WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer tissues insight

  1. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer. PMID:26890363

  2. Gene expression and epigenetic profiles of mammary gland tissue: insight into the differential predisposition of four rat strains to mammary gland cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-02-01

    Rats are excellent experimental models for studying breast cancer, but rat strains differ in susceptibility. Among the four strains used in this study, Fischer rats are less susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer, yet they are highly prone to extremely severe metastatic and drug-resistant tumors, in those case where they actually develop the disease. In contrast, Sprague Dawley rats are the most susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer among the strains. ACI rats are highly prone to estrogen-induced cancer. Long-Evans rats are commonly used in mammary gland carcinogenesis studies. The molecular mechanisms of differential breast cancer susceptibility among rat strains are not well understood. Here, gene expression analysis was conducted in the mammary gland tissue of four rat strains--August × Copenhagen Irish (ACI), Long Evans, Fischer-344 and Sprague Dawley--to evaluate possible explanations for the differing breast cancer predispositions. According to the DAVID functional annotation analysis, there were at least eleven, five, and one significantly different pathways, respectively, in Fischer-344, Long-Evans and Sprague Dawley rats, in comparison to ACI rats. Two strains, Fischer-344 and Long-Evans, displayed differential expression in the complement and coagulation cascades, chemokine signaling, PPAR signaling, renin-angiotensin system, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion and glutathione metabolism pathways. The only pathway that was significantly different between the Sprague Dawley and the ACI rats was the ribosome pathway. Our data indicate that general cancer susceptibility and predisposition to the development of aggressive and metastatic cancer are independent genetic conditions. Moreover, we have identified several important differences in the basal epigenetic profile of four rat strains with varying degrees of susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25813725

  3. Somatic Mutaome Profile in Human Cancer Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Nayoung; Hong, Yourae; Kwon, Doyoung; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutation is a major cause of cancer progression and varied responses of tumors against anticancer agents. Thus, we must obtain and characterize genome-wide mutational profiles in individual cancer subtypes. The Cancer Genome Atlas database includes large amounts of sequencing and omics data generated from diverse human cancer tissues. In the present study, we integrated and analyzed the exome sequencing data from ~3,000 tissue samples and summarized the major mutant genes in each of t...

  4. A pilot study of sampling subcutaneous adipose tissue to examine biomarkers of cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Kristin L.; Makar, Karen W.; Kratz, Mario; Foster-Schubert, Karen E.; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2009-01-01

    Examination of adipose tissue biology may provide important insight into mechanistic links for the observed association between higher body fat and risk of several types of cancer, in particular colorectal and breast cancer. We tested two different methods of obtaining adipose tissue from healthy individuals.

  5. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Larner, F; Woodley, LN; Shousha, S; Moyes, A; Humphreys-Williams, E; Strekopytov, S; Halliday, AN; Rehkämper, M; Coombes, RC

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn i...

  6. Diagnosis of breast cancer by tissue analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debnath Bhattacharyya; Samir Kumar Bandyopadhyay; Tai-hoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we propose a technique to locate abnormal growth of cells in breast tissue and suggest further pathological test,when require.We compare normal breast tissue with malignant invasive breast tissue by a series of image processing steps.Normal ductal epithelial cells and ductal/lobular invasive carcinogenic cells also consider for comparison here in this paper.In fact,features of cancerous breast tissue (invasive) are extracted and analyses with normal breast tissue.We also suggest the breast cancer recognition technique through image processing and prevention by controlling p53 gene mutation to some extent.

  7. Nonmuscle Tissues Contribution to Cancer Cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Argilés, Josep M.; Britta Stemmler; López-Soriano, Francisco J.; Silvia Busquets

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia is a syndrome associated with cancer, characterized by body weight loss, muscle and adipose tissue wasting, and inflammation, being often associated with anorexia. In spite of the fact that muscle tissue represents more than 40% of body weight and seems to be the main tissue involved in the wasting that occurs during cachexia, recent developments suggest that tissues/organs such as adipose (both brown and white), brain, liver, gut, and heart are directly involved in the cachectic pro...

  8. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although its total molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Therefore, the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several function and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in the disease processes. Newly evolving advances in disease diagnostics and therapy will further facilitate future growth in the field of mitochondrian biology, where there is a dire need for sensitive and more affordable diagnostic tools and an urgency to develop effective therapies and identify reliable drug to predict accurately the response to a cancer therapy. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process as targets of drug-induced cytotoxicity or cancer promotion, as regulators of apoptosis, as sources of cell signalling through reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial control of specific nuclear responses. However, several novel mitochondrial targets are now emerging, including the potential to manipulate the mitochondrial pool to maintain function via biogenesis and mitophagy. Forthcoming insights into the fine regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis will likely open future perspectives for cancer drug development.

  9. Construction of metastatic spinal cancer tissue microarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xinghai; Chen Huajiang; Xiao Jianru; Yuan Wen; Jia Lianshun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the construction of metastatic spinal cancer (MSC) tissue microarrays and validate its value in immunohistochemical study of MSC. Methods: Paraffin-embedded specimens from 71 MSC cases and 6 primary tumor cases were selected as donor blocks and prepared into MSC tissue microarrays by tissue array arrangement, the steps of which included location, punching, sampling, sample seeding, and re-diagnosis by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) as well as MMP-9 and MMP-14 immunohistochemical staining. Results: The MSC tissue microarrays thus constructed were intact and crackless, containing 154 complete and well arranged microarray points. None of the sectioned tissue microarrays was lost, and the results of HE staining was consistent with the primary pathologic diagnoses. Immunohistochemical staining was also good without non-specific or marginal effect. Conclusion: The MSC tissue microarrays have a high value in the immunohistochemical study of MSC.

  10. Thrombospondin-1 Silencing Down-Regulates Integrin Expression Levels in Human Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Cells with BRAFV600E: New Insights in the Host Tissue Adaptation and Homeostasis of Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Mark; Sadow, Peter M.; Lawler, Jack; Nucera, Carmelo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is characterized by pleomorphic cells, has a poor prognosis, is highly devastating disease, and is not curable. No reliable biomarkers of metastatic potential, helpful for early diagnosis of ATC and therapeutic response have been found yet. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) plays a fundamental role in cancer progression by regulating cell stromal cross-talk in the tumor microenvironment. Goals: Our goal was to understand whether TSP-1 could affect protein levels of its integrin receptors (e.g., ITGα3, α6, and β1) and cell morphology in BRAFV600E-ATC cells in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design: Anaplastic thyroid cancer-derived cell cultures and western blotting were used to assess integrin protein expression upon TSP-1 silencing. Immunohistochemistry was performed on orthotopic primary human ATC and metastatic ATC in lung tissue to compare TSP-1 and integrin protein expression levels. Results: TSP-1 knock-down down-regulates ITGα3, α6, and β1 in BRAFV600E-human ATC cells. BRAFV600E-ATC cells with TSP-1 knock-down were rounded compared to control cells, which displayed a spread morphology. TSP-1 knock-down also reduced TSP-1, ITGα3, α6, and β1 protein expression levels in vivo in the ATC microenvironment, which is enriched in stromal and inflammatory cells. Conclusion: TSP-1 silencing causes changes in ITG levels and ATC cell morphology. The assessment of TSP-1 and ITG levels might contribute to earlier metastatic potential of BRAFV600E-positive aggressive thyroid cancers, and allow improved patient selection for clinical trials. PMID:24348463

  11. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  12. New insights into the genetic basis of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gylfe, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer, and the second most common cause of cancer mortality. The aim of this thesis work was to gain novel insight into the molecular mechanisms behind CRC predisposition, as well as tumor progression and development. Microsatellite instability (MSI) arises due to a defective mismatch repair system and is characteristic for a subset of all CRCs. Here, we aimed to identify novel MSI target genes with potential oncogenic effects. We charact...

  13. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinthalapally V Rao; Altaf Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of allcancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressivetreatment. Recently, there have been important advancesin the molecular, pathological and biological understandingof pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recentnew targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeuticcombinations, no treatment option is viable in patients withadvanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to targetprogression of PC is of intense interest. A small populationof pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been foundto be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation,progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recentlyachieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors,including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads tofocus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. Thefocus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention andtreatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salientdevelopments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here,we provide a review of current updates and new insightson the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression withspecial emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathwaysaltered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention andtreatment of PC.

  14. Biophysical insights into cancer transformation and treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří; Foletti, A.; Kobilková, J.; Jandová, Anna; Vrba, J.; Vrba, J. jr.; Nedbalová, M.; Čoček, A.; Danani, A.; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, č. 195028 (2013). ISSN 1537-744X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0649 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : fatty acid * mitochondrial membrane * cancer cell Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.219, year: 2013

  15. Cultures of cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast and radiosensitivity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to test the radiosensitivity of normal skin tissue, the authors cultured cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast, surviving fraction experiment was employed to provide data for understanding of the different radiosensitivity among the cancer patients, Method: cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast were cultured in vitro by the way of tar's attachment, cells were irradiated by graded doses of γ-ray , cell dose response experiment was used to test the radiosensitivity of cell. Result: Cancer patient's skin fibroblast could be propagated and passaged by the method of culture in vitro. Radiosensitivity are different among the various cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblasts

  16. Human periprostatic adipose tissue promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro Ricardo; Monteiro Cátia; Cunha Virgínia; Oliveira Maria; Freitas Mariana; Fraga Avelino; Príncipe Paulo; Lobato Carlos; Lobo Francisco; Morais António; Silva Vítor; Sanches-Magalhães José; Oliveira Jorge; Pina Francisco; Mota-Pinto Anabela

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Obesity is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and mortality. The contribution of periprostatic adipose tissue, which is often infiltrated by malignant cells, to cancer progression is largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to determine if periprostatic adipose tissue is linked with aggressive tumor biology in prostate cancer. Methods Supernatants of whole adipose tissue (explants) or stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from paired fat samples of periprostatic (PP) ...

  17. Detection of infectious organisms in archival prostate cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Yow, Melissa A; Sepehr N. Tabrizi; Severi, Gianluca; Damien M. Bolton; Pedersen, John; Longano, Anthony; Suzanne M. Garland; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Seroepidemiological studies have reported associations between exposure to sexually transmitted organisms and prostate cancer risk. This study sought DNA evidence of candidate organisms in archival prostate cancer tissues with the aim of assessing if a subset of these cancers show any association with common genital infections. Methods 221 archival paraffin-embedded tissue blocks representing 128 histopathologically confirmed prostate cancers comprising 52 “aggressive” (Gleason sco...

  18. Mechanical Characterization of Breast Tissue Constituents for Cancer Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Zaeimdar, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Breast elastography is a method of cancer detection that uses the response of soft tissue to deformations, leading to discovery of abnormalities. The methods of Clinical Breast Examination and Breast Self-Examination are based primarily on stiffness and, hence, on the mechanics of tissue constituents examined by palpation (Goodson, 1996). However, little is known about the mechanical characteristics of breast tissue under compression and the contribution of tissue mechanics to breast cancer d...

  19. The tissue injury and repair in cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the difficulties in cancer radiotherapy arises from the fact that the tissue tolerance dose is much smaller than the tumor lethal dose. In our opinion the former depends upon the tolerance of the endothelial cell of the blood vessel in the normal tissue. In this introduction, a new concept regarding the estimation of tissue radiosensitivity was described, and the possible significance of the mode of radiation injury and the repair capability of normal tissue in the cancer radiotheraphy was discussed. (author)

  20. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie-restriction studies in mouse models that support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link. PMID:26373570

  1. Adiposity in childhood cancer survivors: insights into obesity physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2009-03-01

    As childhood cancer treatment has become more effective, survival rates have improved, and a number of complications have been described while many of these patients reach adulthood. Obesity is a well-recognized late effect, and its metabolic effects may lead to cardiovascular disease. Currently, studies concerning overweight have focused on acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors, since they are at risk for hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation, chemotherapy, and brain surgery) or to primary tumor location. Obesity and cancer have metabolic syndrome features in common. Thus, it remains controversial if overweight is a cause or consequence of cancer, and to date additional mechanisms involving adipose tissue and hypothalamic derangements have been considered, comprising premature adiposity rebound, hyperinsulinemia, leptin regulation, and the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. Overall, further research is still necessary to better understand the relationship between adipogenesis and hypothalamic control deregulation following cancer therapy. PMID:19466212

  2. Thrombospondin-1 silencing down-regulates integrin expression levels in human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells with BRAFV600E: new insights in the host tissue adaptation and homeostasis of tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    CarmeloNucera; PeterM.Sadow; JackLawler

    2013-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is characterized by pleomorphic cells, has a poor prognosis, is highly devastating disease, and is not curable. No reliable biomarkers of metastatic potential, helpful for early diagnosis of ATC and therapeutic response have been found yet. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) plays a fundamental role in cancer progression by regulating cell stromal cross talk in the tumor microenvironment. Goals: Our goal was to understand whether TSP-1 could...

  3. NIH Study Offers Insight into Why Cancer Incidence Increases with Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH study offers insight into why cancer incidence increases with age The accumulation of age-associated changes ... of many types of cancer, but why aging increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA ...

  4. Terahertz imaging diagnostics of cancer tissues with a chemometrics technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sachiko; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Masatsugu; Otani, Chiko; Miyoshi, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopic images of paraffin-embedded cancer tissues have been measured by a terahertz time domain spectrometer. For the systematic identification of cancer tumors, the principal component analysis and the clustering analysis were applied. In three of the four samples, the cancer tissue was recognized as an aggregate of the data points in the principal component plots. By the agglomerative hierarchical clustering, the data points were well categorized into cancer and the other tissues. This method can be also applied to various kinds of automatic discrimination of plural components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging.

  5. Distribution of trace metal concentrations in paired cancerous and non-cancerous human stomach tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Yaman; Gokce Kaya; Hayrettin Yekeler

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether trace metal concentrations (which influence metabolism as both essential and non-essential elements) are increased or decreased in cancerous tissues and to understand the precise role of these metals in carcinogenesis.METHODS: Concentrations of trace metals including Cd,Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mg and Ca in both cancerous and noncancerous stomach tissue samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Tissue samples were digested using microwave energy. Slotted tube atom trap was used to improve the sensitivity of copper and cadmium in flame AAS determinations.RESULTS: From the obtained data in this study,the concentrations of nickel, copper and iron in the cancerous human stomach were found to be significantly higher than those in the non-cancerous tissues, by using t-test for the paired samples. Furthermore, the average calcium concentrations in the cancerous stomach tissue samples were found to be significantly lower than those in the non-cancerous stomach tissue samples by using t-test. Exceedingly high Zn concentrations (207-826 mg/kg) were found in two paired stomach tissue samples from both cancerous and non-cancerous parts.CONCLUSION: In contrast to the literature data for Cu and Fe, the concentrations of copper, iron and nickel in cancerous tissue samples are higher than those in the non-cancerous samples. Furthermore, the Ca levels are lower in cancerous tissue samples than in non-cancerous tissue samples.

  6. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans: Insights into a Rare Soft Tissue Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Barwani, Aliya Sarhan; Taif, Sawsan; Al Mazrouai, Reem Ahmed; Al Muzahmi, Khamis Salim; Alrawi, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare soft tumor which originally represents a cutaneous sarcoma. It grows slowly and presents usually as nodular superficial lesion on the trunk or the extremities. Although these tumors are locally aggressive with high rate of recurrence following surgery; the prognosis is considered excellent when it is effectively treated. The radiological appearance of this tumor has rarely been studied and findings infrequently discussed in the literature probably because many lesions underwent resection before imaging. Although imaging is infrequently performed for this lesion; it can show characteristic features and demonstrate the full extent. Imaging may also play a role in the differentiation of this tumor from more serious soft tissue lesions such as more aggressive sarcomas and hemangioma. In this article, we discuss the imaging findings of DFSP that can aid in its diagnosis and its variable appearances. In addition; the clinical presentation and treatment options are also described with review of the previous literature. PMID:27195182

  7. Cancer of the Soft Tissue including Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site Race / Ethnicity Sex Race / Sex Age at Diagnosis or Death Data ... population who are the same age, race, and sex and who have not been diagnosed with cancer. Because survival statistics are based on large groups of people, they ...

  8. The safety of transplanting cryopreserved ovarian tissue in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mikkel; Greve, Tine; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue from patients with a malignant condition is associated with a risk of re-introduction of the disease as the tissue usually is removed before anti-cancer therapy and may thus contain malignant cells. We review studies investigating the presence of ma...... malignant cells in cryopreserved ovarian tissue from patients with malignant disease and based on the strength of the evidence, recommendations for transplantations are proposed....

  9. Optical transillumination spectroscopy of breast tissue for cancer risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilge, Lothar; Blyschak, Kristina; Simick, Michelle; Jong, Roberta A.

    2003-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women. The lifetime risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer is approximately 1 in 10 thereby the highest out of all cancers. Breast cancer screening programs have been shown to decrease the mortality rates of women between ages 50-69, since cancers are detected at an earlier, more favourable stage. It is apparent that the development of breast cancer is a slow process following initial transformation of the breast tissue. Hence, there has been a strong effort within the research community to understand risk factors for the disease. Risk factors are defined as those characteristics that are more common in people with the disease when compared to the normal population. Quantification of an individual's breast cancer rate may lead that individual to modify her lifestyle and/or diet. Lifestyle changes could lead to a reduction in the incidence of breast cancer. Anatomically, the presence of increased amounts of fibroglandular tissue raises the estimated risk by up to 6 fold (correct for age), hence representing one of the strongest known risk factors pertaining to the entire female population. In this study the relative area of mammographic densities within a mammogram will be used as a global risk assessment tool. It has been shown previously that quantification of water, lipids, haemoglobin and other tissue chromophores of the optically interrogated breast tissue, which also gives rise to the mammographic densities, is feasible through near-infrared spectroscopy. Thus, the hypothesis for this study is that optical transillumination spectroscopy provides consistent and/or complementary information to conventional mammography in quantifying breast tissue density.

  10. Gene expression profiles in liver cancer and normal liver tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Xin Liu; Hong Chi Jiang; An Long Zhu; Jin Zhou; Xiu Qin Wang; Min Wu

    2000-01-01

    AIM To describe a liver cancer = specific gene expression profile and to identify genes that showed alteredexpression between liver cancer tissues and their adjacent nearly normal tissues.METHODS The cDNA probes which were labeled with a-32P dATP were synthesized from total RNA ofliver cancer and adjacent normal tissues and hybridized separately to two identical Atlas human cancer eDNAexpression array membranes containing 588 known genes.RESULTS Autoradiographic results were analyzed by specific Atlas ImageTM (version 1. 0) software.Among the 588 genes analyzed, 18 genes were found up-regulated in cancer, including TFDP2, Aktl, E2F-3etc, and 25 genes were down-regulated in cancer, including TDGF1, BAK, LAR, etc. Expression levels ofgenes that associated with the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, cell-cellinteraction, invasion regulators and eytokines altered mostly.CONCLUSION The result obtained from Atlas microarray provides a comprehensive liver cancer-specificexpression profile. The results can lead to the identification of liver cancer-specific biomarkers and may behelpful in early diagnosis and dentifiction of target genes for designing rational therapeutic strategies.

  11. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, F Philipp; Berry, Janice E; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-05-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target or "trap" for metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:25771021

  12. Lipolytic and thermogenic depletion of adipose tissue in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoli, Maria; Swarbrick, Michael M; Robertson, Graham R

    2016-06-01

    Although muscle wasting is the obvious manifestation of cancer cachexia that impacts on patient quality of life, the loss of lipid reserves and metabolic imbalance in adipose tissue also contribute to the devastating impact of cachexia. Depletion of fat depots in cancer patients is more pronounced than loss of muscle and often precedes, or even occurs in the absence of, reduced lean body mass. Rapid mobilisation of triglycerides stored within adipocytes to supply the body with fatty acids in periods of high-energy demand is normally mediated through a well-defined process of lipolysis involving the lipases ATGL, HSL and MGL. Studies into how these lipases contribute to fat loss in cancer cachexia have revealed the prominent role for ATGL in initiating lipolysis during adipose tissue atrophy, together with links between tumour-derived factors and the signalling pathways that control lipid flux within fat cells. The recent findings of increased thermogenesis in brown fat during cancer cachexia indicate that metabolically active adipose tissue contributes to the imbalance in energy homeostasis involved in catabolic wasting. Such energetically futile use of fatty acids liberated from adipose tissue to generate heat represents a maladaptive response in conjunction with anorexia experienced by cancer patients. As IL-6 release by tumours provokes lipolysis and activates the thermogenic programme in brown fat, this review explores the overlap in dysregulated metabolic processes due to inflammatory mediators in cancer cachexia and other disease states characterised by elevated cytokines such as obesity and diabetes. PMID:26529279

  13. BCCTBbp: the Breast Cancer Campaign Tissue Bank bioinformatics portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, Rosalind J; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gadaleta, Emanuela; Dayem Ullah, Abu Z; Chelala, Claude

    2015-01-01

    BCCTBbp (http://bioinformatics.breastcancertissue bank.org) was initially developed as the data-mining portal of the Breast Cancer Campaign Tissue Bank (BCCTB), a vital resource of breast cancer tissue for researchers to support and promote cutting-edge research. BCCTBbp is dedicated to maximising research on patient tissues by initially storing genomics, methylomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and microRNA data that has been mined from the literature and linking to pathways and mechanisms involved in breast cancer. Currently, the portal holds 146 datasets comprising over 227,795 expression/genomic measurements from various breast tissues (e.g. normal, malignant or benign lesions), cell lines and body fluids. BCCTBbp can be used to build on breast cancer knowledge and maximise the value of existing research. By recording a large number of annotations on samples and studies, and linking to other databases, such as NCBI, Ensembl and Reactome, a wide variety of different investigations can be carried out. Additionally, BCCTBbp has a dedicated analytical layer allowing researchers to further analyse stored datasets. A future important role for BCCTBbp is to make available all data generated on BCCTB tissues thus building a valuable resource of information on the tissues in BCCTB that will save repetition of experiments and expand scientific knowledge. PMID:25332396

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of Metadherin in proliferative and cancerous breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qinghui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metadherin (MTDH has been reported to be associated with cancer progression in various types of human cancers including breast cancer. Whether MTDH contributes to carcinogenesis of breast cancer is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the expression of MTDH in normal, UDH (usual ductal hyperplasia, ADH (atypical ductal hyperplasia, DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer to explore the possible role of MTDH for breast cancer carcinogenesis. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of surgical removed breast samples. Results The immunohistochemical results showed almost no staining in normal tissue, moderate staining in ADH and UDH, intense MTDH stains in DCIS and cancer. Statistical analysis demonstrated significant different MTDH expression between proliferative and cancerous breast lesions (p p = 0.028. In breast cancer, statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between MTDH expression with patients' age (p = 0.042, ER status (p = 0.018 and p53 status (p = 0.001. We also examined the effect of MTDH on cell proliferation in DCIS and cancer, and we found that MTDH overexpression was significantly correlated with high Ki67 index (p = 0.008 and p = 0.036, respectively. Conclusions MTDH overexpression could be identified in proliferative breast lesions and may contribute to breast cancer progression.

  15. Expression of a novel immunoglobulin gene SNC73 in humar cancer and non-cancerous tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Bin Hu; Shu Zheng; Yong-Chuan Deng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of immunoglobulin gene SNC73 in malignant tumors and non-cancerous normal tissues.METHODS: Expression level of SNC73 in tumors and noncancerous tissues from the same patient was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (RT-PCR-ELISA) in 90cases of malignant tumors, including colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and liver cancer. Analysis on the correlation of SNC73 expression with sex, age, site,grade of differentiation, depth of invasion, and metastases in colorectal cancer patients was made.RESULTS: Expression level of SNC73 in non-cancerous colorectal mucosa and colorectal cancerous tissues was 1.234±0.842 and 0.737±0.731, respectively (P<0.01), with the mean ratio of 7.134±14.092 (range, 0.36-59.54).Expression of SNC73 showed no significant difference among gastric cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and liver cancer when compared with non-cancerous tissues (P>0.05). No correlation was found between SNC73 expression level and various clinicopathological factors, including sex, age, site,grade of differentiation, depth of invasion and metastases of CRC patients.CONCLUSION: Down-regulation of SNC73 expression may be a relatively specific phenomenon in colorectal cancer.SNC73 is a potential genetic marker for the carcinongenesis of colorectal cancer. The relationship of SNC73 expression and carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer merits further study.

  16. Distribution of Human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates in Serbia are among the highest in Europe and data on Human papilloma virus (HPV type distribution are scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV types in archival specimens of cervical cancer tissues of women in the Serbian population. A total of 45 paraffin-embedded tissue samples of cervical carcinoma were used in this study. The procedure included deparaffinization of tissue samples, DNA extraction, PCR, gel electrophoresis and HPV genotyping by direct sequencing. HPV was detected in 32 samples (71%. Genotyping revealed the presence of 6 high-risk HPV types 16, 18, 33, 45, 53 and 58, where HPV type 16 was the most prevalent type (73.7%. The results of this study and further studies will provide more detailed information about HPV genotype distribution and may contribute to the formulation of national guidelines for the prevention of cervical cancer. [175073

  17. Limitations of tissue micro array in Duke's B colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Frifeldt, Sanne; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brunner, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    distribution. We selected 61 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks representing patients diagnosed with Dukes B colon cancer. Two 1 mm and two 2 mm cores were taken from both the centre and the invasive front of the tumour respectively. The immunostaining included MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, p53, COX-2, TIMP and Betacatenin....... Twenty-five percent of the cores taken from paraffin blocks less than 0.5 cm was lost and the total loss was 8%. The homogeneous stains (MLH1, MSH2 and PMS2) all showed high agreement between TMA and whole tissue stains (kappa = 0.96,1 and 1 respectively). The COX-2, p53 and Betacatenin illustrated......Tissue micro array (TMA) is widely used in cancer research in search of new predictive and prognostic markers. Colon cancer is known to be heterogeneous and the present study addresses some methodological aspects using cores of different size and analysing markers with different cellular...

  18. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Sørensen, Nanna Møller;

    2005-01-01

    parameters a significant proportion of patients are over-treated. Thus, in order to improve stratification of breast cancer patients, additional prognostic factors need to be identified. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) is one of the promising candidates for new prognostic markers in breast......Whether patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer are offered adjuvant systemic therapy following surgical removal of the tumor is based on prognosis. Prognosis is estimated in every patient using established prognostic variables. Unfortunately, when using the currently available prognostic...... cancer, as a number of studies have demonstrated an association between high tumor-tissue levels of TIMP-1 mRNA as well as TIMP-1 protein and a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. TIMP-1 is a member of the TIMP family, currently comprising four members (TIMP-1-4), and its main function is...

  19. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Babu Rajendra Santosh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific functions, but there is a well-defined interaction mechanism, which mediates between them. Epithelial mesenchymal interactions (EMIs are part of this mechanism, which can be regarded as a biological conversation between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations involved in the cellular differentiation of one or both cell populations. EMIs represent a process that is essential for cell growth, cell differentiation and cell multiplication. EMIs are associated with normal physiological processes in the oral cavity, such as odontogenesis, dentino-enamel junction formation, salivary gland development, palatogenesis, and also pathological processes, such as oral cancer. This paper focuses the role EMIs in odontogenesis, salivary gland development, palatogenesis and oral cancer.

  20. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Norman F.; Lisa J Martin; Bronskill, Michael; Martin J. Yaffe; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associat...

  1. Automated prostate tissue referencing for cancer detection and diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Kajdacsy-Balla, André Alexander; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Background The current practice of histopathology review is limited in speed and accuracy. The current diagnostic paradigm does not fully describe the complex and complicated patterns of cancer. To address these needs, we develop an automated and objective system that facilitates a comprehensive and easy information management and decision-making. We also develop a tissue similarity measure scheme to broaden our understanding of tissue characteristics. Results The system includes a database o...

  2. Tissue Microarray A New Tool for Cancer Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Shanghai Outdo Biotech Co.Ltd. (Outdo Biotech) is a leading company in human/animal Tissue Microarrays (TMA) and "Clinical-Type" Gene Chip (CTGC) in China. Our shareholders are Shanghai Biochip Co., Ltd. & National Engineering Center for Biochip at Shanghai, Shanghai Cancer institute and Eastern Liver and Bladder Hospital of Second Military Medical University. TMA is a mean of combining tens to hundreds of specimens of tissue, paraffin embedded or frozen, onto a single slide for analysis at once. Our constr...

  3. GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues.

  4. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Marchesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic (or tertiary lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC. We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS. B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV. Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  5. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response

  6. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergomas, Francesca [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Laghi, Luigi [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan 20089 (Italy); Marchesi, Federica, E-mail: federica.marchesi@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-28

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21{sup +} follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  7. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  8. Accessory breast tissue in axilla masquerading as breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Shikha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic or accessory breast tissue is most commonly located in the axilla, though it may be present anywhere along the milk line. Development is hormone dependent, similar to normal breast tissue. These lesions do not warrant any intervention unless they produce discomfort, thus their identification and distinction from other breast pathologies, both benign and malignant, is essential. We report a case with locally advanced breast cancer who presented with an ipsilateral axillary mass following surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Subsequent evaluation with excision biopsy showed duct ectasia in axillary breast tissue and the patient was continued on hormone therapy with tamoxifen.

  9. Human periprostatic adipose tissue promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Ricardo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and mortality. The contribution of periprostatic adipose tissue, which is often infiltrated by malignant cells, to cancer progression is largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to determine if periprostatic adipose tissue is linked with aggressive tumor biology in prostate cancer. Methods Supernatants of whole adipose tissue (explants or stromal vascular fraction (SVF from paired fat samples of periprostatic (PP and pre-peritoneal visceral (VIS anatomic origin from different donors were prepared and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs 2 and 9 activity. The effects of those conditioned media (CM on growth and migration of hormone-refractory (PC-3 and hormone-sensitive (LNCaP prostate cancer cells were measured. Results We show here that PP adipose tissue of overweight men has higher MMP9 activity in comparison with normal subjects. The observed increased activities of both MMP2 and MMP9 in PP whole adipose tissue explants, likely reveal the contribution of adipocytes plus stromal-vascular fraction (SVF as opposed to SVF alone. MMP2 activity was higher for PP when compared to VIS adipose tissue. When PC-3 cells were stimulated with CM from PP adipose tissue explants, increased proliferative and migratory capacities were observed, but not in the presence of SVF. Conversely, when LNCaP cells were stimulated with PP explants CM, we found enhanced motility despite the inhibition of proliferation, whereas CM derived from SVF increased both cell proliferation and motility. Explants culture and using adipose tissue of PP origin are most effective in promoting proliferation and migration of PC-3 cells, as respectively compared with SVF culture and using adipose tissue of VIS origin. In LNCaP cells, while explants CM cause increased migration compared to SVF, the use of PP adipose tissue to generate CM result in the increase of both cellular proliferation and migration

  10. Tissue protein fluorescence for cancer diagnosis-a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study deals with the application of fluorescent techniques in the characterization of normal and cancerous cervical tissues by measuring fluorescence emission spectra in the spectral range 300-500 nm at 280 nm excitation and fluorescence excitation spectra in the spectral range 250-320 nm at 340 nm emission

  11. Differences in gene expression in prostate cancer, normal appearing prostate tissue adjacent to cancer and prostate tissue from cancer free organ donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical high throughput microarrays experiments compare gene expression across two specimen classes – an experimental class and baseline (or comparison) class. The choice of specimen classes is a major factor in the differential gene expression patterns revealed by these experiments. In most studies of prostate cancer, histologically malignant tissue is chosen as the experimental class while normal appearing prostate tissue adjacent to the tumor (adjacent normal) is chosen as the baseline against which comparison is made. However, normal appearing prostate tissue from tumor free organ donors represents an alterative source of baseline tissue for differential expression studies. To examine the effect of using donor normal tissue as opposed to adjacent normal tissue as a baseline for prostate cancer expression studies, we compared, using oligonucleotide microarrays, the expression profiles of primary prostate cancer (tumor), adjacent normal tissue and normal tissue from tumor free donors. Statistical analysis using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) demonstrates the presence of unique gene expression profiles for each of these specimen classes. The tumor v donor expression profile was more extensive that the tumor v adjacent normal profile. The differentially expressed gene lists from tumor v donor, tumor v adjacent normal and adjacent normal v donor comparisons were examined to identify regulated genes. When donors were used as the baseline, similar genes are highly regulated in both tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Significantly, both tumor and adjacent normal tissue exhibit significant up regulation of proliferation related genes including transcription factors, signal transducers and growth regulators compared to donor tissue. These genes were not picked up in a direct comparison of tumor and adjacent normal tissues. The up-regulation of these gene types in both tissue types is an unexpected finding and suggests that normal appearing prostate tissue

  12. Genes overexpressed in different human solid cancers exhibit different tissue-specific expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Bock Axelsen, Jacob; Lotem, Joseph; Sachs, Leo; Domany, Eytan

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression in different normal human tissues and different types of solid cancers derived from these tissues. The cancers analyzed include brain (astrocytoma and glioblastoma), breast, colon, endometrium, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, prostate, skin, and thyroid cancers. Comparing gene expression in each normal tissue to 12 other normal tissues, we identified 4,917 tissue-selective genes that were selectively expressed in different normal tissues. We also identified 2,929 ...

  13. Iron and other elements studies in cancerous and non-cancerous prostate tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the role of trace elements in the oxidative stress, which may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, we investigated the distribution and chemical state of Fe using synchrotron radiation. Therefore, both synchrotron radiation induced X-ray emission (SRIXE) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) techniques have been applied to study cancerous and non-cancerous prostate tissues. The results obtained in this work prove that SRIXE and XANES techniques are complementary ones for analysis of trace elements in biomedical samples. The absorption K-edge position of iron determined in cancerous tissue is shifted by 2.9 eV towards higher energies in comparison to iron absorption K-edge determined in non-cancerous tissue. The information obtained in this way may help to understand the role of oxidation state of iron in the oxidative stress underlying the oncogenesis

  14. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:27142790

  15. The Function of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1 in Normal Tissues and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. Walsh, Li Qin, Jean Ching-Yi Tien, Leonie S. Young, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995, the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1 was identified as the first authentic steroid receptor coactivator. Since then, the SRC proteins have remained at the epicenter of coregulator biology, molecular endocrinology and endocrine-related cancer. Cumulative works on SRC-1 have shown that it is primarily a nuclear receptor coregulator and functions to construct highly specific enzymatic protein complexes which can execute efficient and successful transcriptional activation of designated target genes. The versatile nature of SRC-1 enables it to respond to steroid dependent and steroid independent stimulation, allowing it to bind across many families of transcription factors to orchestrate and regulate complex physiological reactions. This review highlights the multiple functions of SRC-1 in the development and maintenance of normal tissue functions as well as its major role in mediating hormone receptor responsiveness. Insights from genetically manipulated mouse models and clinical data suggest SRC-1 is significantly overexpressed in many cancers, in particular, cancers of the reproductive tissues. SRC-1 has been associated with cellular proliferation and tumor growth but its major tumorigenic contributions are promotion and execution of breast cancer metastasis and mediation of resistance to endocrine therapies. The ability of SRC-1 to coordinate multiple signaling pathways makes it an important player in tumor cells' escape of targeted therapy.

  16. New insights into centrosome imaging in Drosophila and mouse neuroepithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujano, Maria A; Basto, Renata; Marthiens, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome is the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells. It participates in the assembly of a bipolar spindle that ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes during mitosis. Recently, mutations in centrosome genes have been identified in patients affected by neurodevelopmental disorders. In fact, the etiology of several neurodevelopmental pathologies seems to be linked to defects in the assembly of the mitotic spindle in the neural stem cell compartment during neurogenesis. Therefore, getting better insights into the structure and function/dysfunction of the mitotic spindle apparatus in an intact tissue environment is of utmost importance. However, imaging nanometer-scale structures like centrosomes and microtubule bundles within the depth of a tissue is still challenging. Here we describe two procedures to acquire high-resolution images on fixed tissues and to perform live imaging of microtubule-based structures in the neuroepithelia of the Drosophila brain and of the mouse neocortex. We take advantage of the accumulation of centrosomes and mitotic figures at the apical surface of these polarized tissues to improve the quality of staining and imaging. Both Drosophila and mouse models with centrosome dysfunction showed abnormalities in the neuroepithelium reminiscent of the ones described in brains of human patients. These observations have highlighted their value as model organisms to study the etiology of human neurodevelopmental pathologies. PMID:26175441

  17. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José; Gromova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis, ...... translation of basic discoveries into the daily breast cancer clinical practice. In particular, we address major issues in experimental design by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of current proteomic strategies in the context of the analysis of human breast tissue specimens....

  18. A role of active brown adipose tissue in cancer cachexia?

    OpenAIRE

    Emiel Beijer; Janna Schoenmakers; Guy Vijgen; Fons Kessels; Anne-Marie Dingemans; Patrick Schrauwen; Miel Wouters; Wouter van Marken Lichtenbelt; Jaap Teule; Boudewijn Brans

    2012-01-01

    Until a few years ago, adult humans were not thought to have brown adipose tissue (BAT). Now, this is a rapidly evolving field of research with perspectives in metabolic syndromes such as obesity and new therapies targeting its bio-energetic pathways. White, brown and socalled brite adipose fat seem to be able to trans-differentiate into each other, emphasizing the dynamic nature of fat tissue for metabolism. Human and animal data in cancer cachexia to date provide some evidence for BAT activ...

  19. An informatics model for tissue banks – Lessons learned from the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamed Jonathan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in molecular biology and growing requirements from biomarker validation studies have generated a need for tissue banks to provide quality-controlled tissue samples with standardized clinical annotation. The NCI Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR is a distributed tissue bank that comprises four academic centers and provides thousands of clinically annotated prostate cancer specimens to researchers. Here we describe the CPCTR information management system architecture, common data element (CDE development, query interfaces, data curation, and quality control. Methods Data managers review the medical records to collect and continuously update information for the 145 clinical, pathological and inventorial CDEs that the Resource maintains for each case. An Access-based data entry tool provides de-identification and a standard communication mechanism between each group and a central CPCTR database. Standardized automated quality control audits have been implemented. Centrally, an Oracle database has web interfaces allowing multiple user-types, including the general public, to mine de-identified information from all of the sites with three levels of specificity and granularity as well as to request tissues through a formal letter of intent. Results Since July 2003, CPCTR has offered over 6,000 cases (38,000 blocks of highly characterized prostate cancer biospecimens, including several tissue microarrays (TMA. The Resource developed a website with interfaces for the general public as well as researchers and internal members. These user groups have utilized the web-tools for public query of summary data on the cases that were available, to prepare requests, and to receive tissues. As of December 2005, the Resource received over 130 tissue requests, of which 45 have been reviewed, approved and filled. Additionally, the Resource implemented the TMA Data Exchange Specification in its TMA program and created a

  20. A role of active brown adipose tissue in cancer cachexia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiel Beijer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Until a few years ago, adult humans were not thought to have brown adipose tissue (BAT. Now, this is a rapidly evolving field of research with perspectives in metabolic syndromes such as obesity and new therapies targeting its bio-energetic pathways. White, brown and socalled brite adipose fat seem to be able to trans-differentiate into each other, emphasizing the dynamic nature of fat tissue for metabolism. Human and animal data in cancer cachexia to date provide some evidence for BAT activation, but its quantitative impact on energy expenditure and weight loss is controversial. Prospective clinical studies can address the potential role of BAT in cancer cachexia using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanning, with careful consideration of co-factors such as diet, exposure to the cold, physical activity and body mass index, that all seem to act on BAT recruitment and activity.

  1. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. New insights into pancreatic cancer-induced paraneoplastic diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Nagpal, Sajan Jiv Singh; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chari, Suresh T.

    2013-01-01

    Up to 85% of patients with pancreatic cancer have diabetes or hyperglycaemia, which frequently manifests as early as 2–3 years before a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Conversely, patients with new-onset diabetes have a 5–8-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 1–3 years of developing diabetes. Emerging evidence now indicates that pancreatic cancer causes diabetes. As in type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are seen in pancreatic...

  3. Latest insights into the risk of cancer in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Noto, Hiroshi; Goto, Atsushi; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Osame, Keiichiro; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A growing body of evidence from observational studies and meta‐analyses of the data suggest that diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cancer. Meta‐analyses have shown that diabetes increases the risks of total cancer, and of site‐specific cancers of the breast, endometrium, bladder, liver, colorectum and pancreas, and that it decreases the risk of prostate cancer. Insulin resistance and secondary hyperinsulinemia is the most frequently proposed hypothesis, and hy...

  4. Detection and Localization of Pre-Cancerous Lesions and Early Lung Cancer Using Tissue Autofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jaclyn Yip-Chan

    In this work, two different yet related hypotheses were tested by experimental means as follows: (i) pre-cancerous and non-invasive (early) lung cancer can be detected and localized using the fluorescence properties of tumour localizing drugs at non-photosensitizing doses to skin tissue; (ii) significant differences exist in laser-induced autofluorescence between normal, pre-cancerous and cancerous tissues such that these differences alone can be exploited to detect and delineate early lung cancer without using exogenous drug(s). Exogenous fluorescent tumour markers such as hematoporphyrin derivatives (e.g. Photofrin) have been used to enhance to detection of occult lung lesions. Photofrin is preferentially retained in tumor tissues compared to the surrounding normal tissues; it fluoresces at 630 nm and 690 nm when excited at -405 nm. Based on this principle several imaging and non-imaging devices have been developed. However, wider clinical applications were limited due to the skin photosensitivity property of Photofrin. We have postulated that this could be solved by employing a much lower dose of Photofrin (0.25 mg/kg) which was believed to be less photosensitizing to human patients. This postulate was experimentally tested by ratio fluorometry and early lung cancers were detected with no false negative results and no apparent skin photosensitivity. An important finding in this study was that the mechanism for detection of early cancer was mainly due to the differences in the green autofluorescence between normal and malignant tissues, rather than fluorescence of tumour localizing drug. This discovery led to the second postulate of this thesis that tissue autofluorescence alone can be exploited for the detection of early lung cancer. The results indicated that algorithm(s) could be developed to clearly delineate early lesions from the normal tissues. Several algorithms were then tested using a non-imaging ratio fluorometer device and a prototype imaging

  5. Heterogeneous response of adipose tissue to cancer cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Bertevello

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia causes disruption of lipid metabolism. Since it has been well established that the various adipose tissue depots demonstrate different responses to stimuli, we assessed the effect of cachexia on some biochemical and morphological parameters of adipocytes obtained from the mesenteric (MES, retroperitoneal (RPAT, and epididymal (EAT adipose tissues of rats bearing Walker 256 carcinosarcoma, compared with controls. Relative weight and total fat content of tissues did not differ between tumor-bearing rats and controls, but fatty acid composition was modified by cachexia. Adipocyte dimensions were increased in MES and RPAT from tumor-bearing rats, but not in EAT, in relation to control. Ultrastructural alterations were observed in the adipocytes of tumor-bearing rat RPAT (membrane projections and EAT (nuclear bodies.

  6. The presence of bacteria within tissue provides insights into the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yunji; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Baek, Keum Jin; Alam, Jehan; Park, Hee Kyung; Choi, Youngnim

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic T cell-mediated mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiopathogenesis. Although various antigens have been considered, what actually triggers the inflammatory response of T cells is unknown. In the present study, we propose that intracellular bacteria present within tissues trigger T cell infiltration and provide target antigens. Sections of OLP (n = 36) and normal (n = 10) oral mucosal tissues were subjected to in situ hybridization using a universal probe targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and immunohistochemistry with anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, and anti-macrophage-specific antibodies. Bacteria were abundant throughout the epithelium and the lamina propria of OLP tissues, which exhibited positive correlations with the levels of infiltrated CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) cells. Furthermore, bacteria were detected within the infiltrated T cells. Pyrosequencing analysis of the mucosal microbiota from OLP patients (n = 13) and control subjects (n = 11) revealed a decrease in Streptococcus and increases in gingivitis/periodontitis-associated bacteria in OLP lesions. Using the selected bacterial species, we demonstrated that certain oral bacteria damage the epithelial physical barrier, are internalized into epithelial cells or T cells, and induce production of T cell chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5. Our findings provide insights into the pathogenesis of OLP. PMID:27383402

  7. Robust multi-tissue gene panel for cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talantov Dmitri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified a set of genes whose relative mRNA expression levels in various solid tumors can be used to robustly distinguish cancer from matching normal tissue. Our current feature set consists of 113 gene probes for 104 unique genes, originally identified as differentially expressed in solid primary tumors in microarray data on Affymetrix HG-U133A platform in five tissue types: breast, colon, lung, prostate and ovary. For each dataset, we first identified a set of genes significantly differentially expressed in tumor vs. normal tissue at p-value = 0.05 using an experimentally derived error model. Our common cancer gene panel is the intersection of these sets of significantly dysregulated genes and can distinguish tumors from normal tissue on all these five tissue types. Methods Frozen tumor specimens were obtained from two commercial vendors Clinomics (Pittsfield, MA and Asterand (Detroit, MI. Biotinylated targets were prepared using published methods (Affymetrix, CA and hybridized to Affymetrix U133A GeneChips (Affymetrix, CA. Expression values for each gene were calculated using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis software MAS 5.0. We then used a software package called Genes@Work for differential expression discovery, and SVM light linear kernel for building classification models. Results We validate the predictability of this gene list on several publicly available data sets generated on the same platform. Of note, when analysing the lung cancer data set of Spira et al, using an SVM linear kernel classifier, our gene panel had 94.7% leave-one-out accuracy compared to 87.8% using the gene panel in the original paper. In addition, we performed high-throughput validation on the Dana Farber Cancer Institute GCOD database and several GEO datasets. Conclusions Our result showed the potential for this panel as a robust classification tool for multiple tumor types on the Affymetrix platform, as well as other whole genome arrays

  8. Insights from Epidemiology into Dichloromethane and Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Siegel Scott

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dichloromethane (methylene chloride is a widely used chlorinated solvent. We review the available epidemiology studies (five cohort studies, 13 case-control studies, including seven of hematopoietic cancers, focusing on specific cancer sites. There was little indication of an increased risk of lung cancer in the cohort studies (standardized mortality ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.21. These cohorts are relatively small, and variable effects (e.g., point estimates ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 were seen for the rarer forms of cancers such as brain cancer and specific hematopoietic cancers. Three large population-based case-control studies of incident non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Europe and the United States observed odds ratios between 1.5 and 2.2 with dichloromethane exposure (ever exposed or highest category of exposure, with higher risk seen in specific subsets of disease. More limited indications of associations with brain cancer, breast cancer, and liver and biliary cancer were also seen in this collection of studies. Existing cohort studies, given their size and uneven exposure information, are unlikely to resolve questions of cancer risks and dichloromethane exposure. More promising approaches are population-based case-control studies of incident disease, and the combination of data from such studies, with robust exposure assessments that include detailed occupational information and exposure assignment based on industry-wide surveys or direct exposure measurements.

  9. The first insight into the tissue specific taxus transcriptome via Illumina second generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Cheng Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Illumina second generation sequencing is now an efficient route for generating enormous sequence collections that represent expressed genes and quantitate expression level. Taxus is a world-wide endangered gymnosperm genus and forms an important anti-cancer medicinal resource, but the large and complex genomes of Taxus have hindered the development of genomic resources. The research of its tissue-specific transcriptome is absent. There is also no study concerning the association between the plant transcriptome and metabolome with respect to the plant tissue type. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the de novo assembly of Taxus mairei transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In a single run, we produced 13,737,528 sequencing reads corresponding to 2.03 Gb total nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 36,493 unique sequences. Based on similarity search with known proteins, 23,515 Unigenes were identified to have the Blast hit with a cut-off E-value above 10⁻⁵. Furthermore, we investigated the transcriptome difference of three Taxus tissues using a tag-based digital gene expression system. We obtained a sequencing depth of over 3.15 million tags per sample and identified a large number of genes associated with tissue specific functions and taxane biosynthetic pathway. The expression of the taxane biosynthetic genes is significantly higher in the root than in the leaf and the stem, while high activity of taxane-producing pathway in the root was also revealed via metabolomic analyses. Moreover, many antisense transcripts and novel transcripts were found; clusters with similar differential expression patterns, enriched GO terms and enriched metabolic pathways with regard to the differentially expressed genes were revealed for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provides the most comprehensive sequence resource available for Taxus study and will help define mechanisms of tissue

  10. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although it...

  11. MicroRNAs and Recent Insights into Pediatric Ovarian Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Anne Crawford

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most common pediatric gynecologic malignancy. When diag-nosed in children, ovarian cancers present unique challenges that differ dramatically from those faced by adults. Here, we review the spectrum of ovarian cancers found in young women and girls and discuss the biology of these diseases. A number of advances have re-cently shed significant new understanding on the potential causes of ovarian cancer in this unique population. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how altered expression of non-coding RNA transcripts known as microRNAs play a key role in the etiology of ovarian germ cell and sex cord-stromal tumors. Emerging transgenic models for these diseases are also reviewed. Lastly, future challenges and opportunities for understanding pediatric ovarian cancers, delineating clinically useful biomarkers and developing targeted therapies are discussed.

  12. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parisha; Bhatia; Koji; Tsumagari; Zakaria; Y; Abd; Elmageed; Paul; Friedlander; Joseph; F; Buell; Emad; Kandil

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  13. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies

  14. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana, E-mail: luciana.dini@unisalento.it [Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Technology (Di.S.Te.B.A.), University of Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2013-03-21

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies.

  15. Mechanisms of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activation in Cancer Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kataoka, Hiroaki, E-mail: mejina@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Section of Oncopathology and Regenerative Biology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) plays critical roles in cancer progression through its specific receptor, MET. HGF/SF is usually synthesized and secreted as an inactive proform (pro-HGF/SF) by stromal cells, such as fibroblasts. Several serine proteases are reported to convert pro-HGF/SF to mature HGF/SF and among these, HGF activator (HGFA) and matriptase are the most potent activators. Increased activities of both proteases have been observed in various cancers. HGFA is synthesized mainly by the liver and secreted as an inactive pro-form. In cancer tissues, pro-HGFA is likely activated by thrombin and/or human kallikrein 1-related peptidase (KLK)-4 and KLK-5. Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed by most epithelial cells and is also synthesized as an inactive zymogen. Matriptase activation is likely to be mediated by autoactivation or by other trypsin-like proteases. Recent studies revealed that matriptase autoactivation is promoted by an acidic environment. Given the mildly acidic extracellular environment of solid tumors, matriptase activation may, thus, be accelerated in the tumor microenvironment. HGFA and matriptase activities are regulated by HGFA inhibitor (HAI)-1 (HAI-1) and/or HAI-2 in the pericellular microenvironment. HAIs may have an important role in cancer cell biology by regulating HGF/SF-activating proteases.

