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Sample records for cancer tissues insight

  1. Mathematical modeling of cancer cell invasion of tissue: biological insight from mathematical analysis and computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andasari, Vivi; Gerisch, Alf; Lolas, Georgios; South, Andrew P; Chaplain, Mark A J

    2011-07-01

    The ability of cancer cells to break out of tissue compartments and invade locally gives solid tumours a defining deadly characteristic. One of the first steps of invasion is the remodelling of the surrounding tissue or extracellular matrix (ECM) and a major part of this process is the over-expression of proteolytic enzymes, such as the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), by the cancer cells to break down ECM proteins. Degradation of the matrix enables the cancer cells to migrate through the tissue and subsequently to spread to secondary sites in the body, a process known as metastasis. In this paper we undertake an analysis of a mathematical model of cancer cell invasion of tissue, or ECM, which focuses on the role of the urokinase plasminogen activation system. The model consists of a system of five reaction-diffusion-taxis partial differential equations describing the interactions between cancer cells, uPA, uPA inhibitors, plasmin and the host tissue. Cancer cells react chemotactically and haptotactically to the spatio-temporal effects of the uPA system. The results obtained from computational simulations carried out on the model equations produce dynamic heterogeneous spatio-temporal solutions and using linear stability analysis we show that this is caused by a taxis-driven instability of a spatially homogeneous steady-state. Finally we consider the biological implications of the model results, draw parallels with clinical samples and laboratory based models of cancer cell invasion using three-dimensional invasion assay, and go on to discuss future development of the model.

  2. Framework of collagen type I - vasoactive vessels structuring invariant geometric attractor in cancer tissues: insight into biological magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo A Díaz

    Full Text Available In a previous research, we have described and documented self-assembly of geometric triangular chiral hexagon crystal-like complex organizations (GTCHC in human pathological tissues. This article documents and gathers insights into the magnetic field in cancer tissues and also how it generates an invariant functional geometric attractor constituted for collider partners in their entangled environment. The need to identify this hierarquic attractor was born out of the concern to understand how the vascular net of these complexes are organized, and to determine if the spiral vascular subpatterns observed adjacent to GTCHC complexes and their assembly are interrelational. The study focuses on cancer tissues and all the macroscopic and microscopic material in which GTCHC complexes are identified, which have been overlooked so far, and are rigorously revised. This revision follows the same parameters that were established in the initial phase of the investigation, but with a new item: the visualization and documentation of external dorsal serous vascular bed areas in spatial correlation with the localization of GTCHC complexes inside the tumors. Following the standard of the electro-optical collision model, we were able to reproduce and replicate collider patterns, that is, pairs of left and right hand spin-spiraled subpatterns, associated with the orientation of the spinning process that can be an expansion or contraction disposition of light particles. Agreement between this model and tumor data is surprisingly close; electromagnetic spiral patterns generated were identical at the spiral vascular arrangement in connection with GTCHC complexes in malignant tumors. These findings suggest that the framework of collagen type 1 - vasoactive vessels that structure geometric attractors in cancer tissues with invariant morphology sets generate collider partners in their magnetic domain with opposite biological behavior. If these principles are incorporated

  3. Signalling networks associated with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 in breast cancer tissues: new insights from protein microarray analysis.

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    Wolff, Claudia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Berg, Daniela; Schragner, Kerstin; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the main uPA inhibitor PAI-1 play important roles in cell migration and invasion in both physiological and pathological contexts. Both factors are clinically applicable predictive markers in node-negative breast cancer patients that are used to stratify patients for adjuvant chemotherapy. In addition to their classical functions in plasmin regulation, both factors are key components in cancer-related cell signalling. Such signalling cascades are well described in cell culture systems, but a better understanding of uPA- and PAI-1-associated signalling networks in clinical tissues is needed. We examined the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and 21 signalling molecules in 201 primary breast cancer tissues using protein microarrays. Expression of uPA was significantly correlated with the expression of ERK and Stat3, while expression of PAI-1 was correlated with the uPA receptor and Akt activation, presumably via integrin and HER-receptor signalling. Analysis of uPA expression did not reveal any significant correlation with staging, grading or age of the patients. The PAI-1 expression was correlated with nodal stage. Network monitoring for uPA and PAI-1 in breast cancer reveals interactions with main signalling cascades and extends the findings from cell culture experiments. Our results reveal possible mechanisms underlying cancer development.

  4. Gene expression and epigenetic profiles of mammary gland tissue: insight into the differential predisposition of four rat strains to mammary gland cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-02-01

    Rats are excellent experimental models for studying breast cancer, but rat strains differ in susceptibility. Among the four strains used in this study, Fischer rats are less susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer, yet they are highly prone to extremely severe metastatic and drug-resistant tumors, in those case where they actually develop the disease. In contrast, Sprague Dawley rats are the most susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer among the strains. ACI rats are highly prone to estrogen-induced cancer. Long-Evans rats are commonly used in mammary gland carcinogenesis studies. The molecular mechanisms of differential breast cancer susceptibility among rat strains are not well understood. Here, gene expression analysis was conducted in the mammary gland tissue of four rat strains--August × Copenhagen Irish (ACI), Long Evans, Fischer-344 and Sprague Dawley--to evaluate possible explanations for the differing breast cancer predispositions. According to the DAVID functional annotation analysis, there were at least eleven, five, and one significantly different pathways, respectively, in Fischer-344, Long-Evans and Sprague Dawley rats, in comparison to ACI rats. Two strains, Fischer-344 and Long-Evans, displayed differential expression in the complement and coagulation cascades, chemokine signaling, PPAR signaling, renin-angiotensin system, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion and glutathione metabolism pathways. The only pathway that was significantly different between the Sprague Dawley and the ACI rats was the ribosome pathway. Our data indicate that general cancer susceptibility and predisposition to the development of aggressive and metastatic cancer are independent genetic conditions. Moreover, we have identified several important differences in the basal epigenetic profile of four rat strains with varying degrees of susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25813725

  5. Adipose Tissue Immunity and Cancer

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    Victoria eCatalan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete proinflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favourable for tumour growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching towards M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumour growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumour cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumour microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoural drugs.

  6. Somatic Mutaome Profile in Human Cancer Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Nayoung; Hong, Yourae; Kwon, Doyoung; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutation is a major cause of cancer progression and varied responses of tumors against anticancer agents. Thus, we must obtain and characterize genome-wide mutational profiles in individual cancer subtypes. The Cancer Genome Atlas database includes large amounts of sequencing and omics data generated from diverse human cancer tissues. In the present study, we integrated and analyzed the exome sequencing data from ~3,000 tissue samples and summarized the major mutant genes in each of t...

  7. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Larner, F; Woodley, LN; Shousha, S; Moyes, A; Humphreys-Williams, E; Strekopytov, S; Halliday, AN; Rehkämper, M; Coombes, RC

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn i...

  8. Diagnosis of breast cancer by tissue analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debnath Bhattacharyya; Samir Kumar Bandyopadhyay; Tai-hoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we propose a technique to locate abnormal growth of cells in breast tissue and suggest further pathological test,when require.We compare normal breast tissue with malignant invasive breast tissue by a series of image processing steps.Normal ductal epithelial cells and ductal/lobular invasive carcinogenic cells also consider for comparison here in this paper.In fact,features of cancerous breast tissue (invasive) are extracted and analyses with normal breast tissue.We also suggest the breast cancer recognition technique through image processing and prevention by controlling p53 gene mutation to some extent.

  9. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  10. Nonmuscle Tissues Contribution to Cancer Cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Argilés, Josep M.; Britta Stemmler; López-Soriano, Francisco J.; Silvia Busquets

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia is a syndrome associated with cancer, characterized by body weight loss, muscle and adipose tissue wasting, and inflammation, being often associated with anorexia. In spite of the fact that muscle tissue represents more than 40% of body weight and seems to be the main tissue involved in the wasting that occurs during cachexia, recent developments suggest that tissues/organs such as adipose (both brown and white), brain, liver, gut, and heart are directly involved in the cachectic pro...

  11. Disrupting Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization: Insights from Metastasis Suppressor Studies

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    Shaheena Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer affects approximately 25,000 women in the United States each year and remains one of the most lethal female malignancies. A standard approach to therapy is surgical cytoreduction, after which the remaining microscopic residual disease is treated with chemotherapy. The vast majority of patients have disease recurrence, underscoring the crucial need for approaches to control the regrowth, or colonization, of tissues after local treatment. Improved therapies require mechanistic information about the process of metastatic colonization, the final step in metastasis, in which cancer cells undergo progressive growth at secondary sites. Studies of metastasis suppressors are providing insights into events controlling metastatic colonization. This paper reviews our laboratory's approach to the identification, characterization, and functional testing of the JNKK1/MKK4 metastasis suppressor in ovarian cancer metastatic colonization. Specifically, we demonstrate that interaction of ovarian caner cells with the omental microenvironment activates JNKK1/MKK4 resulting in decreased proliferation without affecting apoptosis. The potential role of the omental microenvironment, specifically milky spot structures, is also described. It is our goal to provide this work as a usable paradigm that will enable others to study metastasis suppressors in clinical and experimental ovarian cancer metastases.

  12. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

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    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although its total molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Therefore, the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several function and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in the disease processes. Newly evolving advances in disease diagnostics and therapy will further facilitate future growth in the field of mitochondrian biology, where there is a dire need for sensitive and more affordable diagnostic tools and an urgency to develop effective therapies and identify reliable drug to predict accurately the response to a cancer therapy. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process as targets of drug-induced cytotoxicity or cancer promotion, as regulators of apoptosis, as sources of cell signalling through reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial control of specific nuclear responses. However, several novel mitochondrial targets are now emerging, including the potential to manipulate the mitochondrial pool to maintain function via biogenesis and mitophagy. Forthcoming insights into the fine regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis will likely open future perspectives for cancer drug development.

  13. Construction of metastatic spinal cancer tissue microarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xinghai; Chen Huajiang; Xiao Jianru; Yuan Wen; Jia Lianshun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the construction of metastatic spinal cancer (MSC) tissue microarrays and validate its value in immunohistochemical study of MSC. Methods: Paraffin-embedded specimens from 71 MSC cases and 6 primary tumor cases were selected as donor blocks and prepared into MSC tissue microarrays by tissue array arrangement, the steps of which included location, punching, sampling, sample seeding, and re-diagnosis by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) as well as MMP-9 and MMP-14 immunohistochemical staining. Results: The MSC tissue microarrays thus constructed were intact and crackless, containing 154 complete and well arranged microarray points. None of the sectioned tissue microarrays was lost, and the results of HE staining was consistent with the primary pathologic diagnoses. Immunohistochemical staining was also good without non-specific or marginal effect. Conclusion: The MSC tissue microarrays have a high value in the immunohistochemical study of MSC.

  14. Adipogenesis: new insights into brown adipose tissue differentiation.

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    Carobbio, Stefania; Rosen, Barry; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Confirmation of the presence of functional brown adipose tissue (BAT) in humans has renewed interest in investigating the potential therapeutic use of this tissue. The finding that its activity positively correlates with decreased BMI, decreased fat content, and augmented energy expenditure suggests that increasing BAT mass/activity or browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) could be a strategy to prevent or treat obesity and its associated morbidities. The challenge now is to find a safe and efficient way to develop this idea. Whereas BAT has being widely studied in murine models both in vivo and in vitro, there is an urgent need for human cellular models to investigate BAT physiology and functionality from a molecular point of view. In this review, we focus on the latest insights surrounding BAT development and activation in rodents and humans. Then, we discuss how the availability of murine models has been essential to identify BAT progenitors and trace their lineage. Finally, we address how this information can be exploited to develop human cellular models for BAT differentiation/activation. In this context, human embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells-based cellular models represent a resource of great potential value, as they can provide a virtually inexhaustible supply of starting material for functional genetic studies, -omics based analysis and validation of therapeutic approaches. Moreover, these cells can be readily genetically engineered, opening the possibility of generating patient-specific cellular models, allowing the investigation of the influence of different genetic backgrounds on BAT differentiation in pathological or in physiological states.

  15. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

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    A. R. Rama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  16. Lung Cancer Presenting as a Soft-Tissue Metastasis

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    Candice Baldeo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft-tissue metastasis refers to the growth of cancer cells, originating from internal cancer, in soft tissues. In most cases, soft-tissue metastases develop after initial diagnosis of the primary internal malignancy and late in the course of the disease. In very rare cases, they may occur at the same time or before the primary cancer has been detected. In our cases, the soft-tissue metastases and the primary lung cancer were diagnosed at the same time.

  17. When fat becomes an ally of the enemy: adipose tissue as collaborator in human breast cancer.

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    Lapeire, Lore; Denys, Hannelore; Cocquyt, Véronique; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of leptin in 1994, our vision of adipose tissue as a static organ regulating mainly lipid storage and release has been completely overthrown, and adipose tissue is now seen as an active and integral organ in human physiology. In the past years, extensive research has tremendously given us more insights in the mechanisms and pathways involved not only in normal but also in 'sick' adipose tissue, for example, in obesity and lipodystrophy. With growing evidence of a link between obesity and several types of cancer, research focusing on the interaction between adipose tissue and cancer has begun to unravel the interesting but complex multi-lateral communication between the different players. With breast cancer as one of the first cancer types where a positive correlation between obesity and breast cancer incidence and prognosis in post-menopausal women was found, we have focused this review on the paracrine and endocrine role of adipose tissue in breast cancer initiation and progression. As important inter-species differences in adipose tissue occur, we mainly selected human adipose tissue- and breast cancer-based studies with a short reflection on therapeutic possibilities. This review is part of the special issue on "Adiposopathy in Cancer and (Cardio)Metabolic Diseases".

  18. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinthalapally V Rao; Altaf Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of allcancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressivetreatment. Recently, there have been important advancesin the molecular, pathological and biological understandingof pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recentnew targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeuticcombinations, no treatment option is viable in patients withadvanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to targetprogression of PC is of intense interest. A small populationof pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been foundto be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation,progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recentlyachieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors,including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads tofocus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. Thefocus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention andtreatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salientdevelopments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here,we provide a review of current updates and new insightson the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression withspecial emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathwaysaltered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention andtreatment of PC.

  19. Colorectal cancer, diabetes and survival: epidemiological insights.

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    Zanders, M M J; Vissers, P A J; Haak, H R; van de Poll-Franse, L V

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with pre-existing diabetes have significantly lower rates of overall survival compared with patients without diabetes. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society in 2010 reviewed the scientific literature concerning diabetes and cancer. One of the key issues identified for further investigation was the need for a better understanding of whether diabetes influences cancer prognosis above and beyond the prognosis conferred by each disease state independently. Whether the worsened survival of CRC patients with diabetes could be explained by less favourable patient-, tumour- and treatment-related characteristics has also been evaluated in numerous recent studies. However, as most studies did not account for all the various potential confounders, such as cancer stage, comorbidities and body mass index (BMI) in their analyses, the current evidence for the association between diabetes and survival in CRC patients remains inconclusive. Nevertheless, based on multiple examples in the literature, the present review demonstrates that diabetes affects the presentation of CRC as well as its treatment and outcome, which may then result in lower overall rates of survival in patients with, compared to those without, diabetes. PMID:24507584

  20. Cancer immunotherapy : insights from transgenic animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaughlin, PMJ; Kroesen, BJ; Harmsen, MC; de Leij, LFMH

    2001-01-01

    A wide range of strategies in cancer immunotherapy has been developed in the last decade, some of which are currently being used in clinical settings. The development of these immunotherapeutical strategies has been facilitated by the generation of relevant transgenic animal models. Since the differ

  1. Detection of infectious organisms in archival prostate cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Yow, Melissa A; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Severi, Gianluca; Bolton, Damien M; Pedersen, John; Longano, Anthony; Suzanne M Garland; Southey, Melissa C.; Graham G Giles

    2014-01-01

    Background Seroepidemiological studies have reported associations between exposure to sexually transmitted organisms and prostate cancer risk. This study sought DNA evidence of candidate organisms in archival prostate cancer tissues with the aim of assessing if a subset of these cancers show any association with common genital infections. Methods 221 archival paraffin-embedded tissue blocks representing 128 histopathologically confirmed prostate cancers comprising 52 “aggressive” (Gleason sco...

  2. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies.

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    Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie-restriction studies in mouse models that support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link.

  3. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie-restriction studies in mouse models that support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link. PMID:26373570

  4. Recent insights on applications of pullulan in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Navpreet; Rana, Vikas; Kennedy, John F

    2016-11-20

    Tissue engineering is a recently emerging line of act which assists the regeneration of damaged tissues, unable to self-repair themselves and in turn, enhances the natural healing potential of patients. The repair of injured tissue can be induced with the help of some artificially created polymer scaffolds for successful tissue regeneration. The pullulan composite scaffolds can be used to enhance the proliferation and differentiation of cells for tissue regeneration. The unique pattern of pullulan with α-(1→4) and α-(1→6) linkages along with the presence of nine hydroxyl groups on its surface, endows the polymer with distinctive physical features required for tissue engineering. Pullulan can be used for vascular engineering, bone repair and skin tissue engineering. Pullulan composite scaffolds can also be used for treatment of injured femoral condyle bone, skull bone and full thickness skin wound of murine models, transversal mandibular and tibial osteotomy in goat, etc. This review article highlights the latest developments on applications of pullulan and its derivatives in tissue engineering. PMID:27561517

  5. Mechanical Characterization of Breast Tissue Constituents for Cancer Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Zaeimdar, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Breast elastography is a method of cancer detection that uses the response of soft tissue to deformations, leading to discovery of abnormalities. The methods of Clinical Breast Examination and Breast Self-Examination are based primarily on stiffness and, hence, on the mechanics of tissue constituents examined by palpation (Goodson, 1996). However, little is known about the mechanical characteristics of breast tissue under compression and the contribution of tissue mechanics to breast cancer d...

  6. Cancer stem cells: an insight and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sandeep; Singh, Gurdeep; Kaur, Kirandeep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept derives from the fact that cancers are dysregulated tissue clones whose continued propagation is vested in a biologically distinct subset of cells that are typically rare. Rare CSCs have been isolated from a number of human tumors, including hematopoietic, brain, colon, and breast cancer. With the growing evidence that CSCs exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. Understanding the biology of CSCs will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies.

  7. Terahertz imaging diagnostics of cancer tissues with a chemometrics technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sachiko; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Masatsugu; Otani, Chiko; Miyoshi, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopic images of paraffin-embedded cancer tissues have been measured by a terahertz time domain spectrometer. For the systematic identification of cancer tumors, the principal component analysis and the clustering analysis were applied. In three of the four samples, the cancer tissue was recognized as an aggregate of the data points in the principal component plots. By the agglomerative hierarchical clustering, the data points were well categorized into cancer and the other tissues. This method can be also applied to various kinds of automatic discrimination of plural components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging.

  8. Distribution of trace metal concentrations in paired cancerous and non-cancerous human stomach tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Yaman; Gokce Kaya; Hayrettin Yekeler

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether trace metal concentrations (which influence metabolism as both essential and non-essential elements) are increased or decreased in cancerous tissues and to understand the precise role of these metals in carcinogenesis.METHODS: Concentrations of trace metals including Cd,Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mg and Ca in both cancerous and noncancerous stomach tissue samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Tissue samples were digested using microwave energy. Slotted tube atom trap was used to improve the sensitivity of copper and cadmium in flame AAS determinations.RESULTS: From the obtained data in this study,the concentrations of nickel, copper and iron in the cancerous human stomach were found to be significantly higher than those in the non-cancerous tissues, by using t-test for the paired samples. Furthermore, the average calcium concentrations in the cancerous stomach tissue samples were found to be significantly lower than those in the non-cancerous stomach tissue samples by using t-test. Exceedingly high Zn concentrations (207-826 mg/kg) were found in two paired stomach tissue samples from both cancerous and non-cancerous parts.CONCLUSION: In contrast to the literature data for Cu and Fe, the concentrations of copper, iron and nickel in cancerous tissue samples are higher than those in the non-cancerous samples. Furthermore, the Ca levels are lower in cancerous tissue samples than in non-cancerous tissue samples.

  9. [Studies on trace elements in cancerous stomach tissue of the patients with stomach cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M

    1990-05-01

    This study was performed to find out whether copper, zinc, manganese, selenium and iron concentrations in the cancerous and normal stomach tissues of the patients with stomach cancer vary within the malignant stages and Borrmann classification or not, and to investigate the interaction of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium and iron concentrations in blood of these patients. Copper concentration in cancerous tissues was not statistically significant as compared with normal tissues. Plasma and whole blood copper concentration of Stage IV showed a significant higher level than that of stage I. Zinc concentration in cancerous tissues was not statistically significant as compared with normal tissues. Selenium concentration in cancerous tissues showed a statistically significant high level as compared with that in normal tissues. Plasma selenium concentration of Stage III showed a significant lower level than that of stage I. Iron concentration in cancerous tissues showed a significantly lower level than that in normal tissues at stage IV. Whole blood iron concentration was low levels in proportion to the progress of stomach cancer. The correlation of selenium concentration between in cancerous tissues and in whole blood of these patients was significant with the correlation coefficient of 0.340. The correlation of iron concentration between in cancerous tissues and in whole blood of these patients was significant with the correlation coefficient of 0.423. The correlation between iron concentration in cancerous tissues and hemoglobin concentration in whole blood of these patients was significant with the correlation coefficient of 0.361.

  10. Direct cancer tissue proteomics: a method to identify candidate cancer biomarkers from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S-I; Thumar, J; Lundgren, D H; Rezaul, K; Mayya, V; Wu, L; Eng, J; Wright, M E; Han, D K

    2007-01-01

    Successful treatment of multiple cancer types requires early detection and identification of reliable biomarkers present in specific cancer tissues. To test the feasibility of identifying proteins from archival cancer tissues, we have developed a methodology, termed direct tissue proteomics (DTP), which can be used to identify proteins directly from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue samples. Using minute prostate biopsy sections, we demonstrate the identification of 428 prostate-expressed proteins using the shotgun method. Because the DTP method is not quantitative, we employed the absolute quantification method and demonstrate picogram level quantification of prostate-specific antigen. In depth bioinformatics analysis of these expressed proteins affords the categorization of metabolic pathways that may be important for distinct stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we validate Wnt-3 as an upregulated protein in cancerous prostate cells by immunohistochemistry. We propose that this general strategy provides a roadmap for successful identification of critical molecular targets of multiple cancer types.

  11. New Insights into Fe Localization in Plant Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannetz eRoschzttardtz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering cellular iron (Fe homeostasis requires having access to both quantitative and qualitative information on the subcellular pools of Fe in tissues and their dynamics within the cells. We have taken advantage of the Perls/DAB Fe staining procedure to perform a systematic analysis of Fe distribution in roots, leaves and reproductive organs of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, using wild-type and mutant genotypes affected in iron transport and storage. Roots of soil-grown plants accumulate iron in the apoplast of the central cylinder, a pattern that is strongly intensified when the citrate effluxer FRD3 is not functional, thus stressing the importance of citrate in the apoplastic movement of Fe. In leaves, Fe level is low and only detected in and around vascular tissues. In contrast, Fe staining in leaves of iron-treated plants extends in the surrounding mesophyll cells where Fe deposits, likely corresponding to Fe-ferritin complexes, accumulate in the chloroplasts. The loss of ferritins in the fer1,3,4 triple mutant provoked a massive accumulation of Fe in the apoplastic space, suggesting that in the absence of iron buffering in the chloroplast, cells activate iron efflux and/or repress iron influx to limit the amount of iron in the cell. In flowers, Perls/DAB staining has revealed a major sink for Fe in the anthers. In particular, developing pollen grains accumulate detectable amounts of Fe in small-size intracellular bodies that aggregate around the vegetative nucleus at the binuclear stage and that were identified as amyloplasts. In conclusion, using the Perls/DAB procedure combined to selected mutant genotypes, this study has established a reliable atlas of Fe distribution in the main Arabidopsis organs, proving and refining long-assumed intracellular locations and uncovering new ones. This iron map of Arabidopsis will serve as a basis for future studies of possible actors of iron movement in plant tissues and cell compartments.

  12. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans: Insights into a Rare Soft Tissue Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Barwani, Aliya Sarhan; Taif, Sawsan; Al Mazrouai, Reem Ahmed; Al Muzahmi, Khamis Salim; Alrawi, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare soft tumor which originally represents a cutaneous sarcoma. It grows slowly and presents usually as nodular superficial lesion on the trunk or the extremities. Although these tumors are locally aggressive with high rate of recurrence following surgery; the prognosis is considered excellent when it is effectively treated. The radiological appearance of this tumor has rarely been studied and findings infrequently discussed in the literature probably because many lesions underwent resection before imaging. Although imaging is infrequently performed for this lesion; it can show characteristic features and demonstrate the full extent. Imaging may also play a role in the differentiation of this tumor from more serious soft tissue lesions such as more aggressive sarcomas and hemangioma. In this article, we discuss the imaging findings of DFSP that can aid in its diagnosis and its variable appearances. In addition; the clinical presentation and treatment options are also described with review of the previous literature. PMID:27195182

  13. Cancer of the Soft Tissue including Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site Race / Ethnicity Sex Race / Sex Age at Diagnosis or Death Data ... population who are the same age, race, and sex and who have not been diagnosed with cancer. Because survival statistics are based on large groups of people, they ...

  14. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  15. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA). PMID:26382040

  16. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-09-08

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA).

  17. Preventing clonal evolutionary processes in cancer: Insights from mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio A; Wodarz, Dominik

    2015-07-21

    Clonal evolutionary processes can drive pathogenesis in human diseases, with cancer being a prominent example. To prevent or treat cancer, mechanisms that can potentially interfere with clonal evolutionary processes need to be understood better. Mathematical modeling is an important research tool that plays an ever-increasing role in cancer research. This paper discusses how mathematical models can be useful to gain insights into mechanisms that can prevent disease initiation, help analyze treatment responses, and aid in the design of treatment strategies to combat the emergence of drug-resistant cells. The discussion will be done in the context of specific examples. Among defense mechanisms, we explore how replicative limits and cellular senescence induced by telomere shortening can influence the emergence and evolution of tumors. Among treatment approaches, we consider the targeted treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We illustrate how basic evolutionary mathematical models have the potential to make patient-specific predictions about disease and treatment outcome, and argue that evolutionary models could become important clinical tools in the field of personalized medicine.

  18. Optical transillumination spectroscopy of breast tissue for cancer risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilge, Lothar; Blyschak, Kristina; Simick, Michelle; Jong, Roberta A.

    2003-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women. The lifetime risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer is approximately 1 in 10 thereby the highest out of all cancers. Breast cancer screening programs have been shown to decrease the mortality rates of women between ages 50-69, since cancers are detected at an earlier, more favourable stage. It is apparent that the development of breast cancer is a slow process following initial transformation of the breast tissue. Hence, there has been a strong effort within the research community to understand risk factors for the disease. Risk factors are defined as those characteristics that are more common in people with the disease when compared to the normal population. Quantification of an individual's breast cancer rate may lead that individual to modify her lifestyle and/or diet. Lifestyle changes could lead to a reduction in the incidence of breast cancer. Anatomically, the presence of increased amounts of fibroglandular tissue raises the estimated risk by up to 6 fold (correct for age), hence representing one of the strongest known risk factors pertaining to the entire female population. In this study the relative area of mammographic densities within a mammogram will be used as a global risk assessment tool. It has been shown previously that quantification of water, lipids, haemoglobin and other tissue chromophores of the optically interrogated breast tissue, which also gives rise to the mammographic densities, is feasible through near-infrared spectroscopy. Thus, the hypothesis for this study is that optical transillumination spectroscopy provides consistent and/or complementary information to conventional mammography in quantifying breast tissue density.

  19. Gene expression profiles in liver cancer and normal liver tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Xin Liu; Hong Chi Jiang; An Long Zhu; Jin Zhou; Xiu Qin Wang; Min Wu

    2000-01-01

    AIM To describe a liver cancer = specific gene expression profile and to identify genes that showed alteredexpression between liver cancer tissues and their adjacent nearly normal tissues.METHODS The cDNA probes which were labeled with a-32P dATP were synthesized from total RNA ofliver cancer and adjacent normal tissues and hybridized separately to two identical Atlas human cancer eDNAexpression array membranes containing 588 known genes.RESULTS Autoradiographic results were analyzed by specific Atlas ImageTM (version 1. 0) software.Among the 588 genes analyzed, 18 genes were found up-regulated in cancer, including TFDP2, Aktl, E2F-3etc, and 25 genes were down-regulated in cancer, including TDGF1, BAK, LAR, etc. Expression levels ofgenes that associated with the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, cell-cellinteraction, invasion regulators and eytokines altered mostly.CONCLUSION The result obtained from Atlas microarray provides a comprehensive liver cancer-specificexpression profile. The results can lead to the identification of liver cancer-specific biomarkers and may behelpful in early diagnosis and dentifiction of target genes for designing rational therapeutic strategies.

  20. Interleukin 18 expression in the primary breast cancer tumour tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahida Srabović

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate the presence and expression levels of the IL-18 in the primary breast cancer tissue in relation to the unchangedbreast tissue in same patients and the breast tissue in patients withbenign breast disease, as well as the correlation between the IL-18 expression levels and pathohistological factors, including thecorrelation between IL-18 expression and the estrogens and progesterone receptor status. Methods This prospective randomized study was conducted at the Policlinic for Laboratory Diagnostics of the University Clinical Centre of Tuzla. 50 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast diseases were included in the study. The tree-step immunohistochemical staining was used for testing the levels of IL-18 expression and hormone receptor status. Results IL-18 was present in the breast cancer tumour, in the surrounding unchanged tissue of the same patients and in the breast tissue of patients with benign breast tumour and other benign breast disease. The expression of this interleukin was signiicantly higher in breast cancer tumour tissue as compared to its expression in surrounding unchanged tissue of the same patients (p<0,05, whereas IL-18 expression was not signiicantly higher in breast cancer tumours compared to its expression in breast tissue of the patients with benign breast diseases (p=0,057. There was no signiicant correlation between IL-18 expression and the lymph node status, and between IL-18 expression and the pathohistological factors. Conclusion The results suggest possible involvement of IL-18 in complex mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis.

  1. Expression of a novel immunoglobulin gene SNC73 in humar cancer and non-cancerous tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Bin Hu; Shu Zheng; Yong-Chuan Deng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of immunoglobulin gene SNC73 in malignant tumors and non-cancerous normal tissues.METHODS: Expression level of SNC73 in tumors and noncancerous tissues from the same patient was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (RT-PCR-ELISA) in 90cases of malignant tumors, including colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and liver cancer. Analysis on the correlation of SNC73 expression with sex, age, site,grade of differentiation, depth of invasion, and metastases in colorectal cancer patients was made.RESULTS: Expression level of SNC73 in non-cancerous colorectal mucosa and colorectal cancerous tissues was 1.234±0.842 and 0.737±0.731, respectively (P<0.01), with the mean ratio of 7.134±14.092 (range, 0.36-59.54).Expression of SNC73 showed no significant difference among gastric cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and liver cancer when compared with non-cancerous tissues (P>0.05). No correlation was found between SNC73 expression level and various clinicopathological factors, including sex, age, site,grade of differentiation, depth of invasion and metastases of CRC patients.CONCLUSION: Down-regulation of SNC73 expression may be a relatively specific phenomenon in colorectal cancer.SNC73 is a potential genetic marker for the carcinongenesis of colorectal cancer. The relationship of SNC73 expression and carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer merits further study.

  2. Limitations of tissue micro array in Duke's B colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Frifeldt, Sanne; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brunner, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    Tissue micro array (TMA) is widely used in cancer research in search of new predictive and prognostic markers. Colon cancer is known to be heterogeneous and the present study addresses some methodological aspects using cores of different size and analysing markers with different cellular...... distribution. We selected 61 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks representing patients diagnosed with Dukes B colon cancer. Two 1 mm and two 2 mm cores were taken from both the centre and the invasive front of the tumour respectively. The immunostaining included MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, p53, COX-2, TIMP and Betacatenin...... moderate to high agreement (kappa = 0.54-0.9) whereas TIMP-1 had the lowest score (kappa 0.19-0.25). The application of TMA in Dukes B colon cancer has several pitfalls and depends substantially on the immunohistochemical marker in question. Therefore a validation study seems justified before applying...

  3. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Norman F.; Lisa J Martin; Bronskill, Michael; Martin J. Yaffe; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associat...

  4. GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues.

  5. Automated prostate tissue referencing for cancer detection and diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Kajdacsy-Balla, André Alexander; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Background The current practice of histopathology review is limited in speed and accuracy. The current diagnostic paradigm does not fully describe the complex and complicated patterns of cancer. To address these needs, we develop an automated and objective system that facilitates a comprehensive and easy information management and decision-making. We also develop a tissue similarity measure scheme to broaden our understanding of tissue characteristics. Results The system includes a database o...

  6. Tissue Microarray A New Tool for Cancer Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Shanghai Outdo Biotech Co.Ltd. (Outdo Biotech) is a leading company in human/animal Tissue Microarrays (TMA) and "Clinical-Type" Gene Chip (CTGC) in China. Our shareholders are Shanghai Biochip Co., Ltd. & National Engineering Center for Biochip at Shanghai, Shanghai Cancer institute and Eastern Liver and Bladder Hospital of Second Military Medical University. TMA is a mean of combining tens to hundreds of specimens of tissue, paraffin embedded or frozen, onto a single slide for analysis at once. Our constr...

  7. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Babu Rajendra Santosh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific functions, but there is a well-defined interaction mechanism, which mediates between them. Epithelial mesenchymal interactions (EMIs are part of this mechanism, which can be regarded as a biological conversation between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations involved in the cellular differentiation of one or both cell populations. EMIs represent a process that is essential for cell growth, cell differentiation and cell multiplication. EMIs are associated with normal physiological processes in the oral cavity, such as odontogenesis, dentino-enamel junction formation, salivary gland development, palatogenesis, and also pathological processes, such as oral cancer. This paper focuses the role EMIs in odontogenesis, salivary gland development, palatogenesis and oral cancer.

  8. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response

  9. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergomas, Francesca [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Laghi, Luigi [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan 20089 (Italy); Marchesi, Federica, E-mail: federica.marchesi@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-28

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21{sup +} follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  10. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Marchesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic (or tertiary lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC. We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS. B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV. Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  11. Differences in gene expression in prostate cancer, normal appearing prostate tissue adjacent to cancer and prostate tissue from cancer free organ donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical high throughput microarrays experiments compare gene expression across two specimen classes – an experimental class and baseline (or comparison) class. The choice of specimen classes is a major factor in the differential gene expression patterns revealed by these experiments. In most studies of prostate cancer, histologically malignant tissue is chosen as the experimental class while normal appearing prostate tissue adjacent to the tumor (adjacent normal) is chosen as the baseline against which comparison is made. However, normal appearing prostate tissue from tumor free organ donors represents an alterative source of baseline tissue for differential expression studies. To examine the effect of using donor normal tissue as opposed to adjacent normal tissue as a baseline for prostate cancer expression studies, we compared, using oligonucleotide microarrays, the expression profiles of primary prostate cancer (tumor), adjacent normal tissue and normal tissue from tumor free donors. Statistical analysis using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) demonstrates the presence of unique gene expression profiles for each of these specimen classes. The tumor v donor expression profile was more extensive that the tumor v adjacent normal profile. The differentially expressed gene lists from tumor v donor, tumor v adjacent normal and adjacent normal v donor comparisons were examined to identify regulated genes. When donors were used as the baseline, similar genes are highly regulated in both tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Significantly, both tumor and adjacent normal tissue exhibit significant up regulation of proliferation related genes including transcription factors, signal transducers and growth regulators compared to donor tissue. These genes were not picked up in a direct comparison of tumor and adjacent normal tissues. The up-regulation of these gene types in both tissue types is an unexpected finding and suggests that normal appearing prostate tissue

  12. Genes overexpressed in different human solid cancers exhibit different tissue-specific expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Bock Axelsen, Jacob; Lotem, Joseph; Sachs, Leo; Domany, Eytan

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression in different normal human tissues and different types of solid cancers derived from these tissues. The cancers analyzed include brain (astrocytoma and glioblastoma), breast, colon, endometrium, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, prostate, skin, and thyroid cancers. Comparing gene expression in each normal tissue to 12 other normal tissues, we identified 4,917 tissue-selective genes that were selectively expressed in different normal tissues. We also identified 2,929 ...

  13. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:27142790

  14. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-05-04

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery.

  15. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  16. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  17. The Function of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1 in Normal Tissues and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. Walsh, Li Qin, Jean Ching-Yi Tien, Leonie S. Young, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995, the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1 was identified as the first authentic steroid receptor coactivator. Since then, the SRC proteins have remained at the epicenter of coregulator biology, molecular endocrinology and endocrine-related cancer. Cumulative works on SRC-1 have shown that it is primarily a nuclear receptor coregulator and functions to construct highly specific enzymatic protein complexes which can execute efficient and successful transcriptional activation of designated target genes. The versatile nature of SRC-1 enables it to respond to steroid dependent and steroid independent stimulation, allowing it to bind across many families of transcription factors to orchestrate and regulate complex physiological reactions. This review highlights the multiple functions of SRC-1 in the development and maintenance of normal tissue functions as well as its major role in mediating hormone receptor responsiveness. Insights from genetically manipulated mouse models and clinical data suggest SRC-1 is significantly overexpressed in many cancers, in particular, cancers of the reproductive tissues. SRC-1 has been associated with cellular proliferation and tumor growth but its major tumorigenic contributions are promotion and execution of breast cancer metastasis and mediation of resistance to endocrine therapies. The ability of SRC-1 to coordinate multiple signaling pathways makes it an important player in tumor cells' escape of targeted therapy.

  18. Nano-analytical electron microscopy reveals fundamental insights into human cardiovascular tissue calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Gentleman, Eileen; Cloyd, Kristy L; Chester, Adrian H; Yacoub, Magdi H; Stevens, Molly M

    2013-06-01

    The accumulation of calcified material in cardiovascular tissue is thought to involve cytochemical, extracellular matrix and systemic signals; however, its precise composition and nanoscale architecture remain largely unexplored. Using nano-analytical electron microscopy techniques, we examined valves, aortae and coronary arteries from patients with and without calcific cardiovascular disease and detected spherical calcium phosphate particles, regardless of the presence of calcific lesions. We also examined lesions after sectioning with a focused ion beam and found that the spherical particles are composed of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite that crystallographically and structurally differs from bone mineral. Taken together, these data suggest that mineralized spherical particles may play a fundamental role in calcific lesion formation. Their ubiquitous presence in varied cardiovascular tissues and from patients with a spectrum of diseases further suggests that lesion formation may follow a common process. Indeed, applying materials science techniques to ectopic and orthotopic calcification has great potential to lend critical insights into pathophysiological processes underlying calcific cardiovascular disease.

  19. Insights into cancer severity from biomolecular interaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Singh, Gurdeep; Betts, Matthew J.; Apic, Gordana; Vukotic, Ranka; Andreone, Pietro; Stein, Lincoln; Russell, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    To attain a deeper understanding of diseases like cancer, it is critical to couple genetics with biomolecular mechanisms. High-throughput sequencing has identified thousands of somatic mutations across dozens of cancers, and there is a pressing need to identify the few that are pathologically relevant. Here we use protein structure and interaction data to interrogate nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations, identifying a set of 213 molecular interfaces (protein-protein, -small molecule or –nucleic acid) most often perturbed in cancer, highlighting several potentially novel cancer genes. Over half of these interfaces involve protein-small-molecule interactions highlighting their overall importance in cancer. We found distinct differences in the predominance of perturbed interfaces between cancers and histological subtypes and presence or absence of certain interfaces appears to correlate with cancer severity. PMID:27698488

  20. A role of active brown adipose tissue in cancer cachexia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiel Beijer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Until a few years ago, adult humans were not thought to have brown adipose tissue (BAT. Now, this is a rapidly evolving field of research with perspectives in metabolic syndromes such as obesity and new therapies targeting its bio-energetic pathways. White, brown and socalled brite adipose fat seem to be able to trans-differentiate into each other, emphasizing the dynamic nature of fat tissue for metabolism. Human and animal data in cancer cachexia to date provide some evidence for BAT activation, but its quantitative impact on energy expenditure and weight loss is controversial. Prospective clinical studies can address the potential role of BAT in cancer cachexia using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanning, with careful consideration of co-factors such as diet, exposure to the cold, physical activity and body mass index, that all seem to act on BAT recruitment and activity.

