further treatment also in advanced stages of the disease. Interviewees unanimously emphasized the difficulty of anticipating the time at which stopping cancer treatment would be the right decision. The findings can serve as starting point for reflection on professional decision-making in pancreatic cancer and larger representative surveys on ethical issues in treatment decision-making in pancreatic cancer.

  14. A MULTICENTRE STUDY OF ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SALVAGING LYMPHADENECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER WITH DISEASE PROGRESSION AFTER THE RADICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Y. Alekseev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most urgent problems of modern oncourology because of the continuing high incidence of this pathology. The main methods of radical treatment of patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer are radical prostatectomy (RP and radiotherapy – remote (RRT or brachytherapy.  However, the frequency of biochemical markers of disease progression after curative treatment is high and reaches up to 27–53%. It is extremely important to find the tumor lesion that leads to the increase of the marker. The  palliative hormone therapy (PHT was the only accepted method in patients with occurrence of distant metastases in recent time. However, a significant number of patients relapse marker may be associated with the so-called oligo-metastatic disease progression, in which the number of detected metastatic lesions is minimal. As the results of the research, the use of surgical or radiological treatment in selected patients of this cohort can significantly increase the length of time prior to the appointment of HT, and in some cases completely abandon its holding.Purpose. To evaluate the results of the saving pelvic lymphadenectomy in patients with prostate cancer with disease progression after radical therapies.Patients and methods. The article summarizes the results of surgical treatment of patients who have undergone life-saving lymphadenectomy about oligo-nodal metastatic progression of prostate cancer after treatment in 3 centers – P. Hertsen MORI, the branch of NMRRC; N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology and Russian scientific center of radiology and surgical technologies. In this multicenter study they evaluated the immediate and remote results of surgical treatment of 57 patients.Results. The results performed the high efficiency of the method of the saving pelvic lymphadenectomy in patients with prostate cancer with disease progression after radical treatment. So, response to therapy and reduction

  15. Carbon Nanomaterials for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Casais-Molina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, breast cancer is considered as a health problem worldwide. Furthermore, current treatments neither are capable of stopping its propagation and/or recurrence nor are specific for cancer cells. Therefore, side effects on healthy tissues and cells are common. An increase in the efficiency of treatments, along with a reduction in their toxicity, is desirable to improve the life quality of patients affected by breast cancer. Nanotechnology offers new alternatives for the design and synthesis of nanomaterials that can be used in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer and has now become a very promising tool for its use against this disease. Among the wide variety of nanomaterials, the scientific community is particularly interested in carbon nanomaterials (fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene due to their physical properties, versatile chemical functionalization, and biocompatibility. Recent scientific evidence shows the potential uses of carbon nanomaterials as therapeutic agents, systems for selective and controlled drug release, and contrast agents for diagnosing and locating tumors. This generates new possibilities for the development of innovative systems to treat breast cancer and can be used to detect this disease at much earlier stages. Thus, applications of carbon nanomaterials in breast cancer treatment are discussed in this article.

  16. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Li, Sha; Meng, Xiao; Gan, Ren-You; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-07-08

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among females worldwide. Several epidemiological studies suggested the inverse correlation between the intake of vegetables and fruits and the incidence of breast cancer. Substantial experimental studies indicated that many dietary natural products could affect the development and progression of breast cancer, such as soy, pomegranate, mangosteen, citrus fruits, apple, grape, mango, cruciferous vegetables, ginger, garlic, black cumin, edible macro-fungi, and cereals. Their anti-breast cancer effects involve various mechanisms of action, such as downregulating ER-α expression and activity, inhibiting proliferation, migration, metastasis and angiogenesis of breast tumor cells, inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and sensitizing breast tumor cells to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarizes the potential role of dietary natural products and their major bioactive components in prevention and treatment of breast cancer, and special attention was paid to the mechanisms of action.

  17. Efficacy of a global supportive skin care programme with hydrotherapy after non-metastatic breast cancer treatment: A randomised, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenc, F; Ribet, V; Rossi, A B; Guyonnaud, J; Bernard-Marty, C; de Lafontan, B; Salas, S; Ranc Royo, A-L; Sarda, C; Levasseur, N; Massabeau, C; Levecq, J-M; Dulguerova, P; Guerrero, D; Sibaud, V