  16. Mechanisms of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activation in Cancer Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) plays critical roles in cancer progression through its specific receptor, MET. HGF/SF is usually synthesized and secreted as an inactive proform (pro-HGF/SF) by stromal cells, such as fibroblasts. Several serine proteases are reported to convert pro-HGF/SF to mature HGF/SF and among these, HGF activator (HGFA) and matriptase are the most potent activators. Increased activities of both proteases have been observed in various cancers. HGFA is synthesized mainly by the liver and secreted as an inactive pro-form. In cancer tissues, pro-HGFA is likely activated by thrombin and/or human kallikrein 1-related peptidase (KLK)-4 and KLK-5. Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed by most epithelial cells and is also synthesized as an inactive zymogen. Matriptase activation is likely to be mediated by autoactivation or by other trypsin-like proteases. Recent studies revealed that matriptase autoactivation is promoted by an acidic environment. Given the mildly acidic extracellular environment of solid tumors, matriptase activation may, thus, be accelerated in the tumor microenvironment. HGFA and matriptase activities are regulated by HGFA inhibitor (HAI)-1 (HAI-1) and/or HAI-2 in the pericellular microenvironment. HAIs may have an important role in cancer cell biology by regulating HGF/SF-activating proteases

  17. A new insight into cancer stem cell markers: Could local and circulating cancer stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Alireza; Tavoosidana, Gholamreza; Rad, Afshin Abdi; Rezaei, Farhad; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Kadijani, Azade Amini; Khalili, Ehsan; Madjd, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) markers could serve as potential prognostic procedure. This study is aimed to investigate the local expression of doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) and Lgr5 in colorectal cancer tissues (CRC) at both protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level, followed by providing a comparison of the local and circulating expression pattern of these markers, based on our present and previous study. The mRNA expression level of DCLK1 and Lgr5 was evaluated using comparative real-time PCR method applying 58 fresh tumor tissues and their correspondent normal margins. Immunohistochemistry was applied to analyze the protein expression level of DCLK1 and Lgr5 in paraffin-embedded CRC tissues. The correlation of DCLK1 and Lgr5 expression pattern with clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. A higher mRNA expression level of DCLK1 (3.28-fold change, p < 0.001) and Lgr5 (2.29-fold change, p < 0.001) was observed in CRC fresh tissues compared to the normal adjacent margins, and the expression level was higher in patients with higher grade and stages of disease and patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The protein expression level of DCLK1 and Lgr5 was also increased significantly in tumor tissues compared to normal colon tissues which were positively correlated to tumor stage and grade and neoadjuvant CRT. Taken together, the results of protein analysis were in accordance with mRNA assessment. The local expression pattern of DCLK1 and Lgr5 was also in accordance with their expression level in circulation. However, some minor inconsistencies were observed which may be attributed to several factors including the possible effect of CRT on CSC reprogramming. PMID:26383518

  18. Electrical impedance characterization of normal and cancerous human hepatic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four-electrode method was used to measure the ex vivo complex electrical impedance of tissues from 14 hepatic tumors and the surrounding normal liver from six patients. Measurements were done in the frequency range 1–400 kHz. It was found that the conductivity of the tumor tissue was much higher than that of the normal liver tissue in this frequency range (from 0.14 ± 0.06 S m−1 versus 0.03 ± 0.01 S m−1 at 1 kHz to 0.25 ± 0.06 S m−1 versus 0.15 ± 0.03 S m−1 at 400 kHz). The Cole–Cole models were estimated from the experimental data and the four parameters (ρ0, ρ∞, α, fc) were obtained using a least-squares fit algorithm. The Cole–Cole parameters for the cancerous and normal liver are 9 ± 4 Ω m−1, 2.2 ± 0.7 Ω m−1, 0.5 ± 0.2, 140 ± 103 kHz and 50 ± 28 Ω m−1, 3.2 ± 0.6 Ω m−1, 0.64 ± 0.04, 10 ± 7 kHz, respectively. These data can contribute to developing bioelectric applications for tissue diagnostics and in tissue treatment planning with electrical fields such as radiofrequency tissue ablation, electrochemotherapy and gene therapy with reversible electroporation, nanoscale pulsing and irreversible electroporation

  19. ADVANTAGES AND APPLICATIONS OF TISSUE MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY ON CANCER RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张喜平; 苏丹; 程琪辉

    2003-01-01

    S To provide evidences for exploiting tissue microarray (TMA) technology, we reviewed advantages and applications of TMA on tumor research. TMA has many advantages, including (1) section from TMA blocks can be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of up to 1,000 different tumors at DNA, RNA or protein level; (2) TMA is highly representative of their donor tissues; (3) TMA can improve conservation of tissue resources and experimental reagents, improve internal experimental control, and increase sample numbers per experiment, and can be used for large-scale, massively parallel in situ analysis; (4) TMA facilitates rapid translation of molecular discoveries to clinical applications. TMA has been applied to tumor research, such as glioma, breast tumor, lung cancer and so on. The development of novel biochip technologies has opened up new possibilities for the high-throughput molecular profiling of human tumors. Novel molecular markers emerging from high-throughput expression surveys could be analyzed on tumor TMA. It is anticipated that TMA, a new member of biochip, will soon become a widely used tool for all types of tissue-based research. TMA will lead to a significant acceleration of the transition of basic research findings into clinical applications.

  20. Trace elements in digestive cancer tissue by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental composition study of digestive cancer tissue with different localizations (esophagus, stomach, colon), by using PIXE analysis, is presented. A number of 20 tumors and normal (control) tissue samples was analyzed. Thin targets were prepared by mineralization with nitric acid of the lyophilized tissue and dropping on 2 μm Mylar foil. The measurements were carried out in vacuum using 3 MeV protons delivered by the Tandem Accelerator in Bucharest, Romania. The following elements were determined: S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Although the results show relatively large variations from a sample to another, there were obtained mean ratios of tumor/normal concentrations which are significantly greater than one, in the limit of the standard deviation, for the following elements: K(1.45 ± 0.28), Ca(1.30 ± 0.21), Cr(2.33 ± 0.56), and Zn(1.18 ± 0.15). For other elements determined, no significant difference between the tumor and normal tissues , in the limit of the present standard deviation, was found. (authors)

  1. NIH scientists provide new insight into rare kidney cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIH scientists have discovered a unique feature of a rare, hereditary form of kidney cancer that may provide a better understanding of its progression and metastasis, possibly laying the foundation for the development of new targeted therapies.

  2. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicabil- ity of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. We propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  3. Pesticides and cancer: insights into toxicoproteomic-based findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jasmine; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2011-11-18

    Humans are often exposed to a variety of pollutants that contribute to an individual's risk for diseases including cancer. Animal, cell cultures and epidemiological lines of evidence demonstrate that exposure to various environmental pollutants including pesticides are associated with increasing frequency of cancers. Organophosphates, organochlorines, carbamates, pyrethroids, the major groups of pesticides, have been reported to be carcinogenic in various models. However, the results of these studies are still controversial, nevertheless, their mechanism of action is clear. Therefore, new strategies in toxicological research are needed for efficient screening for adverse effects of pesticides on complex living systems. Biomarkers can be employed to identify causal associations and to make better quantitative and qualitative estimates of those associations at relevant levels of exposure. This will enable us to deepen our understanding of mechanism behind their carcinogenic potential. Deciphering the associations between pesticide exposure and cancer, following toxicoproteomics application, will be useful in the development of potential predictive biomarkers of pesticide induced carcinogenicity. Therefore, the thrust of this article was to review the risk of cancer due to pesticide exposure and significant toxicoproteomic-based studies conducted so far, to identify the novel molecules as possible biomarkers for cancer following pesticide exposure. PMID:21989265

  4. Insights into the key roles of proteoglycans in breast cancer biology and translational medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Neill, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans control numerous normal and pathological processes, among which are morphogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, vascularization and cancer metastasis. During tumor development and growth, proteoglycan expression is markedly modified in the tumor microenvironment. Altered expression of...... proteoglycans on tumor and stromal cell membranes affects cancer cell signaling, growth and survival, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. Despite the high complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the rapid evolution in our knowledge that proteoglycans are among the key players in the breast tumor...

  5. Clinical and molecular insights into primary pediatric liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Weeda, V.B.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to give insight into the clinical status quo of primary pediatric liver tumors and investigate signaling pathways that may be of importance for liver tumorigenesis. The most recent series of the International Childhood Liver Tumors Strategy Group (SIOPEL) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its distinct variant fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) are discussed. For both tumors, complete resection is at present the only curative option. FL-HCC does not have a bet...

  6. The significance of nuclear ER in the assessment of ER status of breast cancer and ovarian cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance of estrogen receptor in cell nucleus in the assessment of the ER status of patients with breast cancer and ovarian cancer was assessed 151 breast cancer tissues and 124 ovarian cancer tissues were analyzed for their EcR and EnR using radioligand binding assay (RBA). In 36.42% of the breast cancer tissues, both EcR and EnR were positive. This rate was significantly lower than that of tissues with positive EcR alone (55.63%). In the ovarian cancer tissues, the rate of both EcR and EnR position (34.68%) was also significantly lower than that of EcR positive alone (51.61%). Only 65.48% of EcR-positive breast cancer tissues and 67.19% EcR-positive ovarian cancer tissues were accompanied by EnR positive. To assess the ER status of breast cancer or ovarian cancer, it is important to analyse not only EcR but also EnR

  7. Genomic insights into a contagious cancer in Tasmanian devils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueber, Catherine E; Peel, Emma; Gooley, Rebecca; Belov, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    The Tasmanian devil faces extinction due to a contagious cancer. Genetic and genomic technologies revealed that the disease arose in a Schwann cell of a female devil. Instead of dying with the original host, the tumour was passed from animal to animal, slipping under the radar of the immune system. Studying the genomes of the devil and the cancer has driven our understanding of this unique disease. From characterising immune genes and immune responses to studying tumour evolution, we have begun to uncover how a cancer can be 'caught' and are using genomic data to manage an insurance population of disease-free devils for the long-term survival of the species. PMID:26027792

  8. Histamine H4 receptor: insights into a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Rivera, Elena S; Medina, Vanina A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide, and the leading cause of cancer death in women. Several studies underlined the critical role of histamine in breast cancer development and progression. This review addresses the latest evidence regarding the involvement of histamine and histamine receptors in breast cancer, focusing particularly in the histamine H4 receptor (H4R). Histamine concentration in breast cancer tissues was found to be higher than that in normal tissues of healthy controls by means of an increase in the activity of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the enzyme involved in histamine production. The expression of H4R in different experimental models and human biopsies, the associated biological responses, as well as the in vivo treatment of experimental tumors with H4R ligands is reviewed. Evidence demonstrates that the H4R exhibits a key role in histamine-mediated biological processes such as cell proliferation, senescence and apoptosis in breast cancer. The polymorphisms of the H4R and HDC genes and their association with breast cancer risk and malignancy reinforce the critical (patho)physiological role of H4R in breast cancer. In addition, H4R agonists display anti-tumor effects in vivo in a triple negative breast cancer model. The findings support the exploitation of the H4R as a molecular target for breast cancer drug development. PMID:25961682

  9. Cancer tissue engineering - new perspectives in understanding the biology of solid tumours - a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, C.; Moroni, L.; Danti, S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding cancer biology is a major challenge of this century. The recent insight about carcinogenesis mechanisms, including the role exerted by the tumour microenvironment and cancer stem cells in chemoresistance, relapse and metastases, has made it self-evident that only new cancer models, wit

  10. New insights into calcium, dairy and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter R Holt

    2008-01-01

    This paper is to review recent information about the relationship of calcium and dairy foods to colon cancer.The review focuses on primary prevention, discusses the potential components in dairy foods that might be anti-neoplastic, reviews the epidemiologic information and describes intervention studies demonstrating efficacy of calcium and vitamin D in reducing colorectal polyp recurrence. Since vitamin D is important in cancer prevention, pertinent data is discussed and potential mechanisms of actions presented. Calcium and vitamin D are important agents for the primary prevention of colorectal neoplasia.

  11. Waves of ratcheting cancer cells in growing tumor tissue layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Taeseok; Kwon, Tae; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung; CenterCell Dynamics Team

    2015-03-01

    Over many years researchers have shown that the mechanical forces generated by, and acting on, tissues influence the way they grow, develop and migrate. As for cancer research goes, understanding the role of these forces may even be as influential as deciphering the relevant genetic and molecular basis. Often the key issues in the field of cancer mechanics are to understand the interplay of mechanics and chemistry. In this study, we discuss very intriguing population density waves observed in slowly proliferating of tumor cell layers. The temporal periods are around 4 hr and their wavelength is in the order of 1 mm. Tumor cell layer, which is initially plated in a small disk area, expands as a band of tumor cells is ``ratcheting'' in concert in radially outward direction. By adding Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, or Mytomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, we could halt and modulate the wave activities reversibly. The observed waves are visually quite similar to those of chemotaxing dictyostelium discodium amoeba population, which are driven by nonlinear chemical reaction-diffusion waves of cAMP. So far, we have not been able to show any relevant chemo-attractants inducing the collective behavior of these tumor cells. Researchers have been investigating how forces from both within and outside developing cancer cells interact in intricate feedback loops. This work reports the example of periodic density waves of tumor cells with an explanation purely based on nonlinear mechanics.

  12. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane;

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  13. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  14. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways

  15. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Daidone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC. BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+, have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  16. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia, E-mail: mariagrazia.daidone@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Amadeo 42, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2011-03-16

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup −/low} and/or CD133{sup +} expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1{sup +}), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  17. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation

  18. Folate receptor and Ki-67 nucleoprotein expressions in cervical cancer tissue and their correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Yan; Feng Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To detect the expression of both FR-α protein and ki-67 in cervical cancer tissues, and discuss the relationship between them and clinical significance.Methods:Using immunohistochemical method test normal cervical tissue and cervical cancer tissue before FR-α protein expression and the expression of Ki-67.Results:FR- protein expression in normal cervical tissues was positive for 7.0% while in cervical cancer tissue the positive rate was 82.1%. The difference was statistically significant. Ki-67 protein expression in normal cervical tissues was 0% while in cervical cancer tissue the positive rate was 80.2%. The difference was statistically significant. The two protein expression in cervical cancer stageⅠ,Ⅱ and stageⅢ were different, but the difference was not statistically significant. In cervical cancer tissues, both the two protein were positively correlated. There are correlations between them. Difference was statistically significant.Conclusion:FR-α elevated protein expression is involved in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. FR-α protein expression in cervical cancer and precancerous tissue has correlation with Ki-67, FR-α protein maybe participate in the occurrence and development of the cell proliferation in cervical cancer.

  19. A minimum spanning forest based hyperspectral image classification method for cancerous tissue detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Robert; Patton, Samuel K.; Lu, Guolan; Halig, Luma V.; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a developing modality for cancer detection. The rich information associated with hyperspectral images allow for the examination between cancerous and healthy tissue. This study focuses on a new method that incorporates support vector machines into a minimum spanning forest algorithm for differentiating cancerous tissue from normal tissue. Spectral information was gathered to test the algorithm. Animal experiments were performed and hyperspectral images were acquired from tumor-bearing mice. In vivo imaging experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed classification method for cancer tissue classification on hyperspectral images.

  20. Integrated analysis of copy number variation and genome-wide expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Zarina Ali Hassan

    Full Text Available Integrative analyses of multiple genomic datasets for selected samples can provide better insight into the overall data and can enhance our knowledge of cancer. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between copy number variation (CNV and gene expression in colorectal cancer (CRC samples and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Sixty-four paired CRC samples from the same patients were subjected to CNV profiling using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad assay, and validation was performed using multiplex ligation probe amplification method. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed on 15 paired samples from the same group of patients using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Significant genes obtained from both array results were then overlapped. To identify molecular pathways, the data were mapped to the KEGG database. Whole genome CNV analysis that compared primary tumor and non-cancerous epithelium revealed gains in 1638 genes and losses in 36 genes. Significant gains were mostly found in chromosome 20 at position 20q12 with a frequency of 45.31% in tumor samples. Examples of genes that were associated at this cytoband were PTPRT, EMILIN3 and CHD6. The highest number of losses was detected at chromosome 8, position 8p23.2 with 17.19% occurrence in all tumor samples. Among the genes found at this cytoband were CSMD1 and DLC1. Genome-wide expression profiling showed 709 genes to be up-regulated and 699 genes to be down-regulated in CRC compared to non-cancerous samples. Integration of these two datasets identified 56 overlapping genes, which were located in chromosomes 8, 20 and 22. MLPA confirmed that the CRC samples had the highest gains in chromosome 20 compared to the reference samples. Interpretation of the CNV data in the context of the transcriptome via integrative analyses may provide more in-depth knowledge of the genomic landscape of CRC.

  1. Cancerous 'floater': a lesson learned about tissue identity testing, endometrial cancer and microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Veerle; Buza, Natalia; Ngo, Nhu T; Much, Melissa A; Asis, Maria C; Schwartz, Peter E; Hui, Pei

    2013-09-01

    A 46-year-old woman presented with endometrial cells on a pap smear and underwent endometrial curettage. The specimen revealed secretory endometrium and a possible endometrial polyp. In addition, a single 4 mm fragment of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma was found. Tissue identity DNA genotyping was performed and the adenocarcinoma tissue fragment showed a drastically different allelic pattern from that of the background endometrium. To confirm tissue contamination, genotyping of three other tumor specimens-probable sources for a contaminant-was performed but failed to identify a match. Without confirmation of contamination, a second endometrial curettage was obtained from the patient, in which similar adenocarcinoma tissue was once again found. Further workup demonstrated that the patient had a microsatellite unstable (MSI) endometrial adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry and molecular testing. The patient subsequently underwent staging surgery, which revealed an early-stage, well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma. This case study illustrates an uncommon, yet important caveat of tissue identity testing by DNA genotyping, where MSI instability can significantly alter the allelic pattern of DNA polymorphisms in the tumor genome, leading to erroneous conclusion regarding the tissue identity. Awareness of this phenomenon is crucial for a molecular pathologist to avoid interpretation errors of tissue identity testing in a cancer diagnostic workup. PMID:23558568

  2. Nutrition support and dietary interventions for patients with lung cancer: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss N

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicole Kiss1,2 1Nutrition and Speech Pathology Department, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Cancer Experiences Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Malnutrition and weight loss are prevalent in patients with lung cancer. The impact of malnutrition on patients with cancer, and specifically in patients with lung cancer, has been demonstrated in a large number of studies. Malnutrition has been shown to negatively affect treatment completion, survival, quality of life, physical function, and health care costs. Emerging evidence is providing some insight into which lung cancer patients are at higher nutritional risk. In lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, stage III or more disease, treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and the extent of radiotherapy delivered to the esophagus appear to confer a higher risk of weight loss during and post-treatment. Studies investigating nutrition interventions for lung cancer patients have examined intensive dietary counseling, supplementation with fish oils, and interdisciplinary models of nutrition and exercise interventions and show promise for improved outcomes from these interventions. However, further research utilizing these interventions in large clinical trials is required to definitively establish effective interventions in this patient group. Keywords: lung cancer, nutrition, malnutrition

  3. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Babu Rajendra Santosh; Thaon Jon Jones

    2014-01-01

    In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific fu...

  4. Novel insights into Notum and glypicans regulation in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Mariangela; Arigoni, Maddalena; Loiacono, Luisa; Riccardo, Federica; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Feodorova, Yana; Tashkova, Dessislava; Belovejdov, Vesselin; Sarafian, Victoria; Cavallo, Federica; Signori, Emanuela

    2015-12-01

    The connection between colorectal cancer (CRC) and Wnt signaling pathway activation is well known, but full elucidation of the underlying regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its biological functions in CRC pathogenesis is still needed. Here, the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium salt (AOM/DSS) murine model has been used as an experimental platform able to mimic human sporadic CRC development with predictable timing. We performed genome-wide expression profiling of AOM/DSS-induced tumors and normal colon mucosa to identify potential novel CRC biomarkers. Remarkably, the enhanced expression of Notum, a conserved feedback antagonist of Wnt, was observed in tumors along with alterations in Glypican-1 and Glypican-3 levels. These findings were confirmed in a set of human CRC samples. Here, we provide the first demonstration of significant changes in Notum and glypicans gene expression during CRC development and present evidence to suggest them as potential new biomarkers of CRC pathogenesis. PMID:26517809

  5. Ex vivo electrical impedance measurements on excised hepatic tissue from human patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Point-wise ex vivo electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were conducted on excised hepatic tissue from human patients with metastatic colorectal cancer using a linear four-electrode impedance probe. This study of 132 measurements from 10 colorectal cancer patients, the largest to date, reports that the equivalent electrical conductivity for tumor tissue is significantly higher than normal tissue (p < 0.01), ranging from 2–5 times greater over the measured frequency range of 100 Hz–1 MHz. Difference in tissue electrical permittivity is also found to be statistically significant across most frequencies. Furthermore, the complex impedance is also reported for both normal and tumor tissue. Consistent with trends for tissue electrical conductivity, normal tissue has a significantly higher impedance than tumor tissue (p < 0.01), as well as a higher net capacitive phase shift (33° for normal liver tissue in contrast to 10° for tumor tissue). (paper)

  6. Comparison of effective atomic numbers of the cancerous and normal kidney tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Ne) of normal kidney and cancerous kidney have been computed for total and partial photon interactions by computing the molecular, atomic, and electronic cross section in the wide energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV using WinXCOM. The mean Zeff and Ne of normal kidney and cancerous kidney in the various energy ranges and for total and partial photon interactions are tabulated. The variation of effective Ne with energy is shown graphically for all photon interactions. In addition to this computer tomography (CT), numbers of normal kidney and cancerous kidney for photon interaction and energy absorption is also computed. The role of Zeff in the dual-energy dividing radiography is also discussed. The values of Zeff and Ne for cancerous kidney are higher than normal kidney. This is due to the levels of elements K, Ca, Fe, Ni, and Se are lower and those of the elements Ti, Co, Zn, As, and Cd are higher in the cancer tissue of kidney than those observed in the normal tissue. The soft tissue and cancerous tissue are very similar, but their atomic number differs. The cancerous tissue exhibits a higher Zeff than the normal tissue. This fact helps in the dual-energy dividing radiography which enables to improve the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. Hence, the computed values may be useful in the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. CT numbers for normal kidney are higher than cancerous kidney. (author)

  7. Soft tissue sarcoma after treatment for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a register study all women in the West of Sweden Health Care Region with a breast cancer diagnosed between 1960 and 1980 (n = 13 490) were followed up in the Swedish Cancer Register to the end of 1988 for later occurrence of a soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Nineteen sarcomas were reported, whereas 8.7 were expected and the relative risk (RR) was 2.2 (CI 95% 1.3-3.4). The absolute risk was (1.7(104)) person years (PY) in comparison with 0.8 expected. To obtain a more detailed analysis of the associations between arm lymphoedema, radiotherapy and STS development, and to control the quality of the register data, a case control study was also performed. Clinical records from the different hospitals in the region were collected for all the 19 cases as well as for three selected controls per case. The histopathology of the cases were reviewed, and one of the cases was reclassified as a malignant melanoma and excluded from further analysis. Thirteen of the cases were clustered around the treated breast area. To quantify the exposure to radiotherapy, the integral dose was estimated. The presence of lymphedema was included as a binary variable in the analysis. The exact conditional randomisation test indicated a significant correlation between the integral dose and the development of an STS (p = 0.008) and this association was still significant after stratification for arm oedema. A conditional logistic regression analysis with STS as the dependent variable and the integral dose as the explanatory variable gave an odds ratio (OR) of(5.2(100)) J (CI 95% 1.3-21.2), and if this regression was restricted only to the STS developing in the radiation fields the OR was(3.2(100)) J (CI 95% 0.8-12.9). Thus, the excess of STS in this breast cancer cohort was very low ((0.9(104)) PY). However the integral dose correlates well to the development of STS and can be useful in quantifying even small risks of secondary malignancies in the breast cancer population

  8. DETECTION AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THROMBOMODULIN IN BOTH PLASMA AND TISSUE EXTRACTS OF CANCER PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓华; 卢兴国; 徐根波; 朱蕾; 黄连生

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of thrombomodulin (TM) in both plasma and tissue extracts of cancer patients for evaluating its clinical significance. Methods: Plasma TM levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both plasma of 188 cancer patients and 24 cancer tissue extracts including their adjacent non-cancer tissues. Results: The plasma TM levels both in cancer patients and in metastasis patients were significantly higher than that in controls [(33.47±14.25)μg/L, (41.68±16.96)μg/L, vs(20.40±7.22)μg/L,P0.05). The TM levels in cancer tissue extracts were significantly lower than that in their adjacent non-cancer tissue extracts [(647.71±317.51)μg/L vs (1455.63±772.22)μg/L, P<0.01]. On the contrary, the plasma TM levels in these cancers were significantly higher than that in controls. Conclusion: The rise of plasma TM levels in cancer patients was associated with metastasis and diffusion of cancers. The TM levels can be served as an sensitive index for judging progression and metastasis of cancers.

  9. Surgery and Adjuvant Chemotherapy Use Among Veterans With Colon Cancer: Insights From a California Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Denise M.; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Perrin, Ruth; Zhang, Qiuying; Weichle, Thomas; Ferreira, M. Rosario; Lee, Todd; Benson, Al B.; Bhoopalam, Nirmala; Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose US veterans have been shown to be a vulnerable population with high cancer rates, and cancer care quality in Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals is the focus of a congressionally mandated review. We examined rates of surgery and chemotherapy use among veterans with colon cancer at VA and non-VA facilities in California to gain insight into factors associated with quality of cancer care. Methods A retrospective cohort of incident colon cancer patients from the California Cancer Registry, who were ≥ 66 years old and eligible to use VA and Medicare between 1999 and 2001, were observed for 6 months after diagnosis. Results Among 601 veterans with colon cancer, 72% were initially diagnosed and treated in non-VA facilities. Among veterans with stage I to III cancer, those diagnosed and initially treated in VA facilities experienced similar colectomy rates as those at non-VA facilities. Stage III patients diagnosed and initially treated in VA versus non-VA facilities had similar odds of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. In both settings, older patients had lower odds of receiving chemotherapy than their younger counterparts even when race and comorbidity were considered (age 76 to 85 years: odds ratio [OR] = 0.18; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.46; age ≥ 86 years: OR = 0.17; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.73). Conclusion In California, older veterans with colon cancer used both VA and non-VA facilities for cancer treatment, and odds of receiving cancer-directed surgery and chemotherapy were similar in both systems. Among stage III patients, older age lowered odds of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy in both systems. Further studies should continue to explore potential health system effects on quality of colon cancer care across the United States. PMID:20406940

  10. Immunohistochemical analysis of Metadherin in proliferative and cancerous breast tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Qinghui; Su Peng; Yang Qifeng

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Metadherin (MTDH) has been reported to be associated with cancer progression in various types of human cancers including breast cancer. Whether MTDH contributes to carcinogenesis of breast cancer is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the expression of MTDH in normal, UDH (usual ductal hyperplasia), ADH (atypical ductal hyperplasia), DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) and invasive cancer to explore the possible role of MTDH for breast cancer carcinogenesis. M...

  11. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  12. Understanding community beliefs of Chinese-Australians about cancer: initial insights using an ethnographic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Soo See; Meiser, Bettina; Barlow-Stewart, Kristine; Goldstein, David; Tucker, Katherine; Eisenbruch, Maurice

    2005-03-01

    Ethnography was employed to investigate the hypothesis that the cultural meaning of cancer is one of the possible barriers to access of cancer services. The objectives were to identify indigenous terminologies, taxonomies and illness explanatory models of cancer in a community-based sample of 15 Chinese-Australians and a sample of 16 informants who had been recruited through two Sydney familial cancer clinics. Many of the informants included in their narrative terms that seemed to match Western biomedical explanations for cancer. The majority of informants also maintained traditional Chinese beliefs, despite high acculturation and beliefs in biomedical explanations about cancer. Explanations of illness including cancer, referred to the following concepts: (i) karma (yeh), (ii) retribution (bao ying), (iii) fate (ming yun) or Heaven's or God's will, (iv) geomancy (feng-shui), (v) touched evil (zhong chia), (vi) misfortune or bad luck (shui wan, dong hark); (vii) offending the gods or deities requiring prayers or offerings for appeasement; and (viii) kong-tau (spells invoked through human intervention). Taking into consideration the heterogeneity of the Chinese population, the findings provide an insight into Chinese illness conceptualization that may assist health professionals to develop an understanding of how the cultural explanatory models affect access to screening services, communication of diagnosis of cancer and management of treatment regimen. PMID:15386778

  13. Molecular insights into connective tissue growth factor action in rat pancreatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Anna; Fitzner, Brit; Brock, Peter; Sparmann, Gisela; Emmrich, Jörg; Liebe, Stefan; Jaster, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a key feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, is mediated by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been suggested to play a major role in fibrogenesis by enhancing PSC activation after binding to alpha5beta1 integrin. Here, we have focussed on molecular determinants of CTGF action. Inhibition of CTGF expression in PSC by siRNA was associated with decreased proliferation, while application of exogenous CTGF stimulated both cell growth and collagen synthesis. Real-time PCR studies revealed that CTGF target genes in PSC not only include mediators of matrix remodelling but also the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6. CTGF stimulated binding of NF-kappaB to the IL-6 promoter, and siRNA targeting the NF-kappaB subunit RelA interfered with CTGF-induced IL-6 expression, implicating the NF-kappaB pathway in the mediation of the CTGF effect. In further studies, we have analyzed regulation of CTGF expression in PSC. Transforming growth factor-beta1, activin A and tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhanced expression of the CTGF gene, while interferon-gamma displayed the opposite effect. The region from -74 to -125 of the CTGF promoter was revealed to be critical for its activity in PSC as well as for the inhibitory effect of interferon-gamma. Taken together, our results indicate a tight control of CTGF expression in PSC at the transcriptional level. CTGF promotes fibrogenesis both directly by enhancing PSC proliferation and matrix protein synthesis, and indirectly through the release of proinflammatory cytokines that may accelerate the process of chronic inflammation. PMID:18639630

  14. Analysis of UHRF1 expression in human ovarian cancer tissues and its regulation in cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feng; Wang, Xiaoming; Shao, Lijia; Ge, Mengyuan; Hu, Xiaoya

    2015-11-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1), known as ICB90 or Np95, has been found to be overexpressed in numerous cancers. In this study, we evaluated the expression level of UHRF1 in ovarian cancer. UHRF1 levels in paired ovarian cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues from 80 ovarian cancer patients were detected using relative quantitatively PCR and Western blot. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was introduced in two human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3) to downregulate the expression of UHRF1. The proliferation of siRNA-treated cells was examined using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The growth of these cells showed a remarkable decrease. Moreover, flow cytometric and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to detect the apoptosis. The diagnostic value of UHRF1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in ovarian cancer was estimated by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve. The correlation between UHRF1 mRNA expression and clinicopathologic features of ovarian cancer patients was evaluated by χ (2) test. Our results demonstrated that both UHRF1 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues and significantly higher than that in adjacent normal tissues. Moreover, the inhibition of UHRF1 may lead to cells to undergo apoptosis. Thus, UHRF1 could act as a new oncogenic factor in ovarian cancer and be a potential molecular target for ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:26070868

  15. [Binding capability of lidamycin apoprotein to human breast cancer detected by tissue microarrays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lin; Gao, Rui-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2010-05-01

    This study is to investigate the binding capability of lidamycin apoprotein (LDP), an enediyne-associated apoprotein of the chromoprotein antitumor antibiotic family, to human breast cancer and normal tissues, the correlation of LDP binding capability to human breast cancer tissues and the expression of tumor therapeutic targets such as VEGF and HER2. In this study, the binding capability of LDP to human breast cancer tissues was detected with tissue microarray. The correlation study of LDP binding capability to human breast tumor tissues and relevant therapeutic targets was performed on breast cancer tissue microarrays. Immunocytochemical examination was used to detect the binding capability of LDP to human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. As a result, tissue microarray showed that LDP staining of 73.2% (30/41) of breast cancer tissues was positive, whereas that of 48.3% (15/31) of the adjacent normal breast specimens was positive. The difference between the tumor and normal samples was significant (Chi2 = 4.63, P < 0.05). LDP immunoreactivity in breast cancer correlated significantly with the overexpression of VEGF and HER2 (P < 0.001 and < 0.01, r = 0.389 and 0.287, respectively). Determined with confocal immunofluorescent analysis, LDP showed the binding capability to mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells. It is demonstrated that LDP can bind to human breast cancer tissues and there is significant difference between the breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal tissues. Notably, the binding reactivity shows positive correlation with the expression of VEGF and HER2 in breast carcinoma tissues. The results imply that LDP may have a potential use as targeting drug carrier in the research and development of new anticancer therapeutics. This study may provide reference for drug combination of LDM and other therapeutic agents. PMID:20931759

  16. Enhanced ZAG production by subcutaneous adipose tissue is linked to weight loss in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mracek, T.; Stephens, N. A.; Gao, D.; Bao, Y.; Ross, J A; Rydén, M; Arner, P; Trayhurn, P.; Fearon, K C H; Bing, C

    2011-01-01

    Background: Profound loss of adipose tissue is a hallmark of cancer cachexia. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG), a recently identified adipokine, is suggested as a candidate in lipid catabolism. Methods: In the first study, eight weight-stable and 17 cachectic cancer patients (weight loss ⩾5% in previous 6 months) were recruited. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein mRNA and protein expression were assessed in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue morphology was examined and serum ZAG conce...

  17. The clinical implications of new insights into the origins of epithelial ovarian cancer with emphasis on the British Columbia Ovarian Cancer Prevention Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Miller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten years our understanding of the origin of epithelial ovarian cancer has changed. This includes the realization that the majority of High Grade serous cancers originate in fallopian tube epithelium and the majority of endometroid and clear cell cancer arise in foci of endometriosis. These new insights have profound implications of both prevention and treatment.

  18. Identification of alternatively spliced TIMP-1 mRNA in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usher, Pernille Autzen; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bartels, Annette;

    2007-01-01

    TIMP-1 is a promising new candidate as a prognostic marker in colorectal and breast cancer. We now describe the discovery of two alternatively spliced variants of TIMP-1 mRNA. The two variants lacking exon 2 (del-2) and 5 (del-5), respectively, were identified in human cancer cell lines by RT......-PCR. The del-2 variant was, furthermore, detected in extracts from 12 colorectal cancer tissue samples. By western blotting additional bands of lower molecular mass than full-length TIMP-1 were identified in tumor tissue, but not in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients. The two splice variants of...

  19. Discovery of EST-SSRs in lung cancer: tagged ESTs with SSRs lead to differential amino acid and protein expression patterns in cancerous tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Bakhtiarizadeh

    Full Text Available Tandem repeats are found in both coding and non-coding sequences of higher organisms. These sequences can be used in cancer genetics and diagnosis to unravel the genetic basis of tumor formation and progression. In this study, a possible relationship between SSR distributions and lung cancer was studied by comparative analysis of EST-SSRs in normal and lung cancerous tissues. While the EST-SSR distribution was similar between tumorous tissues, this distribution was different between normal and tumorous tissues. Trinucleotides tandem repeats were highly different; the number of trinucleotides in ESTs of lung cancer was 3 times higher than normal tissue. Significant negative correlation between normal and cancerous tissue showed that cancerous tissue generates different types of trinucleotides. GGC and CGC were the more frequent expressed trinucleotides in cancerous tissue, but these SSRs were not expressed in normal tissue. Similar to the EST level, the expression pattern of EST-SSRs-derived amino acids was significantly different between normal and cancerous tissues. Arg, Pro, Ser, Gly, and Lys were the most abundant amino acids in cancerous tissues, and Leu, Cys, Phe, and His were significantly more abundant in normal tissues than in cancerous tissues. Next, the putative functions of triplet SSR-containing genes were analyzed. In cancerous tissue, EST-SSRs produce different types of proteins. Chromodomain helicase DNA binding proteins were one of the major protein products of EST-SSRs in the cancerous library, while these proteins were not produced from EST-SSRs in normal tissue. For the first time, the findings of this study confirmed that EST-SSRs in normal lung tissues are different than in unhealthy tissues, and tagged ESTs with SSRs cause remarkable differences in amino acid and protein expression patterns in cancerous tissue. We suggest that EST-SSRs and EST-SSRs differentially expressed in cancerous tissue may be suitable candidate

  20. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT)

    OpenAIRE

    Nicastro, Holly L.; Dunn, Barbara K

    2013-01-01

    The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was ...

  1. Multispectral fluorescence imaging of human ovarian and Fallopian tube tissue for early stage cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Baggett, Brenda; Rice, Photini; Watson, Jennifer; Orsinger, Gabe; Nymeyer, Ariel C.; Welge, Weston A.; Keenan, Molly; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Hatch, Kenneth; Chambers, Setsuko; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    With early detection, five year survival rates for ovarian cancer are over 90%, yet no effective early screening method exists. Emerging consensus suggests that perhaps over 50% of the most lethal form of the disease, high grade serous ovarian cancer, originates in the Fallopian tube. Cancer changes molecular concentrations of various endogenous fluorophores. Using specific excitation wavelengths and emissions bands on a Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) system, spatial and spectral data over a wide field of view can be collected from endogenous fluorophores. Wavelength specific reflectance images provide additional information to normalize for tissue geometry and blood absorption. Ratiometric combination of the images may create high contrast between neighboring normal and abnormal tissue. Twenty-six women undergoing oophorectomy or debulking surgery consented the use of surgical discard tissue samples for MFI imaging. Forty-nine pieces of ovarian tissue and thirty-two pieces of Fallopian tube tissue were collected and imaged with excitation wavelengths between 280 nm and 550 nm. After imaging, each tissue sample was fixed, sectioned and HE stained for pathological evaluation. Comparison of mean intensity values between normal, benign, and cancerous tissue demonstrate a general trend of increased fluorescence of benign tissue and decreased fluorescence of cancerous tissue when compared to normal tissue. The predictive capabilities of the mean intensity measurements are tested using multinomial logistic regression and quadratic discriminant analysis. Adaption of the system for in vivo Fallopian tube and ovary endoscopic imaging is possible and is briefly described.

  2. Warburg effect's manifestation in aggressive pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas: insights from a mouse cell model applied to human tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M J Fliedner

    Full Text Available A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT cells has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC. We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in

  3. Warburg effect's manifestation in aggressive pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas: insights from a mouse cell model applied to human tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedner, Stephanie M J; Kaludercic, Nina; Jiang, Xiao-Sheng; Hansikova, Hana; Hajkova, Zuzana; Sladkova, Jana; Limpuangthip, Andrea; Backlund, Peter S; Wesley, Robert; Martiniova, Lucia; Jochmanova, Ivana; Lendvai, Nikoletta K; Breza, Jan; Yergey, Alfred L; Paolocci, Nazareno; Tischler, Arthur S; Zeman, Jiri; Porter, Forbes D; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT) cells) has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC). We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in aggressive human

  4. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kryczka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years. The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye.

  5. Multiplatform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues of origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoadley, Katherine A; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M;

    2014-01-01

    on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head and neck, and a subset......Recent genomic analyses of pathologically defined tumor types identify "within-a-tissue" disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform...... of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multiplatform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides...

  6. Raman microspectroscopy of Hematoporphyrins. Imaging of the noncancerous and the cancerous human breast tissues with photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek-Pluska, B; Kopec, M

    2016-12-01

    Raman microspectroscopy combined with fluorescence were used to study the distribution of Hematoporphyrin (Hp) in noncancerous and cancerous breast tissues. The results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish between noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissue and to identify differences in the distribution and photodegradation of Hematoporphyrin, which is a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT), photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of cancer. Presented results show that Hematoporphyrin level in the noncancerous breast tissue is lower compared to the cancerous one. We have proved also that the Raman intensity of lipids and proteins doesn't change dramatically after laser light irradiation, which indicates that the PDT treatment destroys preferably cancer cells, in which the photosensitizer is accumulated. The specific subcellular localization of photosensitizer for breast tissues samples soaked with Hematoporphyrin was not observed. PMID:27376758

  7. Trace elemental analysis in cancer-afflicted tissues of penis and testis by PIXE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Raju, G. J.; John Charles, M.; Bhuloka Reddy, S.; Sarita, P.; Seetharami Reddy, B.; Rama Lakshmi, P. V. B.; Vijayan, V.

    2005-04-01

    PIXE technique was employed to estimate the trace elemental concentrations in the biological samples of cancerous penis and testis. A 3 MeV proton beam was employed to excite the samples. From the present results it can be seen that the concentrations of Cl, Fe and Co are lower in the cancerous tissue of the penis when compared with those in normal tissue while the concentrations of Cu, Zn and As are relatively higher. The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Br, Sr and Pb are in agreement within standard deviations in both cancerous and normal tissues. In the cancerous tissue of testis, the concentrations of K, Cr and Cu are higher while the concentrations of Fe, Co and Zn are lower when compared to those in normal tissue of testis. The concentrations of Cl, Ca, Ti and Mn are in agreement in both cancerous and normal tissues of testis. The higher levels of Cu lead to the development of tumor. Our results also support the underlying hypothesis of an anticopper, antiangiogenic approach to cancer therapy. The Cu/Zn ratios of both penis and testis were higher in cancer tissues compared to that of normal.

  8. Trace elemental analysis in cancer-afflicted tissues of penis and testis by PIXE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIXE technique was employed to estimate the trace elemental concentrations in the biological samples of cancerous penis and testis. A 3 MeV proton beam was employed to excite the samples. From the present results it can be seen that the concentrations of Cl, Fe and Co are lower in the cancerous tissue of the penis when compared with those in normal tissue while the concentrations of Cu, Zn and As are relatively higher. The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Br, Sr and Pb are in agreement within standard deviations in both cancerous and normal tissues. In the cancerous tissue of testis, the concentrations of K, Cr and Cu are higher while the concentrations of Fe, Co and Zn are lower when compared to those in normal tissue of testis. The concentrations of Cl, Ca, Ti and Mn are in agreement in both cancerous and normal tissues of testis. The higher levels of Cu lead to the development of tumor. Our results also support the underlying hypothesis of an anticopper, antiangiogenic approach to cancer therapy. The Cu/Zn ratios of both penis and testis were higher in cancer tissues compared to that of normal

  9. Expression of BCRP Gene in the Normal Lung Tissue and Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of novel multidrugresistance transporter (BCRP gene) from human MCF-7/AdrVp breast cancer cells in normal lung tissue and non-small lung cancer tissue. Methods: RNA was extracted immediately from fresh normal lung tissue and viable tumor tissue harvested from surgically resected specimens of non-small cell lung cancer patients. cDNA of BCRP gene was prepared by RT-PCR and was then amplified by PCR. cDNA products from those specimens were transferred to blotting membrane through electrophoresis and transferring technique and southern blot hybridization was eventually performed to detect the expression of BCRP gene. Results: RNA were extracted from 8 tumor tissue alone and 12 pairs of tumor tissue and normal lung tissue harvested from the same lung. Four patients' RNA samples with poor quality due to degrading were discarded. cDNA products of BCRP gene were obtained by RT-PCR and were then amplified by PCR in the remain 16 patients' RNA samples. Through southern blot hybridization, BCRP gene was found to be slightly expressed in various amounts in all normal lung tissue (10/10) and only in a half of tumor tissue samples (8/16). Conclusion: BCRP gene is slightly expressed in different amount in all normal lung tissue and only in a half of tumor tissue of non-small cell lung cancer patients. It is possible to induce it's overexpression and to develop multidrug resistance during chemotherapy if using anthracycline anticancer drugs.

  10. Detection of methylation damage in DNA of gastric cancer tissues using 32P-postlabelling assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Korea. The causes are still unknown but it has been speculated that gastric cancer is associated with consumption of foods rich in nitrates/nitrites or a high dietary intake of salt or pickled food. In the present study, we studied the level of alkylated DNA adducts formed in gastric cancer tissues in comparison with that in normal gastric mucosa. DNA was extracted from surgically removed gastric cancer tissues and patient-matched normal gastric mucosa. The level of N7-methyldeoxyguanosine was measured by 32P-postlabelling assay after high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) enrichment. We found that the level of N7-methyldeoxyguanosine of gastric cancerous tissues was significantly higher than that of normal gastric mucosa (P=0.01685). (author)

  11. Overexpression of Gli1 in cancer interstitial tissues predicts early relapse after radical operation of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hua Li; Hai-Feng Gao; Yan Wang; Fang Liu; Xiao-Feng Tian; Yang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate whether Gli1 expression is important in relapse after radical operation of breast cancer.Methods:Using immunohistochemistry,Glil expression was analyzed in human primary breast cancer (n=284) and paracancerous tissues (n=20),and also in local lymph nodes (n=28) and metastatic lymph nodes (n=28).Results:Initial analysis of Gli1 expression in a small cohort of 20 breast tumors and their paracancerous tissues showed a tendency towards Gli1 overexpression in breast cancer tissues (P<0.001).Further,Gli1 expression in 284 breast cancer tissue samples was analyzed and a significant correlation was found between increased expression of nuclear Gli1 and unfavorable recurrence-free survival (RFS) (P<0.05).The nuclear expression of Gli1 in metastatic lymph nodes following relapse after radical operation was much higher than that in the local lymph nodes of primary carcinoma (P<0.05).Most interestingly,the expression of Gli1 was much higher in the interstitial tissues of the relapsed group than of the non-relapsed group (P<0.001).Conclusions:Breast cancer shows a high prevalence of Gli1 expression,which is significantly correlated with aggressive features and unfavorable RFS.Nuclear Gli1 overexpression,especially in the interstitial tissues,signified early relapse after radical operation of breast cancer.

  12. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium and nickel in cancerous and healthy tissues from patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to heavy metals has long been recognized as being capable to increase head and neck cancer incidence among exposed human populations. Head and neck cancer is a significant public health issue in Tunisia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of As, Cd, Cr and Ni in healthy and tumor tissues of head and neck cancer patients. Metal concentrations were determined in tumor and healthy tissues of 101 head and neck cancer patients, using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The As, Cd, Cr, and Ni levels in tumor tissues were 3.4, 2.5, 1.3 and 1.5 times higher than those of healthy tissues (p 60 years) in both never-smokers and ever-smokers (< 20 and ≥ 20 pack per year). Healthy tissue Cd levels were negatively associated with age in those three groups of smokers. The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among both workers and non-workers were observed in tumor tissues. The Cd and Cr in tissues of farmers, bricklayers and painters were all significantly higher among the workers as compared with the non-workers group. Tissue metal levels have increased due to smoking and occupational exposure. Heavy metal exposure via tobacco smoking and occupational exposures may increase the risk of head and neck in the Tunisian population. - Highlights: ► Heavy metal levels in tumor tissues were higher than those in healthy tissues. ► Tumor tissue Cd levels were positively associated with age in smokers. ► Tumor tissue metal levels were higher in men than in women. ► The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among workers were observed in tumor tissues. ► Heavy metal exposure via occupational exposures may increase the risk of HNC

  13. Non-Coding CK19 RNA in Peripheral Blood and Tissue of Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Neda Moazzezy; Saeid Bouzari; Najmeh Yardehnavi; Mana Oloomi

    2013-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the major cause of cancer-related death in women. The incidence of this carcinoma is rising and there are many attempts to decrease this problem. The aim of this study was detection of full-length cytokeratin 19 (CK19) mRNA, in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients in early stage of cancer. In this study, RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) technique was used for detection of CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer pat...

  14. The nanomechanical signature of liver cancer tissues and its molecular origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mengxin; Li, Yiran; Liu, Weiren; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Xifei; Wang, Xinyan; Ding, Zhenbin; Peng, Yuanfei; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yinghong

    2015-07-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus distribution of surgically removed liver cancer tissues can serve as a mechanical fingerprint to evaluate the malignancy of liver cancer. Cirrhotic tissues shared the same LEP as normal tissues. However, a noticeable downward shift in the LEP was detected when the cirrhotic tissues progressed to a malignant state, making the tumor tissues more prone to microvascular invasion. Cell-level mechanistic studies revealed that the expression level of a Rho-family effector (mDia1) was consistent with the mechanical trend exhibited by the tissue. Our findings indicate that the mechanical profiles of liver cancer tissues directly varied with tumor progression, providing an additional platform for the future diagnosis of HCC.Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus

  15. Progesterone and adiponectin receptor family member 3 expression and clinical significance in breast cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qiang Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Hong-Mei Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss progesterone and adiponectin receptor family member 3 expression and clinical significance in breast cancer tissues. Method:A total of 90 cases with breast cancer who were admitted in our hospital from Jan 2000 to Jan 2010 were selected. Meanwhile, normal tumor-adjacent breast tissues were selected as comparison. Diagnosis of all patients was confirmed by postoperative pathological examinations. Immunohistochemistry method was adopted to detect PAQR3 protein expression in breast cancer tissues and normal tumor-adjacent breast tissues and its clinical significance was discussed. Results:PAQR3 protein positive expression rate in breast cancer tissues was 25.6%, which was significantly lower than that (78.9%) in normal tumor-adjacent breast tissues;PAQR3 protein positive expression rate had nothing to do with age, tumor size, pathological types and differentiated degree of patients, but had significant correlation with TNM staging and lymphatic metastasis existence of patients. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis results showed that five years survival rate of patients with PAQR3 protein positive expression was significantly higher than whom with negative expression. Conclusion:PAQR3 protein expression in breast cancer tissues was significantly reduced, which indicated that PAQR3 protein possibly played an important role in pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  16. Quantitative methylation profiling in tumor and matched morphologically normal tissues from breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we determined the gene hypermethylation profiles of normal tissues adjacent to invasive breast carcinomas and investigated whether these are associated with the gene hypermethylation profiles of the corresponding primary breast tumors. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR assay was used to analyze the DNA methylation status of 6 genes (DAPK, TWIST, HIN-1, RASSF1A, RARβ2 and APC) in 9 normal breast tissue samples from unaffected women and in 56 paired cancerous and normal tissue samples from breast cancer patients. Normal tissue adjacent to breast cancer displayed statistically significant differences to unrelated normal breast tissues regarding the aberrant methylation of the RASSF1A (P = 0.03), RARβ2 (P = 0.04) and APC (P = 0.04) genes. Although methylation ratios for all genes in normal tissues from cancer patients were significantly lower than in the cancerous tissue from the same patient (P ≤ 0.01), in general, a clear correlation was observed between methylation ratios measured in both tissue types for all genes tested (P < 0.01). When analyzed as a categorical variable, there was a significant concordance between methylation changes in normal tissues and in the corresponding tumor for all genes tested but RASSF1A. Notably, in 73% of patients, at least one gene with an identical methylation change in cancerous and normal breast tissues was observed. Histologically normal breast tissues adjacent to breast tumors frequently exhibit methylation changes in multiple genes. These methylation changes may play a role in the earliest stages of the development of breast neoplasia

  17. RELATED GENES IN LUNG CANCER TISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH RESIDENTIAL HIGH RADON EXPOSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏英; 杨梅英; 张守志; 叶常青

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the related genes in lung cancer tissues associated with residential high radon exposure. Methods: Differentially expressed gene fragments in lung cancer and normal lung tissues were discovered by differential display and reverse Northern blot hybridization method. The fragments positive in lung cancer and negative in normal lung tissue were determined. Results: Seven differential displayed fragments were sequenced. One of them named NA7 is 95% homologous with AI208667 in EAT of Genbank. Another fragment named NG2 is up to 98% homologous with five fragments. The remained one CA1 may be a new gene fragment. Conclusion: 3 gene fragments were discovered from lung cancer and normal lung tissues of high radon exposure resident.