  1. An informatics model for tissue banks – Lessons learned from the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamed Jonathan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in molecular biology and growing requirements from biomarker validation studies have generated a need for tissue banks to provide quality-controlled tissue samples with standardized clinical annotation. The NCI Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR is a distributed tissue bank that comprises four academic centers and provides thousands of clinically annotated prostate cancer specimens to researchers. Here we describe the CPCTR information management system architecture, common data element (CDE development, query interfaces, data curation, and quality control. Methods Data managers review the medical records to collect and continuously update information for the 145 clinical, pathological and inventorial CDEs that the Resource maintains for each case. An Access-based data entry tool provides de-identification and a standard communication mechanism between each group and a central CPCTR database. Standardized automated quality control audits have been implemented. Centrally, an Oracle database has web interfaces allowing multiple user-types, including the general public, to mine de-identified information from all of the sites with three levels of specificity and granularity as well as to request tissues through a formal letter of intent. Results Since July 2003, CPCTR has offered over 6,000 cases (38,000 blocks of highly characterized prostate cancer biospecimens, including several tissue microarrays (TMA. The Resource developed a website with interfaces for the general public as well as researchers and internal members. These user groups have utilized the web-tools for public query of summary data on the cases that were available, to prepare requests, and to receive tissues. As of December 2005, the Resource received over 130 tissue requests, of which 45 have been reviewed, approved and filled. Additionally, the Resource implemented the TMA Data Exchange Specification in its TMA program and created a

  2. New insights into centrosome imaging in Drosophila and mouse neuroepithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujano, Maria A; Basto, Renata; Marthiens, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome is the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells. It participates in the assembly of a bipolar spindle that ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes during mitosis. Recently, mutations in centrosome genes have been identified in patients affected by neurodevelopmental disorders. In fact, the etiology of several neurodevelopmental pathologies seems to be linked to defects in the assembly of the mitotic spindle in the neural stem cell compartment during neurogenesis. Therefore, getting better insights into the structure and function/dysfunction of the mitotic spindle apparatus in an intact tissue environment is of utmost importance. However, imaging nanometer-scale structures like centrosomes and microtubule bundles within the depth of a tissue is still challenging. Here we describe two procedures to acquire high-resolution images on fixed tissues and to perform live imaging of microtubule-based structures in the neuroepithelia of the Drosophila brain and of the mouse neocortex. We take advantage of the accumulation of centrosomes and mitotic figures at the apical surface of these polarized tissues to improve the quality of staining and imaging. Both Drosophila and mouse models with centrosome dysfunction showed abnormalities in the neuroepithelium reminiscent of the ones described in brains of human patients. These observations have highlighted their value as model organisms to study the etiology of human neurodevelopmental pathologies. PMID:26175441

  3. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Detection and Localization of Pre-Cancerous Lesions and Early Lung Cancer Using Tissue Autofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jaclyn Yip-Chan

    In this work, two different yet related hypotheses were tested by experimental means as follows: (i) pre-cancerous and non-invasive (early) lung cancer can be detected and localized using the fluorescence properties of tumour localizing drugs at non-photosensitizing doses to skin tissue; (ii) significant differences exist in laser-induced autofluorescence between normal, pre-cancerous and cancerous tissues such that these differences alone can be exploited to detect and delineate early lung cancer without using exogenous drug(s). Exogenous fluorescent tumour markers such as hematoporphyrin derivatives (e.g. Photofrin) have been used to enhance to detection of occult lung lesions. Photofrin is preferentially retained in tumor tissues compared to the surrounding normal tissues; it fluoresces at 630 nm and 690 nm when excited at -405 nm. Based on this principle several imaging and non-imaging devices have been developed. However, wider clinical applications were limited due to the skin photosensitivity property of Photofrin. We have postulated that this could be solved by employing a much lower dose of Photofrin (0.25 mg/kg) which was believed to be less photosensitizing to human patients. This postulate was experimentally tested by ratio fluorometry and early lung cancers were detected with no false negative results and no apparent skin photosensitivity. An important finding in this study was that the mechanism for detection of early cancer was mainly due to the differences in the green autofluorescence between normal and malignant tissues, rather than fluorescence of tumour localizing drug. This discovery led to the second postulate of this thesis that tissue autofluorescence alone can be exploited for the detection of early lung cancer. The results indicated that algorithm(s) could be developed to clearly delineate early lesions from the normal tissues. Several algorithms were then tested using a non-imaging ratio fluorometer device and a prototype imaging

  5. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Sørensen, Nanna Møller;

    2005-01-01

    biological functions of TIMP-1 such as growth-stimulating functions, as well as anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenetic effects, may in part explain this paradox. The purpose of this review is to give an update on the current status of TIMP-1 in breast cancer, emphasizing the prognostic utility of the inhibitor......Whether patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer are offered adjuvant systemic therapy following surgical removal of the tumor is based on prognosis. Prognosis is estimated in every patient using established prognostic variables. Unfortunately, when using the currently available prognostic...... parameters a significant proportion of patients are over-treated. Thus, in order to improve stratification of breast cancer patients, additional prognostic factors need to be identified. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) is one of the promising candidates for new prognostic markers in breast...

  6. KLC1-ALK: a novel fusion in lung cancer identified using a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue only.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Togashi

    Full Text Available The promising results of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitors have changed the significance of ALK fusions in several types of cancer. These fusions are no longer mere research targets or diagnostic markers, but they are now directly linked to the therapeutic benefit of patients. However, most available tumor tissues in clinical settings are formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE, and this significantly limits detailed genetic studies in many clinical cases. Although recent technical improvements have allowed the analysis of some known mutations in FFPE tissues, identifying unknown fusion genes by using only FFPE tissues remains difficult. We developed a 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends-based system optimized for FFPE tissues and evaluated this system on a lung cancer tissue with ALK rearrangement and without the 2 known ALK fusions EML4-ALK and KIF5B-ALK. With this system, we successfully identified a novel ALK fusion, KLC1-ALK. The result was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Then, we synthesized the putative full-length cDNA of KLC1-ALK and demonstrated the transforming potential of the fusion kinase with assays using mouse 3T3 cells. To the best of our knowledge, KLC1-ALK is the first novel oncogenic fusion identified using only FFPE tissues. This finding will broaden the potential value of archival FFPE tissues and provide further biological and clinical insights into ALK-positive lung cancer.

  7. Insights from Epidemiology into Dichloromethane and Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Siegel Scott

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dichloromethane (methylene chloride is a widely used chlorinated solvent. We review the available epidemiology studies (five cohort studies, 13 case-control studies, including seven of hematopoietic cancers, focusing on specific cancer sites. There was little indication of an increased risk of lung cancer in the cohort studies (standardized mortality ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.21. These cohorts are relatively small, and variable effects (e.g., point estimates ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 were seen for the rarer forms of cancers such as brain cancer and specific hematopoietic cancers. Three large population-based case-control studies of incident non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Europe and the United States observed odds ratios between 1.5 and 2.2 with dichloromethane exposure (ever exposed or highest category of exposure, with higher risk seen in specific subsets of disease. More limited indications of associations with brain cancer, breast cancer, and liver and biliary cancer were also seen in this collection of studies. Existing cohort studies, given their size and uneven exposure information, are unlikely to resolve questions of cancer risks and dichloromethane exposure. More promising approaches are population-based case-control studies of incident disease, and the combination of data from such studies, with robust exposure assessments that include detailed occupational information and exposure assignment based on industry-wide surveys or direct exposure measurements.

  8. Electrical impedance characterization of normal and cancerous human hepatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Shlomi; Ivorra, Antoni; Reuter, Victor E; Rubinsky, Boris; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-07-01

    The four-electrode method was used to measure the ex vivo complex electrical impedance of tissues from 14 hepatic tumors and the surrounding normal liver from six patients. Measurements were done in the frequency range 1-400 kHz. It was found that the conductivity of the tumor tissue was much higher than that of the normal liver tissue in this frequency range (from 0.14 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.03 +/- 0.01 S m(-1) at 1 kHz to 0.25 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.15 +/- 0.03 S m(-1) at 400 kHz). The Cole-Cole models were estimated from the experimental data and the four parameters (rho(0), rho(infinity), alpha, f(c)) were obtained using a least-squares fit algorithm. The Cole-Cole parameters for the cancerous and normal liver are 9 +/- 4 Omega m(-1), 2.2 +/- 0.7 Omega m(-1), 0.5 +/- 0.2, 140 +/- 103 kHz and 50 +/- 28 Omega m(-1), 3.2 +/- 0.6 Omega m(-1), 0.64 +/- 0.04, 10 +/- 7 kHz, respectively. These data can contribute to developing bioelectric applications for tissue diagnostics and in tissue treatment planning with electrical fields such as radiofrequency tissue ablation, electrochemotherapy and gene therapy with reversible electroporation, nanoscale pulsing and irreversible electroporation.

  9. Robust multi-tissue gene panel for cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talantov Dmitri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified a set of genes whose relative mRNA expression levels in various solid tumors can be used to robustly distinguish cancer from matching normal tissue. Our current feature set consists of 113 gene probes for 104 unique genes, originally identified as differentially expressed in solid primary tumors in microarray data on Affymetrix HG-U133A platform in five tissue types: breast, colon, lung, prostate and ovary. For each dataset, we first identified a set of genes significantly differentially expressed in tumor vs. normal tissue at p-value = 0.05 using an experimentally derived error model. Our common cancer gene panel is the intersection of these sets of significantly dysregulated genes and can distinguish tumors from normal tissue on all these five tissue types. Methods Frozen tumor specimens were obtained from two commercial vendors Clinomics (Pittsfield, MA and Asterand (Detroit, MI. Biotinylated targets were prepared using published methods (Affymetrix, CA and hybridized to Affymetrix U133A GeneChips (Affymetrix, CA. Expression values for each gene were calculated using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis software MAS 5.0. We then used a software package called Genes@Work for differential expression discovery, and SVM light linear kernel for building classification models. Results We validate the predictability of this gene list on several publicly available data sets generated on the same platform. Of note, when analysing the lung cancer data set of Spira et al, using an SVM linear kernel classifier, our gene panel had 94.7% leave-one-out accuracy compared to 87.8% using the gene panel in the original paper. In addition, we performed high-throughput validation on the Dana Farber Cancer Institute GCOD database and several GEO datasets. Conclusions Our result showed the potential for this panel as a robust classification tool for multiple tumor types on the Affymetrix platform, as well as other whole genome arrays

  10. Insights from Epidemiology into Dichloromethane and Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl Siegel Scott; Cooper, Glinda S.; Bale, Ambuja S.

    2011-01-01

    Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) is a widely used chlorinated solvent. We review the available epidemiology studies (five cohort studies, 13 case-control studies, including seven of hematopoietic cancers), focusing on specific cancer sites. There was little indication of an increased risk of lung cancer in the cohort studies (standardized mortality ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.21). These cohorts are relatively small, and variable effects (e.g., point estimates ranging from 0.5 to 2.0) we...

  11. The presence of bacteria within tissue provides insights into the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yunji; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Baek, Keum Jin; Alam, Jehan; Park, Hee Kyung; Choi, Youngnim

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic T cell-mediated mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiopathogenesis. Although various antigens have been considered, what actually triggers the inflammatory response of T cells is unknown. In the present study, we propose that intracellular bacteria present within tissues trigger T cell infiltration and provide target antigens. Sections of OLP (n = 36) and normal (n = 10) oral mucosal tissues were subjected to in situ hybridization using a universal probe targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and immunohistochemistry with anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, and anti-macrophage-specific antibodies. Bacteria were abundant throughout the epithelium and the lamina propria of OLP tissues, which exhibited positive correlations with the levels of infiltrated CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) cells. Furthermore, bacteria were detected within the infiltrated T cells. Pyrosequencing analysis of the mucosal microbiota from OLP patients (n = 13) and control subjects (n = 11) revealed a decrease in Streptococcus and increases in gingivitis/periodontitis-associated bacteria in OLP lesions. Using the selected bacterial species, we demonstrated that certain oral bacteria damage the epithelial physical barrier, are internalized into epithelial cells or T cells, and induce production of T cell chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5. Our findings provide insights into the pathogenesis of OLP. PMID:27383402

  12. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although it...

  13. MicroRNAs and Recent Insights into Pediatric Ovarian Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Anne Crawford

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most common pediatric gynecologic malignancy. When diag-nosed in children, ovarian cancers present unique challenges that differ dramatically from those faced by adults. Here, we review the spectrum of ovarian cancers found in young women and girls and discuss the biology of these diseases. A number of advances have re-cently shed significant new understanding on the potential causes of ovarian cancer in this unique population. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how altered expression of non-coding RNA transcripts known as microRNAs play a key role in the etiology of ovarian germ cell and sex cord-stromal tumors. Emerging transgenic models for these diseases are also reviewed. Lastly, future challenges and opportunities for understanding pediatric ovarian cancers, delineating clinically useful biomarkers and developing targeted therapies are discussed.

  14. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial and cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-02-01

    This protocol describes a strategy for the generation of 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate cells (either bulk or FACS-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumor cells. Organoids derived from healthy material contain the differentiated luminal and basal cell types, whereas organoids derived from prostate cancer tissue mimic the histology of the tumor. We explain how to establish these cultures in the fully defined serum-free conditioned medium that is required to sustain organoid growth. Starting with the plating of digested tissue material, full-grown organoids can usually be obtained in ∼2 weeks. The culture protocol we describe here is currently the only one that allows the growth of both the luminal and basal prostatic epithelial lineages, as well as the growth of advanced prostate cancers. Organoids established using this protocol can be used to study many different aspects of prostate biology, including homeostasis, tumorigenesis and drug discovery.

  15. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parisha; Bhatia; Koji; Tsumagari; Zakaria; Y; Abd; Elmageed; Paul; Friedlander; Joseph; F; Buell; Emad; Kandil

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  16. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  17. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana, E-mail: luciana.dini@unisalento.it [Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Technology (Di.S.Te.B.A.), University of Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2013-03-21

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies.

  18. The first insight into the tissue specific taxus transcriptome via Illumina second generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Cheng Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Illumina second generation sequencing is now an efficient route for generating enormous sequence collections that represent expressed genes and quantitate expression level. Taxus is a world-wide endangered gymnosperm genus and forms an important anti-cancer medicinal resource, but the large and complex genomes of Taxus have hindered the development of genomic resources. The research of its tissue-specific transcriptome is absent. There is also no study concerning the association between the plant transcriptome and metabolome with respect to the plant tissue type. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the de novo assembly of Taxus mairei transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In a single run, we produced 13,737,528 sequencing reads corresponding to 2.03 Gb total nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 36,493 unique sequences. Based on similarity search with known proteins, 23,515 Unigenes were identified to have the Blast hit with a cut-off E-value above 10⁻⁵. Furthermore, we investigated the transcriptome difference of three Taxus tissues using a tag-based digital gene expression system. We obtained a sequencing depth of over 3.15 million tags per sample and identified a large number of genes associated with tissue specific functions and taxane biosynthetic pathway. The expression of the taxane biosynthetic genes is significantly higher in the root than in the leaf and the stem, while high activity of taxane-producing pathway in the root was also revealed via metabolomic analyses. Moreover, many antisense transcripts and novel transcripts were found; clusters with similar differential expression patterns, enriched GO terms and enriched metabolic pathways with regard to the differentially expressed genes were revealed for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provides the most comprehensive sequence resource available for Taxus study and will help define mechanisms of tissue

  19. NIH scientists provide new insight into rare kidney cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIH scientists have discovered a unique feature of a rare, hereditary form of kidney cancer that may provide a better understanding of its progression and metastasis, possibly laying the foundation for the development of new targeted therapies.

  20. Mechanisms of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activation in Cancer Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kataoka, Hiroaki, E-mail: mejina@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Section of Oncopathology and Regenerative Biology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) plays critical roles in cancer progression through its specific receptor, MET. HGF/SF is usually synthesized and secreted as an inactive proform (pro-HGF/SF) by stromal cells, such as fibroblasts. Several serine proteases are reported to convert pro-HGF/SF to mature HGF/SF and among these, HGF activator (HGFA) and matriptase are the most potent activators. Increased activities of both proteases have been observed in various cancers. HGFA is synthesized mainly by the liver and secreted as an inactive pro-form. In cancer tissues, pro-HGFA is likely activated by thrombin and/or human kallikrein 1-related peptidase (KLK)-4 and KLK-5. Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed by most epithelial cells and is also synthesized as an inactive zymogen. Matriptase activation is likely to be mediated by autoactivation or by other trypsin-like proteases. Recent studies revealed that matriptase autoactivation is promoted by an acidic environment. Given the mildly acidic extracellular environment of solid tumors, matriptase activation may, thus, be accelerated in the tumor microenvironment. HGFA and matriptase activities are regulated by HGFA inhibitor (HAI)-1 (HAI-1) and/or HAI-2 in the pericellular microenvironment. HAIs may have an important role in cancer cell biology by regulating HGF/SF-activating proteases.

  1. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicabil- ity of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. We propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  2. Clinical and molecular insights into primary pediatric liver cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.B. Weeda

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to give insight into the clinical status quo of primary pediatric liver tumors and investigate signaling pathways that may be of importance for liver tumorigenesis. The most recent series of the International Childhood Liver Tumors Strategy Group (SIOPEL) of hepatocellular carcinoma

  3. Electrical impedance characterization of normal and cancerous human hepatic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four-electrode method was used to measure the ex vivo complex electrical impedance of tissues from 14 hepatic tumors and the surrounding normal liver from six patients. Measurements were done in the frequency range 1–400 kHz. It was found that the conductivity of the tumor tissue was much higher than that of the normal liver tissue in this frequency range (from 0.14 ± 0.06 S m−1 versus 0.03 ± 0.01 S m−1 at 1 kHz to 0.25 ± 0.06 S m−1 versus 0.15 ± 0.03 S m−1 at 400 kHz). The Cole–Cole models were estimated from the experimental data and the four parameters (ρ0, ρ∞, α, fc) were obtained using a least-squares fit algorithm. The Cole–Cole parameters for the cancerous and normal liver are 9 ± 4 Ω m−1, 2.2 ± 0.7 Ω m−1, 0.5 ± 0.2, 140 ± 103 kHz and 50 ± 28 Ω m−1, 3.2 ± 0.6 Ω m−1, 0.64 ± 0.04, 10 ± 7 kHz, respectively. These data can contribute to developing bioelectric applications for tissue diagnostics and in tissue treatment planning with electrical fields such as radiofrequency tissue ablation, electrochemotherapy and gene therapy with reversible electroporation, nanoscale pulsing and irreversible electroporation

  4. ADVANTAGES AND APPLICATIONS OF TISSUE MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY ON CANCER RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张喜平; 苏丹; 程琪辉

    2003-01-01

    S To provide evidences for exploiting tissue microarray (TMA) technology, we reviewed advantages and applications of TMA on tumor research. TMA has many advantages, including (1) section from TMA blocks can be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of up to 1,000 different tumors at DNA, RNA or protein level; (2) TMA is highly representative of their donor tissues; (3) TMA can improve conservation of tissue resources and experimental reagents, improve internal experimental control, and increase sample numbers per experiment, and can be used for large-scale, massively parallel in situ analysis; (4) TMA facilitates rapid translation of molecular discoveries to clinical applications. TMA has been applied to tumor research, such as glioma, breast tumor, lung cancer and so on. The development of novel biochip technologies has opened up new possibilities for the high-throughput molecular profiling of human tumors. Novel molecular markers emerging from high-throughput expression surveys could be analyzed on tumor TMA. It is anticipated that TMA, a new member of biochip, will soon become a widely used tool for all types of tissue-based research. TMA will lead to a significant acceleration of the transition of basic research findings into clinical applications.

  5. Trace elements in digestive cancer tissue by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental composition study of digestive cancer tissue with different localizations (esophagus, stomach, colon), by using PIXE analysis, is presented. A number of 20 tumors and normal (control) tissue samples was analyzed. Thin targets were prepared by mineralization with nitric acid of the lyophilized tissue and dropping on 2 μm Mylar foil. The measurements were carried out in vacuum using 3 MeV protons delivered by the Tandem Accelerator in Bucharest, Romania. The following elements were determined: S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Although the results show relatively large variations from a sample to another, there were obtained mean ratios of tumor/normal concentrations which are significantly greater than one, in the limit of the standard deviation, for the following elements: K(1.45 ± 0.28), Ca(1.30 ± 0.21), Cr(2.33 ± 0.56), and Zn(1.18 ± 0.15). For other elements determined, no significant difference between the tumor and normal tissues , in the limit of the present standard deviation, was found. (authors)

  6. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial tissue and prostate cancer tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R.; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Summary This protocol describes a recently developed strategy to generate 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate (either bulk or FAC-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumour cells. Organoids derived from healthy material contain the differentiated luminal and basal cell types, whereas organoids derived from prostate cancer tissue mimic the histology of the tumour. The stepwise establishment of these cultures and the fully defined serum-free conditioned medium that is required to sustain organoid growth are outlined. Organoids established using this protocol can be used to study many different aspects of prostate biology, including homeostasis, tumorigenesis and drug discovery. PMID:26797458

  7. Insights into the key roles of proteoglycans in breast cancer biology and translational medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Neill, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans control numerous normal and pathological processes, among which are morphogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, vascularization and cancer metastasis. During tumor development and growth, proteoglycan expression is markedly modified in the tumor microenvironment. Altered expression of...... proteoglycans on tumor and stromal cell membranes affects cancer cell signaling, growth and survival, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. Despite the high complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the rapid evolution in our knowledge that proteoglycans are among the key players in the breast tumor...

  8. New insights into calcium, dairy and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter R Holt

    2008-01-01

    This paper is to review recent information about the relationship of calcium and dairy foods to colon cancer.The review focuses on primary prevention, discusses the potential components in dairy foods that might be anti-neoplastic, reviews the epidemiologic information and describes intervention studies demonstrating efficacy of calcium and vitamin D in reducing colorectal polyp recurrence. Since vitamin D is important in cancer prevention, pertinent data is discussed and potential mechanisms of actions presented. Calcium and vitamin D are important agents for the primary prevention of colorectal neoplasia.

  9. Clinical and molecular insights into primary pediatric liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Weeda, V.B.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to give insight into the clinical status quo of primary pediatric liver tumors and investigate signaling pathways that may be of importance for liver tumorigenesis. The most recent series of the International Childhood Liver Tumors Strategy Group (SIOPEL) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its distinct variant fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) are discussed. For both tumors, complete resection is at present the only curative option. FL-HCC does not have a bet...

  10. Implementation of tissue microarrays technique for cancer research in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Lahera-Sánchez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The tissue microarray (TMA technique is based on making cylindrical cores from paraffin donor blocks and transfer to a single recipient block. The TMA has revolutionized the field of pathology for the possibility to evaluate multiple samples in one slide. There is no precedent of this subject in Cuba, so the objective of this research was to implement the TMA technique. The concordance of the results obtained by complete section and the TMA were evaluated for this purpose, in the evaluation of the estrogen receptors (ER, progesterone (PR and epidermal growth factor type 2 (HER2 in samples of breast cancer. Forty-five paraffin-embedded samples from women diagnosed with breast cancer at the Institute of Oncology in 2012 were studied. Two TMA blocks were constructed, and subsequently the expression of markers ER, PR and HER2 was determined by immunohistochemistry, in the complete section of tissue and in the TMA. Kappa index was used for concordance analysis. A good concordance was obtained for all three markers (ER k=0.8272; PR k=0.793 and HER2 k=0.716. This study constitutes the first report on the TMA technique in Cuba and shows that it is a valuable tool, suggesting its potential use in translational research and clinical trials on vaccines.

  11. Cancer tissue engineering - new perspectives in understanding the biology of solid tumours - a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, C.; Moroni, L.; Danti, S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding cancer biology is a major challenge of this century. The recent insight about carcinogenesis mechanisms, including the role exerted by the tumour microenvironment and cancer stem cells in chemoresistance, relapse and metastases, has made it self-evident that only new cancer models, wit

  12. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  13. Therapy Insight: fertility in women after cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, Philippe; Pautier, Patricia; Fanchin, Renato; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chauveaud-Lambling, Aurelia; Frydman, René; Frydman, Nelly

    2007-12-01

    Cancer is the second-commonest cause of death in women under 40 years of age in Western Europe and the US. The survival of cancer patients has, nevertheless, improved during the past two decades. During this period, and especially during the last decade, there have been ground-breaking advances in the optimization of the quality of life of patients treated for cancer, in particular by the development of fertility-enhancing and fertility-preserving procedures in young patients treated for cancer. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy affect the fertility potential of women in different ways. Surgery to remove the uterus and ovaries has a direct impact on fertility. Radiation therapy (external or brachytherapy) can affect ovarian and also uterine function. Different drugs used in chemotherapy can directly influence ovarian function. Some markers have now been evaluated that are predictive of the potential toxic injury to the gonads and uterus. Various procedures have been proposed to preserve the fertility potential in women before anticancer treatment begins or after the tumor is treated; however, such optimization of management should only be undertaken if it does not have a deleterious effect on the survival of the patient. PMID:18026160

  14. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Breast Cancer Tissue and Drug-resistant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yan; Yuan Yuan; Zhang Lili; Zhu Hong; Hu Sainan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in clinical breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells. Methods:The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma as well as breast cancer cell MCF-7 and paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results:The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue was signiifcantly higher than in normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and that in paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T obviously higher than in breast cancer cell MCF-7. Conclusion:UCP2 is highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells.

  15. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Breast Cancer Tissue and Drug-resistant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in clinical breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells. Methods: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma as well as breast cancer cell MCF-7 and paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue was significantly higher than in normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and that in paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T obviously higher than in breast cancer cell MCF-7. Conclusion: UCP2 is highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells.

  16. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Daidone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC. BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+, have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  17. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia, E-mail: mariagrazia.daidone@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Amadeo 42, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2011-03-16

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup −/low} and/or CD133{sup +} expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1{sup +}), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  18. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane;

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  19. A minimum spanning forest based hyperspectral image classification method for cancerous tissue detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Robert; Patton, Samuel K.; Lu, Guolan; Halig, Luma V.; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a developing modality for cancer detection. The rich information associated with hyperspectral images allow for the examination between cancerous and healthy tissue. This study focuses on a new method that incorporates support vector machines into a minimum spanning forest algorithm for differentiating cancerous tissue from normal tissue. Spectral information was gathered to test the algorithm. Animal experiments were performed and hyperspectral images were acquired from tumor-bearing mice. In vivo imaging experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed classification method for cancer tissue classification on hyperspectral images.

  20. Folate receptor and Ki-67 nucleoprotein expressions in cervical cancer tissue and their correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Yan; Feng Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To detect the expression of both FR-α protein and ki-67 in cervical cancer tissues, and discuss the relationship between them and clinical significance.Methods:Using immunohistochemical method test normal cervical tissue and cervical cancer tissue before FR-α protein expression and the expression of Ki-67.Results:FR- protein expression in normal cervical tissues was positive for 7.0% while in cervical cancer tissue the positive rate was 82.1%. The difference was statistically significant. Ki-67 protein expression in normal cervical tissues was 0% while in cervical cancer tissue the positive rate was 80.2%. The difference was statistically significant. The two protein expression in cervical cancer stageⅠ,Ⅱ and stageⅢ were different, but the difference was not statistically significant. In cervical cancer tissues, both the two protein were positively correlated. There are correlations between them. Difference was statistically significant.Conclusion:FR-α elevated protein expression is involved in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. FR-α protein expression in cervical cancer and precancerous tissue has correlation with Ki-67, FR-α protein maybe participate in the occurrence and development of the cell proliferation in cervical cancer.

  1. Integrated analysis of copy number variation and genome-wide expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Zarina Ali Hassan

    Full Text Available Integrative analyses of multiple genomic datasets for selected samples can provide better insight into the overall data and can enhance our knowledge of cancer. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between copy number variation (CNV and gene expression in colorectal cancer (CRC samples and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Sixty-four paired CRC samples from the same patients were subjected to CNV profiling using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad assay, and validation was performed using multiplex ligation probe amplification method. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed on 15 paired samples from the same group of patients using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Significant genes obtained from both array results were then overlapped. To identify molecular pathways, the data were mapped to the KEGG database. Whole genome CNV analysis that compared primary tumor and non-cancerous epithelium revealed gains in 1638 genes and losses in 36 genes. Significant gains were mostly found in chromosome 20 at position 20q12 with a frequency of 45.31% in tumor samples. Examples of genes that were associated at this cytoband were PTPRT, EMILIN3 and CHD6. The highest number of losses was detected at chromosome 8, position 8p23.2 with 17.19% occurrence in all tumor samples. Among the genes found at this cytoband were CSMD1 and DLC1. Genome-wide expression profiling showed 709 genes to be up-regulated and 699 genes to be down-regulated in CRC compared to non-cancerous samples. Integration of these two datasets identified 56 overlapping genes, which were located in chromosomes 8, 20 and 22. MLPA confirmed that the CRC samples had the highest gains in chromosome 20 compared to the reference samples. Interpretation of the CNV data in the context of the transcriptome via integrative analyses may provide more in-depth knowledge of the genomic landscape of CRC.

  2. Nutrition support and dietary interventions for patients with lung cancer: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss N

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicole Kiss1,2 1Nutrition and Speech Pathology Department, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Cancer Experiences Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Malnutrition and weight loss are prevalent in patients with lung cancer. The impact of malnutrition on patients with cancer, and specifically in patients with lung cancer, has been demonstrated in a large number of studies. Malnutrition has been shown to negatively affect treatment completion, survival, quality of life, physical function, and health care costs. Emerging evidence is providing some insight into which lung cancer patients are at higher nutritional risk. In lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, stage III or more disease, treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and the extent of radiotherapy delivered to the esophagus appear to confer a higher risk of weight loss during and post-treatment. Studies investigating nutrition interventions for lung cancer patients have examined intensive dietary counseling, supplementation with fish oils, and interdisciplinary models of nutrition and exercise interventions and show promise for improved outcomes from these interventions. However, further research utilizing these interventions in large clinical trials is required to definitively establish effective interventions in this patient group. Keywords: lung cancer, nutrition, malnutrition

  3. New insights of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yadi Wu; Binhua P.Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step during embryonic morphogenesis,heart development,chronic degenerative fibrosis,and cancer metastasis.Several distinct traits have been conveyed by EMT,including cell motility,invasiveness,resistance to apoptosis,and some properties of stem cells.Many signal pathways have contributed to the induction of EMT,such as transforming growth factor-β,Wnt,Hedgehog,Notch,and nuclear factor-κB.Over the last few years,increasing evidence has shown that EMT plays an essential role in tumor progression and metastasis.Understanding the molecular mechanism of EMT has a great effect in unraveling the metastatic cascade and may lead to novel interventions for metastatic disease.

  4. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    1999-01-01

    -operative adjuvant chemotherapy. Tissue blocks were cut from the periphery of the tumours and embedded in paraffin. All blocks included both tumour tissue and normal bowel tissue. Serial sections of 4 microm were analysed for tumour tissue inflammatory cell infiltration using a computer- and video......, the prognostic value of individual white cell counts in the peritumoural inflammatory infiltrate in colorectal cancer was assessed. Intra-operative tumour tissue samples from 584 patients undergoing elective surgery for colorectal cancer were included. None of the patients received pre- or post...... should investigate the potential biological role of tumour tissue eosinophils and mast cells in the modulation of tumour growth....

  5. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Babu Rajendra Santosh; Thaon Jon Jones

    2014-01-01

    In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific fu...

  6. Surgery and Adjuvant Chemotherapy Use Among Veterans With Colon Cancer: Insights From a California Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Denise M.; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Perrin, Ruth; Zhang, Qiuying; Weichle, Thomas; Ferreira, M. Rosario; Lee, Todd; Benson, Al B.; Bhoopalam, Nirmala; Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose US veterans have been shown to be a vulnerable population with high cancer rates, and cancer care quality in Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals is the focus of a congressionally mandated review. We examined rates of surgery and chemotherapy use among veterans with colon cancer at VA and non-VA facilities in California to gain insight into factors associated with quality of cancer care. Methods A retrospective cohort of incident colon cancer patients from the California Cancer Registry, who were ≥ 66 years old and eligible to use VA and Medicare between 1999 and 2001, were observed for 6 months after diagnosis. Results Among 601 veterans with colon cancer, 72% were initially diagnosed and treated in non-VA facilities. Among veterans with stage I to III cancer, those diagnosed and initially treated in VA facilities experienced similar colectomy rates as those at non-VA facilities. Stage III patients diagnosed and initially treated in VA versus non-VA facilities had similar odds of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. In both settings, older patients had lower odds of receiving chemotherapy than their younger counterparts even when race and comorbidity were considered (age 76 to 85 years: odds ratio [OR] = 0.18; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.46; age ≥ 86 years: OR = 0.17; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.73). Conclusion In California, older veterans with colon cancer used both VA and non-VA facilities for cancer treatment, and odds of receiving cancer-directed surgery and chemotherapy were similar in both systems. Among stage III patients, older age lowered odds of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy in both systems. Further studies should continue to explore potential health system effects on quality of colon cancer care across the United States. PMID:20406940

  7. Comparison of effective atomic numbers of the cancerous and normal kidney tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Ne) of normal kidney and cancerous kidney have been computed for total and partial photon interactions by computing the molecular, atomic, and electronic cross section in the wide energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV using WinXCOM. The mean Zeff and Ne of normal kidney and cancerous kidney in the various energy ranges and for total and partial photon interactions are tabulated. The variation of effective Ne with energy is shown graphically for all photon interactions. In addition to this computer tomography (CT), numbers of normal kidney and cancerous kidney for photon interaction and energy absorption is also computed. The role of Zeff in the dual-energy dividing radiography is also discussed. The values of Zeff and Ne for cancerous kidney are higher than normal kidney. This is due to the levels of elements K, Ca, Fe, Ni, and Se are lower and those of the elements Ti, Co, Zn, As, and Cd are higher in the cancer tissue of kidney than those observed in the normal tissue. The soft tissue and cancerous tissue are very similar, but their atomic number differs. The cancerous tissue exhibits a higher Zeff than the normal tissue. This fact helps in the dual-energy dividing radiography which enables to improve the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. Hence, the computed values may be useful in the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. CT numbers for normal kidney are higher than cancerous kidney. (author)

  8. Ex vivo electrical impedance measurements on excised hepatic tissue from human patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Point-wise ex vivo electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were conducted on excised hepatic tissue from human patients with metastatic colorectal cancer using a linear four-electrode impedance probe. This study of 132 measurements from 10 colorectal cancer patients, the largest to date, reports that the equivalent electrical conductivity for tumor tissue is significantly higher than normal tissue (p < 0.01), ranging from 2–5 times greater over the measured frequency range of 100 Hz–1 MHz. Difference in tissue electrical permittivity is also found to be statistically significant across most frequencies. Furthermore, the complex impedance is also reported for both normal and tumor tissue. Consistent with trends for tissue electrical conductivity, normal tissue has a significantly higher impedance than tumor tissue (p < 0.01), as well as a higher net capacitive phase shift (33° for normal liver tissue in contrast to 10° for tumor tissue). (paper)

  9. Soft tissue sarcoma after treatment for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a register study all women in the West of Sweden Health Care Region with a breast cancer diagnosed between 1960 and 1980 (n = 13 490) were followed up in the Swedish Cancer Register to the end of 1988 for later occurrence of a soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Nineteen sarcomas were reported, whereas 8.7 were expected and the relative risk (RR) was 2.2 (CI 95% 1.3-3.4). The absolute risk was (1.7(104)) person years (PY) in comparison with 0.8 expected. To obtain a more detailed analysis of the associations between arm lymphoedema, radiotherapy and STS development, and to control the quality of the register data, a case control study was also performed. Clinical records from the different hospitals in the region were collected for all the 19 cases as well as for three selected controls per case. The histopathology of the cases were reviewed, and one of the cases was reclassified as a malignant melanoma and excluded from further analysis. Thirteen of the cases were clustered around the treated breast area. To quantify the exposure to radiotherapy, the integral dose was estimated. The presence of lymphedema was included as a binary variable in the analysis. The exact conditional randomisation test indicated a significant correlation between the integral dose and the development of an STS (p = 0.008) and this association was still significant after stratification for arm oedema. A conditional logistic regression analysis with STS as the dependent variable and the integral dose as the explanatory variable gave an odds ratio (OR) of(5.2(100)) J (CI 95% 1.3-21.2), and if this regression was restricted only to the STS developing in the radiation fields the OR was(3.2(100)) J (CI 95% 0.8-12.9). Thus, the excess of STS in this breast cancer cohort was very low ((0.9(104)) PY). However the integral dose correlates well to the development of STS and can be useful in quantifying even small risks of secondary malignancies in the breast cancer population

  10. Understanding community beliefs of Chinese-Australians about cancer: initial insights using an ethnographic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Soo See; Meiser, Bettina; Barlow-Stewart, Kristine; Goldstein, David; Tucker, Katherine; Eisenbruch, Maurice

    2005-03-01

    Ethnography was employed to investigate the hypothesis that the cultural meaning of cancer is one of the possible barriers to access of cancer services. The objectives were to identify indigenous terminologies, taxonomies and illness explanatory models of cancer in a community-based sample of 15 Chinese-Australians and a sample of 16 informants who had been recruited through two Sydney familial cancer clinics. Many of the informants included in their narrative terms that seemed to match Western biomedical explanations for cancer. The majority of informants also maintained traditional Chinese beliefs, despite high acculturation and beliefs in biomedical explanations about cancer. Explanations of illness including cancer, referred to the following concepts: (i) karma (yeh), (ii) retribution (bao ying), (iii) fate (ming yun) or Heaven's or God's will, (iv) geomancy (feng-shui), (v) touched evil (zhong chia), (vi) misfortune or bad luck (shui wan, dong hark); (vii) offending the gods or deities requiring prayers or offerings for appeasement; and (viii) kong-tau (spells invoked through human intervention). Taking into consideration the heterogeneity of the Chinese population, the findings provide an insight into Chinese illness conceptualization that may assist health professionals to develop an understanding of how the cultural explanatory models affect access to screening services, communication of diagnosis of cancer and management of treatment regimen. PMID:15386778

  11. DETECTION AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THROMBOMODULIN IN BOTH PLASMA AND TISSUE EXTRACTS OF CANCER PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓华; 卢兴国; 徐根波; 朱蕾; 黄连生

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of thrombomodulin (TM) in both plasma and tissue extracts of cancer patients for evaluating its clinical significance. Methods: Plasma TM levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both plasma of 188 cancer patients and 24 cancer tissue extracts including their adjacent non-cancer tissues. Results: The plasma TM levels both in cancer patients and in metastasis patients were significantly higher than that in controls [(33.47±14.25)μg/L, (41.68±16.96)μg/L, vs(20.40±7.22)μg/L,P0.05). The TM levels in cancer tissue extracts were significantly lower than that in their adjacent non-cancer tissue extracts [(647.71±317.51)μg/L vs (1455.63±772.22)μg/L, P<0.01]. On the contrary, the plasma TM levels in these cancers were significantly higher than that in controls. Conclusion: The rise of plasma TM levels in cancer patients was associated with metastasis and diffusion of cancers. The TM levels can be served as an sensitive index for judging progression and metastasis of cancers.

  12. The clinical implications of new insights into the origins of epithelial ovarian cancer with emphasis on the British Columbia Ovarian Cancer Prevention Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Miller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten years our understanding of the origin of epithelial ovarian cancer has changed. This includes the realization that the majority of High Grade serous cancers originate in fallopian tube epithelium and the majority of endometroid and clear cell cancer arise in foci of endometriosis. These new insights have profound implications of both prevention and treatment.

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of Metadherin in proliferative and cancerous breast tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Qinghui; Su Peng; Yang Qifeng

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Metadherin (MTDH) has been reported to be associated with cancer progression in various types of human cancers including breast cancer. Whether MTDH contributes to carcinogenesis of breast cancer is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the expression of MTDH in normal, UDH (usual ductal hyperplasia), ADH (atypical ductal hyperplasia), DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) and invasive cancer to explore the possible role of MTDH for breast cancer carcinogenesis. M...

  14. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  15. Up-regulation of ALG-2 in hepatomas and lung cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Winding, Pernille;

    2003-01-01

    , a result confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Staining of four different lung cancer tissue microarrays including specimens of 263 patients showed that ALG-2 is mainly localized to epithelial cells and significantly up-regulated in small-cell lung cancers and in non-small-cell lung cancers. Our...

  16. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT)

    OpenAIRE

    Nicastro, Holly L.; Dunn, Barbara K

    2013-01-01

    The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was ...

  17. Identification of alternatively spliced TIMP-1 mRNA in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usher, Pernille Autzen; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bartels, Annette;

    2007-01-01

    TIMP-1 is a promising new candidate as a prognostic marker in colorectal and breast cancer. We now describe the discovery of two alternatively spliced variants of TIMP-1 mRNA. The two variants lacking exon 2 (del-2) and 5 (del-5), respectively, were identified in human cancer cell lines by RT......-PCR. The del-2 variant was, furthermore, detected in extracts from 12 colorectal cancer tissue samples. By western blotting additional bands of lower molecular mass than full-length TIMP-1 were identified in tumor tissue, but not in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients. The two splice variants of TIMP...

  18. [Binding capability of lidamycin apoprotein to human breast cancer detected by tissue microarrays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lin; Gao, Rui-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2010-05-01

    This study is to investigate the binding capability of lidamycin apoprotein (LDP), an enediyne-associated apoprotein of the chromoprotein antitumor antibiotic family, to human breast cancer and normal tissues, the correlation of LDP binding capability to human breast cancer tissues and the expression of tumor therapeutic targets such as VEGF and HER2. In this study, the binding capability of LDP to human breast cancer tissues was detected with tissue microarray. The correlation study of LDP binding capability to human breast tumor tissues and relevant therapeutic targets was performed on breast cancer tissue microarrays. Immunocytochemical examination was used to detect the binding capability of LDP to human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. As a result, tissue microarray showed that LDP staining of 73.2% (30/41) of breast cancer tissues was positive, whereas that of 48.3% (15/31) of the adjacent normal breast specimens was positive. The difference between the tumor and normal samples was significant (Chi2 = 4.63, P < 0.05). LDP immunoreactivity in breast cancer correlated significantly with the overexpression of VEGF and HER2 (P < 0.001 and < 0.01, r = 0.389 and 0.287, respectively). Determined with confocal immunofluorescent analysis, LDP showed the binding capability to mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells. It is demonstrated that LDP can bind to human breast cancer tissues and there is significant difference between the breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal tissues. Notably, the binding reactivity shows positive correlation with the expression of VEGF and HER2 in breast carcinoma tissues. The results imply that LDP may have a potential use as targeting drug carrier in the research and development of new anticancer therapeutics. This study may provide reference for drug combination of LDM and other therapeutic agents. PMID:20931759

  19. Enhanced ZAG production by subcutaneous adipose tissue is linked to weight loss in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mracek, T.; Stephens, N. A.; Gao, D.; Bao, Y.; Ross, J A; Rydén, M; Arner, P; Trayhurn, P.; Fearon, K C H; Bing, C

    2011-01-01

    Background: Profound loss of adipose tissue is a hallmark of cancer cachexia. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG), a recently identified adipokine, is suggested as a candidate in lipid catabolism. Methods: In the first study, eight weight-stable and 17 cachectic cancer patients (weight loss ⩾5% in previous 6 months) were recruited. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein mRNA and protein expression were assessed in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue morphology was examined and serum ZAG conce...