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of post-treatment hydrotherapy as supportive care for management of persistent/long-lasting dermatologic adverse events (dAEs) induced in breast cancer survivors by adjuvant therapy, and its impact on quality of life (QoL). Patients in complete remission after standardised (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy combination treatment for infiltrating HR+/HER2-breast carcinoma were enrolled in this randomised, multicentre controlled study 1-5 weeks after completing radiotherapy. The control group (CG, n = 33) received best supportive care and the treatment group (HG, n = 35) received 3-weeks of specific hydrotherapy. The primary criterion was change in QoL (QLQ-BR23) after hydrotherapy. Clinical grading of dAEs, cancer-related QoL (QLQ-C30), dermatologic QoL (DLQI) and general psychological well-being (PGWBI) were assessed. Significant dAEs were found at inclusion in both groups (n = 261). Most items showed significantly greater improvement in the HG versus CG group: QLQ-BR23 (breast [p = .0001] and arm symptoms [p = .0015], systemic therapy side effects [p = .0044], body image [p = .0139]), some dAE grading, DLQI (p = .0002) and PGWBI (p = .0028). Xerosis (88% of patients at inclusion) completely healed in all HG patients. Specific hydrotherapy is an effective supportive care for highly prevalent and long-lasting dAEs occurring after early breast cancer treatment, including chemotherapy, and leads to improved QoL and dermatologic toxicities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  19. Development and feasibility of a Swallowing intervention Package (SiP) for patients receiving radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer-the SiP study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary; King, Emma; Toft, Kate; MacAulay, Fiona; Patterson, Joanne; Dougall, Nadine; Hulbert-Williams, Nick; Boa, Sally; Slaven, Eleanor; Cowie, Julie; McGarva, John; Niblock, Patricia Gail; Philp, Julie; Roe, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and the functional, psychological and social consequences of HNC cancer and its treatment can be severe and chronic. Dysphagia (swallowing problems) affects up to two thirds of patients undergoing combined chemoradiotherapy. Recent reviews suggest that prophylactic swallowing exercises may improve a range of short- and long-term outcomes; however, the importance of psychological and behavioural factors on adherence to swallowing exercises has not been adequately studied. This study aims to develop and test the feasibility of a Swallowing intervention Package (SiP) designed in partnership with patients, speech and language therapists (SLTs) and other members of the head and neck multi-disciplinary team (MDT), for patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. This feasibility study uses quantitative and qualitative research methods, within a quasi-experimental design, to assess whether patients will tolerate and adhere to the SiP intervention, which aspects of the intervention can be implemented and which cannot, whether treatment fidelity can be achieved across different contexts, whether study processes and outcome measures will be feasible and acceptable and to what extent the intervention is likely to have an impact on swallowing dysfunction and quality of life. Patients are being recruited from five sites in Scotland and England (three interventions and two usual care). The SLT based in the relevant intervention centre teaches the exercise programme and provides supporting materials. A combination of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), adherence measures and clinical swallowing assessments are used prior to intervention (baseline), at the end of treatment, 3 and 6 months post-treatment. This collaborative study has taken a unique approach to the development of a patient-centred and evidence-based swallowing intervention. The introduction of

  20. The unpaved journey of vitamin C in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Ping; Dong, Ruochen

    2015-12-01

    Effectiveness and low-toxicity to normal tissues are ideal properties for a cancer treatment, and one that numerous research programs are aiming for. Vitamin C has long been used in the field of Complementary and Alternative Medicine as a cancer treatment, with profound safety and anecdotal efficacy. Recent studies revealed the scientific basis for this use, and indicated that vitamin C, at supra-nutritional doses, holds considerable promise as an effective and low-toxic therapeutic strategy to treat cancer. Reviewed here are the early controversies surrounding vitamin C and cancer treatment, the breakthrough discoveries that led to the current advancement, and recent clinical studies, as well as research into its mechanisms of action.

  1. What is the benefit of treatment with multiple lines of chemotherapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, J L; Wever, K; van Waesberghe, J H; Beeker, A; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Konings, I R; Verheul, H M W

    2015-12-01

    Despite the extensive clinical experience, it is still under debate to what extent patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) benefit from multiple lines of chemotherapy beyond standard first or second line treatment. Selection of patients with MBC who will benefit from treatment is crucial to improve outcome and reduce unnecessary toxicity. In this retrospective study, systemic treatment outcome for patients with metastatic MBC is being evaluated. We evaluated to what extent the clinical benefit of prior chemotherapy can predict the success of a subsequent treatment line. Ninety-one patients treated with chemotherapy for MBC between January 2005 and January 2009 were included in this study. Clinical characteristics of patients, choices of chemotherapy and response at first evaluation of every treatment line was evaluated based on radiologic and clinical data. Patients received multiple systemic cytotoxic and biological (combination) therapies. 30% of these patients received more than five consecutive systemic (combination) treatments. First line chemotherapy was mostly anthracycline-based, followed by taxanes, capecitabine and vinorelbine. The response rate (RR, complete response plus partial response according to RECIST 1.1) decreased from 20% (95% CI 11-28%) upon first line of treatment to 0% upon the fourth line. The clinical benefit rate (combining RR and stable disease) decreased from 85% (95% CI 78-93%) in the first to 54% (95% CI 26-67) upon the fourth line. 24% of the patients with clinical benefit at first evaluation did not receive a subsequent line of treatment when progressive disease occurred, while sixty-one percent of the patients with progressive disease at first evaluation of a treatment did not receive a subsequent line of chemotherapy. When applied, the efficacy of a subsequent line of treatment was similar for patients independent of previous treatment benefit. The clinical benefit at first evaluation from systemic treatment in MBC does not