  18. Impact of EBUS-TBNA on modalities for tissue acquisition in patients with lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    José, R. J.; Shaw, P.; M. Taylor; Lawrence, D R; George, P J; Janes, S.M.; Navani, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The impact of the introduction of Endobronchial ultrasound with real-time guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) on the use of diagnostic modalities for tissue acquisition in patients with lung cancer is unknown.

  19. Estradiol suppresses tissue androgens and prostate cancer growth in castration resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogens suppress tumor growth in prostate cancer which progresses despite anorchid serum androgen levels, termed castration resistant prostate cancers (CRPC), although the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that estrogen inhibits CRPC in anorchid animals by suppressing tumoral androgens, an effect independent of the estrogen receptor. The human CRPC xenograft LuCaP 35V was implanted into orchiectomized male SCID mice and established tumors were treated with placebo, 17β-estradiol or 17β-estradiol and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Effects of 17β-estradiol on tumor growth were evaluated and tissue testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) evaluated by mass spectrometry. Treatment of LuCaP 35V with 17β-estradiol slowed tumor growth compared to controls (tumor volume at day 21: 785 ± 81 mm3 vs. 1195 ± 84 mm3, p = 0.002). Survival was also significantly improved in animals treated with 17β-estradiol (p = 0.03). The addition of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 did not significantly change survival or growth. 17β-estradiol in the presence and absence of ICI 182,780 suppressed tumor testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as assayed by mass spectrometry. Tissue androgens in placebo treated LuCaP 35V xenografts were; T = 0.71 ± 0.28 pg/mg and DHT = 1.73 ± 0.36 pg/mg. In 17β-estradiol treated LuCaP35V xenografts the tissue androgens were, T = 0.20 ± 0.10 pg/mg and DHT = 0.15 ± 0.15 pg/mg, (p < 0.001 vs. controls). Levels of T and DHT in control liver tissue were < 0.2 pg/mg. CRPC in anorchid animals maintains tumoral androgen levels despite castration. 17β-estradiol significantly suppressed tumor T and DHT and inhibits growth of CRPC in an estrogen receptor independent manner. The ability to manipulate tumoral androgens will be critical in the development and testing of agents targeting CRPC through tissue steroidogenesis

  20. Analysis of blood and tissue in gallbladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautray, T.R. [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, 2-188-1 Samduk-dong, Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: tapash77@hotmail.com; Vijayan, V. [Dept. of Physics, Valliammai Engineering College, SRM Nagar, Chennai (India); Sudarshan, M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, 3/LB-8 Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 098, West Bengal (India); Panigrahi, S. [Dept. of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela 769 008, Orissa (India)

    2009-09-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission, particle induced {gamma}-ray emission studies has been carried out to analyse normal and carcinoma tissues and blood samples of gallbladder of both sexes and seventeen trace elements namely Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br and Pb were estimated in the tissue and blood samples. In the present study, concentration of Zn in the carcinoma gallbladder tissue is less than that of the normal gallbladder tissue. Tobacco habit could be one of the important factors to decrease the elemental concentrations in blood and tissue samples.

  1. Legal termination of a pregnancy resulting from transplanted cryopreserved ovarian tissue due to cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, EH; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Andersen, Claus Yding;

    2013-01-01

    To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer.......To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer....

  2. Comparative Trace Elemental Analysis in Cancerous and Noncancerous Human Tissues Using PIXE

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Juma Mulware

    2013-01-01

    The effect of high or low levels of trace metals in human tissues has been studied widely. There have been detectable significant variations in the concentrations of trace metals in normal and cancerous tissues suggesting that these variations could be a causative factor to various cancers. Even though essential trace metals play an important role such as stabilizers, enzyme cofactors, elements of structure, and essential elements for normal hormonal functions, their imbalanced toxic effects ...

  3. Beclin 1 Expression in Ovarian Tissues and Its Effects on Ovarian Cancer Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mingbo Cai; Zhenhua Hu; Juanjuan Liu; Jian Gao; Chuan Liu; Dawo Liu; Mingzi Tan; Danye Zhang; Bei Lin

    2014-01-01

    Beclin 1 is an autophagy-associated protein involved in apoptosis and drug resistance, as well as various malignancies. We investigated the expression of Beclin 1 protein in ovarian epithelial tissues and correlated it with the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Beclin 1 protein expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in 148 patients with ovarian epithelial cancer, 26 with ovarian borderline tumor, 25 with benign ovarian tumor, and 30 with normal ovarian tissue. The relationships betwe...

  4. Greatly increased occurrence of breast cancers in areas of mammographically dense tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Ursin, Giske; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Parisky, Yuri R; Pike, Malcolm C.; Wu, Anna H

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong, independent risk factor for breast cancer. A critical unanswered question is whether cancers tend to arise in mammographically dense tissue (i.e. are densities directly related to risk or are they simply a marker of risk). This question cannot be addressed by studying invasive tumors because they manifest as densities and cannot be confidently differentiated from the densities representing fibrous and glandular tissue. We addressed this question ...

  5. Computational dissection of tissue contamination for identification of colon cancer-specific expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türeci, Ozlem; Ding, Jiayi; Hilton, Holly; Bian, Hongjin; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Braxenthaler, Michael; Seitz, Gerhard; Raddrizzani, Laura; Friess, Helmut; Buchler, Markus; Sahin, Ugur; Hammer, Juergen

    2003-03-01

    Microarray profiles of bulk tumor tissues reflect gene expression corresponding to malignant cells as well as to many different types of contaminating normal cells. In this report, we assess the feasibility of querying baseline multitissue transcriptome databases to dissect disease-specific genes. Using colon cancer as a model tumor, we show that the application of Boolean operators (AND, OR, BUTNOT) for database searches leads to genes with expression patterns of interest. The BUTNOT operator for example allows the assignment of "expression signatures" to normal tissue specimens. These expression signatures were then used to computationally identify contaminating cells within conventionally dissected tissue specimens. The combination of several logic operators together with an expression database based on multiple human tissue specimens can resolve the problem of tissue contamination, revealing novel cancer-specific gene expression. Several markers, previously not known to be colon cancer associated, are provided. PMID:12631577

  6. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periprostatic (PP adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia. Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated. Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis, whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH. Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable

  7. High level of ezrin expression in colorectal cancer tissues is closely related to tumor malignancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Jian Wang; Jin-Shui Zhu; Qiang Zhang; Qun Sun; Hua Guo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ezrin expression in normal colorectal mucosa and colorectal cancer tissues,and study the correlation between ezrin expression in colorectal cancer tissues and tumor invasion and metastasis.METHODS: Eighty paraffin-embedded cancer tissue samples were selected from primary colorectal adenocarcinoma. Twenty-eight patients had welldifferentiated,22 had moderately differentiated and 30had poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Forty-five patients and 35 patients had lymph node metastasis.Forty-five patients were of Dukes A to B stage, and 35were of C to D stage. Another 22 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of normal colorectal epithelium (> 5 cm away from the edge of the tumor) were selected as the control group. All patients with colorectal cancer were treated surgically and diagnosed histologically, without preoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The immunohistochemistry was used to detect the ezrin expression in paraffin-embedded normal colorectal mucosa tissues and colorectal cancer tissue samples.RESULTS: Ezrin expression in colorectal cancer was significantly higher than in normal colorectal mucosa (75.00% vs 9.09%, P < 0.01), and there was a close relationship between ezrin expression and the degree of tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and Dukes stage (88.46% vs 50.00%, P < 0.01; 94.28%vs 51.11%, P < 0.01; 94.28% vs 51.11%, P < 0.01).

  8. Cellular Mechanisms of Tissue Fibrosis. 7. New insights into the cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barkauskas, Christina E.; Paul W. Noble

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease characterized by severe and progressive scar formation in the gas-exchange regions of the lung. Despite years of research, therapeutic treatments remain elusive and there is a pressing need for deeper mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of the disease. In this article, we review our current knowledge of the triggers and/or perpetuators of pulmonary fibrosis with special emphasis on the alveolar epithelium and the underlying m...

  9. NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-related proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners : variation by occupational exposure and subtype of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pesch, Beate; Casjens, Swaantje; Stricker, Ingo; Westerwick, Daniela; Taeger, Dirk; Rabstein, Sylvia; Wiethege, Thorsten; Tannapfel, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Johnen, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background Radon and arsenic are established pulmonary carcinogens. We investigated the association of cumulative exposure to these carcinogens with NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-specific proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners. Methodology/Principal Findings Paraffin-embedded tissue of 147 miners was randomly selected from an autopsy repository by type of lung tissue, comprising adenocarcinoma (AdCa), squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and cancer-free tissue....

  10. The role of the tissue microenvironment in the regulation of cancer cell motility and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brábek Jan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During malignant neoplastic progression the cells undergo genetic and epigenetic cancer-specific alterations that finally lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and restructuring of the microenvironment. The invasion of cancer cells through connective tissue is a crucial prerequisite for metastasis formation. Although cell invasion is foremost a mechanical process, cancer research has focused largely on gene regulation and signaling that underlie uncontrolled cell growth. More recently, the genes and signals involved in the invasion and transendothelial migration of cancer cells, such as the role of adhesion molecules and matrix degrading enzymes, have become the focus of research. In this review we discuss how the structural and biomechanical properties of extracellular matrix and surrounding cells such as endothelial cells influence cancer cell motility and invasion. We conclude that the microenvironment is a critical determinant of the migration strategy and the efficiency of cancer cell invasion.

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in human pancreatic cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Chen; Run-Zhou Ni; Ming-Bing Xiao; Ji-Guang Guo; Jia-Wei Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors. Early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is dififcult because of the latent onset and lack of good biomarkers. This study aimed to look for and identify differentially expressed proteins in tissues of pancreatic cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues by proteomic approaches so as to provide information about possible pancreatic cancer markers and therapeutic targets. METHODS:Proteins extracted from 3 paired adjacent noncancerous and cancerous pancreatic tissue specimens were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The protein spots exhibiting statistical alternations between the two groups through computerized image analysis were then identiifed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-lfight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). In addition, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to verify the expression of certain candidate proteins. RESULTS:Twelve proteins were signiifcantly upregulated and 4 were downregulated between cancerous and paired adjacent noncancerous pancreatic tissues. Several proteins (S100A11, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, GSTO1 and peroxiredoxin 4) were found for the ifrst time to be associated with pancreatic cancer. Differential expression of some identiifed proteins was further conifrmed by Western blotting analysis and/or immunohistochemical analysis.CONCLUSIONS:Comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-MS is an effective method for identifying differentially expressed proteins that may be the potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Spectroscopic analysis of bladder cancer tissues using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muslet, Nafie A.; Ali, Essam E.

    2012-03-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in Africa. It takes several days to reach a diagnosis using histological examinations of specimens obtained by endoscope, which increases the medical expense. Recently, spectroscopic analysis of bladder cancer tissues has received considerable attention as a diagnosis technique due to its sensitivity to biochemical variations in the samples. This study investigated the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to analyze a number of bladder cancer tissues. Twenty-two samples were collected from 11 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer from different hospitals without any pretreatment. From each patient two samples were collected, one normal and another cancerous. FTIR spectrometer was used to differentiate between normal and cancerous bladder tissues via changes in spectra of these samples. The investigations detected obvious changes in the bands of proteins (1650, 1550 cm-1), lipids (2925, 2850 cm-1), and nucleic acid (1080, 1236 cm-1). The results show that FTIR spectroscopy is promising as a rapid, accurate, nondestructive, and easy to use alternative method for identification and diagnosis of bladder cancer tissues.

  13. Serum and Lung Tissue Selenium Measurements in Subjects with Lung Cancer from Xuanwei, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan ZHOU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Xuanwei is an area of the highest incidence and mortality with lung cancer in China. The aim of this study is to determine serum selenium concentrations in lung cancer patients from Xuanwei as well as selenium levels of cancerous tissues, cancer-adjacent pulmonary tissues, and normal pulmonary lung tissues from lung cancer patients, and the relationship between selenium and the high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei. Methods One hundred and twenty female adults from Xuanwei were enrolled in the study (60 lung cancer patients and 60 with non-tumor and non-respiratory diseases, respectively and blood samples were collected. Sixty fresh cancerous tissues and their adjacent as well as normal tissues were collected (31 samples from lung cancer patients living in Xuanwei for more than 2 years and 29 from patients in other regions of Yunnan Province outside of Xuanwei, respectively. Serum and tissue selenium concentrations were assayed using a fluorometric method. Results Women with lung cancer had a mean serum selenium value (55.22 μg/L±13.34 μg/L of averagely 8.47%, significantly lower than that in subjects with non-tumor and non-respiratory disease controls (60.33 μg/L±13.82 μg/L(P < 0.05. Selenium concentrations in the tumor tissues (0.105 μg/g±0.034 μg/g were statistically lower than that of normal ones (0.140 μg/g±0.048 μg/g(P < 0.05 from lung cancer patients in Xuanwei. Statistical differences had not been found between the cases from Xuanwei and non-Xuanwei district, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, among Stage I, Stage II, stage III groups. Conclusion Lower serum selenium state was negatively related to the incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei. It was likely that lower selenium level of lung tissues was potential risk factor to lead to lung cancer.

  14. Prostate cancer specific integrin αvβ3 modulates bone metastatic growth and tissue remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, NP; De, S.; Vasanji, A; Brainard, J; Byzova, TV

    2007-01-01

    The management of pain and morbidity owing to the spreading and growth of cancer within bone remains to be a paramount problem in clinical care. Cancer cells actively transform bone, however, the molecular requirements and mechanisms of this process remain unclear. This study shows that functional modulation of the αvβ3 integrin receptor in prostate cancer cells is required for progression within bone and determines tumor-induced bone tissue transformation. Using histology and quantitative mi...

  15. Tissue proteomics in pancreatic cancer study: discovery, emerging technologies and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Kelly, Kimberly; Chen, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose and treat. The advances of proteomics technology, especially quantitative proteomics, have stimulated a great interest to apply this technology for pancreatic cancer study. A variety of tissue proteomics approaches have been applied to investigate pancreatic cancer and the associated diseases. These studies were carried out with various goals, aiming to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic t...

  16. Molecular Markers for Prostate Cancer in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Sequeiros; Marta García; Melania Montes; Mireia Oliván; Marina Rigau; Eva Colás; Inés de Torres; Juan Morote; Jaume Reventós; Andreas Doll

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer in developed countries. The decisive method of diagnosis is based on the results of biopsies, morphologically evaluated to determine the presence or absence of cancer. Although this approach leads to a confident diagnosis in most cases, it can be improved by using the molecular markers present in the tissue. Both miRNAs and proteins are considered excellent candidates for biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE...

  17. RNA-Seq Accurately Identifies Cancer Biomarker Signatures to Distinguish Tissue of Origin1

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Iris H.; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Hui; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Arul M Chinnaiyan

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic cancer of unknown primary (CUP) accounts for up to 5% of all new cancer cases, with a 5-year survival rate of only 10%. Accurate identification of tissue of origin would allow for directed, personalized therapies to improve clinical outcomes. Our objective was to use transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify lineage-specific biomarker signatures for the cancer types that most commonly metastasize as CUP (colorectum, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, prostate, and stomach)....

  18. Presence of S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in cancer tissues correlates with an early stage cancer and a better prognosis in patients with gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S100A9 was originally discovered as a factor secreted by inflammatory cells. Recently, S100A9 was found to be associated with several human malignancies. The purpose of this study is to investigate S100A9 expression in gastric cancer and explore its role in cancer progression. S100A9 expression in gastric tissue samples from 177 gastric cancer patients was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The expression of its dimerization partner S100A8 and the S100A8/A9 heterodimer were also assessed by the same method. The effect of exogenous S100A9 on motility of gastric cancer cells AGS and BGC-823 was then investigated. S100A9 was specifically expressed by inflammatory cells such as macrophages and neutrophils in human gastric cancer and gastritis tissues. Statistical analysis showed that a high S100A9 cell count (> = 200) per 200x magnification microscopic field in cancer tissues was predictive of early stage gastric cancer. High S100A9-positive cell count was negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.009) and tumor invasion (P = 0.011). S100A9 was identified as an independent prognostic predictor of overall survival of patients with gastric cancer (P = 0.04). Patients with high S100A9 cell count were with favorable prognosis (P = 0.021). Further investigation found that S100A8 distribution in human gastric cancer tissues was similar to S100A9. However, the number of S100A8-positive cells did not positively correlate with patient survival. The inflammatory cells infiltrating cancer were S100A8/A9 negative, while those in gastritis were positive. Furthermore, exogenous S100A9 protein inhibited migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results suggested S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in gastric cancer tissues are associated with early stage of gastric cancer and good prognosis

  19. Lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity via protein disulfide isomerase-dependent tissue factor decryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysov, Zakhar; Swystun, Laura L; Kuruvilla, Sara; Arnold, Andrew; Liaw, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy have an elevated risk for thrombosis. However, the mechanisms by which chemotherapy agents increase the risk for thrombosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) by which lung cancer chemotherapy agents cisplatin, carboplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel elicit increased tissue factor activity on endothelial cells, A549 cells, and monocytes. Tissue factor activity, tissue factor antigen, and phosphatidylserine exposure were measured on chemotherapy-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), A549 cells, and monocytes. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and cell surface free thiol levels were measured on HUVEC and A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. Treatment of HUVECs, A549 cells, and monocytes with lung cancer chemotherapy significantly increased cell surface tissue factor activity. However, elevated tissue factor antigen levels were observed only on cisplatin-treated and gemcitabine-treated monocytes. Cell surface levels of phosphatidylserine were increased on HUVEC and monocytes treated with cisplatin/gemcitabine combination therapy. Chemotherapy also resulted in increased cell surface levels of PDI and reduced cell surface free thiol levels. Glutathione treatment and PDI inhibition, but not phosphatidylserine inhibition, attenuated tissue factor activity. Furthermore, increased tissue factor activity was reversed by reducing cysteines with dithiothreitol. These studies are the first to demonstrate that lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity on endothelial cells and A549 cells by tissue factor decryption through a disulfide bond formation in a PDI-dependent mechanism. PMID:24911456

  20. Diffusion optical spectroscopy of cancerous and normal prostate tissues in time-resolved and frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kenneth J.; Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun

    2014-03-01

    It is well-known that light transport can be well described using Maxwell's electromagnetic theory. In biological tissue, the scattering particles cause the interaction of scattered waves from neighboring particles. Since such interaction cannot be ignored, multiple scattering occurs. The theoretical solution of multiple scattering is complicated. A suitable description is that the wavelike behavior of light is ignored and the transport of an individual photon is considered to be absorbed or scattered. This is known as the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) theory. Analytical solutions to the RTE that explicitly describes photon migration can be obtained by introducing some proper approximations. One of the most popular models used in the field of tissue optics is the Diffusion Approximation (DA). In this study, we report on the results of our initial study of optical properties of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissues and how tissue parameters affect the near infrared light transporting in the two types of tissues. The time-resolved transport of light is simulated as an impulse isotropic point source of energy within a homogeneous unbounded medium with different absorption and scattering properties of cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Light source is also modulated sinusoidally to yield a varied fluence rate in frequency domain at a distant observation point within the cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Due to difference of the absorption and scattering coefficients between cancerous and normal tissues, the expansion of light pulse, intensity, phase are found to be different.

  1. Proteogenomic Study beyond Chromosome 9: New Insight into Expressed Variant Proteome and Transcriptome in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-In; Lee, Jongan; Choi, Young-Jin; Seo, Jawon; Park, Jisook; Lee, Soo-Youn; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2015-12-01

    This is a report of a human proteome project (HPP) related to chromosome 9 (Chr 9). To reveal missing proteins and undiscovered features in proteogenomes, both LC-MS/MS analysis and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based identification and characterization were conducted on five pairs of lung adenocarcinoma tumors and adjacent nontumor tissues. Before our previous Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) special issue, there were 170 remaining missing proteins on Chr 9 (neXtProt 2013.09.26 rel.); 133 remain at present (neXtProt 2015.04.28 rel.). In the proteomics study, we found two missing protein candidates that require follow-up work and one unrevealed protein across all chromosomes. RNA-seq analysis detected RNA expression for four nonsynonymous (NS) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (in CDH17, HIST1H1T, SAPCD2, and ZNF695) and three synonymous SNPs (in CDH17, CST1, and HNF1A) in all five tumor tissues but not in any of the adjacent normal tissues. By constructing a cancer patient sample-specific protein database based on individual RNA-seq data and by searching the proteomics data from the same sample, we identified four missense mutations in four genes (LTF, HDLBP, TF, and HBD). Two of these mutations were found in tumor samples but not in paired normal tissues. In summary, our proteogenomic study of human primary lung tumor tissues detected additional and revealed novel missense mutations and synonymous SNP signatures, some of which are specific to lung cancers. Data from mass spectrometry have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD002523. PMID:26584007

  2. Concentration of uranium in human cancerous tissues of Southern Iraqi patients using fission track analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of nuclear fission track analysis with solid state nuclear track detectors CR-39 has been applied to determine concentrations of uranium in cancerous samples of human tissues that excised from patients in the three key southern Iraqi governorates namely, Basrah, Dhi-Qar, and Muthanna. These provinces were the sites of intensive military events during the Gulf Wars in 1991 and 2003. The investigation was based on the study of 24 abnormal samples and 12 normal samples for comparing the results. These samples include four types of soft tissues (kidney, breast, stomach and uterus). The results show that uranium concentrations in the normal tissues ranged between (1.42-4.76 μg kg-1), whereas in the cancerous tissues ranged between (3.37-7.22 μg kg-1). The uranium concentrations in the normal tissues were significantly lower than in the abnormal tissues (P < 0.001). (author)

  3. Meta-analysis of cancer transcriptomes: A new approach to uncover molecular pathological events in different cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundus Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To explore secrets of metastatic cancers, individual expression of true sets of respective genes must spread across the tissue. In this study, meta-analysis for transcriptional profiles of oncogenes was carried out to hunt critical genes or networks helping in metastasizing cancers. For this, transcriptomic analysis of different cancerous tissues causing leukemia, lung, liver, spleen, colorectal, colon, breast, bladder, and kidney cancers was performed by extracting microarray expression data from online resource; Gene Expression Omnibus. A newly developed bioinformatics technique; Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA was applied for enrichment analysis of transcriptional profiles using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID. Furthermore, oPOSSUM (v. 2.0 and Cytoscape (v. 2.8.2 were used for in-depth analysis of transcription factors and regulatory gene networks respectively. DAVID analysis uncovered the most significantly enriched pathways in molecular functions that were 'Ubiquitin thiolesterase activity' up regulated in blood, breast, bladder, colorectal, lung, spleen, prostrate cancer. 'Transforming growth factor beta receptor activity' was inhibited in all cancers except leukemia, colon and liver cancer. oPOSSUM further revealed highly over-represented Transcription Factors (TFs; Broad-complex_3, Broad-complex_4, and Foxd3 except for leukemia and bladder cancer. From these findings, it is possible to target genes and networks, play a crucial role in the development of cancer. In the future, these transcription factors can serve as potential candidates for the therapeutic drug targets which can impede the deadly spread.

  4. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium and nickel in cancerous and healthy tissues from patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khlifi, Rim, E-mail: rimkhlifi@yahoo.fr [Marine Ecotoxicology, UR 09-03, Sfax University, IPEIS, BP 805, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Bioinformatics Unit, Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando [Department of Legal Medicine and Toxicology, University of Granada (Spain); Hammami, Bouthaina; Chakroun, Amine [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, HUC Habib Borguiba Hospital, Sfax (Tunisia); Rebai, Ahmed [Bioinformatics Unit, Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Hamza-Chaffai, Amel [Marine Ecotoxicology, UR 09-03, Sfax University, IPEIS, BP 805, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2013-05-01

    Chronic exposure to heavy metals has long been recognized as being capable to increase head and neck cancer incidence among exposed human populations. Head and neck cancer is a significant public health issue in Tunisia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of As, Cd, Cr and Ni in healthy and tumor tissues of head and neck cancer patients. Metal concentrations were determined in tumor and healthy tissues of 101 head and neck cancer patients, using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The As, Cd, Cr, and Ni levels in tumor tissues were 3.4, 2.5, 1.3 and 1.5 times higher than those of healthy tissues (p < 0.05), respectively. Tumor tissue metal levels were higher in men than in women. As and Cd levels in tumor and healthy tissue samples of patients smokers are significantly higher than those of non-smokers (p < 0.05). A strong effect of cumulative smoking as expressed in the number of pack per year, and tumor tissue Cd levels were positively associated with three groups of age (< 40, 51–60 and > 60 years) in both never-smokers and ever-smokers (< 20 and ≥ 20 pack per year). Healthy tissue Cd levels were negatively associated with age in those three groups of smokers. The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among both workers and non-workers were observed in tumor tissues. The Cd and Cr in tissues of farmers, bricklayers and painters were all significantly higher among the workers as compared with the non-workers group. Tissue metal levels have increased due to smoking and occupational exposure. Heavy metal exposure via tobacco smoking and occupational exposures may increase the risk of head and neck in the Tunisian population. - Highlights: ► Heavy metal levels in tumor tissues were higher than those in healthy tissues. ► Tumor tissue Cd levels were positively associated with age in smokers. ► Tumor tissue metal levels were higher in men than in women. ► The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among workers were observed in tumor tissues

  5. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly L. Nicastro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention.

  6. CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM CONTENT IN CANCEROUS AND HEALTHY TISSUES OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Głogowska; Dariusz Pabis; Robert Stawarz; Grzegorz Formicki

    2012-01-01

    Studies concerning concentration of biogenic metals in tissues of digestive system are sparse and diversified. The objectives of this study were to determine the mean concentration of biogenic metals: Mg and Ca, in cancerous and normal tissues of digestive system. Research was conducted on samples taken from different segments of human digestive tract. Tissues were taken during biopsy, surgery, and post-mortem from Military Hospital and PROSMED Health Center Patients’ located in Cracow. Sampl...

  7. Application of RT-PCR in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zhuo-min; Liu, Hong-Yu; Bai, Yun; Sen WEI; Ying LI; Wang, Min; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Qing-hua

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To analyze gene expression in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues using modified method. Methods: Total RNA from frozen tissues was extracted using TRIZOL reagent. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues by digestion with proteinase K before the acid-phenol:chloroform extraction and carrier precipitation. We modified this method by using a higher concentration of proteinase K and a longer digestion time, optimized to 16 hours. RT-PCR and real-ti...

  8. Quantitative proteomics in resected renal cancer tissue for biomarker discovery and profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Atrih, A; Mudaliar, M A V; Zakikhani, P; Lamont, D J; Huang, J T-J; Bray, S.E.; Barton, G.; Fleming, S; Nabi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteomics-based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. We present state-of-art label-free quantitative proteomics method to assess proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with noncancer renal tissues. Methods: Fresh frozen tissue samples from eight primary RCC lesions and autologous adjacent normal renal tissues were obtained from surgically resected tumour-bearing kidneys. Proteins were extracted by complete solubilisation of...

  9. Magnetically actuated tissue engineered scaffold: insights into mechanism of physical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir-Lekhovitser, Yulia; Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Jopp, Juergen; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-02-01

    Providing the right stimulatory conditions resulting in efficient tissue promoting microenvironment in vitro and in vivo is one of the ultimate goals in tissue development for regenerative medicine. It has been shown that in addition to molecular signals (e.g. growth factors) physical cues are also required for generation of functional cell constructs. These cues are particularly relevant to engineering of biological tissues, within which mechanical stress activates mechano-sensitive receptors, initiating biochemical pathways which lead to the production of functionally mature tissue. Uniform magnetic fields coupled with magnetizable nanoparticles embedded within three dimensional (3D) scaffold structures remotely create transient physical forces that can be transferrable to cells present in close proximity to the nanoparticles. This study investigated the hypothesis that magnetically responsive alginate scaffold can undergo reversible shape deformation due to alignment of scaffold's walls in a uniform magnetic field. Using custom made Helmholtz coil setup adapted to an Atomic Force Microscope we monitored changes in matrix dimensions in situ as a function of applied magnetic field, concentration of magnetic particles within the scaffold wall structure and rigidity of the matrix. Our results show that magnetically responsive scaffolds exposed to an externally applied time-varying uniform magnetic field undergo a reversible shape deformation. This indicates on possibility of generating bending/stretching forces that may exert a mechanical effect on cells due to alternating pattern of scaffold wall alignment and relaxation. We suggest that the matrix structure deformation is produced by immobilized magnetic nanoparticles within the matrix walls resulting in a collective alignment of scaffold walls upon magnetization. The estimated mechanical force that can be imparted on cells grown on the scaffold wall at experimental conditions is in the order of 1 pN, which

  10. Control of sulfatase activity by nomegestrol acetate in normal and cancerous human breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetrite, Gérard Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Shields-Botella, Jaqueline; Cortes-Prieto, Joaquin; Philippe, Jean-Claude; Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2005-01-01

    Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a 17alpha-hydroxy-nor-progesterone derivative (17alpha-acetoxy-6-methyl-19-nor-4,6-pregnadiene-3,20-dione, the active substance in Lutenyl), is a potent and useful clinical synthetic progestin for the treatment of menopausal complaints and is under current development for oral contraception. Previous studies in this laboratory demonstrated that NOMAC can block sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and transformation of estradiol (E2) in hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T-47D breast cancer cells. In the present study, the effect of NOMAC on sulfatase activity using total breast cancer tissue, compared to the effect in normal breast tissue, was explored. Slices of tumoral or normal breast tissues (45-65 mg) were incubated in buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.2) with physiological concentrations of [3H]-estrone sulfate (5x10(-9) M), alone or in the presence of nomegestrol acetate (5x10(-5) - 5x10(-7) - 5x10(-9) M), for 4 h at 37 degrees C. Estrone sulfate (E1S), estrone (E1) and E2 were characterized by thin layer chromatography and quantified using the corresponding standard. It was observed that [3H]- E1S was only converted to [3H]- E1 and not to [3H]- E2, in normal or cancerous breast tissues, which suggests a low or no 17beta-HSD activity under these experimental conditions. The sulfatase activity was more intense with breast cancer tissue than normal tissue, since the concentrations of E1 were 42.5 +/- 3.4 and 27.2 +/- 2.5 pg/mg tissue, respectively. NOMAC, at the concentration of 5x10(-5) M, inhibited this conversion by 49.2% and 40.8% in cancerous and normal breast tissues, respectively. The sulfatase inhibition at low concentration (5x10(-7) M) was 32.5% and 22.8%, respectively. It is concluded that sulfatase activity is almost twice as potent in cancerous breast tissues than in normal tissues. Nomegestrol acetate is a strong anti-sulfatase agent, in particular with cancerous breast

  11. Contribution to the study of radiation induced bone tissue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work four original observations of more or less long-delayed cancers induced by ionizing radiations are compared with 34 other cases in the literature, after which an attempt is made to establish a general and prognostic synthesis of the results; the indications to emerge are as follows: - Ionizing radiation-induced cancers are very rare, especially when compared with the extensive therapeutic use made of X-rays; - The probability of radio-cancer formation, though no figures are given in the many papers consulted, seems nevertheless to be higher in cases of benign lesion irradiation; - Induced cancers have been observed after treatments with all types of radiation, whether or not the lesion is tumoral or cancerous, whatever the patient's age at the time of irradiations; - As a general rule these neoplasms appear after a variable latency period but usually from the 6th post-radiotherapy year onwards, with a greater frequency range between 6 and 12 years; - These induced cancers are generally epitheliomas or sarcomas, the latter being noticeably more predominant than in the case of spontaneous cancers. Leukoses may also be observed

  12. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  13. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins. PMID:26535413

  14. New Mechanism of Bone Cancer Pain: Tumor Tissue-Derived Endogenous Formaldehyde Induced Bone Cancer Pain via TRPV1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, You

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, our serial investigations focused on the role of cancer cells-derived endogenous formaldehyde in bone cancer pain. We found that cancer cells produced formaldehyde through demethylation process by serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT1 and SHMT2) and lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1). When the cancer cells metastasized into bone marrow, the elevated endogenous formaldehyde induced bone cancer pain through activation on the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) in the peripheral nerve fibers. More interestingly, TRPV1 expressions in the peripheral fibers were upregulated by the local insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) produced by the activated osteoblasts. In conclusion, tumor tissue-derived endogenous formaldehyde induced bone cancer pain via TRPV1 activation. PMID:26900062

  15. Laser Direct-Write Onto Live Tissues: A Novel Model for Studying Cancer Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Hope E; Phamduy, Theresa B; Azimi, Mohammad S; Saksena, Jayant; Burow, Matthew E; Collins-Burow, Bridgette M; Chrisey, Douglas B; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-11-01

    Investigation into the mechanisms driving cancer cell behavior and the subsequent development of novel targeted therapeutics requires comprehensive experimental models that mimic the complexity of the tumor microenvironment. Recently, our laboratories have combined a novel tissue culture model and laser direct-write, a form of bioprinting, to spatially position single or clustered cancer cells onto ex vivo microvascular networks containing blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and interstitial cell populations. Herein, we highlight this new model as a tool for quantifying cancer cell motility and effects on angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in an intact network that matches the complexity of a real tissue. Application of our proposed methodology offers an innovative ex vivo tissue perspective for evaluating the effects of gene expression and targeted molecular therapies on cancer cell migration and invasion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2333-2338, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26923437

  16. Recent insights in the therapeutic management of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestier, Louis; Lardière-Deguelte, Sophie; Volet, Julien; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains frequent and one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. In this article, we aimed to comprehensively review recent insights in the therapeutic management of gastric cancer, with focus on the surgical and perioperative management of resectable forms, and the latest advances regarding advanced diseases. Surgical improvements comprise the use of laparoscopic surgery including staging laparoscopy, a better definition of nodal dissection, and the development of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The best individualized perioperative management should be assessed before curative-intent surgery for all patients and can consists in perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The optimal timing and sequence of chemotherapy and radiation therapy with respect to surgery should be further explored. Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, they can benefit from doublet or triplet chemotherapy combination, including trastuzumab in HER2-positive patients. Upon progression, second-line therapy can be considered in patients with good performance status. Although anti-HER2 (trastuzumab) and anti-VEGFR (ramucirumab) may yield survival benefit, anti-EGFR and anti-HGFR therapies have failed to improve outcomes. Nevertheless, combination regimens containing cytotoxic drugs and targeted therapies should be further evaluated; keeping in mind that gastric cancer biology is different between Asia and the Western countries. PMID:27156069

  17. Expression of inflammatory cytokines by adipose tissue from patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlyak, A; Zakhaleva, J; Pearl, M; Mileva, I; Gelato, M; Mynarcik, D; McNurlan, M

    2012-01-01

    Obesity results in increased mortality from many forms of cancer. We looked at the levels of gene expression for TNFalpha, IL-6, IkappaB kinase (inhibitor of NF-kappaB), CD 68 (glycoprotein expressed on macrophages) and leptin in samples of adipose tissue from individuals with endometrial cancer versus patients with benign conditions. This is a prospective study which included patients of a gynecologic oncology group. A piece of omental tissue was harvested from them during surgery. RNA was purified from all samples. Relative amounts of RNA for IkappaB, TNFalpha, IL-6, CD68 and leptin were calculated. Pearson's correlation method was used to correlate RNA levels with BMI. Logistic regression method was used to compare gene expression for cancer and control groups. The total sample size was 56 (24 endometrial cancer and 32 controls). IkappaB, TNFalpha and IL-6 levels increased linearly with increasing BMI in the control group. There was no correlation of IkappaB, TNFalpha, IL-6 or CD-68 levels with cancer status of the patients. Leptin had a weak protective effect against endometrial cancer (odds ratio = 0.92). Obesity is associated with increased expression of certain inflammatory cytokines in the adipose tissue. However, increased levels of these inflammatory markers in the adipose tissue of the omentum are not associated with presence of endometrial cancer. PMID:23091891

  18. Study of selected trace elements in cancerous and non-cancerous human breast tissues using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of cancer on selected trace elements among sudanese patients with confirmed breast cancer. Eighty samples of cancerous and normal tissues (total of one hundred and sixty) were obtained from the same breast of the same subject from different hospitals in Khartoum State. Samples were freeze dried and analyzed using neutron activation analysis (NAA). Neutron irradiations were performed at Egypt second research reactor with a maximum thermal flux of 2.37 Χ 1014 n cm-2 s-1. To examine if there was any difference in the concentrations of elements from normal and malignant tissues; Wilcox on signed ranks test was used. It was found that Al, Mn, Mg, Se, Zn, and Cr elements from the malignant tissues are significantly elevated (p0.05). The results obtained have shown consistency with results obtained by some previous studies, however, no data could be found for the elements Mg, Cr, and Sc.(Author)

  19. A Cancer-Indicative microRNA Pattern in Normal Prostate Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schlomm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the levels of selected micro-RNAs in normal prostate tissue to assess their potential to indicate tumor foci elsewhere in the prostate. Histologically normal prostate tissue samples from 31 prostate cancer patients and two cancer negative control groups with either unsuspicious or elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA levels (14 and 17 individuals, respectively were analyzed. Based on the expression analysis of 157 microRNAs in a pool of prostate tissue samples and information from data bases/literature, we selected eight microRNAs for quantification by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Selected miRNAs were analyzed in histologically tumor-free biopsy samples from patients and healthy controls. We identified seven microRNAs (miR-124a, miR-146a & b, miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a & b, which displayed significant differential expression in normal prostate tissue from men with prostate cancer compared to both cancer negative control groups. Four microRNAs (miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a and let-7b remained to significantly discriminate normal tissues from prostate cancer patients from those of the cancer negative control group with elevated PSA levels. The transcript levels of these microRNAs were highly indicative for the presence of cancer in the prostates, independently of the PSA level. Our results suggest a microRNA-pattern in histologically normal prostate tissue, indicating prostate cancer elsewhere in the organ.

  20. Oncoprotein DEK as a tissue and urinary biomarker for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bladder cancer is a significant healthcare problem in the United States of America with a high recurrence rate. Early detection of bladder cancer is essential for removing the tumor with preservation of the bladder, avoiding metastasis and hence improving prognosis and long-term survival. The objective of this study was to analyze the presence of DEK protein in voided urine of bladder cancer patients as a urine-based bladder cancer diagnostic test. We examined the expression of DEK protein by western blot in 38 paired transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) bladder tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissue. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine was analyzed by western blot in 42 urine samples collected from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals. The DEK protein is expressed in 33 of 38 bladder tumor tissues with no expression in adjacent normal tissue. Based on our sample size, DEK protein is expressed in 100% of tumors of low malignant potential, 92% of tumors of low grade and in 71% of tumors of high grade. Next, we analyzed 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals for DEK protein expression by western blot analysis. We are the first to show that the DEK protein is present in the urine of bladder cancer patients. Approximately 84% of TCC patient urine specimens were positive for urine DEK. Based on our pilot study of 38 bladder tumor tissue and 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals; DEK protein is expressed in bladder tumor tissue and voided urine of bladder cancer patients. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine is potentially a suitable biomarker for bladder cancer and that the screening for the presence of DEK protein in urine can be explored as a noninvasive diagnostic test for bladder cancer

  1. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  2. PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Shi, Jian-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Rui; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Ya-Chao; Wei, Teng-Yao; Gao, Ying; Li, Wei; Tang, Hong-Ying; Tang, Mei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues, as well as the association with colorectal cancer clinical data. In total, 54 cases of colorectal cancer tissue samples and normal adjacent tissue samples were collected between June, 2013 and July, 2014. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of PAQR3 in colorectal samples, respectively. MSP was used to detect the methylation level of PAQR3 gene in colorectal samples, which was compared with colorectal data. The results showed that a decreased expression level of PAQR3 mRNA in colorectal cancer tissues and the expression reduction rate was 57.4% (31/54). Similarly, the expression level of PAQR3 protein was reduced in cancer tissues, and the reduction rate was 46.3% (25/54), while the protein expression reduction rate in cancer adjacent tissue was 5.6% (3/54), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Furthermore, the methylation rates of PAQR3 in cancer tissues and cancer adjacent tissues were 33.3% (18/54) and 5.6% (3/54), respectively. In addition, PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels in colorectal cancer tissues were associated with the differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. The methylation level of PAQR3 was associated with age, differentiated degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In conclusion, the expression of PAQR3 mRNA and protein in colorectal cancer was reduced and methylation of PAQR3 occurred. Although the PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels were not associated with gender, age or the location of tumor, there was an association with differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In addition, the methylation level of PAQR3 was not correlated with gender or tumor location, but was correlated with age, differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth.

  3. Insights into the molecular mechanism of glucose metabolism regulation under stress in chicken skeletal muscle tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wuyi; Zhao, Jingpeng

    2014-01-01

    As substantial progress has been achieved in modern poultry production with large-scale and intensive feeding and farming in recent years, stress becomes a vital factor affecting chicken growth, development, and production yield, especially the quality and quantity of skeletal muscle mass. The review was aimed to outline and understand the stress-related genetic regulatory mechanism, which significantly affects glucose metabolism regulation in chicken skeletal muscle tissues. Progress in curr...

  4. Contemporary and future insights into fertility preservation in male cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, survival rates of cancer patients have increased, resulting in a shift of focus from quantity to quality of life. A key aspect of quality of life is fertility potential; patients suffering from iatrogenic infertility often become depressed. Since many cancer therapies-chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery-and even cancer itself have detrimental effects on the male reproductive system, it is important to preserve fertility before any treatment commences. Currently, the only reliable method of male fertility preservation is sperm banking. For patients who are unable to provide semen samples by the conventional method of masturbation, there are other techniques such as electroejaculation, microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration and testicular sperm extraction that can be employed. Unfortunately, it is presently impossible to preserve the fertility potential of pre-pubertal patients. Due to the increasing numbers of adolescent cancer patients surviving treatment, extensive research is being conducted into several possible methods such as testicular tissue cryopreservation, xenografting, in vitro gamete maturation and even the creation of artificial gametes. However, in spite of its ease, safety, convenience and many accompanying benefits, sperm banking remains underutilized in cancer patients. There are several barriers involved such as the lack of information and the urgency to begin treatment, but various measures can be put in place to overcome these barriers so that sperm banking can be more widely utilized. PMID:26816750

  5. Analysis of different components in the peritumoral tissue microenvironment of colorectal cancer: A potential prospect in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Liu, Hong; Gong, Xiuli; Wen, Bin; Chen, Dan; Liu, Jinyuan; Hu, Fengliang

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to observe the varying expression of biomarkers in the microenvironment adjacent to colorectal cancer lesions to provide additional insight into the functions of microenvironment components in carcinogenesis and present a novel or improved indicator for early diagnosis of cancer. A total of 144 human samples from three different locations in 48 patients were collected, these locations were 10, 5 and 2 cm from the colorectal cancer lesion, respectively. The biomarkers analyzed included E‑cadherin, cytokeratin 18 (CK18), hyaluronidase‑1 (Hyal‑1), collagen type I (Col‑I), Crumbs3 (CRB3), vimentin, proteinase activated receptor 3 (PAR‑3), α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA), cyclin D1 (CD1) and cluster of differentiation (CD)133. In addition, crypt architecture was observed. Related functional analysis of proteins was performed using hierarchical index cluster analysis. More severe destroyed crypt architecture closer to the cancer lesions was observed compared with the 10 cm sites, with certain crypts degraded entirely. Expression levels of E‑cadherin, CK18, CRB3 and PAR‑3 were lower in 2 cm sites compared with the 10 cm sites (all P0.05 and P=0.0001, respectively), while the expression of vimentin, α‑SMA, CD1 and CD133 were not. Hyal‑1 and Col‑I may be independently important in cancer initiation in the tumor microenvironment. The results of the present study suggest that the biomarkers in the tissue microenvironment are associated with early tumorigenesis and may contribute to the development of carcinomas. These observations may be useful for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. PMID:27484148

  6. Hyaluronidase activity in gynaecological cancer tissues with different metastatic forms.

    OpenAIRE

    Tamakoshi, K.; Kikkawa, F; Maeda, O; Suganuma, N; Yamagata, S.; T. Yamagata; Tomoda, Y

    1997-01-01

    We investigated hyaluronidase activity in gynaecological normal and malignant tissues. Hyaluronidase activity in culture medium of tissue specimens was detected by hyaluronic acid zymography and quantified by densitometry. Hyaluronidase activity was shown as one dominant band (molecular weight 65 kDa) at pH 3.5. Hyaluronidase activity was significantly higher in normal ovary (P < 0.05) and normal endometrium (P< 0.05) than in normal cervix. One dominant 65-kDa hyaluronidase was expressed in 1...

  7. Loss of antigenicity with tissue age in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Susan E; Han, Gang; Mani, Nikita; Beruti, Susan; Nerenberg, Michael; Rimm, David L

    2016-03-01

    Archived tumor specimens, particularly those collected by large cooperative groups and trials, provide a wealth of material for post hoc clinical investigation. As these tissues are rigorously collected and preserved for many decades, subsequent use of the specimens to answer clinical questions must rely on the assumption that expression and detection of target biomarkers are not degraded with time. To test this assumption, we measured the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki67 in human breast carcinoma using quantitative immunofluorescence (QIF) in a series of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from 1295 individual patients preserved for 7 to 53 years in four cohorts on tissue microarrays. Protein expression was measured using the automated quantitative analysis method for QIF. Change in quantitative protein expression over time was estimated in positive cases using both Pearson's correlation and a polynomial regression analysis with a random effects model. The average signal decreased with preservation time for all biomarkers measured. For ER and HER2, there was an average of 10% signal loss after 9.9 years and 8.5 years, respectively, compared with the most recent tissue. Detection of Ki67 expression was lost more rapidly, with 10% signal loss in just 4.5 years. Overall, these results demonstrate the need for adjustment of tissue age when studying FFPE biospecimens. The rate of antigenicity loss is biomarker specific and should be considered as an important variable for studies using archived tissues. PMID:26568292

  8. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo

  9. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    1999-01-01

    prognostic value of individual white cell counts in the peritumoural inflammatory infiltrate in colorectal cancer was assessed. Intra-operative tumour tissue samples from 584 patients undergoing elective surgery for colorectal cancer were included. None of the patients received pre- or post......-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. Tissue blocks were cut from the periphery of the tumours and embedded in paraffin. All blocks included both tumour tissue and normal bowel tissue. Serial sections of 4 microm were analysed for tumour tissue inflammatory cell infiltration using a computer- and video......-assisted microscope, which allowed semi-automated quantification of cells within a fixed area. Total white cells and individual counts of eosinophils, neutrophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were evaluated in every tumour specimen. Stratification into four groups with similar numbers of events was used...

  10. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Ruth M [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cole, Bryan E [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wallace, Vincent P [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pye, Richard J [Department of Dermatology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Arnone, Donald D [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Linfield, Edmund H [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pepper, Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-07

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. New Insights into the Genetic Control of Gene Expression using a Bayesian Multi-tissue Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petretto, E.; Bottolo, L.; Langley, S. R.; Heinig, M.; McDermott-Roe, Ch.; Sarwar, R.; Pravenec, Michal; Hübner, N.; Aitman, T. J.; Cook, S.A.; Richardson, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2010), e1000737. ISSN 1553-734X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/08/0166; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GAP301/10/0290 Grant ostatní: EC(XE) LSHG-CT-2005-019015; Fondation Leducq(FR) 06 CVD 03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : expression profiles * Bayesian multi- tissue approach * genetical genomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.515, year: 2010

  12. Level of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate in cancerous tissue in patients with gastric cancer under preoperative administration of TS-1. A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S; Kubota, K

    2005-09-01

    Metabolizing enzymes such as thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) have long been known to be useful for predicting response and outcome in patients receiving 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, few studies have examined the cancerous tissue levels of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (FdUMP), a metabolite of 5-FU that has an important role in inhibiting DNA synthesis. In this study, for the first time to our knowledge, we measured concentrations of FdUMP in tumor specimens and surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained at operation in 10 patients with gastric cancer who received TS-1 before surgery (80 mg/m2, 3 days). The FdUMP level in the cancerous tissue was significantly higher than that in the non-cancerous tissue (153.0 +/- 85.7 pmol/g tissue vs. 53.0 +/- 47.0 pmol/g tissue)(p = 0.0046). Furthermore, the TS level in tumor was significantly higher than that in non-cancerous tissue (6.362 +/- 5.106 pmol/g tissue vs. 2.092 +/- 2.050 pmol/g tissue) (p = 0.0310). The mean ratios of TS-bound FdUMP to TS and FdUMP concentrations in the cancerous tissues were 45.9% and 2.00%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that in cancerous tissue, TS-1 may produce high FdUMP concentration and suppress about half FdUMP concentration by forming ternary complexes. PMID:16270533

  13. Exome Enrichment and SOLiD Sequencing of Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE Prostate Cancer Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Biskup

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue. This study’s aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing.

  14. Exploration of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecule expression in cervical cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Chong Yuan; QiongYang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecules in cervical cancer tissue.Methods:Cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected to detect the expression of FoxM1, proliferation-related genes (CDK6 and CDK8) and angiogenesis-related genes (VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC); Hela cells were cultured and transfected with FoxM1 siRNA, and then expression of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC were detected.Results:mRNA contents of FoxM1, CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in normal cervical tissue; mRNA content of FoxM1 was positively correlated with mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC; mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC of FoxM1-siRNA group were significantly lower than those of negative control-siRNA group.Conclusion:FoxM1 expression abnormally increases in cervical cancer tissue, and its downstream target genes include CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC.