  20. Discovery of EST-SSRs in lung cancer: tagged ESTs with SSRs lead to differential amino acid and protein expression patterns in cancerous tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Bakhtiarizadeh

    Full Text Available Tandem repeats are found in both coding and non-coding sequences of higher organisms. These sequences can be used in cancer genetics and diagnosis to unravel the genetic basis of tumor formation and progression. In this study, a possible relationship between SSR distributions and lung cancer was studied by comparative analysis of EST-SSRs in normal and lung cancerous tissues. While the EST-SSR distribution was similar between tumorous tissues, this distribution was different between normal and tumorous tissues. Trinucleotides tandem repeats were highly different; the number of trinucleotides in ESTs of lung cancer was 3 times higher than normal tissue. Significant negative correlation between normal and cancerous tissue showed that cancerous tissue generates different types of trinucleotides. GGC and CGC were the more frequent expressed trinucleotides in cancerous tissue, but these SSRs were not expressed in normal tissue. Similar to the EST level, the expression pattern of EST-SSRs-derived amino acids was significantly different between normal and cancerous tissues. Arg, Pro, Ser, Gly, and Lys were the most abundant amino acids in cancerous tissues, and Leu, Cys, Phe, and His were significantly more abundant in normal tissues than in cancerous tissues. Next, the putative functions of triplet SSR-containing genes were analyzed. In cancerous tissue, EST-SSRs produce different types of proteins. Chromodomain helicase DNA binding proteins were one of the major protein products of EST-SSRs in the cancerous library, while these proteins were not produced from EST-SSRs in normal tissue. For the first time, the findings of this study confirmed that EST-SSRs in normal lung tissues are different than in unhealthy tissues, and tagged ESTs with SSRs cause remarkable differences in amino acid and protein expression patterns in cancerous tissue. We suggest that EST-SSRs and EST-SSRs differentially expressed in cancerous tissue may be suitable candidate

  1. Molecular insights into connective tissue growth factor action in rat pancreatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Anna; Fitzner, Brit; Brock, Peter; Sparmann, Gisela; Emmrich, Jörg; Liebe, Stefan; Jaster, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a key feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, is mediated by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been suggested to play a major role in fibrogenesis by enhancing PSC activation after binding to alpha5beta1 integrin. Here, we have focussed on molecular determinants of CTGF action. Inhibition of CTGF expression in PSC by siRNA was associated with decreased proliferation, while application of exogenous CTGF stimulated both cell growth and collagen synthesis. Real-time PCR studies revealed that CTGF target genes in PSC not only include mediators of matrix remodelling but also the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6. CTGF stimulated binding of NF-kappaB to the IL-6 promoter, and siRNA targeting the NF-kappaB subunit RelA interfered with CTGF-induced IL-6 expression, implicating the NF-kappaB pathway in the mediation of the CTGF effect. In further studies, we have analyzed regulation of CTGF expression in PSC. Transforming growth factor-beta1, activin A and tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhanced expression of the CTGF gene, while interferon-gamma displayed the opposite effect. The region from -74 to -125 of the CTGF promoter was revealed to be critical for its activity in PSC as well as for the inhibitory effect of interferon-gamma. Taken together, our results indicate a tight control of CTGF expression in PSC at the transcriptional level. CTGF promotes fibrogenesis both directly by enhancing PSC proliferation and matrix protein synthesis, and indirectly through the release of proinflammatory cytokines that may accelerate the process of chronic inflammation. PMID:18639630

  2. Expression and Clinical Significance of REGy in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Variously Differentiated Gastric Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Tian Tian; Xiaoyi Wang; Fan Li; Guosheng Ren

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the REGy expression in gastric cancer tissue and gastric cancer cell lines of various differentiation levels and its clinical significance.METHODS Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of REGy protein in 70 specimens of gastric cancer and 30 specimens of normal gastric mucosa. The relationship between the expression of REGy protein and the biological behaviors of gastric cancer was analyzed. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the mRNA level and the protein expression of REGγ in normal gastric cell line GES-1, well differentiated gastric cancer cell line MKN-28, moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 and poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line BGC-823.RESULTS The expression rate of REGγprotein in gastric cancer tissue (52/70, 74.29%) was significantly higher than that in normal gastric tissue (12/30, 40%) (P<0.01). The expression rate of REGywas correlated with tumor size (P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), differentiation degree (P<0.01), infiltration depth (P<0.01)and distant metastasis (P<0.05). RT-PCR analysis showed that theexpression of REGγ mRNA was 0.459±0.079 in the normal gastric mucosa cell line, 0.588±0.118 in the well differentiated gastric cancer cell line, 0.715±0.066 in the moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line, and 0.873±0.099 in the poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line, showing a negative correla- tion between REGγmRNA expression and differentiation level (P <0.05). Western blot analysis showed that the expression of REGy protein was 0.712±0.065 in the normal gastric mucosa cell line, 1.176±0.185 in the well differentiated gastric cancer cell line, 1.533 ±0.127 in the moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line, and 2.061±0.398 in the poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line, showing a negative correlation between REGγprotein expression and differentiation level (P<0.05).CONCLUSION REGγ is expressed in gastric cancer

  3. Raman microspectroscopy of Hematoporphyrins. Imaging of the noncancerous and the cancerous human breast tissues with photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek-Pluska, B; Kopec, M

    2016-12-01

    Raman microspectroscopy combined with fluorescence were used to study the distribution of Hematoporphyrin (Hp) in noncancerous and cancerous breast tissues. The results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish between noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissue and to identify differences in the distribution and photodegradation of Hematoporphyrin, which is a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT), photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of cancer. Presented results show that Hematoporphyrin level in the noncancerous breast tissue is lower compared to the cancerous one. We have proved also that the Raman intensity of lipids and proteins doesn't change dramatically after laser light irradiation, which indicates that the PDT treatment destroys preferably cancer cells, in which the photosensitizer is accumulated. The specific subcellular localization of photosensitizer for breast tissues samples soaked with Hematoporphyrin was not observed. PMID:27376758

  4. Trace elemental analysis in cancer-afflicted tissues of penis and testis by PIXE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Raju, G. J.; John Charles, M.; Bhuloka Reddy, S.; Sarita, P.; Seetharami Reddy, B.; Rama Lakshmi, P. V. B.; Vijayan, V.

    2005-04-01

    PIXE technique was employed to estimate the trace elemental concentrations in the biological samples of cancerous penis and testis. A 3 MeV proton beam was employed to excite the samples. From the present results it can be seen that the concentrations of Cl, Fe and Co are lower in the cancerous tissue of the penis when compared with those in normal tissue while the concentrations of Cu, Zn and As are relatively higher. The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Br, Sr and Pb are in agreement within standard deviations in both cancerous and normal tissues. In the cancerous tissue of testis, the concentrations of K, Cr and Cu are higher while the concentrations of Fe, Co and Zn are lower when compared to those in normal tissue of testis. The concentrations of Cl, Ca, Ti and Mn are in agreement in both cancerous and normal tissues of testis. The higher levels of Cu lead to the development of tumor. Our results also support the underlying hypothesis of an anticopper, antiangiogenic approach to cancer therapy. The Cu/Zn ratios of both penis and testis were higher in cancer tissues compared to that of normal.

  5. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  6. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis

    2016-02-09

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer.

  7. Expression of BCRP Gene in the Normal Lung Tissue and Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of novel multidrugresistance transporter (BCRP gene) from human MCF-7/AdrVp breast cancer cells in normal lung tissue and non-small lung cancer tissue. Methods: RNA was extracted immediately from fresh normal lung tissue and viable tumor tissue harvested from surgically resected specimens of non-small cell lung cancer patients. cDNA of BCRP gene was prepared by RT-PCR and was then amplified by PCR. cDNA products from those specimens were transferred to blotting membrane through electrophoresis and transferring technique and southern blot hybridization was eventually performed to detect the expression of BCRP gene. Results: RNA were extracted from 8 tumor tissue alone and 12 pairs of tumor tissue and normal lung tissue harvested from the same lung. Four patients' RNA samples with poor quality due to degrading were discarded. cDNA products of BCRP gene were obtained by RT-PCR and were then amplified by PCR in the remain 16 patients' RNA samples. Through southern blot hybridization, BCRP gene was found to be slightly expressed in various amounts in all normal lung tissue (10/10) and only in a half of tumor tissue samples (8/16). Conclusion: BCRP gene is slightly expressed in different amount in all normal lung tissue and only in a half of tumor tissue of non-small cell lung cancer patients. It is possible to induce it's overexpression and to develop multidrug resistance during chemotherapy if using anthracycline anticancer drugs.

  8. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  9. Classification of normal and cancerous lung tissues by electrical impendence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianling; Yue, Shihong; Chen, Jun; Wang, Huaxiang

    2014-01-01

    Biological tissue impedance spectroscopy can provide rich physiological and pathological information by measuring the variation of the complex impedance of biological tissues under various frequencies of driven current. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) technique can measure the impedance spectroscopy of biological tissue in medical field. Before application, a key problem must be solved on how to generally distinguish normal tissues from the cancerous in terms of measurable EIT data. In this paper, the impedance spectroscopy characteristics of human lung tissue are studied. On the basis of the measured data of 109 lung cancer patients, Cole-Cole Circle radius (CCCR) and the complex modulus are extracted. In terms of the two characteristics, 71.6% and 66.4% samples of cancerous and normal tissues can be correctly classified, respectively. Furthermore, two characteristics of the measured EIT data of each patient consist of a two-dimensional vector and all such vectors comprise a set of vectors. When classifying the vector set, the rate of correctly partitioning normal and cancerous tissues can be raised to 78.2%. The main factors to affect the classification results on normal and cancerous tissues are generally analyzed. The proposed method will play an important role in further working out an efficient and feasible diagnostic method for potential lung cancer patients, and provide theoretical basis and reference data for electrical impedance tomography technology in monitoring pulmonary function.

  10. Overexpression of Gli1 in cancer interstitial tissues predicts early relapse after radical operation of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hua Li; Hai-Feng Gao; Yan Wang; Fang Liu; Xiao-Feng Tian; Yang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate whether Gli1 expression is important in relapse after radical operation of breast cancer.Methods:Using immunohistochemistry,Glil expression was analyzed in human primary breast cancer (n=284) and paracancerous tissues (n=20),and also in local lymph nodes (n=28) and metastatic lymph nodes (n=28).Results:Initial analysis of Gli1 expression in a small cohort of 20 breast tumors and their paracancerous tissues showed a tendency towards Gli1 overexpression in breast cancer tissues (P<0.001).Further,Gli1 expression in 284 breast cancer tissue samples was analyzed and a significant correlation was found between increased expression of nuclear Gli1 and unfavorable recurrence-free survival (RFS) (P<0.05).The nuclear expression of Gli1 in metastatic lymph nodes following relapse after radical operation was much higher than that in the local lymph nodes of primary carcinoma (P<0.05).Most interestingly,the expression of Gli1 was much higher in the interstitial tissues of the relapsed group than of the non-relapsed group (P<0.001).Conclusions:Breast cancer shows a high prevalence of Gli1 expression,which is significantly correlated with aggressive features and unfavorable RFS.Nuclear Gli1 overexpression,especially in the interstitial tissues,signified early relapse after radical operation of breast cancer.

  11. Insights into esophagus tissue architecture using two-photon confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nenrong; Wang, Yue; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, microstructures of human esophageal mucosa were evaluated using the two-photon laser scanning confocal microscopy (TPLSCM), based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). The distribution of epithelial cells, muscle fibers of muscularis mucosae has been distinctly obtained. Furthermore, esophageal submucosa characteristics with cancer cells invading into were detected. The variation of collagen, elastin and cancer cells is very relevant to the pathology in esophagus, especially early esophageal cancer. Our experimental results indicate that the MPM technique has the much more advantages for label-free imaging, and has the potential application in vivo in the clinical diagnosis and monitoring of early esophageal cancer.

  12. Warburg effect's manifestation in aggressive pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas: insights from a mouse cell model applied to human tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M J Fliedner

    Full Text Available A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT cells has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC. We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in

  13. The magnitude of linear dichroism of biological tissues as a result of cancer changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojchuk, T. M.; Yermolenko, S. B.; Fedonyuk, L. Y.; Petryshen, O. I.; Guminetsky, S. G.; Prydij, O. G.

    2012-01-01

    The results of studies of linear dichroism values of different types of biological tissues (human prostate, esophageal epithelial human muscle tissue in rats) both healthy and infected tumor at different stages of development are shown here. The significant differences in magnitude of linear dichroism and its spectral dependence in the spectral range λ = 330 - 750 nm both among the objects of study, and between biotissues: healthy (or affected by benign tumors) and cancer patients are established. It is researched that in all cases in biological tissues (prostate gland, esophagus, human muscle tissue in rats) with cancer the linear dichroism arises, the value of which depends on the type of tissue and time of the tumor process. As for healthy tissues linear dichroism is absent, the results may have diagnostic value for detecting and assessing the degree of development of cancer.

  14. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium and nickel in cancerous and healthy tissues from patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to heavy metals has long been recognized as being capable to increase head and neck cancer incidence among exposed human populations. Head and neck cancer is a significant public health issue in Tunisia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of As, Cd, Cr and Ni in healthy and tumor tissues of head and neck cancer patients. Metal concentrations were determined in tumor and healthy tissues of 101 head and neck cancer patients, using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The As, Cd, Cr, and Ni levels in tumor tissues were 3.4, 2.5, 1.3 and 1.5 times higher than those of healthy tissues (p 60 years) in both never-smokers and ever-smokers (< 20 and ≥ 20 pack per year). Healthy tissue Cd levels were negatively associated with age in those three groups of smokers. The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among both workers and non-workers were observed in tumor tissues. The Cd and Cr in tissues of farmers, bricklayers and painters were all significantly higher among the workers as compared with the non-workers group. Tissue metal levels have increased due to smoking and occupational exposure. Heavy metal exposure via tobacco smoking and occupational exposures may increase the risk of head and neck in the Tunisian population. - Highlights: ► Heavy metal levels in tumor tissues were higher than those in healthy tissues. ► Tumor tissue Cd levels were positively associated with age in smokers. ► Tumor tissue metal levels were higher in men than in women. ► The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among workers were observed in tumor tissues. ► Heavy metal exposure via occupational exposures may increase the risk of HNC

  15. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kryczka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years. The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye.

  16. Non-Coding CK19 RNA in Peripheral Blood and Tissue of Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Neda Moazzezy; Saeid Bouzari; Najmeh Yardehnavi; Mana Oloomi

    2013-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the major cause of cancer-related death in women. The incidence of this carcinoma is rising and there are many attempts to decrease this problem. The aim of this study was detection of full-length cytokeratin 19 (CK19) mRNA, in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients in early stage of cancer. In this study, RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) technique was used for detection of CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer pat...

  17. Expression of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-zhi; FANG Tai-yong; XU Hai-gang; ZHUO Zhi-qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background CD44v6 plays an important role in invasion and metastasis of tumor,Livin has anti-apoptotic effects.The present study aimed to explore the expression and clinical significance of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue.Methods Streptavidin-peroxidase linked immunohistochemical method was used to determine the expression of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal gastric tissues from 59 patients with histopathologically confirmed gastric cancer,and in gastric tissue specimens of 15 patients with gastric polyps,and 15 patients with chronic non-atrophic gastritis.The chi-square test was used for comparison of the relevant factors,Spearman's rank correlation test was applied for relationship among positive expression of the proteins.Results The expresion of CD44v6 was positive in 64.4% of the gastric cancer patients; 5.1%,0 and 13.3% in specimens of normal tissues adjacent to the cancer tissues,in gastric tissue specimens of patients with gastric polyps,and patients with chronic non-atrophic gastritis,respectively.The expression of Livin was positive in 52.5% of the gastric cancer tissues,6.8%,0 and 6.7% in the adjacent normal gastric tissue,specimens of patients with gastric polyps and chronic non-atrophic gastritis,respectively.The expression of CD44v6 was significantly correlated with the depth of invasion,the degree of differentiation,and lymphnode metastasis of gastric cancer (P <0.05).The positive expression rate of Livin protein was also significantly correlated with degree of differentiation of gastric cancer cells and metastasis to lymphnodes (P <0.05),but not correlated with the depth of invasion and pathological types (P >0.05).The expression of CD44v6 and Livin in the gastric cancer tissue was positively correlated (rs=0.286,P=-0.028).Conclusions The increased expression of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue may be closely related with development and progression of gastric cancer.CD44v6 and Livin

  18. Progesterone and adiponectin receptor family member 3 expression and clinical significance in breast cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qiang Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Hong-Mei Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss progesterone and adiponectin receptor family member 3 expression and clinical significance in breast cancer tissues. Method:A total of 90 cases with breast cancer who were admitted in our hospital from Jan 2000 to Jan 2010 were selected. Meanwhile, normal tumor-adjacent breast tissues were selected as comparison. Diagnosis of all patients was confirmed by postoperative pathological examinations. Immunohistochemistry method was adopted to detect PAQR3 protein expression in breast cancer tissues and normal tumor-adjacent breast tissues and its clinical significance was discussed. Results:PAQR3 protein positive expression rate in breast cancer tissues was 25.6%, which was significantly lower than that (78.9%) in normal tumor-adjacent breast tissues;PAQR3 protein positive expression rate had nothing to do with age, tumor size, pathological types and differentiated degree of patients, but had significant correlation with TNM staging and lymphatic metastasis existence of patients. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis results showed that five years survival rate of patients with PAQR3 protein positive expression was significantly higher than whom with negative expression. Conclusion:PAQR3 protein expression in breast cancer tissues was significantly reduced, which indicated that PAQR3 protein possibly played an important role in pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  19. The nanomechanical signature of liver cancer tissues and its molecular origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mengxin; Li, Yiran; Liu, Weiren; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Xifei; Wang, Xinyan; Ding, Zhenbin; Peng, Yuanfei; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yinghong

    2015-07-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus distribution of surgically removed liver cancer tissues can serve as a mechanical fingerprint to evaluate the malignancy of liver cancer. Cirrhotic tissues shared the same LEP as normal tissues. However, a noticeable downward shift in the LEP was detected when the cirrhotic tissues progressed to a malignant state, making the tumor tissues more prone to microvascular invasion. Cell-level mechanistic studies revealed that the expression level of a Rho-family effector (mDia1) was consistent with the mechanical trend exhibited by the tissue. Our findings indicate that the mechanical profiles of liver cancer tissues directly varied with tumor progression, providing an additional platform for the future diagnosis of HCC.Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus

  20. HER1-4 protein concentrations in normal breast tissue from breast cancer patients are expressed by the same profile as in the malignant tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dorte Aa; Ostergaard, Birthe; Bokmand, Susanne;

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: The epidermal growth factor receptor HER2 is overexpressed or amplified in 25%-30% of patients with breast cancer. The mechanism behind HER2 amplification is unknown, but may be a patho-physiological phenomenon caused by continuous stimulation and activation of the HER1......-4 system. We have mapped the protein concentrations of HER1-4 in breast cancer tissue, autologous reference tissue, normal breast tissue and serum samples, to see whether non-cancer cells from these patients express a protein profile indicating general activation. Methods: Tissue samples from malignant...... and adjacent normal breast tissue (autologous reference tissue) were collected from 118 women consecutively admitted for surgical treatment of breast cancer. In addition, 26 samples of normal breast tissue were collected from healthy women having breast reduction surgery. The tissue samples were homogenized...

  1. NIH scientists map gene changes driving tumors in common pediatric soft-tissue cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have mapped the genetic changes that drive tumors in rhabdomyosarcoma, a pediatric soft-tissue cancer, and found that the disease is characterized by two distinct genotypes. The genetic alterations identified in this malignancy could be useful

  2. RELATED GENES IN LUNG CANCER TISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH RESIDENTIAL HIGH RADON EXPOSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏英; 杨梅英; 张守志; 叶常青

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the related genes in lung cancer tissues associated with residential high radon exposure. Methods: Differentially expressed gene fragments in lung cancer and normal lung tissues were discovered by differential display and reverse Northern blot hybridization method. The fragments positive in lung cancer and negative in normal lung tissue were determined. Results: Seven differential displayed fragments were sequenced. One of them named NA7 is 95% homologous with AI208667 in EAT of Genbank. Another fragment named NG2 is up to 98% homologous with five fragments. The remained one CA1 may be a new gene fragment. Conclusion: 3 gene fragments were discovered from lung cancer and normal lung tissues of high radon exposure resident.

  3. Breast cancer phenotypes regulated by tissue factor-factor VII pathway: Possible therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2014-12-10

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women, worldwide. Fortunately, breast cancer is relatively chemosensitive, with recent advances leading to the development of effective therapeutic strategies, significantly increasing disease cure rate. However, disease recurrence and treatment of cases lacking therapeutic molecular targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptors, referred to as triple-negative breast cancers, still pose major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches to treat aggressive breast cancers are essential. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is produced in the liver and secreted into the blood stream. Tissue factor (TF), the cellular receptor for fVII, is an integral membrane protein that plays key roles in the extrinsic coagulation cascade. TF is overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. The TF-fVII complex may be formed in the absence of injury, because fVII potentially exists in the tissue fluid within cancer tissues. The active form of this complex (TF-fVIIa) may stimulate the expression of numerous malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Thus, the TF-fVII pathway is a potentially attractive target for breast cancer treatment. To date, a number of studies investigating the mechanisms by which TF-fVII signaling contributes to breast cancer progression, have been conducted. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms controlling TF and fVII synthesis and regulation in breast cancer cells. Our current understanding of the TF-fVII pathway as a mediator of breast cancer progression will be also described. Finally, we will discuss how this knowledge can be applied to the design of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25493229

  4. Legal termination of a pregnancy resulting from transplanted cryopreserved ovarian tissue due to cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, EH; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Andersen, Claus Yding;

    2013-01-01

    To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer.......To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer....

  5. Analysis of blood and tissue in gallbladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautray, T.R. [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, 2-188-1 Samduk-dong, Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: tapash77@hotmail.com; Vijayan, V. [Dept. of Physics, Valliammai Engineering College, SRM Nagar, Chennai (India); Sudarshan, M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, 3/LB-8 Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 098, West Bengal (India); Panigrahi, S. [Dept. of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela 769 008, Orissa (India)

    2009-09-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission, particle induced {gamma}-ray emission studies has been carried out to analyse normal and carcinoma tissues and blood samples of gallbladder of both sexes and seventeen trace elements namely Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br and Pb were estimated in the tissue and blood samples. In the present study, concentration of Zn in the carcinoma gallbladder tissue is less than that of the normal gallbladder tissue. Tobacco habit could be one of the important factors to decrease the elemental concentrations in blood and tissue samples.

  6. Detergent-enzymatic decellularization of swine blood vessels: insight on mechanical properties for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegata, Alessandro F; Asnaghi, M Adelaide; Stefani, Ilaria; Maestroni, Anna; Maestroni, Silvia; Dominioni, Tommaso; Zonta, Sandro; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Mantero, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Small caliber vessels substitutes still remain an unmet clinical need; few autologous substitutes are available, while synthetic grafts show insufficient patency in the long term. Decellularization is the complete removal of all cellular and nuclear matters from a tissue while leaving a preserved extracellular matrix representing a promising tool for the generation of acellular scaffolds for tissue engineering, already used for various tissues with positive outcomes. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of a detergent-enzymatic decellularization protocol on swine arteries in terms of cell removal, extracellular matrix preservation, and mechanical properties. Furthermore, the effect of storage at -80°C on the mechanical properties of the tissue is evaluated. Swine arteries were harvested, frozen, and decellularized; histological analysis revealed complete cell removal and preserved extracellular matrix. Furthermore, the residual DNA content in decellularized tissues was far low compared to native one. Mechanical testings were performed on native, defrozen, and decellularized tissues; no statistically significant differences were reported for Young's modulus, ultimate stress, compliance, burst pressure, and suture retention strength, while ultimate strain and stress relaxation of decellularized vessels were significantly different from the native ones. Considering the overall results, the process was confirmed to be suitable for the generation of acellular scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

  7. Computational dissection of tissue contamination for identification of colon cancer-specific expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türeci, Ozlem; Ding, Jiayi; Hilton, Holly; Bian, Hongjin; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Braxenthaler, Michael; Seitz, Gerhard; Raddrizzani, Laura; Friess, Helmut; Buchler, Markus; Sahin, Ugur; Hammer, Juergen

    2003-03-01

    Microarray profiles of bulk tumor tissues reflect gene expression corresponding to malignant cells as well as to many different types of contaminating normal cells. In this report, we assess the feasibility of querying baseline multitissue transcriptome databases to dissect disease-specific genes. Using colon cancer as a model tumor, we show that the application of Boolean operators (AND, OR, BUTNOT) for database searches leads to genes with expression patterns of interest. The BUTNOT operator for example allows the assignment of "expression signatures" to normal tissue specimens. These expression signatures were then used to computationally identify contaminating cells within conventionally dissected tissue specimens. The combination of several logic operators together with an expression database based on multiple human tissue specimens can resolve the problem of tissue contamination, revealing novel cancer-specific gene expression. Several markers, previously not known to be colon cancer associated, are provided. PMID:12631577

  8. Diagnosis of colon cancer with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on the malignant colon tissue samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-bin; LIU Qian; HE Fei; GUO Chun-guang; WANG Cheng-feng; ZHAO Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with chemometrics discriminant analysis technology could improve diagnosis. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of FT-IR on malignant colon tissue samples in diagnosis of colon cancer.Methods Principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine classification were used to discriminate FT-IR spectra from malignant and normal tissue. Colon tissues samples from 85 patients were used to demonstrate the procedure.Results For this set of colon spectral data, the sensitivity and specificity of the support vector machine (SVM)classification were found both higher than 90%.Conclusions FT-IR provided important information about cancerous tissue, which could be used to discriminate malignant from normal tissues. The combination of PCA and SVM classification indicated that FT-IR has a potential clinical application in diagnosis of colon cancer.

  9. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periprostatic (PP adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia. Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated. Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis, whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH. Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable

  10. High level of ezrin expression in colorectal cancer tissues is closely related to tumor malignancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Jian Wang; Jin-Shui Zhu; Qiang Zhang; Qun Sun; Hua Guo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ezrin expression in normal colorectal mucosa and colorectal cancer tissues,and study the correlation between ezrin expression in colorectal cancer tissues and tumor invasion and metastasis.METHODS: Eighty paraffin-embedded cancer tissue samples were selected from primary colorectal adenocarcinoma. Twenty-eight patients had welldifferentiated,22 had moderately differentiated and 30had poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Forty-five patients and 35 patients had lymph node metastasis.Forty-five patients were of Dukes A to B stage, and 35were of C to D stage. Another 22 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of normal colorectal epithelium (> 5 cm away from the edge of the tumor) were selected as the control group. All patients with colorectal cancer were treated surgically and diagnosed histologically, without preoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The immunohistochemistry was used to detect the ezrin expression in paraffin-embedded normal colorectal mucosa tissues and colorectal cancer tissue samples.RESULTS: Ezrin expression in colorectal cancer was significantly higher than in normal colorectal mucosa (75.00% vs 9.09%, P < 0.01), and there was a close relationship between ezrin expression and the degree of tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and Dukes stage (88.46% vs 50.00%, P < 0.01; 94.28%vs 51.11%, P < 0.01; 94.28% vs 51.11%, P < 0.01).

  11. NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-related proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners : variation by occupational exposure and subtype of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pesch, Beate; Casjens, Swaantje; Stricker, Ingo; Westerwick, Daniela; Taeger, Dirk; Rabstein, Sylvia; Wiethege, Thorsten; Tannapfel, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Johnen, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background Radon and arsenic are established pulmonary carcinogens. We investigated the association of cumulative exposure to these carcinogens with NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-specific proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners. Methodology/Principal Findings Paraffin-embedded tissue of 147 miners was randomly selected from an autopsy repository by type of lung tissue, comprising adenocarcinoma (AdCa), squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and cancer-free tissue....

  12. Comparison of nuclear matrix proteins between gastric cancer and normal gastric tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin-Xian Zhang; Yi Ding; Zhuo Li; Xiao-Ping Le; Wei Zhang; Ling Sun; Hui-Rong Shi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the alteration of nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs) in gastric cancer.METHODS: The NMPs extracted from 22 cases of gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues were investigated by SDS-PAGE technique and the data were analyzed using Genetools analysis software.RESULTS: Compared with normal gastric tissue, the expression of 30 ku and 28 ku NMPs in gastric cancer decreased significantly (P=0.002, P=0.001, P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the expression of the two NMPs between the various differentiated grades (P=0.947, P=0.356) and clinical stages of gastric cancer (P=0.920, P=0.243, P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The results suggested that the alteration of NMPs in gastric cancer occurred at the early stage of gastric cancer development.

  13. The role of the tissue microenvironment in the regulation of cancer cell motility and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brábek Jan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During malignant neoplastic progression the cells undergo genetic and epigenetic cancer-specific alterations that finally lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and restructuring of the microenvironment. The invasion of cancer cells through connective tissue is a crucial prerequisite for metastasis formation. Although cell invasion is foremost a mechanical process, cancer research has focused largely on gene regulation and signaling that underlie uncontrolled cell growth. More recently, the genes and signals involved in the invasion and transendothelial migration of cancer cells, such as the role of adhesion molecules and matrix degrading enzymes, have become the focus of research. In this review we discuss how the structural and biomechanical properties of extracellular matrix and surrounding cells such as endothelial cells influence cancer cell motility and invasion. We conclude that the microenvironment is a critical determinant of the migration strategy and the efficiency of cancer cell invasion.

  14. Presence of S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in cancer tissues correlates with an early stage cancer and a better prognosis in patients with gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S100A9 was originally discovered as a factor secreted by inflammatory cells. Recently, S100A9 was found to be associated with several human malignancies. The purpose of this study is to investigate S100A9 expression in gastric cancer and explore its role in cancer progression. S100A9 expression in gastric tissue samples from 177 gastric cancer patients was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The expression of its dimerization partner S100A8 and the S100A8/A9 heterodimer were also assessed by the same method. The effect of exogenous S100A9 on motility of gastric cancer cells AGS and BGC-823 was then investigated. S100A9 was specifically expressed by inflammatory cells such as macrophages and neutrophils in human gastric cancer and gastritis tissues. Statistical analysis showed that a high S100A9 cell count (> = 200) per 200x magnification microscopic field in cancer tissues was predictive of early stage gastric cancer. High S100A9-positive cell count was negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.009) and tumor invasion (P = 0.011). S100A9 was identified as an independent prognostic predictor of overall survival of patients with gastric cancer (P = 0.04). Patients with high S100A9 cell count were with favorable prognosis (P = 0.021). Further investigation found that S100A8 distribution in human gastric cancer tissues was similar to S100A9. However, the number of S100A8-positive cells did not positively correlate with patient survival. The inflammatory cells infiltrating cancer were S100A8/A9 negative, while those in gastritis were positive. Furthermore, exogenous S100A9 protein inhibited migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results suggested S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in gastric cancer tissues are associated with early stage of gastric cancer and good prognosis

  15. The AKT-mTOR signalling pathway in kidney cancer tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirina, L. V.; Usynin, Y. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Yurmazov, Z. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Kolegova, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    An increased expression of phospho-AKT, m-TOR, glycogen regulator GSK-3-beta and transcription inhibitor 4E-BP1 was observed in kidney cancer tissues. Tumor size growth was associated with a high level of c-Raf and low content of phospho-m-TOR. Cancer metastasis development led to a decreased PTEN and phospho-AKT expression.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in human pancreatic cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Chen; Run-Zhou Ni; Ming-Bing Xiao; Ji-Guang Guo; Jia-Wei Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors. Early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is dififcult because of the latent onset and lack of good biomarkers. This study aimed to look for and identify differentially expressed proteins in tissues of pancreatic cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues by proteomic approaches so as to provide information about possible pancreatic cancer markers and therapeutic targets. METHODS:Proteins extracted from 3 paired adjacent noncancerous and cancerous pancreatic tissue specimens were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The protein spots exhibiting statistical alternations between the two groups through computerized image analysis were then identiifed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-lfight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). In addition, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to verify the expression of certain candidate proteins. RESULTS:Twelve proteins were signiifcantly upregulated and 4 were downregulated between cancerous and paired adjacent noncancerous pancreatic tissues. Several proteins (S100A11, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, GSTO1 and peroxiredoxin 4) were found for the ifrst time to be associated with pancreatic cancer. Differential expression of some identiifed proteins was further conifrmed by Western blotting analysis and/or immunohistochemical analysis.CONCLUSIONS:Comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-MS is an effective method for identifying differentially expressed proteins that may be the potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly L. Nicastro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention.

  18. Extensive adipose tissue necrosis following pfannenstiel incision for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Maryse Céline; Plante, Marie; Lemieux, Marie-Carine; Roberge, Céline; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Grégoire, Jean; Roy, Michel; Sebastianelli, Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Contexte : Les hématomes sont des complications postopératoires qui peuvent en venir à se manifester à la suite du recours à des incisions de Pfannenstiel. Habituellement, ils se résorbent de façon spontanée ou font l’objet d’un drainage (en fonction de leur ampleur). Des facteurs de risque importants (comme l’obésité et le diabète) pourraient mener à des complications surajoutées et aggraver davantage l’issue. Cas : Dix jours après avoir subi une hystérectomie abdominale totale par incision de Pfannenstiel en raison d’un cancer de l’endomètre, une femme de 73 ans a présenté un gros hématome sous-cutané. L’hématome en question a évolué et a mené à une nécrose étendue du tissu adipeux sous-cutané. La mise en œuvre d’un débridement de grande envergure s’est avérée nécessaire et la plaie a été traitée par pression négative au moyen de gaze afin de permettre une cicatrisation par deuxième intention. Une guérison satisfaisante a été constatée après 82 jours de traitement, sans greffe cutanée. Conclusion : Ce cas souligne l’utilité du traitement de plaie par pression négative au moyen de gaze, ainsi que la nécessité d’avoir recours à une approche multidisciplinaire au moment d’assurer la prise en charge de complications de plaie d’une telle complexité.

  19. Tissue proteomics in pancreatic cancer study: discovery, emerging technologies and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Kelly, Kimberly; Chen, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose and treat. The advances of proteomics technology, especially quantitative proteomics, have stimulated a great interest to apply this technology for pancreatic cancer study. A variety of tissue proteomics approaches have been applied to investigate pancreatic cancer and the associated diseases. These studies were carried out with various goals, aiming to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic t...

  20. Prostate cancer specific integrin αvβ3 modulates bone metastatic growth and tissue remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, NP; De, S.; Vasanji, A; Brainard, J; Byzova, TV

    2007-01-01

    The management of pain and morbidity owing to the spreading and growth of cancer within bone remains to be a paramount problem in clinical care. Cancer cells actively transform bone, however, the molecular requirements and mechanisms of this process remain unclear. This study shows that functional modulation of the αvβ3 integrin receptor in prostate cancer cells is required for progression within bone and determines tumor-induced bone tissue transformation. Using histology and quantitative mi...

  1. Molecular Markers for Prostate Cancer in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Sequeiros; Marta García; Melania Montes; Mireia Oliván; Marina Rigau; Eva Colás; Inés de Torres; Juan Morote; Jaume Reventós; Andreas Doll

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer in developed countries. The decisive method of diagnosis is based on the results of biopsies, morphologically evaluated to determine the presence or absence of cancer. Although this approach leads to a confident diagnosis in most cases, it can be improved by using the molecular markers present in the tissue. Both miRNAs and proteins are considered excellent candidates for biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE...

  2. RNA-Seq Accurately Identifies Cancer Biomarker Signatures to Distinguish Tissue of Origin1

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Iris H.; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Hui; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Arul M Chinnaiyan

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic cancer of unknown primary (CUP) accounts for up to 5% of all new cancer cases, with a 5-year survival rate of only 10%. Accurate identification of tissue of origin would allow for directed, personalized therapies to improve clinical outcomes. Our objective was to use transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify lineage-specific biomarker signatures for the cancer types that most commonly metastasize as CUP (colorectum, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, prostate, and stomach)....

  3. Meta-analysis of cancer transcriptomes: A new approach to uncover molecular pathological events in different cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundus Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To explore secrets of metastatic cancers, individual expression of true sets of respective genes must spread across the tissue. In this study, meta-analysis for transcriptional profiles of oncogenes was carried out to hunt critical genes or networks helping in metastasizing cancers. For this, transcriptomic analysis of different cancerous tissues causing leukemia, lung, liver, spleen, colorectal, colon, breast, bladder, and kidney cancers was performed by extracting microarray expression data from online resource; Gene Expression Omnibus. A newly developed bioinformatics technique; Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA was applied for enrichment analysis of transcriptional profiles using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID. Furthermore, oPOSSUM (v. 2.0 and Cytoscape (v. 2.8.2 were used for in-depth analysis of transcription factors and regulatory gene networks respectively. DAVID analysis uncovered the most significantly enriched pathways in molecular functions that were 'Ubiquitin thiolesterase activity' up regulated in blood, breast, bladder, colorectal, lung, spleen, prostrate cancer. 'Transforming growth factor beta receptor activity' was inhibited in all cancers except leukemia, colon and liver cancer. oPOSSUM further revealed highly over-represented Transcription Factors (TFs; Broad-complex_3, Broad-complex_4, and Foxd3 except for leukemia and bladder cancer. From these findings, it is possible to target genes and networks, play a crucial role in the development of cancer. In the future, these transcription factors can serve as potential candidates for the therapeutic drug targets which can impede the deadly spread.

  4. MicroRNA Expression in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Cancer Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Mogens Karsbøl; Dehlendorff, Christian; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer tissue samples are a readily available resource for microRNA (miRNA) biomarker identification. No established standard for reference miRNAs in FFPE tissue exists. We sought to identify stable reference miRNAs for normalization...

  5. Diffusion optical spectroscopy of cancerous and normal prostate tissues in time-resolved and frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kenneth J.; Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun

    2014-03-01

    It is well-known that light transport can be well described using Maxwell's electromagnetic theory. In biological tissue, the scattering particles cause the interaction of scattered waves from neighboring particles. Since such interaction cannot be ignored, multiple scattering occurs. The theoretical solution of multiple scattering is complicated. A suitable description is that the wavelike behavior of light is ignored and the transport of an individual photon is considered to be absorbed or scattered. This is known as the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) theory. Analytical solutions to the RTE that explicitly describes photon migration can be obtained by introducing some proper approximations. One of the most popular models used in the field of tissue optics is the Diffusion Approximation (DA). In this study, we report on the results of our initial study of optical properties of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissues and how tissue parameters affect the near infrared light transporting in the two types of tissues. The time-resolved transport of light is simulated as an impulse isotropic point source of energy within a homogeneous unbounded medium with different absorption and scattering properties of cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Light source is also modulated sinusoidally to yield a varied fluence rate in frequency domain at a distant observation point within the cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Due to difference of the absorption and scattering coefficients between cancerous and normal tissues, the expansion of light pulse, intensity, phase are found to be different.

  6. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) as a biomarker in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Mie; Mau-Sørensen, Morten; Brünner, Nils

    2013-01-01

    The value of Tissue Inhibitor of MetalloProteinase-1 (TIMP-1) as a biomarker in patients with gastric cancer (GC) is widely debated. The aim of this review is to evaluate available literature describing the association between levels of TIMP-1 in tumor tissue and/or blood and the prognosis...

  7. The nanomechanical signature of liver cancer tissues and its molecular origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mengxin; Li, Yiran; Liu, Weiren; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Xifei; Wang, Xinyan; Ding, Zhenbin; Peng, Yuanfei; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yinghong

    2015-08-14

    Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the "gold standard" in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus distribution of surgically removed liver cancer tissues can serve as a mechanical fingerprint to evaluate the malignancy of liver cancer. Cirrhotic tissues shared the same LEP as normal tissues. However, a noticeable downward shift in the LEP was detected when the cirrhotic tissues progressed to a malignant state, making the tumor tissues more prone to microvascular invasion. Cell-level mechanistic studies revealed that the expression level of a Rho-family effector (mDia1) was consistent with the mechanical trend exhibited by the tissue. Our findings indicate that the mechanical profiles of liver cancer tissues directly varied with tumor progression, providing an additional platform for the future diagnosis of HCC.