  2. Depressive symptoms during adverse economic and political circumstances: A comparative study on Greek female breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelekasis, P; Kampoli, K; Ntavatzikos, A; Charoni, A; Tsionou, C; Koumarianou, A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to search for an effect of the adverse economic and political events that took place in 2015 in Greece (threat of bankruptcy, referendum, capital controls) on depressive symptoms of breast cancer patients on chemotherapy. The clinician-rated version of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C30) and a form documenting sociodemographic, medical and social network characteristics were administrated in two groups of patients: one in 2010 and one in the aftermath of the July 2015 events. No differences were found between medical, demographic and social characteristics. The IDS-C30 median value of patients treated in 2010 was 28.07 (CI, 25.91-31.60), while that of the 2015's group was 18.00 (CI, 16.92-20.60), indicating less depressive symptoms for the second group. The analysis revealed that the differences between the two groups were statistically significant (p = <.001), denoting a strong effect size (r = .53). Lower depressive symptoms after the July 2015 events could be explained by different personal and social factors- most possibly an increase of social support to the most vulnerable-yet to be proven. Future research on the effect of striking economic and political events on mental health of a larger cohort of breast cancer patients is warranted. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  4. [Prospective randomized study of HMVP, MVP, and HVP regimens in treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian-Fei; Li, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Du, Guang-Zu; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Yu-Ze; Ou, Wu-Ling; Yang, Bo

    2004-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is hyposensitive to the normal first and second-line chemotherapy regimens. Camptothecin derivative is becoming a hot point in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. The objective of this article was to evaluate the response, toxicity, and survival time of HMVP, MVP, and HVP regimens (detail in below) in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. A total of 134 cases with advanced NSCLC was randomized into three groups: HMVP group [46 patients, hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) 12 mg/m(2) from d1 to d5, mitomycin C (MMC) 6 mg/m(2) d1, vindesine (VDS) 2.5-3 mg/m(2) d1 and d8, cisplatin (DDP) 50 mg/m(2) d2 and d3], MVP group (44 patients, MMC, VDS and DDP were the same as HMVP group) and HVP group (44 patients, HCPT, VDS, DDP were the same as HMVP group). The response rates were 39.54% (17/43), 35.57% (15/42), and 26.19% (11/42) in HMVP, MVP, and HVP groups, respectively; no significant difference was detected among the three groups (P >0.05). No significant difference was detected in the median time of remission, median survival time, and 1-, 2-year survival rates among the three groups. Moreover, no significant difference was detected in grade III-IV leukopenia, grade III-IV thrombocytopenia, grade III-IV nausea and vomiting and grade III-IV constipation among the three groups. The response rate of MVP regimen is slightly lower than that of HMVP regimen, but HMVP regimen do not show obvious superiority. It may increase toxicities such as leukopenia, nausea/vomiting, and constipation. The response rate of HVP regimen is slightly lower than that of MVP regimen.

  5. Breast cancer and early retirement: Associations with disease characteristics, treatment, comorbidity, social position and participation in a six-day rehabilitation course in a register-based study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjaer, L. H.; Deltour, I.; Suppli, N. P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this register-based study was to identify factors related to disease, treatment, sociodemographics and comorbidity associated with taking early retirement among women treated for breast cancer, and to evaluate the risk for taking early retirement among breast cancer s...... contribute to the identification of at-risk women and point to the need for tailored rehabilitation to avoid unnecessary marginalization of breast cancer survivors due to permanent labor market withdrawal....

  6. Quality of Life and Neutropenia in Patients with Early Stage Breast Cancer: A Randomized Pilot Study Comparing Additional Treatment with Mistletoe Extract to Chemotherapy Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Tröger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemotherapy for breast cancer often deteriorates quality of life, augments fatigue, and induces neutropenia. Mistletoe preparations are frequently used by cancer patients in Central Europe. Physicians have reported better quality of life in breast cancer patients additionally treated with mistletoe preparations during chemotherapy. Mistletoe preparations also have immunostimulant properties and might therefore have protective effects against chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective randomized open label pilot study with 95 patients randomized into three groups. Two groups received Iscador® M special (IMS or a different mistletoe preparation, respectively, additionally to chemotherapy with six cycles of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and 5-fluoro-uracil (CAF. A control group received CAF with no additional therapy. Here we report the comparison IMS (n = 30 vs. control (n = 31. Quality of life including fatigue was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30. Neutropenia was defined as neutrophil counts <1,000/µl and assessed at baseline and one day before each CAF cycle.Results: In the descriptive analysis all 15 scores of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 showed better quality of life in the IMS group compared to the control group. In 12 scores the differences were significant (p < 0.02 and nine scores showed a clinically relevant and significant difference of at least 5 points. Neutropenia occurred in 3/30 IMS patients and in 8/31 control patients (p = 0.182.Conclusions: This pilot study showed an improvement of quality of life by treating breast cancer patients with IMS additionally to CAF. CAF-induced neutropenia showed a trend to lower frequency in the IMS group.