  15. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  16. Expression of CD40 and CD40L in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Its Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To study expression of CD40 and CD40L in gastric cancer tissue we assessed gastric cancer patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University and control subjects. Gastric cancer and normal (from around tumours tissue samples were obtained from patients. Venous blood samples (gastric cancer and ulcer groups were drawn on the morning of the day before surgery for the measurement of peripheral sCD40L. The expression of CD40 in gastric carcinoma specimens was examined immuno-histochemically. The clinicopathological factors, including age, sex, tumor size, gross appearance, degree of cellular differentiation, histological classification, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage were analyzed according to the different expression of CD40. The results indicated a high CD40 expression in gastric cancer tissues. This positive expression of CD40 revealed a significant (P < 0.05 correlation with lymphatic metastasis and tumor TNM stage in gastric cancer patients. It is concluded that higher CD40 expression existed in expanding type tumors and could play an important role in clinical diagnosis of gastric cancer patients.

  17. Critical roles of specimen type and temperature before and during fixation in the detection of phosphoproteins in breast cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Gündisch, Sibylle; Annaratone, Laura; Beese, Christian; Drecol, Enken; Marchiò, Caterina; Quaglino, Elena; Sapino, Anna; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Bussolati, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The most efficient approach for therapy selection to inhibit the deregulated kinases in cancer tissues is to measure their phosphorylation status prior to the treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of pre-analytical parameters (cold ischemia time, temperature before and during tissue fixation, and sample type) on the levels of proteins and phosphoproteins in breast cancer tissues, focusing on the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. The BALB-neuT mouse breast cancer model expressing...

  18. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  19. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial and cancer tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a strategy for the generation of 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate cells (either bulk or FACS-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumor cells. Organoids derived from healthy material cont

  20. Prognostic microRNAs in cancer tissue from patients operated for pancreatic cancer--five microRNAs in a prognostic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Andersen, Klaus; Roslind, Anne;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) that can predict overall survival (OS) in non micro-dissected cancer tissues from patients operated for pancreatic cancer (PC).......The aim of the present study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) that can predict overall survival (OS) in non micro-dissected cancer tissues from patients operated for pancreatic cancer (PC)....

  1. The potential of spectral imaging in the noninvasive diagnostics of tissue cancers and precancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Costas J.

    2003-08-01

    A novel approach to the problem of non-invasive diagnostics is presented, which relay son a combiend optical and chemical excitation of the tissue, by employing white light and topical application of acetic acid solution, respecitvley. Acetic acid-tissue interaction results in a transient alteration in the light scattering properties of the abnormal tissue selectivity. A specially developed Spectral Imaging system was used for the in vivo spectral imaging and analysis of the tissue and for the measurement, as a function of both time and location, of the acetic acid-induced alterations in the tissue scattering properties. Modeling and fitting of the experimental data result in the calculation of the kinetic constants of the marker-tissue interaction process, and spatil distribution of whcih is visualized with the aid of a pseudocolor scale. Clinical evaluation of both methodology and technology in normal, precancerous and cancerous lesions of cervix show that the measured kinetic data contain specific information, which enables the differentiation between cancerous and non-cancerous lesions, as well as between dysplasias of different grade. The calculated map of the kinetic constants provides information for the spatial distribution of the lesion's grades, thus enabling the detection of incipient lesions and the precise localization and classification of pathologic tissue areas.

  2. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2000-06-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

  3. Selection of a breast cancer subpopulation-specific antibody using phage display on tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla J;

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations. These populations display a high variance in morphology, growth and metastatic propensity. They respond differently to therapeutic interventions, and some may be more prone to cause recurrence. Studying individual subpopulations...... of breast cancer may provide crucial knowledge for the development of individualized therapy. However, this process is challenged by the availability of biomarkers able to identify subpopulations specifically. Here, we demonstrate an approach for phage display selection of recombinant antibody...... fragments on cryostat sections of human breast cancer tissue. This method allows for selection of recombinant antibodies binding to antigens specifically expressed in a small part of the tissue section. In this case, a CD271(+) subpopulation of breast cancer cells was targeted, and these may be potential...

  4. Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue: A New Player in Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Emma V.; Edwards, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is a favored site for a number of cancers, including the hematological malignancy multiple myeloma, and metastasis of breast and prostate cancer. This specialized microenvironment is highly supportive, not only for tumor growth and survival but also for the development of an associated destructive cancer-induced bone disease. The interactions between tumor cells, osteoclasts and osteoblasts are well documented. By contrast, despite occupying a significant proportion of the bone marrow, the importance of bone marrow adipose tissue is only just emerging. The ability of bone marrow adipocytes to regulate skeletal biology and hematopoiesis, combined with their metabolic activity, endocrine functions, and proximity to tumor cells means that they are ideally placed to impact both tumor growth and bone disease. This review discusses the recent advances in our understanding of how marrow adipose tissue contributes to bone metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease.

  5. Expression of glucocorticoid and progesterone nuclear receptor genes in archival breast cancer tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown associations of specific nuclear receptor gene variants with sporadic breast cancer. In order to investigate these findings further, we conducted the present study to determine whether expression levels of the progesterone and glucocorticoid nuclear receptor genes vary in different breast cancer grades. RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded archival breast tumour tissue and converted into cDNA. Sample cDNA underwent PCR using labelled primers to enable quantitation of mRNA expression. Expression data were normalized against the 18S ribosomal gene multiplex and analyzed using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance indicated a variable level of expression of both genes with regard to breast cancer grade (P = 0.00033 for glucocorticoid receptor and P = 0.023 for progesterone receptor). Statistical analysis indicated that expression of the progesterone nuclear receptor is elevated in late grade breast cancer tissue

  6. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  7. TET1 Suppresses Cancer Invasion by Activating the Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor gene silencing through cytosine methylation contributes to cancer formation. Whether DNA demethylation enzymes counteract this oncogenic effect is unknown. Here, we show that TET1, a dioxygenase involved in cytosine demethylation, is downregulated in prostate and breast cancer tissues. TET1 depletion facilitates cell invasion, tumor growth, and cancer metastasis in prostate xenograft models and correlates with poor survival rates in breast cancer patients. Consistently, enforced expression of TET1 reduces cell invasion and breast xenograft tumor formation. Mechanistically, TET1 suppresses cell invasion through its dioxygenase and DNA binding activities. Furthermore, TET1 maintains the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP family proteins 2 and 3 by inhibiting their DNA methylation. Concurrent low expression of TET1 and TIMP2 or TIMP3 correlates with advanced node status in clinical samples. Together, these results illustrate a mechanism by which TET1 suppresses tumor development and invasion partly through downregulation of critical gene methylation.

  8. Nonlinear optical microscopy for histology of fresh normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of only 1-5%. The acceleration of intraoperative histological examination would be beneficial for better management of pancreatic cancer, suggesting an improved survival. Nonlinear optical methods based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second harmonic generation (SHG of intrinsic optical biomarkers show the ability to visualize the morphology of fresh tissues associated with histology, which is promising for real-time intraoperative evaluation of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate whether the nonlinear optical imaging methods have the ability to characterize pancreatic histology at cellular resolution, we studied different types of pancreatic tissues by using label-free TPEF and SHG. Compared with other routine methods for the preparation of specimens, fresh tissues without processing were found to be most suitable for nonlinear optical imaging of pancreatic tissues. The detailed morphology of the normal rat pancreas was observed and related with the standard histological images. Comparatively speaking, the preliminary images of a small number of chemical-induced pancreatic cancer tissues showed visible neoplastic differences in the morphology of cells and extracellular matrix. The subcutaneous pancreatic tumor xenografts were further observed using the nonlinear optical microscopy, showing that most cells are leucocytes at 5 days after implantation, the tumor cells begin to proliferate at 10 days after implantation, and the extracellular collagen fibers become disordered as the xenografts grow. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, nonlinear optical imaging was used to characterize the morphological details of fresh pancreatic tissues for the first time. We demonstrate that it is possible to provide real-time histological evaluation of pancreatic cancer by the nonlinear optical methods, which present an

  9. N-glycoprotein analysis discovers new up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastri, Annalisa; Gaspari, Marco; Sacco, Rosario; Elia, Laura; Gabriele, Caterina; Romano, Roberto; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cuda, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death due to cancer worldwide. Therefore, the identification of high-specificity and -sensitivity biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer is urgently needed. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, are known to play an important role in cancer progression. In the present work, we used a quantitative proteomic technique based on (18)O stable isotope labeling to identify differentially expressed N-linked glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue samples compared with healthy colorectal tissue from 19 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. We identified 54 up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer samples, therefore potentially involved in the biological processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, nine of these (PLOD2, DPEP1, SE1L1, CD82, PAR1, PLOD3, S12A2, LAMP3, OLFM4) were found to be up-regulated in the great majority of the cohort, and, interestingly, the association with colorectal cancer of four (PLOD2, S12A2, PLOD3, CD82) has not been hitherto described. PMID:25247386

  10. A tissue-engineered humanized xenograft model of human breast cancer metastasis to bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Thibaudeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The skeleton is a preferred homing site for breast cancer metastasis. To date, treatment options for patients with bone metastases are mostly palliative and the disease is still incurable. Indeed, key mechanisms involved in breast cancer osteotropism are still only partially understood due to the lack of suitable animal models to mimic metastasis of human tumor cells to a human bone microenvironment. In the presented study, we investigate the use of a human tissue-engineered bone construct to develop a humanized xenograft model of breast cancer-induced bone metastasis in a murine host. Primary human osteoblastic cell-seeded melt electrospun scaffolds in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 were implanted subcutaneously in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. The tissue-engineered constructs led to the formation of a morphologically intact ‘organ’ bone incorporating a high amount of mineralized tissue, live osteocytes and bone marrow spaces. The newly formed bone was largely humanized, as indicated by the incorporation of human bone cells and human-derived matrix proteins. After intracardiac injection, the dissemination of luciferase-expressing human breast cancer cell lines to the humanized bone ossicles was detected by bioluminescent imaging. Histological analysis revealed the presence of metastases with clear osteolysis in the newly formed bone. Thus, human tissue-engineered bone constructs can be applied efficiently as a target tissue for human breast cancer cells injected into the blood circulation and replicate the osteolytic phenotype associated with breast cancer-induced bone lesions. In conclusion, we have developed an appropriate model for investigation of species-specific mechanisms of human breast cancer-related bone metastasis in vivo.

  11. Statistical interpretations and new findings on Variation in Cancer Risk Among Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Robert; Kaltz, Oliver; Hochberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Tomasetti and Vogelstein (2015a) find that the incidence of a set of cancer types is correlated with the total number of normal stem cell divisions. Here, we separate the effects of standing stem cell number (i.e., organ or tissue size) and per stem cell lifetime replication rate. We show that each has a statistically significant and independent effect on explaining variation in cancer incidence over the 31 cases considered by Tomasetti and Vogelstein. When considering the total number of ste...

  12. Distribution of tamoxifen and metabolites into brain tissue and brain metastases in breast cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, E A; Wester, K.; Lønning, P. E.; Solheim, E; Ueland, P. M.

    1991-01-01

    We determined the amount of tamoxifen, N-desmethyltamoxifen (metabolite X), N-desdimethyltamoxifen (metabolite Z), and hydroxylated metabolites (Y, B, BX) in brain metastases from breast cancer and in the surrounding brain tissues. Specimens were collected from the breast cancer patients who received tamoxifen for 7-180 days and with the last dose taken within 28 h before surgical removal of the tumour. The concentrations of tamoxifen and its metabolites were up to 46-fold higher in the brain...

  13. Erythropoietin administration partially prevents adipose tissue loss in experimental cancer cachexia models

    OpenAIRE

    Penna, Fabio; Busquets, Silvia; Toledo, Miriam; Pin, Fabrizio; Massa, David; López-Soriano, Francisco J.; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated cachexia is characterized, among other symptoms, by a dramatic loss of both muscle and fat. In addition, the cachectic syndrome is often associated with anemia. The object of the present investigation was to assess the effects of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment on experimental cancer cachexia models. The results clearly show that, in addition to the improvement of the hematocrit, EPO treatment promoted a partial preservation of adipose tissue while exerting negligible effects...

  14. Colon cancer : Disease related proteins in tumor tissue and serum

    OpenAIRE

    Roblick, Uwe Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Despite the progress in surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies the mortality of around 60% within the group of colon cancer patients did not decrease significantly over the last decades. This determines a growing demand for biomarkers for early detection, prognosis and risk assessment in colorectal malignancies. Desirable criteria for such a biomarker test are minimal burden and maximum safety for the patient, cost efficiency and broad acceptance to reach a high complian...

  15. Expression of HSP90 and HIF-1α in human colorectal cancer tissue and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ran; Xu; Xin; Liu; Ying-Min; Yao; Qing-Guang; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expression of HSP90 and HIF-1αin human colorectal cancer tissue,the influence of HSP90 and HIF-1αon human colorectal cancer biological behavior and their related factors.Methods:The expression of HSP90 and HIF-1 a protein in human colorectal cancer as well as normal tissue were detected by imnmnohistochemical method.Results:The positive expression rates of HSP90 and HIF-1αprotein in normal human colorectal tissue as well as colorectal cancer tissue were 30%vs.63.0%,15.0%vs.71.7%,respectively.There were significant difference(P=0.035 and P=0.005 respectively).The expression of HSP90 was significantly correlated with the differentiation,Dukes stages and lymph node metastasis(P<0.05),while the expression of HIF-1 a was significantly correlated with the Dukes stages and lymph node metastasis(P<0.05).Association analysis showed that the expression of HSF90 protein was significantly correlated with that of HIF-1αprotein(P<0.01).Conclusions:The expression of HSP90 and HIF—1αprotein may be related to the development,metastasis and invasion of human colorectal cancer,and their synergistic effects may participate in the development of the colorectal carcinoma.

  16. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is associated with up regulation, down regulation of normal antigens or abnormal antigens. These antigens are very useful candidates as targets for the different breast cancer therapies and for vaccination trials. This study was done to characterize abnormal antigens, extract one of them and to produce monoclonal antibodies against the extracted antigen. One hundred and twenty Sudanese female patients were included in this study after informed consent. The mean age was 47. 2 years (16-80). Two tissue samples were obtained from each patient and they were confirmed as normal and cancerous breast tissues microscopically. 2D PAGE was used to analyze the protein content of samples. LC/MS and nr. fast a database search were used for separation and indentification of the abnormal proteins. Three different patterns of 2D Page results were obtained, the first pattern involved detection of four abnormal proteins in 26.7% of the patient cancerous tissues while they were undetected in the normal tissues of the same patients. In the second 2D PAGE result pattern the cancerous and the normal tissues of 67.5% patients were identical and they did not contain the four abnormal proteins while the third 2D PAGE pattern involved the presence of two abnormal antigens (from the four) in the cancerous tissues of 5.8% of the patients and they were absent from the normal tissues of the same patients. The four abnormal proteins were identified as, human Thioredoxin (D60nmutant), x-ray crystal structure of human galectin-1, retrocopy of tropomyosin 3(rc TPM3) and beta-tropomyosin (isoform 2). The primary and the secondary structures were obtained from the SWISSPROT and the PDB databases. Beta tropomyosin spot was extracted and used as antigen for monoclonal antibody production. Monoclonal antibody against beta- tropomyosin with a concentration of 0.35 mg/ml and a G11 anti beta-tropomyosin hybridoma cell line were produced. The monoclonal antibody was with single bad and

  17. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  18. Comparative Trace Elemental Analysis in Cancerous and Noncancerous Human Tissues Using PIXE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Juma Mulware

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high or low levels of trace metals in human tissues has been studied widely. There have been detectable significant variations in the concentrations of trace metals in normal and cancerous tissues suggesting that these variations could be a causative factor to various cancers. Even though essential trace metals play an important role such as stabilizers, enzyme cofactors, elements of structure, and essential elements for normal hormonal functions, their imbalanced toxic effects contribute to the rate of the reactive oxygen species (ROS and formation of complexities in the body cells which may lead to DNA damage. The induction of oxidative-induced DNA damage by ROS may lead to isolated base lesions or single-strand breaks, complex lesions like double-strand breaks, and some oxidative generated clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs which are linked to cell apoptosis and mutagenesis. The difference in published works on the level of variations of trace metals in different cancer tissues can be attributed to the accuracy of the analytical techniques, sample preparation methods, and inability of taking uniform samples from the affected tissues. This paper reviews comparative trace elemental concentrations of cancerous and noncancerous tissues using PIXE that has been reported in the published literature.

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC). Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells

  20. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardulli Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and invasive breast cancer (IBC. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. Results We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Conclusions Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells.

  1. Gene expression profiles from formalin fixed paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue are largely comparable to fresh frozen matched tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Mittempergher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE samples represent a valuable resource for cancer research. However, the discovery and development of new cancer biomarkers often requires fresh frozen (FF samples. Recently, the Whole Genome (WG DASL (cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation assay was specifically developed to profile FFPE tissue. However, a thorough comparison of data generated from FFPE RNA and Fresh Frozen (FF RNA using this platform is lacking. To this end we profiled, in duplicate, 20 FFPE tissues and 20 matched FF tissues and evaluated the concordance of the DASL results from FFPE and matched FF material. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that after proper normalization, all FFPE and FF pairs exhibit a high level of similarity (Pearson correlation >0.7, significantly larger than the similarity between non-paired samples. Interestingly, the probes showing the highest correlation had a higher percentage G/C content and were enriched for cell cycle genes. Predictions of gene expression signatures developed on frozen material (Intrinsic subtype, Genomic Grade Index, 70 gene signature showed a high level of concordance between FFPE and FF matched pairs. Interestingly, predictions based on a 60 gene DASL list (best match with the 70 gene signature showed very high concordance with the MammaPrint® results. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that data generated from FFPE material with the DASL assay, if properly processed, are comparable to data extracted from the FF counterpart. Specifically, gene expression profiles for a known set of prognostic genes for a specific disease are highly comparable between two conditions. This opens up the possibility of using both FFPE and FF material in gene expressions analyses, leading to a vast increase in the potential resources available for cancer research.

  2. GREAT PROMISE OF TISSUE-RESIDENT ADULT STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS IN TRANSPLANTATION AND CANCER THERAPIES

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great prom...

  3. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Herman Tania De; Gabrish Heather; Herman Terence; Vlachaki Maria; Ahmad Salahuddin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six...

  4. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases Are Essential for the Inflammatory Response in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Sun

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays a critical role in the development of cancer. Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) functions in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix that is integral for many normal and pathological processes such as morphogenesis, angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tumor invasion. The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) family regulates the activity of multifunctional metalloproteinases. In this paper, we discuss the role and mechanism of MMP and TIMP in regulating inflammation r...

  5. Non-Coding CK19 RNA in Peripheral Blood and Tissue of Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Moazzezy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast carcinoma is the major cause of cancer-related death in women. The incidence of this carcinoma is rising and there are many attempts to decrease this problem. The aim of this study was detection of full-length cytokeratin 19 (CK19 mRNA, in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients in early stage of cancer. In this study, RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique was used for detection of CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients. Primers were established to amplify the CK19 as a tumor marker. Moreover, CYFRA 21-1 subunit of CK19 protein was measured in the serum of patients. CK19 mRNA was detected and sequenced. It is shown that the most released CK19 mRNAs in blood and tissue of cancer patients are non-coding RNA. The mutated forms of mRNA are the incomplete transcripts of protein-coding gene as a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA that could regulate gene expression. Moreover, small non-coding RNA (ncRNA as fragments of CK19 is mostly observed in this experiment. They may play a role in tumorogenesis and their biologic exact function in breast cancer should be further elucidated.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Srigopalram, Srisesharam; Ilavenil, Soundharrajan; Kim, Young Ock; Agastian, Paul; Baaru, Rajasekhar; Balamurugan, Kannan; Choi, Ki Choon; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research.

  7. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  8. Visualization of risk of radiogenic second cancer in the organs and tissues of the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiogenic second cancer is a common late effect in long term cancer survivors. Currently there are few methods or tools available to visually evaluate the spatial distribution of risks of radiogenic late effects in the human body. We developed a risk visualization method and demonstrated it for radiogenic second cancers in tissues and organs of one patient treated with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy and one patient treated with proton craniospinal irradiation. Treatment plans were generated using radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) and dose information was obtained from TPS. Linear non-threshold risk coefficients for organs at risk of second cancer incidence were taken from the Biological Effects of Ionization Radiation VII report. Alternative risk models including linear exponential model and linear plateau model were also examined. The predicted absolute lifetime risk distributions were visualized together with images of the patient anatomy. The risk distributions of second cancer for the two patients were visually presented. The risk distributions varied with tissue, dose, dose-risk model used, and the risk distribution could be similar to or very different from the dose distribution. Our method provides a convenient way to directly visualize and evaluate the risks of radiogenic second cancer in organs and tissues of the human body. In the future, visual assessment of risk distribution could be an influential determinant for treatment plan scoring

  9. Visual perception enhancement for detection of cancerous oral tissue by multi-spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Chiang, Chun-Ping

    2013-05-01

    Color reproduction systems based on the multi-spectral imaging technique (MSI) for both directly estimating reflection spectra and direct visualization of oral tissues using various light sources are proposed. Images from three oral cancer patients were taken as the experimental samples, and spectral differences between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues were calculated at three time points during 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) to analyze whether they were consistent with disease processes. To check the successful treatment of oral cancer with ALA-PDT, oral cavity images by swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) are demonstrated. This system can also reproduce images under different light sources. For pre-cancerous detection, the oral images after the second ALA-PDT are assigned as the target samples. By using RGB LEDs with various correlated color temperatures (CCTs) for color difference comparison, the light source with a CCT of about 4500 K was found to have the best ability to enhance the color difference between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues in the oral cavity. Compared with the fluorescent lighting commonly used today, the color difference can be improved by 39.2% from 16.5270 to 23.0023. Hence, this light source and spectral analysis increase the efficiency of the medical diagnosis of oral cancer and aid patients in receiving early treatment.

  10. Visual perception enhancement for detection of cancerous oral tissue by multi-spectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Color reproduction systems based on the multi-spectral imaging technique (MSI) for both directly estimating reflection spectra and direct visualization of oral tissues using various light sources are proposed. Images from three oral cancer patients were taken as the experimental samples, and spectral differences between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues were calculated at three time points during 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) to analyze whether they were consistent with disease processes. To check the successful treatment of oral cancer with ALA-PDT, oral cavity images by swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) are demonstrated. This system can also reproduce images under different light sources. For pre-cancerous detection, the oral images after the second ALA-PDT are assigned as the target samples. By using RGB LEDs with various correlated color temperatures (CCTs) for color difference comparison, the light source with a CCT of about 4500 K was found to have the best ability to enhance the color difference between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues in the oral cavity. Compared with the fluorescent lighting commonly used today, the color difference can be improved by 39.2% from 16.5270 to 23.0023. Hence, this light source and spectral analysis increase the efficiency of the medical diagnosis of oral cancer and aid patients in receiving early treatment. (paper)

  11. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Abdullah Al-Dhabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research.

  13. RNA-Seq accurately identifies cancer biomarker signatures to distinguish tissue of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Iris H; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Hui; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic cancer of unknown primary (CUP) accounts for up to 5% of all new cancer cases, with a 5-year survival rate of only 10%. Accurate identification of tissue of origin would allow for directed, personalized therapies to improve clinical outcomes. Our objective was to use transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify lineage-specific biomarker signatures for the cancer types that most commonly metastasize as CUP (colorectum, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, prostate, and stomach). RNA-Seq data of 17,471 transcripts from a total of 3,244 cancer samples across 26 different tissue types were compiled from in-house sequencing data and publically available International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas datasets. Robust cancer biomarker signatures were extracted using a 10-fold cross-validation method of log transformation, quantile normalization, transcript ranking by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and stepwise logistic regression. The entire algorithm was then repeated with a new set of randomly generated training and test sets, yielding highly concordant biomarker signatures. External validation of the cancer-specific signatures yielded high sensitivity (92.0% ± 3.15%; mean ± standard deviation) and specificity (97.7% ± 2.99%) for each cancer biomarker signature. The overall performance of this RNA-Seq biomarker-generating algorithm yielded an accuracy of 90.5%. In conclusion, we demonstrate a computational model for producing highly sensitive and specific cancer biomarker signatures from RNA-Seq data, generating signatures for the top eight cancer types responsible for CUP to accurately identify tumor origin. PMID:25425966

  14. The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 μg/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 μg/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 μg Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content

  15. [Infertility treatments after gynecologic cancers and indications of ovarian tissue cryopreservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle; Bringer-Deutch, Sophie

    2010-03-01

    Increasing numbers of young people are surviving cancer, but treatment can affect their reproductive function. Female fertility is more difficult to preserve than male fertility. Fertility-sparing treatments may be possible for some women. For others, embryo cryopreservation is the only established option, provided cancer therapy can be postponed. However, cryopreservation of eggs or ovarian tissue is now becoming a real possibility. Medically assisted reproductive options for cancers survivors include ovarian stimulation, IVF and oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy and adoption are other possibilities. PMID:21171244

  16. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank: integrating research on radiation-induced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. Cancer is a complicated disease and it is unclear whether the mechanism by which radiation gives rise to cancer differs from that involved in the generation of cancers of the same type by other environmental stimuli. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established in response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl to address this question. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3 million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 23 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated co-operation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age. (note)

  17. EXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF C-erbB-2 IN THE TISSUES OF LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the expression and clinical significance of C-erbB-2 in the tissue of lung cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry method was used to detect the protein expression of C-erbB-2 in lung cancer tissue. Results The positive expression rate of C-erbB-2 protein in 38 cases of lung cancer was 53.3% (21/38),which was higher than those in lung benign control group (P<0. 001). The significant correlation were found between the protein level and tumor stage(r= +0. 64,P<0.02). The order was stage Ⅳ>stage Ⅲ >stage Ⅱ >stage Ⅰ . There was no correlation among protein expression of C-erbB-2 in various histological types of lung cancer (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion The positive expression rates of C-erbB-2 were significantly higher in lung cancer group than those in benign control group. There is significant correlation between C-erbB-2 expression and lung cancer stage. There is no correlation among protein expression of C-erbB-2 and histological types of lung cancer.

  18. Testing of human papillomavirus in lung cancer and non-tumor lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk factors for lung cancer, such as cigarette smoking, environmental pollution, asbestos, and genetic determinants, are well-known, whereas involvement of the human papillomavirus (HPV) is still unclear. We examined a series of 100 lung cancer patients from Italy and the UK for the presence of HPV DNA in both lung tumor specimens and adjacent non-tumoral specimens from the same patients. Thirty-five of the most clinically relevant HPV types were assayed using PCR amplification of the highly conserved L1 region of the viral genome followed by hybridization with specific probes. No HPV was detected in tumor specimens nor in normal lung tissue of any patient. These data indicate that, in this Western series, HPV is not associated with the risk of lung cancer. Our findings will help refine estimates of lung cancer risk in patients affected by a common viral infection involved in other types of human cancer

  19. Expression and Clinical Significance of SHP2 in the Tumor Tissues of Smokers with Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei ZHAN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proved that protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were important mechanisms in lung cancer development, and tobacco smoking is an important risk factor of lung cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and clinical significance of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and small cell lung cancer (SCLC; the relationship between tobacco smoking and the expression of SHP2 is also studied. Methods Immunohistochemistry (Invision and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH were used to detect the expression of SHP2 and the augment of SHP2 mRNA in the 53 lung cancer specimens. Results The weak positive rate of SHP2 was 80% (which was also the total positive rate in normal bronchial epithelium. The weak, moderate and strong positive rates were 35.4%, 43.8% and 6.2% (total positive rate was 85.4% in 48 NSCLC patients, 0%, 80% and 20% (total positve rate was 100% in 5 SCLC patients, 40.7%, 37.4% and 3.7% (total positive rate was 81.5% in the tumor tissues of 27 NSCLC patients who didn’t smoke and 23.8%, 71.4% and 4.7% (total positive rate was 100% in the tumor tissues of 21 NSCLC patients whose smoking indexes were ≥400. Significant differences of SHP2 expression were observed between tumor tissues and normal bronchial epithelium, NSCLC and SCLC, and between different smoking indexes (P < 0.05. Conclusion The enhancement of SHP2 expression in the tumor tissues of NSCLC patients who smoke may be correlated with tobacco smoking; SHP2 may play certain role in the development of lung cancer; SHP2 prospectively provides new ideas for the drug research and development of lung cancer treatment.

  20. Hypothermia activates adipose tissue to promote malignant lung cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangjun Du

    Full Text Available Microenvironment has been increasingly recognized as a critical regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we identified early changes in the microenvironment that contribute to malignant progression. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B to methylnitrosourea (MNU caused a reduction in cell toxicity and an increase in clonogenic capacity when the temperature was lowered from 37°C to 28°C. Hypothermia-incubated adipocyte media promoted proliferation in A549 cells. Although a hypothermic environment could increase urethane-induced tumor counts and Lewis lung cancer (LLC metastasis in lungs of three breeds of mice, an increase in tumor size could be discerned only in obese mice housed in hypothermia. Similarly, coinjections using differentiated adipocytes and A549 cells promoted tumor development in athymic nude mice when adipocytes were cultured at 28°C. Conversely, fat removal suppressed tumor growth in obese C57BL/6 mice inoculated with LLC cells. Further studies show hypothermia promotes a MNU-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and protects the tumor cell against immune control by TGF-β1 upregulation. We also found that activated adipocytes trigger tumor cell proliferation by increasing either TNF-α or VEGF levels. These results suggest that hypothermia activates adipocytes to stimulate tumor boost and play critical determinant roles in malignant progression.

  1. It takes a tissue to make a tumor: epigenetics, cancer and the microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    How do normal tissues limit the development of cancer? This review discusses the evidence that normal cells effectively restrict malignant behavior, and that such tissue forces must be subjugated to establish a tumor. The action of ionizing radiation will be specifically discussed regarding the disruption of the microenvironment that promotes the transition from preneoplastic to neoplastic growth. Unlike the highly unpredictable nature of genetic mutations, the response of normal cells to radiation damage follows an epigenetic program similar to wound healing and other damage responses. Our hypothesis is that the persistent disruption of the microenvironment in irradiated tissue compromises its ability to suppress carcinogenesis.

  2. It takes a tissue to make a tumor: Epigenetics, cancer and the microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2001-01-19

    How do normal tissues limit the development of cancer? This review discusses the evidence that normal cells effectively restrict malignant behavior, and that such tissue forces must be subjugated to establish a tumor. The action of ionizing radiation will be specifically discussed regarding the disruption of the microenvironment that promotes the transition from preneoplastic to neoplastic growth. Unlike the highly unpredictable nature of genetic mutations, the response of normal cells to radiation damage follows an epigenetic program similar to wound healing and other damage responses. Our hypothesis is that the persistent disruption of the microenvironment in irradiated tissue compromises its ability to suppress carcinogenesis.

  3. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  4. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

  5. Methylation profiling of 48 candidate genes in tumor and matched normal tissues from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zibo; Guo, Xinwu; Wu, Yepeng; Li, Shengyun; Yan, Jinhua; Peng, Limin; Xiao, Zhi; Wang, Shouman; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Yi, Wenjun; Xia, Kun; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Gene-specific methylation alterations in breast cancer have been suggested to occur early in tumorigenesis and have the potential to be used for early detection and prevention. The continuous increase in worldwide breast cancer incidences emphasizes the urgent need for identification of methylation biomarkers for early cancer detection and patient stratification. Using microfluidic PCR-based target enrichment and next-generation bisulfite sequencing technology, we analyzed methylation status of 48 candidate genes in paired tumor and normal tissues from 180 Chinese breast cancer patients. Analysis of the sequencing results showed 37 genes differentially methylated between tumor and matched normal tissues. Breast cancer samples with different clinicopathologic characteristics demonstrated distinct profiles of gene methylation. The methylation levels were significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, with basal-like and luminal B tumors having the lowest and the highest methylation levels, respectively. Six genes (ACADL, ADAMTSL1, CAV1, NPY, PTGS2, and RUNX3) showed significant differential methylation among the 4 breast cancer subtypes and also between the ER +/ER- tumors. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we identified a panel of 13 hypermethylated genes as candidate biomarkers that performed a high level of efficiency for cancer prediction. These 13 genes included CST6, DBC1, EGFR, GREM1, GSTP1, IGFBP3, PDGFRB, PPM1E, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WRN. Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer prediction and patient stratification. The novel gene panel might be a valuable biomarker for early detection of breast cancer. PMID:25636590

  6. Chemometric methods for studying the relationships between trace elements in laryngeal cancer and healthy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, R; Klatka, J; Brodnjak-Voncina, D; Trojanowska, A; Myśliwiec, D; Ostrowski, J; Remer, M

    2014-06-01

    A quick and reliable method for the evaluation and classification of two types of tissues is presented. Several chemometric methods were applied to evaluate multivariate data of the tissue samples with respect to the content of trace elements. The content of Pb, Al, Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni and Co was determined in samples of healthy and cancerous tissue obtained from 26 patients. Determination was done at milligram/kilogram level with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques. Contents of trace metals in studied tissues are not normally distributed; however, normal distribution was confirmed for log values. There is a statistically significant difference in the content of Zn, Cd, Cu and Al (p<0.01) and Ni and Co (p<0.05) when healthy tissue is compared to cancerous one. Correlation between contents of trace elements for studied tissues was positive; the highest was found between Zn and Cu. A chemometric methodology seems to be a promising tool for classifications of the tissue samples. PMID:24838928

  7. Tissue temperature distribution measurement by MRI and laser immunology for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yichao; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Wu, Feng; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In cancer treatment and immune response enhancement research, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an ideal method for non-invasive, three-dimensional temperature measurement. We used a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager for ex vivo tissues and small animal to determine temperature distribution of target tissue during laser irradiation. The feasibility of imaging is approved with high spatial resolution and high signal-noise- ratio. Tissue-simulating gel phantom gel, biological tissues, and tumor-bearing animals were used in the experiments for laser treatment and MR imaging. Thermal couple measurement of temperature in target samples was used for system calibration. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the samples with a laser power in the range of 1 to 2.5 watts. Using the MRI system and a specially developed processing algorithm, a clear temperature distribution matrix in the target tissue and surrounding tissue was obtained. The temperature profiles show that the selective laser photothermal effect could result in tissue temperature elevation in a range of 10 to 45 °C. The temperature resolution of the measurement was about 0.37°C including the total system error. The spatial resolution was 0.4 mm (128x128 pixels with field of view of 5.5x5.5 cm). The temperature distribution provided in vivo thermal information and future reference for optimizing dye concentration and irradiation parameters to achieve optimal thermal effects in cancer treatment.

  8. Effect of REG Iα protein on angiogenesis in gastric cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ken; Fukui, Hirokazu; Sun, Chao; Kitayama, Yoshitaka; Eda, Hirotsugu; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Kondo, Takashi; Tomita, Toshihiko; Oshima, Tadayuki; Watari, Jiro; Fujimori, Takahiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-05-01

    Regenerating gene (REG) Iα is not only overexpressed in a subset of gastric cancers, but also involved in tumor progression. However, the mechanism by which (REG) Iα promotes tumor growth is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated whether REG Iα plays a role in angiogenesis during the progression of gastric cancers. Expression of REG Iα and its receptor (EXTL3; exostoses like-3) was examined using immunohistochemistry in specimens of human gastric cancer. Microvessel density (MVD) in gastric cancer tissues was evaluated using an image analysis system after CD34 immunostaining. Relationships among clinicopathological features, REG Iα expression and MVD in gastric cancer tissues were analyzed. Effects of REG Iα protein on HUVEC cells in terms of proliferation and anti-apoptosis were assessed by WST-1 assay and FACS, respectively. Furthermore, the intracellular signaling by which REG Iα exerts its biological roles was examined in vitro. REG Iα expression was significantly related to lymph node metastasis and its receptor EXTL3 was ubiquitously expressed in not only the tumor cells, but also the tumor vessel cells in the gastric cancer tissues. MVD was significantly higher in gastric cancers that were REG Iα-positive than in those that were negative. Treatment with REG Iα protein promoted growth and anti-apoptosis through activation of the ERK and Akt signaling pathways in HUVEC cells, whereas these effects were attenuated by treatment with anti-REG Iα -antibody. REG Iα protein may play a role in angiogenesis during progression of gastric cancer. PMID:25813126

  9. Normal tissue effects of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation responses of several normal tissues in the treatment of tumors of the head and neck have been discussed. The severity of damage to normal tissues can vary considerably according to the quantity and quality of the radiation, amounts of tissue irradiated, temporal aspects of treatment as well as numerous biological factors. The radiation effects of several normal tissues including bone, larynx, spinal cord, ear and eye, have not been addressed in this report, but nevertheless are important in the treatment of a variety of head and neck tumors. Attention to potential normal tissue complications in the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer must be considered an integral part of the therapy. Proper management of complications may improve response to therapy and improve the quality of life

  10. Cellular origin and procoagulant activity of tissue factor-exposing microparticles in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Berckmans, R.J.; Böing, A.N.; Sturk, A.; Büller, H.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Nieuwland, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In patients with cancer, tissue factor-exposing microparticles (TF-exposing MP) have been associated with disease progression and thrombosis. The cellular origin and coagulant activity of TF-exposing MP, however, remain disputed. Therefore, we investigated the cellular origin of the TF-e

  11. Effect of implant vs. tissue reconstruction on cancer specific survival varies by axillary lymph node status in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ouyang

    Full Text Available To compare the breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS between patients who underwent tissue or implant reconstruction after mastectomy.We used the database from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER registries and compared the BCSS between patients who underwent tissue and implant reconstruction after mastectomy. Cox-regression models were fitted, adjusting for known clinicopathological features. The interaction between the reconstruction types (tissue/implant and nodal status (N-stage was investigated.A total of 6,426 patients with a median age of 50 years were included. With a median follow up of 100 months, the 10-year cumulative BCSS and non-BCSS were 85.1% and 95.4%, respectively. Patients who underwent tissue reconstruction had tumors with a higher T-stage, N-stage, and tumor grade and tended to be ER/PR-negative compared to those who received implant reconstruction. In univariate analysis, implant-reconstruction was associated with a 2.4% increase (P = 0.003 in the BCSS compared with tissue-reconstruction. After adjusting for significant risk factors of the BCSS (suggested by univariate analysis and stratifying based on the N-stage, there was only an association between the reconstruction type and the BCSS for the N2-3 patients (10-year BCSS of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction: 68.7% and 59.0%, P = 0.004. The 10-year BCSS rates of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction were 91.7% and 91.8% in N0 patients (P>0.05 and 84.5% and 84.4% in N1 patients (P>0.05, respectively.The implant (vs. tissue reconstruction after mastectomy was associated with an improved BCSS in N2-3 breast cancer patients but not in N0-1 patients. A well-designed, prospective study is needed to further confirm these findings.

  12. Androgen receptor isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie XIA; Xiao-Da TANG; Qing-Zheng MA

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoform expressions in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line. Methods: With high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) method we demonstrated the different expressions of AR isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissues and LNCaP cell line. Results: Data were obtained from three prostatic cancer specimens and the LNCaP cell line. Three types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5,6.0, and 5.3. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, 1 sample showed all the three types of AR isoforms, the second specimen expressed at 6.5 and 6.0, and the third failed to show any type of isoforms. The LNCaP cell line expressed all the three AR isoforms. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT) to these three isoforms was inhibited by the addition ofl00-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, while not by progesterone, oestradiol and diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: The expression of AR isofonns is different in different prostate cancer tissues, which may be related to the difference in the effect of anti-androgen therapy in different patients.

  13. Multiobjective Simulated Annealing-Based Clustering of Tissue Samples for Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sudipta; Saha, Sriparna; Thadisina, Yamini

    2016-03-01

    In the field of pattern recognition, the study of the gene expression profiles of different tissue samples over different experimental conditions has become feasible with the arrival of microarray-based technology. In cancer research, classification of tissue samples is necessary for cancer diagnosis, which can be done with the help of microarray technology. In this paper, we have presented a multiobjective optimization (MOO)-based clustering technique utilizing archived multiobjective simulated annealing(AMOSA) as the underlying optimization strategy for classification of tissue samples from cancer datasets. The presented clustering technique is evaluated for three open source benchmark cancer datasets [Brain tumor dataset, Adult Malignancy, and Small Round Blood Cell Tumors (SRBCT)]. In order to evaluate the quality or goodness of produced clusters, two cluster quality measures viz, adjusted rand index and classification accuracy ( % CoA) are calculated. Comparative results of the presented clustering algorithm with ten state-of-the-art existing clustering techniques are shown for three benchmark datasets. Also, we have conducted a statistical significance test called t-test to prove the superiority of our presented MOO-based clustering technique over other clustering techniques. Moreover, significant gene markers have been identified and demonstrated visually from the clustering solutions obtained. In the field of cancer subtype prediction, this study can have important impact. PMID:25706936

  14. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins in cancerous and normal colonic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Harn Gam; Chiuan-Herng Leow; Che Nin Man; Boon-Hui Gooi; Manjit Singh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To identify and analyze the differentially expressed proteins in normal and cancerous tissues of four patients suffering from colon cancer.METHODS: Colon tissues (normal and cancerous)were homogenized and the proteins were extracted using three protein extraction buffers. The extraction buffers were used in an orderly sequence of increasing extraction strength for proteins with hydrophobic properties. The protein extracts were separated using the SDS-PAGE method and the images were captured and analyzed using Quantity One software. The target protein bands were subjected to in-gel digestion with trypsin and finally analyzed using an ESI-ion trap mass spectrometer.RESULTS: A total of 50 differentially expressed proteins in colonic cancerous and normal tissues were identified.CONCLUSION: Many of the identified proteins have been reported to be involved in the progression of similar or other types of cancers. However, some of the identified proteins have not been reported before. In addition, a number of hypothetical proteins were also identified.

  15. Alteration of proliferation and apoptotic markers in normal and premalignant tissue associated with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ximing J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular markers identifying alterations in proliferation and apoptotic pathways could be particularly important in characterizing high-risk normal or pre-neoplastic tissue. We evaluated the following markers: Ki67, Minichromosome Maintenance Protein-2 (Mcm-2, activated caspase-3 (a-casp3 and Bcl-2 to determine if they showed differential expression across progressive degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer in the prostate. To identify field effects, we also evaluated whether high-risk expression patterns in normal tissue were more common in prostates containing cancer compared to those without cancer (supernormal, and in histologically normal glands adjacent to a cancer focus as opposed to equivalent glands that were more distant. Methods The aforementioned markers were studied in 13 radical prostatectomy (RP and 6 cystoprostatectomy (CP specimens. Tissue compartments representing normal, low grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (LGPIN, high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN, as well as different grades of cancer were mapped on H&E slides and adjacent sections were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Normal glands within 1 mm distance of a tumor focus and glands beyond 5 mm were considered "near" and "far", respectively. Randomly selected nuclei and 40 × fields were scored by a single observer; basal and luminal epithelial layers were scored separately. Results Both Ki-67 and Mcm-2 showed an upward trend from normal tissue through HGPIN and cancer with a shift in proliferation from basal to luminal compartment. Activated caspase-3 showed a significant decrease in HGPIN and cancer compartments. Supernormal glands had significantly lower proliferation indices and higher a-casp3 expression compared to normal glands. "Near" normal glands had higher Mcm-2 indices compared to "far" glands; however, they also had higher a-casp3 expression. Bcl-2, which varied minimally in normal tissue, did not show

  16. Alteration of proliferation and apoptotic markers in normal and premalignant tissue associated with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular markers identifying alterations in proliferation and apoptotic pathways could be particularly important in characterizing high-risk normal or pre-neoplastic tissue. We evaluated the following markers: Ki67, Minichromosome Maintenance Protein-2 (Mcm-2), activated caspase-3 (a-casp3) and Bcl-2 to determine if they showed differential expression across progressive degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer in the prostate. To identify field effects, we also evaluated whether high-risk expression patterns in normal tissue were more common in prostates containing cancer compared to those without cancer (supernormal), and in histologically normal glands adjacent to a cancer focus as opposed to equivalent glands that were more distant. The aforementioned markers were studied in 13 radical prostatectomy (RP) and 6 cystoprostatectomy (CP) specimens. Tissue compartments representing normal, low grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (LGPIN), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), as well as different grades of cancer were mapped on H&E slides and adjacent sections were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Normal glands within 1 mm distance of a tumor focus and glands beyond 5 mm were considered 'near' and 'far', respectively. Randomly selected nuclei and 40 × fields were scored by a single observer; basal and luminal epithelial layers were scored separately. Both Ki-67 and Mcm-2 showed an upward trend from normal tissue through HGPIN and cancer with a shift in proliferation from basal to luminal compartment. Activated caspase-3 showed a significant decrease in HGPIN and cancer compartments. Supernormal glands had significantly lower proliferation indices and higher a-casp3 expression compared to normal glands. 'Near' normal glands had higher Mcm-2 indices compared to 'far' glands; however, they also had higher a-casp3 expression. Bcl-2, which varied minimally in normal tissue, did not show any trend

  17. CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM CONTENT IN CANCEROUS AND HEALTHY TISSUES OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Głogowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning concentration of biogenic metals in tissues of digestive system are sparse and diversified. The objectives of this study were to determine the mean concentration of biogenic metals: Mg and Ca, in cancerous and normal tissues of digestive system. Research was conducted on samples taken from different segments of human digestive tract. Tissues were taken during biopsy, surgery, and post-mortem from Military Hospital and PROSMED Health Center Patients’ located in Cracow. Samples were mineralized by wet digestion. First, they were dried and after dry mass were obtained the samples were put into digestion flasks and 1cm3 of nitric acid 65% was added to each of them. The samples were heated for about 2 hours, at 105°C. Mineralized material was moved to tubes with a capacity of 10 cm3 and filled with distilled water up to this volume. The resulting solutions were used to analyze the content of selected elements by FAAS method. The results are expressed in micrograms per gram of dry weight of tissue (µg•g-1d.m.. Average calcium content is higher in the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract of both healthy women (15890,28 µg•g-1d.m. and men (13040,24 µg•g-1d.m. in comparison with tumor tissues of the gastrointestinal tract of women (5365,19 µg•g-1 d.m. and men (2459,42 µg•g-1d.m.. Average magnesium content is higher in the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract of both healthy women (2887,19 µg•g-1 d.m. and men (1112,69 µg•g-1 d.m., in comparison with gastrointestinal cancerous tissues of women (1146,77 µg•g-1 d.m. and men (621,42 µg•g-1 d.m.. It was shown that differences between calcium and magnesium contents in the digestive tract tissues depend on the state of health - significantly higher contents of Ca and Mg were present in the tissues of healthy men and women in comparison to the tissues of men and women with digestive tract cancer. Magnesium and calcium have protective properties (they prevent the

  18. Breast cancer cell lines carry cell line-specific genomic alterations that are distinct from aberrations in breast cancer tissues: Comparison of the CGH profiles between cancer cell lines and primary cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell lines are commonly used in various kinds of biomedical research in the world. However, it remains uncertain whether genomic alterations existing in primary tumor tissues are represented in cell lines and whether cell lines carry cell line-specific genomic alterations. This study was performed to answer these questions. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was employed with 4030 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) that cover the genome at 1.0 megabase resolution to analyze DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs) in 35 primary breast tumors and 24 breast cancer cell lines. DCNAs were compared between these two groups. A tissue microdissection technique was applied to primary tumor tissues to reduce the contamination of samples by normal tissue components. The average number of BAC clones with DCNAs was 1832 (45.3% of spotted clones) and 971 (24.9%) for cell lines and primary tumor tissues, respectively. Gains of 1q and 8q and losses of 8p, 11q, 16q and 17p were detected in >50% of primary cancer tissues. These aberrations were also frequently detected in cell lines. In addition to these alterations, the cell lines showed recurrent genomic alterations including gains of 5p14-15, 20q11 and 20q13 and losses of 4p13-p16, 18q12, 18q21, Xq21.1 and Xq26-q28 that were barely detected in tumor tissue specimens. These are considered to be cell line-specific DCNAs. The frequency of the HER2 amplification was high in both cell lines and tumor tissues, but it was statistically different between cell lines and primary tumors (P = 0.012); 41.3 ± 29.9% for the cell lines and 15.9 ± 18.6% for the tissue specimens. Established cell lines carry cell lines-specific DCNAs together with recurrent aberrations detected in primary tumor tissues. It must therefore be emphasized that cell lines do not always represent the genotypes of parental tumor tissues

  19. A Breast Tissue Protein Expression Profile Contributing to Early Parity-Induced Protection Against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Marie Gutierrez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Early parity reduces breast cancer risk, whereas, late parity and nulliparity increase breast cancer risk. Despite substantial efforts to understand the protective effects of early parity, the precise molecular circuitry responsible for these changes is not yet fully defined. Methods: Here, we have conducted the first study assessing protein expression profiles in normal breast tissue of healthy early parous, late parous, and nulliparous women. Breast tissue biopsies were obtained from 132 healthy parous and nulliparous volunteers. These samples were subjected to global protein expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. GeneSpring and MetaCore bioinformatics analysis software were used to identify protein expression profiles associated with early parity (low risk versus late/nulliparity (high risk. Results: Early parity reduces expression of key proteins involved in mitogenic signaling pathways in breast tissue through down regulation of EGFR1/3, ESR1, AKT1, ATF, Fos, and SRC. Early parity is also characterized by greater genomic stability and reduced tissue inflammation based on differential expression of aurora kinases, p53, RAD52, BRCA1, MAPKAPK-2, ATF-1, ICAM1, and NF-kappaB compared to late and nulli parity. Conclusions: Early parity reduces basal cell proliferation in breast tissue, which translates to enhanced genomic stability, reduced cellular stress/inflammation, and thus reduced breast cancer risk.

  20. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  1. Soft tissue metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed by {sup 18}F FDG PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Califano, Ines; Quildrian, Sergio; Otero, Jose; Coduti, Martin; Califano, Leonardo; Rojas Bilbao, Erica, E-mail: ines.m.califano@gmail.com [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    Distant metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer are unusual; lung and bones are the most frequently affected sites. Soft tissue metastases (STM) are extremely rare. We describe two cases of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer metastasizing to soft tissues. Both patients had widespread metastatic disease; clinically asymptomatic soft tissue metastases were found by 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F FDG PET-CT), and confirmed by cytological and/or histopathological studies. These findings underscore the ability of {sup 18}F FDG PET-CT in accurately assessing the extent of the disease, as well as the utility of the method to evaluate regions of the body that are not routinely explored. (author)

  2. Statistical Analysis of Tissue Images for Detection and Classification of Cervical Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Jagtap, Jaidip; Pandey, Kiran; Agarwa, Asha; Panigrahi, Prasanta K; Pradhan, Asima

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the major health threats in women worldwide. The current "gold standard" for detecting cancer of the epithelial tissue is the histopathology analysis of biopsy samples. However it relies on the pathologist's judgment of the disease. We investigate the utility of statistical parameters as a potential tool for detection and discrimination of the stages of dysplasia. Digital images of the tissue slides are captured with the help of a digital camera plugged to a microscope. Statistical data analysis is performed with the help of software to evaluate parameters such as mean, maxima, full width half maxima, skewness, kurtosis etc. for the images. We believe that these parameters can help effectively to improve the diagnosis and further classify normal and abnormal tissue sections. These parameters can be used independently as well as in tandem with other parameters as features in classification algorithms that involve the use of Neural networks or Principal component analysis.