  8. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium and nickel in cancerous and healthy tissues from patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khlifi, Rim, E-mail: rimkhlifi@yahoo.fr [Marine Ecotoxicology, UR 09-03, Sfax University, IPEIS, BP 805, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Bioinformatics Unit, Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando [Department of Legal Medicine and Toxicology, University of Granada (Spain); Hammami, Bouthaina; Chakroun, Amine [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, HUC Habib Borguiba Hospital, Sfax (Tunisia); Rebai, Ahmed [Bioinformatics Unit, Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Hamza-Chaffai, Amel [Marine Ecotoxicology, UR 09-03, Sfax University, IPEIS, BP 805, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2013-05-01

    Chronic exposure to heavy metals has long been recognized as being capable to increase head and neck cancer incidence among exposed human populations. Head and neck cancer is a significant public health issue in Tunisia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of As, Cd, Cr and Ni in healthy and tumor tissues of head and neck cancer patients. Metal concentrations were determined in tumor and healthy tissues of 101 head and neck cancer patients, using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The As, Cd, Cr, and Ni levels in tumor tissues were 3.4, 2.5, 1.3 and 1.5 times higher than those of healthy tissues (p < 0.05), respectively. Tumor tissue metal levels were higher in men than in women. As and Cd levels in tumor and healthy tissue samples of patients smokers are significantly higher than those of non-smokers (p < 0.05). A strong effect of cumulative smoking as expressed in the number of pack per year, and tumor tissue Cd levels were positively associated with three groups of age (< 40, 51–60 and > 60 years) in both never-smokers and ever-smokers (< 20 and ≥ 20 pack per year). Healthy tissue Cd levels were negatively associated with age in those three groups of smokers. The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among both workers and non-workers were observed in tumor tissues. The Cd and Cr in tissues of farmers, bricklayers and painters were all significantly higher among the workers as compared with the non-workers group. Tissue metal levels have increased due to smoking and occupational exposure. Heavy metal exposure via tobacco smoking and occupational exposures may increase the risk of head and neck in the Tunisian population. - Highlights: ► Heavy metal levels in tumor tissues were higher than those in healthy tissues. ► Tumor tissue Cd levels were positively associated with age in smokers. ► Tumor tissue metal levels were higher in men than in women. ► The highest Cd and Cr concentrations among workers were observed in tumor tissues

  9. Concentration of uranium in human cancerous tissues of Southern Iraqi patients using fission track analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of nuclear fission track analysis with solid state nuclear track detectors CR-39 has been applied to determine concentrations of uranium in cancerous samples of human tissues that excised from patients in the three key southern Iraqi governorates namely, Basrah, Dhi-Qar, and Muthanna. These provinces were the sites of intensive military events during the Gulf Wars in 1991 and 2003. The investigation was based on the study of 24 abnormal samples and 12 normal samples for comparing the results. These samples include four types of soft tissues (kidney, breast, stomach and uterus). The results show that uranium concentrations in the normal tissues ranged between (1.42-4.76 μg kg-1), whereas in the cancerous tissues ranged between (3.37-7.22 μg kg-1). The uranium concentrations in the normal tissues were significantly lower than in the abnormal tissues (P < 0.001). (author)

  10. Cellular Mechanisms of Tissue Fibrosis. 7. New insights into the cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barkauskas, Christina E.; Paul W. Noble

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease characterized by severe and progressive scar formation in the gas-exchange regions of the lung. Despite years of research, therapeutic treatments remain elusive and there is a pressing need for deeper mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of the disease. In this article, we review our current knowledge of the triggers and/or perpetuators of pulmonary fibrosis with special emphasis on the alveolar epithelium and the underlying m...

  11. Recent insights in the therapeutic management of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestier, Louis; Lardière-Deguelte, Sophie; Volet, Julien; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains frequent and one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. In this article, we aimed to comprehensively review recent insights in the therapeutic management of gastric cancer, with focus on the surgical and perioperative management of resectable forms, and the latest advances regarding advanced diseases. Surgical improvements comprise the use of laparoscopic surgery including staging laparoscopy, a better definition of nodal dissection, and the development of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The best individualized perioperative management should be assessed before curative-intent surgery for all patients and can consists in perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The optimal timing and sequence of chemotherapy and radiation therapy with respect to surgery should be further explored. Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, they can benefit from doublet or triplet chemotherapy combination, including trastuzumab in HER2-positive patients. Upon progression, second-line therapy can be considered in patients with good performance status. Although anti-HER2 (trastuzumab) and anti-VEGFR (ramucirumab) may yield survival benefit, anti-EGFR and anti-HGFR therapies have failed to improve outcomes. Nevertheless, combination regimens containing cytotoxic drugs and targeted therapies should be further evaluated; keeping in mind that gastric cancer biology is different between Asia and the Western countries.

  12. Recent insights in the therapeutic management of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestier, Louis; Lardière-Deguelte, Sophie; Volet, Julien; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains frequent and one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. In this article, we aimed to comprehensively review recent insights in the therapeutic management of gastric cancer, with focus on the surgical and perioperative management of resectable forms, and the latest advances regarding advanced diseases. Surgical improvements comprise the use of laparoscopic surgery including staging laparoscopy, a better definition of nodal dissection, and the development of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The best individualized perioperative management should be assessed before curative-intent surgery for all patients and can consists in perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The optimal timing and sequence of chemotherapy and radiation therapy with respect to surgery should be further explored. Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, they can benefit from doublet or triplet chemotherapy combination, including trastuzumab in HER2-positive patients. Upon progression, second-line therapy can be considered in patients with good performance status. Although anti-HER2 (trastuzumab) and anti-VEGFR (ramucirumab) may yield survival benefit, anti-EGFR and anti-HGFR therapies have failed to improve outcomes. Nevertheless, combination regimens containing cytotoxic drugs and targeted therapies should be further evaluated; keeping in mind that gastric cancer biology is different between Asia and the Western countries. PMID:27156069

  13. Molecular Insights into Division of Single Human Cancer Cells in On-Chip Transparent Microtubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In vivo, mammalian cells proliferate within 3D environments consisting of numerous microcavities and channels, which contain a variety of chemical and physical cues. External environments often differ between normal and pathological states, such as the unique spatial constraints that metastasizing cancer cells experience as they circulate the vasculature through arterioles and narrow capillaries, where they can divide and acquire elongated cylindrical shapes. While metastatic tumors cause most cancer deaths, factors impacting early cancer cell proliferation inside the vasculature and those that can promote the formation of secondary tumors remain largely unknown. Prior studies investigating confined mitosis have mainly used 2D cell culture systems. Here, we mimic aspects of metastasizing tumor cells dividing inside blood capillaries by investigating single-cell divisions of living human cancer cells, trapped inside 3D rolled-up, transparent nanomembranes. We assess the molecular effects of tubular confinement on key mitotic features, using optical high- and super-resolution microscopy. Our experiments show that tubular confinement affects the morphology and dynamics of the mitotic spindle, chromosome arrangements, and the organization of the cell cortex. Moreover, we reveal that membrane blebbing and/or associated processes act as a potential genome-safety mechanism, limiting the extent of genomic instability caused by mitosis in confined circumstances, especially in tubular 3D microenvironments. Collectively, our study demonstrates the potential of rolled-up nanomembranes for gaining molecular insights into key cellular events occurring in tubular 3D microenvironments in vivo. PMID:27267364

  14. Biomimetic tissue-engineered systems for advancing cancer research: NCI Strategic Workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, Teresa K; Chan, Xin Yi; Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Ji, Kyungmin; Park, Kyung Min; Roshan-Ghias, Alireza; Sethi, Pallavi; Thakur, Archana; Tian, Xi; Villasante, Aranzazu; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Moore, Nicole M; Nagahara, Larry A; Kuhn, Nastaran Z

    2014-10-01

    Advanced technologies and biomaterials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine present tractable biomimetic systems with potential applications for cancer research. Recently, the National Cancer Institute convened a Strategic Workshop to explore the use of tissue biomanufacturing for development of dynamic, physiologically relevant in vitro and ex vivo biomimetic systems to study cancer biology and drug efficacy. The workshop provided a forum to identify current progress, research gaps, and necessary steps to advance the field. Opportunities discussed included development of tumor biomimetic systems with an emphasis on reproducibility and validation of new biomimetic tumor models, as described in this report.

  15. Intraoperative near-infrared imaging can distinguish cancer from normal tissue but not inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Holt

    Full Text Available Defining tumor from non-tumor tissue is one of the major challenges of cancer surgery. Surgeons depend on visual and tactile clues to select which tissues should be removed from a patient. Recently, we and others have hypothesized near-infrared (NIR imaging can be used during surgery to differentiate tumors from normal tissue.We enrolled 8 canines and 5 humans undergoing cancer surgery for NIR imaging. The patients were injected with indocyanine green (ICG, an FDA approved non-receptor specific NIR dye that accumulates in hyperpermeable tissues, 16-24 hours prior to surgery. During surgery, NIR imaging was used to discriminate the tumor from non-tumor tissue.NIR imaging identified all tumors with a mean signal-to-background ratio of 6.7. Optical images were useful during surgery in discriminating normal tissue from cancer. In 3 canine cases and 1 human case, the tissue surrounding the tumor was inflamed due to obstruction of the vascular supply due to mass effect. In these instances, NIR imaging could not distinguish tumor tissue from tissue that was congested, edematous and did not contain cancer.This study shows that NIR imaging can identify tumors from normal tissues, provides excellent tissue contrast, and it facilitates the resection of tumors. However, in situations where there is significant peritumoral inflammation, NIR imaging with ICG is not helpful. This suggests that non-targeted NIR dyes that accumulate in hyperpermeable tissues will have significant limitations in the future, and receptor-specific NIR dyes may be necessary to overcome this problem.

  16. Quantitative proteomics in resected renal cancer tissue for biomarker discovery and profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Atrih, A; Mudaliar, M A V; Zakikhani, P; Lamont, D J; Huang, J T-J; Bray, S.E.; Barton, G.; Fleming, S; Nabi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteomics-based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. We present state-of-art label-free quantitative proteomics method to assess proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with noncancer renal tissues. Methods: Fresh frozen tissue samples from eight primary RCC lesions and autologous adjacent normal renal tissues were obtained from surgically resected tumour-bearing kidneys. Proteins were extracted by complete solubilisation of...

  17. Application of RT-PCR in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zhuo-min; Liu, Hong-Yu; Bai, Yun; Sen WEI; Ying LI; Wang, Min; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Qing-hua

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To analyze gene expression in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues using modified method. Methods: Total RNA from frozen tissues was extracted using TRIZOL reagent. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues by digestion with proteinase K before the acid-phenol:chloroform extraction and carrier precipitation. We modified this method by using a higher concentration of proteinase K and a longer digestion time, optimized to 16 hours. RT-PCR and real-ti...

  18. New Mechanism of Bone Cancer Pain: Tumor Tissue-Derived Endogenous Formaldehyde Induced Bone Cancer Pain via TRPV1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, You

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, our serial investigations focused on the role of cancer cells-derived endogenous formaldehyde in bone cancer pain. We found that cancer cells produced formaldehyde through demethylation process by serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT1 and SHMT2) and lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1). When the cancer cells metastasized into bone marrow, the elevated endogenous formaldehyde induced bone cancer pain through activation on the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) in the peripheral nerve fibers. More interestingly, TRPV1 expressions in the peripheral fibers were upregulated by the local insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) produced by the activated osteoblasts. In conclusion, tumor tissue-derived endogenous formaldehyde induced bone cancer pain via TRPV1 activation. PMID:26900062

  19. Contribution to the study of radiation induced bone tissue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work four original observations of more or less long-delayed cancers induced by ionizing radiations are compared with 34 other cases in the literature, after which an attempt is made to establish a general and prognostic synthesis of the results; the indications to emerge are as follows: - Ionizing radiation-induced cancers are very rare, especially when compared with the extensive therapeutic use made of X-rays; - The probability of radio-cancer formation, though no figures are given in the many papers consulted, seems nevertheless to be higher in cases of benign lesion irradiation; - Induced cancers have been observed after treatments with all types of radiation, whether or not the lesion is tumoral or cancerous, whatever the patient's age at the time of irradiations; - As a general rule these neoplasms appear after a variable latency period but usually from the 6th post-radiotherapy year onwards, with a greater frequency range between 6 and 12 years; - These induced cancers are generally epitheliomas or sarcomas, the latter being noticeably more predominant than in the case of spontaneous cancers. Leukoses may also be observed

  20. Tissue Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Calcium, Copper and Iron Levels in Cancerous Lung Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Yousuf ALWAHAIBI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The expression of various trace elements and markers in lung cancer is controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the presence of calcium (Ca, copper (Cu, iron (Fe and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA in cancerous untreated lung tissues and to determine a possible association between these markers and lung cancer. Methods Fourty-eight cancerous lung tissue blocks, from Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Sultanate of Oman, were studied. Fe, Ca, Cu, and CEA were demonstrated in the tissue blocks using Perl's Prussian blue, Von Kossa's, modified rhodanine and immunohistochemical staining methods, respectively. Results Twenty-three of 48 specimens showed positive Fe staining, 2 showed positive Ca staining and Cu was absent in all specimens. 93.7% expressed CEA in varying degree of positivity. 81.25% of these sections showed high expression of CEA. Conclusion Tissue concentrations of trace elements were not elevated in lung cancer and therefore cannot be considered as a potential marker. Despite the low sensitivity and specificity of CEA as previously reported, tissue CEA should be considered as a potential marker in the evaluation of lung cancer.

  1. Tissue Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Calcium, Copper and Iron Levels in Cancerous Lung Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasar Yousuf ALWAHAIBI; Jokha Sultan ALGHARIBI; Amna Salim ALSHUKAILI; Ahmed Khalifa ALSHUKAILI

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective The expression of various trace elements and markers in lung cancer is controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the presence of calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in cancerous untreated lung tissues and to determine a possible association between these markers and lung cancer.Methods Fourty-eight cancerous lung tissue blocks, from Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Sultanate of Oman, were studied. Fe, Ca, Cu, and CEA were demonstrated in the tissue blocks using Perl's Prussian blue, Von Kossa's, modified rhodanine and immunohistochemical staining methods, respectively.Results Twenty-three of 48 specimens showed positive Fe staining, 2 showed positive Ca staining and Cu was absent in all specimens. 93.7% expressed CEA in varying degree of positivity. 81.25% of these sections showed high expression of CEA. Conclusion Tissue concentrations of trace elements were not elevated in lung cancer and therefore cannot be considered as a potential marker. Despite the low sensitivity and specificity of CEA as previously reported, tissue CEA should be considered as a potential marker in the evaluation of lung cancer.

  2. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  3. Contemporary and future insights into fertility preservation in male cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, survival rates of cancer patients have increased, resulting in a shift of focus from quantity to quality of life. A key aspect of quality of life is fertility potential; patients suffering from iatrogenic infertility often become depressed. Since many cancer therapies-chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery-and even cancer itself have detrimental effects on the male reproductive system, it is important to preserve fertility before any treatment commences. Currently, the only reliable method of male fertility preservation is sperm banking. For patients who are unable to provide semen samples by the conventional method of masturbation, there are other techniques such as electroejaculation, microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration and testicular sperm extraction that can be employed. Unfortunately, it is presently impossible to preserve the fertility potential of pre-pubertal patients. Due to the increasing numbers of adolescent cancer patients surviving treatment, extensive research is being conducted into several possible methods such as testicular tissue cryopreservation, xenografting, in vitro gamete maturation and even the creation of artificial gametes. However, in spite of its ease, safety, convenience and many accompanying benefits, sperm banking remains underutilized in cancer patients. There are several barriers involved such as the lack of information and the urgency to begin treatment, but various measures can be put in place to overcome these barriers so that sperm banking can be more widely utilized. PMID:26816750

  4. Laser Direct-Write Onto Live Tissues: A Novel Model for Studying Cancer Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Hope E; Phamduy, Theresa B; Azimi, Mohammad S; Saksena, Jayant; Burow, Matthew E; Collins-Burow, Bridgette M; Chrisey, Douglas B; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-11-01

    Investigation into the mechanisms driving cancer cell behavior and the subsequent development of novel targeted therapeutics requires comprehensive experimental models that mimic the complexity of the tumor microenvironment. Recently, our laboratories have combined a novel tissue culture model and laser direct-write, a form of bioprinting, to spatially position single or clustered cancer cells onto ex vivo microvascular networks containing blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and interstitial cell populations. Herein, we highlight this new model as a tool for quantifying cancer cell motility and effects on angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in an intact network that matches the complexity of a real tissue. Application of our proposed methodology offers an innovative ex vivo tissue perspective for evaluating the effects of gene expression and targeted molecular therapies on cancer cell migration and invasion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2333-2338, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26923437

  5. Study of selected trace elements in cancerous and non-cancerous human breast tissues using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of cancer on selected trace elements among sudanese patients with confirmed breast cancer. Eighty samples of cancerous and normal tissues (total of one hundred and sixty) were obtained from the same breast of the same subject from different hospitals in Khartoum State. Samples were freeze dried and analyzed using neutron activation analysis (NAA). Neutron irradiations were performed at Egypt second research reactor with a maximum thermal flux of 2.37 Χ 1014 n cm-2 s-1. To examine if there was any difference in the concentrations of elements from normal and malignant tissues; Wilcox on signed ranks test was used. It was found that Al, Mn, Mg, Se, Zn, and Cr elements from the malignant tissues are significantly elevated (p0.05). The results obtained have shown consistency with results obtained by some previous studies, however, no data could be found for the elements Mg, Cr, and Sc.(Author)

  6. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  7. A Cancer-Indicative microRNA Pattern in Normal Prostate Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schlomm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the levels of selected micro-RNAs in normal prostate tissue to assess their potential to indicate tumor foci elsewhere in the prostate. Histologically normal prostate tissue samples from 31 prostate cancer patients and two cancer negative control groups with either unsuspicious or elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA levels (14 and 17 individuals, respectively were analyzed. Based on the expression analysis of 157 microRNAs in a pool of prostate tissue samples and information from data bases/literature, we selected eight microRNAs for quantification by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Selected miRNAs were analyzed in histologically tumor-free biopsy samples from patients and healthy controls. We identified seven microRNAs (miR-124a, miR-146a & b, miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a & b, which displayed significant differential expression in normal prostate tissue from men with prostate cancer compared to both cancer negative control groups. Four microRNAs (miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a and let-7b remained to significantly discriminate normal tissues from prostate cancer patients from those of the cancer negative control group with elevated PSA levels. The transcript levels of these microRNAs were highly indicative for the presence of cancer in the prostates, independently of the PSA level. Our results suggest a microRNA-pattern in histologically normal prostate tissue, indicating prostate cancer elsewhere in the organ.

  8. PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Shi, Jian-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Rui; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Ya-Chao; Wei, Teng-Yao; Gao, Ying; Li, Wei; Tang, Hong-Ying; Tang, Mei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues, as well as the association with colorectal cancer clinical data. In total, 54 cases of colorectal cancer tissue samples and normal adjacent tissue samples were collected between June, 2013 and July, 2014. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of PAQR3 in colorectal samples, respectively. MSP was used to detect the methylation level of PAQR3 gene in colorectal samples, which was compared with colorectal data. The results showed that a decreased expression level of PAQR3 mRNA in colorectal cancer tissues and the expression reduction rate was 57.4% (31/54). Similarly, the expression level of PAQR3 protein was reduced in cancer tissues, and the reduction rate was 46.3% (25/54), while the protein expression reduction rate in cancer adjacent tissue was 5.6% (3/54), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Furthermore, the methylation rates of PAQR3 in cancer tissues and cancer adjacent tissues were 33.3% (18/54) and 5.6% (3/54), respectively. In addition, PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels in colorectal cancer tissues were associated with the differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. The methylation level of PAQR3 was associated with age, differentiated degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In conclusion, the expression of PAQR3 mRNA and protein in colorectal cancer was reduced and methylation of PAQR3 occurred. Although the PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels were not associated with gender, age or the location of tumor, there was an association with differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In addition, the methylation level of PAQR3 was not correlated with gender or tumor location, but was correlated with age, differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth.

  9. Magnetically actuated tissue engineered scaffold: insights into mechanism of physical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir-Lekhovitser, Yulia; Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Jopp, Juergen; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-02-01

    Providing the right stimulatory conditions resulting in efficient tissue promoting microenvironment in vitro and in vivo is one of the ultimate goals in tissue development for regenerative medicine. It has been shown that in addition to molecular signals (e.g. growth factors) physical cues are also required for generation of functional cell constructs. These cues are particularly relevant to engineering of biological tissues, within which mechanical stress activates mechano-sensitive receptors, initiating biochemical pathways which lead to the production of functionally mature tissue. Uniform magnetic fields coupled with magnetizable nanoparticles embedded within three dimensional (3D) scaffold structures remotely create transient physical forces that can be transferrable to cells present in close proximity to the nanoparticles. This study investigated the hypothesis that magnetically responsive alginate scaffold can undergo reversible shape deformation due to alignment of scaffold's walls in a uniform magnetic field. Using custom made Helmholtz coil setup adapted to an Atomic Force Microscope we monitored changes in matrix dimensions in situ as a function of applied magnetic field, concentration of magnetic particles within the scaffold wall structure and rigidity of the matrix. Our results show that magnetically responsive scaffolds exposed to an externally applied time-varying uniform magnetic field undergo a reversible shape deformation. This indicates on possibility of generating bending/stretching forces that may exert a mechanical effect on cells due to alternating pattern of scaffold wall alignment and relaxation. We suggest that the matrix structure deformation is produced by immobilized magnetic nanoparticles within the matrix walls resulting in a collective alignment of scaffold walls upon magnetization. The estimated mechanical force that can be imparted on cells grown on the scaffold wall at experimental conditions is in the order of 1 pN, which

  10. Magnetically actuated tissue engineered scaffold: insights into mechanism of physical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir-Lekhovitser, Yulia; Rotenberg, Menahem Y; Jopp, Juergen; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-02-14

    Providing the right stimulatory conditions resulting in efficient tissue promoting microenvironment in vitro and in vivo is one of the ultimate goals in tissue development for regenerative medicine. It has been shown that in addition to molecular signals (e.g. growth factors) physical cues are also required for generation of functional cell constructs. These cues are particularly relevant to engineering of biological tissues, within which mechanical stress activates mechano-sensitive receptors, initiating biochemical pathways which lead to the production of functionally mature tissue. Uniform magnetic fields coupled with magnetizable nanoparticles embedded within three dimensional (3D) scaffold structures remotely create transient physical forces that can be transferrable to cells present in close proximity to the nanoparticles. This study investigated the hypothesis that magnetically responsive alginate scaffold can undergo reversible shape deformation due to alignment of scaffold's walls in a uniform magnetic field. Using custom made Helmholtz coil setup adapted to an Atomic Force Microscope we monitored changes in matrix dimensions in situ as a function of applied magnetic field, concentration of magnetic particles within the scaffold wall structure and rigidity of the matrix. Our results show that magnetically responsive scaffolds exposed to an externally applied time-varying uniform magnetic field undergo a reversible shape deformation. This indicates on possibility of generating bending/stretching forces that may exert a mechanical effect on cells due to alternating pattern of scaffold wall alignment and relaxation. We suggest that the matrix structure deformation is produced by immobilized magnetic nanoparticles within the matrix walls resulting in a collective alignment of scaffold walls upon magnetization. The estimated mechanical force that can be imparted on cells grown on the scaffold wall at experimental conditions is in the order of 1 pN, which

  11. Relationship between expression of EGFR in gastric cancer tissue and clinicopathological features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Gao; Xiu-Ju Liang; Zi-Sen Zhang; Wang Ma; Zhi-Wei Chang; Ming-Zhi Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in gastric cancer and the clinicopathological features and prognosis. Methods: A total of 78 paraffin specimens of gastric cancer operation were collected. The immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of EGFR in 78 cases of gastric cancer and 20 cases of adjacent normal tissue. The relationship between the high expression of EGFR and clinicopathological features was analyzed. Results: EGFR positive expression rate in the 78 cases of gastric cancer tissue was 57.7 %( 45/78), while EGFR was not expressed in 20 cases of adjacent normal tissue. The high EGFR expression was positively correlated with the position of gastric cancer, tumor size, cell differentiation, invasive depth, lymph node metastasis and TNM staging, yet having no obvious relation with gender or age. Conclusions: EGFR expression level in gastric cancer is closely related to the incidence and development of gastric cancer, which can provide a theoretical basis for the targeted therapy for gastric cancer with EGFR as the target.

  12. Selection of a breast cancer subpopulation-specific antibody using phage display on tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla J;

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations. These populations display a high variance in morphology, growth and metastatic propensity. They respond differently to therapeutic interventions, and some may be more prone to cause recurrence. Studying individual subpopulations...... of breast cancer may provide crucial knowledge for the development of individualized therapy. However, this process is challenged by the availability of biomarkers able to identify subpopulations specifically. Here, we demonstrate an approach for phage display selection of recombinant antibody fragments...... on cryostat sections of human breast cancer tissue. This method allows for selection of recombinant antibodies binding to antigens specifically expressed in a small part of the tissue section. In this case, a CD271(+) subpopulation of breast cancer cells was targeted, and these may be potential breast cancer...

  13. Analysis of different components in the peritumoral tissue microenvironment of colorectal cancer: A potential prospect in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Liu, Hong; Gong, Xiuli; Wen, Bin; Chen, Dan; Liu, Jinyuan; Hu, Fengliang

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to observe the varying expression of biomarkers in the microenvironment adjacent to colorectal cancer lesions to provide additional insight into the functions of microenvironment components in carcinogenesis and present a novel or improved indicator for early diagnosis of cancer. A total of 144 human samples from three different locations in 48 patients were collected, these locations were 10, 5 and 2 cm from the colorectal cancer lesion, respectively. The biomarkers analyzed included E‑cadherin, cytokeratin 18 (CK18), hyaluronidase‑1 (Hyal‑1), collagen type I (Col‑I), Crumbs3 (CRB3), vimentin, proteinase activated receptor 3 (PAR‑3), α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA), cyclin D1 (CD1) and cluster of differentiation (CD)133. In addition, crypt architecture was observed. Related functional analysis of proteins was performed using hierarchical index cluster analysis. More severe destroyed crypt architecture closer to the cancer lesions was observed compared with the 10 cm sites, with certain crypts degraded entirely. Expression levels of E‑cadherin, CK18, CRB3 and PAR‑3 were lower in 2 cm sites compared with the 10 cm sites (all P0.05 and P=0.0001, respectively), while the expression of vimentin, α‑SMA, CD1 and CD133 were not. Hyal‑1 and Col‑I may be independently important in cancer initiation in the tumor microenvironment. The results of the present study suggest that the biomarkers in the tissue microenvironment are associated with early tumorigenesis and may contribute to the development of carcinomas. These observations may be useful for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. PMID:27484148

  14. Analysis of different components in the peritumoral tissue microenvironment of colorectal cancer: A potential prospect in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Liu, Hong; Gong, Xiuli; Wen, Bin; Chen, Dan; Liu, Jinyuan; Hu, Fengliang

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to observe the varying expression of biomarkers in the microenvironment adjacent to colorectal cancer lesions to provide additional insight into the functions of microenvironment components in carcinogenesis and present a novel or improved indicator for early diagnosis of cancer. A total of 144 human samples from three different locations in 48 patients were collected, these locations were 10, 5 and 2 cm from the colorectal cancer lesion, respectively. The biomarkers analyzed included E‑cadherin, cytokeratin 18 (CK18), hyaluronidase‑1 (Hyal‑1), collagen type I (Col‑I), Crumbs3 (CRB3), vimentin, proteinase activated receptor 3 (PAR‑3), α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA), cyclin D1 (CD1) and cluster of differentiation (CD)133. In addition, crypt architecture was observed. Related functional analysis of proteins was performed using hierarchical index cluster analysis. More severe destroyed crypt architecture closer to the cancer lesions was observed compared with the 10 cm sites, with certain crypts degraded entirely. Expression levels of E‑cadherin, CK18, CRB3 and PAR‑3 were lower in 2 cm sites compared with the 10 cm sites (all P0.05 and P=0.0001, respectively), while the expression of vimentin, α‑SMA, CD1 and CD133 were not. Hyal‑1 and Col‑I may be independently important in cancer initiation in the tumor microenvironment. The results of the present study suggest that the biomarkers in the tissue microenvironment are associated with early tumorigenesis and may contribute to the development of carcinomas. These observations may be useful for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  15. Peri-Implant Tissue Findings in Bone Grafted Oral Cancer Patients Compared to non Bone Grafted Patients without Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Wolff; Hideki Agata; George K. Sándor; Suvi Haimi

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study was to compare microbiological, histological, and mechanical findings from tissues around osseointergrated dental implants in patients who had undergone tumour resection and subsequent bone grafting with non bone grafted patients without a history of oral cancer and to develop an effective tool for the monitoring of the peri-implant tissues. A third aim was to assess and compare the masticatory function of the two patient groups after reconstruction w...

  16. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo

  17. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Ruth M [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cole, Bryan E [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wallace, Vincent P [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pye, Richard J [Department of Dermatology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Arnone, Donald D [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Linfield, Edmund H [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pepper, Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-07

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Hyaluronidase activity in gynaecological cancer tissues with different metastatic forms.

    OpenAIRE

    Tamakoshi, K.; Kikkawa, F; Maeda, O; Suganuma, N; Yamagata, S.; T. Yamagata; Tomoda, Y

    1997-01-01

    We investigated hyaluronidase activity in gynaecological normal and malignant tissues. Hyaluronidase activity in culture medium of tissue specimens was detected by hyaluronic acid zymography and quantified by densitometry. Hyaluronidase activity was shown as one dominant band (molecular weight 65 kDa) at pH 3.5. Hyaluronidase activity was significantly higher in normal ovary (P < 0.05) and normal endometrium (P< 0.05) than in normal cervix. One dominant 65-kDa hyaluronidase was expressed in 1...

  19. Level of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate in cancerous tissue in patients with gastric cancer under preoperative administration of TS-1. A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S; Kubota, K

    2005-09-01

    Metabolizing enzymes such as thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) have long been known to be useful for predicting response and outcome in patients receiving 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, few studies have examined the cancerous tissue levels of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (FdUMP), a metabolite of 5-FU that has an important role in inhibiting DNA synthesis. In this study, for the first time to our knowledge, we measured concentrations of FdUMP in tumor specimens and surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained at operation in 10 patients with gastric cancer who received TS-1 before surgery (80 mg/m2, 3 days). The FdUMP level in the cancerous tissue was significantly higher than that in the non-cancerous tissue (153.0 +/- 85.7 pmol/g tissue vs. 53.0 +/- 47.0 pmol/g tissue)(p = 0.0046). Furthermore, the TS level in tumor was significantly higher than that in non-cancerous tissue (6.362 +/- 5.106 pmol/g tissue vs. 2.092 +/- 2.050 pmol/g tissue) (p = 0.0310). The mean ratios of TS-bound FdUMP to TS and FdUMP concentrations in the cancerous tissues were 45.9% and 2.00%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that in cancerous tissue, TS-1 may produce high FdUMP concentration and suppress about half FdUMP concentration by forming ternary complexes. PMID:16270533

  20. Loss of antigenicity with tissue age in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Susan E; Han, Gang; Mani, Nikita; Beruti, Susan; Nerenberg, Michael; Rimm, David L

    2016-03-01

    Archived tumor specimens, particularly those collected by large cooperative groups and trials, provide a wealth of material for post hoc clinical investigation. As these tissues are rigorously collected and preserved for many decades, subsequent use of the specimens to answer clinical questions must rely on the assumption that expression and detection of target biomarkers are not degraded with time. To test this assumption, we measured the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki67 in human breast carcinoma using quantitative immunofluorescence (QIF) in a series of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from 1295 individual patients preserved for 7 to 53 years in four cohorts on tissue microarrays. Protein expression was measured using the automated quantitative analysis method for QIF. Change in quantitative protein expression over time was estimated in positive cases using both Pearson's correlation and a polynomial regression analysis with a random effects model. The average signal decreased with preservation time for all biomarkers measured. For ER and HER2, there was an average of 10% signal loss after 9.9 years and 8.5 years, respectively, compared with the most recent tissue. Detection of Ki67 expression was lost more rapidly, with 10% signal loss in just 4.5 years. Overall, these results demonstrate the need for adjustment of tissue age when studying FFPE biospecimens. The rate of antigenicity loss is biomarker specific and should be considered as an important variable for studies using archived tissues. PMID:26568292

  1. Insights into the molecular mechanism of glucose metabolism regulation under stress in chicken skeletal muscle tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wuyi; Zhao, Jingpeng

    2014-01-01

    As substantial progress has been achieved in modern poultry production with large-scale and intensive feeding and farming in recent years, stress becomes a vital factor affecting chicken growth, development, and production yield, especially the quality and quantity of skeletal muscle mass. The review was aimed to outline and understand the stress-related genetic regulatory mechanism, which significantly affects glucose metabolism regulation in chicken skeletal muscle tissues. Progress in curr...

  2. Exome Enrichment and SOLiD Sequencing of Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE Prostate Cancer Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Biskup

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue. This study’s aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing.

  3. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  4. Insights on Metal Based Dental Implants and their Interaction with the Surrounding Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Marcela; Hussien, Mohamed D; Cirstea, Alexandra; Grigore, Raluca; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Sakizlian, Monica; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Bertesteanu, Serban

    2015-01-01

    At present, the use of dental implants is a very common practice as tooth loss is a frequent problem and can occur as a result of disease or trauma. An implant is usually made of biocompatible materials that do not cause rejection reactions and allow the implant union with the respective bone. To achieve this goal, the implant surface may have different structures and coatings, generally used to increase the adherence of the implant to the bone and to decrease the risk of the periimplantar inflammatory reactions. This review gives some insights of the metal based materials used for dental implants, their limits, improvement strategies as well as the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of periimplantary diseases.

  5. Exploration of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecule expression in cervical cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Chong Yuan; QiongYang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecules in cervical cancer tissue.Methods:Cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected to detect the expression of FoxM1, proliferation-related genes (CDK6 and CDK8) and angiogenesis-related genes (VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC); Hela cells were cultured and transfected with FoxM1 siRNA, and then expression of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC were detected.Results:mRNA contents of FoxM1, CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in normal cervical tissue; mRNA content of FoxM1 was positively correlated with mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC; mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC of FoxM1-siRNA group were significantly lower than those of negative control-siRNA group.Conclusion:FoxM1 expression abnormally increases in cervical cancer tissue, and its downstream target genes include CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC.

  6. Expression of CD40 and CD40L in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Its Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To study expression of CD40 and CD40L in gastric cancer tissue we assessed gastric cancer patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University and control subjects. Gastric cancer and normal (from around tumours tissue samples were obtained from patients. Venous blood samples (gastric cancer and ulcer groups were drawn on the morning of the day before surgery for the measurement of peripheral sCD40L. The expression of CD40 in gastric carcinoma specimens was examined immuno-histochemically. The clinicopathological factors, including age, sex, tumor size, gross appearance, degree of cellular differentiation, histological classification, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage were analyzed according to the different expression of CD40. The results indicated a high CD40 expression in gastric cancer tissues. This positive expression of CD40 revealed a significant (P < 0.05 correlation with lymphatic metastasis and tumor TNM stage in gastric cancer patients. It is concluded that higher CD40 expression existed in expanding type tumors and could play an important role in clinical diagnosis of gastric cancer patients.

  7. Prognostic microRNAs in cancer tissue from patients operated for pancreatic cancer--five microRNAs in a prognostic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Andersen, Klaus; Roslind, Anne;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) that can predict overall survival (OS) in non micro-dissected cancer tissues from patients operated for pancreatic cancer (PC).......The aim of the present study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) that can predict overall survival (OS) in non micro-dissected cancer tissues from patients operated for pancreatic cancer (PC)....

  8. Critical roles of specimen type and temperature before and during fixation in the detection of phosphoproteins in breast cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Gündisch, Sibylle; Annaratone, Laura; Beese, Christian; Drecol, Enken; Marchiò, Caterina; Quaglino, Elena; Sapino, Anna; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Bussolati, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The most efficient approach for therapy selection to inhibit the deregulated kinases in cancer tissues is to measure their phosphorylation status prior to the treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of pre-analytical parameters (cold ischemia time, temperature before and during tissue fixation, and sample type) on the levels of proteins and phosphoproteins in breast cancer tissues, focusing on the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. The BALB-neuT mouse breast cancer model expressing...

  9. Adipose tissue development during early life: novel insights into energy balance from small and large mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Michael E; Pope, Mark; Budge, Helen

    2012-08-01

    Since the rediscovery of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult human subjects in 2007, there has been a dramatic resurgence in research interest in its role in heat production and energy balance. This has coincided with a reassessment of the origins of BAT and the suggestion that brown preadipocytes could share a common lineage with skeletal myoblasts. In precocial newborns, such as sheep, the onset of non-shivering thermogenesis through activation of the BAT-specific uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is essential for effective adaptation to the cold exposure of the extra-uterine environment. This is mediated by a combination of endocrine adaptations which accompany normal parturition at birth and further endocrine stimulation from the mother's milk. Three distinct adipose depots have been identified in all species studied to date. These contain either primarily white, primarily brown or a mix of brown and white adipocytes. The latter tissue type is present, at least, in the fetus and, thereafter, appears to take on the characteristics of white adipose tissue during postnatal development. It is becoming apparent that a range of organ-specific mechanisms can promote UCP1 expression. They include the liver, heart and skeletal muscle, and involve unique endocrine systems that are stimulated by cold exposure and/or exercise. These multiple pathways that promote BAT function vary with age and between species that may determine the potential to be manipulated in early life. Such interventions could modify, or reverse, the normal ontogenic pathway by which BAT disappears after birth, thereby facilitating BAT thermogenesis through the life cycle.

  10. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Primary tumors display a great level of intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. The current lack of prognostic and predictive biomarkers limits accurate stratification and the ability to predict response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to select recombinant antibody...... fragments specific against breast cancer subpopulations, aiding the discovery of novel biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recombinant antibody fragments were selected by phage display. A novel shadowstick technology enabled the direct selection using tissue sections of antibody fragments specific against...... small subpopulations of breast cancer cells. Selections were performed against a subpopulation of breast cancer cells expressing CD271(+), as these previously have been indicated to be potential breast cancer stem cells. The selected antibody fragments were screened by phage ELISA on both breast cancer...

  11. BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in fine needle aspiration thyroid cancer tissue and their correlation with tumor malignancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Guo Sheng; Bin Wang; Zong-Ping Diao; Kun-Kun Cao; Sai Zhang; Zheng-Guo Pu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in fine needle aspiration thyroid cancer tissue and their correlation with tumor malignancy.Methods:Patients undergoing thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy in our hospital from April 2012 to October 2015 were selected for study, 60 patients with thyroid cancer and 60 patients with benign thyroid tumor were screened after pathological diagnosis, biopsy tissue was collected to determine the expression of BRMS1 and Cx43, and serum specimens were collected to determin Gal-3, CEACAM1, MMP2 and MMP9 content.Results: mRNA levels and positive expression rate of BRMS1 andCx43in thyroid cancer tissue were significantly lower than those in benign thyroid tumor tissue; mRNA levels ofBRMS1andCx43in thyroid cancer tissue with different pathological types and tumor diameters were not different, mRNA level ofCx43in thyroid cancer tissue with TNM III-IV stage was significantly lower than that in thyroid cancer tissue with TNM I-II stage, mRNA levels ofBRMS1 in thyroid cancer tissue with different TNM stages were not different, and mRNA levels ofBRMS1andCx43in thyroid carcinoma tissue with lymph node metastasis were significantly lower than those in thyroid carcinoma tissue without lymph node metastasis; serum Gal-3, CEACAM1, MMP2 and MMP9 levels in patients with positive BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in thyroid cancer tissue were significantly lower than those in patients with negative BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in thyroid cancer tissue.Conclusions:Lower expression of BRMS1 and Cx43 in fine needle aspiration thyroid cancer tissue is associated with the distant metastasis and malignant degree of tumor, and lower expression of Cx43 is also associated with the growth of tumor and cancer cell proliferation.

  12. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial and cancer tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a strategy for the generation of 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate cells (either bulk or FACS-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumor cells. Organoids derived from healthy material cont

  13. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  14. The potential of spectral imaging in the noninvasive diagnostics of tissue cancers and precancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Costas J.

    2003-08-01

    A novel approach to the problem of non-invasive diagnostics is presented, which relay son a combiend optical and chemical excitation of the tissue, by employing white light and topical application of acetic acid solution, respecitvley. Acetic acid-tissue interaction results in a transient alteration in the light scattering properties of the abnormal tissue selectivity. A specially developed Spectral Imaging system was used for the in vivo spectral imaging and analysis of the tissue and for the measurement, as a function of both time and location, of the acetic acid-induced alterations in the tissue scattering properties. Modeling and fitting of the experimental data result in the calculation of the kinetic constants of the marker-tissue interaction process, and spatil distribution of whcih is visualized with the aid of a pseudocolor scale. Clinical evaluation of both methodology and technology in normal, precancerous and cancerous lesions of cervix show that the measured kinetic data contain specific information, which enables the differentiation between cancerous and non-cancerous lesions, as well as between dysplasias of different grade. The calculated map of the kinetic constants provides information for the spatial distribution of the lesion's grades, thus enabling the detection of incipient lesions and the precise localization and classification of pathologic tissue areas.