  7. Nanotechnology Cancer Therapy and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanotechnology offers the means to target therapies directly and selectively to cancerous cells and neoplasms. With these tools, clinicians can safely and effectively deliver chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and the next generation of immuno- and gene therapies to the tumor. Futhermore, surgical resection of tumors can be guided and enhanced by way of nanotechnology tools. Find out how nanotechnology will offer the next generation of our therapeutic arsenal to the patient.

  8. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-01-01

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  9. Do single and partnered women with gynecologic cancer differ in types and intensities of illness- and treatment-related psychosocial concerns? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Janet M; Mah, Kenneth; Fyles, Anthony; Winton, Susan; Greenwood, Sarah; DePetrillo, Denny; Devins, Gerald M

    2007-09-01

    We compared the psychosocial and psychosexual concerns of single and partnered women with gynecologic cancer, since relationship status and psychosocial context are known to affect sexuality, a life domain commonly affected by this cancer. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 49 women (68% response), with ovarian (n=31), endometrial (n=12), and cervical (n=6) cancer, responded to a 72-item self-report Cancer Concerns Questionnaire and additional psychosocial questionnaires. Single (n=13) and partnered women (n=36) similarly reported prognosis as their highest concern, but single women (26% of the sample) reported that communication with the treatment team, treatment side effects, and prognosis were of greater salience to them than did partnered women. The latter group had greater sexuality and partner relationship concerns. These preliminary findings suggest that relationship status, whether partnered or single, influences current psychosocial concerns among women with gynecologic cancer, despite similar levels of illness- and treatment-related intrusions on important life domains.

  10. Gastric cancer: epidemiology, prevention, classification, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitarz R

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert Sitarz,1–3 Małgorzata Skierucha,1,2 Jerzy Mielko,1 G Johan A Offerhaus,3 Ryszard Maciejewski,2 Wojciech P Polkowski1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 2Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world, the epidemiology of which has changed within last decades. A trend of steady decline in gastric cancer incidence rates is the effect of the increased standards of hygiene, conscious nutrition, and Helicobacter pylori eradication, which together constitute primary prevention. Avoidance of gastric cancer remains a priority. However, patients with higher risk should be screened for early detection and chemoprevention. Surgical resection enhanced by standardized lymphadenectomy remains the gold standard in gastric cancer therapy. This review briefly summarizes the most important aspects of gastric cancers, which include epidemiology, risk factors, classification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The paper is mostly addressed to physicians who are interested in updating the state of art concerning gastric carcinoma from easily accessible and credible source. Keywords: gastric cancer, epidemiology, classification, risk factors, treatment

  11. Cancer Stem Cells – New Approach to Cancerogenensis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Mačingová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there is an increasing evidence supporting the theory of cancer stem cells not only in leukemia but also in solid cancer. To date, the existence of cancer stem cells has been proven in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia, in breast cancer, in brain tumors, in lung cancer and gastrointestinal tumors. This review is focusing on the recent discovery of stem cells in leukemia, human brain tumors and breast cancer. A small population of cells in the tumor (less than 1 % shows the potential to give rise to the tumor and its growth. These cells have a substantial characteristic of stem cells – ability for self-renewal without loss of proliferation capacity with each cell division. Furthermore they are immortal, rather resistant to treatment and express typical markers of stem cells. The origin of these resident cancer stem cells is not clear. Whether the cancer stem cells originate from normal stem cells in consequence of genetic and epigenetic changes and/or redifferentiation from somatic tumor cells to the stem-like cells remains to be investigated. We propose the idea of the relation between normal tissue stem cells and cancer stem cells and their populations – progenitor cells. Based on this we highlight one of the major characteristic of stem cell – plasticity, which is equally important in the physiological regeneration process as well as carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we consider the microenvironment as a limiting factor for tumor genesis in AML, breast cancer and brain tumors. Thus the biological properties of cancer stem cells are just beginning to be revealed, the continuation of these studies should lead to the development of cancer stem cells target therapies for cancer treatment.

  12. [Available resources for the treatment of breast cancer in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohar, Alejandro; Bargalló, Enrique; Ramírez, Ma Teresa; Lara, Fernando; Beltrán-Ortega, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Describe the resources for the treatment of breast cancer in Mexico. Information was obtained from 23 Centros Estatales de Cáncer (State Cancer Centers, CEC), two federal hospitals and Cancerología. This study was performed in Mexico City in August/September of 2008. These 23 centers provide medical care for breast cancer including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy; all of them validated by the Seguro Popular. The costs were defined according to clinical stage and ranged from $27,500.00 pesos for clinical stage 0 to $480,00.00 in the advanced stage. A total of 2 689 women with breast cancer have been treated; only 1% was reported with in situ carcinoma. An adequate medical infrastructure is in place to treat breast cancer in Mexico. The costs are high due to late diagnosis of the disease. Early detection of breast cancer is a high priority for optimal control of this disease in Mexico.