  3. Using endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy singular tissue plural tissues in organ-preserving surgery of laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study has demonstrated feasibility of performing larynx preservation surgeries in patients with recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of radiotherapy. The technique of combined laryngeal reconstruction with endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy Singular tissue Plural tissues results in improvement of life quality by preserving laryngeal functions

  4. Using endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy singular tissue plural tissues in organ-preserving surgery of laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulbakin, D. E., E-mail: kulbakin-d@mail.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, 5 Kooperativny Street, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Mukhamedov, M. R., E-mail: muhamedov@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, 5 Kooperativny Street, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Siberian State Medical University, 2, Moscow Highway, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Choynzonov, E. L., E-mail: choynzonov@gmail.com [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, 5 Kooperativny Street, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Siberian State Medical University, 2, Moscow Highway, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Gynter, V. E., E-mail: tc77@rec.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Research Institute of Medical Materials, 17, 19 Gv. Divizii, Tomsk, 634034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Our study has demonstrated feasibility of performing larynx preservation surgeries in patients with recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of radiotherapy. The technique of combined laryngeal reconstruction with endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy Singular tissue Plural tissues results in improvement of life quality by preserving laryngeal functions.

  5. Measurement of asbestos bodies in lung tissue of autopsy cases diagnosed with primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the relation between asbestos-related lung cancer and the concentration of asbestos bodies in lung tissue, we analyzed the concentration in 24 autopsy cases diagnosed with primary lung cancer, with regard to the gender, age, histological type of lung cancer and occupation of each case. The asbestos bodies were measured according to Kohyama's method. Positive cases (more than 5,000 bodies per 1 g of dry lung tissue) were further analyzed for asbestosis and pleural plaques by chest X-ray and chest CT. Two cases exhibited more than 5,000 bodies, five cases between 1,000 and 5,000, and seventeen cases less than 1,000. The occupation of the two positive cases was not informative: one demonstrated neither asbestosis nor pleural plaques, and the other showed only pleural plaques. Although the number of cases of asbestos-related lung cancer is minimal among all lung cancer cases, the number of the former may exceed that of mesothelioma patients. Not only physicians but also radiologists, surgeons and pathologists need to collaborate in the diagnosis of asbestos-related lung cancer. (author)

  6. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  7. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Matei, D [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  8. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials. PMID:27016619

  9. Virtual Touch tissue quantification cannot assess breast cancer lesions except for ductal carcinomas in situ and small invasive cancers: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Tada, Keiichiro; Nishioka, Kotoe; Kikuchi, Yasuko; Niwa, Takayoshi; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) is a promising new technology that quantitatively determines the stiffness of tissue. However, the clinical impact of this device on the assessment of breast cancer is unclear. Methods This study aimed to review the ultrasound records of patients with breast lesions where VTTQ was used to assess 123 normal breast tissues, 18 benign tumors, and 117 histopathologically confirmed breast cancers in a total of 129 patients. To determine the VTT...

  10. Methylation profiling defines an extensive field defect in histologically normal prostate tissues associated with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Bhusari, Sachin; Kueck, Jessica; Weeratunga, Pushpa; Wagner, Jennifer; Leverson, Glen; Huang, Wei; Jarrard, David F

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is typically found as a multifocal disease suggesting the potential for molecular defects within the morphologically normal tissue. The frequency and spatial extent of DNA methylation changes encompassing a potential field defect are unknown. A comparison of non-tumor-associated (NTA) prostate to histologically indistinguishable tumor-associated (TA) prostate tissues detected a distinct profile of DNA methylation alterations (0.2%) using genome-wide DNA arrays based on the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements 18 sequence that tile both gene-rich and poor regions. Hypomethylation (87%) occurred more frequently than hypermethylation (13%). Several of the most significantly altered loci (CAV1, EVX1, MCF2L, and FGF1) were then used as probes to map the extent of these DNA methylation changes in normal tissues from prostates containing cancer. In TA tissues, the extent of methylation was similar both adjacent (2 mm) and at a distance (>1 cm) from tumor foci. These loci were also able to distinguish NTA from TA tissues in a validation set of patient samples. These mapping studies indicate that a spatially widespread epigenetic defect occurs in the peripheral prostate tissues of men who have PCa that may be useful in the detection of this disease. PMID:23555185

  11. Methylation Profiling Defines an Extensive Field Defect in Histologically Normal Prostate Tissues Associated with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Yang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is typically found as a multifocal disease suggesting the potential for molecular defects within the morphologically normal tissue. The frequency and spatial extent of DNA methylation changes encompassing a potential field defect are unknown. A comparison of non-tumor-associated (NTA prostate to histologically indistinguishable tumor-associated (TA prostate tissues detected a distinct profile of DNA methylation alterations (0.2% using genome-wide DNA arrays based on the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements 18 sequence that tile both gene-rich and poor regions. Hypomethylation (87% occurred more frequently than hypermethylation (13%. Several of the most significantly altered loci (CAV1, EVX1, MCF2L, and FGF1 were then used as probes to map the extent of these DNA methylation changes in normal tissues from prostates containing cancer. In TA tissues, the extent of methylation was similar both adjacent (2 mm and at a distance (>1 cm from tumor foci. These loci were also able to distinguish NTA from TA tissues in a validation set of patient samples. These mapping studies indicate that a spatially widespread epigenetic defect occurs in the peripheral prostate tissues of men who have PCa that may be useful in the detection of this disease.

  12. Serum biomarkers reflecting specific tumor tissue remodeling processes are valuable diagnostic tools for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as collagen type I and elastin, and intermediate filament (IMF) proteins, such as vimentin are modified and dysregulated as part of the malignant changes leading to disruption of tissue homeostasis. Noninvasive biomarkers that reflect such changes may have a great potential for cancer. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) generated fragments of type I collagen (C1M), of elastin (ELM), and of citrullinated vimentin (VICM) were measured in serum from patients with lung cancer (n = 40), gastrointestinal cancer (n = 25), prostate cancer (n = 14), malignant melanoma (n = 7), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 13), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 10), as well as in age-matched controls (n = 33). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) was calculated and a diagnostic decision tree generated from specific cutoff values. C1M and VICM were significantly elevated in lung cancer patients as compared with healthy controls (AUROC = 0.98, P < 0.0001) and other cancers (AUROC = 0.83 P < 0.0001). A trend was detected when comparing lung cancer with COPD+IPF. No difference could be seen for ELM. Interestingly, C1M and VICM were able to identify patients with lung cancer with a positive predictive value of 0.9 and an odds ratio of 40 (95% CI = 8.7–186, P < 0.0001). Biomarkers specifically reflecting degradation of collagen type I and citrullinated vimentin are applicable for lung cancer patients. Our data indicate that biomarkers reflecting ECM and IMF protein dysregulation are highly applicable in the lung cancer setting. We speculate that these markers may aid in diagnosing and characterizing patients with lung cancer

  13. Tissue heterogeneity in IMRT dose calculation for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuti, Katia; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia; Malatesta, Tiziana; Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria; Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina; Landoni, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the γ function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the Γ analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable. PMID:20970989

  14. COX-2 gene expression in colon cancer tissue related to regulating factors and promoter methylation status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased cyclooxygenase activity promotes progression of colorectal cancer, but the mechanisms behind COX-2 induction remain elusive. This study was therefore aimed to define external cell signaling and transcription factors relating to high COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue. Tumor and normal colon tissue were collected at primary curative operation in 48 unselected patients. COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue was quantified including microarray analyses on tumor mRNA accounting for high and low tumor COX-2 expression. Cross hybridization was performed between tumor and normal colon tissue. Methylation status of up-stream COX-2 promoter region was evaluated. Tumors with high COX-2 expression displayed large differences in gene expression compared to normal colon. Numerous genes with altered expression appeared in tumors of high COX-2 expression compared to tumors of low COX-2. COX-2 expression in normal colon was increased in patients with tumors of high COX-2 compared to normal colon from patients with tumors of low COX-2. IL1β, IL6 and iNOS transcripts were up-regulated among external cell signaling factors; nine transcription factors (ATF3, C/EBP, c-Fos, Fos-B, JDP2, JunB, c-Maf, NF-κB, TCF4) showed increased expression and 5 (AP-2, CBP, Elk-1, p53, PEA3) were decreased in tumors with high COX-2. The promoter region of COX-2 gene did not show consistent methylation in tumor or normal colon tissue. Transcription and external cell signaling factors are altered as covariates to COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue, but DNA methylation of the COX-2 promoter region was not a significant factor behind COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue

  15. Influence of nanoparticles accumulation on optical properties of human normal and cancerous liver tissue in vitro estimated by OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Wei, Huajiang; Ye, Xiangping; Hu, Kun; Wu, Guoyong; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Zhouyi

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the potential use of nanoparticles as contrast agents by using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in liver tissue was demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles (average size of 25 and 70 nm), were studied in human normal and cancerous liver tissues in vitro, respectively. Each sample was monitored with SD-OCT functional imaging for 240 min. Continuous OCT monitoring showed that, after application of gold nanoparticles, the OCT signal intensities of normal liver and cancerous liver tissue both increase with time, and the larger nanoparticles tend to produce a greater signal enhancement in the same type of tissue. The results show that the values of attenuation coefficients have significant differences between normal liver tissue and cancerous liver tissue. In addition, 25 nm gold nanoparticles allow higher penetration depth than 70 nm gold nanoparticles in liver tissues.

  16. Tissue components of weight loss in cancer patients. A new method of study and preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, S B; McManus, C B

    1985-01-01

    A new approach using anthropometric, radiographic, biochemical, and ultrasonic methods allowed partition of body weight into fat, fat-free mass, skeletal muscle, and volume of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, and tumor. These methods were used to evaluate body composition longitudinally in a pilot group of nine cancer patients, seven of whom lost weight (greater than 2.5 kg) during the study period. Two control groups also underwent the protocol: (1) healthy subjects (+/- 10% IBW) of similar age, sex, and height; and (2) patients with weight loss due to anorexia nervosa. Weight loss in both the cancer and anorexia nervosa groups could be accounted for primarily by loss in fat and skeletal muscle; although the relative magnitude of these tissue losses were approximately the same in both groups, cancer patients lost relatively less body weight. This was because (1) overt or occult ascites (detected radiographically) was present in cancer patients (3 of 9); (2) tumor bulk increased fat-free mass by up to 1 to 2 kg; and (3) the proportional loss in visceral organ volume was less in cancer patients than in anorexia nervosa patients. In the latter group, heart, liver, kidneys, and spleen were reduced in proportion to body weight, whereas in the cancer group as a whole, these organs (when uninvolved with tumor) lost little (heart and kidneys) or no volume (liver and spleen). This initial study suggests that the principal endogenous energy and nitrogen sources during evolution of weight loss in cancer are primarily adipose tissue triglycerides and skeletal muscle proteins. In some cancer patients, fluid accumulation, a large tumor burden, and the slow rate of visceral organ atrophy make body weight an unreliable index of available energy-nitrogen reserves. PMID:3965090

  17. Which, when and why? Rational use of tissue-based molecular testing in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A E; D'Amico, A V; Freedland, S J

    2016-03-01

    An increased molecular understanding of localized prostate cancer and the improved ability for molecular testing of pathologic tissue has led to the development of multiple clinical assays. Here we review the relevant molecular biology of localized prostate cancer, currently available tissue-based tests and describe which is best supported for use in various clinical scenarios. Literature regarding testing of human prostate cancer tissue with Ki-67, PTEN (by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluroescence in situ hybridization (FISH)), ProMark, Prolaris, OncotypeDX Prostate and Decipher was reviewed to allow for generation of expert opinions. At diagnosis, evaluation of PTEN status, use of ProMark or OncotypeDX Prostate in men with Gleason 6 or 3+4=7 disease may help guide the use of active surveillance. For men with Gleason 7 or above disease considering watchful waiting, Ki-67 and Prolaris add independent prognostic information. For those men who have undergone prostatectomy and have adverse pathology, Decipher testing may aid in the decision to undergo adjuvant radiation. Newly available molecular tests bring opportunities to improve decision making for men with localized prostate cancer. A review of the currently available data suggests clinical scenarios for which each of these tests may have the greatest utility. PMID:26123120

  18. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for MicroRNA Detection in Archived Oral Cancer Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonggao Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The noncoding RNA designated as microRNA (miRNA is a large group of small single-stranded regulatory RNA and has generated wide-spread interest in human disease studies. To facilitate delineating the role of microRNAs in cancer pathology, we sought to explore the feasibility of detecting microRNA expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues. Using FFPE materials, we have compared fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH procedures to detect miR-146a with (a different synthetic probes: regular custom DNA oligonucleotides versus locked nucleic acid (LNA incorporated DNA oligonucleotides; (b different reporters for the probes: biotin versus digoxigenin (DIG; (c different visualization: traditional versus tyramide signal amplification (TSA system; (d different blocking reagents for endogenous peroxidase. Finally, we performed miR-146a FISH on a commercially available oral cancer tissue microarray, which contains 40 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and 10 cases of normal epithelia from the human oral cavity. A sample FISH protocol for detecting miR-146a is provided. In summary, we have established reliable in situ hybridization procedures for detecting the expression of microRNA in FFPE oral cancer tissues. This method is an important tool for studies on the involvement of microRNA in oral cancer pathology and may have potential prognostic or diagnostic value.

  19. Multispectral fluorescence imaging of human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue for early-stage cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler H.; Baggett, Brenda; Rice, Photini F. S.; Koevary, Jennifer Watson; Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Nymeyer, Ariel C.; Welge, Weston A.; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer Kehlet

    2016-05-01

    With early detection, 5-year survival rates for ovarian cancer exceed 90%, yet no effective early screening method exists. Emerging consensus suggests over 50% of the most lethal form of the disease originates in the fallopian tube. Twenty-eight women undergoing oophorectomy or debulking surgery provided informed consent for the use of surgical discard tissue samples for multispectral fluorescence imaging. Using multiple ultraviolet and visible excitation wavelengths and emissions bands, 12 fluorescence and 6 reflectance images of 47 ovarian and 31 fallopian tube tissue samples were recorded. After imaging, each sample was fixed, sectioned, and stained for pathological evaluation. Univariate logistic regression showed cancerous tissue samples had significantly lower intensity than noncancerous tissue for 17 image types. The predictive power of multiple image types was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression (MLR) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA). Two MLR models each using two image types had receiver operating characteristic curves with area under the curve exceeding 0.9. QDA determined 56 image type combinations with perfect resubstituting using as few as five image types. Adaption of the system for future in vivo fallopian tube and ovary endoscopic imaging is possible, which may enable sensitive detection of ovarian cancer with no exogenous contrast agents.

  20. MicroRNA Expression in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Cancer Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Mogens Karsbøl; Dehlendorff, Christian; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer tissue samples are a readily available resource for microRNA (miRNA) biomarker identification. No established standard for reference miRNAs in FFPE tissue exists. We sought to identify stable reference miRNAs for normalization of...... miRNA expression in FFPE tissue samples from patients with colorectal (CRC) and pancreatic (PC) cancer and to quantify the variability associated with sample age and fixation. METHODS: High-throughput miRNA profiling results from 203 CRC and 256 PC FFPE samples as well as from 37 paired frozen...... global mean expression in each cancer type. Nine of these miRNAs were present in both lists, and miR-103a-3p was the most stable reference miRNA for both CRC and PC FFPE tissue. The optimal number of reference miRNAs was 4 in CRC and 10 in PC. Sample age had a significant effect on global mi...

  1. In Vitro and Ex Vivo Evaluations of Lipid Anti-Cancer Nanoformulations: Insights and Assessment of Bioavailability Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankitkumar S; Dhawan, Vivek V; Sarmento, Bruno; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-06-01

    Lipid-based nanoformulations have been extensively investigated for improving oral efficacy of plethora of drugs. Chemotherapeutic agents remain a preferred option for effective management of cancer; however, most chemotherapeutic agents suffer from limitation of poor oral bioavailability that is associated with their physicochemical properties. Drug delivery via lipid-based nanosystems possesses strong rational and potential for improving oral bioavailability of such anti-cancer molecules through various mechanisms, viz. improving their gut solubilisation owing to micellization, improving mucosal permeation, improving lymphatic uptake, inhibiting intestinal metabolism and/or inhibiting P-glycoprotein efflux of molecules in the gastrointestinal tract. Various in vitro characterization techniques have been reported in literature that aid in getting insights into mechanisms of lipid-based nanodevices in improving oral efficacy of anti-cancer drugs. The review focuses on different characterization techniques that can be employed for evaluation of lipid-based nanosystems and their role in effective anti-cancer drug delivery. PMID:27068527

  2. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that S100 proteins are often up-regulated in many cancers, including breast, and this is frequently associated with tumour progression. Samples of breast cancer tissues were obtained during surgical intervention, according to the bioethical recommendations, and cryo-preserved until used. Tissue extracts were submitted to proteomic preparations for 2D-IPG. Protein identification was performed by N-terminal sequencing and/or peptide mass finger printing. The majority of the detected S100 proteins were absent, or present at very low levels, in the non-tumoral tissues adjacent to the primary tumor. This finding strengthens the role of S100 proteins as putative biomarkers. The proteomic screening of 100 cryo-preserved breast cancer tissues showed that some proteins were ubiquitously expressed in almost all patients while others appeared more sporadic. Most, if not all, of the detected S100 members appeared reciprocally correlated. Finally, from the perspective of biomarkers establishment, a promising finding was the observation that patients which developed distant metastases after a three year follow-up showed a general tendency of higher S100 protein expression, compared to the disease-free group. This article reports for the first time the comparative proteomic screening of several S100 protein members among a large group of breast cancer patients. The results obtained strongly support the hypothesis that a significant deregulation of multiple S100 protein members is

  3. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancemi Patrizia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that S100 proteins are often up-regulated in many cancers, including breast, and this is frequently associated with tumour progression. Methods Samples of breast cancer tissues were obtained during surgical intervention, according to the bioethical recommendations, and cryo-preserved until used. Tissue extracts were submitted to proteomic preparations for 2D-IPG. Protein identification was performed by N-terminal sequencing and/or peptide mass finger printing. Results The majority of the detected S100 proteins were absent, or present at very low levels, in the non-tumoral tissues adjacent to the primary tumor. This finding strengthens the role of S100 proteins as putative biomarkers. The proteomic screening of 100 cryo-preserved breast cancer tissues showed that some proteins were ubiquitously expressed in almost all patients while others appeared more sporadic. Most, if not all, of the detected S100 members appeared reciprocally correlated. Finally, from the perspective of biomarkers establishment, a promising finding was the observation that patients which developed distant metastases after a three year follow-up showed a general tendency of higher S100 protein expression, compared to the disease-free group. Conclusions This article reports for the first time the comparative proteomic screening of several S100 protein members among a large group of breast cancer patients. The results obtained strongly support the hypothesis

  4. Excess risk of breast cancer in the mothers of children with soft tissue sarcomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Birch, J M; Hartley, A L; Marsden, H B; Harris, M; Swindell, R.

    1984-01-01

    Information was obtained on the health status or cause of death in the mothers of a population-based series of 143 children with soft tissue sarcomas. Among these mothers there were 6 cases of breast cancer. All 6 women were pre-menopausal and 2 had bilateral disease. This represents a significant 3-fold excess risk of breast cancer. Malignant disease had occurred in 6 other women whose ages at diagnosis ranged from 33 to 58 years. This was not significantly in excess of expectation. The inci...

  5. A low dimensional entropy-based descriptor of several tissues in skin cancer histopathology samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Pablo; Corredor, Germán.; García-Arteaga, Juan D.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The use of low-level visual features to assign high level labels in datasets of histopathology images is a possible solution to the problems derived from manual labeling by experts. However, in many cases, the visual cues are not enough. In this article we propose the use of features derived exclusively from the spatial distribution of the cell nuclei. These features are calculated using the weight of k-nn graphs constructed from the distances between cells. Results show that there are k values with enhanced discriminatory power, especially when comparing cancerous and non-cancerous tissue.

  6. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches.

  7. Limited prognostic value of tissue protein expression levels of cyclin E in Danish ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeran, Mel C; Høgdall, Claus K; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2012-01-01

    tissue arrays (TA), we analysed the cyclin E expression levels in tissues from 168 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) (147 stage I, 4 stage II, 17 stage III) and 493 Ovarian cancer (OC) patients (127 stage I, 45 stage II, 276 stage III, 45 stage IV). Using a 10% cut-off level for cyclin E...... overexpression, 20% of the BOTs were positive with a higher proportion of serous than mucinous tumours. Sixty-two per cent of the OCs were positive for cyclin E expression with the highest percentage found in clear cell carcinomas. Results based on univariate and multivariate survival analyses with a 10% cut-off...

  8. An unusual case of retrovesical ectopic prostate tissue accompanied by primary prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fu-Qing; Xu, Xin; Shen, Bo-Hua; Qin, Jie; Sun, Ke; You, Qihan; Shang, De-Sheng; Zheng, Xiang-Yi

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of retrovesical ectopic prostate tissue in a 73-year-old man with primary prostate cancer. The man's prostate-specific antigen was 24.66 ng/ml.Transabdominal ultrasonography, pelvic computed tomography,and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a heterogeneous 8.5 × 8.0 × 7.0 cm mass in contact with the posterior wall of the urinary bladder. The patient underwent a retropubic radical prostatectomy and resection of tumor. Pathological examination of prostate revealed a prostatic adenocarcinoma, Gleason score of 4 + 5 = 9, and the retrovesical tumor was confirmed to be a benign prostate tissue. PMID:22966979

  9. Laser-induced tissue hyperthermia mediated by gold nanoparticles: toward cancer phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Suleymanova, Leyla V.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-03-01

    We describe an application of plasmonic silica/gold nanoshells to produce a controllable laser hyperthermia in tissues with the aim of the enhancement of cancer photothermal therapy. Laser irradiation parameters are optimized on the basis of preliminary experimental studies using a test-tube phantom and laboratory rats. Temperature distributions on the animal skin surface at hypodermic and intramuscular injection of gold nanoparticle suspensions and affectations by the laser radiation are measured in vivo with a thermal imaging system. The results of temperature measurements are compared with tissue histology.

  10. Upregulation of MiR-1280 Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Min Xu; Li-Qin Li; Jing Li; Hong-Wei Li; Qi-Bin Shen; Jin-Liang Ping; Zhi-Hong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a prolific and high-mortality disease with few effective treatments.Although the detection and surgical techniques for NSCLC continue to advance,the survival rate for the patients with NSCLC remains poor.Enhanced predictive biomarkers such as microRNAs (miRNAs) are needed at the time of diagnosis to better tailor therapies for patients.This study focused on the expression ofmiR-1280 in NSCLC tissues and distal normal tissues in order to explore the association between miR-1280 expression and NSCLC.Methods:A total of 72 newly diagnosed primary NSCLC patients were enrolled in this study.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to identify the expression level ofmiR-1280 in the NSCLC tissues and distal normal tissues of these patients.Results:The miR-1280 expression was significantly higher in the NSCLC tissues (0.084 ± 0.099) than distal normal tissues (0.014 ± 0.015,P =0.009).In 54 patients (75%),the miR-1280 expression in the NSCLC tissues was upregulated (2-△△ct > 2),and no case showed a downregulation of miR-1280 expression.Conclusions:The expression level ofmiR-1280 could be regarded as a biomarker for NSCLC.

  11. A tissue biopsy-based epigenetic multiplex PCR assay for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Neste Leander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA-directed prostate cancer screening leads to a high rate of false positive identifications and an unnecessary biopsy burden. Epigenetic biomarkers have proven useful, exhibiting frequent and abundant inactivation of tumor suppressor genes through such mechanisms. An epigenetic, multiplex PCR test for prostate cancer diagnosis could provide physicians with better tools to help their patients. Biomarkers like GSTP1, APC and RASSF1 have demonstrated involvement with prostate cancer, with the latter two genes playing prominent roles in the field effect. The epigenetic states of these genes can be used to assess the likelihood of cancer presence or absence. Results An initial test cohort of 30 prostate cancer-positive samples and 12 cancer-negative samples was used as basis for the development and optimization of an epigenetic multiplex assay based on the GSTP1, APC and RASSF1 genes, using methylation specific PCR (MSP. The effect of prostate needle core biopsy sample volume and age of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples was evaluated on an independent follow-up cohort of 51 cancer-positive patients. Multiplexing affects copy number calculations in a consistent way per assay. Methylation ratios are therefore altered compared to the respective singleplex assays, but the correlation with patient outcome remains equivalent. In addition, tissue-biopsy samples as small as 20 μm can be used to detect methylation in a reliable manner. The age of FFPE-samples does have a negative impact on DNA quality and quantity. Conclusions The developed multiplex assay appears functionally similar to individual singleplex assays, with the benefit of lower tissue requirements, lower cost and decreased signal variation. This assay can be applied to small biopsy specimens, down to 20 microns, widening clinical applicability. Increasing the sample volume can compensate the loss of DNA quality and quantity in older samples.

  12. Metastatic breast cancer patients: attitudes toward tissue donation for rapid autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, Tala; Wilson, John; Simon, Jacqueline; Rosenzweig, Margaret; Puhalla, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Rapid autopsy (RA) offers a unique opportunity to obtain a large amount of metastatic tissue at death in order to deepen existing understanding of cancer evolution and heterogeneity. In breast cancer, understanding metastasis is particularly valuable given that treatment regimens are based on the traditional hormone and HER2 receptor status as well as evolving genomic data of the primary tumor. We aimed to elucidate the attitudes and interests of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) toward RA, and to identify associated demographic or disease characteristics that may influence patient attitudes and interest. Ninety-seven patients with MBC were surveyed over the course of 12 months at a large, urban comprehensive cancer center's breast cancer outpatient clinic. 93/97 patients completed the survey sufficiently to be included in the analysis. Fisher's exact test was employed for categorical variables, and t test and rank-sum tests for continuous variables. p values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Of the 93 patients with MBC analyzed, 87 % were willing to donate tissue at death. Marital status and younger age were associated with willingness to donate (p = 0.000, p = 0.025, respectively). Race, employment status, religion/spirituality, and cancer subtype were not associated with likelihood of donating. Forty-five percent of patients felt that doctors should ask about RA at diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer rather than during late-stage disease. These data provide evidence that an RA program would be welcomed by patients and requires initiative by providers. PMID:26705147

  13. Nutrition support and dietary interventions for patients with lung cancer: current insights

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss N

    2016-01-01

    Nicole Kiss1,2 1Nutrition and Speech Pathology Department, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Cancer Experiences Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Malnutrition and weight loss are prevalent in patients with lung cancer. The impact of malnutrition on patients with cancer, and specifically in patients with lung cancer, has been demonstrated in a large number of studies. Malnutrition has been shown to neg...

  14. Insight into early-phase trials for lung cancer in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jin-Ji; Wu, Yi-Long

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Few data have been published comparing early-phase trials for lung cancer between China and the United States (US). This study was to investigate the differences of phase 1 trials for lung cancer between these two countries. Methods In 2014, a cross-sectional survey was conducted to compare phase 1 trials for lung cancer between the Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute (GLCI), the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC), and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Cen...

  15. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2004-12-19

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and {sigma}{sub {lambda}}, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, {gamma} and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between f{Delta}{mu}s in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the

  16. CURED I - LENT. Late effects of cancer treatment on normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for the most favorable therapeutic ratio - at which ablation of cancer is achieved while normal tissues are conserved - has been modern radiation oncology's equivalent of the quest for the Holy Grail. Our awareness of the late effects of radiation grew during the past century as new modalities were introduced. Heightened normal tissue reactions accompanied the higher rates of cancer ablation achieved by escalation of radiation doses, accelerated fractionated radiotherapy, and aggressive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation regimens. This volume is based on the LENT V NCI-sponsored meeting held in May 2004 and the CURED I conference held in 2006. Written by experts in the field, it addresses a number of critical topics relating to late effects, such as mechanisms of injury, the role of screening, options for interventions, second malignancies, and prevention. It is hoped that it will assist the reader in understanding how to prevent and treat the long-term side-effects of irradiation. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of MicroRNA Deep Sequencing of Matched Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Cancer Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Meng; McElroy, Joseph P.; Stefano Volinia; Jeff Palatini; Sarah Warner; Ayers, Leona W; Kamalakannan Palanichamy; Arnab Chakravarti; Tim Lautenschlaeger

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate several aspects of tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Most cancer tissues are archived formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE). While microRNAs are a more stable form of RNA thought to withstand FFPE-processing and degradation there is only limited evidence for the latter assumption. We examined whether microRNA profiling can be successfully conducted on FFPE cancer tissues using SOLiD ligation based sequencing. Tissue storage times (2-9 years) appeared to not affect...

  18. Evaluation of algorithm methods for fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The paper focus on the various algorithms on to unravel the fluorescence spectra by unmixing methods to identify cancerous and normal human tissues from the measured fluorescence spectroscopy. The biochemical or morphologic changes that cause fluorescence spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological approach; therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases for in vivo use. The method can further identify tissue biomarkers by decomposing the spectral contributions of different fluorescent molecules of interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of blind source un-mixing methods (backward model) and spectral fitting approaches (forward model) in decomposing the contributions of key fluorescent molecules from the tissue mixture background when certain selected excitation wavelength is applied. Pairs of adenocarcinoma as well as normal tissues confirmed by pathologist were excited by selective wavelength of 340 nm. The emission spectra of resected fresh tissue were used to evaluate the relative changes of collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and Flavin by various spectral un-mixing methods. Two categories of algorithms: forward methods and Blind Source Separation [such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF)] will be introduced and evaluated. The purpose of the spectral analysis is to discard the redundant information which conceals the difference between these two types of tissues, but keep their diagnostically significance. The facts predicted by different methods were compared to the gold standard of histopathology. The results indicate that these key fluorophores within tissue, e.g. tryptophan, collagen, and NADH, and flavin, show differences of relative contents of fluorophores among different types of human cancer and normal tissues. The

  19. SU-E-T-168: Evaluation of Normal Tissue Damage in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H [IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer by calculating average survival fraction (SF) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for normal tissue cells. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were generated using EclipseTM treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The average SF for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from dose spectrum acquired from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Finally, EUDs for three types of normal tissue of each structure were calculated from average SF. Results: The EUDs of the brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, brachial plexus and etc were calculated. Our analysis indicated that the brainstem can absorb as much as 14.3% of prescription dose to the tumor if the cell line is radiosensitive. In addition, as much as 16.1% and 18.3% of prescription dose were absorbed by the brainstem for moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant cells, respectively. For the spinal cord, the EUDs reached up to 27.6%, 35.0% and 42.9% of prescribed dose for the three types of radiosensitivities respectively. Three types of normal cells for parotid glands can get up to 65.6%, 71.2% and 78.4% of prescription dose, respectively. The maximum EUDs of brachial plexsus were calculated as 75.4%, 76.4% and 76.7% of prescription for three types of normal cell lines. Conclusion: The results indicated that EUD can be used to quantify and evaluate the radiation damage to surrounding normal tissues. Large variation of normal tissue EUDs may come from variation of target volumes and radiation beam orientations among the patients.

  20. Lung cancer diagnosis and staging in the minimally invasive age with increasing demands for tissue analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Folch, Erik; Costa, Daniel B.; Wright, Jeffrey; VanderLaan, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of patients with lung cancer in recent decades has increasingly relied on minimally invasive tissue sampling techniques, such as endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) needle aspiration, transbronchial biopsy, and transthoracic image guided core needle biopsy. These modalities have been shown to have low complication rates, and provide adequate cellular material for pathologic diagnosis and necessary ancillary molecular testing. As an importan...

  1. Relationship Between Diseased Lung Tissues on Computed Tomography and Motion of Fiducial Marker Near Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Onodera, Yuya; Nishoka, Noriko; Yasuda, Koichi; Fujima, Noriyuki; TORRES, MYLIN; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Ooyama, Noriko; Onimaru, Rikiya; Terae, Satoshi; Ooizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For lung cancer patients with poor pulmonary function due to emphysema or fibrosis, it is important to predict the amplitude of internal tumor motion to minimize the irradiation of the functioning lung tissue before receiving stereotactic body radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two board-certified diagnostic radiologists independently assessed the degree of pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis on computed tomography (CT) in 71 patients with peripheral lung tumors before real-time tu...

  2. Associations of persistent organic pollutants in serum and adipose tissue with breast cancer prognostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrebola, J P; Fernández-Rodríguez, M; Artacho-Cordón, F; Garde, C; Perez-Carrascosa, F; Linares, I; Tovar, I; González-Alzaga, B; Expósito, J; Torne, P; Fernández, M F; Olea, N

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate associations between exposure to a group of persistent organic pollutants, measured in both adipose tissue and serum samples from breast cancer patients, and a set of tumor prognostic markers. The study population comprised 103 breast cancer patients recruited in Granada, Southern Spain. Data for tumor prognostic markers were retrieved from hospital clinical records and socio-demographic information was gathered by questionnaire. Persistent organic pollutants were quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Exposure levels were categorized in quartiles, and associations were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression. Adipose tissue HCB concentrations were associated positively with ER and PR expression (p-trends=0.044 and 0.005, respectively) and negatively with E-Cadherin and p53 expression (p-trends=0.012 and 0.027, respectively). PCB-180 adipose tissue concentrations were positively associated with HER2 expression (p-trend=0.036). Serum PCB-138 concentrations were positively associated with ER and PR expression (p-trends=0.052 and 0.042, respectively). The risk of p53 expression was higher among women in the lowest quartile of serum PCB-138 concentrations, but no significant trend was observed (p-trend=0.161). These findings indicate that human exposure to certain persistent organic pollutants might be related to breast cancer aggressiveness. We also highlight the influence on exposure assessment of the biological matrix selected, given that both serum and adipose tissue might yield relevant information on breast cancer prognosis. PMID:27213669

  3. Novel antioxidants are not toxic to normal tissues but effectively kill cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Aladedunye, Felix; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Li, Dongping; Thomas, James; Kovalchuk, Olga; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as a result of cellular processes and play a key role in predisposition to and development of numerous diseases and of premature aging. Recently, we reported the syntheses of a number of novel phenolic antioxidants for possible application in food industry. In the present study, analyses of the cellular processes and molecular gene expression effects of some of the novel antioxidants in normal human tissues and in cancer cells were undertaken. Results indicated that w...

  4. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Sedger, Lisa M.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Malcolm J McConville; De Souza, David P.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Williams, Spencer J; Saravanan Dayalan; Daniel Lanzer; Helen Mackie; Lam, Thomas C.; John Boyages

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained ...

  5. Impact of different IMRT techniques to improve conformity and normal tissue sparing in upper esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amin E Amin; Mohamed Kelaney; Samah K Elshamndy; Osiris W. Guirguis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical esophageal cancer is challenging. Although IMRT techniques using inverse planning algorithms are facilitating the treatment planning process, the irradiation dose to the normal tissues can be a critical issue. This study was performed to investigate the effect of beam numbers and their directions and local optimization on: (1) dose conformity and homogeneity to the planning target volume (PTV) and (2) dose to the organ at risks (OA...

  6. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, Helene, E-mail: helene.rahn@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [ENT-Department, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftungsprofessur), University Hospital Erlangen, Waldstraße 1, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, Berlin 10587 (Germany); Odenbach, Stefan [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XµCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XµCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-µCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XµCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration. - Highlights: • Local cancer treatments are promising in reducing negative side effects occurring during conventional chemotherapy. • The nanoparticles play an important role in delivering drugs to the designated area during local cancer treatments as magnetic drug targeting. • We study the nanoparticles distribution in tumor tissue after magnetic drug targeting with X-ray computed tomography. • We achieved a 3-dimensional quantification of the nanoparticles content in tumor tissue out of digital tomographic data.

  7. Anti-tissue factor short hairpin RNA inhibits breast cancer growth in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bluff, J. E.; Amarzguioui, M.; Slattery, J; Reed, M.W.R.; Brown, N J; Staton, C A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In breast cancer, there is a correlation between tissue factor (TF) expression, angiogenesis and disease progression. TF stimulates tumour angiogenesis, in part, through up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, this study aimed to establish whether TF stimulates angiogenesis and tumour progression directly and independent of VEGF up-regulation. Initially, the effects of TF and VEGF were assessed on endothelial cell migration (Boyden chamber) a...

  8. Tissue Biomarkers in Prognostication of Serous Ovarian Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Binny Khandakar; Sandeep R Mathur; Lalit Kumar; Sunesh Kumar; Siddhartha Datta Gupta; Venkateswaran K Iyer; Kalaivani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer (SOC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in females with poor prognosis because of advanced stage at presentation. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is being used for management of advanced SOC, but role of tissue biomarkers in prognostication following NACT is not well established. The study was conducted on advanced stage SOC patients (n = 100) that were treated either conventionally (n = 50) or with NACT (n = 50), followed by surgery. In order t...

  9. Investigating the Role of Sox2 in Stomach Tissue Homeostasis and Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Abby Joya

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Sox2 is essential for the establishment and maintenance of multiple stem cell populations and its coding region is amplified in certain carcinomas. However, Sox2’s role in stomach homeostasis and cancer is poorly understood. In this thesis, I used mouse genetics to investigate the expression pattern and function of Sox2 in the adult stomach during normal tissue homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Using a genetic lineage tracing system, I found that Sox2 expression marks a ...

  10. Evolving Clinical Cancer Radiotherapy: Concerns Regarding Normal Tissue Protection and Quality Assurance

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy, which is one of three major cancer treatment methods in modern medicine, has continued to develop for a long period, more than a century. The development of radiotherapy means allowing the administration of higher doses to tumors to improve tumor control rates while minimizing the radiation doses absorbed by surrounding normal tissues through which radiation passes for administration to tumors, thereby reducing or removing the incidence of side effects. Such development of radio...

  11. Characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes in ovarian cancer tissues and sphere cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases belong to a superfamily of detoxifying enzymes that protect cells from carcinogenic aldehydes. Of the superfamily, ALDH1A1 has gained most attention because current studies have shown that its expression is associated with human cancer stem cells. However, ALDH1A1 is only one of the 19 human ALDH subfamilies currently known. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the expression and activities of other major ALDH isozymes are associated with human ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer sphere cultures. Immunohistochemistry was used to delineate ALDH isozyme localization in clinical ovarian tissues. Western Blot analyses were performed on lysates prepared from cancer cell lines and ovarian cancer spheres to confirm the immunohistochemistry findings. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions were used to measure the mRNA expression levels. The Aldefluor® assay was used to measure ALDH activity in cancer cells from the four tumor subtypes. Immunohistochemical staining showed significant overexpression of ALDH1A3, ALDH3A2, and ALDH7A1 isozymes in ovarian tumors relative to normal ovarian tissues. The expression and activity of ALDH1A1 is tumor type-dependent, as seen from immunohistochemisty, Western blot analysis, and the Aldefluor® assay. The expression was elevated in the mucinous and endometrioid ovarian epithelial tumors than in serous and clear cell tumors. In some serous and most clear cell tumors, ALDH1A1 expression was found in the stromal fibroblasts. RNA expression of all studied ALDH isozymes also showed higher expression in endometrioid and mucinous tumors than in the serous and clear cell subtypes. The expression of ALDH enzymes showed tumor type-dependent induction in ovarian cancer cells growing as sphere suspensions in serum-free medium. The results of our study indicate that ALDH enzyme expression and activity may be associated with specific cell types in ovarian tumor tissues and vary according to

  12. Up-regulation of ALG-2 in hepatomas and lung cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Winding, Pernille; Tarabykina, Svetlana; Sehested, Maxwell; Berchtold, Martin W

    2003-01-01

    antibodies against ALG-2 did neither detect mouse recombinant ALG-2 nor endogenous ALG-2 in Jurkat cell lysates, whereas our own affinity-purified antibody recognized recombinant as well as endogenous ALG-2. The specificity of the antibody was shown by preabsorbtion experiments and on ALG-2-deficient cells......ALG-2 was isolated in a screen for proteins involved in programmed cell death and is the first Ca(2+)-binding protein found to be directly involved in apoptosis. We have generated polyclonal antibodies that are suitable for detecting ALG-2 using different immunological methods. Three commercial...... result confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Staining of four different lung cancer tissue microarrays including specimens of 263 patients showed that ALG-2 is mainly localized to epithelial cells and significantly up-regulated in small-cell lung cancers and in non-small-cell lung cancers. Our...

  13. Tissue hyaluronan expression, as reflected in the sputum of lung cancer patients, is an indicator of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, M.P.; Sá, V.K. de; Martins, V. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, J.R.M. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Endocrinologia e Metabolismo, Laboratório de Endocrinologia Molecular e Translacional-LEMT, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Parra, E.R. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mendes, A. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, P.C. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reis, R.M. [Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga (Portugal); ICVS/3B' s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Guimarães (Portugal); Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Longatto-Filho, A. [Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga (Portugal); ICVS/3B' s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Guimarães (Portugal); Laboratório de Investigação Médica (LIM 14), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, C.Z. [Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Takagaki, T. [Divisão de Pneumologia, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carraro, D.M. [Centro Internacional de Pesquisa/CIPE, AC Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nader, H.B. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Capelozzi, V.L. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-08

    Hyaluronan (HA) shows promise for detecting cancerous change in pleural effusion and urine. However, there is uncertainty about the localization of HA in tumor tissue and its relationship with different histological types and other components of the extracellular matrix, such as angiogenesis. We evaluated the association between HA and degree of malignancy through expression in lung tumor tissue and sputum. Tumoral tissue had significantly increased HA compared to normal tissue. Strong HA staining intensity associated with cancer cells was significant in squamous cell carcinoma compared to adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma. A significant direct association was found between tumors with a high percentage of HA and MVD (microvessel density) in tumoral stroma. Similarly significant was the direct association between N1 tumors and high levels of HA in cancer cells. Cox multivariate analysis showed significant association between better survival and low HA. HA increased in sputum from lung cancer patients compared to cancer-free and healthy volunteers and a significant correlation was found between HA in sputum and HA in cancer tissue. Localization of HA in tumor tissue was related to malignancy and reflected in sputum, making this an emerging factor for an important diagnostic procedure in patients suspected to have lung cancer. Further study in additional patients in a randomized prospective trial is required to finalize these results and to validate our quantitative assessment of HA, as well as to couple it to gold standard sputum cytology.

  14. Tissue hyaluronan expression, as reflected in the sputum of lung cancer patients, is an indicator of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyaluronan (HA) shows promise for detecting cancerous change in pleural effusion and urine. However, there is uncertainty about the localization of HA in tumor tissue and its relationship with different histological types and other components of the extracellular matrix, such as angiogenesis. We evaluated the association between HA and degree of malignancy through expression in lung tumor tissue and sputum. Tumoral tissue had significantly increased HA compared to normal tissue. Strong HA staining intensity associated with cancer cells was significant in squamous cell carcinoma compared to adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma. A significant direct association was found between tumors with a high percentage of HA and MVD (microvessel density) in tumoral stroma. Similarly significant was the direct association between N1 tumors and high levels of HA in cancer cells. Cox multivariate analysis showed significant association between better survival and low HA. HA increased in sputum from lung cancer patients compared to cancer-free and healthy volunteers and a significant correlation was found between HA in sputum and HA in cancer tissue. Localization of HA in tumor tissue was related to malignancy and reflected in sputum, making this an emerging factor for an important diagnostic procedure in patients suspected to have lung cancer. Further study in additional patients in a randomized prospective trial is required to finalize these results and to validate our quantitative assessment of HA, as well as to couple it to gold standard sputum cytology

  15. Tissue and serum fluorescence spectroscopy as a marker to monitor radiation therapy in cancer of human uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of neoplasia epithelial tissues undergo biochemical and structural changes that can manifest in tissue auto-fluorescence. Several research groups have reported the tissue fluorescence spectroscopy for the discrimination of carcinoma or human uterine cervix. And also there have been several reports on using different biomarkers for the detection of cervical cancer. It is attempted to make use of fluorescence spectroscopy technique to monitor the radiation therapy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of cervix. The clinical samples from 10 patients with stage II and stage III B cervical cancer were analysed. The results showed significant changes in spectral characteristics in tissue fluorescence before and after radiation

  16. Detection of miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and preliminary analysis of its downstream target molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Shen; Jian-Wu Gao; Yan-Yu Li; Peng Teng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and analyze its downstream target molecules.Methods:Patients with different FIGO stages of cervical cancer and healthy subjects were selected, cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected, and contents of miRNA-21 and apoptotic genes were detected; cervical cancer SiHa cells were cultured, miRNA-21 mimics and inhibitors were transfected, and then apoptotic gene contents were detected.Results:miRNA-21 contents in different stages of cervical cancer tissue were all higher than those in normal cervical tissue, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were lower than those in normal tissue, and mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were negatively correlated with miRNA-21 contents; after miRNA-21 mimics were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly decreased, and after miRNA-21 inhibitors were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly increased.Conclusion:miRNA-21 contents in cervical cancer tissue significantly increase; downstream target genes of this miRNA may be apoptotic genes p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19.

  17. STED super-resolution microscopy of clinical paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ilgen

    Full Text Available Formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human tissue resected during cancer surgery is indispensable for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and represents a vast and largely unexploited resource for research. Optical microscopy of such specimen is curtailed by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional optical microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we used STED super-resolution microscopy enabling optical resolution well below the diffraction barrier. We visualized nanoscale protein distributions in sections of well-annotated paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue stored in a clinical repository. Using antisera against several mitochondrial proteins, STED microscopy revealed distinct sub-mitochondrial protein distributions, suggesting a high level of structural preservation. Analysis of human tissues stored for up to 17 years demonstrated that these samples were still amenable for super-resolution microscopy. STED microscopy of sections of HER2 positive rectal adenocarcinoma revealed details in the surface and intracellular HER2 distribution that were blurred in the corresponding conventional images, demonstrating the potential of super-resolution microscopy to explore the thus far largely untapped nanoscale regime in tissues stored in biorepositories.

  18. Determination of acidic isoferritin and ferritin in the serum and cancer tissues of lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serum AIF (acidic isoferritin) and Ferr (ferritin) levels are determined for 16 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, 24 patients with pneumonia, 34 patients with lung cancer and 95 normal donors with RIA method. The results are 142.2 +- 84.5 μg/l and 104.2 +- 59.3 mg/l, 148.8 +- 79.5 μg/l and 107.3 +- 46.8 mg/l, 260.7 +- 126.3 μg/l and 161.5 +- 75.3 mg/l, and 103.8 +- 54.3 μg/l and 72.1 +- 39.5 mg/l, respectively. The lung cancer patients group has a remarkably high level as compared with other groups (P<0.01), which indicates that the serum AIF and Ferr contents can be used as important indices in lung cancer diagnosis

  19. CRISPRi and CRISPRa: New Functional Genomics Tools Provide Complementary Insights into Cancer Biology and Therapeutic Strategies | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A central goal of research for targeted cancer therapy, or precision oncology, is to reveal the intrinsic vulnerabilities of cancer cells and exploit them as therapeutic targets. Examples of cancer cell vulnerabilities include driver oncogenes that are essential for the initiation and progression of cancer, or non-oncogene addictions resulting from the cancerous state of the cell. To identify vulnerabilities, scientists perform genetic “loss-of-function” and “gain-of-function” studies to better understand the roles of specific genes in cancer cells.

  20. Atomic Insight into the Altered O6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Protein Architecture in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Anjum Chikan

    Full Text Available O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is one of the major DNA repair protein that counteracts the alkalyting agent-induced DNA damage by replacing O6-methylguanine (mutagenic lesion back to guanine, eventually suppressing the mismatch errors and double strand crosslinks. Exonic alterations in the form of nucleotide polymorphism may result in altered protein structure that in turn can lead to the loss of function. In the present study, we focused on the population feared for high exposure to alkylating agents owing to their typical and specialized dietary habits. To this end, gastric cancer patients pooled out from the population were selected for the mutational screening of a specific error prone region of MGMT gene. We found that nearly 40% of the studied neoplastic samples harbored missense mutation at codon151 resulting into Serine to Isoleucine variation. This variation resulted in bringing about the structural disorder, subsequently ensuing into a major stoichiometric variance in recognition domain, substrate binding and selectivity loop of the active site of the MGMT protein, as observed under virtual microscope of molecular dynamics simulation (MDS. The atomic insight into MGMT protein by computational approach showed a significant change in the intra molecular hydrogen bond pattern, thus leading to the observed structural anomalies. To further examine the mutational implications on regulatory plugs of MGMT that holds the protein in a DNA-Binding position, a MDS based analysis was carried out on, all known physically interacting amino acids essentially clustered into groups based on their position and function. The results generated by physical-functional clustering of protein indicated that the identified mutation in the vicinity of the active site of MGMT protein causes the local and global destabilization of a protein by either eliminating the stabilizing salt bridges in cluster C3, C4, and C5 or by locally destabilizing the

  1. Potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Characterization of Malignant, Benign, and Healthy Breast Tissues and Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uma; Sah, Rani G.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Parshad, Rajinder; Seenu, Vurthaluru; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Hari, Smriti; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its association with molecular biomarkers was investigated in 259 patients with breast cancer, 67 with benign pathology, and 54 healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 1.5 T. In 59 breast cancer patients, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) was also acquired. Mean ADC of malignant lesions was significantly lower (1.02 ± 0.17 × 10−3 mm2/s) compared to benign (1.57 ± 0.26 × 10−3 mm2/s) and healthy (1.78 ± 0.13 × 10−3 mm2/s) breast tissues. A cutoff ADC value of 1.23 × 10−3 mm2/s (sensitivity 92.5%; specificity 91.1%; area under the curve 0.96) to differentiate malignant from benign diseases was arrived by receiver operating curve analysis. In 10/59 breast cancer patients, indeterminate DCE curve was seen, while their ADC value was indicative of malignancy, implying the potential of the addition of DWI in increasing the specificity of DCEMRI data. Further, the association of ADC with tumor volume, stage, hormonal receptors [estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor (HER2)], and menopausal status was investigated. A significant difference was seen in tumor volume between breast cancer patients of stages IIA and IIIA, IIB and IIIA, and IIB and III (B + C), respectively (P < 0.05). Patients with early breast cancer (n = 52) had significantly lower ADC and tumor volume than those with locally advanced breast cancer (n = 207). No association was found in ADC and tumor volume with the menopausal status. Breast cancers with ER−, PR−, and triple-negative (TN) status showed a significantly larger tumor volume compared to ER+, PR+, and non-triple-negative (nTN) cancers, respectively. Also, TN tumors showed a significantly higher ADC compared to ER+, PR+, and nTN cancers. Patients with ER− and TN cancers were younger than those with ER+ and nTN cancers

  2. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The c...