  15. A targeting ligand enhances infectivity and cytotoxicity of an oncolytic adenovirus in human pancreatic cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Goto, Naoko; Rin, Yosei; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-10-28

    The addition of a targeting strategy is necessary to enhance oncolysis and secure safety of a conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd). We have constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber, and have successfully identified a pancreatic cancer-targeting ligand (SYENFSA). Here, the usefulness of cancer-targeted CRAd for pancreatic cancer was examined as a preclinical study. First, we constructed a survivin promoter-regulated CRAd expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP), which displayed the identified targeting ligand (AdSur-SYE). The AdSur-SYE resulted in higher gene transduction efficiency and oncolytic potency than the untargeted CRAd (AdSur) in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. An intratumoral injection of AdSur-SYE significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors, in which AdSur-SYE effectively proliferated and spread. An ectopic infection in adjacent tissues and organs of intratumorally injected AdSur-SYE was decreased compared with AdSur. Then, to examine whether the targeting ligand actually enhanced the infectivity of CRAd in human pancreatic cancer tissues, tumor cells prepared from surgical specimens were infected with viruses. The AdSur-SYE increased gene transduction efficiency 6.4-fold higher than did AdSur in single cells derived from human pancreatic cancer, whereas the infectivity of both vectors was almost the same in the pancreas and other cancers. Immunostaining showed that most EGFP(+) cells were cytokeratin-positive in the sliced tissues, indicating that pancreatic cancer cells but not stromal cells were injected with AdSur-SYE. AdSur-SYE resulted in a stronger oncolysis in the primary pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblasts than AdSur did. CRAd in combination with a tumor-targeting ligand is promising as a next-generation of oncolytic virotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

  16. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2000-06-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

  17. N-glycoprotein analysis discovers new up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastri, Annalisa; Gaspari, Marco; Sacco, Rosario; Elia, Laura; Gabriele, Caterina; Romano, Roberto; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cuda, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death due to cancer worldwide. Therefore, the identification of high-specificity and -sensitivity biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer is urgently needed. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, are known to play an important role in cancer progression. In the present work, we used a quantitative proteomic technique based on (18)O stable isotope labeling to identify differentially expressed N-linked glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue samples compared with healthy colorectal tissue from 19 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. We identified 54 up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer samples, therefore potentially involved in the biological processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, nine of these (PLOD2, DPEP1, SE1L1, CD82, PAR1, PLOD3, S12A2, LAMP3, OLFM4) were found to be up-regulated in the great majority of the cohort, and, interestingly, the association with colorectal cancer of four (PLOD2, S12A2, PLOD3, CD82) has not been hitherto described. PMID:25247386

  18. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  19. Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue: A New Player in Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Emma V.; Edwards, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is a favored site for a number of cancers, including the hematological malignancy multiple myeloma, and metastasis of breast and prostate cancer. This specialized microenvironment is highly supportive, not only for tumor growth and survival but also for the development of an associated destructive cancer-induced bone disease. The interactions between tumor cells, osteoclasts and osteoblasts are well documented. By contrast, despite occupying a significant proportion of the bone marrow, the importance of bone marrow adipose tissue is only just emerging. The ability of bone marrow adipocytes to regulate skeletal biology and hematopoiesis, combined with their metabolic activity, endocrine functions, and proximity to tumor cells means that they are ideally placed to impact both tumor growth and bone disease. This review discusses the recent advances in our understanding of how marrow adipose tissue contributes to bone metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease.

  20. Nonlinear optical microscopy for histology of fresh normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of only 1-5%. The acceleration of intraoperative histological examination would be beneficial for better management of pancreatic cancer, suggesting an improved survival. Nonlinear optical methods based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second harmonic generation (SHG of intrinsic optical biomarkers show the ability to visualize the morphology of fresh tissues associated with histology, which is promising for real-time intraoperative evaluation of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate whether the nonlinear optical imaging methods have the ability to characterize pancreatic histology at cellular resolution, we studied different types of pancreatic tissues by using label-free TPEF and SHG. Compared with other routine methods for the preparation of specimens, fresh tissues without processing were found to be most suitable for nonlinear optical imaging of pancreatic tissues. The detailed morphology of the normal rat pancreas was observed and related with the standard histological images. Comparatively speaking, the preliminary images of a small number of chemical-induced pancreatic cancer tissues showed visible neoplastic differences in the morphology of cells and extracellular matrix. The subcutaneous pancreatic tumor xenografts were further observed using the nonlinear optical microscopy, showing that most cells are leucocytes at 5 days after implantation, the tumor cells begin to proliferate at 10 days after implantation, and the extracellular collagen fibers become disordered as the xenografts grow. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, nonlinear optical imaging was used to characterize the morphological details of fresh pancreatic tissues for the first time. We demonstrate that it is possible to provide real-time histological evaluation of pancreatic cancer by the nonlinear optical methods, which present an

  1. A tissue-engineered humanized xenograft model of human breast cancer metastasis to bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Thibaudeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The skeleton is a preferred homing site for breast cancer metastasis. To date, treatment options for patients with bone metastases are mostly palliative and the disease is still incurable. Indeed, key mechanisms involved in breast cancer osteotropism are still only partially understood due to the lack of suitable animal models to mimic metastasis of human tumor cells to a human bone microenvironment. In the presented study, we investigate the use of a human tissue-engineered bone construct to develop a humanized xenograft model of breast cancer-induced bone metastasis in a murine host. Primary human osteoblastic cell-seeded melt electrospun scaffolds in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 were implanted subcutaneously in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. The tissue-engineered constructs led to the formation of a morphologically intact ‘organ’ bone incorporating a high amount of mineralized tissue, live osteocytes and bone marrow spaces. The newly formed bone was largely humanized, as indicated by the incorporation of human bone cells and human-derived matrix proteins. After intracardiac injection, the dissemination of luciferase-expressing human breast cancer cell lines to the humanized bone ossicles was detected by bioluminescent imaging. Histological analysis revealed the presence of metastases with clear osteolysis in the newly formed bone. Thus, human tissue-engineered bone constructs can be applied efficiently as a target tissue for human breast cancer cells injected into the blood circulation and replicate the osteolytic phenotype associated with breast cancer-induced bone lesions. In conclusion, we have developed an appropriate model for investigation of species-specific mechanisms of human breast cancer-related bone metastasis in vivo.

  2. Progress in Tissue Specimens Alternative for the Driver Genes Testing of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan SUN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Target treatment based on driver genes in advanced non-small cell lung cancer is very important currently. Tumor tissues is the gold standard for driver genes testing. However, most of patients could not get the gene information for lack of enough tissues. To explore the tissue specimens alternatives is a hot spot in clinical work. This report reviews the tissue specimen alternatives of driver gene testing in non-small cell lung cancer.

  3. Statistical interpretations and new findings on Variation in Cancer Risk Among Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Robert; Kaltz, Oliver; Hochberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Tomasetti and Vogelstein (2015a) find that the incidence of a set of cancer types is correlated with the total number of normal stem cell divisions. Here, we separate the effects of standing stem cell number (i.e., organ or tissue size) and per stem cell lifetime replication rate. We show that each has a statistically significant and independent effect on explaining variation in cancer incidence over the 31 cases considered by Tomasetti and Vogelstein. When considering the total number of ste...

  4. Erythropoietin administration partially prevents adipose tissue loss in experimental cancer cachexia models

    OpenAIRE

    Penna, Fabio; Busquets, Silvia; Toledo, Miriam; Pin, Fabrizio; Massa, David; López-Soriano, Francisco J.; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated cachexia is characterized, among other symptoms, by a dramatic loss of both muscle and fat. In addition, the cachectic syndrome is often associated with anemia. The object of the present investigation was to assess the effects of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment on experimental cancer cachexia models. The results clearly show that, in addition to the improvement of the hematocrit, EPO treatment promoted a partial preservation of adipose tissue while exerting negligible effects...

  5. Levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 in plasma and urine from patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Mads Nikolaj; Brünner, Nils; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen;

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the potential use of plasma and urine levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1) in urothelial cancer. METHODS: TIMP-1 levels were determined in urine and plasma from healthy donors (n=26), patients with bacterial bladder infection (n=24), urothelial bladder adenoma....... No correlation between plasma and urine TIMP-1 was found. Measurement of TIMP-1 in plasma and/or urine is apparently not useful for the identification of bladder cancer....

  6. Levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 in plasma and urine frompatients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten Andersen, MN; Brunner, N; Nielsen, HJ;

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To assess the potential use of plasma and urine levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1) in urothelial cancer. Methods: TIMP-1 levels were determined in urine and plasma from healthy donors (n=26), patients with bacterial bladder infection (n=24), urothelial bladder adenoma....... No correlation between plasma and urine TIMP-1 was found. Measurement of TIMP-1 in plasma and/or urine is apparently not useful for the identification of bladder cancer....

  7. Increased expression of cysteine cathepsins in ovarian tissue from chickens with ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Suzie E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine cathepsins (CTSs are involved in the degradation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and are associated with cell transformation, differentiation, motility, and adhesion. These functions are also related to cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Chickens spontaneously develop epithelial ovarian cancer and are therefore a good animal model for human ovarian cancer. However, no studies have investigated the expression of CTSs in chickens with ovarian cancer. Methods Cancerous (n = 5 and normal (n = 3 ovaries were collected from 2-to 3-year-old hens, and ovarian tissue samples were collected for study. Ovarian cancers were evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Reverse transcriptase and quantitative PCR analyses, in situ hybridization analysis were performed to examine the mRNA expression pattern of three CTSs in detail, and protein expression of CTSB was evaluated. Results The CTSB, CTSC, and CTSS genes were highly expressed in cancerous chicken ovaries. Messenger RNAs for the three CTSs were localized to a nodule area, a major characteristic of cancerous ovaries, but the three CTSs showed no specific localization in normal ovaries. Immunoreactive CTSB protein was present in the nodule area of cancerous ovaries. Conclusion Our results suggest that CTSB, CTSC, and CTSS have important functions in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer.

  8. Pathobiology and management of prostate cancer-induced bone pain: recent insights and future treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Arjun; Smith, Maree T

    2013-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) has a high propensity for metastasis to bone. Despite the availability of multiple treatment options for relief of PCa-induced bone pain (PCIBP), satisfactory relief of intractable pain in patients with advanced bony metastases is challenging for the clinicians because currently available analgesic drugs are often limited by poor efficacy and/or dose-limiting side effects. Rodent models developed in the past decade show that the pathobiology of PCIBP comprises elements of inflammatory, neuropathic and ischemic pain arising from ectopic sprouting and sensitization of sensory nerve fibres within PCa-invaded bones. In addition, at the cellular level, PCIBP is underpinned by dynamic cross talk between metastatic PCa cells, cellular components of the bone matrix, factors associated with the bone microenvironment as well as peripheral components of the somatosensory system. These insights are aligned with the clinical management of PCIBP involving use of a multimodal treatment approach comprising analgesic agents (opioids, NSAIDs), radiotherapy, radioisotopes, cancer chemotherapy agents and bisphosphonates. However, a major drawback of most rodent models of PCIBP is their short-term applicability due to ethical concerns. Thus, it has been difficult to gain insight into the mal(adaptive) neuroplastic changes occurring at multiple levels of the somatosensory system that likely contribute to intractable pain at the advanced stages of metastatic disease. Specifically, the functional responsiveness of noxious circuitry as well as the neurochemical signature of a broad array of pro-hyperalgesic mediators in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord of rodent models of PCIBP is relatively poorly characterized. Hence, recent work from our laboratory to develop a protocol for an optimized rat model of PCIBP will enable these knowledge gaps to be addressed as well as identification of novel targets for drug discovery programs aimed at producing new analgesics

  9. Expression of HSP90 and HIF-1α in human colorectal cancer tissue and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ran; Xu; Xin; Liu; Ying-Min; Yao; Qing-Guang; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expression of HSP90 and HIF-1αin human colorectal cancer tissue,the influence of HSP90 and HIF-1αon human colorectal cancer biological behavior and their related factors.Methods:The expression of HSP90 and HIF-1 a protein in human colorectal cancer as well as normal tissue were detected by imnmnohistochemical method.Results:The positive expression rates of HSP90 and HIF-1αprotein in normal human colorectal tissue as well as colorectal cancer tissue were 30%vs.63.0%,15.0%vs.71.7%,respectively.There were significant difference(P=0.035 and P=0.005 respectively).The expression of HSP90 was significantly correlated with the differentiation,Dukes stages and lymph node metastasis(P<0.05),while the expression of HIF-1 a was significantly correlated with the Dukes stages and lymph node metastasis(P<0.05).Association analysis showed that the expression of HSF90 protein was significantly correlated with that of HIF-1αprotein(P<0.01).Conclusions:The expression of HSP90 and HIF—1αprotein may be related to the development,metastasis and invasion of human colorectal cancer,and their synergistic effects may participate in the development of the colorectal carcinoma.

  10. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is associated with up regulation, down regulation of normal antigens or abnormal antigens. These antigens are very useful candidates as targets for the different breast cancer therapies and for vaccination trials. This study was done to characterize abnormal antigens, extract one of them and to produce monoclonal antibodies against the extracted antigen. One hundred and twenty Sudanese female patients were included in this study after informed consent. The mean age was 47. 2 years (16-80). Two tissue samples were obtained from each patient and they were confirmed as normal and cancerous breast tissues microscopically. 2D PAGE was used to analyze the protein content of samples. LC/MS and nr. fast a database search were used for separation and indentification of the abnormal proteins. Three different patterns of 2D Page results were obtained, the first pattern involved detection of four abnormal proteins in 26.7% of the patient cancerous tissues while they were undetected in the normal tissues of the same patients. In the second 2D PAGE result pattern the cancerous and the normal tissues of 67.5% patients were identical and they did not contain the four abnormal proteins while the third 2D PAGE pattern involved the presence of two abnormal antigens (from the four) in the cancerous tissues of 5.8% of the patients and they were absent from the normal tissues of the same patients. The four abnormal proteins were identified as, human Thioredoxin (D60nmutant), x-ray crystal structure of human galectin-1, retrocopy of tropomyosin 3(rc TPM3) and beta-tropomyosin (isoform 2). The primary and the secondary structures were obtained from the SWISSPROT and the PDB databases. Beta tropomyosin spot was extracted and used as antigen for monoclonal antibody production. Monoclonal antibody against beta- tropomyosin with a concentration of 0.35 mg/ml and a G11 anti beta-tropomyosin hybridoma cell line were produced. The monoclonal antibody was with single bad and

  11. Evaluation of frozen tissue-derived prognostic gene expression signatures in FFPE colorectal cancer samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Deane, Natasha G; Lewis, Keeli B; Padmanabhan, Chandrasekhar; Washington, M Kay; Ciombor, Kristen K; Timmers, Cynthia; Goldberg, Richard M; Beauchamp, R Daniel; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Defining molecular features that can predict the recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) for stage II-III patients remains challenging in cancer research. Most available clinical samples are Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE). NanoString nCounter® and Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA) are the two platforms marketed for high-throughput gene expression profiling for FFPE samples. In this study, to evaluate the gene expression of frozen tissue-derived prognostic signatures in FFPE CRC samples, we evaluated the expression of 516 genes from published frozen tissue-derived prognostic signatures in 42 FFPE CRC samples measured by both platforms. Based on HTA platform-derived data, we identified both gene (99 individual genes, FDR FFPE tumor tissues to detect frozen tissue-derived prognostic gene expression signatures for CRC patients. PMID:27623752

  12. Comparative Trace Elemental Analysis in Cancerous and Noncancerous Human Tissues Using PIXE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Juma Mulware

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high or low levels of trace metals in human tissues has been studied widely. There have been detectable significant variations in the concentrations of trace metals in normal and cancerous tissues suggesting that these variations could be a causative factor to various cancers. Even though essential trace metals play an important role such as stabilizers, enzyme cofactors, elements of structure, and essential elements for normal hormonal functions, their imbalanced toxic effects contribute to the rate of the reactive oxygen species (ROS and formation of complexities in the body cells which may lead to DNA damage. The induction of oxidative-induced DNA damage by ROS may lead to isolated base lesions or single-strand breaks, complex lesions like double-strand breaks, and some oxidative generated clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs which are linked to cell apoptosis and mutagenesis. The difference in published works on the level of variations of trace metals in different cancer tissues can be attributed to the accuracy of the analytical techniques, sample preparation methods, and inability of taking uniform samples from the affected tissues. This paper reviews comparative trace elemental concentrations of cancerous and noncancerous tissues using PIXE that has been reported in the published literature.

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC). Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardulli Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and invasive breast cancer (IBC. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. Results We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Conclusions Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells.

  15. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  16. Preventing premature deaths from breast and cervical cancer among underserved women in the United States: insights gained from a national cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary C; Wong, Faye L

    2015-05-01

    This commentary highlights some of the valuable insights gained from a special collection of papers that utilized data from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) and appear in this special issue. The data and experiences of the NBCCEDP can inform the identification of new opportunities and directions for meeting the cancer screening needs of underserved women in a complex and changing health care environment.

  17. Visual perception enhancement for detection of cancerous oral tissue by multi-spectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Color reproduction systems based on the multi-spectral imaging technique (MSI) for both directly estimating reflection spectra and direct visualization of oral tissues using various light sources are proposed. Images from three oral cancer patients were taken as the experimental samples, and spectral differences between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues were calculated at three time points during 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) to analyze whether they were consistent with disease processes. To check the successful treatment of oral cancer with ALA-PDT, oral cavity images by swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) are demonstrated. This system can also reproduce images under different light sources. For pre-cancerous detection, the oral images after the second ALA-PDT are assigned as the target samples. By using RGB LEDs with various correlated color temperatures (CCTs) for color difference comparison, the light source with a CCT of about 4500 K was found to have the best ability to enhance the color difference between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues in the oral cavity. Compared with the fluorescent lighting commonly used today, the color difference can be improved by 39.2% from 16.5270 to 23.0023. Hence, this light source and spectral analysis increase the efficiency of the medical diagnosis of oral cancer and aid patients in receiving early treatment. (paper)

  18. Visualization of risk of radiogenic second cancer in the organs and tissues of the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiogenic second cancer is a common late effect in long term cancer survivors. Currently there are few methods or tools available to visually evaluate the spatial distribution of risks of radiogenic late effects in the human body. We developed a risk visualization method and demonstrated it for radiogenic second cancers in tissues and organs of one patient treated with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy and one patient treated with proton craniospinal irradiation. Treatment plans were generated using radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) and dose information was obtained from TPS. Linear non-threshold risk coefficients for organs at risk of second cancer incidence were taken from the Biological Effects of Ionization Radiation VII report. Alternative risk models including linear exponential model and linear plateau model were also examined. The predicted absolute lifetime risk distributions were visualized together with images of the patient anatomy. The risk distributions of second cancer for the two patients were visually presented. The risk distributions varied with tissue, dose, dose-risk model used, and the risk distribution could be similar to or very different from the dose distribution. Our method provides a convenient way to directly visualize and evaluate the risks of radiogenic second cancer in organs and tissues of the human body. In the future, visual assessment of risk distribution could be an influential determinant for treatment plan scoring

  19. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  20. Visual perception enhancement for detection of cancerous oral tissue by multi-spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Chiang, Chun-Ping

    2013-05-01

    Color reproduction systems based on the multi-spectral imaging technique (MSI) for both directly estimating reflection spectra and direct visualization of oral tissues using various light sources are proposed. Images from three oral cancer patients were taken as the experimental samples, and spectral differences between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues were calculated at three time points during 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) to analyze whether they were consistent with disease processes. To check the successful treatment of oral cancer with ALA-PDT, oral cavity images by swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) are demonstrated. This system can also reproduce images under different light sources. For pre-cancerous detection, the oral images after the second ALA-PDT are assigned as the target samples. By using RGB LEDs with various correlated color temperatures (CCTs) for color difference comparison, the light source with a CCT of about 4500 K was found to have the best ability to enhance the color difference between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues in the oral cavity. Compared with the fluorescent lighting commonly used today, the color difference can be improved by 39.2% from 16.5270 to 23.0023. Hence, this light source and spectral analysis increase the efficiency of the medical diagnosis of oral cancer and aid patients in receiving early treatment.

  1. Non-Coding CK19 RNA in Peripheral Blood and Tissue of Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Moazzezy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast carcinoma is the major cause of cancer-related death in women. The incidence of this carcinoma is rising and there are many attempts to decrease this problem. The aim of this study was detection of full-length cytokeratin 19 (CK19 mRNA, in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients in early stage of cancer. In this study, RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique was used for detection of CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients. Primers were established to amplify the CK19 as a tumor marker. Moreover, CYFRA 21-1 subunit of CK19 protein was measured in the serum of patients. CK19 mRNA was detected and sequenced. It is shown that the most released CK19 mRNAs in blood and tissue of cancer patients are non-coding RNA. The mutated forms of mRNA are the incomplete transcripts of protein-coding gene as a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA that could regulate gene expression. Moreover, small non-coding RNA (ncRNA as fragments of CK19 is mostly observed in this experiment. They may play a role in tumorogenesis and their biologic exact function in breast cancer should be further elucidated.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Abdullah Al-Dhabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research.

  3. RNA-Seq accurately identifies cancer biomarker signatures to distinguish tissue of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Iris H; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Hui; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic cancer of unknown primary (CUP) accounts for up to 5% of all new cancer cases, with a 5-year survival rate of only 10%. Accurate identification of tissue of origin would allow for directed, personalized therapies to improve clinical outcomes. Our objective was to use transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify lineage-specific biomarker signatures for the cancer types that most commonly metastasize as CUP (colorectum, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, prostate, and stomach). RNA-Seq data of 17,471 transcripts from a total of 3,244 cancer samples across 26 different tissue types were compiled from in-house sequencing data and publically available International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas datasets. Robust cancer biomarker signatures were extracted using a 10-fold cross-validation method of log transformation, quantile normalization, transcript ranking by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and stepwise logistic regression. The entire algorithm was then repeated with a new set of randomly generated training and test sets, yielding highly concordant biomarker signatures. External validation of the cancer-specific signatures yielded high sensitivity (92.0% ± 3.15%; mean ± standard deviation) and specificity (97.7% ± 2.99%) for each cancer biomarker signature. The overall performance of this RNA-Seq biomarker-generating algorithm yielded an accuracy of 90.5%. In conclusion, we demonstrate a computational model for producing highly sensitive and specific cancer biomarker signatures from RNA-Seq data, generating signatures for the top eight cancer types responsible for CUP to accurately identify tumor origin. PMID:25425966

  4. TGF β1 expression and angiogenesis in colorectal cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Xiong; Ling-Ling Gong; Feng Zhang; Ming-Bo Hu; Hong-Yin Yuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Transforming growth factor(TGF)β1 is involved in avariety of important cellular functions, including cell growthand differentiation, angiogenesis, immune function andextracellular matrix formation. However, the role of TGF β1as an angiogenic factor in colorectal cancer is still unclear.We investigate the relationship between transforming growthfactor β1 and angiogenesis by analyzing the expression oftransforming growth factor(TGF) β1 in colorectal cancer, aswell as its association with VEGF and MVDMETHODS: The expression of TGF β1 、VEGF, as well as MVDwere detected in 98 colorectal cancer by immunohistochemicalstaining. The relationship between the TGF β1 expression andVEGF expression、MVD was evaluated. To evaluate the effect ofTGF β1 on the angiogenesis of colorectal cancers.RESULTS: Among 98 cases of colorectal cancer, 37 werepositive for TGF β1 (37. 8 %),36 for VEGF(36. 7 %),respectively. The microvessel counts ranged from 19 to 139.8, with a mean of 48.7 (standard deviation, 21. 8). Theexpression of TGF β1 was correlated significantly with thedepth of invasion, stage of disease, lymph nodemetastasis, VEGF expression and MVD. Patients in T3-T4,stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ and with lymph node metastasis had muchhigher expression of TGF β1 than patients in T1-T2, stage Ⅰ -Ⅱ and without lymph node metastasis ( P < 0.05).Thepositive expression rate of VEGF (58.3 %) in the TGF-β1positive group is higher than that in the TGF-β1 negativegroup(41.7 %, P< 0.05). Also, the microvessel count (54+ 18) in TGF-β1 positive group is significantly highar thanthat in TGF-β1 negative group (46 + 15, P < 0.05 ). Themicrovessel count in tumors with both TGF-β1 and VEGFpositive were the highest (58 + 20, 36-140, P < 0. 05 ).Whereas that in tumors with both TGF-β1 and VEGF negativewere the lowest (38+ 16, 19-60, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: TGF β1 might be associated with tumorprogression by madulating the angiogenesis in colorectalcancer and TGF β1 may be used as a

  5. Optimum 3D Matrix Stiffness for Maintenance of Cancer Stem Cells Is Dependent on Tissue Origin of Cancer Cells.

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    Esmaiel Jabbari

    Full Text Available The growth and expression of cancer stem cells (CSCs depend on many factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of cancer cells' tissue origin on the optimum matrix stiffness for CSC growth and marker expression in a model polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA hydrogel without the interference of other factors in the microenvironment.Human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma, HCT116 colorectal and AGS gastric carcinoma, and U2OS osteosarcoma cells were used. The cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gels with compressive moduli in the 2-70 kPa range and optimized cell seeding density of 0.6x106 cells/mL. Micropatterning was used to optimize the growth of encapsulated cells with respect to average tumorsphere size. The CSC sub-population of the encapsulated cells was characterized by cell number, tumorsphere size and number density, and mRNA expression of CSC markers.The optimum matrix stiffness for growth and marker expression of CSC sub-population of cancer cells was 5 kPa for breast MCF7 and MDA231, 25 kPa for colorectal HCT116 and gastric AGS, and 50 kPa for bone U2OS cells. Conjugation of a CD44 binding peptide to the gel stopped tumorsphere formation by cancer cells from different tissue origin. The expression of YAP/TAZ transcription factors by the encapsulated cancer cells was highest at the optimum stiffness indicating a link between the Hippo transducers and CSC growth. The optimum average tumorsphere size for CSC growth and marker expression was 50 μm.The marker expression results suggest that the CSC sub-population of cancer cells resides within a niche with optimum stiffness which depends on the cancer cells' tissue origin.

  6. GREAT PROMISE OF TISSUE-RESIDENT ADULT STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS IN TRANSPLANTATION AND CANCER THERAPIES

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great prom...

  7. Gene expression profiles from formalin fixed paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue are largely comparable to fresh frozen matched tissue.

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    Lorenza Mittempergher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE samples represent a valuable resource for cancer research. However, the discovery and development of new cancer biomarkers often requires fresh frozen (FF samples. Recently, the Whole Genome (WG DASL (cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation assay was specifically developed to profile FFPE tissue. However, a thorough comparison of data generated from FFPE RNA and Fresh Frozen (FF RNA using this platform is lacking. To this end we profiled, in duplicate, 20 FFPE tissues and 20 matched FF tissues and evaluated the concordance of the DASL results from FFPE and matched FF material. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that after proper normalization, all FFPE and FF pairs exhibit a high level of similarity (Pearson correlation >0.7, significantly larger than the similarity between non-paired samples. Interestingly, the probes showing the highest correlation had a higher percentage G/C content and were enriched for cell cycle genes. Predictions of gene expression signatures developed on frozen material (Intrinsic subtype, Genomic Grade Index, 70 gene signature showed a high level of concordance between FFPE and FF matched pairs. Interestingly, predictions based on a 60 gene DASL list (best match with the 70 gene signature showed very high concordance with the MammaPrint® results. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that data generated from FFPE material with the DASL assay, if properly processed, are comparable to data extracted from the FF counterpart. Specifically, gene expression profiles for a known set of prognostic genes for a specific disease are highly comparable between two conditions. This opens up the possibility of using both FFPE and FF material in gene expressions analyses, leading to a vast increase in the potential resources available for cancer research.

  8. EXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF SURVIVIN mRNA IN LUNG CANCER TISSUE MICROARRAY DETECTED BY FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-yun Wang; Xing-ye Wu; Zhi Yao; Yan Li; Ting Liu; Hai-yan Zheng; Cong-zhong Zhu; Cui-yun Sun; Ai-xiang Wang; Min Zhao

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of Survivin mRNA in lung cancer tissue microarray (TMA) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method, and determine the role and significance of it in lung cancer genesis and progress. Methods The expression of Survivin mRNA was detected by FISH method and TMA technology. Fifty-four cases of lung cancer and 10 cases of normal lung tissue were examined. Results Survivin mRNA was expressed in 66.7% (36/54) of lung cancer; the positive ratio of lung cancer was significantly higher than that of normal lung tissue (0/10; x2= 15.238, P < 0.05). The positive ratio of Survivin mRNA was significantly higher in poor differentiated cancer (20/24, 83.3%) than moderate and well differentiated cancer (16/30, 53.3%; x2= 5.40, P <0.05). The positive ratio of Survivin mRNA was significantly higher in group with lymph node metastasis (27/32, 84.4%) than without lymph node metastasis (9/22, 40.9%; x2= 11.084, P < 0.05). The positive ratio of Survivin mRNA was significantly higher in stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ(12/13, 92.3%) than stage Ⅰ - Ⅱ (24/41, 58.5%; x2= 5.066, P < 0.05). Conclusion Survivin mRNA highly expresses in lung cancer, which is related to the progress and malignant behavior. Survivin may play a promoting role in lung cancer genesis and progress and provide a basis for estimating prognosis and treatment.

  9. Bioluminescence-activated deep-tissue photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm(2) for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT.

  10. The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 μg/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 μg/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 μg Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content

  11. The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 μg/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 μg/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 μg Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content

  12. PUTATIVE ROLE OF ADIPOSE TISSUE IN GROWTH AND METABOLISM OF COLON CANCER CELLS

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    Betty eSchwartz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Newly emerging data highlight obesity as an important risk factor for developing certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Although evidence supports a link between the two, the mechanisms responsible for this relationship have not yet been fully elucidated. Hypertrophied and dysfunctional adipose tissue of the obese state is characterized by low-grade inflammation. Adipokines and cytokines secreted from adipocytes, together with the abundant availability of lipids from adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment, promote adhesion, migration, and invasion of tumor cells and support tumor progression and uncontrolled growth. One of the predisposed targets of the deleterious effects exerted by secretions from adipose tissue in obesity are the activities associated with the cellular mitochondria. Mitochondrial oxidative metabolism plays a key role in meeting cells' energetic demands by oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos. Here we discuss: (a the dynamic relationship between glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and OxPhos; (b the evidence for impaired OxPhos (i.e. mitochondrial dysfunction in colon cancer; (c the mechanisms by which mitochondrial dysfunction can predispose to cancer. We propose that impaired OxPhos increases susceptibility to colon cancer since OxPhos is sensitive to a large number of factors that are intrinsic to the host (e.g. inflammation.Given that adipocytes are a major source of adipokines and energy for the cancer cell, understanding the mechanisms of metabolic symbiosis between cancer cells and adipocytes should reveal new therapeutic possibilities.

  13. EXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF C-erbB-2 IN THE TISSUES OF LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the expression and clinical significance of C-erbB-2 in the tissue of lung cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry method was used to detect the protein expression of C-erbB-2 in lung cancer tissue. Results The positive expression rate of C-erbB-2 protein in 38 cases of lung cancer was 53.3% (21/38),which was higher than those in lung benign control group (P<0. 001). The significant correlation were found between the protein level and tumor stage(r= +0. 64,P<0.02). The order was stage Ⅳ>stage Ⅲ >stage Ⅱ >stage Ⅰ . There was no correlation among protein expression of C-erbB-2 in various histological types of lung cancer (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion The positive expression rates of C-erbB-2 were significantly higher in lung cancer group than those in benign control group. There is significant correlation between C-erbB-2 expression and lung cancer stage. There is no correlation among protein expression of C-erbB-2 and histological types of lung cancer.

  14. Concentration of Cd, Pb, Hg, and Se in Different Parts of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality between women in the world. Metals involved in environmental toxicology are closely related to tumor growth and cancer. On the other hand, some metals such as selenium have anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of this study is to determine the concentration of cadmium, lead, mercury, and selenium in separated parts of tegmen, tumor, tumor adiposity, and tegmen adiposity of 14 breast cancer tissues which have been analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption (AA-670 and ICP-OES (ULTIMA 2CE. Our results show that Se and Hg have maximum and minimum concentration, respectively. Statistical analysis reveals no significant differences between metal accumulations in different parts of cancer tissues (P>0.05 and this observation might be due to the close relation of separated parts of fatty breast organ. Thus, we could conclude that a high level of these heavy metals is accumulated in Iranian cancerous breasts and their presence can be one of the reasons of cancer appearance.

  15. Expression and significance of multidrug resistance gene in the colorectal cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Lu; Min-Hong Pang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the correlation of expressions of MDR1/P-gp and CerbB-2 in the colorectal cancer tissues and their clinical significance.Methods:A total of 86 colorectal cancer tissues specimens were included in the study. The immunohistochemical S-P method was used to detect the expressions of P-gp and CerbB-2, and their correlations were analyzed.Results:The positive rates of the expressions of MDR1/P-gp and CerbB-2 were 36% (31/86) and 28% (24/86), respectively. The positive expression rate of CerbB-2 in the colorectal cancer tissues at a clinical stage of III was significantly higher than that at stage I and II. The positive expression rates of MDR1/P-gp and CerbB-2 in the colorectal cancer tissues with axillary lymph node metastasis were significantly higher than those in the tissues without axillary lymph node metastasis. In the P-gp positive expression group, the positive rate of CerbB-2 was 75.5% (37/49), while the negative rate of CerbB-2 was 24.48% (12/49), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). P-gp had a certain positive correlation with the positive expression rate of CerbB-2. Conclusions:P-gp and CerbB-2 play a certain role in the occurrence of multidrug resistance of colorectal cancer, and their expressions are correlated; therefore, the combination detection can provide an evidence for the chemotherapy choice of colorectal cancer.

  16. Nitrate dynamics in natural plants: Insights based on the concentration and natural isotope abundances of tissue nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yan Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nitrate (NO3-, a major nitrogen (N source for natural plants, has been studied mostly through experimental N addition, enzymatic assay, isotope labeling, and genetic expression. However, artificial N supply may not reasonably reflect the N strategies in natural plants because NO3- uptake and reduction may vary with external N availability. Abrupt application and short operation times, field N addition, and isotopic labeling hinder the elucidation of in situ NO3--use mechanisms. The concentration and natural isotopes of tissue NO3- can offer insights into the plant NO3- sources and dynamics in a natural context. Furthermore, they facilitate the exploration of plant NO3- utilization and its interaction with N pollution and ecosystem N cycles without disturbing the N pools. The present study was conducted to review the application of the denitrifier method for concentration and isotope analyses of NO3- in plants. Moreover, this study highlights the utility and benefits of these parameters in interpreting NO3- sources and dynamics in natural plants. We summarize the major sources and reduction processes of NO3- in plants, and discuss the implications of NO3- concentration in plant tissues based on existing data. Particular emphasis was laid on the regulation of soil NO3 - and plant ecophysiological functions in interspecific and intra-plant NO3- variations. We introduce N and O isotope systematics of NO3- in plants and discusse the principles and feasibilities of using isotopic enrichment and fractionation factors; the correlation between concentration and isotopes (N and O isotopes: δ18O and ∆17O; and isotope mass-balance calculations to constrain sources and reduction of NO3- in possible scenarios for natural plants are deliberated. Finally, we construct a preliminary framework of intraplant δ18O-NO3- variation, and summarize the uncertainties in using tissue NO3- parameters to interpret plant NO3- utilization.

  17. Expression and Clinical Significance of SHP2 in the Tumor Tissues of Smokers with Lung Cancer

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    Xuemei ZHAN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proved that protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were important mechanisms in lung cancer development, and tobacco smoking is an important risk factor of lung cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and clinical significance of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and small cell lung cancer (SCLC; the relationship between tobacco smoking and the expression of SHP2 is also studied. Methods Immunohistochemistry (Invision and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH were used to detect the expression of SHP2 and the augment of SHP2 mRNA in the 53 lung cancer specimens. Results The weak positive rate of SHP2 was 80% (which was also the total positive rate in normal bronchial epithelium. The weak, moderate and strong positive rates were 35.4%, 43.8% and 6.2% (total positive rate was 85.4% in 48 NSCLC patients, 0%, 80% and 20% (total positve rate was 100% in 5 SCLC patients, 40.7%, 37.4% and 3.7% (total positive rate was 81.5% in the tumor tissues of 27 NSCLC patients who didn’t smoke and 23.8%, 71.4% and 4.7% (total positive rate was 100% in the tumor tissues of 21 NSCLC patients whose smoking indexes were ≥400. Significant differences of SHP2 expression were observed between tumor tissues and normal bronchial epithelium, NSCLC and SCLC, and between different smoking indexes (P < 0.05. Conclusion The enhancement of SHP2 expression in the tumor tissues of NSCLC patients who smoke may be correlated with tobacco smoking; SHP2 may play certain role in the development of lung cancer; SHP2 prospectively provides new ideas for the drug research and development of lung cancer treatment.

  18. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

  19. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  20. Hypothermia activates adipose tissue to promote malignant lung cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangjun Du

    Full Text Available Microenvironment has been increasingly recognized as a critical regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we identified early changes in the microenvironment that contribute to malignant progression. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B to methylnitrosourea (MNU caused a reduction in cell toxicity and an increase in clonogenic capacity when the temperature was lowered from 37°C to 28°C. Hypothermia-incubated adipocyte media promoted proliferation in A549 cells. Although a hypothermic environment could increase urethane-induced tumor counts and Lewis lung cancer (LLC metastasis in lungs of three breeds of mice, an increase in tumor size could be discerned only in obese mice housed in hypothermia. Similarly, coinjections using differentiated adipocytes and A549 cells promoted tumor development in athymic nude mice when adipocytes were cultured at 28°C. Conversely, fat removal suppressed tumor growth in obese C57BL/6 mice inoculated with LLC cells. Further studies show hypothermia promotes a MNU-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and protects the tumor cell against immune control by TGF-β1 upregulation. We also found that activated adipocytes trigger tumor cell proliferation by increasing either TNF-α or VEGF levels. These results suggest that hypothermia activates adipocytes to stimulate tumor boost and play critical determinant roles in malignant progression.

  1. It takes a tissue to make a tumor: Epigenetics, cancer and the microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2001-01-19

    How do normal tissues limit the development of cancer? This review discusses the evidence that normal cells effectively restrict malignant behavior, and that such tissue forces must be subjugated to establish a tumor. The action of ionizing radiation will be specifically discussed regarding the disruption of the microenvironment that promotes the transition from preneoplastic to neoplastic growth. Unlike the highly unpredictable nature of genetic mutations, the response of normal cells to radiation damage follows an epigenetic program similar to wound healing and other damage responses. Our hypothesis is that the persistent disruption of the microenvironment in irradiated tissue compromises its ability to suppress carcinogenesis.

  2. It takes a tissue to make a tumor: epigenetics, cancer and the microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    How do normal tissues limit the development of cancer? This review discusses the evidence that normal cells effectively restrict malignant behavior, and that such tissue forces must be subjugated to establish a tumor. The action of ionizing radiation will be specifically discussed regarding the disruption of the microenvironment that promotes the transition from preneoplastic to neoplastic growth. Unlike the highly unpredictable nature of genetic mutations, the response of normal cells to radiation damage follows an epigenetic program similar to wound healing and other damage responses. Our hypothesis is that the persistent disruption of the microenvironment in irradiated tissue compromises its ability to suppress carcinogenesis.

  3. Tissue temperature distribution measurement by MRI and laser immunology for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yichao; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Wu, Feng; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In cancer treatment and immune response enhancement research, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an ideal method for non-invasive, three-dimensional temperature measurement. We used a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager for ex vivo tissues and small animal to determine temperature distribution of target tissue during laser irradiation. The feasibility of imaging is approved with high spatial resolution and high signal-noise- ratio. Tissue-simulating gel phantom gel, biological tissues, and tumor-bearing animals were used in the experiments for laser treatment and MR imaging. Thermal couple measurement of temperature in target samples was used for system calibration. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the samples with a laser power in the range of 1 to 2.5 watts. Using the MRI system and a specially developed processing algorithm, a clear temperature distribution matrix in the target tissue and surrounding tissue was obtained. The temperature profiles show that the selective laser photothermal effect could result in tissue temperature elevation in a range of 10 to 45 °C. The temperature resolution of the measurement was about 0.37°C including the total system error. The spatial resolution was 0.4 mm (128x128 pixels with field of view of 5.5x5.5 cm). The temperature distribution provided in vivo thermal information and future reference for optimizing dye concentration and irradiation parameters to achieve optimal thermal effects in cancer treatment.

  4. Effect of implant vs. tissue reconstruction on cancer specific survival varies by axillary lymph node status in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ouyang

    Full Text Available To compare the breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS between patients who underwent tissue or implant reconstruction after mastectomy.We used the database from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER registries and compared the BCSS between patients who underwent tissue and implant reconstruction after mastectomy. Cox-regression models were fitted, adjusting for known clinicopathological features. The interaction between the reconstruction types (tissue/implant and nodal status (N-stage was investigated.A total of 6,426 patients with a median age of 50 years were included. With a median follow up of 100 months, the 10-year cumulative BCSS and non-BCSS were 85.1% and 95.4%, respectively. Patients who underwent tissue reconstruction had tumors with a higher T-stage, N-stage, and tumor grade and tended to be ER/PR-negative compared to those who received implant reconstruction. In univariate analysis, implant-reconstruction was associated with a 2.4% increase (P = 0.003 in the BCSS compared with tissue-reconstruction. After adjusting for significant risk factors of the BCSS (suggested by univariate analysis and stratifying based on the N-stage, there was only an association between the reconstruction type and the BCSS for the N2-3 patients (10-year BCSS of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction: 68.7% and 59.0%, P = 0.004. The 10-year BCSS rates of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction were 91.7% and 91.8% in N0 patients (P>0.05 and 84.5% and 84.4% in N1 patients (P>0.05, respectively.The implant (vs. tissue reconstruction after mastectomy was associated with an improved BCSS in N2-3 breast cancer patients but not in N0-1 patients. A well-designed, prospective study is needed to further confirm these findings.