  13. Treatment deintensification in human papillomavirus-positive oropharynx cancer: Outcomes from the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghlou, Shayan; Yu, Phoebe K; Otremba, Michael D; Park, Henry S; Bhatia, Aarti; Zogg, Cheryl K; Mehra, Saral; Yarbrough, Wendell G; Judson, Benjamin L

    2018-02-15

    The growing epidemic of human papillomavirus-positive (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer and the favorable prognosis of this disease etiology have led to a call for deintensified treatment for some patients with HPV+ cancers. One of the proposed methods of treatment deintensification is the avoidance of chemotherapy concurrent with definitive/adjuvant radiotherapy. To the authors' knowledge, the safety of this form of treatment de-escalation is unknown and the current literature in this area is sparse. The authors investigated outcomes after various treatment combinations stratified by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) eighth edition disease stage using patients from the National Cancer Data Base. A retrospective study of 4443 patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer in the National Cancer Data Base was conducted. Patients were stratified into AJCC eighth edition disease stage groups. Multivariate Cox regressions as well as univariate Kaplan-Meier analyses were conducted. For patients with stage I disease, treatment with definitive radiotherapy was associated with diminished survival compared with chemoradiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR], 1.798; P = .029), surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy (HR, 2.563; P = .002), or surgery with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (HR, 2.427; P = .001). For patients with stage II disease, compared with treatment with chemoradiotherapy, patients treated with a single-modality (either surgery [HR, 2.539; P = .009] or radiotherapy [HR, 2.200; P = .030]) were found to have poorer survival. Among patients with stage III disease, triple-modality therapy was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.518; P = .024) compared with treatment with chemoradiotherapy. Deintensification of treatment from chemoradiotherapy to radiotherapy or surgery alone in cases of HPV+ AJCC eighth edition stage I or stage II disease may compromise patient safety. Treatment intensification to triple-modality therapy for patients with stage III disease may improve survival in

  14. Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anal cancer is uncommon, but often curable with treatment. Treatments include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. Get detailed information about anal cancer including risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  15. Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of liver cancer in adults depends on the stage. Treatment options include hepatectomy, liver transplant, ablation, electroporation therapy (EPT), embolization therapy, targeted therapy, and/or radiation therapy. Learn more about treatment for the different stages of liver cancer.

  16. Young female cancer survivors' use of fertility care after completing cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayeon; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Su, H. Irene; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Gorman, Jessica R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate factors associated with female young adult cancer survivors’ (YCS) use of fertility care (FC), including consultation or fertility treatment, after completing their cancer treatment. Methods In this cross-sectional study, females between that ages of 18 and 35 years who had been diagnosed with childhood, adolescent, or young adult cancers completed a 20-min web-based survey that included demographics, reproductive history, use of FC, fertility-related informational needs, and reproductive concerns. Results A total of 204 participants completed the survey. Participants’ mean age was 28.3±4.5 years. Thirty (15%) participants reported using FC after cancer treatment. The majority of participants recalled not receiving enough information about FP options at the time of cancer diagnosis (73%). In multivariable analysis, those with higher concerns about having children because of perceived risk to their personal health (P=0.003) were less likely to report use of FC after cancer treatment. Those who had used FC before cancer treatment (P=0.003) and who felt less fertile than age-matched women (P=0.02) were more likely to use FC after their cancer treatment. Conclusions While most YCS in this cohort believed that they did not receive enough information about fertility and most wanted to have children, the vast majority did not seek FC. The findings of this study offer further evidence of the need for improved education and emotional support regarding reproductive options after cancer treatment is completed. Targeted discussions with YCS about appropriate post-treatment FC options may improve providers’ capacity to help YCS meet their parenthood goals. PMID:26939923

  17. Long-term prognosis of young breast cancer patients (≤40 years) who did not receive adjuvant systemic treatment: protocol for the PARADIGM initiative cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dackus, Gwen M. H. E.; ter Hoeve, Natalie D.; Opdam, Mark; Vreuls, Willem; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Koop, Esther; Willems, Stefan M.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Groen, Emilie J.; Cordoba, Alicia; Bart, Jos; Mooyaart, Antien L.; van den Tweel, Jan G.; Zolota, Vicky; Wesseling, Jelle; Sapino, Anna; Chmielik, Ewa; Ryska, Ales; Amant, Frederic; Broeks, Annegien; Kerkhoven, Ron; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Veta, Mitko; Voogd, Adri; Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Hauptmann, Michael; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Sonke, Gabe; van der Wall, Elsken; Siesling, Sabine; van Diest, Paul J.; Linn, Sabine C.