  3. Expression profiles of inhibitor of growth protein 2 in normal and cancer tissues: An immunohistochemical screening analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Xue-Feng; Gou, Wen-Feng; Lu, Hang; Li, Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Tu; Sun, Hong-Zhi; Zheng, Hua-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    Inhibitor of growth protein 2 (ING2) has an important role in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell proliferation, cell‑cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. The present study performed an immunohistochemical analysis for expression profiling of ING2 protein in an array of tissues comprising normal mouse and human tissues, as well as human hepatocellular (n=62), renal clear cell (n=62), pancreatic (n=62), esophageal squamous cell (n=45), cervical squamous cell (n=31), breast (n=144), gastric (n=196), colorectal (n=96), ovarian (n=208), endometrial (n=96) and lung (n=192) carcinoma tissues. In mouse tissues, ING2 was detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of the glandular epithelium of breast, hepatocytes, intestine, bronchium and alveoli, as well as the squamous epithelium of skin and glomeruli, and in myocardial cells, while it was located in the cytoplasm of renal tubules and striated muscle cells. ING2 protein was scattered in the brain and spleen. In human tissues, ING2 protein was principally distributed in the cytoplasm, while in it was present in the cytoplasm and nuclei in the stomach, intestine, cervix, endometrium trachea, breast and pancreas. The nuclear location of ING2 in the stomach was more prominent than that in the cytoplasm. High ING2 immunoreactivity was detected in the tongue, stomach, skin, pancreas, cervix and breast, whereas weakly in the brain stem, thymus, thyroid, lung, striated muscle, testis, bladder and ovary. In total, 617 out of 1,194 of the tested cancer tissues (51.7%) were ING2-positive. In most cases, ING2 expression was found to be restricted to the cytoplasm of all cancer tissues, while in certain cancer types, including renal clear cell, ovarian and colorectal carcinoma, it was occasionally present in the nuclei. Among the cancer tissues examined, ING2 was most frequently expressed in breast cancer (67.4%) and gynecological cancer types, including ovarian cancer (61.5%) and endometrial cancer (57.3%). Compared with

  4. Serum and tissue markers of myopathy in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Adami

    2012-09-01

    . Patients affected with colorectal cancer at disease onset display low pre surgical serum levels of prealbumin (also known as transtiretin and regenerating myofibers in the rectus abdominis muscle. The myopathy appears to be associated with an early stage of cancer and it could be interpreted as a consequence on the skeletal muscle of anti-cancer defense mechanisms (pro- apoptotic, thus non inflammatory, during the pre-invasive stage of the neoplasia. A comprehensive study on the potential molecular mechanisms that are responsible for this cancer-associated myopathy could possibly provide new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and new therapeutic targets to prevent the severe loss of muscle tissue which characterizes late-onset cancer cachexia.

  5. Dynamic infrared imaging in identification of breast cancer tissue with combined image processing and frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joro, R; Lääperi, A-L; Soimakallio, S; Järvenpää, R; Kuukasjärvi, T; Toivonen, T; Saaristo, R; Dastidar, P

    2008-01-01

    Five combinations of image-processing algorithms were applied to dynamic infrared (IR) images of six breast cancer patients preoperatively to establish optimal enhancement of cancer tissue before frequency analysis. mid-wave photovoltaic (PV) IR cameras with 320x254 and 640x512 pixels were used. The signal-to-noise ratio and the specificity for breast cancer were evaluated with the image-processing combinations from the image series of each patient. Before image processing and frequency analysis the effect of patient movement was minimized with a stabilization program developed and tested in the study by stabilizing image slices using surface markers set as measurement points on the skin of the imaged breast. A mathematical equation for superiority value was developed for comparison of the key ratios of the image-processing combinations. The ability of each combination to locate the mammography finding of breast cancer in each patient was compared. Our results show that data collected with a 640x512-pixel mid-wave PV camera applying image-processing methods optimizing signal-to-noise ratio, morphological image processing and linear image restoration before frequency analysis possess the greatest superiority value, showing the cancer area most clearly also in the match centre of the mammography estimation. PMID:18666012

  6. Expression of BMI-1 and Mel-18 in breast tissue - a diagnostic marker in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollan Hilde S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb Group (PcG proteins are epigenetic silencers involved in maintaining cellular identity, and their deregulation can result in cancer. Expression of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 has been studied in tumor tissue, but not in adjacent non-cancerous breast epithelium. Our study compares the expression of the two genes in normal breast epithelium of cancer patients and relates it to the level of expression in the corresponding tumors as well as in breast epithelium of healthy women. Methods A total of 79 tumors, of which 71 malignant tumors of the breast, 6 fibroadenomas, and 2 DCIS were studied and compared to the reduction mammoplastic specimens of 11 healthy women. In addition there was available adjacent cancer free tissue for 23 of the malignant tumors. The tissue samples were stored in RNAlater, RNA was isolated to create expression microarray profile. These two genes were then studied more closely first on mRNA transcription level by microarrays (Agilent 44 K and quantitative RT-PCR (TaqMan and then on protein expression level using immunohistochemistry. Results Bmi-1 mRNA is significantly up-regulated in adjacent normal breast tissue in breast cancer patients compared to normal breast tissue from noncancerous patients. Conversely, mRNA transcription level of Mel-18 is lower in normal breast from patients operated for breast cancer compared to breast tissue from mammoplasty. When protein expression of these two genes was evaluated, we observed that most of the epithelial cells were positive for Bmi-1 in both groups of tissue samples, although the expression intensity was stronger in normal tissue from cancer patients compared to mammoplasty tissue samples. Protein expression of Mel-18 showed inversely stronger intensity in tissue samples from mammoplasty compared to normal breast tissue from patients operated for breast cancer. Conclusion Bmi-1 mRNA level is consistently increased and Mel-18 mRNA level is consistently decreased

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Estimations of Volumetric Inductive Phase Shift in Breast Cancer Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C. A.; Lozano, L. M.; Uscanga, M. C.; Silva, J. G.; Polo, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Impedance measurements based on magnetic induction for breast cancer detection has been proposed in some studies. This study evaluates theoretical and experimentally the use of a non-invasive technique based on magnetic induction for detection of patho-physiological conditions in breast cancer tissue associated to its volumetric electrical conductivity changes through inductive phase shift measurements. An induction coils-breast 3D pixel model was designed and tested. The model involves two circular coils coaxially centered and a human breast volume centrally placed with respect to the coils. A time-harmonic numerical simulation study addressed the effects of frequency-dependent electrical properties of tumoral tissue on the volumetric inductive phase shift of the breast model measured with the circular coils as inductor and sensor elements. Experimentally; five female volunteer patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma previously diagnosed by the radiology and oncology departments of the Specialty Clinic for Women of the Mexican Army were measured by an experimental inductive spectrometer and the use of an ergonomic inductor-sensor coil designed to estimate the volumetric inductive phase shift in human breast tissue. Theoretical and experimental inductive phase shift estimations were developed at four frequencies: 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 MHz. The theoretical estimations were qualitatively in agreement with the experimental findings. Important increments in volumetric inductive phase shift measurements were evident at 0.01MHz in theoretical and experimental observations. The results suggest that the tested technique has the potential to detect pathological conditions in breast tissue associated to cancer by non-invasive monitoring. Further complementary studies are warranted to confirm the observations.

  8. Emergentism as a default: cancer as a problem of tissue organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Ana M; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2005-02-01

    During the last fifty years the dominant stance in experimental biology has been reductionism. For the most part, research programs were based on the notion that genes were in 'the driver's seat' controlling the developmental program and determining normalcy and disease (genetic reductionism and genetic determinism). Philosophers were the first to realize that the belief that the Mendelian genes were reduced to DNA molecules was questionable. Soon after these pronouncements, experimental data confirmed their misgivings. The optimism of molecular biologists, fueled by early success in tackling relatively simple problems, has now been tempered by the difficulties found when attempting to understand complex biological problems. Here, we analyse experimental data that illustrate the shortcomings of this sort of reductionism. We also examine the prevailing paradigm in cancer research, the somatic mutation theory (SMT), the premises of which are: (i) cancer is derived from a single somatic cell that has accumulated multiple DNA mutations; (ii) the default state of cell proliferation in metazoa is quiescence; and (iii) cancer is a disease of cell proliferation caused by mutations in genes that control proliferation and the cell cycle. We challenge the notion that cancer is a cellular problem caused by mutated genes by assessing data gathered both from within the reductionist paradigm and from an alternative view that regards carcinogenesis as a developmental process gone awry. This alternative view, explored under the name of the tissue organization field theory (TOFT), is based on premises that place cancer in a different hierarchical level of complexity from that proposed by the SMT, namely: (i) carcinogenesis represents a problem of tissue organization comparable to organogenesis, and (ii) proliferation is the default state of all cells. We propose that the organicist view, in which the TOFT is based, is a good starting point from which to explore emergent phenomena

  9. Ultrasound Thermometry for Optimizing heat Supply During a Hyperthermia Therapy of Cancer Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mario; Rath, Katharina; Ruiz, Andrés Eduardo Ramos; Kühnicke, Elfgard

    Monitoring the temperature during a hyperthermia therapy allows optimizing the heat supply to destroy the cancer whereby the damage in the surrounding tissue is minimized. This contribution presents the fundamental research and current work to realize a locally resolved, noninvasive and intra-surgically applicable temperature measurement in tissue. This is realized by measuring the sound velocity locally resolved by an annular array, which allows noninvasive measurements although the observed tissue is not accessible from all directions. The method had been already qualified for fluids and analyses the echoes of moving scattering particles to obtain the time of flight to the focus of the transducer. As the parameters of the transducer are known the focus position (and thus the time of flight) can be calculated as a function of the sound velocity distribution of the propagation medium. Hence the measured time of flight allows determining the focus position and mean sound velocity simultaneously by means of this function. Varying the time lags of the signals for each element allows moving the focus and so measuring locally resolved. This contribution presents first ex-vivo measurements in tissue and thus proves the adaptability of this technique for tissue.

  10. Combined blood/tissue analysis for cancer biomarker discovery: application to renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Prieto, DaRue A; Chan, King C; Ye, Xiaying; Valera, Vladimir A; Simpson, R Mark; Rudnick, Paul A; Xiao, Zhen; Issaq, Haleem J; Linehan, W Marston; Stein, Stephen E; Veenstra, Timothy D; Blonder, Josip

    2010-03-01

    A method that relies on subtractive tissue-directed shot-gun proteomics to identify tumor proteins in the blood of a patient newly diagnosed with cancer is described. To avoid analytical and statistical biases caused by physiologic variability of protein expression in the human population, this method was applied on clinical specimens obtained from a single patient diagnosed with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The proteomes extracted from tumor, normal adjacent tissue and preoperative plasma were analyzed using 2D-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The lists of identified proteins were filtered to discover proteins that (i) were found in the tumor but not normal tissue, (ii) were identified in matching plasma, and (iii) whose spectral count was higher in tumor tissue than plasma. These filtering criteria resulted in identification of eight tumor proteins in the blood. Subsequent Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of cadherin-5, cadherin-11, DEAD-box protein-23, and pyruvate kinase in the blood of the patient in the study as well as in the blood of four other patients diagnosed with RCC. These results demonstrate the utility of a combined blood/tissue analysis strategy that permits the detection of tumor proteins in the blood of a patient diagnosed with RCC. PMID:20121140

  11. A tissue-engineered subcutaneous pancreatic cancer model for antitumor drug evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Q

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Qingyi He,2,* Xiaohui Wang,3,* Xing Zhang,4 Huifang Han,4 Baosan Han,5 Jianzhong Xu,2 Kanglai Tang,2 Zhiren Fu,1 Hao Yin1,4 1Department of Surgery, Organ Transplant Center, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai Second Military Medical School, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 3Department of General Surgery, Bayinguoleng Mengguzizhizhou People's Hospital, Korla, Xinjiang, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Department of Surgery, Shanghai Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The traditional xenograft subcutaneous pancreatic cancer model is notorious for its low incidence of tumor formation, inconsistent results for the chemotherapeutic effects of drug molecules of interest, and a poor predictive capability for the clinical efficacy of novel drugs. These drawbacks are attributed to a variety of factors, including inoculation of heterogeneous tumor cells from patients with different pathological histories, and use of poorly defined Matrigel®. In this study, we aimed to tissue-engineer a pancreatic cancer model that could readily cultivate a pancreatic tumor derived from highly homogenous CD24+CD44+ pancreatic cancer stem cells delivered by a well defined electrospun scaffold of poly(glycolide-co-trimethylene carbonate and gelatin. The scaffold supported in vitro tumorigenesis from CD24+CD44+ cancer stem cells for up to 7 days without inducing apoptosis. Moreover, CD24+CD44+ cancer stem cells delivered by the scaffold grew into a native-like mature pancreatic tumor within 8 weeks in vivo and exhibited accelerated tumorigenesis as well as a higher incidence of tumor formation than the traditional model. In the scaffold model, we discovered that oxaliplatin-gemcitabine (OXA-GEM, a chemotherapeutic regimen, induced tumor regression whereas gemcitabine

  12. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL OBSERVATION OF MACROPHAGE COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR AND ITS RECEPTOR IN BREAST CANCER AND HEPATOMA TISSUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the potential role of cellular macrophageolony-stimulating factor (cM-CSF) and cellular macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (cM-CSF-R) with breast cancer and hepatoma and search the way for clinical application. Methods: Frozen surgical specimens from 48 breast cancer patients, including 29 cases of histological grade II and 19 eases of grade III, and 16 hepatoma patients were investigated by Avidin Biotin Complex (ABC) immunohistochemical assay with anti-M-CSF monoclonal antibody (Mab) and anti-M-CSF-R Mab. Pathohistological examination was performed as well. Results: cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R were detected in tested specimens. The expression levels of cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R in grade III group were higher than in grade II group and more higher than control group hyperplasia of breast. Hepatoma tissues also showed higher expression level of cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R than normal adult and fetal liver. Conclusion: Breast cancer and hepatoma tissues presented higher expression levels of cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R than control and expression level might be related with tumor's process.

  13. Targeting the Hippo Signaling Pathway for Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Wen Chun; Hong, Wanjin

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a highly-conserved developmental pathway that plays an essential role in organ size control, tumor suppression, tissue regeneration and stem cell self-renewal. The YES-associated protein (YAP) and the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) are two important transcriptional co-activators that are negatively regulated by the Hippo signaling pathway. By binding to transcription factors, especially the TEA domain transcription factors (TEADs), YAP and TAZ induce the expression of growth-promoting genes, which can promote organ regeneration after injury. Therefore, controlled activation of YAP and TAZ can be useful for regenerative medicine. However, aberrant activation of YAP and TAZ due to deregulation of the Hippo pathway or overexpression of YAP/TAZ and TEADs can promote cancer development. Hence, pharmacological inhibition of YAP and TAZ may be a useful approach to treat tumors with high YAP and/or TAZ activity. In this review, we present the mechanisms regulating the Hippo pathway, the role of the Hippo pathway in tissue repair and cancer, as well as a detailed analysis of the different strategies to target the Hippo signaling pathway and the genes regulated by YAP and TAZ for regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. PMID:27589805

  14. Soft tissue sarcomas after radiation treatment for breast cancer. Three case studies and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims: By means of 3 cases with infield soft tissue carcinomas after radiotherapy for breast cancer, symptoms and therapy are described. Consequences for treatment planning and patient's information before radiotherapy for breast cancer are discussed. Patients: Three of 1,025 patients with breast cancer irradiated from 1984 to 1997 suffered from infield secondary soft tissue sarcomas. The latency periods were 61, 49 and 59 months. Two patients had been treated with breast-conserving therapy (computerized planning, 50 Gy to reference point, 5 times 2 Gy/week, 5-MV photons), 1 patient received a local boost dose of 15 Gy (10-MeV electrons), patient 3 radiotherapy of the thoracic wall and regional lymph nodes after mastectomy using 12-MeV electrons (thoracic wall) and 5-MV photons (lymph node areas) to 50 Gy, 5 times 2 Gy/week. No adjuvant chemotherapy was given. All sarcomas were very extensive, all patients died from local progression and/or distant failure after 17, 13 and 12 months. Results: The incidence of spontaneous sarcomas of the breast in about 0.06%, after operation and radiotherapy 0.09 to 0.45%. No correlations to radiotherapy technique and no risk factors were found. Radiation dose could play a role, but there are very sparse data about this. (orig.)

  15. Preservation of biomolecules in breast cancer tissue by a formalin-free histology system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Azorides R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential problems associated with the use of formalin in histology, such as health hazards, degradation of RNA and cross-linking of proteins are well recognized. We describe the utilization of a formalin-free fixation and processing system for tissue detection of two important biopredictors in breast cancer – estrogen receptor and HER2 – at the RNA and protein levels. Methods Parallel sections of 62 cases of breast cancer were fixed in an alcohol-based molecular fixative and in formalin. Molecular fixative samples were processed by a novel formalin-free microwave-assisted processing system that preserves DNA, RNA and proteins. Formalin-fixed samples were processed using the conventional method. Estrogen receptor was assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. HER2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry, FISH, CISH and real-time PCR. Results The immunohistochemical reaction for estrogen receptor was similar in molecular- and formalin-fixed samples (Spearman Rank R = 0.83, p Conclusion The formalin-free tissue fixation and processing system is a practical platform for evaluation of biomolecular markers in breast cancer and it allows reliable DNA and RNA and protein studies.

  16. The Complex Interaction of Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Migration of Cancer Cells through Breast Tissue Stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry J. Davies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer mortality is directly linked to metastatic spread. The metastatic cell must exhibit a complex phenotype that includes the capacity to escape from the primary tumour mass, invade the surrounding normal tissue, and penetrate into the circulation before proliferating in the parenchyma of distant organs to produce a metastasis. In the normal breast, cellular structures change cyclically in response to ovarian hormones leading to regulated cell proliferation and apoptosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of zinc dependent endopeptidases. Their primary function is degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix to allow ductal progression through the basement membrane. A complex balance between matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors regulate these changes. These proteinases interact with cytokines, growth factors, and tumour necrosis factors to stimulate branching morphologies in normal breast tissues. In breast cancer this process is disrupted facilitating tumour progression and metastasis and inhibiting apoptosis increasing the life of the metastatic cells. This paper highlights the role of matrix metalloproteinases in cell progression through the breast stroma and reviews the complex relationships between the different proteinases and their inhibitors in relation to breast cancer cells as they metastasise.

  17. Intrafraction motion in patients with cervical cancer: The benefit of soft tissue registration using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: During radiation delivery, target volumes change their position and shape due to intrafraction motion. The extent of these changes and the capability to correct for them will contribute to the benefit of an MRI-accelerator in terms of PTV margin reduction. Therefore, we investigated the primary CTV motion within a typical IMRT delivery time for cervical cancer patients for various correction techniques: no registration, rigid bony anatomy registration, and rigid soft tissue registration. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients underwent 2-3 offline MRI exams before and during their radiation treatment. Each MRI exam included four sagittal and four axial MRI scans alternately within 16 min. We addressed the CTV motion by comparing subsequent midsagittal CTV delineations and investigated the correlation with intrafraction bladder filling. Results: The maximum (residual) motions within 16 min for all points on the CTV contour for 90% of the MRI exams without registration, with rigid bony anatomy registration, and with rigid soft tissue registration were 10.6, 9.9, and 4.0 mm. A significant but weak correlation was found between intrafraction bladder filling and CTV motion. Conclusions: Considerable intrafraction CTV motion is observed in cervical cancer patients. Intrafraction MRI-guided soft tissue registration using an MRI-accelerator will correct for this motion.

  18. Aqueous extract from taxus baccata inhibits adenosine deaminase activity significantly in cancerous and noncancerous human gastric and colon tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahide Esra Durak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate possible effects of aqueous taxus baccata extract on adenosine deaminase (ADA activity in cancerous and noncancerous human tissues and to clarify mechanism(s of its anticancer potential. Materials and Methods: Cancerous and noncancerous human gastric and colon tissues were used in the study. The extracts were prepared in distilled water. Before and after treatment with the extracts, ADA activities in the tissue homogenates were measured. Results: ADA activity was found to be higher in gastric tissue compared with colon tissue, but no differences were found between ADA activities of cancerous and noncancerous tissues for both as well. In the plant extract studies, it was found that taxus extract significantly inhibited ADA activity both in cancerous and noncancerous gastric and colon tissues. Conclusion: Our results suggest that aqueous extract from taxus baccata inhibits ADA activities in both gastric and colon tissues significantly. It is suggested that in addition to other proposed mechanisms, accumulated adenosine due to the inhibition of ADA enzyme might also play part in the anticancer properties of taxus species.

  19. Insights into orphan nuclear receptors as prognostic markers and novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Reidun eAesoy; Colin D Clyne; Ashwini eChand

    2015-01-01

    The roles of orphan nuclear receptors in breast cancer development and progression are not well understood. In this review, we correlate orphan nuclear receptor expression in breast cancer tumour subtypes with patient outcomes and provide an overview of functional evidence that identifies candidate orphan nuclear receptors as prognostic markers or as therapeutic targets in breast cancer.

  20. Correlations between papillary thyroid cancer and peripheral blood levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shao-fei; HU San-yuan; MA Lei; MIAO Lei; MAO Wei-zheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between the presence of metalloproteinases and thyroid cancer remains unknown,and many controversies still exist in this field.The objective of this study was to investigate the correlations between papillary thyroid cancer and peripheral blood levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2.Methods The correlations were studied by detecting the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in the peripheral blood of 30 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma,27 patients with benign thyroid disease,and 25 healthy volunteers.Results The levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in the peripheral blood of patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma were significantly higher than those in the peripheral blood of patients with benign thyroid disease and healthy volunteers (P <0.05).However,there were no significant differences between patients with benign thyroid disease and healthy volunteers (P >0.05).The accuracy of detection by both enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in the papillary thyroid cancer group was 83.33%.Conclusions The levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in the peripheral blood are helpful in identifying thyroid carcinoma and aid in preoperative assessment.

  1. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding site: new insight into small cell lung cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yu LIU; Jun CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause in cancer-related deaths with less than 15% five-year survival worldwide.Small cell lung cancer (SCLC),which accounts for about 15%-18% of lung cancer,carries the worst prognosis within the lung cancer patients.SCLC differs from other lung cancers,so called non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs),in the specifically clinical and biologic characteristics.It exhibits aggressive behavior,with rapid growth,early spread to distant sites.Although exquisite sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation,SCLC recurs rapidly with only 5% of patients surviving five years and frequent association with distinct paraneoplastic syndromes[1].

  2. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

  4. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingsong Lei; Xiaoyuan Deng; Huajiang Wei; Zhouyi Guo [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, Guangdong Province (China); Guoyong Wu [Department of Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China); Hongqin Yang; Shusen Xie [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education of China, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian (China); Yonghong He [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China)

    2014-12-31

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 ± 0.81) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.19 ± 0.13) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 ± 0.93) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.43 ± 0.17) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection. (optical coherence tomography)

  5. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 ± 0.81) × 10-6 cm s-1 and (1.19 ± 0.13) × 10-5 cm s-1 in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 ± 0.93) × 10-6 cm s-1 and (1.43 ± 0.17) × 10-5 cm s-1 in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection. (optical coherence tomography)

  6. Tissue Microarrays in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Reliability of Immunohistochemically-Determined Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen Ege; Holst, René;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reliability of immunohistochemically-determined biomarkers using tissue microarrays (TMAs) of clinical specimens has long been open to question. Heterogeneity related to tumor biology might compromise determination of accurate biomarker expression in tumors, especially in small core...... biopsies. We evaluated the reliability of immunohistochemical staining scoring in small core biopsies using 11 biomarkers in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four 1-mm tumor cores from 178 NSCLCs, 2 representing peripheral areas close to the border of normal lung tissue and 2...... representing central areas, were examined. The biomarkers analyzed included p63, p40, cytokeratin 1/5/10/14, cytokeratin 7, thyroid transcription factor-1, napsin A, cyclin-D1, p53, Ki-67, integrin beta-1, and thymidylate synthase. RESULTS: Using a random intercept logistic regression model...

  7. Laparoscopic insertion of pelvic tissue expander to prevent radiation enteritis prior to radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation enteritis is a significant complication of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to the pelvis, particularly in patients having high dose radiotherapy (>80 Gy) and in those with a low pelvic peritoneal reflection allowing loops of small bowel to enter the radiation field. Laparoscopic insertion and subsequent removal of a pelvic tissue expander before and after external beam radiotherapy is a relatively convenient, safe and effective method for displacing loops of bowel out of the pelvis. We report on a patient with prostate cancer who ordinarily would not have been a candidate for EBRT due to loops of bowel low in the pelvis. With laparoscopic insertion and subsequent removal of a tissue expander, he was able to have radiotherapy to the prostate without developing radiation enteritis

  8. Interaction between fragile histamine triad and protein kinase C alpha in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-hui Zhuang; Zhao-hui Liu; Xiao-gang Jiang; Cheng-en Pan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interaction between fragile histamine triad (FHIT) and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Methods FHIT and PKC伪 double positive samples were screened by immunohistochemical staining from 13 human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed by using anti-FHIT and anti-PKCα. The immune precipitate was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results Immune precipitate staining detection showed that 3 samples out of the 13 cases were double positive for FHIT and PKCα. FHIT protein was present in the immune precipitate of anti-PKCα while there was PKCα in the immune precipitate of anti-FHITmAb. Conclusion FHIT and PKCα exist as a complex in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues, which will provide a new route for studying the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels in plasma from tumour arteries and veins of patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.; Lykke, J.; Christensen, I.J.; Brünner, Nils; Nielsen, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective . Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) plays a major role in the regulation of tissue growth, including cancer growth. The TIMP-1 protein can be determined in plasma, and increased plasma levels of TIMP-1 are associated with a poor prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. The...... aim of the present study was to evaluate whether tumour tissue release of the TIMP-1 protein contributes to the increased plasma levels of TIMP-1 observed in patients with colorectal cancer. Material and methods . Preoperative blood samples from a peripheral vein and intraoperative blood samples from...... a tumour artery, a tumour vein and from a peripheral vein were drawn from 24 patients undergoing elective, intended curative surgery for primary rectal cancer. TIMP-1 levels were determined concurrently in plasma from all samples using a validated ELISA method. Counts of white blood cells and...

  10. Tissue-specific promoters active in CD44+CD24-/low breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerschmitz, Gerd J; Ranki, Tuuli; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Ribacka, Camilla; Eriksson, Minna; Porten, Marius; Herrmann, Isabell; Ristimäki, Ari; Virkkunen, Pekka; Tarkkanen, Maija; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Kanerva, Anna; Rein, Daniel; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that human tumors contain stem cells that have a central role in tumor initiation and posttreatment relapse. Putative breast cancer stem cells may reside in the CD44(+)CD24(-/low) population. Oncolytic adenoviruses are attractive for killing of these cells because they enter through infection and are therefore not susceptible to active and passive mechanisms that render stem cells resistant to many drugs. Although adenoviruses have been quite safe in cancer trials, preclinical work suggests that toxicity may eventually be possible with more active agents. Therefore, restriction of virus replication to target tissues with tissues-specific promoters is appealing for improving safety and can be achieved without loss of efficacy. We extracted CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells from pleural effusions of breast cancer patients and found that modification of adenovirus type 5 tropism with the serotype 3 knob increased gene delivery to CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells. alpha-Lactalbumin, cyclo-oxygenase 2, telomerase, and multidrug resistance protein promoters were studied for activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells, and a panel of oncolytic viruses was subsequently constructed. Each virus featured 5/3 chimerism of the fiber and a promoter controlling expression of E1A, which was also deleted in the Rb binding domain for additional tumor selectivity. Cell killing assays identified Ad5/3-cox2L-d24 and Ad5/3-mdr-d24 as the most active agents, and these viruses were able to completely eradicate CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells in vitro. In vivo, these viruses had significant antitumor activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low)-derived tumors. These findings may have relevance for elimination of cancer stem cells in humans. PMID:18632604

  11. Mueller matrix microscope: a quantitative tool to facilitate detections and fibrosis scorings of liver cirrhosis and cancer tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; He, Chao; Liu, Shaoxiong; Li, Migao; Zeng, Nan; Wu, Jian; Ma, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Today the increasing cancer incidence rate is becoming one of the biggest threats to human health. Among all types of cancers, liver cancer ranks in the top five in both frequency and mortality rate all over the world. During the development of liver cancer, fibrosis often evolves as part of a healing process in response to liver damage, resulting in cirrhosis of liver tissues. In a previous study, we applied the Mueller matrix microscope to pathological liver tissue samples and found that both the Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) and Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) parameters are closely related to the fibrous microstructures. In this paper, we take this one step further to quantitatively facilitate the fibrosis detections and scorings of pathological liver tissue samples in different stages from cirrhosis to cancer using the Mueller matrix microscope. The experimental results of MMPD and MMT parameters for the fibrotic liver tissue samples in different stages are measured and analyzed. We also conduct Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere birefringence model to examine in detail the influence of structural changes in different fibrosis stages on the imaging parameters. Both the experimental and simulated results indicate that the polarized light microscope and transformed Mueller matrix parameters can provide additional quantitative information helpful for fibrosis detections and scorings of liver cirrhosis and cancers. Therefore, the polarized light microscope and transformed Mueller matrix parameters have a good application prospect in liver cancer diagnosis.

  12. Multi-centre Raman spectral mapping of oesophageal cancer tissues: a study to assess system transferability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, M; Dorney, J; Lewis, A; Lloyd, G R; Old, O; Shepherd, N; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Barr, H; Lau, K; Bell, I; Ohrel, S; Thomas, G; Stone, N; Kendall, C

    2016-06-23

    The potential for Raman spectroscopy to provide early and improved diagnosis on a wide range of tissue and biopsy samples in situ is well documented. The standard histopathology diagnostic methods of reviewing H&E and/or immunohistochemical (IHC) stained tissue sections provides valuable clinical information, but requires both logistics (review, analysis and interpretation by an expert) and costly processing and reagents. Vibrational spectroscopy offers a complimentary diagnostic tool providing specific and multiplexed information relating to molecular structure and composition, but is not yet used to a significant extent in a clinical setting. One of the challenges for clinical implementation is that each Raman spectrometer system will have different characteristics and therefore spectra are not readily compatible between systems. This is essential for clinical implementation where classification models are used to compare measured biochemical or tissue spectra against a library training dataset. In this study, we demonstrate the development and validation of a classification model to discriminate between adenocarcinoma (AC) and non-cancerous intraepithelial metaplasia (IM) oesophageal tissue samples, measured on three different Raman instruments across three different locations. Spectra were corrected using system transfer spectral correction algorithms including wavenumber shift (offset) correction, instrument response correction and baseline removal. The results from this study indicate that the combined correction methods do minimize the instrument and sample quality variations within and between the instrument sites. However, more tissue samples of varying pathology states and greater tissue area coverage (per sample) are needed to properly assess the ability of Raman spectroscopy and system transferability algorithms over multiple instrument sites. PMID:27048868

  13. Relationship between promoter methylation & tissue expression of MGMT gene in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Epigenetic alterations, in addition to multiple gene abnormalities, are involved in the genesis and progression of human cancers. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands within promoter regions is associated with transcriptional inactivation of various tumour suppressor genes. O 6 -methyguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is a DNA repair gene that removes mutagenic and cytotoxic adducts from the O 6 -position of guanine induced by alkylating agents. MGMT promoter hypermethylation and reduced expression has been found in some primary human carcinomas. We studied DNA methylation of CpG islands of the MGMT gene and its relation with MGMT protein expression in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Methods: A total of 88 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC tissue samples, 14 low malignant potential (LMP tumours and 20 benign ovarian tissue samples were analysed for MGMT promoter methylation by nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP after bisulphite modification of DNA. A subset of 64 EOC samples, 10 LMP and benign tumours and five normal ovarian tissue samples were analysed for protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: The methylation frequencies of the MGMT gene promoter were found to be 29.5, 28.6 and 20 per cent for EOC samples, LMP tumours and benign cases, respectively. Positive protein expression was observed in 93.8 per cent of EOC and 100 per cent in LMP, benign tumours and normal ovarian tissue samples. Promoter hypermethylation with loss of protein expression was seen only in one case of EOC. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that MGMT promoter hypermethylation does not always reflect gene expression.

  14. Relationship between promoter methylation & tissue expression of MGMT gene in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpa, V.; Bhagat, Rahul; Premalata, C.S.; Pallavi, V.R.; Ramesh, G.; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Epigenetic alterations, in addition to multiple gene abnormalities, are involved in the genesis and progression of human cancers. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands within promoter regions is associated with transcriptional inactivation of various tumour suppressor genes. O6-methyguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair gene that removes mutagenic and cytotoxic adducts from the O6-position of guanine induced by alkylating agents. MGMT promoter hypermethylation and reduced expression has been found in some primary human carcinomas. We studied DNA methylation of CpG islands of the MGMT gene and its relation with MGMT protein expression in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Methods: A total of 88 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tissue samples, 14 low malignant potential (LMP) tumours and 20 benign ovarian tissue samples were analysed for MGMT promoter methylation by nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) after bisulphite modification of DNA. A subset of 64 EOC samples, 10 LMP and benign tumours and five normal ovarian tissue samples were analysed for protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: The methylation frequencies of the MGMT gene promoter were found to be 29.5, 28.6 and 20 per cent for EOC samples, LMP tumours and benign cases, respectively. Positive protein expression was observed in 93.8 per cent of EOC and 100 per cent in LMP, benign tumours and normal ovarian tissue samples. Promoter hypermethylation with loss of protein expression was seen only in one case of EOC. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that MGMT promoter hypermethylation does not always reflect gene expression. PMID:25579142

  15. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six field beams optimized with tissue heterogeneity corrections to deliver a prescribed dose of 60 Gy in three fractions to at least 95% of the planning target volume, keeping spinal cord dose < 10 Gy. The same plans were then regenerated without heterogeneity correction by recalculating previously optimized treatment plans keeping identical beam arrangements, field fluences and monitor units. Compared with heterogeneity corrected plans, the non-corrected plans had lower average minimum, mean, and maximum tumor doses by 13%, 8% and 6% respectively. The results indicate that tissue heterogeneity is an important determinant of dosimetric optimization of SBRT plans. (author)

  16. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Tania De

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six field beams optimized with tissue heterogeneity corrections to deliver a prescribed dose of 60 Gy in three fractions to at least 95% of the planning target volume, keeping spinal cord dose <10 Gy. The same plans were then regenerated without heterogeneity correction by recalculating previously optimized treatment plans keeping identical beam arrangements, field fluences and monitor units. Compared with heterogeneity corrected plans, the non-corrected plans had lower average minimum, mean, and maximum tumor doses by 13%, 8%, and 6% respectively. The results indicate that tissue heterogeneity is an important determinant of dosimetric optimization of SBRT plans.

  17. New methods for multimodal MS imaging of histological tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amstalden Van Hove, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    The insights derived from spatial localization of molecules in tissue sections are of great value for understanding and treating cancer and other diseases. These insights can relate to molecules linked to a disease as well as to drug molecules distributed across organs of interest. Mass spectrometry

  18. Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Are Associated with Coagulopathy Causing Ischemic Stroke via Tissue Factor-Independent Way: The OASIS-CANCER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young; Chung, Jong-Won; Lee, Mi Ji; Kim, Suk Jae; Cho, Yeon Hee; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer and stroke, which are known to be associated with one another, are the most common causes of death in the elderly. However, the pathomechanisms that lead to stroke in cancer patients are not well known. Circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in cancer-associated thrombosis and tumor progression. Therefore, we hypothesized that cancer cell-derived EVs cause cancer-related coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke. Methods Serum levels of D-dimer and EVs expressing markers for cancer cells (epithelial cell adhesion molecule [CD326]), tissue factor (TF [CD142]), endothelial cells (CD31+CD42b-), and platelets (CD62P) were measured using flow cytometry in (a) 155 patients with ischemic stroke and active cancer (116 − cancer-related, 39 − conventional stroke mechanisms), (b) 25 patients with ischemic stroke without cancer, (c) 32 cancer patients without stroke, and (d) 101 healthy subjects. Results The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs correlated with the levels of D-dimer and TF+ EVs. The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs (CD326+ and CD326+CD142+) were higher in cancer-related stroke than in other groups (P<0.05 in all the cases). Path analysis showed that cancer cell-derived EVs are related to stroke via coagulopathy as measured by D-dimer levels. Poor correlation was observed between TF+ EV and D-dimer, and path analysis demonstrated that cancer cell-derived EVs may cause cancer-related coagulopathy independent of the levels of TF+ EVs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cancer cell-derived EVs mediate coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke via TF-independent mechanisms. PMID:27427978

  19. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  20. New mechanistic insights of integrin β1 in breast cancer bone colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaudeau, Laure; Taubenberger, Anna V.; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Holzapfel, Boris M.; Ramuz, Olivier; Straub, Melanie; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent and life-threatening complication of breast cancer. The molecular mechanisms supporting the establishment of breast cancer cells in the skeleton are still not fully understood, which may be attributed to the lack of suitable models that interrogate interactions between human breast cancer cells and the bone microenvironment. Although it is well-known that integrins mediate adhesion of malignant cells to bone extracellular matrix, their role during bone colonizati...

  1. Contemporary and future insights into fertility preservation in male cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, survival rates of cancer patients have increased, resulting in a shift of focus from quantity to quality of life. A key aspect of quality of life is fertility potential; patients suffering from iatrogenic infertility often become depressed. Since many cancer therapies—chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery—and even cancer itself have detrimental effects on the male reproductive system, it is important to preserve fertility before any treatment commences. Currently, the onl...

  2. Insights into Orphan Nuclear Receptors as Prognostic Markers and Novel Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Aesoy, Reidun; Colin D Clyne; Chand, Ashwini L.

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence asserting the importance of orphan nuclear receptors (ONRs) in cancer initiation and progression. In breast cancer, there is a lot unknown about ONRs in terms of their expression profile and their transcriptional targets in the various stages of tumor progression. With the classification of breast tumors into distinct molecular subtypes, we assess ONR expression in the different breast cancer subtypes and with patient outcomes. Complementing this, we review evidence...

  3. Lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism: new insights in treatment and chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Thomas E; Hennig Rene; Ding Xian-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The essential fatty acids, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid play an important role in pancreatic cancer development and progression. These fatty acids are metabolized to eicosanoids by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. Abnormal expression and activities of both cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases have been reported in pancreatic cancer. In this article, we aim to provide a brief summary of (1) our understanding of the roles of these enzymes in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and pro...

  4. Tetranectin positive expression in tumour tissue leads to longer survival in Danish women with ovarian cancer. Results from the 'Malova' ovarian cancer study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeran, Mel C; Rask, Lene; Høgdall, Claus K;

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to analyse Tetranectin (TN) expression in tumour tissues and TN serum concentration in 758 women with epithelial ovarian tumours. The second was to evaluate, whether TN tissue expression levels correlate with clinico-pathological parameters and prognosis of...... the disease. Using tissue arrays we analysed the expression levels in tissues from 166 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOTs) and 592 women with ovarian cancer (OC). A panel of three antibodies was used for immunohistochemistry: a polyclonal and two monoclonal antibodies. Serum TN was measured...... using the polyclonal antibody A-371. Univariate survival analyses stratified for chemotherapy showed that positive tissue TN as demonstrated by the polyclonal antibody indicated a significantly longer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0001) as well as cancer specific survival (CSS) (p < 0.0001). High serum...

  5. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Gomy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice.

  6. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomy, Israel; Diz, Maria Del Pilar Estevez

    2016-05-13

    Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice. PMID:27192130

  7. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomy, Israel; Diz, Maria Del Pilar Estevez

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice. PMID:27192130

  8. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery. PMID:27229857

  9. Lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism: new insights in treatment and chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Thomas E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The essential fatty acids, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid play an important role in pancreatic cancer development and progression. These fatty acids are metabolized to eicosanoids by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. Abnormal expression and activities of both cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases have been reported in pancreatic cancer. In this article, we aim to provide a brief summary of (1 our understanding of the roles of these enzymes in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and progression; and (2 the potential of using cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors for pancreatic cancer treatment and prevention.

  10. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. Methods mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. Results MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20. In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41 and 36.6% (15/41, while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41 and 14.6% (6/41. In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7 and 14.3% (1/7. The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P P Conclusion Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer. These genes can be used as one of the important indicators for early diagnosis, efficacy evaluation and prognostic determination of ovarian cancer.

  11. Quantifying glucose permeability and enhanced light penetration in ex vivo human normal and cancerous esophagus tissues with optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our pilot results on quantification of glucose (G) diffusion permeability in human normal esophagus and ESCC tissues in vitro by using OCT technique. The permeability coefficient of 40% aqueous solution of G was found to be (1.74±0.04)×10-5 cm/s in normal esophagus and (2.45±0.06)×10-5 cm/s in ESCC tissues. The results from this study indicate that ESCC tissues had a higher permeability coefficient compared to normal esophageal tissues, and the light penetration depths gradually increase with the increase of applied topically with G time for the normal esophageal and ESCC tissues. The results indicate that the permeability coefficient of G in cancer tissues was 1.41-fold than that in normal tissues, and the light penetration depth for the ESCC tissues is significantly smaller than that of normal esophagus tissues in the same time range. These results demonstrate that the optical clearing of normal and cancer esophagus tissues are improved after application of G

  12. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study’s purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity (≥6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients

  13. Effect of different BNCT protocols on DNA synthesis in precancerous and normal tissues in an experimental model of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported the therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in the treatment of oral cancer, employing the hamster cheek pouch model. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of these BNCT protocols on DNA synthesis in precancerous and normal tissue in this model and assess the potential lag in the development of second primary tumors in precancerous tissue. The data are relevant to potential control of field cancerized tissue and tolerance of normal tissue. We evaluated DNA synthesis in precancerous and normal pouch tissue 1-30 days post-BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 or BPA + GB-10 employing incorporation of bromo-deoxyuridine as an end-point. The BNCT-induced potential lag in the development of second primary tumors in precancerous tissue was monitored. A drastic, statistically significant reduction in DNA synthesis occurred in pacancerous tissue as early as 1 day post-BNCT and was sustained at virtually all time points until 30 days post-BNCT for all protocols. The histological categories evaluated individually within precancerous tissue (dysplasia, hyperplasia and NUMF [no unusual microscopic features]) responded similarly. DNA synthesis in normal tissue treated with BNCT oscillated around the very low pre-treatment values. A BNCT-induced lag in the development of second primary tumors was observed. BNCT induced a drastic fall in DNA synthesis in precancerous tissue that would be associated to the observed lag in the development of second primary tumors. The minimum variations in DNA synthesis in BNCT-treated normal tissue would correlate with the absence of normal tissue radiotoxicity. The present data would contribute to optimize therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of field-cancerized areas. (author)

  14. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors

  15. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  16. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  17. Molecular profiling of signalling pathways in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Daniela; Hipp, Susanne; Malinowsky, Katharina; Böllner, Claudia; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    In most hospitals word-wide, histopathological cancer diagnosis is currently based on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. In the last few years new approaches and developments in patient-tailored cancer therapy have raised the need to select more precisely those patients, who will respond to personalised treatments. The most efficient way for optimal therapy and patient selection is probably to provide a tumour-specific protein network portrait prior to treatment. The discovery and characterisation of deregulated signalling molecules (e.g. human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, mitogen-activated protein kinases) are very promising candidates for the identification of new suitable therapy targets and for the selection of those patients who will receive the greatest benefit from individualised treatments. The reverse phase protein array (RPPA) is a promising new technology that allows quick, precise and simultaneous analysis of many components of a network. Importantly it requires only limited amounts of routine clinical material (e.g. FFPE biopsies) and can be used for absolute protein measurements. We and other research groups have described successful protein extraction from routine FFPE tissues. In this manuscript we show how these recent developments might facilitate the implementation of RPPA in clinical trials and routine settings. PMID:19914823

  18. Expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan-Hong Yi; Jing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines.Methods:Cancer tissue and adjacent normal lung tissue were collected and mRNA contents of Klf8 were detected; lung cancer A549 cell lines were cultured, and after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, cell cycle, cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were detected.Results:mRNA contents of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue were higher than those in adjacent normal lung tissue; after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, Klf8 mRNA inhibition rate was 74.31%; G0/G1 phase ratio of Klf8 siRNA group was higher than that of negative control siRNA group; ratios of S-phase and G2/M phase cells, mRNA contents of Cyclin D1 and number of cells invading to the outer side of the transwell microporous membrane were lower than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of CDH1 and CK18 as well as Snail and Slug of Klf8 siRNA group were higher than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of VIM and N-cadherin were lower than those of negative control siRNA group.Conclusion:The expression of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue abnormally elevates; downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines can inhibit malignant biological effect of cells, manifested as cell cycle arrest as well as the inhibition of cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition processes.

  19. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  20. Twist and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue as well as its correlation with epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Liu; Hong Li; Yu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the Twist and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue as well as its correlation with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Methods:Normal cervical tissue, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue and cervical cancer tissue were collected for study. ELISA kits were used to detect Twist, YB-1, E-cadherin,β-catenin, N-cadherin and Vimentin contents in cervical tissue, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect Twist and YB-1 expression levels in cervical tissue.Results:Twist and YB-1 contents, cell positive rate and immunohistochemical scores as well as N-cadherin and Vimentin contents in cervical cancer tissue and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue were significantly higher than those in normal cervical tissue while E-cadherin andβ-catenin contents were lower than those in normal cervical tissue; Twist and YB-1 contents, cell positive rate and immunohistochemical scores as well as N-cadherin and Vimentin contents in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue while E-cadherin andβ-catenin contents were lower than those in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue; the higher the Twist and YB-1 expression levels in cervical cancer tissue, the lower the E-cadherin andβ-catenin contents, and the higher the N-cadherin and Vimentin contents.Conclusions: Twist and YB-1 gene overexpression can promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition to be involved in the occurrence of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

  1. Tissue Tolerable Plasma (TTP) induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of microscopic incomplete resections of gastrointestinal cancers including pancreatic cancer has not changed considerably over the past years. Future intra-operative applications of tissue tolerable plasmas (TTP) could help to address this problem. Plasma is generated by feeding energy, like electrical discharges, to gases. The development of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas displaying spectra of temperature within or just above physiological ranges allows biological or medical applications of plasmas. We have investigated the effects of tissue tolerable plasmas (TTP) on the human pancreatic cancer cell line Colo-357 and PaTu8988T and the murine cell line 6606PDA in vitro (Annexin-V-FITC/DAPI-Assay and propidium iodide DNA staining assay) as well as in the in vivo tumour chorio-allantoic membrane (TUM-CAM) assay using Colo-357. TTP of 20 seconds (s) induced a mild elevation of an experimental surface temperature of 23.7 degree Celsius up to 26.63+/−0.40 degree Celsius. In vitro TTP significantly (p=0.0003) decreased cell viability showing the strongest effects after 20s TTP. Also, TTP effects increased over time levelling off after 72 hours (30.1+/−4.4% of dead cells (untreated control) versus 78.0+/−9.6% (20s TTP)). However, analyzing these cells for apoptosis 10s TTP revealed the largest proportion of apoptotic cells (34.8+/−7.2%, p=0.0009 versus 12.3+/−6.6%, 20s TTP) suggesting non-apoptotic cell death in the majority of cells after 20s TTP. Using solid Colo-357 tumours in the TUM-CAM model TUNEL-staining showed TTP-induced apoptosis up to a depth of tissue penetration (DETiP) of 48.8+/−12.3μm (20s TTP, p<0.0001). This was mirrored by a significant (p<0.0001) reduction of Ki-67+ proliferating cells (80.9+/−13.2% versus 37.7+/−14.6%, p<0.0001) in the top cell layers as well as typical changes on HE specimens. The bottom cell layers were not affected by TTP. Our data suggest possible future intra-operative applications of TTP to reduce

  2. Recent insight on the control of enzymes involved in estrogen formation and transformation in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Jorge R; Chetrite, Gérard S

    2005-02-01

    The great majority of breast cancers are in their early stage hormone-dependent and it is well accepted that estradiol (E2) plays an important role in the genesis and evolution of this tumor. Human breast cancer tissues contain all the enzymes: estrone sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, aromatase involved in the last steps of E2 bioformation. Sulfotransferases which convert estrogens into the biologically inactive estrogen sulfates are also present in this tissue. Quantitative data show that the 'sulfatase pathway', which transforms estrogen sulfates into the bioactive unconjugated E2, is 100-500 times higher than the 'aromatase pathway', which converts androgens into estrogens. The treatment of breast cancer patients with anti-aromatases is largely developed with very positive results. However, the formation of E2 via the 'sulfatase pathway' is very important in the breast cancer tissue. In recent years it was found that antiestrogens (e.g. tamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen), various progestins (e.g. promegestone, nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, dydrogesterone, norelgestromin), tibolone and its metabolites, as well as other steroidal (e.g. sulfamates) and non-steroidal compounds, are potent sulfatase inhibitors. In another series of studies, it was found that E2 itself has a strong anti-sulfatase action. This paradoxical effect of E2 adds a new biological response of this hormone and could be related to estrogen replacement therapy in which it was observed to have either no effect or to decrease breast cancer mortality in postmenopausal women. Interesting information is that high expression of steroid sulfatase mRNA predicts a poor prognosis in patients with +ER. These progestins, as well as tibolone, can also block the conversion of estrone to estradiol by the inhibition of the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (17beta-HSD-1). High expressison of 17beta-HSD-1 can be an indicator of adverse prognosis in ER-positive patients. It was shown that

  3. New insight into epirubicin cardiac toxicity: competing risks analysis of 1097 breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Marianne; Cortese, Giuliana; Nielsen, Gitte;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current recommendations that cancer patients receive a maximum cumulative dose of 900 mg/m(2) epirubicin are based on the risk of epirubicin-mediated cardiotoxicity and do not take into account the competing risk of death from cancer. Here, we identify risk factors for cardiotoxicity...... and overall mortality and determine the cumulative dose of epirubicin that yields a 5% risk for cardiotoxicity for cancer patients from different risk backgrounds. METHODS: Data were collected from 1097 consecutive anthracycline-naive patients treated for metastatic breast cancer with epirubicin.......40, 95% confidence interval = 1.21 to 1.61), patient age, predisposition to cardiac disease, history of mediastinal irradiation, or antihormonal treatment for metastatic disease. Risk factors for death from all other causes (including breast cancer) included lesser dosages of epirubicin, increased tumor...