  5. Cellular origin and procoagulant activity of tissue factor-exposing microparticles in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Berckmans, R.J.; Böing, A.N.; Sturk, A.; Büller, H.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Nieuwland, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In patients with cancer, tissue factor-exposing microparticles (TF-exposing MP) have been associated with disease progression and thrombosis. The cellular origin and coagulant activity of TF-exposing MP, however, remain disputed. Therefore, we investigated the cellular origin of the TF-e

  6. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in the postoperative monitoring of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Mads Nikolaj; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Sørensen, Steen;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the pre- and postoperative plasma levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) were associated with outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC). Pre- and postoperative plasma TIMP-1 from 280 curatively resected CRC patients and carcinoembryon...

  7. Association of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 and Ki67 in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Christina Annette; Knoop, Ann; Bjerre, Karsten;

    2013-01-01

    The role of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer remains to be fully elucidated. We evaluated TIMP-1 as a prognostic marker in patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen and investigated TIMP-1s association with Ki67 and ER/progesterone ...

  8. N-glycan MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Enables the Delineation of Ovarian Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everest-Dass, Arun V; Briggs, Matthew T; Kaur, Gurjeet; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a fatal gynaecological malignancy in adult women with a five-year overall survival rate of only 30%. Glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling studies have reported extensive protein glycosylation pattern alterations in ovarian cancer. Therefore, spatio-temporal investigation of these glycosylation changes may unearth tissue-specific changes that occur in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. A novel method for investigating tissue-specific N-linked glycans is using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections that can spatially profile N-glycan compositions released from proteins in tissue-specific regions. In this study, tissue regions of interest (e.g. tumor, stroma, adipose tissue and necrotic areas) were isolated from FFPE tissue sections of advanced serous ovarian cancers (n = 3). PGC-LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MSI were used as complementary techniques to firstly generate structural information on the tissue-specific glycans in order to then obtain high resolution images of the glycan structure distribution in ovarian cancer tissue. The N-linked glycan repertoires carried by the proteins in these tissue regions were structurally characterized for the first time in FFPE ovarian cancer tissue regions, using enzymatic peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) release of N-glycans. The released glycans were analyzed by porous graphitized carbon liquid chromatography (PGC-LC) and collision induced electrospray negative mode MS fragmentation analysis. The N-glycan profiles identified by this analysis were then used to determine the location and distribution of each N-glycan on FFPE ovarian cancer sections that were treated with PNGase F using high resolution MALDI-MSI. A tissue-specific distribution of N-glycan structures identified particular regions of the ovarian cancer sections. For example, high mannose glycans were predominantly expressed in the

  9. Androgen receptor isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie XIA; Xiao-Da TANG; Qing-Zheng MA

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoform expressions in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line. Methods: With high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) method we demonstrated the different expressions of AR isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissues and LNCaP cell line. Results: Data were obtained from three prostatic cancer specimens and the LNCaP cell line. Three types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5,6.0, and 5.3. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, 1 sample showed all the three types of AR isoforms, the second specimen expressed at 6.5 and 6.0, and the third failed to show any type of isoforms. The LNCaP cell line expressed all the three AR isoforms. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT) to these three isoforms was inhibited by the addition ofl00-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, while not by progesterone, oestradiol and diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: The expression of AR isofonns is different in different prostate cancer tissues, which may be related to the difference in the effect of anti-androgen therapy in different patients.

  10. Multiobjective Simulated Annealing-Based Clustering of Tissue Samples for Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sudipta; Saha, Sriparna; Thadisina, Yamini

    2016-03-01

    In the field of pattern recognition, the study of the gene expression profiles of different tissue samples over different experimental conditions has become feasible with the arrival of microarray-based technology. In cancer research, classification of tissue samples is necessary for cancer diagnosis, which can be done with the help of microarray technology. In this paper, we have presented a multiobjective optimization (MOO)-based clustering technique utilizing archived multiobjective simulated annealing(AMOSA) as the underlying optimization strategy for classification of tissue samples from cancer datasets. The presented clustering technique is evaluated for three open source benchmark cancer datasets [Brain tumor dataset, Adult Malignancy, and Small Round Blood Cell Tumors (SRBCT)]. In order to evaluate the quality or goodness of produced clusters, two cluster quality measures viz, adjusted rand index and classification accuracy ( % CoA) are calculated. Comparative results of the presented clustering algorithm with ten state-of-the-art existing clustering techniques are shown for three benchmark datasets. Also, we have conducted a statistical significance test called t-test to prove the superiority of our presented MOO-based clustering technique over other clustering techniques. Moreover, significant gene markers have been identified and demonstrated visually from the clustering solutions obtained. In the field of cancer subtype prediction, this study can have important impact. PMID:25706936

  11. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins in cancerous and normal colonic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Harn Gam; Chiuan-Herng Leow; Che Nin Man; Boon-Hui Gooi; Manjit Singh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To identify and analyze the differentially expressed proteins in normal and cancerous tissues of four patients suffering from colon cancer.METHODS: Colon tissues (normal and cancerous)were homogenized and the proteins were extracted using three protein extraction buffers. The extraction buffers were used in an orderly sequence of increasing extraction strength for proteins with hydrophobic properties. The protein extracts were separated using the SDS-PAGE method and the images were captured and analyzed using Quantity One software. The target protein bands were subjected to in-gel digestion with trypsin and finally analyzed using an ESI-ion trap mass spectrometer.RESULTS: A total of 50 differentially expressed proteins in colonic cancerous and normal tissues were identified.CONCLUSION: Many of the identified proteins have been reported to be involved in the progression of similar or other types of cancers. However, some of the identified proteins have not been reported before. In addition, a number of hypothetical proteins were also identified.

  12. Alteration of proliferation and apoptotic markers in normal and premalignant tissue associated with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular markers identifying alterations in proliferation and apoptotic pathways could be particularly important in characterizing high-risk normal or pre-neoplastic tissue. We evaluated the following markers: Ki67, Minichromosome Maintenance Protein-2 (Mcm-2), activated caspase-3 (a-casp3) and Bcl-2 to determine if they showed differential expression across progressive degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer in the prostate. To identify field effects, we also evaluated whether high-risk expression patterns in normal tissue were more common in prostates containing cancer compared to those without cancer (supernormal), and in histologically normal glands adjacent to a cancer focus as opposed to equivalent glands that were more distant. The aforementioned markers were studied in 13 radical prostatectomy (RP) and 6 cystoprostatectomy (CP) specimens. Tissue compartments representing normal, low grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (LGPIN), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), as well as different grades of cancer were mapped on H&E slides and adjacent sections were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Normal glands within 1 mm distance of a tumor focus and glands beyond 5 mm were considered 'near' and 'far', respectively. Randomly selected nuclei and 40 × fields were scored by a single observer; basal and luminal epithelial layers were scored separately. Both Ki-67 and Mcm-2 showed an upward trend from normal tissue through HGPIN and cancer with a shift in proliferation from basal to luminal compartment. Activated caspase-3 showed a significant decrease in HGPIN and cancer compartments. Supernormal glands had significantly lower proliferation indices and higher a-casp3 expression compared to normal glands. 'Near' normal glands had higher Mcm-2 indices compared to 'far' glands; however, they also had higher a-casp3 expression. Bcl-2, which varied minimally in normal tissue, did not show any trend

  13. YKL-40 tissue expression and plasma levels in patients with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid V S; Ringsholt, Merete; Høgdall, Claus K;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like-1) is a member of "mammalian chitinase-like proteins". The protein is expressed in many types of cancer cells and the highest plasma YKL-40 levels have been found in patients with metastatic disease, short recurrence/progression-free intervals, and short overall...... survival. The aim of the study was to determine the expression of YKL-40 in tumor tissue and plasma in patients with borderline ovarian tumor or epithelial ovarian cancer (OC), and investigate prognostic value of this marker. METHODS: YKL-40 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry...... in tissue arrays from 181 borderline tumors and 473 OC. Plasma YKL-40 was determined by ELISA in preoperative samples from 19 patients with borderline tumor and 76 OC patients. RESULTS: YKL-40 protein expression was found in cancer cells, tumor associated macrophages, neutrophils and mast cells. The tumor...

  14. A Breast Tissue Protein Expression Profile Contributing to Early Parity-Induced Protection Against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Marie Gutierrez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Early parity reduces breast cancer risk, whereas, late parity and nulliparity increase breast cancer risk. Despite substantial efforts to understand the protective effects of early parity, the precise molecular circuitry responsible for these changes is not yet fully defined. Methods: Here, we have conducted the first study assessing protein expression profiles in normal breast tissue of healthy early parous, late parous, and nulliparous women. Breast tissue biopsies were obtained from 132 healthy parous and nulliparous volunteers. These samples were subjected to global protein expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. GeneSpring and MetaCore bioinformatics analysis software were used to identify protein expression profiles associated with early parity (low risk versus late/nulliparity (high risk. Results: Early parity reduces expression of key proteins involved in mitogenic signaling pathways in breast tissue through down regulation of EGFR1/3, ESR1, AKT1, ATF, Fos, and SRC. Early parity is also characterized by greater genomic stability and reduced tissue inflammation based on differential expression of aurora kinases, p53, RAD52, BRCA1, MAPKAPK-2, ATF-1, ICAM1, and NF-kappaB compared to late and nulli parity. Conclusions: Early parity reduces basal cell proliferation in breast tissue, which translates to enhanced genomic stability, reduced cellular stress/inflammation, and thus reduced breast cancer risk.

  15. Detection of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in tissue and serum samples from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga-Eon; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Yoo Duk; Lee, Ji Shin; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Nam, Jong Hee; Choi, Chan; Park, Min Ho; Yoon, Jung Han

    2011-10-01

    Promoter hypermethylation has been shown to be a common mechanism for inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in both the tumor and serum samples of breast cancer patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). The methylation status of Slit2 was investigated in 210 tissue samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 169 IBC samples) and 123 corresponding serum samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 82 IBC samples) using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining for Slit2 was also performed using tissue microarray blocks to determine whether Slit2 promoter hypermethylation correlated with loss of Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was not detected in breast tissue and serum samples from patients with no pathological findings. DCIS or IBC showed a statistically higher frequency of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation compared to breast with no pathological findings in both the tissue and serum samples; however, there were no statistically significant differences between DCIS and IBC samples. Similar Slit2 promoter hypermethylation patterns were seen in the tissue samples and corresponding serum specimens (p Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was associated with loss of Slit2 expression. These results suggest that Slit2 promoter hypermethylation appears to be responsible for functionally silencing Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation may be considered as a possible serum marker for early detection of breast cancer.

  16. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  17. Statistical Analysis of Tissue Images for Detection and Classification of Cervical Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Jagtap, Jaidip; Pandey, Kiran; Agarwa, Asha; Panigrahi, Prasanta K; Pradhan, Asima

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the major health threats in women worldwide. The current "gold standard" for detecting cancer of the epithelial tissue is the histopathology analysis of biopsy samples. However it relies on the pathologist's judgment of the disease. We investigate the utility of statistical parameters as a potential tool for detection and discrimination of the stages of dysplasia. Digital images of the tissue slides are captured with the help of a digital camera plugged to a microscope. Statistical data analysis is performed with the help of software to evaluate parameters such as mean, maxima, full width half maxima, skewness, kurtosis etc. for the images. We believe that these parameters can help effectively to improve the diagnosis and further classify normal and abnormal tissue sections. These parameters can be used independently as well as in tandem with other parameters as features in classification algorithms that involve the use of Neural networks or Principal component analysis.

  18. Tissue of origin dictates branched-chain amino acid metabolism in mutant Kras-driven cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Jared R; Torrence, Margaret E; Danai, Laura V; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Davidson, Shawn M; Bauer, Matthew R; Lau, Allison N; Ji, Brian W; Dixit, Purushottam D; Hosios, Aaron M; Muir, Alexander; Chin, Christopher R; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Jacks, Tyler; Wolpin, Brian M; Vitkup, Dennis; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2016-09-01

    Tumor genetics guides patient selection for many new therapies, and cell culture studies have demonstrated that specific mutations can promote metabolic phenotypes. However, whether tissue context defines cancer dependence on specific metabolic pathways is unknown. Kras activation and Trp53 deletion in the pancreas or the lung result in pancreatic ductal adenocarinoma (PDAC) or non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), respectively, but despite the same initiating events, these tumors use branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) differently. NSCLC tumors incorporate free BCAAs into tissue protein and use BCAAs as a nitrogen source, whereas PDAC tumors have decreased BCAA uptake. These differences are reflected in expression levels of BCAA catabolic enzymes in both mice and humans. Loss of Bcat1 and Bcat2, the enzymes responsible for BCAA use, impairs NSCLC tumor formation, but these enzymes are not required for PDAC tumor formation, arguing that tissue of origin is an important determinant of how cancers satisfy their metabolic requirements. PMID:27609895

  19. Soft tissue metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed by {sup 18}F FDG PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Califano, Ines; Quildrian, Sergio; Otero, Jose; Coduti, Martin; Califano, Leonardo; Rojas Bilbao, Erica, E-mail: ines.m.califano@gmail.com [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    Distant metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer are unusual; lung and bones are the most frequently affected sites. Soft tissue metastases (STM) are extremely rare. We describe two cases of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer metastasizing to soft tissues. Both patients had widespread metastatic disease; clinically asymptomatic soft tissue metastases were found by 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F FDG PET-CT), and confirmed by cytological and/or histopathological studies. These findings underscore the ability of {sup 18}F FDG PET-CT in accurately assessing the extent of the disease, as well as the utility of the method to evaluate regions of the body that are not routinely explored. (author)

  20. Computerized prediction of breast cancer risk: comparison between the global and local bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-03-01

    We have developed and preliminarily tested a new breast cancer risk prediction model based on computerized bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. In this study, we investigated and compared the performance difference of our risk prediction model when the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetrical features were extracted in two different methods namely (1) the entire breast area and (2) the mirror-matched local strips between the left and right breast. A testing dataset including bilateral craniocaudal (CC) view images of 100 negative and 100 positive cases for developing breast abnormalities or cancer was selected from a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry, a set of 20 initial "global" features were extracted from the entire breast areas of two bilateral mammograms in CC view and their differences were computed. Meanwhile, a pool of 16 local histogram-based statistic features was computed from eight mirror-matched strips between the left and right breast. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) to select optimal features, two artificial neural networks (ANN) were built to predict the risk of a test case developing cancer. Using the leave-one-case-out training and testing method, two GAoptimized ANNs yielded the areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.754+/-0.024 (using feature differences extracted from the entire breast area) and 0.726+/-0.026 (using the feature differences extracted from 8 pairs of local strips), respectively. The risk prediction model using either ANN is able to detect 58.3% (35/60) of cancer cases 6 to 18 months earlier at 80% specificity level. This study compared two methods to compute bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry and demonstrated that bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry was a useful breast cancer risk indicator with high discriminatory power.

  1. Measurement of asbestos bodies in lung tissue of autopsy cases diagnosed with primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the relation between asbestos-related lung cancer and the concentration of asbestos bodies in lung tissue, we analyzed the concentration in 24 autopsy cases diagnosed with primary lung cancer, with regard to the gender, age, histological type of lung cancer and occupation of each case. The asbestos bodies were measured according to Kohyama's method. Positive cases (more than 5,000 bodies per 1 g of dry lung tissue) were further analyzed for asbestosis and pleural plaques by chest X-ray and chest CT. Two cases exhibited more than 5,000 bodies, five cases between 1,000 and 5,000, and seventeen cases less than 1,000. The occupation of the two positive cases was not informative: one demonstrated neither asbestosis nor pleural plaques, and the other showed only pleural plaques. Although the number of cases of asbestos-related lung cancer is minimal among all lung cancer cases, the number of the former may exceed that of mesothelioma patients. Not only physicians but also radiologists, surgeons and pathologists need to collaborate in the diagnosis of asbestos-related lung cancer. (author)

  2. Using endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy singular tissue plural tissues in organ-preserving surgery of laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study has demonstrated feasibility of performing larynx preservation surgeries in patients with recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of radiotherapy. The technique of combined laryngeal reconstruction with endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy Singular tissue Plural tissues results in improvement of life quality by preserving laryngeal functions

  3. Using endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy singular tissue plural tissues in organ-preserving surgery of laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulbakin, D. E., E-mail: kulbakin-d@mail.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, 5 Kooperativny Street, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Mukhamedov, M. R., E-mail: muhamedov@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, 5 Kooperativny Street, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Siberian State Medical University, 2, Moscow Highway, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Choynzonov, E. L., E-mail: choynzonov@gmail.com [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, 5 Kooperativny Street, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Siberian State Medical University, 2, Moscow Highway, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Gynter, V. E., E-mail: tc77@rec.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Research Institute of Medical Materials, 17, 19 Gv. Divizii, Tomsk, 634034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Our study has demonstrated feasibility of performing larynx preservation surgeries in patients with recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of radiotherapy. The technique of combined laryngeal reconstruction with endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy Singular tissue Plural tissues results in improvement of life quality by preserving laryngeal functions.

  4. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Matei, D [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  5. Virtual Touch tissue quantification cannot assess breast cancer lesions except for ductal carcinomas in situ and small invasive cancers: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Tada, Keiichiro; Nishioka, Kotoe; Kikuchi, Yasuko; Niwa, Takayoshi; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) is a promising new technology that quantitatively determines the stiffness of tissue. However, the clinical impact of this device on the assessment of breast cancer is unclear. Methods This study aimed to review the ultrasound records of patients with breast lesions where VTTQ was used to assess 123 normal breast tissues, 18 benign tumors, and 117 histopathologically confirmed breast cancers in a total of 129 patients. To determine the VTT...

  6. Adipose tissue omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid content and breast cancer in the euramic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonsen, N.; Veer, P. van 't; Strain, J.J.; Martin-Moreno, J.M.; Huttunen, J.K.; Navajas, J.F.-C.; Martin, B.C.; Thamm, M.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kohlmeier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid content of adipose tissue in postmenopausal breast cancer cases and controls from five European countries in the European Community Multicenter Study on Antioxidants, Myocardial Infarction, and Cancer (EURAMIC) breast cancer study (1991-1992) was used to explore the hypothesis that fa

  7. Adipose tissue lipolysis and energy metabolism in early cancer cachexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliewer, Kara L; Ke, Jia-Yu; Tian, Min; Cole, Rachel M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Belury, Martha A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a progressive metabolic disorder that results in depletion of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. A growing body of literature suggests that maintaining adipose tissue mass in cachexia may improve quality-of-life and survival outcomes. Studies of lipid metabolism in cachexia, however, have generally focused on later stages of the disorder when severe loss of adipose tissue has already occurred. Here, we investigated lipid metabolism in adipose, liver and muscle tissues during early stage cachexia - before severe fat loss - in the colon-26 murine model of cachexia. White adipose tissue mass in cachectic mice was moderately reduced (34-42%) and weight loss was less than 10% of initial body weight in this study of early cachexia. In white adipose depots of cachectic mice, we found evidence of enhanced protein kinase A - activated lipolysis which coincided with elevated total energy expenditure and increased expression of markers of brown (but not white) adipose tissue thermogenesis and the acute phase response. Total lipids in liver and muscle were unchanged in early cachexia while markers of fatty oxidation were increased. Many of these initial metabolic responses contrast with reports of lipid metabolism in later stages of cachexia. Our observations suggest intervention studies to preserve fat mass in cachexia should be tailored to the stage of cachexia. Our observations also highlight a need for studies that delineate the contribution of cachexia stage and animal model to altered lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia and identify those that most closely mimic the human condition.

  8. Tissue heterogeneity in IMRT dose calculation for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuti, Katia; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia; Malatesta, Tiziana; Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria; Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina; Landoni, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the γ function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the Γ analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable. PMID:20970989

  9. Mining the epigenetic landscape of tissue polarity in search of new targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrian, Farzaneh; Lelièvre, Sophie A

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic nature of cancer encourages the development of inhibitors of epigenetic pathways. Yet, the clinical use for solid tumors of approved epigenetic drugs is meager. We argue that this situation might improve upon understanding the coinfluence between epigenetic pathways and tissue architecture. We present emerging information on the epigenetic control of the polarity axis, a central feature of epithelial architecture created by the orderly distribution of multiprotein complexes at cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts and altered upon cancer onset (with apical polarity loss), invasive progression (with basolateral polarity loss) and metastatic development (with basoapical polarity imbalance). This information combined with the impact of polarity-related proteins on epigenetic mechanisms of cancer enables us to envision how to guide the choice of drugs specific for distinct epigenetic modifiers, in order to halt cancer development and counter the consequences of polarity alterations.

  10. Hsp90 as a "Chaperone" of the Epigenome: Insights and Opportunities for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    The cellular functions of Hsp90 have historically been attributed to its ability to chaperone client proteins involved in signal transduction. Although numerous stimuli and the signaling cascades they activate contribute to cancer progression, many of these pathways ultimately require transcriptional effectors to elicit tumor-promoting effects. Despite this obvious connection, the majority of studies evaluating Hsp90 function in malignancy have focused upon its regulation of cytosolic client proteins, and particularly members of receptor and/or kinase families. However, in recent years, Hsp90 has emerged as a pivotal orchestrator of nuclear events. Discovery of an expanding repertoire of Hsp90 clients has illuminated a vital role for Hsp90 in overseeing nuclear events and influencing gene transcription. Hence, this chapter will cast a spotlight upon several regulatory themes involving Hsp90-dependent nuclear functions. Highlighted topics include a summary of chaperone-dependent regulation of key transcription factors (TFs) and epigenetic effectors in malignancy, as well as a discussion of how the complex interplay among a subset of these TFs and epigenetic regulators may generate feed-forward loops that further support cancer progression. This chapter will also highlight less recognized indirect mechanisms whereby Hsp90-supported signaling may impinge upon epigenetic regulation. Finally, the relevance of these nuclear events is discussed within the framework of Hsp90's capacity to enable phenotypic variation and drug resistance. These newly acquired insights expanding our understanding of Hsp90 function support the collective notion that nuclear clients are major beneficiaries of Hsp90 action, and their impairment is likely responsible for many of the anticancer effects elicited by Hsp90-targeted approaches.

  11. The expression of HER-2/neu gene in colon cancer tissues and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Jin; Yuxuan Che; Qimin Wang; Fang Liu; Man Li; Lifen Wang; Xiuhua Sun; Yang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The article aims to detect the expression of HER-2/neu gene in colon cancer tissues and adjacent tissues, to analyze the relationship between dif erent pathologic types and clinical features, also to invest the distribution of patients with positive expression of HER-2 gene. Methods:The expression of HER-2 gene in the 223 samples with colon can-cer was detected by immunochemical approach. The expression of HER-2 gene in colon cancer tissues and adjacent tissues and dif erent pathologic types was analyzed byχ2 test. The correlation between the expression of HER-2 gene and clinical features was analyzed by Spearman. Results:The number of positive expression of HER-2 gene in colon cancer tissues and adjacent tissues were 74 and 0 respectively, the dif erence has statistical significance. The number of papil ary or tubular adenocarcinoma was 182, among them, 60 cases were positive expression. The number of mucinous adenocarcinoma was 41, among them, 14 cases were positive expression. The expression of HER-2/neu gene has no correlation with sex, age, the maximum diameter, general classification, degree of dif erentiation and depth of invasion, which has no statistical significance. However, the expression of HER-2/neu gene has correlation with metastasis of lymph node and Dukes stage, which has statistical significance. The expression of HER-2/neu gene was positive correlation with metastasis of lymph node and Dukes stage. The correlated coef icient index was 0.320 and 0.320 respectively. In the 74 patients with positive expression of HER-2 gene, 59.4%of them were 60-74 years old. And there was 97.3%of the patients without family history of adenocarcinoma. Conclusion:The expression of HER-2/neu gene in colon cancer tissues was higher than in adjacent tissues. The expression of HER-2/neu gene has no correlation with sex, age, the maximum diameter, general classification, degree of dif erentiation and depth of invasion, but has correlation with metastasis of

  12. Influence of nanoparticles accumulation on optical properties of human normal and cancerous liver tissue in vitro estimated by OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Wei, Huajiang; Ye, Xiangping; Hu, Kun; Wu, Guoyong; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Zhouyi

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the potential use of nanoparticles as contrast agents by using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in liver tissue was demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles (average size of 25 and 70 nm), were studied in human normal and cancerous liver tissues in vitro, respectively. Each sample was monitored with SD-OCT functional imaging for 240 min. Continuous OCT monitoring showed that, after application of gold nanoparticles, the OCT signal intensities of normal liver and cancerous liver tissue both increase with time, and the larger nanoparticles tend to produce a greater signal enhancement in the same type of tissue. The results show that the values of attenuation coefficients have significant differences between normal liver tissue and cancerous liver tissue. In addition, 25 nm gold nanoparticles allow higher penetration depth than 70 nm gold nanoparticles in liver tissues.

  13. Which, when and why? Rational use of tissue-based molecular testing in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A E; D'Amico, A V; Freedland, S J

    2016-03-01

    An increased molecular understanding of localized prostate cancer and the improved ability for molecular testing of pathologic tissue has led to the development of multiple clinical assays. Here we review the relevant molecular biology of localized prostate cancer, currently available tissue-based tests and describe which is best supported for use in various clinical scenarios. Literature regarding testing of human prostate cancer tissue with Ki-67, PTEN (by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluroescence in situ hybridization (FISH)), ProMark, Prolaris, OncotypeDX Prostate and Decipher was reviewed to allow for generation of expert opinions. At diagnosis, evaluation of PTEN status, use of ProMark or OncotypeDX Prostate in men with Gleason 6 or 3+4=7 disease may help guide the use of active surveillance. For men with Gleason 7 or above disease considering watchful waiting, Ki-67 and Prolaris add independent prognostic information. For those men who have undergone prostatectomy and have adverse pathology, Decipher testing may aid in the decision to undergo adjuvant radiation. Newly available molecular tests bring opportunities to improve decision making for men with localized prostate cancer. A review of the currently available data suggests clinical scenarios for which each of these tests may have the greatest utility. PMID:26123120

  14. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for MicroRNA Detection in Archived Oral Cancer Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonggao Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The noncoding RNA designated as microRNA (miRNA is a large group of small single-stranded regulatory RNA and has generated wide-spread interest in human disease studies. To facilitate delineating the role of microRNAs in cancer pathology, we sought to explore the feasibility of detecting microRNA expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues. Using FFPE materials, we have compared fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH procedures to detect miR-146a with (a different synthetic probes: regular custom DNA oligonucleotides versus locked nucleic acid (LNA incorporated DNA oligonucleotides; (b different reporters for the probes: biotin versus digoxigenin (DIG; (c different visualization: traditional versus tyramide signal amplification (TSA system; (d different blocking reagents for endogenous peroxidase. Finally, we performed miR-146a FISH on a commercially available oral cancer tissue microarray, which contains 40 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and 10 cases of normal epithelia from the human oral cavity. A sample FISH protocol for detecting miR-146a is provided. In summary, we have established reliable in situ hybridization procedures for detecting the expression of microRNA in FFPE oral cancer tissues. This method is an important tool for studies on the involvement of microRNA in oral cancer pathology and may have potential prognostic or diagnostic value.

  15. Characterization of breast tissue composition and breast cancer risk assessment using non-invasive transillumination breast spectroscopy (TIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Kristina M.; Weersink, Robert; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-09-01

    Tissue undergoing transformation into a state that is more favourable for tumor growth may present itself with different tissue optical properties and contain different amounts of the major tissue chromophores. Here, we decomposed transillumination spectra obtain in women from various risk levels of developing breast cancer.

  16. Predominant expression of Th1-type cytokines in primary hepatic cancer and adjacent liver tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-Bo Qiu; Li-Qun Wu; Yun Lu; Shun Zhang; Bing-Yuan Zhang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research has revealed a shift towards Th2 in many types of malignant tumor, but the state of Th1/Th2 is not clear in patients with primary hepatic cancer (PHC). This study was designed to determine the expression of Th1-versus Th2-type cytokines in primary hepatic cancer and the adjacent liver tissue in order to provide evidence for treatment of the Th1/Th2 shift. METHODS:Samples were collected from 11 patients with PHC. The gene expression of Th1/Th2 cytokines was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using IFN-γ and IL-2 as Th1-type cytokine genes, and IL-4 and IL-10 as Th2-type cytokine genes. RESULTS: Th1-type cytokines were expressed in 7/11 PHCs and 9/11 adjacent liver tissues, while Th0 type cytokines occurred in 4/11 PHCs and 2/11 adjacent liver tissues. CONCLUSION: Th1-type cytokines are expressed predominantly in primary hepatic cancer and the adjacent liver tissue.

  17. Multispectral fluorescence imaging of human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue for early-stage cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler H.; Baggett, Brenda; Rice, Photini F. S.; Koevary, Jennifer Watson; Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Nymeyer, Ariel C.; Welge, Weston A.; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer Kehlet

    2016-05-01

    With early detection, 5-year survival rates for ovarian cancer exceed 90%, yet no effective early screening method exists. Emerging consensus suggests over 50% of the most lethal form of the disease originates in the fallopian tube. Twenty-eight women undergoing oophorectomy or debulking surgery provided informed consent for the use of surgical discard tissue samples for multispectral fluorescence imaging. Using multiple ultraviolet and visible excitation wavelengths and emissions bands, 12 fluorescence and 6 reflectance images of 47 ovarian and 31 fallopian tube tissue samples were recorded. After imaging, each sample was fixed, sectioned, and stained for pathological evaluation. Univariate logistic regression showed cancerous tissue samples had significantly lower intensity than noncancerous tissue for 17 image types. The predictive power of multiple image types was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression (MLR) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA). Two MLR models each using two image types had receiver operating characteristic curves with area under the curve exceeding 0.9. QDA determined 56 image type combinations with perfect resubstituting using as few as five image types. Adaption of the system for future in vivo fallopian tube and ovary endoscopic imaging is possible, which may enable sensitive detection of ovarian cancer with no exogenous contrast agents.

  18. The contributions of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 genotypes to triple negative breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Liang-Chih; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Su, Chen-Hsien; Wang, Hwei-Chung; Ji, Hong-Xue; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Maa, Ming-Chei; Bau, Da-Tian

    2016-03-01

    The tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are a family of multifunctional proteins which have been shown to be upregulated in various types of cancers. However, the contribution of TIMPs in breast cancer is not fully understood, not to mention triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). This study's aim was to evaluate the contribution of TIMP-1 rs4898, rs6609533, and rs2070584 genotypes to the risk of breast cancer, especially the subtype of TNBC. The contributions of these TIMP-1 genotypes to cancer risk were examined among 1232 breast cancer patients and 1232 healthy controls, and several clinicopathologic factors were also analyzed. The results showed that the percentages of CC, CT, and TT of TIMP-1 rs4898 were differentially distributed at 28.5%, 33.1% and 38.4% in the breast cancer patient group and 34.5%, 41.0% and 24.5% in the control group, respectively (P for trend = 7.99*10(-13)). It was also found that the CC genotype carriers were of increased risk for breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.90, 95% confidence interval = 1.55-2.33, P = 0.0001) than the TT genotype carriers. In addition, we analyzed the allelic frequency distributions of all three TIMP-1s, and the results showed that the C allele of TIMP-1 rs4898 contributes to an increase in breast cancer susceptibility (P = 2.41*10(-12)). On the other hand, there was no difference found in the distribution of genotypic or allelic frequencies among the patients and the controls for TIMP-1 rs6609533 and rs2070584. Thus, it is our conclusion that the CC genotype of TIMP-1 rs4898 compared to the TT wild-type genotype may increase the risk for breast cancer, especially TNBC in Taiwan, and may serve as an early detective and predictive marker.

  19. Tissue pattern recognition error rates and tumor heterogeneity in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Steven J; Huff, Sarah E; Lange, Holger; Zakharov, Vladislav; Eberhard, David A; Krueger, Joseph S; Hicks, David G; Young, George David; Johnson, Trevor; Whitney-Miller, Christa L

    2013-01-01

    The anatomic pathology discipline is slowly moving toward a digital workflow, where pathologists will evaluate whole-slide images on a computer monitor rather than glass slides through a microscope. One of the driving factors in this workflow is computer-assisted scoring, which depends on appropriate selection of regions of interest. With advances in tissue pattern recognition techniques, a more precise region of the tissue can be evaluated, no longer bound by the pathologist's patience in manually outlining target tissue areas. Pathologists use entire tissues from which to determine a score in a region of interest when making manual immunohistochemistry assessments. Tissue pattern recognition theoretically offers this same advantage; however, error rates exist in any tissue pattern recognition program, and these error rates contribute to errors in the overall score. To provide a real-world example of tissue pattern recognition, 11 HER2-stained upper gastrointestinal malignancies with high heterogeneity were evaluated. HER2 scoring of gastric cancer was chosen due to its increasing importance in gastrointestinal disease. A method is introduced for quantifying the error rates of tissue pattern recognition. The trade-off between fully sampling tumor with a given tissue pattern recognition error rate versus randomly sampling a limited number of fields of view with higher target accuracy was modeled with a Monte-Carlo simulation. Under most scenarios, stereological methods of sampling-limited fields of view outperformed whole-slide tissue pattern recognition approaches for accurate immunohistochemistry analysis. The importance of educating pathologists in the use of statistical sampling is discussed, along with the emerging role of hybrid whole-tissue imaging and stereological approaches.

  20. A low dimensional entropy-based descriptor of several tissues in skin cancer histopathology samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Pablo; Corredor, Germán.; García-Arteaga, Juan D.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The use of low-level visual features to assign high level labels in datasets of histopathology images is a possible solution to the problems derived from manual labeling by experts. However, in many cases, the visual cues are not enough. In this article we propose the use of features derived exclusively from the spatial distribution of the cell nuclei. These features are calculated using the weight of k-nn graphs constructed from the distances between cells. Results show that there are k values with enhanced discriminatory power, especially when comparing cancerous and non-cancerous tissue.

  1. Excess risk of breast cancer in the mothers of children with soft tissue sarcomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Birch, J M; Hartley, A L; Marsden, H B; Harris, M; Swindell, R.

    1984-01-01

    Information was obtained on the health status or cause of death in the mothers of a population-based series of 143 children with soft tissue sarcomas. Among these mothers there were 6 cases of breast cancer. All 6 women were pre-menopausal and 2 had bilateral disease. This represents a significant 3-fold excess risk of breast cancer. Malignant disease had occurred in 6 other women whose ages at diagnosis ranged from 33 to 58 years. This was not significantly in excess of expectation. The inci...

  2. Nutrition support and dietary interventions for patients with lung cancer: current insights

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss N

    2016-01-01

    Nicole Kiss1,2 1Nutrition and Speech Pathology Department, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Cancer Experiences Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Malnutrition and weight loss are prevalent in patients with lung cancer. The impact of malnutrition on patients with cancer, and specifically in patients with lung cancer, has been demonstrated in a large number of studies. Malnutrition has been shown to neg...

  3. Expressions of SEL 1L and C-erbB-2 in Gastric Cancer Tissues and Its Clinical Signiifcance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Guanghui; Li Yu; Li Yan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expressions and clinical signiifcance of human sel-1-like (SEL 1L) gene and oncogene c-erbB-2 in gastric cancer tissue. Methods:SEL 1L and c-erbB-2 expressions in gastric cancer tissues of 96 patients with gastric cancer were detected by immunohistochemical method. Results: The positive expression rate of SEL 1L gene in gastric cancer tissue was 84.4% (81/96), and its expression was significantly associated with the differentiated degree of gastric cancer tissue (P=0.001), but had no association with the age, gender, tumor size, infiltration depth, lymphatic metastasis and TNM staging (P>0.05). The positive expression rate of c-erbB-2 was 70.8% (68/96), and its expression was related to the differentiated degree of gastric cancer tissue, inifltration depth, lymphatic metastasis and TNM staging (P=0.002,P0.05). SEL 1L and c-erbB-2 expressions had a signiifcantly positive correlation (r=0.568,P<0.01). Conclusion: Both SEL 1L and c-erbB-2 are highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues and their joint detection can be considered as a biomarker for identifying the high-risk patients with gastric cancer.

  4. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches.

  5. Metastatic breast cancer patients: attitudes toward tissue donation for rapid autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, Tala; Wilson, John; Simon, Jacqueline; Rosenzweig, Margaret; Puhalla, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Rapid autopsy (RA) offers a unique opportunity to obtain a large amount of metastatic tissue at death in order to deepen existing understanding of cancer evolution and heterogeneity. In breast cancer, understanding metastasis is particularly valuable given that treatment regimens are based on the traditional hormone and HER2 receptor status as well as evolving genomic data of the primary tumor. We aimed to elucidate the attitudes and interests of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) toward RA, and to identify associated demographic or disease characteristics that may influence patient attitudes and interest. Ninety-seven patients with MBC were surveyed over the course of 12 months at a large, urban comprehensive cancer center's breast cancer outpatient clinic. 93/97 patients completed the survey sufficiently to be included in the analysis. Fisher's exact test was employed for categorical variables, and t test and rank-sum tests for continuous variables. p values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Of the 93 patients with MBC analyzed, 87 % were willing to donate tissue at death. Marital status and younger age were associated with willingness to donate (p = 0.000, p = 0.025, respectively). Race, employment status, religion/spirituality, and cancer subtype were not associated with likelihood of donating. Forty-five percent of patients felt that doctors should ask about RA at diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer rather than during late-stage disease. These data provide evidence that an RA program would be welcomed by patients and requires initiative by providers. PMID:26705147

  6. A tissue biopsy-based epigenetic multiplex PCR assay for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Neste Leander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA-directed prostate cancer screening leads to a high rate of false positive identifications and an unnecessary biopsy burden. Epigenetic biomarkers have proven useful, exhibiting frequent and abundant inactivation of tumor suppressor genes through such mechanisms. An epigenetic, multiplex PCR test for prostate cancer diagnosis could provide physicians with better tools to help their patients. Biomarkers like GSTP1, APC and RASSF1 have demonstrated involvement with prostate cancer, with the latter two genes playing prominent roles in the field effect. The epigenetic states of these genes can be used to assess the likelihood of cancer presence or absence. Results An initial test cohort of 30 prostate cancer-positive samples and 12 cancer-negative samples was used as basis for the development and optimization of an epigenetic multiplex assay based on the GSTP1, APC and RASSF1 genes, using methylation specific PCR (MSP. The effect of prostate needle core biopsy sample volume and age of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples was evaluated on an independent follow-up cohort of 51 cancer-positive patients. Multiplexing affects copy number calculations in a consistent way per assay. Methylation ratios are therefore altered compared to the respective singleplex assays, but the correlation with patient outcome remains equivalent. In addition, tissue-biopsy samples as small as 20 μm can be used to detect methylation in a reliable manner. The age of FFPE-samples does have a negative impact on DNA quality and quantity. Conclusions The developed multiplex assay appears functionally similar to individual singleplex assays, with the benefit of lower tissue requirements, lower cost and decreased signal variation. This assay can be applied to small biopsy specimens, down to 20 microns, widening clinical applicability. Increasing the sample volume can compensate the loss of DNA quality and quantity in older samples.

  7. Regional spectroscopy of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue using pulsed terahertz transmission imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    This work seeks to obtain the properties of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tumor tissues using transmission imaging and spectroscopy. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast tumors are first sectioned into slices of 20 μm and 30 μm and placed between two tsurupica slides. The slides are then scanned in a pulsed terahertz system using transmission imaging. The tissue regions in adjacent pathology section are compared to the transmission imaging scan in order to define a region of points over which to average the electrical properties results from the scan.

  8. Laser-induced tissue hyperthermia mediated by gold nanoparticles: toward cancer phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Suleymanova, Leyla V.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-03-01

    We describe an application of plasmonic silica/gold nanoshells to produce a controllable laser hyperthermia in tissues with the aim of the enhancement of cancer photothermal therapy. Laser irradiation parameters are optimized on the basis of preliminary experimental studies using a test-tube phantom and laboratory rats. Temperature distributions on the animal skin surface at hypodermic and intramuscular injection of gold nanoparticle suspensions and affectations by the laser radiation are measured in vivo with a thermal imaging system. The results of temperature measurements are compared with tissue histology.

  9. Limited prognostic value of tissue protein expression levels of cyclin E in Danish ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeran, Mel C; Høgdall, Claus K; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2012-01-01

    tissue arrays (TA), we analysed the cyclin E expression levels in tissues from 168 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) (147 stage I, 4 stage II, 17 stage III) and 493 Ovarian cancer (OC) patients (127 stage I, 45 stage II, 276 stage III, 45 stage IV). Using a 10% cut-off level for cyclin E...... overexpression, 20% of the BOTs were positive with a higher proportion of serous than mucinous tumours. Sixty-two per cent of the OCs were positive for cyclin E expression with the highest percentage found in clear cell carcinomas. Results based on univariate and multivariate survival analyses with a 10% cut...