    2017-01-01

    Currently used tools for breast cancer prognostication and prediction may not adequately reflect a young patient's prognosis or likely treatment benefit because they were not adequately validated in young patients. Since breast cancers diagnosed at a young age are considered prognostically

  18. Long-term prognosis of young breast cancer patients (≤40 years) who did not receive adjuvant systemic treatment: protocol for the PARADIGM initiative cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dackus, Gwen M.H.E.; ter Hoeve, Natalie.D.; Opdam, Mark; Vreuls, Willem; Varga, Zsuzanna; Koop, Esther; Willems, Stefan M.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Groen, Emilie J.; Cordoba, Alicia; Bart, Jos; Mooyaart, Antien L.; van den Tweel, Jan G.; Zolota, Vicky; Wesseling, Jelle; Sapino, Anna; Chmielik, Ewa; Ryska, Ales; Amant, Frederic; Broeks, Annegien; Kerkhoven, Ron; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Veta, Mitko; Voogd, Adri C.; Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Hauptmann, Michael; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Sonke, Gabe S.; van der Wall, E.; Siesling, Sabine; van Diest, Paul J.; Linn, Sabine C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Currently used tools for breast cancer prognostication and prediction may not adequately reflect a young patient’s prognosis or likely treatment benefit because they were not adequately validated in young patients. Since breast cancers diagnosed at a young age are considered

  19. Long-term prognosis of young breast cancer patients (≤40 years) who did not receive adjuvant systemic treatment : protocol for the PARADIGM initiative cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dackus, Gwen Mhe; ter Hoeve, Natalie D.; Opdam, Mark; Vreuls, Willem; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Koop, Esther; Willems, Stefan M; van Deurzen, Carolien Hm; Groen, Emilie J; Cordoba, Alicia; Bart, Jos; Mooyaart, Antien L; van den Tweel, Jan G; Zolota, Vicky; Wesseling, Jelle; Sapino, Anna; Chmielik, Ewa; Ryska, Ales; Amant, Frederic; Broeks, Annegien; Kerkhoven, Ron; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Veta, Mitko; Voogd, Adri C.; Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Hauptmann, Michael; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Sonke, Gabe S; van der Wall, Elsken; Siesling, Sabine; van Diest, Paul J; Linn, Sabine C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Currently used tools for breast cancer prognostication and prediction may not adequately reflect a young patient's prognosis or likely treatment benefit because they were not adequately validated in young patients. Since breast cancers diagnosed at a young age are considered

  20. Regional variation in breast cancer treatment in the Netherlands and the role of external peer review : a cohort study comprising 63,516 women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J.; van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Otter, Renee; van Harten, Wim H.; Siesling, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment variation is an important issue in health care provision. An external peer review programme for multidisciplinary cancer care was introduced in 1994 in the Netherlands to improve the multidisciplinary organisation of cancer care in hospitals. So far the clinical impact of

  1. Long-term prognosis of young breast cancer patients (≤40 years) who did not receive adjuvant systemic treatment : Protocol for the PARADIGM initiative cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dackus, Gwen Mhe; Ter Hoeve, Natalie D; Opdam, Mark; Vreuls, Willem; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Koop, Esther; Willems, Stefan M; Van Deurzen, Carolien Hm; Groen, Emilie J; Cordoba, Alicia; Bart, Jos; Mooyaart, Antien L; van den Tweel, Jan G; Zolota, Vicky; Wesseling, Jelle; Sapino, Anna; Chmielik, Ewa; Ryska, Ales; Amant, Frederic; Broeks, Annegien; Kerkhoven, Ron; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Veta, Mitko; Voogd, Adri; Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Hauptmann, Michael; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sonke, Gabe; van der Wall, Elsken; Siesling, Sabine; van Diest, Paul J; Linn, Sabine C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Currently used tools for breast cancer prognostication and prediction may not adequately reflect a young patient's prognosis or likely treatment benefit because they were not adequately validated in young patients. Since breast cancers diagnosed at a young age are considered

  2. Current status of brachytherapy in cancer treatment – short overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer incidence and mortality depend on a number of factors, including age, socio-economic status and geographical location, and its prevalence is growing around the world. Most of cancer treatments include external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy with energy from radionuclides inserted directly into the tumor, is increasingly used in cancer treatment. For cervical and skin cancers, it has become a standard therapy for more than 100 years as well as an important part of the treatment guidelines for other malignancies, including head and neck, skin, breast, and prostate cancers. Compared to external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy has the potential to deliver an ablative radiation dose over a short period of time directly to the altered tissue area with the advantage of a rapid fall-off in dose, and consequently, sparing of adjacent organs. As a result, the patient is able to complete the treatment earlier, and the risks of occurrence of another cancer are lower than in conventional radiotherapy treatment. Brachytherapy has increased its use as a radical or palliative treatment, and become more advanced with the spread of pulsed-dose-rate and high-dose-rate afterloading machines; the use of new 3D/4D planning systems has additionally improved the quality of the treatment. The aim of the present study was to present short summaries of current studies on brachytherapy for the most frequently diagnosed tumors. Data presented in this manuscript should help especially young physicians or physicists to explore and introduce brachytherapy in cancer treatments.