  4. Efficacy analysis of first radioiodine ablation of residual thyroid tissue in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the influence of age, sex, type of surgery, pathologic type of the tumor, postoperative time to the administration and the dose of radioiodine, TSH level and the existence of radioiodine uptake beyond thyroid to first radioiodine ablation of residual thyroid tissue (RTT) in well-differentiated thyroid cancer after surgery. Methods: Eighty-five well-differentiated thyroid cancer patients after surgery were ablated of RTT with radioiodine from 1975 to 1998 and were followed up for 3 - 6 months after ablation. Using the absence of visible uptake compared with background as the criterion for successful ablation. Results: Fifty-eight of 85 patients (68.2%) had successful ablation of RTT after the first administration of radioiodine. The results were statistically related to the type of surgery, the time after surgery to the ablation and the dosage of radioiodine, TSH level and the simultaneous existence of radioiodine uptake in metastatic site in the patients gained successfully ablation (P < 0.05), there were no statistically significant relation with age, sex and pathologic type of tumor. Conclusions: In well-differentiated thyroid cancer, there would be better effect of first ablation of RTT with suitable dosage of radioiodine, total thyroidectomy, above 50 mU/L TSH level,ablation conducted within 3 months after surgery and radioiodine uptake found only in RTT. The effectiveness of first ablation of RTT possesses no relationship with the age, sex and the pathologic type of the tumor

  5. Immunoprofiles of 11 Biomarkers Using Tissue Microarrays Identify Prognostic Subgroups in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Knösel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND, AIMS: Genomewide expression profiling has identified a number of genes expressed at higher levels in colorectal cancer (CRC than in normal tissues. Our objectives in this study were: 1 to test whether genes were also distinct on the protein level; 2 to evaluate these biomarkers in a series of well-characterized CRCs;, 3 to apply hierarchical cluster analysis to the immunohistochemical data. METHODS: Tissue microarrays (TMAs comprising 351 CRC specimens from 270 patients were constructed to evaluate the genes Adam10, CyclinD1, Annexinll, NFKB, Casein-kinase-2-beta (CK2B, YB-1, P32, Rad51, c-fos, IGFBP4, Connexin26 (Cx26. In total, 3,797 samples were analyzed. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering discovered subgroups of CRC that differed by tumor stage, survival. KaplanMeier analysis showed that reduced Cx26 expression was significantly associated with shorter patient survival, higher tumor grade (G1/G2vs G3, P = .02, Adam10 expression with a higher tumor stage (pT1/2vs pT3/4, P = .04. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights the potential of TMAs for a higher-dimensional analysis by evaluating serial sections of the same tissue core (three-dimensional TMA analysis. In addition, it endorses the use of immunohistochemistry supplemented by hierarchical clustering for the identification of tumor subgroups with diagnostic, prognostic signatures.

  6. Combined HSP90 and kinase inhibitor therapy: Insights from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Harvey; Scroggins, Brad; Zuehlke, Abbey; Kijima, Toshiki; Beebe, Kristin; Mishra, Alok; Neckers, Len; Prince, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The merging of knowledge from genomics, cellular signal transduction and molecular evolution is producing new paradigms of cancer analysis. Protein kinases have long been understood to initiate and promote malignant cell growth and targeting kinases to fight cancer has been a major strategy within the pharmaceutical industry for over two decades. Despite the initial success of kinase inhibitors (KIs), the ability of cancer to evolve resistance and reprogram oncogenic signaling networks has reduced the efficacy of kinase targeting. The molecular chaperone HSP90 physically supports global kinase function while also acting as an evolutionary capacitor. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has compiled a trove of data indicating that a large percentage of tumors overexpress or possess mutant kinases that depend on the HSP90 molecular chaperone complex. Moreover, the overexpression or mutation of parallel activators of kinase activity (PAKA) increases the number of components that promote malignancy and indirectly associate with HSP90. Therefore, targeting HSP90 is predicted to complement kinase inhibitors by inhibiting oncogenic reprogramming and cancer evolution. Based on this hypothesis, consideration should be given by both the research and clinical communities towards combining kinase inhibitors and HSP90 inhibitors (H90Ins) in combating cancer. The purpose of this perspective is to reflect on the current understanding of HSP90 and kinase biology as well as promote the exploration of potential synergistic molecular therapy combinations through the utilization of The Cancer Genome Atlas. PMID:26070366

  7. Determination of trace element distribution in cancerous and normal human tissues by total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Czarnowski, D.; Denkhaus, E.; Lemke, K.

    1997-07-01

    The intention of this study was to establish a method for cancer diagnosis. For this purpose, different trace element distributions in carcinomas of the digestive tract and in normal tissues of human stomach, colon and rectum in correlation to the type of cancer were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF). The tissue samples were frozen and cut by a microtome into 10 μm sections, and a modified sample excision technique was introduced according to the aim of this research. After drying and spiking of the tissue sections, more than 20 elements, especially biologically relevant ones, were determined. The repeatabilities of measurements of element concentrations in malignant and normal tissues were calculated to be 10-30% (RSD) depending on the specific element. The concentration of Ca was found to be virtually constant (0.250±0.025 μg per 0.1 mm 3) in normal tissue and in carcinoma of the digestive organs. A significant diminution of Cr, Fe and Ni in carcinoma of the stomach, of Cr and Co in carcinoma of the colon and a significant accumulation of K in cancerous tissue of the colon and of Fe and K in neoplastic tissue of the rectum were discovered for a very limited population of patients.

  8. The role of CRKL in Breast Cancer Metastasis: Insights from Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Chafik, Abderrahim

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They are involved in key biological processes and then may play a major role in the development of human diseases including cancer, in particular their involvement in breast cancer metastasis has been confirmed. Recently, the authors of ref.(\\cite{key1} have found that miR-429 may have a role in the inhibition of breast cancer metastasis and have identified its target gene CRKL as a potential ca...

  9. An ecological resilience perspective on cancer: insights from a toy model

    OpenAIRE

    Fassoni, Artur C.; Yang, Hyun M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose an ecological resilience point of view on cancer. This view is based on the analysis of a simple ODE model for the interactions between cancer and normal cells. The model presents two regimes for tumor growth. In the first, cancer arises due to three reasons: a partial corruption of the functions that avoid the growth of mutated cells, an aggressive phenotype of tumor cells and exposure to external carcinogenic factors. In this case, treatments may be effective if the...

  10. Expression and Significance of gp96 and Immune-related Gene CTLA-4, CD8 in Lung Cancer Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan ZHENG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that gp96 plays an important role in specific cytotoxic immune response which is involved in anti-tumor effect in the body. The aim of this study is to investigate the biological significance of heat shock protein gp96 and immune-related gene CTLA-4, CD8 expressions in lung cancer tissues of different progressive stages. Methods We used Envision immunohistochemistry method to detect the levels of expression of gp96, CTLA-4, CD8 in tissue microarray, which contained 89 primary lung cancer tissues, 12 lymph node metastasis lung cancer tissues, 12 precancerous lesions and 10 normal lung tissues, and analyzed the relationship between their expressions and clinicopathological parameters. Results (1 The positive rate of gp96 in primary lung cancer was remarkably higher than that in precancerous lesion and normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of CTLA-4 in primary lung cancer tissue and precancerous lesion was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of CD8 in primary lung cancer tissue was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of gp96 in CD8-positive lymphocytes in the high expression group was less than that in the low group (P < 0.05. (2 The positive rate of gp96 was closely related to sex, differentiation and clinical stage (P < 0.05, but not to age, gross type, histological type and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. The positive rate of CTLA-4 was closely related to age and differentiation (P < 0.05, but not to sex, gross type, histological type, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. CD8 expression was related to clinical stage (P < 0.05, but not to sex, age, gross type, histological type, differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. The positive rates of gp96, CTLA-4 were higher than that of CD8 in squamous cell carcinoma and SCLC, respectively. (3 There was positive correlation between gp

  11. Sulforaphane, a cancer chemopreventive agent, induces pathways associated with membrane biosynthesis in response to tissue damage by aflatoxin B1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is one of the major risk factors for liver cancer globally. A recent study showed that sulforaphane (SF), a potent inducer of phase II enzymes that occurs naturally in widely consumed vegetables, effectively induces hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and reduces levels of hepatic AFB1-DNA adducts in AFB1-exposed Sprague Dawley rats. The present study characterized the effects of SF pre-treatment on global gene expression in the livers of similarly treated male rats. Combined treatment with AFB1 and SF caused reprogramming of a network of genes involved in signal transduction and transcription. Changes in gene regulation were observable 4 h after AFB1 administration in SF-pretreated animals and may reflect regeneration of cells in the wake of AFB1-induced hepatotoxicity. At 24 h after AFB1 administration, significant induction of genes that play roles in cellular lipid metabolism and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis was detected in SF-pretreated AFB1-dosed rats. Induction of this group of genes may indicate a metabolic shift toward glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis to generate and maintain pools of intermediate molecules required for tissue repair, cell growth and compensatory hepatic cell proliferation. Collectively, gene expression data from this study provide insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of SF against AFB1 hepatotoxicity and hepatocarcinogenicity, in addition to the chemopreventive activity of this compound as a GST inducer. - Highlights: • This study revealed sulforaphane (SF)-deregulated gene sets in aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-treated rat livers. • SF redirects biochemical networks toward lipid biosynthesis in AFB1-dosed rats. • SF enhanced gene sets that would be expected to favor cell repair and regeneration

  12. New insights in oncology: Epi-genetics and cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a multi-etiologic, multistage disease with a prevalent genetic component, which happens when a large number of genes, critical for cell growth, death, differentiation, migration, and metabolic plasticity are altered irreversibly, so as to either 'gain' (oncogenes) or 'lose' (tumour suppressors) their function. Recent discoveries have revealed the previously underestimated etiologic importance of multiple epigenetic, that is to say, reversible factors (histone modifications, DNA methylation, non-coding RNA) involved in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of proteins, indispensable for the control of cancerous phenotype. Stable alterations of epigenetic machinery ('epi-mutations') turn out to play a critical role at different steps of carcinogenesis. In addition, due to substantial recent progress in stem cell biology, the new concept of cancer stem cells has emerged. This, along with newly discovered epigenetic cancer mechanisms, gives rise to a hope to overcome radio- and chemo-resistance and to eradicate otherwise incurable neoplasms. (authors)

  13. DNA demethylation in normal colon tissue predicts predisposition to multiple cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, H; Suzuki, K; Maeda, T; Koizumi, K; Miyaki, Y; Okada, S; Kawamura, Y J; Samuelsson, J K; Alonso, S; Konishi, F; Perucho, M

    2012-11-29

    Some colon cancer (CC) patients present synchronous cancers at diagnosis and others develop metachronous neoplasms, but the risk factors are unclear for non-hereditary CC. We showed previously that global DNA demethylation increased with aging and correlated with genomic damage in CC, and we show now that preferentially associates to CCs with wild-type p53. This study aimed to elucidate the extent of DNA hypomethylation in patients with single and multiple CC, its relationship with aging, and its potential as predictive tool. We compared by real-time methylation-specific PCR the relative demethylation level (RDL) of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) sequences in matched cancer tissues and non-cancerous colonic mucosa (NCM) from patients with single and multiple right-sided CCs. Although no RDL difference was found in NCM from single CC patients and healthy volunteers (P=0.5), there was more demethylation (higher RDL) in NCM from synchronous cancer patients (P=1.1 × 10(-5)) multiple CCs also were more demethylated than single CCs (P=0.0014). High NCM demethylation was predictive for metachronous neoplasms (P=0.003). In multivariate logistic regression analyses RDL was the only independent predictor for metachronous (P=0.02) and multiple (P=4.9 × 10(-5)) tumors. The higher LINE-1 demethylation in NCM from patients with multiple (synchronous and metachronous) tumors (P=9.6 × 10(-7)) was also very significant in patients with tumors without (P=3.8 × 10(-6)), but not with (P=0.16) microsatellite instability. NCM demethylation increased with aging in patients with single tumors, but decreased in those with multiple tumors. Moreover, the demethylation difference between patients with single vs multiple tumors appeared higher in younger (P=3.6 × 10(-4)) than in older (P=0.0016) patients. These results predict that LINE-1 hypomethylation in NCM can be used as an epigenetic predictive biomarker for multiple CC risk. The stronger association of

  14. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti...

  15. Recent insights into nanotechnology development for detection and treatment of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanath B; Kim S.; Lee K

    2016-01-01

    Buddolla Viswanath,1 Sanghyo Kim,1 Kiyoung Lee2 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon, Republic of Korea Abstract: The global incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is 1.3 million cases. It is the third most frequent cancer in males and females. Most CRCs are adenocarcinomas and often begin as a polyp on the inner wall of the rectum or colon. Some of these polyps become malignant, ev...

  16. New insights into the prevention and treatment of familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euhus, David M

    2011-03-15

    Individuals who inherit a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at very high risk for breast cancer but there are several strategies available for successfully managing this risk. Breast cancers that develop in the context of germline BRCA gene mutation present challenges for management but also opportunities. DNA damaging agents, like cisplatin, and the new class of drugs called PARP inhibitors exploit the underlying defect in DNA damage repair to great effect. PMID:21337561

  17. Analysis of laser surgery in non-melanoma skin cancer for optimal tissue removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Laser surgery is a commonly used technique for tissue ablation or the resection of malignant tumors. It presents advantages over conventional non-optical ablation techniques, like a scalpel or electrosurgery, such as the increased precision of the resected volume, minimization of scars and shorter recovery periods. Laser surgery is employed in medical branches such as ophthalmology or dermatology. The application of laser surgery requires the optimal adjustment of laser beam parameters, taking into account the particular patient and lesion. In this work we present a predictive tool for tissue resection in biological tissue after laser surgery, which allows an a priori knowledge of the tissue ablation volume, area and depth. The model employs a Monte Carlo 3D approach for optical propagation and a rate equation for plasma-induced ablation. The tool takes into account characteristics of the specific lesion to be ablated, mainly the geometric, optical and ablation properties. It also considers the parameters of the laser beam, such as the radius, spatial profile, pulse width, total delivered energy or wavelength. The predictive tool is applied to dermatology tumor resection, particularly to different types of non-melanoma skin cancer tumors: basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and infiltrative carcinoma. The ablation volume, area and depth are calculated for healthy skin and for each type of tumor as a function of the laser beam parameters. The tool could be used for laser surgery planning before the clinical application. The laser parameters could be adjusted for optimal resection volume, by personalizing the process to the particular patient and lesion.

  18. Post-radiation changes in oral tissues - An analysis of cancer irradiation cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Ashokkumar Pandya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation, commonly employed as neoadjuvant, primary, and adjuvant therapy for head and neck cancer causes numerous epithelial and stromal changes, prominent among which is fibrosis with its early and late consequences. Very little is known about the true nature of the fibrosed tissue and the type of fibers accumulated. Radiotherapy affects the supporting tumor stroma often resulting in a worsening grade of tumor post-radiation. Aim: To study epithelial, neoplastic, stromal, and glandular changes in oral cavity induced by radiation therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC using special stains. Materials and Methods: The study included 27 samples of recurrent OSCC following completion of radiotherapy (recurrence within an average span of 11 months, and 26 non-irradiated cases of OSCC. Patients with a history of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy were not included in the study. The epithelial changes assessed included epithelial atrophy, apoptosis, necrosis, dysplasia, and neoplasia. The connective tissue was evaluated for amount of fibrosis, quality of fibers (using picrosirius red staining, fibrinous exudate, necrosis, pattern of invasion, vessel wall thickening, and salivary gland changes. The aforementioned changes were assessed using light and polarizing microscopy and tabulated. Statistical Analysis: Epithelial and connective tissue parameters were compared between the irradiated and non-irradiated cases using chi square and t-tests. Results: Epithelial and connective tissue parameters were found to be increased in irradiated patients. Pattern of invasion by tumor cells varied from strands and  cords between the two groups studied. The effect of radiation was seen to reflect on the maturity of fibers and the regularity of their distribution.

  19. NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-related proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners--variation by occupational exposure and subtype of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Pesch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radon and arsenic are established pulmonary carcinogens. We investigated the association of cumulative exposure to these carcinogens with NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-specific proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Paraffin-embedded tissue of 147 miners was randomly selected from an autopsy repository by type of lung tissue, comprising adenocarcinoma (AdCa, squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC, and cancer-free tissue. Within each stratum, we additionally stratified by low or high level of exposure to radon or arsenic. Lifetime exposure to radon and arsenic was estimated using a quantitative job-exposure matrix developed for uranium mining. For 22 cancer-related proteins, immunohistochemical scores were calculated from the intensity and percentage of stained cells. We explored the associations of these scores with cumulative exposure to radon and arsenic with Spearman rank correlation coefficients (r(s. Occupational exposure was associated with an up-regulation of NOTCH1 (radon r(s = 0.18, 95% CI 0.02-0.33; arsenic: r(s = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.38. Moreover, we investigated whether these cancer-related proteins can classify lung cancer using supervised and unsupervised classification. MUC1 classified lung cancer from cancer-free tissue with a failure rate of 2.1%. A two-protein signature discriminated SCLC (HIF1A low, AdCa (NKX2-1 high, and SqCC (NKX2-1 low with a failure rate of 8.4%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that the radiation-sensitive protein NOTCH1 can be up-regulated in lung tissue from uranium miners by level of exposure to pulmonary carcinogens. We evaluated a three-protein signature consisting of a physiological protein (MUC1, a cancer-specific protein (HIF1A, and a lineage-specific protein (NKX2-1 that could discriminate lung cancer and its major subtypes with a low failure rate.

  20. Expression of a plant-associated human cancer antigen in normal,premalignant and malignant esophageal tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Fu; Ping Qu; Mo Li; Hai-Mei Tian; Zhen-Hai Zheng; Xin-Wen Zheng; Wei Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between the expression profiles of a plant-associated human cancer antigen and carcinogenesis of esophagus and its significance. METHODS: We analyzed expression of a plant-associated human cancer antigen in biopsy specimens of normal (n=29),mildly hyperplastic (n=29), mildly (n=30), moderately (n=27)and severely dysplastic (n=29) and malignant esophageal (n=30) tissues by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The plant-associated human cancer antigen was mainly confined to the cytoplasm and showed diffuse type of staining. Positive staining was absent or weak in normal (0/30) and mildly hyperplastic tissue samples (2/29), while strong staining was observed in severe dysplasia (23/29) and carcinoma in situ (24/30). There was significant difference of its expression between normal mucosa and severely dysplastic tissues (P<0.001) or carcinoma in situ (P<0.001). Significant difference was also observed between mild dysplasia and severe dysplasia (P<0.001) or carcinomain situ (P<0.001). An overall trend toward increased staining intensity with increasing grade of dysplasia was found. There was a linear correlation between grade of lesions and staining intensity (r=0.794,P<0.001). Samples from esophageal cancer showed no higher levels of expression than those in severely dysplastic lesions (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: The abnormal expression of this plantassociated human cancer antigen in esophageal lesions is a frequent and early finding in the normal-dysplasiacarcinoma sequence in esophageal carcinogenesis. It might contribute to the carcinogenesis of esophageal cancer. The abnormal expression of this plant-associated human cancer antigen in esophageal lesion tissues may serve as a potential new biomarker for early identification of esophageal cancer.

  1. Altered expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and its regulatory genes in gastric cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihan Wang

    Full Text Available Tissue hypoxia induces reprogramming of cell metabolism and may result in normal cell transformation and cancer progression. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α, the key transcription factor, plays an important role in gastric cancer development and progression. This study aimed to investigate the underlying regulatory signaling pathway in gastric cancer using gastric cancer tissue specimens. The integration of gene expression profile and transcriptional regulatory element database (TRED was pursued to identify HIF-1α ↔ NFκB1 → BRCA1 → STAT3 ← STAT1 gene pathways and their regulated genes. The data showed that there were 82 differentially expressed genes that could be regulated by these five transcription factors in gastric cancer tissues and these genes formed 95 regulation modes, among which seven genes (MMP1, TIMP1, TLR2, FCGR3A, IRF1, FAS, and TFF3 were hub molecules that are regulated at least by two of these five transcription factors simultaneously and were associated with hypoxia, inflammation, and immune disorder. Real-Time PCR and western blot showed increasing of HIF-1α in mRNA and protein levels as well as TIMP1, TFF3 in mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues. The data are the first study to demonstrate HIF-1α-regulated transcription factors and their corresponding network genes in gastric cancer. Further study with a larger sample size and more functional experiments is needed to confirm these data and then translate into clinical biomarker discovery and treatment strategy for gastric cancer.

  2. Interaction between fragile histamine triad and protein kinase C alpha in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interaction between fragile histamine triad (FHIT) and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Methods FHIT and PKCα double positive samples were screened by immunohistochemical staining from 13 human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed by using anti-FHIT and anti-PKCα. The immune precipitate was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results Immune precipitate staining detection showed that 3 samples out of...

  3. Narrowing Resection of Parametrial Tissues Is Feasible in Low-Risk Cases of Stage IA2-IB1 Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Lian; Liu, Xiao-Xia; Cao, Guan-Shu; Ju, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is the standard surgical treatment for patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer, but the wide excision increases the complications. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the feasibility of narrowing resection of parametrial tissues in stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospectively analyzed the pathological and clinical data of patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in OB/GYN Hospital, Fudan University, China from Jan 2008 to Dec 2011. The affected factors of parametrial metastases and outcomes were discussed. The single factor analysis was made with χ2 test, and the relationship of the resection width of parametrial tissues and the patients' outcomes was analyzed with χ2 test and log-rank. P-values cancer in 513 patients during the follow-up period (from 2 months to 66 months, averaged 39 months). The low-risk factors included diameter of tumor ≤2cm, depth of cervical myometrial invasionrisk factors. Whether the resection width of parametrial tissues ≥3cm or not had no statistically significant effect on progression free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) of low-risk patients. D2-40 and CD31 were related with parametrial metastases, but not with recurrence or outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The resection width of parametrial tissues has no effect on PFS and OS of low-risk patients, and narrowing resection of parametrial tissues (<3cm) is feasible.

  4. Transforming Big Data into Cancer-Relevant Insight: An Initial, Multi-Tier Approach to Assess Reproducibility and Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD(2)) Network was established to accelerate the transformation of "Big Data" into novel pharmacologic targets, lead compounds, and biomarkers for rapid translation into improved patient outcomes. It rapidly became clear in this collaborative network that a key central issue was to define what constitutes sufficient computational or experimental evidence to support a biologically or clinically relevant finding. This article represents a first attempt to delineate the challenges of supporting and confirming discoveries arising from the systematic analysis of large-scale data resources in a collaborative work environment and to provide a framework that would begin a community discussion to resolve these challenges. The Network implemented a multi-tier framework designed to substantiate the biological and biomedical relevance as well as the reproducibility of data and insights resulting from its collaborative activities. The same approach can be used by the broad scientific community to drive development of novel therapeutic and biomarker strategies for cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(8); 675-82. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27401613

  5. Correction of electrode polarization contributions to the dielectric properties of normal and cancerous breast tissues at audio/radiofrequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurious contributions from electrode polarization (EP) are a major nuisance in dielectric measurements of biological tissues and hamper accurate determination of tissue properties in the audio/radiofrequencies. Various electrode geometries and/or treatments have been employed traditionally to reduce EP contributions, although none succeeded to completely remove EP from measurements on tissues for all practical frequency ranges. A method of correction for contributions of EP to the dielectric properties of tissues is proposed. The method is based on modeling the electrode impedance with suitable functions and on the observation that certain parameters are only dependent on electrodes properties and can thus be determined separately. The method is tested on various samples with known properties, and its usefulness is demonstrated with samples of normal and cancerous human female breast tissue. It is observed that the dielectric properties of the tissues over the frequency range 40 Hz-100 MHz are significantly different among different types of breast tissue. This observation is used further to demonstrate that, by scanning the tip of the measuring dielectric probe (with modest spatial resolution) across a sample of excised breast tissue, significant variations in the electrical properties are detected at a position where a tumor is located. This study shows that dielectric spectroscopy has the potential to offer a viable alternative to the current methods for detection of breast cancer in vivo

  6. The determination of selenium concentration in blood and tumour tissues of breast cancer patients in Syria using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relationship of selenium concentration in blood components and tumour tissues of breast cancer patients and healthy volunteers (control), in Syria was investigated, using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Red blood cells and serum selenium concentrations were determined in 50 healthy volunteers aged 25-70 years and 70 breast cancer patients aged 25-84 years. Selenium levels were also measured in malignant and adjacent normal tissues from breast cancer patients. The accuracy of the analysis was evaluated by co-analyses of international reference materials. The results showed that selenium concentration in serum and RBC was significantly lower among breast cancer patients compared to healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). The results also showed that the selenium concentration was significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). There is a good indication for selenium deviation in blood and malignant tissue of breast cancer patients compared to that of healthy volunteers. (author)

  7. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  8. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011) was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care

  9. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigbeder, Alice; Vélot, Lauriane; James, D Andrew; Bisson, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    A precisely controlled network of protein-protein interactions constitutes the basis for functional signaling pathways. This equilibrium is more often than not disrupted in cancer cells, by the aberrant expression or activation of oncogenic proteins. Therefore, the analysis of protein interaction networks in cancer cells has become crucial to expand our comprehension of the molecular underpinnings of tumor formation and progression. This protocol describes a sample preparation method for the analysis of signaling complexes by mass spectrometry (MS), following the affinity purification of a protein of interest from a cancer cell line or a solid tumor. In particular, we provide a spin tip-based protease digestion procedure that offers a more rapid and controlled alternative to other gel-based and gel-free methods. This sample preparation protocol represents a useful strategy to identify protein interactions and to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that contribute to a given cancer phenotype. PMID:27581032

  10. Autofluorescence spectroscopy for multimodal tissues characterization in colitis-associated cancer murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorez, Hugo; Sablong, Raphaël.; Canaple, Laurence; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Gaillard, Sophie; Moussata, Driffa; Beuf, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this research project is to assess mice colon wall, using three optical modalities (conventional endoscopy, confocal endomicroscopy and optical spectroscopy) and endoluminal MRI. The study is done in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer that represent 13% of new cases of cancer, every year in western countries. An optical spectroscopic bench (autofluorescence and reflectance) was developed with a flexible fiber probe. This latter has been combined with a mini multi-purpose rigid endoscope and a confocal endomicroscope. The optical modalities were first used in vivo on SWISS mice. Then, a specific optical a phantom (containing two layers of distinct fluorophores) was developed in order to evaluate our two-channel spectroscopic probe as a basic depth-sensitive measurement tool. The preliminary results show the feasibility to combine such modalities in the same in vivo protocol. Conventional endoscopy is useful to depict inflammation along colon wall. Confocal endomicroscopy provides high-contrasted images of microvascularization. Measured optical spectra both depend on biochemical tissue content and layered structure of the medium. The light collected from one channel is not similar to the other, in terms of intensity and spectroscopic profile as the interaction with the medium observed volume is different. A comparative analysis of the spectra based on our in vitro model exhibits a strong correlation between simple index extracted from spectral data and two main phantom characteristics (fluorophore concentrations and superficial layer thickness). This work suggests that this technique could contribute to assess tissues alterations through autofluorescence spectroscopic measurement under endoscopy.

  11. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20). In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41) and 36.6% (15/41), while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41) and 14.6% (6/41). In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7) and 14.3% (1/7). The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P < 0.05). Gene expression rate was not correlated with menopause or lymph node metastasis. Positive expression of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was positively correlated with tumor differentiation and the clinical stage of the ovarian cancer. In addition, the positive expression rate of BAGE was significantly higher in ovarian cancer patients with ascites (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression profiles of MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV3, A2780 and COC1 varied, but there was at least one gene expressed in each cell line. Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer

  12. New insights into the autotaxin/LPA axis in cancer development and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, Raphaël; Peyruchaud, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.peyruchaud@inserm.fr

    2015-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a simple lipid with a single fatty acyl chain linked to a glycerophosphate backbone. Despite the simplicity of its structure but owing to its interactions with a series of at least six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA{sub 1–6}), LPA exerts pleiotropic bioactivities including stimulation of proliferation, migration and survival of many cell types. Autotaxin (ATX) is a unique enzyme with a lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity that is responsible for the levels of LPA in the blood circulation. Both LPA receptor family members and ATX/LysoPLD are aberrantly expressed in many human cancers. This review will present the more striking as well as novel experimental evidences using cell lines, cancer mouse models and transgenic animals identifying the roles for ATX and LPA receptors in cancer progression, tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  13. New insights into the autotaxin/LPA axis in cancer development and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a simple lipid with a single fatty acyl chain linked to a glycerophosphate backbone. Despite the simplicity of its structure but owing to its interactions with a series of at least six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6), LPA exerts pleiotropic bioactivities including stimulation of proliferation, migration and survival of many cell types. Autotaxin (ATX) is a unique enzyme with a lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity that is responsible for the levels of LPA in the blood circulation. Both LPA receptor family members and ATX/LysoPLD are aberrantly expressed in many human cancers. This review will present the more striking as well as novel experimental evidences using cell lines, cancer mouse models and transgenic animals identifying the roles for ATX and LPA receptors in cancer progression, tumor cell invasion and metastasis

  14. Research on the dose of the tissues located outside the treatment field when breast cancer was irradiated by linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of study was to determine the dose of the tissues which located outside the treatment field, when breast cancer was irradiated by 9 MeV electron-beam and 6 MV-X ray after operation. A search for decreasing the dose of the tissues outside the treatment field was made. Clinically relevant treatment fields were simulated on a tissue-equivalent material phantom and subsequently irradiated with 9 MeV electron-beam and 6 MV-X ray. TLD were used to measure absorbed doses. The prescribed dose of breast cancer region was 50.0 Gy, region-lymph-nodes were 60.0 Gy, each exposure dose was 2.0 Gy. In breast cancer region, if only with 9 MeV electron-beam, the dose of the tissues located outside the treatment field were from 29.0 cGy to 295.5 cGy, when shielded with Pb lump, the doses of the tissues outside the treatment field may descended 9.4%-53.6%; if only with 6 MV-X ray, the doses of aforementioned tissues were from 32.0 cGy to 206.7 cGy, when shielded with Pb lump, the doses of the tissues outside the treatment field descended 19.7%-56.6%. In region-lymph-nodes, with 6 MV-X ray, the doses of aforementioned tissues were from 22.5 cGy to 1650.9 cGy, when shielded with Pb lump, the doses of the tissues outside the treatment field descended 19.7-65.6%. If mix-irradiation (9 MeV electron-beam vs. 6 MV-X ray 2:3) was used, the doses outside field would be lower than only used 9 MeV electron-beam or 6 MV-X ray were used

  15. Deciphering Cell-to-Cell Communication in Acquisition of Cancer Traits: Extracellular Membrane Vesicles Are Regulators of Tissue Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Deep; Wijesinghe, Philip; Oenarto, Vici; Lu, Jamie F; Sampson, David D; Kennedy, Brendan F; Wallace, Vincent P; Bebawy, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Deciphering the role of cell-to-cell communication in acquisition of cancer traits such as metastasis is one of the key challenges of integrative biology and clinical oncology. In this context, extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important vectors in cell-to-cell communication and serve as conduits in the transfer of cellular constituents required for cell function and for the establishment of cellular phenotypes. In the case of malignancy, they have been shown to support the acquisition of common traits defined as constituting the hallmarks of cancer. Cellular biophysics has contributed to our understanding of some of these central traits with changes in tissue biomechanics reflective of cell state. Indeed, much is known about stiffness of the tissue scaffold in the context of cell invasion and migration. This article advances this knowledge frontier by showing for the first time that EVs are mediators of tissue biomechanical properties and, importantly, demonstrates a link between the acquisition of cancer multidrug resistance and increased tissue stiffness of the malignant mass. The methodology used in the study employed optical coherence elastography and atomic force microscopy on breast cancer cell monolayers and tumor spheroids. Specifically, we show here that the acquired changes in tissue stiffness can be attributed to the intracellular transfer of a protein complex comprising ezrin, radixin, moesin, CD44, and P-glycoprotein. This has important implications in facilitating mechano-transduced signaling cascades that regulate the acquisition of cancer traits, such as invasion and metastasis. Finally, this study also introduces novel targets and strategies for diagnostic and therapeutic innovation in oncology, with a view to prevention of metastatic spread and personalized medicine in cancer treatment. PMID:27501296

  16. Association of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 and Ki67 in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Christina Annette; Knoop, Ann; Bjerre, Karsten;

    2013-01-01

    Background. The role of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer remains to be fully elucidated. We evaluated TIMP-1 as a prognostic marker in patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen and investigated TIMP-1s association with Ki67 and ER...... differences in disease free survival (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.63-1.53; p = 0.92) and overall survival (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.63-1.43; p = 0.79) were observed according to TIMP-1 status. A significant negative association between TIMP-1 and Ki67 was identified (p = 0.015). TIMP-1 expression did not differ significantly...... = 0.48; OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.23-1.99). Conclusion. TIMP-1 does not appear to be prognostic in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant tamoxifen. We identified a negative association between TIMP-1 and Ki67. We did not confirm our previous in vitro findings of a negative association between TIMP-1 and...

  17. Evaluation of Urinary Nuclear Matrix Protein-22 as Tumor Marker Versus Tissue Polypeptide Specific Antigen in Bilharzial and Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urinary nuclear matrix protein-22 (NMP-22) and tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS) were determined as potential marker for early detection of bladder tumors in patients with high risk (Bilharzial-patients), monitoring and follow up bladder cancer patients. The objective was to determine sensitivity and specificity of markers for bilharzial and cancer lesions. The levels of two parameters were determined pre and post operation. A total of 110 individuals, 20 healthy, 20 bilharzial patients and 70 bladder cancer patients with confirmed diagnosis were investigated. Urine samples were assayed for NMP-22 and TPS test kits. Some bladder cancer patients were selected to follow up. NMP-22 showed highly significant increase (P,0.001) more than TPS (P<0.01) in bladder cancer patients when compared with bilharzial and control group. Overall sensitivity is 7.8% for TPS and 98.5% for NMP-22

  18. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in colorectal cancer liver metastases is associated with vascular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Eefsen, Rikke Løvendahl; Bird, Nigel Charles;

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic growth by colorectal cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new microenvironment. This interaction results in three histological growth patterns of liver metastases: desmoplastic, pushing, and replacement. In primary colorectal cancer...... several proteases, involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components, are up-regulated. In liver metastases, their expression is growth pattern dependent. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is a strong prognostic marker in plasma from colorectal cancer patients......, with significant higher levels in patients with metastatic disease. We therefore wanted to determine the expression pattern of TIMP-1 in primary colorectal cancers and their matching liver metastases. TIMP-1 mRNA was primarily seen in α-smooth-muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells. In all primary tumors and liver...

  19. Coexpression of cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor and gastrin gene in human gastric tissues and gastric cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jiang Zhou; Man-Ling Chen; Qun-Zhou Zhang; Jian-Kun Hu; Wen-Ling Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the expression patterns of cholecystokininB (CCK-B)/gastrin receptor genes in matched human gastric carcinoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa of patients with gastric cancer, inflammatory gastric mucosa from patients with gastritis, normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients and a gastric carcinoma cell line (SGC-7901), and to explore their relationship with progression to malignancy of human gastric carcinomas.METHODS: RT-PCR and sequencing were employed to detect the mRNA expression levels of CCK-B receptor and gastrin gene in specimens from 30 patients with gastric carcinoma and healthy bordering non-cancerous mucosa, 10 gastritis patients and normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients as well as SGC-7901. The results were semi-quantified by normalizing it to the mRNA level of β-actin gene using Lab Image software. The sequences were analyzed by BLAST program. RESULTS: CCK-B receptor transcripts were detected in all of human gastric tissues in this study, including normal, inflammatory and malignant tissues and SGC-7901. However, the expression levels of CCK-B receptor in normal gastric tissues were higher than those in other groups (P<0.05),and its expressions did not correlate with the differentiation and metastasis of gastric cancer (P>0.05). On the other hand, gastrin mRNA was detected in SGC-7901 and in specimens obtained from gastric cancer patients (22/30) but not in other gastric tissues, and its expression was highly correlated with the metastases of gastric cancer (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Human gastric carcinomas and gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 cells coexpress CCK-B receptor and gastrin mRNA. Gastrin/CCK-B receptor autocrine or paracrine pathway may possibly play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer.

  20. Brain Metastasis in Bone and Soft Tissue Cancers: A Review of Incidence, Interventions, and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Shweikeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone and soft tissue malignancies account for a small portion of brain metastases. In this review, we characterize their incidence, treatments, and prognosis. Most of the data in the literature is based on case reports and small case series. Less than 5% of brain metastases are from bone and soft tissue sarcomas, occurring most commonly in Ewing’s sarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, and osteosarcoma. Mean interval from initial cancer diagnosis to brain metastasis is in the range of 20–30 months, with most being detected before 24 months (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, chordoma, angiosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, some at 24–36 months (malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and alveolar soft part sarcoma, and a few after 36 months (chondrosarcoma and liposarcoma. Overall mean survival ranges between 7 and 16 months, with the majority surviving < 12 months (Ewing’s sarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, angiosarcoma and chordomas. Management is heterogeneous involving surgery, radiosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. While a survival advantage may exist for those given aggressive treatment involving surgical resection, such patients tended to have a favorable preoperative performance status and minimal systemic disease.

  1. STUDY OF ECK GENE EXON-3 FROM HUMAN NORMAL TISSUE AND BREAST CANCER CELL LINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑶琛; 孔令洪; 王一理; 司履生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a method cloning the exon 3 of eck gene from normal tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line (a human breast cancer cell line)and study whether these genes exist mutant. Methods Designed a pair of specific primers and amplified the exon 3 of eck gene fragment from the extracted genomic DNA derived from normal epithelial cells from skin tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively by PCR technique. Transformed the E.coil. JM109 with recombinant plamids constructed by inserting the amplified fragments into medium vector pUCm-T and sequenced these amplified fragments after primary screening of endonuclease restriction digestion and PCR amplification. Results ① Obtained the genomic DNA of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ② Obtained the amplified fragments of human exon 3 of eck gene through PCR technique. ③ Obtained the cloning vectors of exon 3 of eck gene of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ④ ZR-75-1 cell line exists mutation of nucleotides. Conclusion Successfully established the method of cloning the human exon 3 of eck gene and found some mutations in the detected samples. This study lays a foundation for further studying the function of eck gene in tumorgenesis.

  2. Tissue Biomarkers in Prognostication of Serous Ovarian Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binny Khandakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous ovarian cancer (SOC is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in females with poor prognosis because of advanced stage at presentation. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT is being used for management of advanced SOC, but role of tissue biomarkers in prognostication following NACT is not well established. The study was conducted on advanced stage SOC patients (n=100 that were treated either conventionally (n=50 or with NACT (n=50, followed by surgery. In order to evaluate the expression of tissue biomarkers (p53, MIB1, estrogen and progesterone receptors, Her-2/neu, E-cadherin, and Bcl2, immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative scoring were done following morphological examination. Following NACT, significant differences in tumor histomorphology were observed as compared to the native neoplasms. MIB 1 was significantly lower in cases treated with NACT and survival outcome was significantly better in cases with low MIB 1. ER expression was associated with poor overall survival. No other marker displayed any significant difference in expression or correlation with survival between the two groups. Immunophenotype of SOC does not differ significantly in samples from cases treated with NACT, compared to upfront surgically treated cases. The proliferating capacity of the residual tumor cells is less, depicted by low mean MIB1 LI. MIB 1 and ER inversely correlate with survival.

  3. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  4. Comparison of human papillomavirus detection between freshly frozen tissue and paraffin embedded tissue of invasive cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lloveras Belen; Alemany Laia; Quiros Beatriz; Sandin Sven; de Sanjose Silvia; Odida Michael; Quint Wim; Kleter Bernhard; Alejo Maria; van Doorn Leen-Jan; Weiderpass Elisabete

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) detection results comparing paraffin embedded cervical tissue and other cervical specimens have been done with varying degrees of agreement. However, studies comparing freshly frozen specimens and paraffin embedded specimens of invasive cervical carcinomas are lacking. The aim of the study was to compare HPV detection using SPF10 broad-spectrum primers PCR followed by DEIA and genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1) between freshly frozen cervical tissu...

  5. Insights into genetic and epigenetic determinants with impact on vitamin D signaling and cancer association studies: The case of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregoire B Morand

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a key regulator of calcium metabolism and has been implicated as a cancer preventive agent. However, clinical studies have revealed conflicting results on its cancer preventive properties, attributed in part to multiple metabolic and regulatory factors susceptible to affect individual responses to exogenous vitamin D. Vitamin D is obtained from dietary sources and sun exposure, which depends on numerous parameters such as skin type, latitude, and lifestyle factors. Focusing on thyroid cancer, we document that genetic and epigenetic determinants can greatly impact individual response to vitamin D and may outweigh the classical clinical correlative studies that focus on sun exposure/dietary intake factors. In particular, genetic determinants innate to host intrinsic metabolic pathways such as highly polymorphic cytochromes P450s responsible for the metabolic activation of vitamin D are expressed in many organs, including the thyroid gland and can impact vitamin D interaction with its nuclear receptor (VDR in thyroid tissue. Moreover, downstream regulatory pathways in vitamin D signalling as well as VDR are also subject to wide genetic variability among human populations as shown by genome-wide studies. These genetic variations in multiple components of vitamin D pathways are critical determinants for the re-valuation of the potential preventive and anticancer properties of vitamin D in thyroid cancer.

  6. Evaluation of oxidant-antioxidant status in tissue samples in oral cancer: A case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kumar Chandan; Austin, Ravi David; Shrivastava, Deepti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imbalances between the oxidant-antioxidant status have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in the tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients of different clinical stages in comparison with the healthy controls. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was designed with 20 new histopathologically proven oral carcinoma patients and an equal number of age, sex, and tobacco chewing habit matched healthy subjects. Their tissue samples were subjected to evaluation of lipid peroxidation product and antioxidant enzymes, namely, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) using spectrophotometric methods. The data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The statistical comparisons between the study groups were performed by independent Student's unpaired t-test and one-way analysis of variance. Post-hoc analysis was performed for within study group comparisons. Karl Pearson correlation was performed for the biochemical parameters within the group and between the groups. For statistically significant correlations, simple linear regression was performed using SPSS (α=0.05). Results: Significant reduction in lipid peroxidation (P < 0.001) SOD and CAT (P < 0.001) was observed in the tissue of OSCC patients as compared with the healthy controls. On the other hand, reduced GSH and GPx were significantly increased in tumor samples. Conclusion: Reduced lipid peroxidation and increased activity of reduced GSH and GPx provides the suitable environment for the local growth and invasion of the tumor and metastasis in the later stages. Among the antioxidant enzymes, GSH reductase appears to have a profound role in carcinogenesis and thus it can be considered as potential prognostic marker. PMID:27076834

  7. Molecular insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-related muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Diana; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Maciel, Elisabete; Santinha, Deolinda; Oliveira, Paula; Vitorino, Rui; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Nunes, Cláudia; Santos, Lúcio L; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics during cancer cachexia were previously suggested; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. So, the goal of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial phospholipid remodeling in cancer-related muscle wasting and its repercussions to respiratory chain activity and fiber susceptibility to apoptosis. An animal model of urothelial carcinoma induced by exposition to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) and characterized by significant body weight loss due to skeletal muscle mass decrease was used. Morphological evidences of muscle atrophy were associated to decreased respiratory chain activity and increased expression of mitochondrial UCP3, which altogether highlight the lower ability of wasted muscle to produce ATP. Lipidomic analysis of isolated mitochondria revealed a significant decrease of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin in BBN mitochondria, counteracted by increased phosphatidylcholine levels. Besides the impact on membrane fluidity, this phospholipid remodeling seems to justify, at least in part, the lower oxidative phosphorylation activity observed in mitochondria from wasted muscle and their increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Curiously, no evidences of lipid peroxidation were observed but proteins from BBN mitochondria, particularly the metabolic ones, seem more prone to carbonylation with the consequent implications in mitochondria functionality. Overall, data suggest that bladder cancer negatively impacts skeletal muscle activity specifically by affecting mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics and its interaction with proteins, ultimately leading to the dysfunction of this organelle. The regulation of phospholipid biosynthetic pathways might be seen as potential therapeutic targets for the management of cancer-related muscle wasting. PMID:24657703

  8. A Comprehensive Review on the Chemotherapeutic Potential of Piceatannol for Cancer Treatment, with Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed, Mohamed Ali; Jantan, Ibrahim; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Vijayaraghavan, Kavitha

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is a diverse class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth that constitutes the greatest cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despite steady progress, the treatment modalities of cancer are still insufficient. Several new concepts have emerged for therapeutic intervention in malignant diseases with the goal of identifying specific targets and overcoming resistance against current cytotoxic therapies. Many studies have reported the remarkable and significant properties of dietary plant polyphenols such as curcumin, resveratrol, flavopiridol, indirubin, magnolol, piceatannol, parthenolide, epigallocatechin gallate, and cucurbitacin as anticancer agents known for their pleiotropic effects on cancer, immune cells, and inflammation. Piceatannol, an analogue and metabolite of resveratrol, is a natural stilbene commonly found in grape skins and wine. Compared to resveratrol, this molecule exhibits superior bioactivities as an inhibitor of COX-1/2 and the CSN-associated kinase. Piceatannol is thought to be a potent natural compound with many therapeutic effects, such as the prevention of hypercholesterolemia, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, and cardiovascular diseases. It also demonstrates vasorelaxation, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. This comprehensive review summarizes the current data regarding the mechanisms of action of piceatannol, its chemopreventive properties, and its possible therapeutic potential against various types of human cancer. PMID:26758628

  9. Insights into radionuclide-induced lung cancer in people from life-span studies in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In life-span studies, beagle dogs were exposed one time by inhalation to an aerosol containing a beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclide in a relatively soluble or insoluble chemical form. After exposure dogs were observed for late-occurring biological effects. Lung cancer has been a predominant observation for radionuclides inhaled in a relatively insoluble form because most of the absorbed dose was delivered to the lung and contiguous tissues. Approximately 130 lung cancers were observed in dogs exposed to inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides; tumors occurred with absorbed doses to lung ranging from 1100 to 68,000 rads. With inhaled alpha emitters lung tumors occurred at doses between 530 and 8400 rads. Dose rate pattern was shown to be an important factor in the induction of lung cancer by inhaled beta emitters. Doses of low-LET irradiation delivered in a matter of days can be as much as 8 times more effective per unit of dose than radiation doses delivered over a more protracted period of time. Tumors also have occurred in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of dogs that inhaled relatively insoluble forms of beta emitters. From these studies, the risk of lung cancer from inhaled beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides was compared to determine the importance of LET and other dose-effect modifying factors on resulting risks and on extrapolation to human inhalation exposure. Attention also was given to the risk of cancer in tracheobronchial lymph nodes, on the basis of the results of these studies and the current ICRP computational method in which lymph nodes are included with lung for purposes of dose and risk calculation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Study on trace elements behaviour in cancerous and healthy tissues of colon, breast and stomach: Total reflection X-ray fluorescence applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, T. [Centro de Fisica Atomica da Univeridade de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-00, Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, M.L., E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Fisica Atomica da Univeridade de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-00, Lisboa (Portugal); Von Bohlen, A.; Becker, M. [Institute for Analytical Sciences (ISAS), Bunsen-Kirchhoff-Str. 11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    In this work Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyse healthy and cancerous tissues of the same individual along several contiguous thin sections of each tissue. Thirty two samples (16 pairs) of breast tissue, 30 samples (15 pairs) of intestine tissue and 10 samples (5 pairs) of stomach tissue were analysed. The samples were obtained in Civil Hospitals of Germany (Dortmund) and Portugal (Lisbon). The elemental distribution of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb in these samples was studied. Descriptive statistics based on bar graphics and hypotheses tests and also an automatic classification based on hierarchical grouping analysis was used for the several analysed tissues. It was shown that the behaviour of the elements is tissue dependent. Some elements, like P and K exhibit the same behaviour in all the analysed tissue types. They have increased concentrations in all cancerous tissues. Unlike, other elements like Br show completely different behaviour depending on the tissue: similar concentration in healthy and cancerous stomach, decreased levels in colon cancerous tissues and enhanced concentrations in breast was observed. Moreover cancer tissues present decreased Se concentrations on colon and increased on breast.

  11. A comparison of mantle versus involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: reduction in normal tissue dose and second cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) survivors who undergo radiotherapy experience increased risks of second cancers (SC) and cardiac sequelae. To reduce such risks, extended-field radiotherapy (RT) for HL has largely been replaced by involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). While it has generally been assumed that IFRT will reduce SC risks, there are few data that quantify the reduction in dose to normal tissues associated with modern RT practice for patients with mediastinal HL, and no estimates of the expected reduction in SC risk. Organ-specific dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for 41 patients receiving 35 Gy mantle RT, 35 Gy IFRT, or 20 Gy IFRT, and integrated organ mean doses were compared for the three protocols. Organ-specific SC risk estimates were estimated using a dosimetric risk-modeling approach, analyzing DVH data with quantitative, mechanistic models of radiation-induced cancer. Dose reductions resulted in corresponding reductions in predicted excess relative risks (ERR) for SC induction. Moving from 35 Gy mantle RT to 35 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERR for female breast and lung cancer by approximately 65%, and for male lung cancer by approximately 35%; moving from 35 Gy IFRT to 20 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERRs approximately 40% more. The median reduction in integral dose to the whole heart with the transition to 35 Gy IFRT was 35%, with a smaller (2%) reduction in dose to proximal coronary arteries. There was no significant reduction in thyroid dose. The significant decreases estimated for radiation-induced SC risks associated with modern IFRT provide strong support for the use of IFRT to reduce the late effects of treatment. The approach employed here can provide new insight into the risks associated with contemporary IFRT for HL, and may facilitate the counseling of patients regarding the risks associated with this treatment

  12. Separating spectral mixtures in hyperspectral image data using independent component analysis: validation with oral cancer tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duann, Jeng-Ren; Jan, Chia-Ing; Ou-Yang, Mang; Lin, Chia-Yi; Mo, Jen-Feng; Lin, Yung-Jiun; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiou, Jin-Chern

    2013-12-01

    Recently, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems, which can provide 100 or more wavelengths of emission autofluorescence measures, have been used to delineate more complete spectral patterns associated with certain molecules relevant to cancerization. Such a spectral fingerprint may reliably correspond to a certain type of molecule and thus can be treated as a biomarker for the presence of that molecule. However, the outcomes of HSI systems can be a complex mixture of characteristic spectra of a variety of molecules as well as optical interferences due to reflection, scattering, and refraction. As a result, the mixed nature of raw HSI data might obscure the extraction of consistent spectral fingerprints. Here we present the extraction of the characteristic spectra associated with keratinized tissues from the HSI data of tissue sections from 30 oral cancer patients (31 tissue samples in total), excited at two different wavelength ranges (330 to 385 and 470 to 490 nm), using independent and principal component analysis (ICA and PCA) methods. The results showed that for both excitation wavelength ranges, ICA was able to resolve much more reliable spectral fingerprints associated with the keratinized tissues for all the oral cancer tissue sections with significantly higher mean correlation coefficients as compared to PCA (p<0.001).