  10. Peri-Implant Tissue Findings in Bone Grafted Oral Cancer Patients Compared to non Bone Grafted Patients without Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wolff

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare microbiological, histological, and mechanical findings from tissues around osseointergrated dental implants in patients who had undergone tumour resection and subsequent bone grafting with non bone grafted patients without a history of oral cancer and to develop an effective tool for the monitoring of the peri-implant tissues. A third aim was to assess and compare the masticatory function of the two patient groups after reconstruction with dental implants.Material and Methods: A total of 20 patients were divided into 2 groups. The first group was edentulous and treated with dental implants without the need for bone grafting. The second edentulous group, with a history of oral cancer involving the mandible, received onlay bone grafts with concurrent placement of dental implants. Microbiological, histological, mechanical and biochemical assessment methods, crevicular fluid flow rate, hygiene-index, implant mobility, and the masticatory function were analysed and compared in both patient groups.Results: The microbiological examinations showed no evidence of the three most common pathogenic bacteria: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedius, Actinobacillus actinomycetencomitans. A causal relationship between specific microbes and peri-implant inflammation could not be found. All biopsies in both patient groups revealed early signs of soft tissue peri-implant inflammation.Conclusions: The crevicular fluid volume and grade of gingival inflammation around the dental implants were related. Peri-implant tissue findings were similar in the two patient groups despite the history of oral cancer and the need for bone grafting at the time of dental implant placement.

  11. Upregulation of MiR-1280 Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Min Xu; Li-Qin Li; Jing Li; Hong-Wei Li; Qi-Bin Shen; Jin-Liang Ping; Zhi-Hong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a prolific and high-mortality disease with few effective treatments.Although the detection and surgical techniques for NSCLC continue to advance,the survival rate for the patients with NSCLC remains poor.Enhanced predictive biomarkers such as microRNAs (miRNAs) are needed at the time of diagnosis to better tailor therapies for patients.This study focused on the expression ofmiR-1280 in NSCLC tissues and distal normal tissues in order to explore the association between miR-1280 expression and NSCLC.Methods:A total of 72 newly diagnosed primary NSCLC patients were enrolled in this study.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to identify the expression level ofmiR-1280 in the NSCLC tissues and distal normal tissues of these patients.Results:The miR-1280 expression was significantly higher in the NSCLC tissues (0.084 ± 0.099) than distal normal tissues (0.014 ± 0.015,P =0.009).In 54 patients (75%),the miR-1280 expression in the NSCLC tissues was upregulated (2-△△ct > 2),and no case showed a downregulation of miR-1280 expression.Conclusions:The expression level ofmiR-1280 could be regarded as a biomarker for NSCLC.

  12. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and σΛ, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, γ and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (fΔμ) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between fΔμs in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the complete absence of

  13. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2004-12-19

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and {sigma}{sub {lambda}}, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, {gamma} and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between f{Delta}{mu}s in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the

  14. Comparison of MicroRNA Deep Sequencing of Matched Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Cancer Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Meng; McElroy, Joseph P.; Stefano Volinia; Jeff Palatini; Sarah Warner; Ayers, Leona W; Kamalakannan Palanichamy; Arnab Chakravarti; Tim Lautenschlaeger

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate several aspects of tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Most cancer tissues are archived formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE). While microRNAs are a more stable form of RNA thought to withstand FFPE-processing and degradation there is only limited evidence for the latter assumption. We examined whether microRNA profiling can be successfully conducted on FFPE cancer tissues using SOLiD ligation based sequencing. Tissue storage times (2-9 years) appeared to not affect...

  15. Runx2 transcriptome of prostate cancer cells: insights into invasiveness and bone metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabet Yankel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer (PCa cells preferentially metastasize to bone at least in part by acquiring osteomimetic properties. Runx2, an osteoblast master transcription factor, is aberrantly expressed in PCa cells, and promotes their metastatic phenotype. The transcriptional programs regulated by Runx2 have been extensively studied during osteoblastogenesis, where it activates or represses target genes in a context-dependent manner. However, little is known about the gene regulatory networks influenced by Runx2 in PCa cells. We therefore investigated genome wide mRNA expression changes in PCa cells in response to Runx2. Results We engineered a C4-2B PCa sub-line called C4-2B/Rx2dox, in which Doxycycline (Dox treatment stimulates Runx2 expression from very low to levels observed in other PCa cells. Transcriptome profiling using whole genome expression array followed by in silico analysis indicated that Runx2 upregulated a multitude of genes with prominent cancer associated functions. They included secreted factors (CSF2, SDF-1, proteolytic enzymes (MMP9, CST7, cytoskeleton modulators (SDC2, Twinfilin, SH3PXD2A, intracellular signaling molecules (DUSP1, SPHK1, RASD1 and transcription factors (Sox9, SNAI2, SMAD3 functioning in epithelium to mesenchyme transition (EMT, tissue invasion, as well as homing and attachment to bone. Consistent with the gene expression data, induction of Runx2 in C4-2B cells enhanced their invasiveness. It also promoted cellular quiescence by blocking the G1/S phase transition during cell cycle progression. Furthermore, the cell cycle block was reversed as Runx2 levels declined after Dox withdrawal. Conclusions The effects of Runx2 in C4-2B/Rx2dox cells, as well as similar observations made by employing LNCaP, 22RV1 and PC3 cells, highlight multiple mechanisms by which Runx2 promotes the metastatic phenotype of PCa cells, including tissue invasion, homing to bone and induction of high bone turnover. Runx2 is

  16. Evaluation of algorithm methods for fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The paper focus on the various algorithms on to unravel the fluorescence spectra by unmixing methods to identify cancerous and normal human tissues from the measured fluorescence spectroscopy. The biochemical or morphologic changes that cause fluorescence spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological approach; therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases for in vivo use. The method can further identify tissue biomarkers by decomposing the spectral contributions of different fluorescent molecules of interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of blind source un-mixing methods (backward model) and spectral fitting approaches (forward model) in decomposing the contributions of key fluorescent molecules from the tissue mixture background when certain selected excitation wavelength is applied. Pairs of adenocarcinoma as well as normal tissues confirmed by pathologist were excited by selective wavelength of 340 nm. The emission spectra of resected fresh tissue were used to evaluate the relative changes of collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and Flavin by various spectral un-mixing methods. Two categories of algorithms: forward methods and Blind Source Separation [such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF)] will be introduced and evaluated. The purpose of the spectral analysis is to discard the redundant information which conceals the difference between these two types of tissues, but keep their diagnostically significance. The facts predicted by different methods were compared to the gold standard of histopathology. The results indicate that these key fluorophores within tissue, e.g. tryptophan, collagen, and NADH, and flavin, show differences of relative contents of fluorophores among different types of human cancer and normal tissues. The

  17. SU-E-T-168: Evaluation of Normal Tissue Damage in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H [IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer by calculating average survival fraction (SF) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for normal tissue cells. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were generated using EclipseTM treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The average SF for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from dose spectrum acquired from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Finally, EUDs for three types of normal tissue of each structure were calculated from average SF. Results: The EUDs of the brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, brachial plexus and etc were calculated. Our analysis indicated that the brainstem can absorb as much as 14.3% of prescription dose to the tumor if the cell line is radiosensitive. In addition, as much as 16.1% and 18.3% of prescription dose were absorbed by the brainstem for moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant cells, respectively. For the spinal cord, the EUDs reached up to 27.6%, 35.0% and 42.9% of prescribed dose for the three types of radiosensitivities respectively. Three types of normal cells for parotid glands can get up to 65.6%, 71.2% and 78.4% of prescription dose, respectively. The maximum EUDs of brachial plexsus were calculated as 75.4%, 76.4% and 76.7% of prescription for three types of normal cell lines. Conclusion: The results indicated that EUD can be used to quantify and evaluate the radiation damage to surrounding normal tissues. Large variation of normal tissue EUDs may come from variation of target volumes and radiation beam orientations among the patients.

  18. Lung Cancer Signature Biomarkers: tissue specific semantic similarity based clustering of Digital Differential Display (DDD data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Mousami

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue-specific Unigene Sets derived from more than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the NCBI, GenBank database offers a platform for identifying significantly and differentially expressed tissue-specific genes by in-silico methods. Digital differential display (DDD rapidly creates transcription profiles based on EST comparisons and numerically calculates, as a fraction of the pool of ESTs, the relative sequence abundance of known and novel genes. However, the process of identifying the most likely tissue for a specific disease in which to search for candidate genes from the pool of differentially expressed genes remains difficult. Therefore, we have used ‘Gene Ontology semantic similarity score’ to measure the GO similarity between gene products of lung tissue-specific candidate genes from control (normal and disease (cancer sets. This semantic similarity score matrix based on hierarchical clustering represents in the form of a dendrogram. The dendrogram cluster stability was assessed by multiple bootstrapping. Multiple bootstrapping also computes a p-value for each cluster and corrects the bias of the bootstrap probability. Results Subsequent hierarchical clustering by the multiple bootstrapping method (α = 0.95 identified seven clusters. The comparative, as well as subtractive, approach revealed a set of 38 biomarkers comprising four distinct lung cancer signature biomarker clusters (panel 1–4. Further gene enrichment analysis of the four panels revealed that each panel represents a set of lung cancer linked metastasis diagnostic biomarkers (panel 1, chemotherapy/drug resistance biomarkers (panel 2, hypoxia regulated biomarkers (panel 3 and lung extra cellular matrix biomarkers (panel 4. Conclusions Expression analysis reveals that hypoxia induced lung cancer related biomarkers (panel 3, HIF and its modulating proteins (TGM2, CSNK1A1, CTNNA1, NAMPT/Visfatin, TNFRSF1A, ETS1, SRC-1, FN1, APLP2, DMBT1

  19. Relationship Between Diseased Lung Tissues on Computed Tomography and Motion of Fiducial Marker Near Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Onodera, Yuya; Nishoka, Noriko; Yasuda, Koichi; Fujima, Noriyuki; TORRES, MYLIN; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Ooyama, Noriko; Onimaru, Rikiya; Terae, Satoshi; Ooizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For lung cancer patients with poor pulmonary function due to emphysema or fibrosis, it is important to predict the amplitude of internal tumor motion to minimize the irradiation of the functioning lung tissue before receiving stereotactic body radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two board-certified diagnostic radiologists independently assessed the degree of pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis on computed tomography (CT) in 71 patients with peripheral lung tumors before real-time tu...

  20. Tissue Biomarkers in Prognostication of Serous Ovarian Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Binny Khandakar; Sandeep R Mathur; Lalit Kumar; Sunesh Kumar; Siddhartha Datta Gupta; Venkateswaran K Iyer; Kalaivani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer (SOC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in females with poor prognosis because of advanced stage at presentation. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is being used for management of advanced SOC, but role of tissue biomarkers in prognostication following NACT is not well established. The study was conducted on advanced stage SOC patients (n = 100) that were treated either conventionally (n = 50) or with NACT (n = 50), followed by surgery. In order t...

  1. Impact of different IMRT techniques to improve conformity and normal tissue sparing in upper esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amin E Amin; Mohamed Kelaney; Samah K Elshamndy; Osiris W. Guirguis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical esophageal cancer is challenging. Although IMRT techniques using inverse planning algorithms are facilitating the treatment planning process, the irradiation dose to the normal tissues can be a critical issue. This study was performed to investigate the effect of beam numbers and their directions and local optimization on: (1) dose conformity and homogeneity to the planning target volume (PTV) and (2) dose to the organ at risks (OA...

  2. Associations of persistent organic pollutants in serum and adipose tissue with breast cancer prognostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrebola, J P; Fernández-Rodríguez, M; Artacho-Cordón, F; Garde, C; Perez-Carrascosa, F; Linares, I; Tovar, I; González-Alzaga, B; Expósito, J; Torne, P; Fernández, M F; Olea, N

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate associations between exposure to a group of persistent organic pollutants, measured in both adipose tissue and serum samples from breast cancer patients, and a set of tumor prognostic markers. The study population comprised 103 breast cancer patients recruited in Granada, Southern Spain. Data for tumor prognostic markers were retrieved from hospital clinical records and socio-demographic information was gathered by questionnaire. Persistent organic pollutants were quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Exposure levels were categorized in quartiles, and associations were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression. Adipose tissue HCB concentrations were associated positively with ER and PR expression (p-trends=0.044 and 0.005, respectively) and negatively with E-Cadherin and p53 expression (p-trends=0.012 and 0.027, respectively). PCB-180 adipose tissue concentrations were positively associated with HER2 expression (p-trend=0.036). Serum PCB-138 concentrations were positively associated with ER and PR expression (p-trends=0.052 and 0.042, respectively). The risk of p53 expression was higher among women in the lowest quartile of serum PCB-138 concentrations, but no significant trend was observed (p-trend=0.161). These findings indicate that human exposure to certain persistent organic pollutants might be related to breast cancer aggressiveness. We also highlight the influence on exposure assessment of the biological matrix selected, given that both serum and adipose tissue might yield relevant information on breast cancer prognosis. PMID:27213669

  3. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, Helene, E-mail: helene.rahn@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [ENT-Department, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftungsprofessur), University Hospital Erlangen, Waldstraße 1, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, Berlin 10587 (Germany); Odenbach, Stefan [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XµCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XµCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-µCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XµCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration. - Highlights: • Local cancer treatments are promising in reducing negative side effects occurring during conventional chemotherapy. • The nanoparticles play an important role in delivering drugs to the designated area during local cancer treatments as magnetic drug targeting. • We study the nanoparticles distribution in tumor tissue after magnetic drug targeting with X-ray computed tomography. • We achieved a 3-dimensional quantification of the nanoparticles content in tumor tissue out of digital tomographic data.

  4. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Sedger, Lisa M.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Malcolm J McConville; De Souza, David P.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Williams, Spencer J; Saravanan Dayalan; Daniel Lanzer; Helen Mackie; Lam, Thomas C.; John Boyages

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained ...

  5. Anti-tissue factor short hairpin RNA inhibits breast cancer growth in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bluff, J. E.; Amarzguioui, M.; Slattery, J; Reed, M.W.R.; Brown, N J; Staton, C A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In breast cancer, there is a correlation between tissue factor (TF) expression, angiogenesis and disease progression. TF stimulates tumour angiogenesis, in part, through up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, this study aimed to establish whether TF stimulates angiogenesis and tumour progression directly and independent of VEGF up-regulation. Initially, the effects of TF and VEGF were assessed on endothelial cell migration (Boyden chamber) a...

  6. Investigating the Role of Sox2 in Stomach Tissue Homeostasis and Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Abby Joya

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Sox2 is essential for the establishment and maintenance of multiple stem cell populations and its coding region is amplified in certain carcinomas. However, Sox2’s role in stomach homeostasis and cancer is poorly understood. In this thesis, I used mouse genetics to investigate the expression pattern and function of Sox2 in the adult stomach during normal tissue homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Using a genetic lineage tracing system, I found that Sox2 expression marks a ...

  7. Gene expression variation between distinct areas of breast cancer measured from paraffin-embedded tissue cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gugger Mathias

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis and prognosis in breast cancer are mainly based on histology and immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE material. Recently, gene expression analysis was shown to elucidate the biological variance between tumors and molecular markers were identified that led to new classification systems that provided better prognostic and predictive parameters. Archived FFPE samples represent an ideal source of tissue for translational research, as millions of tissue blocks exist from routine diagnostics and from clinical studies. These should be exploited to provide clinicians with more accurate prognostic and predictive information. Unfortunately, RNA derived from FFPE material is partially degraded and chemically modified and reliable gene expression measurement has only become successful after implementing novel and optimized procedures for RNA isolation, demodification and detection. Methods In this study we used tissue cylinders as known from the construction of tissue microarrays. RNA was isolated with a robust protocol recently developed for RNA derived from FFPE material. Gene expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results Sixteen tissue blocks from 7 patients diagnosed with multiple histological subtypes of breast cancer were available for this study. After verification of appropriate localization, sufficient RNA yield and quality, 30 tissue cores were available for gene expression measurement on TaqMan® Low Density Arrays (16 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, 8 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and 6 normal tissue, and 14 tissue cores were lost. Gene expression values were used to calculate scores representing the proliferation status (PRO, the estrogen receptor status and the HER2 status. The PRO scores measured from entire sections were similar to PRO scores determined from IDC tissue cores. Scores determined from normal tissue cores consistently revealed lower PRO scores

  8. CRISPRi and CRISPRa: New Functional Genomics Tools Provide Complementary Insights into Cancer Biology and Therapeutic Strategies | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A central goal of research for targeted cancer therapy, or precision oncology, is to reveal the intrinsic vulnerabilities of cancer cells and exploit them as therapeutic targets. Examples of cancer cell vulnerabilities include driver oncogenes that are essential for the initiation and progression of cancer, or non-oncogene addictions resulting from the cancerous state of the cell. To identify vulnerabilities, scientists perform genetic “loss-of-function” and “gain-of-function” studies to better understand the roles of specific genes in cancer cells.

  9. Molecular Markers for Prostate Cancer in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Sequeiros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer in developed countries. The decisive method of diagnosis is based on the results of biopsies, morphologically evaluated to determine the presence or absence of cancer. Although this approach leads to a confident diagnosis in most cases, it can be improved by using the molecular markers present in the tissue. Both miRNAs and proteins are considered excellent candidates for biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues, due to their stability over long periods of time. In the last few years, a concerted effort has been made to develop the necessary tools for their reliable measurement in these types of samples. Furthermore, the use of these kinds of markers may also help in establishing tumor grade and aggressiveness, as well as predicting the possible outcomes in each particular case for the different treatments available. This would aid clinicians in the decision-making process. In this review, we attempt to summarize and discuss the potential use of microRNA and protein profiles in FFPE tissue samples as markers to better predict PCa diagnosis, progression, and response to therapy.

  10. Deep learning for tissue microarray image-based outcome prediction in patients with colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, Dmitrii; Turkki, Riku; Haglund, Caj; Linder, Nina; Lundin, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in computer vision enable increasingly accurate automated pattern classification. In the current study we evaluate whether a convolutional neural network (CNN) can be trained to predict disease outcome in patients with colorectal cancer based on images of tumor tissue microarray samples. We compare the prognostic accuracy of CNN features extracted from the whole, unsegmented tissue microarray spot image, with that of CNN features extracted from the epithelial and non-epithelial compartments, respectively. The prognostic accuracy of visually assessed histologic grade is used as a reference. The image data set consists of digitized hematoxylin-eosin (H and E) stained tissue microarray samples obtained from 180 patients with colorectal cancer. The patient samples represent a variety of histological grades, have data available on a series of clinicopathological variables including long-term outcome and ground truth annotations performed by experts. The CNN features extracted from images of the epithelial tissue compartment significantly predicted outcome (hazard ratio (HR) 2.08; CI95% 1.04-4.16; area under the curve (AUC) 0.66) in a test set of 60 patients, as compared to the CNN features extracted from unsegmented images (HR 1.67; CI95% 0.84-3.31, AUC 0.57) and visually assessed histologic grade (HR 1.96; CI95% 0.99-3.88, AUC 0.61). As a conclusion, a deep-learning classifier can be trained to predict outcome of colorectal cancer based on images of H and E stained tissue microarray samples and the CNN features extracted from the epithelial compartment only resulted in a prognostic discrimination comparable to that of visually determined histologic grade.

  11. Characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes in ovarian cancer tissues and sphere cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases belong to a superfamily of detoxifying enzymes that protect cells from carcinogenic aldehydes. Of the superfamily, ALDH1A1 has gained most attention because current studies have shown that its expression is associated with human cancer stem cells. However, ALDH1A1 is only one of the 19 human ALDH subfamilies currently known. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the expression and activities of other major ALDH isozymes are associated with human ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer sphere cultures. Immunohistochemistry was used to delineate ALDH isozyme localization in clinical ovarian tissues. Western Blot analyses were performed on lysates prepared from cancer cell lines and ovarian cancer spheres to confirm the immunohistochemistry findings. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions were used to measure the mRNA expression levels. The Aldefluor® assay was used to measure ALDH activity in cancer cells from the four tumor subtypes. Immunohistochemical staining showed significant overexpression of ALDH1A3, ALDH3A2, and ALDH7A1 isozymes in ovarian tumors relative to normal ovarian tissues. The expression and activity of ALDH1A1 is tumor type-dependent, as seen from immunohistochemisty, Western blot analysis, and the Aldefluor® assay. The expression was elevated in the mucinous and endometrioid ovarian epithelial tumors than in serous and clear cell tumors. In some serous and most clear cell tumors, ALDH1A1 expression was found in the stromal fibroblasts. RNA expression of all studied ALDH isozymes also showed higher expression in endometrioid and mucinous tumors than in the serous and clear cell subtypes. The expression of ALDH enzymes showed tumor type-dependent induction in ovarian cancer cells growing as sphere suspensions in serum-free medium. The results of our study indicate that ALDH enzyme expression and activity may be associated with specific cell types in ovarian tumor tissues and vary according to

  12. Biology and potential clinical implications of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in colorectal cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nanna Møller; Sørensen, irene Vejgaard; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg;

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the industrialized world. About half of "curatively" resected patients develop recurrent disease within the next 3-5 years despite the lack of clinical, histological and biochemical evidence of remaining overt disease...... after resection of the primary tumour. Availability of validated biological markers for early detection, selection for adjuvant therapy, prediction of treatment efficacy and monitoring of treatment efficacy would most probably increase survival. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) may...... patients, suggesting that TIMP-1 could have a tumour-promoting function. Furthermore, measurement of plasma TIMP-1 has been shown to be useful for disease detection, with a high sensitivity and high specificity for early-stage colon cancer. This review describes some basic information on the current...

  13. Tissue hyaluronan expression, as reflected in the sputum of lung cancer patients, is an indicator of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, M.P.; Sá, V.K. de; Martins, V. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, J.R.M. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Endocrinologia e Metabolismo, Laboratório de Endocrinologia Molecular e Translacional-LEMT, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Parra, E.R. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mendes, A. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, P.C. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reis, R.M. [Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga (Portugal); ICVS/3B' s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Guimarães (Portugal); Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Longatto-Filho, A. [Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga (Portugal); ICVS/3B' s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Guimarães (Portugal); Laboratório de Investigação Médica (LIM 14), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, C.Z. [Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Takagaki, T. [Divisão de Pneumologia, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carraro, D.M. [Centro Internacional de Pesquisa/CIPE, AC Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nader, H.B. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Capelozzi, V.L. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-08

    Hyaluronan (HA) shows promise for detecting cancerous change in pleural effusion and urine. However, there is uncertainty about the localization of HA in tumor tissue and its relationship with different histological types and other components of the extracellular matrix, such as angiogenesis. We evaluated the association between HA and degree of malignancy through expression in lung tumor tissue and sputum. Tumoral tissue had significantly increased HA compared to normal tissue. Strong HA staining intensity associated with cancer cells was significant in squamous cell carcinoma compared to adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma. A significant direct association was found between tumors with a high percentage of HA and MVD (microvessel density) in tumoral stroma. Similarly significant was the direct association between N1 tumors and high levels of HA in cancer cells. Cox multivariate analysis showed significant association between better survival and low HA. HA increased in sputum from lung cancer patients compared to cancer-free and healthy volunteers and a significant correlation was found between HA in sputum and HA in cancer tissue. Localization of HA in tumor tissue was related to malignancy and reflected in sputum, making this an emerging factor for an important diagnostic procedure in patients suspected to have lung cancer. Further study in additional patients in a randomized prospective trial is required to finalize these results and to validate our quantitative assessment of HA, as well as to couple it to gold standard sputum cytology.

  14. Detection of miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and preliminary analysis of its downstream target molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Shen; Jian-Wu Gao; Yan-Yu Li; Peng Teng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and analyze its downstream target molecules.Methods:Patients with different FIGO stages of cervical cancer and healthy subjects were selected, cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected, and contents of miRNA-21 and apoptotic genes were detected; cervical cancer SiHa cells were cultured, miRNA-21 mimics and inhibitors were transfected, and then apoptotic gene contents were detected.Results:miRNA-21 contents in different stages of cervical cancer tissue were all higher than those in normal cervical tissue, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were lower than those in normal tissue, and mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were negatively correlated with miRNA-21 contents; after miRNA-21 mimics were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly decreased, and after miRNA-21 inhibitors were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly increased.Conclusion:miRNA-21 contents in cervical cancer tissue significantly increase; downstream target genes of this miRNA may be apoptotic genes p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19.

  15. Determination of acidic isoferritin and ferritin in the serum and cancer tissues of lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serum AIF (acidic isoferritin) and Ferr (ferritin) levels are determined for 16 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, 24 patients with pneumonia, 34 patients with lung cancer and 95 normal donors with RIA method. The results are 142.2 +- 84.5 μg/l and 104.2 +- 59.3 mg/l, 148.8 +- 79.5 μg/l and 107.3 +- 46.8 mg/l, 260.7 +- 126.3 μg/l and 161.5 +- 75.3 mg/l, and 103.8 +- 54.3 μg/l and 72.1 +- 39.5 mg/l, respectively. The lung cancer patients group has a remarkably high level as compared with other groups (P<0.01), which indicates that the serum AIF and Ferr contents can be used as important indices in lung cancer diagnosis

  16. Atomic Insight into the Altered O6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Protein Architecture in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Anjum Chikan

    Full Text Available O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is one of the major DNA repair protein that counteracts the alkalyting agent-induced DNA damage by replacing O6-methylguanine (mutagenic lesion back to guanine, eventually suppressing the mismatch errors and double strand crosslinks. Exonic alterations in the form of nucleotide polymorphism may result in altered protein structure that in turn can lead to the loss of function. In the present study, we focused on the population feared for high exposure to alkylating agents owing to their typical and specialized dietary habits. To this end, gastric cancer patients pooled out from the population were selected for the mutational screening of a specific error prone region of MGMT gene. We found that nearly 40% of the studied neoplastic samples harbored missense mutation at codon151 resulting into Serine to Isoleucine variation. This variation resulted in bringing about the structural disorder, subsequently ensuing into a major stoichiometric variance in recognition domain, substrate binding and selectivity loop of the active site of the MGMT protein, as observed under virtual microscope of molecular dynamics simulation (MDS. The atomic insight into MGMT protein by computational approach showed a significant change in the intra molecular hydrogen bond pattern, thus leading to the observed structural anomalies. To further examine the mutational implications on regulatory plugs of MGMT that holds the protein in a DNA-Binding position, a MDS based analysis was carried out on, all known physically interacting amino acids essentially clustered into groups based on their position and function. The results generated by physical-functional clustering of protein indicated that the identified mutation in the vicinity of the active site of MGMT protein causes the local and global destabilization of a protein by either eliminating the stabilizing salt bridges in cluster C3, C4, and C5 or by locally destabilizing the

  17. Targeted proteomic approach in prostatic tissue: a panel of potential biomarkers for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Rosa; Damiano, Rocco; Savino, Rocco; Sindona, Giovanni; Napoli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the sixth highest causes of cancer-related deaths in men. The molecular events underlying its behavior and evolution are not completely understood. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the only approved Food and Drug Administration biomarker. A panel of ten stage-specific tumoral and adjacent non tumoral tissues from patients affected by PCa (Gleason score 6, 3+3; PSA 10 ÷19 ng/ml) was investigated by MS-based proteomics approach. The proposed method was based on identifying the base-soluble proteins from tissue, established an efficient study, which lead to a deeper molecular perspective understanding of the PCa. A total of 164 proteins were found and 132 of these were evaluated differentially expressed in tumoral tissues. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that among all dataset obtained, 105 molecules were involved in epithelial neoplasia with a p-value of 3.62E-05, whereas, only 11 molecules detected were ascribed to sentinel tissue and bodily fluids. PMID:27713912

  18. STED super-resolution microscopy of clinical paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ilgen

    Full Text Available Formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human tissue resected during cancer surgery is indispensable for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and represents a vast and largely unexploited resource for research. Optical microscopy of such specimen is curtailed by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional optical microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we used STED super-resolution microscopy enabling optical resolution well below the diffraction barrier. We visualized nanoscale protein distributions in sections of well-annotated paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue stored in a clinical repository. Using antisera against several mitochondrial proteins, STED microscopy revealed distinct sub-mitochondrial protein distributions, suggesting a high level of structural preservation. Analysis of human tissues stored for up to 17 years demonstrated that these samples were still amenable for super-resolution microscopy. STED microscopy of sections of HER2 positive rectal adenocarcinoma revealed details in the surface and intracellular HER2 distribution that were blurred in the corresponding conventional images, demonstrating the potential of super-resolution microscopy to explore the thus far largely untapped nanoscale regime in tissues stored in biorepositories.

  19. Initial experiments with flexible conductive electrodes for potential applications in cancer tissue screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daehan; Seyfollahi, Sam; Khosla, Ajit; Gray, Bonnie; Parameswaran, Ash; Ramaseshan, Ramani; Kohli, Kirpal

    2011-02-01

    We present initial results on the fabrication and testing of micropatternable conductive nanocomposite polymer (C-NCP) electrodes for tissue impedance measurements. We present these proof-of-concept results as a first step toward the realization of our goal: an improved Electrical Impedance Scanning (EIS) system, whereby tissue can be scanned for cancerous tissue and other anomalies using large arrays of highly flexible microfabricated electrodes. Previous limitations of existing EIS system are addressed by applying polymer based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. In particular, we attempt to minimize mechanical skin contact issues through the use of highly compliant elastomeric polymers, and increase the spatial resolution of measurements through the development of microelectrodes that can be micropatterned into large, highly dense arrays. We accomplish these improvements through the development of C-NCP electrodes that employ silver nanoparticle fillers in an elastomer polymer base that can be easily patterned using conventional soft lithography techniques. These new electrodes are tested on conventional tissue phantoms that mimic the electrical characteristics of human tissue. We characterize the conductivity of the electrodes (average resistivity of 7x10-5 ohm-m +/- 14.3% at 60 wt-% of silver nanoparticles), and further employ the electrodes for impedance characterization via Cole-Cole plots to show that measurements employing C-NCP electrodes are comparable to those obtained with normal macroscopic metal electrodes. We also demonstrate anomaly detection using our highly flexible Ag/AgCl C-NCP electrodes on a tissue phantom.

  20. Can texture of tissue surrounding microcalcifications in mammography be used for breast cancer diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahaliou, A.; Boniatis, I.; Sakellaropoulos, P.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Panayiotakis, G.; Costaridou, L.

    2007-10-01

    This study investigates whether texture properties of the tissue surrounding microcalcifications (MCs) can contribute to breast cancer diagnosis. A case sample of 100 MC clusters (46 benign, 54 malignant) from 85 dense mammographic images included in the Digital Database for Screening Mammography, is analyzed. Regions of interest containing clusters are processed using wavelet-based enhancement and individual MCs are segmented by local thresholding. The segmented MCs are removed from original image data and the surrounding tissue area is subjected to texture analysis. The feasibility of four texture feature sets (first-order statistics, gray level co-occurrence matrices, gray level run length matrices and Laws' texture energy measures) in discriminating malignant from benign tissue was investigated using a k-nearest neighbor classifier. Laws' texture energy measures achieved the best classification accuracy 89% (sensitivity 90.74% and specificity 86.96%).

  1. Can texture of tissue surrounding microcalcifications in mammography be used for breast cancer diagnosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahaliou, A.; Boniatis, I.; Sakellaropoulos, P.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Panayiotakis, G. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras 265 00 (Greece); Costaridou, L. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras 265 00 (Greece)], E-mail: costarid@upatras.gr

    2007-10-01

    This study investigates whether texture properties of the tissue surrounding microcalcifications (MCs) can contribute to breast cancer diagnosis. A case sample of 100 MC clusters (46 benign, 54 malignant) from 85 dense mammographic images included in the Digital Database for Screening Mammography, is analyzed. Regions of interest containing clusters are processed using wavelet-based enhancement and individual MCs are segmented by local thresholding. The segmented MCs are removed from original image data and the surrounding tissue area is subjected to texture analysis. The feasibility of four texture feature sets (first-order statistics, gray level co-occurrence matrices, gray level run length matrices and Laws' texture energy measures) in discriminating malignant from benign tissue was investigated using a k-nearest neighbor classifier. Laws' texture energy measures achieved the best classification accuracy 89% (sensitivity 90.74% and specificity 86.96%)

  2. Targeting obesity-related adipose tissue dysfunction to prevent cancer development and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucalp, Ayca; Iyengar, Neil M; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of obesity, a leading modifiable risk factor for common solid tumors, is increasing. Effective interventions are needed to minimize the public health implications of obesity. Although the mechanisms linking increased adiposity to malignancy are incompletely understood, growing evidence points to complex interactions among multiple systemic and tissue-specific pathways including inflamed white adipose tissue. The metabolic and inflammatory consequences of white adipose tissue dysfunction collectively provide a plausible explanation for the link between overweight/obesity and carcinogenesis. Gaining a better understanding of these underlying molecular pathways and developing risk assessment tools that identify at-risk populations will be critical in implementing effective and novel cancer prevention and management strategies.

  3. Polymer-based platforms by electric field-assisted techniques for tissue engineering and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Vincenzo; Cirillo, Valentina; Altobelli, Rosaria; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A large variety of processes and tools has been investigated to acquire better knowledge on the natural evolution of healthy or pathological tissues in 3D scaffolds to discover new solutions for tissue engineering and cancer therapy. Among them, electrodynamic techniques allow revisiting old scaffold manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force to assemble fibers and/or particles from an electrically charged solution. By carefully selecting materials and processing conditions, they allow to fine control of characteristic shapes and sizes from micro to sub-micrometric scale and incorporate biopolymers/molecules (e.g., proteins, growth factors) for time- and space-controlled release for use in drug delivery and passive/active targeting. This review focuses on current advances to design micro or nanostructured polymer platforms by electrodynamic techniques, to be used as innovative scaffolds for tissue engineering or as 3D models for preclinical in vitro studies of in vivo tumor growth. PMID:25487005

  4. Integrative Tissue-Specific Functional Annotations in the Human Genome Provide Novel Insights on Many Complex Traits and Improve Signal Prioritization in Genome Wide Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; He, Beixin Julie; Zhao, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to understand genomic function through both experimental and computational approaches, yet proper annotation still remains challenging, especially in non-coding regions. In this manuscript, we introduce GenoSkyline, an unsupervised learning framework to predict tissue-specific functional regions through integrating high-throughput epigenetic annotations. GenoSkyline successfully identified a variety of non-coding regulatory machinery including enhancers, regulatory miRNA, and hypomethylated transposable elements in extensive case studies. Integrative analysis of GenoSkyline annotations and results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to novel biological insights on the etiologies of a number of human complex traits. We also explored using tissue-specific functional annotations to prioritize GWAS signals and predict relevant tissue types for each risk locus. Brain and blood-specific annotations led to better prioritization performance for schizophrenia than standard GWAS p-values and non-tissue-specific annotations. As for coronary artery disease, heart-specific functional regions was highly enriched of GWAS signals, but previously identified risk loci were found to be most functional in other tissues, suggesting a substantial proportion of still undetected heart-related loci. In summary, GenoSkyline annotations can guide genetic studies at multiple resolutions and provide valuable insights in understanding complex diseases. GenoSkyline is available at http://genocanyon.med.yale.edu/GenoSkyline. PMID:27058395

  5. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  6. Expression profiles of inhibitor of growth protein 2 in normal and cancer tissues: An immunohistochemical screening analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Xue-Feng; Gou, Wen-Feng; Lu, Hang; Li, Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Tu; Sun, Hong-Zhi; Zheng, Hua-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    Inhibitor of growth protein 2 (ING2) has an important role in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell proliferation, cell‑cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. The present study performed an immunohistochemical analysis for expression profiling of ING2 protein in an array of tissues comprising normal mouse and human tissues, as well as human hepatocellular (n=62), renal clear cell (n=62), pancreatic (n=62), esophageal squamous cell (n=45), cervical squamous cell (n=31), breast (n=144), gastric (n=196), colorectal (n=96), ovarian (n=208), endometrial (n=96) and lung (n=192) carcinoma tissues. In mouse tissues, ING2 was detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of the glandular epithelium of breast, hepatocytes, intestine, bronchium and alveoli, as well as the squamous epithelium of skin and glomeruli, and in myocardial cells, while it was located in the cytoplasm of renal tubules and striated muscle cells. ING2 protein was scattered in the brain and spleen. In human tissues, ING2 protein was principally distributed in the cytoplasm, while in it was present in the cytoplasm and nuclei in the stomach, intestine, cervix, endometrium trachea, breast and pancreas. The nuclear location of ING2 in the stomach was more prominent than that in the cytoplasm. High ING2 immunoreactivity was detected in the tongue, stomach, skin, pancreas, cervix and breast, whereas weakly in the brain stem, thymus, thyroid, lung, striated muscle, testis, bladder and ovary. In total, 617 out of 1,194 of the tested cancer tissues (51.7%) were ING2-positive. In most cases, ING2 expression was found to be restricted to the cytoplasm of all cancer tissues, while in certain cancer types, including renal clear cell, ovarian and colorectal carcinoma, it was occasionally present in the nuclei. Among the cancer tissues examined, ING2 was most frequently expressed in breast cancer (67.4%) and gynecological cancer types, including ovarian cancer (61.5%) and endometrial cancer (57.3%). Compared with

  7. Expression of γ-synuclein in colorectal cancer tissues and its role on colorectal cancer cell line HCT116

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Ye; Bo Feng; Yuan-Fei Peng; Xue-Hua Chen; Qu Cai; Bei-Qin Yu; Liang-Hui Li; Ming-Yuan Qiu; Bing-Ya Liu; Min-Hua Zheng

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression pattern of γ-synuclein in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues, and to study the effects of γ-synuclein on CRC cell line HCT116 biological features in vitro.METHODS: The expression pattern of γ-synuclein was determined in 54 CRC tissues and 30 tumormatched nonneoplastic adjacent tissues (NNAT) 5 cm away from the tumor via real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry.The relationship between γ-synuclein protein expression and clinicopathological factors of CRC tissues was analyzed. Three small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting γ-synuclein mRNA plasmids were constructed and transfected into the CRC cell line HCT116. The stable cell lines were selected with G-418 for 28 d, and the biological features of these cells were examined by cell growth curve, soft agar assay, and cell migration and invasion assays in vitro.RESULTS: The expression of γ-synuclein mRNA and protein was much higher in CRC tissue samples than in NNAT samples ( P = 0.02, P = 0.036). There was a significant correlation between the γ-synuclein protein expression and clinical stage and lymph node involvement of CRC ( P = 0.02, P = 0.033). In functional analysis we found that down-regulation of γ-synuclein expression in HCT116 cells could inhibit the growth, colony formation rate, and migration and invasion ability of HCT116 cells.CONCLUSION: Increased expression of γ-synuclein in CRC tissues and the biological effects of reduced γ-synuclein expression on HCT116 cells suggest that γ-synuclein may play a positive role in the progression of CRC.

  8. Dynamic infrared imaging in identification of breast cancer tissue with combined image processing and frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joro, R; Lääperi, A-L; Soimakallio, S; Järvenpää, R; Kuukasjärvi, T; Toivonen, T; Saaristo, R; Dastidar, P

    2008-01-01

    Five combinations of image-processing algorithms were applied to dynamic infrared (IR) images of six breast cancer patients preoperatively to establish optimal enhancement of cancer tissue before frequency analysis. mid-wave photovoltaic (PV) IR cameras with 320x254 and 640x512 pixels were used. The signal-to-noise ratio and the specificity for breast cancer were evaluated with the image-processing combinations from the image series of each patient. Before image processing and frequency analysis the effect of patient movement was minimized with a stabilization program developed and tested in the study by stabilizing image slices using surface markers set as measurement points on the skin of the imaged breast. A mathematical equation for superiority value was developed for comparison of the key ratios of the image-processing combinations. The ability of each combination to locate the mammography finding of breast cancer in each patient was compared. Our results show that data collected with a 640x512-pixel mid-wave PV camera applying image-processing methods optimizing signal-to-noise ratio, morphological image processing and linear image restoration before frequency analysis possess the greatest superiority value, showing the cancer area most clearly also in the match centre of the mammography estimation. PMID:18666012

  9. Amino acid uptake in arterio-venous serum of normal and cancerous colon tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Bo Wang; Jian-Guo Shen; Su-Zhan Zhang; Ke-Feng Ding; Shu Zheng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the difference of amino acid uptake between normal and cancerous colon tissues.METHODS: Sixteen patients with colon cancer were enrolled in our study. Blood samples were taken during operations, serum amino acid concentrations of blood from cancerous or normal colon were analyzed. Amino acid uptake rate was calculated by the A-V difference and evaluated statistically.RESULTS: Except for methionine, the uptake rate of amino acids in cancer was higher than that in normal colon (25.01% vs-2.29%, P<0.01). The amino acid uptake rate did not correlate to the size of tumor mass (P>0.05). There was no statistical significance in the amino acid uptake rate according to the Dukes stage, though it was higher in patients with Dukes stage C or D than that with Dukes stage B (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: Abnormal synthetic metabolism of colon cancer may contribute to its higher amino acid uptake rate than that of normal colon.

  10. Cannabidiol inhibits cancer cell invasion via upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Robert; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Hinz, Burkhard

    2010-04-01

    Although cannabinoids exhibit a broad variety of anticarcinogenic effects, their potential use in cancer therapy is limited by their psychoactive effects. Here we evaluated the impact of cannabidiol, a plant-derived non-psychoactive cannabinoid, on cancer cell invasion. Using Matrigel invasion assays we found a cannabidiol-driven impaired invasion of human cervical cancer (HeLa, C33A) and human lung cancer cells (A549) that was reversed by antagonists to both CB(1) and CB(2) receptors as well as to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). The decrease of invasion by cannabidiol appeared concomitantly with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Knockdown of cannabidiol-induced TIMP-1 expression by siRNA led to a reversal of the cannabidiol-elicited decrease in tumor cell invasiveness, implying a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of cannabidiol. P38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases were identified as upstream targets conferring TIMP-1 induction and subsequent decreased invasiveness. Additionally, in vivo studies in thymic-aplastic nude mice revealed a significant inhibition of A549 lung metastasis in cannabidiol-treated animals as compared to vehicle-treated controls. Altogether, these findings provide a novel mechanism underlying the anti-invasive action of cannabidiol and imply its use as a therapeutic option for the treatment of highly invasive cancers.