  3. Preparing patients with cancer who work and treatment responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Many patients with life-limiting illnesses continue to work because of financial reasons and because work provides good psychosocial support. A lack of appropriate advice/support through patient education could, however, make having a job detrimental to well-being (eg, symptom worsening). This study investigated the frequency with which patients received information that empowers their understanding of their condition, treatment, side effects of treatment and the likely impact on occupational functioning. A cross-sectional study. An analysis of survey data from 3457 patients with cancer in employment. Logistic regression showed that patients who received information about the impact of cancer on work life or education are 1.72 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Patients who receive written information about the type of cancer are 1.99 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Also, patients who receive written information before a cancer-related operation are 1.90 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Information about the side effects of cancer treatment produces worse odds of a positive treatment outcome (0.65-1). A stepwise logistic regression analysing the effects irrespective of current employment status in 6710 patients showed that preparing them produces nearly twice better odds of cancer treatment responsiveness. Palliative care teams should consider ways of actively advising patients who work. Whereas the results showed evidence of good practice in cancer care, there is a need to ensure that all working patients with potentially life-limiting illnesses receive similar support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Sperm cryopreservation before cancer treatment: a 15-year monocentric experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizet, P; Saias-Magnan, J; Jouve, E; Grillo, J M; Karsenty, G; Metzler-Guillemain, C; Perrin, J

    2012-03-01

    Sperm banking is an important procedure to preserve fertility before cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to comprehensively analyse cryopreservation activity retrospectively for 1080 patients referred to the sperm bank for sperm cryopreservation before cancer treatment. This study included 1007 patients diagnosed with testicular cancer (TC) (41.7%), lymphoma (26%), other haematological cancers (9.4%) or other types of cancer (22.8%); of these, 29 patients did not produce any semen sample and cryopreservation was impossible for 67 patients. Semen characteristics before treatment were within normal ranges, except moderate asthenospermia. Sperm concentration was significantly lower in TC than in non-TC. Straws from 57 patients (6.3%) were used in assisted reproductive technologies, which led to a 46.8% cumulative birth rate. Straws were destroyed for 170 patients (18.7%) and 140 patients performed semen analyses after cancer therapy. After an average delay of 22.5 months after the end of therapy, 43 patients (30.7%) exhibited azoospermia. This study of a large population of cancer patients revealed a high level of successful sperm storage. Utilization of cryopreserved spermatozoa led to good chances of fatherhood. Nevertheless, sperm banks should be aware of the low rates of straw use and straw destruction by cancer patients. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Obesity on Surgical Treatment for Endometrial Cancer: A Multicenter Study Comparing Laparoscopy vs Open Surgery, with Propensity-Matched Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccella, Stefano; Bonzini, Matteo; Palomba, Stefano; Fanfani, Francesco; Ceccaroni, Marcello; Seracchioli, Renato; Vizza, Enrico; Ferrero, Annamaria; Roviglione, Giovanni; Casadio, Paolo; Corrado, Giacomo; Scambia, Giovanni; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of obesity on the outcomes of surgical treatment for endometrial cancer in general and also comparing laparoscopic and open abdominal approach. Retrospective case-control study (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, University of Insubria, Varese, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, International School of Surgical Anatomy, Sacred Heart Hospital, Negrar, and Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. Data of consecutive patients who underwent surgery for endometrial cancer in 4 centers were reviewed. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed. Adjustment for potential selection bias in surgical approach was made using propensity score (PS) matching. Laparoscopic or open surgical treatment for endometrial cancer. A total of 1266 patients were included, including 764 in the laparoscopy group and 502 in the open surgery group. A total of 391 patients (30.9%) were obese, including 238 (18.8%) with class I obesity, 89 (7%) with class II obesity, and 64 (5.1%) with class III obesity. The total number of complications, risk of wound complications, and venous thromboembolic events were higher in obese women compared with nonobese women. Blood transfusions, incidence/severity of postoperative complications, and postoperative hospital stay were significantly higher in the open surgery group compared with the laparoscopy group, irrespective of obesity. These differences remained significant in both multivariable analysis and PS-matched analysis. The percentage of patients who received lymphadenectomy declined significantly in patients with BMI ≥40 in both the laparoscopy and open surgery groups. Conversions from the initially intended minimally invasive approach to open surgery were 1.1% to 2.2% for women with BMI obese women in the laparoscopic group. Laparoscopy for endometrial cancer retains its advantages over open surgery, even in obese patients. However, operating on obese