  13. Computer simulations of plasma–biomolecule and plasma–tissue interactions for a better insight in plasma medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary field at the intersection of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, biology, medicine and bioengineering. It holds great potential in medical, health care, dentistry, surgical, food treatment and other applications. This multidisciplinary nature and variety of possible applications come along with an inherent and intrinsic complexity. Advancing plasma medicine to the stage that it becomes an everyday tool in its respective fields requires a fundamental understanding of the basic processes, which is lacking so far. However, some major advances have already been made through detailed experiments over the last 15 years. Complementary, computer simulations may provide insight that is difficult—if not impossible—to obtain through experiments. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the various simulations that have been carried out in the context of plasma medicine so far, or that are relevant for plasma medicine. We focus our attention mostly on atomistic simulations dealing with plasma–biomolecule interactions. We also provide a perspective and tentative list of opportunities for future modelling studies that are likely to further advance the field. (topical review)

  14. Computer simulations of plasma-biomolecule and plasma-tissue interactions for a better insight in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyts, Erik C.; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Verlackt, Christof C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2014-07-01

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary field at the intersection of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, biology, medicine and bioengineering. It holds great potential in medical, health care, dentistry, surgical, food treatment and other applications. This multidisciplinary nature and variety of possible applications come along with an inherent and intrinsic complexity. Advancing plasma medicine to the stage that it becomes an everyday tool in its respective fields requires a fundamental understanding of the basic processes, which is lacking so far. However, some major advances have already been made through detailed experiments over the last 15 years. Complementary, computer simulations may provide insight that is difficult—if not impossible—to obtain through experiments. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the various simulations that have been carried out in the context of plasma medicine so far, or that are relevant for plasma medicine. We focus our attention mostly on atomistic simulations dealing with plasma-biomolecule interactions. We also provide a perspective and tentative list of opportunities for future modelling studies that are likely to further advance the field.

  15. Recent insights into nanotechnology development for detection and treatment of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Buddolla; Kim, Sanghyo; Lee, Kiyoung

    2016-01-01

    The global incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is 1.3 million cases. It is the third most frequent cancer in males and females. Most CRCs are adenocarcinomas and often begin as a polyp on the inner wall of the rectum or colon. Some of these polyps become malignant, eventually. Detecting and removing these polyps in time can prevent CRC. Therefore, early diagnosis of CRC is advantageous for preventive and instant action interventions to decrease the mortality rates. Nanotechnology has been enhancing different methods for the detection and treatment of CRCs, and the research has provided hope within the scientific community for the development of new therapeutic strategies. This review presents the recent development of nanotechnology for the detection and treatment of CRC.

  16. Recent insights into nanotechnology development for detection and treatment of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Buddolla; Kim, Sanghyo; Lee, Kiyoung

    2016-01-01

    The global incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is 1.3 million cases. It is the third most frequent cancer in males and females. Most CRCs are adenocarcinomas and often begin as a polyp on the inner wall of the rectum or colon. Some of these polyps become malignant, eventually. Detecting and removing these polyps in time can prevent CRC. Therefore, early diagnosis of CRC is advantageous for preventive and instant action interventions to decrease the mortality rates. Nanotechnology has been enhancing different methods for the detection and treatment of CRCs, and the research has provided hope within the scientific community for the development of new therapeutic strategies. This review presents the recent development of nanotechnology for the detection and treatment of CRC. PMID:27330292

  17. Critical roles of specimen type and temperature before and during fixation in the detection of phosphoproteins in breast cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündisch, Sibylle; Annaratone, Laura; Beese, Christian; Drecol, Enken; Marchiò, Caterina; Quaglino, Elena; Sapino, Anna; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Bussolati, Gianni

    2015-05-01

    The most efficient approach for therapy selection to inhibit the deregulated kinases in cancer tissues is to measure their phosphorylation status prior to the treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of pre-analytical parameters (cold ischemia time, temperature before and during tissue fixation, and sample type) on the levels of proteins and phosphoproteins in breast cancer tissues, focusing on the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. The BALB-neuT mouse breast cancer model expressing HER2 and pAKT proteins and human biopsy and resection specimens were analyzed. By using quantitative reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA), 9 proteins and 16 phosphoproteins relevant to breast cancer biology were assessed. Cold temperatures before and during fixation resulted in a marked improvement in the preservation of the reactivity of biological markers (eg, ER, HER2) in general and, specifically, pHER2 and pAKT. Some phosphoproteins, eg, pHER2 and pAKT, were more sensitive to prolonged cold ischemia times than others (eg, pS6RP and pSTAT5). By comparing the phosphoprotein levels in core needle biopsies with those in resection specimens, we found a marked decrease in many phosphoproteins in the latter. Cold conditions can improve the preservation of proteins and phosphoproteins in breast cancer tissues. Biopsies ≤ 1 mm in size are the preferred sample type for assessing the activity of deregulated kinases for personalized cancer treatments because the phosphoprotein levels are better preserved compared with resection specimens. Each potential new (phospho)protein biomarker should be tested for its sensitivity to pre-analytical processing prior to the development of a diagnostic assay. PMID:25730369

  18. Microarrays bring new insights into understanding of breast cancer metastasis to bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a microarray approach, Kang and colleagues identified several genes involved in the generation of breast cancer metastasis in bone and demonstrated their roles in bone colonization in vivo. Their findings and interpretations are reviewed in the context of recent array studies that compared gene expression in primary tumors and metastases. RNA expression array results have already demonstrated value in predicting whether metastases will develop in patients. They have also shown that expression patterns are similar in primary tumors and metastases. The latter data have invited re-examination of long-held notions related to mechanisms of metastasis. While the arrays show promise for improving diagnostic capability in breast cancers, ascribing mechanistic interpretations to correlative data should be done with extreme caution. Kang and colleagues' paper in Cancer Cell elegantly reinforces the concepts that efficiency of the metastatic process is dependent on the coordinated expression of multiple genes and that the expression of metastasis-associated genes is sometimes dependent on the microenvironment in which cells find themselves

  19. Insights into preferences for psycho-oncology services among women with gynecologic cancer following distress screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Sylvie D; Kelly, Brian; Boyes, Allison; Cameron, Alexander; Adams, Catherine; Proietto, Anthony; Girgis, Afaf

    2014-06-01

    Much attention has been given to implementing routine screening programs in cancer care to improve the management of distress following diagnosis. Although patients might screen positive for distress, several studies have found that most then refuse additional psychosocial support. To inform the development of successful models of distress screening, this qualitative study explored preferences for psychosocial care among 18 women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer who scored at least 4 on the Distress Thermometer (DT). Participants were recruited from a gynecologic oncology outpatient clinic in Newcastle, Australia, and interviewed. Unanimously, participants felt that completing the DT was an integral part of their cancer care. However, half then refused the referral to see a psychologist. These women typically reported that a referral was not needed, because their rating on the DT reflected transient stressors or physical distress. Many also spoke about their need to cope with the challenges they were facing on their own and the extensive social support they already had in place to help them overcome these challenges. In contrast, women who accepted referral to the psychologist often struggled to cope with several losses they felt had existential and long-term effects. Commonly, these women reported not having the social support they needed, managing several concurrent life stressors, and/or not having the repertoire of coping skills they required to "remain afloat." Findings from this study begin to bridge the gap between clinicians' and patients' expectations of how psychosocial services should be used in response to distress screening. PMID:24925200

  20. Insights on N-glycosylation of human haptoglobin and its association with cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Shang, Shuxin; Li, Wei; Qin, Xue; Liu, Yinkun

    2016-07-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most significant post-translation modifications and plays a critical role in various biological functions. Haptoglobin (Hp) is one of the acute-phase response proteins secreted by liver. Its glycosylation could be analyzed by many analytical techniques qualitatively and quantitatively. The glycosylation alterations of Hp are reported to be associated with different kinds of diseases. The main glycosylation alterations of Hp in cancer appear to be the presence of aberrantly fucosylated and sialylated structures as well as increased branching. In this mini review, we provided a brief overview of Hp structure and biological function, discussed its glycosylation alterations in different cancers, and described the existing technologies for analyzing glycosylation site and glycan of Hp. Given the importance of Hp glycosylation, its unknown and unclear biological complexity and significances, Hp glycosylation has become a major target in cancer research. Development of sensitive and specific detection of Hp glycosylation including large-scale validation may be significant steps forward to its clinical application. PMID:26873173

  1. Technologies for Protein Analysis and Tissue Engineering, with Applications in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermesh, Udi Benjamin

    The first part of this thesis describes electrolyte transport through an array of 20 nm wide, 20 mum long SiO2 nanofluidic transistors. At sufficiently low ionic strength, the Debye screening length exceeds the channel width, and ion transport is limited by the negatively charged channel surfaces. At source-drain biases > 5 V, the current exhibits a sharp, nonlinear increase, with a 20 - 50-fold conductance enhancement. This behavior is attributed to a breakdown of the zero-slip condition. Implications for peptide sequencing as well as energy conversion devices are discussed. The next part describes a technology for the detection of the highly aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this study, we used an antibody-based microarray to compare plasma samples from glioblastoma patients and healthy controls with respect to the plasma levels of 35 different proteins known to be generally associated with tumor growth, survival, invasion, migration, and immune regulation. Average-linkage hierarchical clustering of the patient data stratified the two groups effectively, permitting accurate assignment of test samples into either GBM or healthy control groups with a sensitivity and specificity as high as 90 % and 94 %, respectively. Using the same 35-protein panel, we then analyzed plasma samples from GBM patients who were treated with the chemotherapeutic drug Avastin (Bevacizumab) and were able to effectively stratify patients based on treatment-responsiveness. Finally, single-cell resolution patterning of tissue engineered structures is demonstrated. The proper functioning of engineered constructs for tissue and organ transplantation requires positioning different cell types in anatomically precise arrangements that mimic their configurations in native tissues. Toward this end, we have developed a technique that involves two microfluidic-patterning steps run perpendicularly to each other using "anchor" and "bridge" DNA oligomers to create dense arrays of

  2. NIH Scientists Map Genetic Changes That Drive Tumors in a Common Pediatric Soft-Tissue Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  3. Simultaneous Determination of 30 Trace Elements in Cancerous and Noncancerous Human Tissue Samples with Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following trace elements were quantitatively determined by gamma-ray spectrometry in T samples of non-cancerous and 5 samples of cancerous human tissue: P, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, La, Au, and Hg. In some of the samples the following elements were qualitatively determined: Ti+Sc, Ga, Sr, In, Ba, Ce, Hf, Os, Pt, and U. Most of the trace elements were found to be present in much higher concentrations in the non-cancerous than in the corresponding cancerous liver samples. In a typical run one sample each of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue was irradiated together with standards of the elements to be determined in a thermal flux of 2.1013 n/cm2/sec. for 24 hours. The radioactive trace elements were separated into 16, and in some cases 18, groups by means of a chemical group separation method. Subsequently, the gamma spectrometric measurements were performed. Two persons can manage the chemical separations and measure the different activities from a run in 1,5 days. A new method of comparing unknown samples with standards was developed

  4. Overexpression of arginine transporter CAT-1 is associated with accumulation of L-arginine and cell growth in human colorectal cancer tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lu

    Full Text Available We previously showed that L-arginine (Arg accumulates in colorectal cancer tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which Arg accumulates and determine its biological significance. The concentration of Arg and Citrulline (Cit in sera and tumor tissues from colorectal cancer (CRC patients was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The expression of Arg transporters was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarray. We also transfected the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with siRNA specific for the Arg transporter CAT-1 and measured the induction of apoptosis by flow cytometry and cell proliferation by MTT assay. Consistent with our previous results, serum Arg and Cit concentrations in colorectal cancer patients were significantly lower than those in normal volunteers, while Arg and Cit concentrations in colorectal cancer tissues were significantly higher than in matched adjacent normal colon tissues. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the CAT-1 gene was highly overexpressed in 70.5% of colorectal cancer tissue samples relative to adjacent normal colon tissues in all 122 patients with colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarray confirmed that the expression of CAT-1 was higher in all 25 colorectal cancer tissues tested. CAT-1 siRNA significantly induced apoptosis of HCT-116 cells and subsequently inhibited cell growth by 20-50%. Our findings indicate that accumulation of L-Arg and Cit and cell growth in colorectal cancer tissues is associated with over-expression of the Arg transporter gene CAT-1. Our results may be useful for the development of molecular diagnostic tools and targeted therapy for colorectal cancer.

  5. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanna Ihnatovych

    Full Text Available Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate- cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  6.   Tumor tissue levels of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and survival following adjuvant chemotherapy in pre-menopausal lymph node-positive breast cancer patients (N=525)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.;

    ) suggesting that TIMP-1 may be a predictive marker in breast cancer patients. Purpose: This study investigates the association of tumor tissue TIMP-1 levels with response to adjuvant chemotherapy with CMF (cyclophosphamide/methotrexate/5-fluorouracil) or an anthracycline-containing regimen. Patients and...... Predictive markers are needed to guide planning of adjuvant therapy for patients with breast cancer. We have recently shown that high tumor tissue levels of TIMP-1 are associated with decreased response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer patients (Schrohl et al, Clin Cancer Res, 2006...

  7. Methylation Profiling Defines an Extensive Field Defect in Histologically Normal Prostate Tissues Associated with Prostate Cancer12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Bhusari, Sachin; Kueck, Jessica; Weeratunga, Pushpa; Wagner, Jennifer; Leverson, Glen; Huang, Wei; Jarrard, David F

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is typically found as a multifocal disease suggesting the potential for molecular defects within the morphologically normal tissue. The frequency and spatial extent of DNA methylation changes encompassing a potential field defect are unknown. A comparison of non-tumor-associated (NTA) prostate to histologically indistinguishable tumor-associated (TA) prostate tissues detected a distinct profile of DNA methylation alterations (0.2%) using genome-wide DNA arrays based on the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements 18 sequence that tile both gene-rich and poor regions. Hypomethylation (87%) occurred more frequently than hypermethylation (13%). Several of the most significantly altered loci (CAV1, EVX1, MCF2L, and FGF1) were then used as probes to map the extent of these DNA methylation changes in normal tissues from prostates containing cancer. In TA tissues, the extent of methylation was similar both adjacent (2 mm) and at a distance (>1 cm) from tumor foci. These loci were also able to distinguish NTA from TA tissues in a validation set of patient samples. These mapping studies indicate that a spatially widespread epigenetic defect occurs in the peripheral prostate tissues of men who have PCa that may be useful in the detection of this disease. PMID:23555185

  8. Adipose atrophy in cancer cachexia: morphologic and molecular analysis of adipose tissue in tumour-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, C; Russell, S; Becket, E; Pope, M; Tisdale, M J; Trayhurn, P; Jenkins, J R

    2006-10-23

    Extensive loss of adipose tissue is a hallmark of cancer cachexia but the cellular and molecular basis remains unclear. This study has examined morphologic and molecular characteristics of white adipose tissue in mice bearing a cachexia-inducing tumour, MAC16. Adipose tissue from tumour-bearing mice contained shrunken adipocytes that were heterogeneous in size. Increased fibrosis was evident by strong collagen-fibril staining in the tissue matrix. Ultrastructure of 'slimmed' adipocytes revealed severe delipidation and modifications in cell membrane conformation. There were major reductions in mRNA levels of adipogenic transcription factors including CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in adipose tissue, which was accompanied by reduced protein content of C/EBPalpha and SREBP-1. mRNA levels of SREBP-1c targets, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 and glycerol-3-phosphate acyl transferase, also fell as did glucose transporter-4 and leptin. In contrast, mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha and uncoupling protein-2 were increased in white fat of tumour-bearing mice. These results suggest that the tumour-induced impairment in the formation and lipid storing capacity of adipose tissue occurs in mice with cancer cachexia. PMID:17047651

  9. [Immunohistochemical Analysis of Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) Expression in Lung Tissue in Primary Lung Cancer Patients with High Serum KL-6 Levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuyanagi, Eiji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Sato, Keisuke

    2015-09-01

    We investigated sialylated carbohydrate antigen( Krebs von den Lungen-6:KL-6) expression in lung tissue and correlation between the expression and serum KL-6 level in the patients with primary lung cancer. Thirty-four primary lung cancer patients with high serum KL-6 levels( >500 U/ml) were evaluated. A coexistence of interstitial pneumonia (IP) was histopathologically evaluated and an immunohistochemical staining using a mouse anti-human KL-6 antibody (mKL-6) was performed. A multiple regression analysis was also caluculated using a serum KL-6 level as a target variable and the histopathological and immunohistochemical factors (KL-6 expression in cancer tissue and IP tissue, coexistence of IP, tumor size, pathological staging) as descriptive variables. Twenty-two patients (64.7%) were histopathologically concomitant with IP. Cancer tissues were positively stained by mKL-6 in 32 patients (94.1%). Among them, 20 patients were concomitant with IP and all of their cancer tissues were more strongly stained by mKL-6 than IP tissues. Although considerable high rate of lung cancer patients might express the KL-6 in the cancer tissue, we could not reveal the relationship between the expression and serum KL-6 level by a multiple regression analysis. For revealing the mechanism of elevating serum KL-6 level in the patients with lung cancer, more detailed and powerful study is thought to be needed. PMID:26329623

  10. Relationship Between Diseased Lung Tissues on Computed Tomography and Motion of Fiducial Marker Near Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For lung cancer patients with poor pulmonary function because of emphysema or fibrosis, it is important to predict the amplitude of internal tumor motion to minimize the irradiation of the functioning lung tissue before undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two board-certified diagnostic radiologists independently assessed the degree of pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis on computed tomography scans in 71 patients with peripheral lung tumors before real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy. The relationships between the computed tomography findings of the lung parenchyma and the motion of the fiducial marker near the lung tumor were investigated. Of the 71 patients, 30 had normal pulmonary function, and 29 had obstructive pulmonary dysfunction (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio of <70%), 6 patients had constrictive dysfunction (percentage of vital capacity <80%), and 16 had mixed dysfunction. Results: The upper region was associated with smaller tumor motion, as expected (p = .0004), and the presence of fibrosis (p = .088) and pleural tumor contact (p = .086) were weakly associated with tumor motion. The presence of fibrotic changes in the lung tissue was associated with smaller tumor motion in the upper region (p <.05) but not in the lower region. The findings of emphysema and pulmonary function tests were not associated with tumor motion. Conclusion: Tumors in the upper lung region with fibrotic changes have smaller motion than those in the upper region of the lungs without fibrotic changes. The tumor motion in the lower lung region was not significantly different between patients with and without lung fibrosis. Emphysema was not associated with the amplitude of tumor motion.

  11. Influence of nanoparticles accumulation on optical properties of human normal and cancerous liver tissue in vitro estimated by OCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the potential use of nanoparticles as contrast agents by using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in liver tissue was demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles (average size of 25 and 70 nm), were studied in human normal and cancerous liver tissues in vitro, respectively. Each sample was monitored with SD-OCT functional imaging for 240 min. Continuous OCT monitoring showed that, after application of gold nanoparticles, the OCT signal intensities of normal liver and cancerous liver tissue both increase with time, and the larger nanoparticles tend to produce a greater signal enhancement in the same type of tissue. The results show that the values of attenuation coefficients have significant differences between normal liver tissue and cancerous liver tissue. In addition, 25 nm gold nanoparticles allow higher penetration depth than 70 nm gold nanoparticles in liver tissues. (paper)

  12. Relevance of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) in tumor tissue and sera of cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An altered expression of the activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is associated with cancer progression in various cancer types. In some cancers ALCAM has a prognostic value or is predictive for the benefit of therapeutic interventions. To date there are no data on the role of ALCAM in cervical cancer available. In this study, ALCAM expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tissue samples of 233 patients with cervical cancer, among them 178 with complete follow-up information. In addition, soluble (s-)ALCAM was measured in sera of a subset of the included patients (n = 55) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ALCAM overexpression was detected (immunoreactive score (IRS) 2-12) in 58.4% of the cervical cancer samples. The normal ectocervical or endocervical epithelium showed no ALCAM reactivity. In untreated patients, ALCAM overexpression in tumor tissue tended to be associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Patients, whose tumor samples showed ALCAM overexpression receiving a cytotoxic therapy like radiotherapy or chemoradiation, however, had a favourable prognosis compared to those patients, whose cancers showed no or minimal ALCAM staining. This effect was particularly apparent in patients receiving chemoradiation where the CSS was significantly longer in patients with ALCAM-positive tumors (p = 0.038; cumulative incidence rates at 96 months 8%, 95% CI 0%-23%, and 26%, CI 3%-43% in ALCAM-positive and ALCAM-negative cases, respectively). Median preoperative s-ALCAM concentration in sera from tumor patients was 27.6 ng/ml (range 17.5-55.1 ng/ml, mean 28.9 ng/ml), serum levels did not correlate with intratumoral ALCAM expression. The data of our retrospective study suggest that the prognostic value of ALCAM expression in cervical carcinoma might be therapy-dependent, and that ALCAM might function as a predictive marker for the response to chemoradiation. This should be confirmed in

  13. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner;

    2016-01-01

    small subpopulations of breast cancer cells. Selections were performed against a subpopulation of breast cancer cells expressing CD271(+), as these previously have been indicated to be potential breast cancer stem cells. The selected antibody fragments were screened by phage ELISA on both breast cancer...

  14. Approach for reduction of late effects caused by radiation therapy on normal tissue for patients of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of 6 prostate cancer patients the dose distribution of the tumor and the normal tissue is discussed in a treatment planning comparison study of protons and photons. Output factors like minimum dose to the tumor, maximum dose to the normal tissue or organ at risk, isodose - lines, integral dose and dose volume histograms (DVH) point up the advantages of particle radiotherapy. As an example for the benefit of particle the therapy dose to the planning target volume (PTV) is compared for the mentioned techniques by DVHs. With respect to the different treatment techniques the wall of the rectum will get a significant higher dose, while using a photon 4-fields technique than a 2-field or 4-field proton technique. Treatment planning comparisons can help to decrease side- and late- effects by the calculation of the tumor control probability and the normal tissue complication probability. In any case, predicting the outcome of cancer treatment implies the knowledge of many specific parameters, like the tolerance dose (TD5/5, TD50/5) to the normal tissue or organ at risk. Nevertheless proton therapy is limited to the appropriateness of available particle therapy facilities, but can support advanced prostate cancer therapy by better tumor coverage and less side- and late- effects. (authors)

  15. Protein Profiling of Isolated Leukocytes, Myofibroblasts, Epithelial, Basal, and Endothelial Cells from Normal, Hyperplastic, Cancerous, and Inflammatory Human Prostate Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis, Kenneth A. Iczkowski, Ziad J. Sahab, Qing-Xiang Amy Sang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ neoplastic prostate cells are not lethal unless they become invasive and metastatic. For cells to become invasive, the prostate gland must undergo degradation of the basement membrane and disruption of the basal cell layer underneath the luminal epithelia. Although the roles of proteinases in breaking down the basement membrane have been well-studied, little is known about the factors that induce basal cell layer disruption, degeneration, and its eventual disappearance in invasive cancer. It is hypothesized that microenvironmental factors may affect the degradation of the basal cell layer, which if protected may prevent tumor progression and invasion. In this study, we have revealed differential protein expression patterns between epithelial and stromal cells isolated from different prostate pathologies and identified several important epithelial and stromal proteins that may contribute to inflammation and malignant transformation of human benign prostate tissues to cancerous tissues using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and proteomics methods. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 was downregulated in basal cells of benign prsotate. Caspase-1 and interleukin-18 receptor 1 were highly expressed in leukocytes of prostate cancer. Proto-oncogene Wnt-3 was downregulated in endothelial cells of prostatitis tissue and tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 1 was only found in normal and benign endothelial cells. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 14 was downregulated in myofibroblasts of prostatitis tissue. Interestingly, integrin alpha-6 was upregulated in epithelial cells but not detected in myofibroblasts of prostate cancer. Further validation of these proteins may generate new strategies for the prevention of basal cell layer disruption and subsequent cancer invasion.

  16. The development and deployment of Common Data Elements for tissue banks for translational research in cancer – An emerging standard based approach for the Mesothelioma Virtual Tissue Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhat Ghada

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, and the increasing demands for biomarker validation studies have catalyzed changes in the landscape of cancer research, fueling the development of tissue banks for translational research. A result of this transformation is the need for sufficient quantities of clinically annotated and well-characterized biospecimens to support the growing needs of the cancer research community. Clinical annotation allows samples to be better matched to the research question at hand and ensures that experimental results are better understood and can be verified. To facilitate and standardize such annotation in bio-repositories, we have combined three accepted and complementary sets of data standards: the College of American Pathologists (CAP Cancer Checklists, the protocols recommended by the Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology (ADASP for pathology data, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registry (NAACCR elements for epidemiology, therapy and follow-up data. Combining these approaches creates a set of International Standards Organization (ISO – compliant Common Data Elements (CDEs for the mesothelioma tissue banking initiative supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Methods The purpose of the project is to develop a core set of data elements for annotating mesothelioma specimens, following standards established by the CAP checklist, ADASP cancer protocols, and the NAACCR elements. We have associated these elements with modeling architecture to enhance both syntactic and semantic interoperability. The system has a Java-based multi-tiered architecture based on Unified Modeling Language (UML. Results Common Data Elements were developed using controlled vocabulary, ontology and semantic modeling methodology. The CDEs for each case are of different types: demographic

  17. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the Environment and Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome ...

  18. Undergraduate nursing students caring for cancer patients: hermeneutic phenomenological insights of their experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambous Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of patients suffering from cancer and especially those facing the death trajectory appears to be complex and demanding not only for student nurses but for professional nurses as well. The educational models often used in nursing require students to face challenging care scenarios, sometimes with minimal or no supervision and guidance. These “worst case scenarios” can be traumatic experiences that can leave the student hopeless and disappointed of themselves and in many cases can “scar” their subsequent professional career. The literature demonstrates that this can be the result of the students’ ill-preparation to care for cancer patients and deal with death and dying. The purpose of this study was to interpret the students’ experiences of coming face-to-face with cancer care during their clinical placements. Methods This is a hermeneutic phenomenological study influenced by the ideas of the French Philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Based on this philosophical enquiry the interpretation process included three stages: 1 naïve reading, 2 structural analysis and 3 comprehensive understanding. Data were collected through reflective/narrative diaries from the 4th grade undergraduate (pre-registration nursing students practicing at oncology, hematology, pediatric oncology departments and hospices. Diaries of twelve students met the inclusion criteria and were included in the interpretation process. The study took place during January and May 2011. Results The interpretation yielded the following themes: a Being part of the center’s life, b Being sympathetic, c Being confronted by others, d Being self-reflective, e Being trapped in the system, f Being caring towards the family and g Being better in clinical practice. Conclusions The students emphasized the need for appropriate preparation both at a theoretical and at a clinical level, as to better confront situations involving death and dying as well as learning

  19. A three-protein biomarker panel assessed in diagnostic tissue predicts death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only a minority of prostate cancers lead to death. Because no tissue biomarkers of aggressiveness other than Gleason score are available at diagnosis, many nonlethal cancers are treated aggressively. We evaluated whether a panel of biomarkers, associated with a range of disease outcomes in previous studies, could predict death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease. Using a case-only design, subjects were identified from three Australian epidemiological studies. Men who had died of their disease, “cases” (N = 83), were matched to “referents” (N = 232), those who had not died of prostate cancer, using incidence density sampling. Diagnostic tissue was retrieved to assess expression of AZGP1, MUC1, NKX3.1, p53, and PTEN by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC). Poisson regression was used to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) adjusted for age, Gleason score, and stage and to estimate survival probabilities. Expression of MUC1 and p53 was associated with increased mortality (MRR 2.51, 95% CI 1.14–5.54, P = 0.02 and 3.08, 95% CI 1.41–6.95, P = 0.005, respectively), whereas AZGP1 expression was associated with decreased mortality (MRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.96, P = 0.04). Analyzing all markers under a combined model indicated that the three markers were independent predictors of prostate cancer death and survival. For men with localized disease at diagnosis, assessment of AZGP1, MUC1, and p53 expression in diagnostic tissue by IHC could potentially improve estimates of risk of dying from prostate cancer based only on Gleason score and clinical stage

  20. Identification and expansion of cancer stem cells in tumor tissues and peripheral blood derived from gastric adenocarcinoma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie Chen; Xinzu Chen; Fang Wang; Fan Zeng; Hong Xu; Jiankun Hu; Xianming Mo; Kun Yang; Jianhua Yu; Wentong Meng; Dandan Yuan; Feng Bi; Fang Liu; Jie Liu; Bing Dai

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide,with a high rate of death and low 5-year survival rate.To date,there is a lack of efficient therapeutic protocols for gastric cancer.Recent studies suggest that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation,invasion,metastasis,and resistance to anticancer therapies.Thus,therapies that target gastric CSCs are attractive.However,CSCs in human gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC)have not been described.Here,we identify CSCs in tumor tissues and peripheral blood from GAC patients.CSCs of human GAC (GCSCs) that are isolated from tumor tissues and peripheral blood of patients carried CD44 and CD54 surface markers,generated tumors that highly resemble the original human tumors when injected into immunodeficient mice,differentiated into gastric epithelial cells in vitro,and self-renewed in vivo and in vitro.Our findings suggest that effective therapeutic protocols must target GCSCs.The capture of GCSCs from the circulation of GAC patients also shows great potential for identification of a critical cell population potentially responsible for tumor metastasis,and provides an effective protocol for early diagnosis and longitudinal monitoring of gastric cancer.

  1. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedger, Lisa M.; Tull, Dedreia L.; McConville, Malcolm J.; De Souza, David P.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Williams, Spencer J.; Dayalan, Saravanan; Lanzer, Daniel; Mackie, Helen; Lam, Thomas C.; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained within the normal range, with no alterations in individual fatty acids. The lipidomic analysis also identified 275 lipid-based molecules, including triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, fatty acids and phospholipids in AT oil and fat. Although the majority of lipid molecules were present in a similar abundance in LE and non-LE samples, there were several small changes: increased C20:5-containing triacylglycerides, reduced C10:0 caprinic and C24:1 nervonic acids. LE AT oil also contained a signature of increased cyclopropane-type fatty acids and inflammatory mediators arachidonic acid and ceramides. Interestingly C20:5 and C22:6 omega-3-type lipids are increased in LE AT, correlating with LE years. Hence, LE AT has a normal lipid profile containing a signature of inflammation and omega-3-lipids. It remains unclear, however, whether these differences reflect a small-scale global metabolic disturbance or effects within localised inflammatory foci. PMID:27182733

  2. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Sedger

    Full Text Available Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT. Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained within the normal range, with no alterations in individual fatty acids. The lipidomic analysis also identified 275 lipid-based molecules, including triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, fatty acids and phospholipids in AT oil and fat. Although the majority of lipid molecules were present in a similar abundance in LE and non-LE samples, there were several small changes: increased C20:5-containing triacylglycerides, reduced C10:0 caprinic and C24:1 nervonic acids. LE AT oil also contained a signature of increased cyclopropane-type fatty acids and inflammatory mediators arachidonic acid and ceramides. Interestingly C20:5 and C22:6 omega-3-type lipids are increased in LE AT, correlating with LE years. Hence, LE AT has a normal lipid profile containing a signature of inflammation and omega-3-lipids. It remains unclear, however, whether these differences reflect a small-scale global metabolic disturbance or effects within localised inflammatory foci.

  3. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedger, Lisa M; Tull, Dedreia L; McConville, Malcolm J; De Souza, David P; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Williams, Spencer J; Dayalan, Saravanan; Lanzer, Daniel; Mackie, Helen; Lam, Thomas C; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained within the normal range, with no alterations in individual fatty acids. The lipidomic analysis also identified 275 lipid-based molecules, including triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, fatty acids and phospholipids in AT oil and fat. Although the majority of lipid molecules were present in a similar abundance in LE and non-LE samples, there were several small changes: increased C20:5-containing triacylglycerides, reduced C10:0 caprinic and C24:1 nervonic acids. LE AT oil also contained a signature of increased cyclopropane-type fatty acids and inflammatory mediators arachidonic acid and ceramides. Interestingly C20:5 and C22:6 omega-3-type lipids are increased in LE AT, correlating with LE years. Hence, LE AT has a normal lipid profile containing a signature of inflammation and omega-3-lipids. It remains unclear, however, whether these differences reflect a small-scale global metabolic disturbance or effects within localised inflammatory foci. PMID:27182733

  4. Microsatellite instability analysis in hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer using the Bethesda consensus panel of microsatellite markers in the absence of proband normal tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dourisboure Ricardo J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant syndrome predisposing to the early development of various cancers including those of colon, rectum, endometrium, ovarium, small bowel, stomach and urinary tract. HNPCC is caused by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, mostly hMSH2 or hMLH1. In this study, we report the analysis for genetic counseling of three first-degree relatives (the mother and two sisters of a male who died of colorectal adenocarcinoma at the age of 23. The family fulfilled strict Amsterdam-I criteria (AC-I with the presence of extracolonic tumors in the extended pedigree. We overcame the difficulty of having a proband post-mortem non-tumor tissue sample for MSI testing by studying the alleles carried by his progenitors. Methods Tumor MSI testing is described as initial screening in both primary and metastasis tumor tissue blocks, using the reference panel of 5 microsatellite markers standardized by the National Cancer Institute (NCI for the screening of HNPCC (BAT-25, BAT-26, D2S123, D5S346 and D17S250. Subsequent mutation analysis of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes was performed. Results Three of five microsatellite markers (BAT-25, BAT-26 and D5S346 presented different alleles in the proband's tumor as compared to those inherited from his parents. The tumor was classified as high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H. We identified in the HNPCC family a novel germline missense (c.1864C>A mutation in exon 12 of hMSH2 gene, leading to a proline 622 to threonine (p.Pro622Thr amino acid substitution. Conclusion This approach allowed us to establish the tumor MSI status using the NCI recommended panel in the absence of proband's non-tumor tissue and before sequencing the obligate carrier. According to the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD and the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors (InSiGHT Database this is the first report of this mutation.

  5. Proteomic patterns analysis with multivariate calculations as a promising tool for prompt differentiation of early stage lung tissue with cancer and unchanged tissue material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Tomasz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer diagnosis in tissue material with commonly used histological techniques is sometimes inconvenient and in a number of cases leads to ambiguous conclusions. Frequently advanced immunostaining techniques have to be employed, yet they are both time consuming and limited. In this study a proteomic approach is presented which may help provide unambiguous pathologic diagnosis of tissue material. Methods Lung tissue material found to be pathologically changed was prepared to isolate proteome with fast and non selective procedure. Isolated peptides and proteins in ranging from 3.5 to 20 kDa were analysed directly using high resolution mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/TOF with sinapic acid as a matrix. Recorded complex spectra of a single run were then analyzed with multivariate statistical analysis algorithms (principle component analysis, classification methods. In the applied protocol we focused on obtaining the spectra richest in protein signals constituting a pattern of change within the sample containing detailed information about its protein composition. Advanced statistical methods were to indicate differences between examined groups. Results Obtained results indicate changes in proteome profiles of changed tissues in comparison to physiologically unchanged material (control group which were reflected in the result of principle component analysis (PCA. Points representing spectra of control group were located in different areas of multidimensional space and were less diffused in comparison to cancer tissues. Three different classification algorithms showed recognition capability of 100% regarding classification of examined material into an appropriate group. Conclusion The application of the presented protocol and method enabled finding pathological changes in tissue material regardless of localization and size of abnormalities in the sample volume. Proteomic profile as a complex, rich in signals spectrum of proteins

  6. New Insights into the Crossroads between EMT and Stemness in the Context of Cancer

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    Isabel Fabregat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is an example of cellular plasticity, where an epithelial cell acquires a mesenchymal-like phenotype that increases its migratory and invasive properties. Stemness is the ability of stem cells to proliferate in an asymmetric way that allows them to maintain the reservoir of undifferentiated cells with stem cell identity, but also to produce new differentiated cells. Initial works revealed that activation of the EMT program in epithelial cells induces the acquisition of stem cell properties, which in the context of cancer may contribute to the appearance of tumor initiating cells (TIC. However, a number of groups have recently reported that mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET is required for efficient metastatic colonization and that EMT may be not necessarily associated with stemness. In this review, we summarize recent findings that extend our knowledge about the crossroads between EMT and stemness and their relevance under physiological or pathological conditions.

  7. ErbB polymorphisms: insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Morand, Grégoire B; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary) and to acquired (secondary) resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed. PMID:25699077

  8. ErbB polymorphisms: Insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A Alaoui-Jamali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary and to acquired (secondary resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed.

  9. Extensive Transcriptomic and Genomic Analysis Provides New Insights about Luminal Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishchenko, Inna; Milioli, Heloisa Helena; Riveros, Carlos; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Despite constituting approximately two thirds of all breast cancers, the luminal A and B tumours are poorly classified at both clinical and molecular levels. There are contradictory reports on the nature of these subtypes: some define them as intrinsic entities, others as a continuum. With the aim of addressing these uncertainties and identifying molecular signatures of patients at risk, we conducted a comprehensive transcriptomic and genomic analysis of 2,425 luminal breast cancer samples. Our results indicate that the separation between the molecular luminal A and B subtypes—per definition—is not associated with intrinsic characteristics evident in the differentiation between other subtypes. Moreover, t-SNE and MST-kNN clustering approaches based on 10,000 probes, associated with luminal tumour initiation and/or development, revealed the close connections between luminal A and B tumours, with no evidence of a clear boundary between them. Thus, we considered all luminal tumours as a single heterogeneous group for analysis purposes. We first stratified luminal tumours into two distinct groups by their HER2 gene cluster co-expression: HER2-amplified luminal and ordinary-luminal. The former group is associated with distinct transcriptomic and genomic profiles, and poor prognosis; it comprises approximately 8% of all luminal cases. For the remaining ordinary-luminal tumours we further identified the molecular signature correlated with disease outcomes, exhibiting an approximately continuous gene expression range from low to high risk. Thus, we employed four virtual quantiles to segregate the groups of patients. The clinico-pathological characteristics and ratios of genomic aberrations are concordant with the variations in gene expression profiles, hinting at a progressive staging. The comparison with the current separation into luminal A and B subtypes revealed a substantially improved survival stratification. Concluding, we suggest a review of the definition of

  10. Distribution analysis of the putative cancer marker S100A4 across invasive squamous cell carcinoma penile tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Flatley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MS-based proteomic methods were utilised for the first time in the discovery of novel penile cancer biomarkers. MALDI MS imaging was used to obtain the in situ biomolecular MS profile of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis which was then compared to benign epithelial MS profiles. Spectra from cancerous and benign tissue areas were examined to identify MS peaks that best distinguished normal epithelial cells from invasive squamous epithelial cells, providing crucial evidence to suggest S100A4 to be differentially expressed. Verification by immunohistochemistry resulted in positive staining for S100A4 in a sub-population of invasive but not benign epithelial cells.

  11. Threat of fertility loss in cancer patients of reproductive age and the current feasibilities of ovarian tissue cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Parokonnaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of preserving reproductive function in cancer patients is very urgent today because antitumor treatment comprising different combinations of radio- and chemotherapy and surgery lead to ovarian reserve depletion and premature menopause in repro- ductive-aged women. The authors propose to consider one of the fertility preservation techniques – ovarian tissue cryopreservation. A procedure for cryopreservation is described in detail; its efficiency is evaluated. In the authors’ opinion, this procedure is one of most promising in preserving the sexual material of cancer patients.

  12. Differential expression of EBV proteins LMP1 and BHFR1 in EBV-associated gastric and nasopharyngeal cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, AILIANG; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Meng; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Sheng; TONG, FENG; ZHOU, YANBING

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with the development of T cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC), and EBV-associated gastric cancer (EBVaGC). This study assessed the expression of the EBV-associated proteins latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) in NPC and EBVaGC tissue specimens and determined their association with clinicopathological data, microvessel density (MVD) and micro-lymphatic vessel density (MLVD). This study collected 600 gast...

  13. A pilot study of FDG PET/CT detects a link between brown adipose tissue and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the second most lethal cancer in women. Understanding biological mechanisms that cause progression of this disease could yield new targets for prevention and treatment. Recent experimental studies suggest that brown adipose tissue (BAT) may play a key role in breast cancer progression. The primary objective for this pilot study was to determine if the prevalence of active BAT in patients with breast cancer is increased compared to cancer patients with other malignancies. We retrospectively analyzed data from 96 breast cancer patients who had FDG PET/CT scan for routine staging at the University of Maryland and 96 age- and weight-matched control female patients with other malignancies (predominantly colon cancer) who had undergone FDG PET/CT imaging on the same day. Data on the distribution (bilateral upper neck, supraclavicular and paraspinal regions) and intensity (SUVmax) of active BAT were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians, blinded to the clinical history. We found sufficient evidence to conclude that based on our sample data the prevalence of active BAT in breast cancer patients’ group is significantly different from that in the control group. The estimated frequency of BAT activity was 3 fold higher in breast cancer patients as compared to controls with other cancers, (16.7% vs. 5.2%, respectively, p = 0.019). When patients were stratified by age in order to determine the possible impact of age related hormonal changes on active BAT among the younger women (≤ 55 years of age), 25.6% breast cancer patients exhibited BAT activity compared to only 2.8% in control women (p = 0.007). In contrast, among the older women (> 55 years of age), the prevalence of active BAT was similar among breast cancer and control women (10.7% vs 6.7%). In breast cancer patients prevalence of BAT activity on FDGPET/CT is 3-fold greater than in age- and body weight-matched patients with other solid tumor malignancies; this difference is particularly

  14. Antibody validation and scoring guidelines for ABCG2 immunohistochemical staining in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colon cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederbye, Camilla Natasha; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Hansen, Tine Plato;

    2016-01-01

    cancer (CRC), probably because of the use of different antibodies and scoring approaches. In this study, we systematically studied six commercially available anti-ABCG2 antibodies, using cell lines with up-regulation of ABCG2, and selected one antibody for validation in CRC tissue. Furthermore, we...... cytoplasmic signal. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in ABCG2 immunoreactivity was observed; however, statistical analyses of tissue microarrays (TMAs) and the corresponding whole sections from primary tumors of 57 metastatic CRC patients revealed a strong positive correlation between maximum TMA scores and whole...

  15. Performance of a novel KRAS mutation assay for formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Kazuko; Yoneshige, Azusa; Ito, Akihiko; UEDA Yoji; Kondo, Satoshi; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Fujita, Yoshihiko; TOGASHI, YOSUKE; Terashima, Masato; Velasco, Marco A.; Tomida, Shuta; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    We compared the performance of the 3D-Gene® mutation assay (3D-Gene® KRAS mutation assay kit) with the Scorpion-ARMS (therascreen® KRAS RGQ PCR Kit) and Luminex (MEBGEN™ KRAS kit) assays for the detection of KRAS mutations in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 150 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the paraffin-embedded tissue samples with or without macrodissection under hematoxylin and eosin staining and the KRAS mutation status was independ...

  16. Study of relationship of selenium concentration in blood components and tumor tissues of breast and GI tract cancers using neutron activation analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between selenium (Se) concentration in blood components and tumour tissues of breast and GI tract cancers using neutron activation analysis. red blood cell (RBC) and serum Se concentrations were determined in 50 healthy volunteers aged 25-84 years, 70 breast cancer patients aged 25-70 years and 34 GI tract cancer patients aged 31-85 years, Se levels were also determined in malignant and adjacent normal tissues from breast cancer and GI tract cancer patients. The results showed that Se concentrations in serum and RBC were significantly lower among breast and GI cancer compared to healthy volunteers. The results also showed that Se concentrations were significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. These data have shown a relationship between selenium status in blood components and both cancer. selenium is enriched in cancer tissue, possibly in an effort of the body to inhibit the growth of tumours. (author)

  17. The tissue diagnostic instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection. PMID:19485522

  18. The tissue diagnostic instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M. Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection.

  19. Polymorphisms and Plasma Levels of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-3: Impact on Genetic Susceptibility and Clinical Outcome of Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Wen; Huang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Su, Shih-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer, the fourth most common cancer among men in Taiwan, is associated with environmental carcinogens. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3), a member of the TIMP family, is the only protein that binds to the extracellular matrix for suppressing cancer cell growth, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion. The association of TIMP3 polymorphism with oral cancer susceptibility, however, has not yet been reported. In this study, 1947 participants-1200 healthy male controls and 747 male patients with oral cancer-were recruited. Allelic discrimination of TIMP3 -1296 T > C (rs9619311), TIMP3 C > T (rs9862), and TIMP3 C > T (rs11547635) polymorphisms were assessed through real-time polymerase chain reaction. The authors discovered that individuals carrying the polymorphic rs9862 allele are more susceptible to oral cancer [odds ratio (OR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-1.9; adjusted OR (AOR), 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.1] after adjustment for betel quid chewing, alcohol, and tobacco consumption. Among 601 betel quid chewers, the TIMP3 polymorphism rs9862 T/T carriers had a 32.2-fold (95% CI, 20.2-51.3) increased oral cancer risk compared with those carrying C/C and not chewing betel quid. In addition, the authors observed a significant association between rs9862 variants and large tumors (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.3) development. Moreover, TIMP3 plasma levels significantly increased in oral cancer patients who have large tumor or carry T allele rs9862 polymorphism. In conclusion, these results suggest that gene-environment interactions between the TIMP3 rs9862 polymorphisms and betel quid may alter oral cancer susceptibility and tumor growth in Taiwanese men. PMID:26579821

  20. Tissue factor expression in ovarian cancer: implications for immunotherapy with hI-con1, a factor VII-IgGF(c) chimeric protein targeting tissue factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Emiliano; Varughese, Joyce; Buza, Natalia; Bellone, Stefania; Lin, Ken-Yu; Bellone, Marta; Todeschini, Paola; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E; Rutherford, Thomas J; Carrara, Luisa; Tassi, Renata; Pecorelli, Sergio; Lockwood, Charles J; Santin, Alessandro D

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the expression of tissue factor (TF) in ovarian cancer (EOC) and the potential of hI-con1, an antibody-like molecule targeting TF, as a novel form of therapy against chemotherapy-resistant ovarian disease. We studied the expression of TF in 88 EOC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and the levels of membrane-bound-complement-regulatory-proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 in primary EOC cell lines by flow-cytometry. Sensitivity to hI-con1-dependent-cell-mediated-cytotoxicity (IDCC), complement-dependent-cell-cytotoxicity and inhibition of IDCC by γ-immunoglobulin were evaluated in 5-h (51)chromium-release-assays. Cytoplasmic and/or membrane TF expression was observed in 24 out of 25 (96%) of the EOC samples tested by IHC, but not in normal ovarian-tissue. EOC with clear cell histology significantly overexpress TF when compared to serous, endometrioid, or undifferentiated tumors by qRT-PCR. With a single exception, all primary EOC that overexpressed TF demonstrated high levels of CD46, CD55 and CD59 and regardless of their histology or resistance to chemotherapy, were highly sensitive to IDCC. The effect of complement and physiologic doses of γ-immunoglobulin on IDCC in ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF was tumor specific and related to the overexpression of CD59 on tumor cells. Small-interfering-RNA-mediated knockdown of CD59 expression in ovarian tumors significantly increased hI-con1-mediated cytotoxic activity in vitro. Finally, low doses of interleukin-2 further increased the cytotoxic effect induced by hI-con1 (P < 0.01). hI-con1 molecule induces strong cytotoxicity against primary chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF and may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of ovarian tumors refractory to standard treatment modalities. PMID:21725665

  1. Tissue factor expression in ovarian cancer: implications for immunotherapy with hI-con1, a factor VII-IgGFc chimeric protein targeting tissue factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Emiliano; Varughese, Joyce; Buza, Natalia; Bellone, Stefania; Lin, Ken-Yu; Bellone, Marta; Todeschini, Paola; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Carrara, Luisa; Tassi, Renata; Pecorelli, Sergio; Lockwood, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of tissue factor (TF) in ovarian cancer (EOC) and the potential of hI-con1, an antibody-like molecule targeting TF, as a novel form of therapy against chemotherapy-resistant ovarian disease. We studied the expression of TF in 88 EOC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and the levels of membrane-bound-complement-regulatory-proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 in primary EOC cell lines by flow-cytometry. Sensitivity to hI-con1-dependent-cell-mediated-cytotoxicity (IDCC), complement-dependent-cell-cytotoxicity and inhibition of IDCC by γ-immunoglobulin were evaluated in 5-h 51chromium-release-assays. Cytoplasmic and/or membrane TF expression was observed in 24 out of 25 (96%) of the EOC samples tested by IHC, but not in normal ovarian-tissue. EOC with clear cell histology significantly overexpress TF when compared to serous, endometrioid, or undifferentiated tumors by qRT-PCR. With a single exception, all primary EOC that overexpressed TF demonstrated high levels of CD46, CD55 and CD59 and regardless of their histology or resistance to chemotherapy, were highly sensitive to IDCC. The effect of complement and physiologic doses of γ-immunoglobulin on IDCC in ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF was tumor specific and related to the overexpression of CD59 on tumor cells. Small-interfering-RNA-mediated knockdown of CD59 expression in ovarian tumors significantly increased hI-con1-mediated cytotoxic activity in vitro. Finally, low doses of interleukin-2 further increased the cytotoxic effect induced by hI-con1 (P < 0.01). hI-con1 molecule induces strong cytotoxicity against primary chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF and may represent a n