  6. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramita Saha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthracycline based regiments and/or taxanes and adjuvant radiotherapy; the main modalities of treatment for breast cancers are associated with deterioration of pulmonary functions and progressive pulmonary toxicities. Aim: Assessment of pulmonary toxicities and impact on pulmonary functions mainly in terms of decline of forced vital capacity (FVC and the ratio of forced expiratory volume (FEV in 1 Second and FEV1/FVC ratio with different treatment times and follow ups in carcinoma breast patients receiving anthracycline and/or taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A prospective single institutional cohort study was performed with 58 breast cancer patients between January 2011 to July 2012 who received either anthracycline based (37 patients received 6 cycles FAC= 5 FU, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide regime and radiotherapy or anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy (21 patients received 4cycles AC= Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide; followed by 4 cycles of T=Taxane and radiotherapy. Assessment of pulmonary symptoms and signs, chest x-ray and pulmonary function tests were performed at baseline, midcycle, at end of chemotherapy, at end radiotherapy, at 1 and 6 months follow ups and compared. By means of a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA model, the course of lung parameters across the time points was compared. Results and Conclusion: Analysis of mean forced vital capacities at different points of study times showed definitive declining pattern, which is at statistically significant level at the end of 6th month of follow up (p=0.032 .The FEV1/FVC ratio (in percentage also revealed a definite decreasing pattern over different treatment times and at statistically significant level at 6th month follow up with p value 0.003. Separate analysis of mean FEV1/FVC ratios over time in anthracycline based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group as well as anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group

  7. Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Alemany

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic use of viruses against cancer has been revived during the last two decades. Oncolytic viruses replicate and spread inside tumors, amplifying their cytotoxicity and simultaneously reversing the tumor immune suppression. Among different viruses, recombinant adenoviruses designed to replicate selectively in tumor cells have been clinically tested by intratumoral or systemic administration. Limited efficacy has been associated to poor tumor targeting, intratumoral spread, and virocentric immune responses. A deeper understanding of these three barriers will be required to design more effective oncolytic adenoviruses that, alone or combined with chemotherapy or immunotherapy, may become tools for oncologists.

  8. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Parathyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following rare disorders that are inherited (passed down from parent to child): Familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome . Treatment with radiation therapy may increase the risk of ...

  10. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi mushroom) for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xingzhong; Ruiz Beguerie, Julieta; Sze, Daniel Man-Yeun; Chan, Godfrey C F

    2016-04-05

    Ganoderma lucidum is a natural medicine that is widely used and recommended by Asian physicians and naturopaths for its supporting effects on immune system. Laboratory research and a handful of preclinical trials have suggested that G. lucidum carries promising anticancer and immunomodulatory properties. The popularity of taking G. lucidum as an alternative medicine has been increasing in cancer patients. However, there is no systematic review that has been conducted to evaluate the actual benefits of G. lucidum in cancer treatment. To evaluate the clinical effects of G. lucidum on long-term survival, tumour response, host immune functions and quality of life in cancer patients, as well as adverse events associated with its use. We searched an extensive set of databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, NIH, AMED, CBM, CNKI, CMCC and VIP Information/Chinese Scientific Journals Database was searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in October 2011. Other strategies used were scanning the references of articles retrieved, handsearching of the International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms and contact with herbal medicine experts and manufacturers of G. lucidum. For this update we updated the searches in February 2016. To be eligible for being included in this review, studies had to be RCTs comparing the efficacy of G. lucidum medications to active or placebo control in patients with cancer that had been diagnosed by pathology. All types and stages of cancer were eligible for inclusion. Trials were not restricted on the basis of language. Five RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Two independent review authors assessed the methodological quality of individual trials. Common primary outcomes were tumour response evaluated according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, immune function parameters such as natural killer (NK)-cell activity and T-lymphocyte co

  11. Epigenetic targets in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Manoharan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of leading cause of cancer related deaths in men. Various aspects of cancer epigenetics are rapidly evolving and the role of 2 major epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications in prostate cancer is being studied widely. The epigenetic changes are early event in the cancer development and are reversible. Novel epigenetic markers are being studied, which have the potential as sensitive diagnostic and prognostic marker. Variety of drugs targeting epigenetic changes are being studied, which can be effective individually or in combination with other conventional drugs in PC treatment. In this review, we discuss epigenetic changes associated with PC and their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications including future areas of research.

  12. Exploring and comparing the experience and coping behaviour of men and women with colorectal cancer after chemotherapy treatment: a qualitative longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Eilis; Prue, Gillian; Parahoo, Kader; McIlfatrick, Sonja; McKenna, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Men have higher incidence and mortality rates for nearly all cancers. They are less likely than women to utilise cancer information services and other social support services. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the experience and coping behaviour of men and women after treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC). A longitudinal qualitative study was conducted involving 38 individuals (24 men and 14 women) with CRC. Data were generated using semi-structured interviews at four time points over an 18-month period, post-diagnosis. Interviews focused on participant's experience of CRC and on how gender affected their coping. This paper reports the findings of interviews 3 and 4 which examined the participant's experience after chemotherapy. Three themes emerged from the interviews ('new normal', living with uncertainty and support needs). Many men and women reacted similarly; however, there was some variation evident between and within sexes. The main difference was with regard to the long-term physical side effects of the illness. Many women admitt