  11. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Breast Cancer and Adjacent Normal Breast Tissues in Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Shan Deng; Tian-Yong Xing; Hong-Ying Zhou; Ruo-Hong Xiong; You-Guang Lu; Bin Wen; Shang-Qing Liu; Hui-Jun Yang

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacryiamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS), incorporated with online database searching, were performed to investigate differential proteins of breast cancer and adjacent normal breast tissues. Considering that serum albumin is abundantly presented in normal control samples, 15 differential spots detected in 11 out of 12 (91.7%) breast cancer samples were identified by online SIENA-2DPAGE database searching and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that pathological changes of breast cancer are concerned with augmentation of substance metabolism, promotion of proteolytic activity, decline of activity of some inhibitors of enzymes, and so on. Some important proteins involved in the pathological process of breast cancer with changed expression may be useful biomarkers, such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, EF1-beta, cathepsin D, TCTP, SMT3A, RPS12, and PSMA1, among which SMT3A,RPS12, and PSMA1 were first reported for breast cancer in this study.

  12. Association of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation with reduced NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer cells and tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Shuanglong; Ma, Jinguo; Li, Zhenhua; Zhi, Yu; Chen, Jing; Lu, Yao; Dai, Dongqiu

    2013-05-01

    NDRG1 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1) plays a role in cell differentiation and suppression of tumor metastasis. This study aims to determine the expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein in gastric cancer cell lines and tissue specimens and then assess the possible cause of its aberrant expression. Six gastric cancer cell lines and 20 pairs of normal and gastric cancer tissue samples were used to assess NDRG1 expression using Real-time PCR and Western blot. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) were performed to detect gene mutation and methylation, respectively, in cell lines and tissues samples. Expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was downregulated in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Specifically, expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was lower in all six gastric cancer cell lines than that of normal gastric cells, while 15 out of 20 cases of gastric cancer tissues had the reduced levels of NDRG1 mRNA and protein. HRM data showed that there was no mutation in NDRG1 gene, but MSP data showed high levels of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation in the CpG islands in both cell lines and tissue samples. Moreover, treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine upregulated NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer HGC27 cells, but not in the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A-treated HGC27 cells. In conclusion, this study has shown that expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was reduced in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues, which is due to methylation of NDRG1 gene promoter. Further study will unearth the clinical significance of the reduced NDRG1 protein in gastric cancer.

  13. Trace elements of normal, benign hypertrophic and cancerous tissues of the Human prostate gland investigated by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaichick, Sofia, E-mail: s-zaichick@northwestern.edu [Radionuclide Diagnostics Department, Medical Radiological Research Centre, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Koroleva Street- 4, Obninsk 249020, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Zaichick, Vladimir, E-mail: vezai@obninsk.com [Radionuclide Diagnostics Department, Medical Radiological Research Centre, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Koroleva Street- 4, Obninsk 249020, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    The Ag, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, and Zn contents in normal (n=37), benign hypertrophic (n=43), and cancerous tissues (n=60) of the human prostate gland were investigated by neutron activation analysis. Mean values (M{+-}S{Epsilon}{Mu}) for content (mg/kg, dry weight basis) of trace elements in the normal tissue were: Ag-0.048{+-}0.009, Co-0.045{+-}0.004, Cr-0.53{+-}0.08, Fe-111{+-}9, Hg-0.056{+-}0.011, Rb-12.7{+-}0.9, Sb-0.045{+-}0.007, Sc-0.029{+-}0.005, Se-0.70{+-}0.04, and Zn-1000{+-}110, respectively. It was observed that in benign hypertrophic tissues the contents of Co, Cr, Hg, Sb, and Se were higher than in normal tissues, with statistically significant differences. The contents of Co, Rb, Sc, and Zn were significantly lower and those of Ag, Cr, Fe, Hg, and Sb were significantly higher in cancerous tissues than in normal tissues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INAA is an adequate tool for the determination of trace element contents in the samples of human prostate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In benign hypertrophic tissues the Co, Cr, Hg, Sb, and Se contents were higher than in normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In cancerous tissues contents of Co, Rb, Sc, and Zn were significantly lower than in normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In cancerous tissues the Ag, Cr, Fe, Hg, and Sb contents were higher than in normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The estimation of Zn content in a needle-biopsy core may be used as a tool to diagnose prostate cancer.

  14. Theoretical and Experimental Estimations of Volumetric Inductive Phase Shift in Breast Cancer Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C. A.; Lozano, L. M.; Uscanga, M. C.; Silva, J. G.; Polo, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Impedance measurements based on magnetic induction for breast cancer detection has been proposed in some studies. This study evaluates theoretical and experimentally the use of a non-invasive technique based on magnetic induction for detection of patho-physiological conditions in breast cancer tissue associated to its volumetric electrical conductivity changes through inductive phase shift measurements. An induction coils-breast 3D pixel model was designed and tested. The model involves two circular coils coaxially centered and a human breast volume centrally placed with respect to the coils. A time-harmonic numerical simulation study addressed the effects of frequency-dependent electrical properties of tumoral tissue on the volumetric inductive phase shift of the breast model measured with the circular coils as inductor and sensor elements. Experimentally; five female volunteer patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma previously diagnosed by the radiology and oncology departments of the Specialty Clinic for Women of the Mexican Army were measured by an experimental inductive spectrometer and the use of an ergonomic inductor-sensor coil designed to estimate the volumetric inductive phase shift in human breast tissue. Theoretical and experimental inductive phase shift estimations were developed at four frequencies: 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 MHz. The theoretical estimations were qualitatively in agreement with the experimental findings. Important increments in volumetric inductive phase shift measurements were evident at 0.01MHz in theoretical and experimental observations. The results suggest that the tested technique has the potential to detect pathological conditions in breast tissue associated to cancer by non-invasive monitoring. Further complementary studies are warranted to confirm the observations.

  15. Clinical research on the expression of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissues and its transfer promoting role

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Jun Shu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To detect the expression of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissue, and to explore its correlation with the clinical and pathological characteristics and its role in promoting the tumor invasion and metastasis.Methods:A total of 102 specimens from the patients with colon cancer who were admitted in the General Surgery Department of our hospital for resection from April, 2013 to October, 2015 were included in the study; meanwhile, 35 colorectal adenoma specimens, and 137 normal colon tissue specimens were collected. The immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of Lgr5.Results:The positive rate of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissues (62.75%) was significantly higher than that in the adenoma tissues (28.57%) and normal tissues (16.06%). The positive expression of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissues was associated with the adenocarcinoma differentiation degree, Dukes staging, lymphatic metastasis, and distant metastasis. Meanwhile, it was found by the Logistic regression that the adenocarcinoma differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis, and distant metastasis were the independent predictive factors for the positive expression of Lgr5. Conclusions:The increasement of Lgr5 expression is probably involved in the formation, differentiation, invasion, and metastasis of colon cancer; therefore, Lgr5 is expected to be a new therapeutic target aiming at colon cancer stem cells.

  16. Sulforaphane, a cancer chemopreventive agent, induces pathways associated with membrane biosynthesis in response to tissue damage by aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techapiesancharoenkij, Nirachara; Fiala, Jeannette L A; Navasumrit, Panida; Croy, Robert G; Wogan, Gerald N; Groopman, John D; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Essigmann, John M

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is one of the major risk factors for liver cancer globally. A recent study showed that sulforaphane (SF), a potent inducer of phase II enzymes that occurs naturally in widely consumed vegetables, effectively induces hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and reduces levels of hepatic AFB1-DNA adducts in AFB1-exposed Sprague Dawley rats. The present study characterized the effects of SF pre-treatment on global gene expression in the livers of similarly treated male rats. Combined treatment with AFB1 and SF caused reprogramming of a network of genes involved in signal transduction and transcription. Changes in gene regulation were observable 4h after AFB1 administration in SF-pretreated animals and may reflect regeneration of cells in the wake of AFB1-induced hepatotoxicity. At 24h after AFB1 administration, significant induction of genes that play roles in cellular lipid metabolism and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis was detected in SF-pretreated AFB1-dosed rats. Induction of this group of genes may indicate a metabolic shift toward glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis to generate and maintain pools of intermediate molecules required for tissue repair, cell growth and compensatory hepatic cell proliferation. Collectively, gene expression data from this study provide insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of SF against AFB1 hepatotoxicity and hepatocarcinogenicity, in addition to the chemopreventive activity of this compound as a GST inducer. PMID:25450479

  17. Insights into orphan nuclear receptors as prognostic markers and novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Reidun eAesoy; Colin D Clyne; Ashwini eChand

    2015-01-01

    The roles of orphan nuclear receptors in breast cancer development and progression are not well understood. In this review, we correlate orphan nuclear receptor expression in breast cancer tumour subtypes with patient outcomes and provide an overview of functional evidence that identifies candidate orphan nuclear receptors as prognostic markers or as therapeutic targets in breast cancer.

  18. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  19. Combined blood/tissue analysis for cancer biomarker discovery: application to renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Prieto, DaRue A; Chan, King C; Ye, Xiaying; Valera, Vladimir A; Simpson, R Mark; Rudnick, Paul A; Xiao, Zhen; Issaq, Haleem J; Linehan, W Marston; Stein, Stephen E; Veenstra, Timothy D; Blonder, Josip

    2010-03-01

    A method that relies on subtractive tissue-directed shot-gun proteomics to identify tumor proteins in the blood of a patient newly diagnosed with cancer is described. To avoid analytical and statistical biases caused by physiologic variability of protein expression in the human population, this method was applied on clinical specimens obtained from a single patient diagnosed with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The proteomes extracted from tumor, normal adjacent tissue and preoperative plasma were analyzed using 2D-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The lists of identified proteins were filtered to discover proteins that (i) were found in the tumor but not normal tissue, (ii) were identified in matching plasma, and (iii) whose spectral count was higher in tumor tissue than plasma. These filtering criteria resulted in identification of eight tumor proteins in the blood. Subsequent Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of cadherin-5, cadherin-11, DEAD-box protein-23, and pyruvate kinase in the blood of the patient in the study as well as in the blood of four other patients diagnosed with RCC. These results demonstrate the utility of a combined blood/tissue analysis strategy that permits the detection of tumor proteins in the blood of a patient diagnosed with RCC. PMID:20121140

  20. Soft tissue sarcomas after radiation treatment for breast cancer. Three case studies and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims: By means of 3 cases with infield soft tissue carcinomas after radiotherapy for breast cancer, symptoms and therapy are described. Consequences for treatment planning and patient's information before radiotherapy for breast cancer are discussed. Patients: Three of 1,025 patients with breast cancer irradiated from 1984 to 1997 suffered from infield secondary soft tissue sarcomas. The latency periods were 61, 49 and 59 months. Two patients had been treated with breast-conserving therapy (computerized planning, 50 Gy to reference point, 5 times 2 Gy/week, 5-MV photons), 1 patient received a local boost dose of 15 Gy (10-MeV electrons), patient 3 radiotherapy of the thoracic wall and regional lymph nodes after mastectomy using 12-MeV electrons (thoracic wall) and 5-MV photons (lymph node areas) to 50 Gy, 5 times 2 Gy/week. No adjuvant chemotherapy was given. All sarcomas were very extensive, all patients died from local progression and/or distant failure after 17, 13 and 12 months. Results: The incidence of spontaneous sarcomas of the breast in about 0.06%, after operation and radiotherapy 0.09 to 0.45%. No correlations to radiotherapy technique and no risk factors were found. Radiation dose could play a role, but there are very sparse data about this. (orig.)

  1. Targeting the Hippo Signaling Pathway for Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Wen Chun; Hong, Wanjin

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a highly-conserved developmental pathway that plays an essential role in organ size control, tumor suppression, tissue regeneration and stem cell self-renewal. The YES-associated protein (YAP) and the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) are two important transcriptional co-activators that are negatively regulated by the Hippo signaling pathway. By binding to transcription factors, especially the TEA domain transcription factors (TEADs), YAP and TAZ induce the expression of growth-promoting genes, which can promote organ regeneration after injury. Therefore, controlled activation of YAP and TAZ can be useful for regenerative medicine. However, aberrant activation of YAP and TAZ due to deregulation of the Hippo pathway or overexpression of YAP/TAZ and TEADs can promote cancer development. Hence, pharmacological inhibition of YAP and TAZ may be a useful approach to treat tumors with high YAP and/or TAZ activity. In this review, we present the mechanisms regulating the Hippo pathway, the role of the Hippo pathway in tissue repair and cancer, as well as a detailed analysis of the different strategies to target the Hippo signaling pathway and the genes regulated by YAP and TAZ for regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. PMID:27589805

  2. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL OBSERVATION OF MACROPHAGE COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR AND ITS RECEPTOR IN BREAST CANCER AND HEPATOMA TISSUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the potential role of cellular macrophageolony-stimulating factor (cM-CSF) and cellular macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (cM-CSF-R) with breast cancer and hepatoma and search the way for clinical application. Methods: Frozen surgical specimens from 48 breast cancer patients, including 29 cases of histological grade II and 19 eases of grade III, and 16 hepatoma patients were investigated by Avidin Biotin Complex (ABC) immunohistochemical assay with anti-M-CSF monoclonal antibody (Mab) and anti-M-CSF-R Mab. Pathohistological examination was performed as well. Results: cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R were detected in tested specimens. The expression levels of cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R in grade III group were higher than in grade II group and more higher than control group hyperplasia of breast. Hepatoma tissues also showed higher expression level of cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R than normal adult and fetal liver. Conclusion: Breast cancer and hepatoma tissues presented higher expression levels of cM-CSF and cM-CSF-R than control and expression level might be related with tumor's process.

  3. Targeting the Hippo Signaling Pathway for Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Wen Chun; Hong, Wanjin

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a highly-conserved developmental pathway that plays an essential role in organ size control, tumor suppression, tissue regeneration and stem cell self-renewal. The YES-associated protein (YAP) and the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) are two important transcriptional co-activators that are negatively regulated by the Hippo signaling pathway. By binding to transcription factors, especially the TEA domain transcription factors (TEADs), YAP and TAZ induce the expression of growth-promoting genes, which can promote organ regeneration after injury. Therefore, controlled activation of YAP and TAZ can be useful for regenerative medicine. However, aberrant activation of YAP and TAZ due to deregulation of the Hippo pathway or overexpression of YAP/TAZ and TEADs can promote cancer development. Hence, pharmacological inhibition of YAP and TAZ may be a useful approach to treat tumors with high YAP and/or TAZ activity. In this review, we present the mechanisms regulating the Hippo pathway, the role of the Hippo pathway in tissue repair and cancer, as well as a detailed analysis of the different strategies to target the Hippo signaling pathway and the genes regulated by YAP and TAZ for regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. PMID:27589805

  4. Preservation of biomolecules in breast cancer tissue by a formalin-free histology system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Azorides R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential problems associated with the use of formalin in histology, such as health hazards, degradation of RNA and cross-linking of proteins are well recognized. We describe the utilization of a formalin-free fixation and processing system for tissue detection of two important biopredictors in breast cancer – estrogen receptor and HER2 – at the RNA and protein levels. Methods Parallel sections of 62 cases of breast cancer were fixed in an alcohol-based molecular fixative and in formalin. Molecular fixative samples were processed by a novel formalin-free microwave-assisted processing system that preserves DNA, RNA and proteins. Formalin-fixed samples were processed using the conventional method. Estrogen receptor was assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. HER2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry, FISH, CISH and real-time PCR. Results The immunohistochemical reaction for estrogen receptor was similar in molecular- and formalin-fixed samples (Spearman Rank R = 0.83, p Conclusion The formalin-free tissue fixation and processing system is a practical platform for evaluation of biomolecular markers in breast cancer and it allows reliable DNA and RNA and protein studies.

  5. The Complex Interaction of Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Migration of Cancer Cells through Breast Tissue Stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry J. Davies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer mortality is directly linked to metastatic spread. The metastatic cell must exhibit a complex phenotype that includes the capacity to escape from the primary tumour mass, invade the surrounding normal tissue, and penetrate into the circulation before proliferating in the parenchyma of distant organs to produce a metastasis. In the normal breast, cellular structures change cyclically in response to ovarian hormones leading to regulated cell proliferation and apoptosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of zinc dependent endopeptidases. Their primary function is degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix to allow ductal progression through the basement membrane. A complex balance between matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors regulate these changes. These proteinases interact with cytokines, growth factors, and tumour necrosis factors to stimulate branching morphologies in normal breast tissues. In breast cancer this process is disrupted facilitating tumour progression and metastasis and inhibiting apoptosis increasing the life of the metastatic cells. This paper highlights the role of matrix metalloproteinases in cell progression through the breast stroma and reviews the complex relationships between the different proteinases and their inhibitors in relation to breast cancer cells as they metastasise.

  6. Role of deregulated microRNAs in breast cancer progression using FFPE tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs contribute to cancer initiation and progression by silencing the expression of their target genes, causing either mRNA molecule degradation or translational inhibition. Intraductal epithelial proliferations of the breast are histologically and clinically classified into normal, atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC. To better understand the progression of ductal breast cancer development, we attempt to identify deregulated miRNAs in this process using Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE tissues from breast cancer patients. Following tissue microdissection, we obtained 8 normal, 4 ADH, 6 DCIS and 7 IDC samples, which were subject to RNA isolation and miRNA expression profiling analysis. We found that miR-21, miR-200b/c, miR-141, and miR-183 were consistently up-regulated in ADH, DCIS and IDC compared to normal, while miR-557 was uniquely down-regulated in DCIS. Interestingly, the most significant miRNA deregulations occurred during the transition from normal to ADH. However, the data did not reveal a step-wise miRNA alteration among discrete steps along tumor progression, which is in accordance with previous reports of mRNA profiling of different stages of breast cancer. Furthermore, the expression of MSH2 and SMAD7, two important molecules involving TGF-β pathway, was restored following miR-21 knockdown in both MCF-7 and Hs578T breast cancer cells. In this study, we have not only identified a number of potential candidate miRNAs for breast cancer, but also found that deregulation of miRNA expression during breast tumorigenesis might be an early event since it occurred significantly during normal to ADH transition. Consequently, we have demonstrated the feasibility of miRNA expression profiling analysis using archived FFPE tissues, typically with rich clinical information, as a means of miRNA biomarker discovery.

  7. Intrafraction motion in patients with cervical cancer: The benefit of soft tissue registration using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: During radiation delivery, target volumes change their position and shape due to intrafraction motion. The extent of these changes and the capability to correct for them will contribute to the benefit of an MRI-accelerator in terms of PTV margin reduction. Therefore, we investigated the primary CTV motion within a typical IMRT delivery time for cervical cancer patients for various correction techniques: no registration, rigid bony anatomy registration, and rigid soft tissue registration. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients underwent 2-3 offline MRI exams before and during their radiation treatment. Each MRI exam included four sagittal and four axial MRI scans alternately within 16 min. We addressed the CTV motion by comparing subsequent midsagittal CTV delineations and investigated the correlation with intrafraction bladder filling. Results: The maximum (residual) motions within 16 min for all points on the CTV contour for 90% of the MRI exams without registration, with rigid bony anatomy registration, and with rigid soft tissue registration were 10.6, 9.9, and 4.0 mm. A significant but weak correlation was found between intrafraction bladder filling and CTV motion. Conclusions: Considerable intrafraction CTV motion is observed in cervical cancer patients. Intrafraction MRI-guided soft tissue registration using an MRI-accelerator will correct for this motion.

  8. Insights into erlotinib action in pancreatic cancer cells using a combined experimental and mathematical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Falko Lange; Katja Rateitschak; Christina Kossow; Olaf Wolkenhauer; Robert Jaster

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To gain insights into the molecular action of erlotinib in pancreatic cancer (PC) cells.METHODS:Two PC cell lines,BxPC-3 and Capan-1,were treated with various concentrations of erlotinib,the specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126,and protein kinase B (AKT) inhibitor XIV.DNA synthesis was measured by 5-bromo2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assays.Expression and phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream signaling molecules were quantified by Western blot analysis.The data were processed to calibrate a mathematical model,based on ordinary differential equations,describing the EGFRmediated signal transduction.RESULTS:Erlotinib significantly inhibited BrdU incorporation in BxPC-3 cells at a concentration of 1 μmol/L,whereas Capan-1 cells were much more resistant.In both cell lines,MEK inhibitor U0126 and erlotinib attenuated DNA synthesis in a cumulative manner,whereas the AKT pathway-specific inhibitor did not enhance the effects of erlotinib.While basal phosphorylation of EGFR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) did not differ much between the two cell lines,BxPC-3 cells displayed a more than five-times higher basal phospho-AKT level than Capan-1 cells.Epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 10 ng/mL induced the phosphorylation of EGFR,AKT and ERK in both cell lines with similar kinetics.In BxPC-3 cells,higher levels of phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK (normalized to the total protein levels) were observed.Independent of the cell line,erlotinib efficiently inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR,AKT and ERK.The mathematical model successfully simulated the experimental findings and provided predictions regarding phosphoprotein levels that could be verified experimentally.CONCLUSION:Our data suggest basal AKT phosphorylation and the degree of EGF-induced activation of AKT and ERK as molecular determinants of erlotinib efficiency in PC cells.

  9. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding site: new insight into small cell lung cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yu LIU; Jun CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause in cancer-related deaths with less than 15% five-year survival worldwide.Small cell lung cancer (SCLC),which accounts for about 15%-18% of lung cancer,carries the worst prognosis within the lung cancer patients.SCLC differs from other lung cancers,so called non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs),in the specifically clinical and biologic characteristics.It exhibits aggressive behavior,with rapid growth,early spread to distant sites.Although exquisite sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation,SCLC recurs rapidly with only 5% of patients surviving five years and frequent association with distinct paraneoplastic syndromes[1].

  10. Vimentin Is a Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutic Target; Insights from In Vitro and In Vivo Mice Xenograft Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Guy Lahat; Quan-Sheng Zhu; Kai-Lieh Huang; Suizhao Wang; Svetlana Bolshakov; Jeffery Liu; Keila Torres; Langley, Robert R; Lazar, Alexander J; Mien Chie Hung; Dina Lev

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vimentin is a ubiquitous mesenchymal intermediate filament supporting mechano-structural integrity of quiescent cells while participating in adhesion, migration, survival, and cell signaling processes via dynamic assembly/disassembly in activated cells. Soft tissue sarcomas and some epithelial cancers exhibiting "epithelial to mesenchymal transition" phenotypes express vimentin. Withaferin-A, a naturally derived bioactive compound, may molecularly target vimentin, so we sought to ...

  11. Correlations between papillary thyroid cancer and peripheral blood levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shao-fei; HU San-yuan; MA Lei; MIAO Lei; MAO Wei-zheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between the presence of metalloproteinases and thyroid cancer remains unknown,and many controversies still exist in this field.The objective of this study was to investigate the correlations between papillary thyroid cancer and peripheral blood levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2.Methods The correlations were studied by detecting the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in the peripheral blood of 30 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma,27 patients with benign thyroid disease,and 25 healthy volunteers.Results The levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in the peripheral blood of patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma were significantly higher than those in the peripheral blood of patients with benign thyroid disease and healthy volunteers (P <0.05).However,there were no significant differences between patients with benign thyroid disease and healthy volunteers (P >0.05).The accuracy of detection by both enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in the papillary thyroid cancer group was 83.33%.Conclusions The levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2,matrix metalloproteinase-9,tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in the peripheral blood are helpful in identifying thyroid carcinoma and aid in preoperative assessment.

  12. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

  14. Role of mesenchymal stem cell-derived fibrinolytic factor in tissue regeneration and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissig, Beate; Dhahri, Douaa; Eiamboonsert, Salita; Salama, Yousef; Shimazu, Hiroshi; Munakata, Shinya; Hattori, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Tissue regeneration during wound healing or cancer growth and progression depends on the establishment of a cellular microenvironment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are part of this cellular microenvironment, where they functionally modulate cell homing, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. MSC recruitment involves detachment of these cells from their niche, and finally MSC migration into their preferred niches; the wounded area, the tumor bed, and the BM, just to name a few. During this recruitment phase, focal proteolysis disrupts the extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture, breaks cell-matrix interactions with receptors, and integrins, and causes the release of bioactive fragments from ECM molecules. MSC produce a broad array of proteases, promoting remodeling of the surrounding ECM through proteolytic mechanisms. The fibrinolytic system, with its main player plasmin, plays a crucial role in cell migration, growth factor bioavailability, and the regulation of other protease systems during inflammation, tissue regeneration, and cancer. Key components of the fibrinolytic cascade, including the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are expressed in MSC. This review will introduce general functional properties of the fibrinolytic system, which go beyond its known function of fibrin clot dissolution (fibrinolysis). We will focus on the role of the fibrinolytic system for MSC biology, summarizing our current understanding of the role of the fibrinolytic system for MSC recruitment and the functional consequences for tissue regeneration and cancer. Aspects of MSC origin, maintenance, and the mechanisms by which these cells contribute to altered protease activity in the microenvironment under normal and pathological conditions will also be discussed.

  15. New Insights into the Role of Macrophages in Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Fatty Liver Disease: Modulation by Endogenous Omega-3 Fatty Acid-derived Lipid Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan eClària

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is causally linked to a chronic state of low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue. Prolonged, unremitting inflammation in this tissue has a direct impact on insulin-sensitive tissues (i.e. liver and its timely resolution is a critical step toward reducing the prevalence of related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This article describes the current state-of-the-art knowledge and novel insights into the role of macrophages in adipose tissue inflammation, with special emphasis on the progressive changes in macrophage polarization observed over the course of obesity. In addition, this article extends the discussion to the contribution of Kupffer cells, the liver resident macrophages, to metabolic liver disease. Special attention is given to the modulation of macrophage responses by omega-3-PUFAs, and more importantly by resolvins, which are potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving autacoids generated from docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids. In fact, resolvins have been shown to work as endogenous stop signals in inflamed adipose tissue and to return this tissue to homeostasis by inducing a phenotypic switch in macrophage polarization toward a pro-resolving phenotype. Collectively, this article offers new views on the role of macrophages in metabolic disease and their modulation by endogenously-generated omega-3-PUFA-derived lipid mediators.

  16. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingsong Lei; Xiaoyuan Deng; Huajiang Wei; Zhouyi Guo [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, Guangdong Province (China); Guoyong Wu [Department of Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China); Hongqin Yang; Shusen Xie [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education of China, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian (China); Yonghong He [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China)

    2014-12-31

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 ± 0.81) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.19 ± 0.13) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 ± 0.93) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.43 ± 0.17) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection. (optical coherence tomography)

  17. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 ± 0.81) × 10-6 cm s-1 and (1.19 ± 0.13) × 10-5 cm s-1 in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 ± 0.93) × 10-6 cm s-1 and (1.43 ± 0.17) × 10-5 cm s-1 in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection. (optical coherence tomography)

  18. Interaction between fragile histamine triad and protein kinase C alpha in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-hui Zhuang; Zhao-hui Liu; Xiao-gang Jiang; Cheng-en Pan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interaction between fragile histamine triad (FHIT) and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Methods FHIT and PKC伪 double positive samples were screened by immunohistochemical staining from 13 human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed by using anti-FHIT and anti-PKCα. The immune precipitate was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results Immune precipitate staining detection showed that 3 samples out of the 13 cases were double positive for FHIT and PKCα. FHIT protein was present in the immune precipitate of anti-PKCα while there was PKCα in the immune precipitate of anti-FHITmAb. Conclusion FHIT and PKCα exist as a complex in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues, which will provide a new route for studying the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer.

  19. Tissue-specific promoters active in CD44+CD24-/low breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerschmitz, Gerd J; Ranki, Tuuli; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Ribacka, Camilla; Eriksson, Minna; Porten, Marius; Herrmann, Isabell; Ristimäki, Ari; Virkkunen, Pekka; Tarkkanen, Maija; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Kanerva, Anna; Rein, Daniel; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that human tumors contain stem cells that have a central role in tumor initiation and posttreatment relapse. Putative breast cancer stem cells may reside in the CD44(+)CD24(-/low) population. Oncolytic adenoviruses are attractive for killing of these cells because they enter through infection and are therefore not susceptible to active and passive mechanisms that render stem cells resistant to many drugs. Although adenoviruses have been quite safe in cancer trials, preclinical work suggests that toxicity may eventually be possible with more active agents. Therefore, restriction of virus replication to target tissues with tissues-specific promoters is appealing for improving safety and can be achieved without loss of efficacy. We extracted CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells from pleural effusions of breast cancer patients and found that modification of adenovirus type 5 tropism with the serotype 3 knob increased gene delivery to CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells. alpha-Lactalbumin, cyclo-oxygenase 2, telomerase, and multidrug resistance protein promoters were studied for activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells, and a panel of oncolytic viruses was subsequently constructed. Each virus featured 5/3 chimerism of the fiber and a promoter controlling expression of E1A, which was also deleted in the Rb binding domain for additional tumor selectivity. Cell killing assays identified Ad5/3-cox2L-d24 and Ad5/3-mdr-d24 as the most active agents, and these viruses were able to completely eradicate CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells in vitro. In vivo, these viruses had significant antitumor activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low)-derived tumors. These findings may have relevance for elimination of cancer stem cells in humans. PMID:18632604

  20. Mueller matrix microscope: a quantitative tool to facilitate detections and fibrosis scorings of liver cirrhosis and cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; He, Chao; Liu, Shaoxiong; Li, Migao; Zeng, Nan; Wu, Jian; Ma, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Today the increasing cancer incidence rate is becoming one of the biggest threats to human health.Among all types of cancers, liver cancer ranks in the top five in both frequency and mortality rate all over the world. During the development of liver cancer, fibrosis often evolves as part of a healing process in response to liver damage, resulting in cirrhosis of liver tissues. In a previous study, we applied the Mueller matrix microscope to pathological liver tissue samples and found that both the Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) and Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) parameters are closely related to the fibrous microstructures. In this paper,we take this one step further to quantitatively facilitate the fibrosis detections and scorings of pathological liver tissue samples in different stages from cirrhosis to cancer using the Mueller matrix microscope. The experimental results of MMPD and MMT parameters for the fibrotic liver tissue samples in different stages are measured and analyzed. We also conduct Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere birefringence model to examine in detail the influence of structural changes in different fibrosis stages on the imaging parameters. Both the experimental and simulated results indicate that the polarized light microscope and transformed Mueller matrix parameter scan provide additional quantitative information helpful for fibrosis detections and scorings of liver cirrhosis and cancers. Therefore, the polarized light microscope and transformed Mueller matrix parameters have a good application prospect in liver cancer diagnosis.

  1. Mueller matrix microscope: a quantitative tool to facilitate detections and fibrosis scorings of liver cirrhosis and cancer tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; He, Chao; Liu, Shaoxiong; Li, Migao; Zeng, Nan; Wu, Jian; Ma, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Today the increasing cancer incidence rate is becoming one of the biggest threats to human health. Among all types of cancers, liver cancer ranks in the top five in both frequency and mortality rate all over the world. During the development of liver cancer, fibrosis often evolves as part of a healing process in response to liver damage, resulting in cirrhosis of liver tissues. In a previous study, we applied the Mueller matrix microscope to pathological liver tissue samples and found that both the Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) and Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) parameters are closely related to the fibrous microstructures. In this paper, we take this one step further to quantitatively facilitate the fibrosis detections and scorings of pathological liver tissue samples in different stages from cirrhosis to cancer using the Mueller matrix microscope. The experimental results of MMPD and MMT parameters for the fibrotic liver tissue samples in different stages are measured and analyzed. We also conduct Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere birefringence model to examine in detail the influence of structural changes in different fibrosis stages on the imaging parameters. Both the experimental and simulated results indicate that the polarized light microscope and transformed Mueller matrix parameters can provide additional quantitative information helpful for fibrosis detections and scorings of liver cirrhosis and cancers. Therefore, the polarized light microscope and transformed Mueller matrix parameters have a good application prospect in liver cancer diagnosis.

  2. Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Are Associated with Coagulopathy Causing Ischemic Stroke via Tissue Factor-Independent Way: The OASIS-CANCER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young; Chung, Jong-Won; Lee, Mi Ji; Kim, Suk Jae; Cho, Yeon Hee; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer and stroke, which are known to be associated with one another, are the most common causes of death in the elderly. However, the pathomechanisms that lead to stroke in cancer patients are not well known. Circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in cancer-associated thrombosis and tumor progression. Therefore, we hypothesized that cancer cell-derived EVs cause cancer-related coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke. Methods Serum levels of D-dimer and EVs expressing markers for cancer cells (epithelial cell adhesion molecule [CD326]), tissue factor (TF [CD142]), endothelial cells (CD31+CD42b-), and platelets (CD62P) were measured using flow cytometry in (a) 155 patients with ischemic stroke and active cancer (116 − cancer-related, 39 − conventional stroke mechanisms), (b) 25 patients with ischemic stroke without cancer, (c) 32 cancer patients without stroke, and (d) 101 healthy subjects. Results The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs correlated with the levels of D-dimer and TF+ EVs. The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs (CD326+ and CD326+CD142+) were higher in cancer-related stroke than in other groups (P<0.05 in all the cases). Path analysis showed that cancer cell-derived EVs are related to stroke via coagulopathy as measured by D-dimer levels. Poor correlation was observed between TF+ EV and D-dimer, and path analysis demonstrated that cancer cell-derived EVs may cause cancer-related coagulopathy independent of the levels of TF+ EVs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cancer cell-derived EVs mediate coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke via TF-independent mechanisms. PMID:27427978

  3. Contemporary and future insights into fertility preservation in male cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, survival rates of cancer patients have increased, resulting in a shift of focus from quantity to quality of life. A key aspect of quality of life is fertility potential; patients suffering from iatrogenic infertility often become depressed. Since many cancer therapies—chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery—and even cancer itself have detrimental effects on the male reproductive system, it is important to preserve fertility before any treatment commences. Currently, the onl...

  4. Insights into Orphan Nuclear Receptors as Prognostic Markers and Novel Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Aesoy, Reidun; Clyne, Colin D.; Chand, Ashwini L

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence asserting the importance of orphan nuclear receptors (ONRs) in cancer initiation and progression. In breast cancer, there is a lot unknown about ONRs in terms of their expression profile and their transcriptional targets in the various stages of tumor progression. With the classification of breast tumors into distinct molecular subtypes, we assess ONR expression in the different breast cancer subtypes and with patient outcomes. Complementing this, we review evidence...

  5. New mechanistic insights of integrin β1 in breast cancer bone colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaudeau, Laure; Taubenberger, Anna V.; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Holzapfel, Boris M.; Ramuz, Olivier; Straub, Melanie; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent and life-threatening complication of breast cancer. The molecular mechanisms supporting the establishment of breast cancer cells in the skeleton are still not fully understood, which may be attributed to the lack of suitable models that interrogate interactions between human breast cancer cells and the bone microenvironment. Although it is well-known that integrins mediate adhesion of malignant cells to bone extracellular matrix, their role during bone colonizati...

  6. A Comprehensive MicroRNA Expression Profile of Liver and Lung Metastases of Colorectal Cancer with Their Corresponding Host Tissue and Its Prognostic Impact on Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecqueux, Mathieu; Liebetrau, Isabell; Werft, Wiebke; Dienemann, Hendrik; Muley, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Joachim; Müssle, Benjamin; Rahbari, Nuh; Schölch, Sebastian; Büchler, Markus W.; Weitz, Jürgen; Reissfelder, Christoph; Kahlert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with a length of 18–25 nucleotides. They can regulate tumor invasion and metastasis by changing the expression and translation of their target mRNAs. Their expression is substantially altered in colorectal cancer cells as well as in the adjacent tumor-associated stroma. Both of these compartments have a mutual influence on tumor progression. In the development of metastases, cancer cells initially interact with the host tissue. Therefore, compartment-specific expression signatures of these three locations—tumor, associated stroma, and host tissue—can provide new insights into the complex tumor biology of colorectal cancer. Frozen tissue samples of colorectal liver (n = 25) and lung metastases (n = 24) were laser microdissected to separate tumor cells and the adjacent tumor-associated stroma cells. Additionally, normal lung and liver tissue was collected from the same patients. We performed a microarray analysis in four randomly selected liver metastases and four randomly selected lung metastases, analyzing a total of 939 human miRNAs. miRNAs with a significant change >2-fold between the tumor, tumor stroma, and host tissue were analyzed in all samples using RT-qPCR (11 miRNAs) and correlated with the clinical data. We found a differential expression of several miRNAs between the tumor, the tumor-associated stroma, and the host tissue compartment. When comparing liver and lung metastases, miR-194 showed a 1.5-fold; miR-125, miR-127, and miR-192 showed a 2.5-fold; miR-19 and miR-215 a 3-fold; miR-145, miR-199-3, and miR-429 a 5-fold; miR-21 a 7-fold; and, finally, miR-199-5 a 12.5-fold downregulation in liver metastases compared to lung metastases. Furthermore miR-19, miR-125, miR-127, miR-192, miR-194, miR-199-5, and miR-215 showed a significant upregulation in the normal liver tissue compared to the normal lung tissue. Univariate analysis identified an association of poor survival with the expression of miR-125 (p = 0

  7. Relationship between promoter methylation & tissue expression of MGMT gene in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Epigenetic alterations, in addition to multiple gene abnormalities, are involved in the genesis and progression of human cancers. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands within promoter regions is associated with transcriptional inactivation of various tumour suppressor genes. O 6 -methyguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is a DNA repair gene that removes mutagenic and cytotoxic adducts from the O 6 -position of guanine induced by alkylating agents. MGMT promoter hypermethylation and reduced expression has been found in some primary human carcinomas. We studied DNA methylation of CpG islands of the MGMT gene and its relation with MGMT protein expression in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Methods: A total of 88 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC tissue samples, 14 low malignant potential (LMP tumours and 20 benign ovarian tissue samples were analysed for MGMT promoter methylation by nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP after bisulphite modification of DNA. A subset of 64 EOC samples, 10 LMP and benign tumours and five normal ovarian tissue samples were analysed for protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: The methylation frequencies of the MGMT gene promoter were found to be 29.5, 28.6 and 20 per cent for EOC samples, LMP tumours and benign cases, respectively. Positive protein expression was observed in 93.8 per cent of EOC and 100 per cent in LMP, benign tumours and normal ovarian tissue samples. Promoter hypermethylation with loss of protein expression was seen only in one case of EOC. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that MGMT promoter hypermethylation does not always reflect gene expression.

  8. Relationship between promoter methylation & tissue expression of MGMT gene in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpa, V.; Bhagat, Rahul; Premalata, C.S.; Pallavi, V.R.; Ramesh, G.; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Epigenetic alterations, in addition to multiple gene abnormalities, are involved in the genesis and progression of human cancers. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands within promoter regions is associated with transcriptional inactivation of various tumour suppressor genes. O6-methyguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair gene that removes mutagenic and cytotoxic adducts from the O6-position of guanine induced by alkylating agents. MGMT promoter hypermethylation and reduced expression has been found in some primary human carcinomas. We studied DNA methylation of CpG islands of the MGMT gene and its relation with MGMT protein expression in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Methods: A total of 88 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tissue samples, 14 low malignant potential (LMP) tumours and 20 benign ovarian tissue samples were analysed for MGMT promoter methylation by nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) after bisulphite modification of DNA. A subset of 64 EOC samples, 10 LMP and benign tumours and five normal ovarian tissue samples were analysed for protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: The methylation frequencies of the MGMT gene promoter were found to be 29.5, 28.6 and 20 per cent for EOC samples, LMP tumours and benign cases, respectively. Positive protein expression was observed in 93.8 per cent of EOC and 100 per cent in LMP, benign tumours and normal ovarian tissue samples. Promoter hypermethylation with loss of protein expression was seen only in one case of EOC. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that MGMT promoter hypermethylation does not always reflect gene expression. PMID:25579142

  9. Multi-centre Raman spectral mapping of oesophageal cancer tissues: a study to assess system transferability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, M; Dorney, J; Lewis, A; Lloyd, G R; Old, O; Shepherd, N; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Barr, H; Lau, K; Bell, I; Ohrel, S; Thomas, G; Stone, N; Kendall, C

    2016-06-23

    The potential for Raman spectroscopy to provide early and improved diagnosis on a wide range of tissue and biopsy samples in situ is well documented. The standard histopathology diagnostic methods of reviewing H&E and/or immunohistochemical (IHC) stained tissue sections provides valuable clinical information, but requires both logistics (review, analysis and interpretation by an expert) and costly processing and reagents. Vibrational spectroscopy offers a complimentary diagnostic tool providing specific and multiplexed information relating to molecular structure and composition, but is not yet used to a significant extent in a clinical setting. One of the challenges for clinical implementation is that each Raman spectrometer system will have different characteristics and therefore spectra are not readily compatible between systems. This is essential for clinical implementation where classification models are used to compare measured biochemical or tissue spectra against a library training dataset. In this study, we demonstrate the development and validation of a classification model to discriminate between adenocarcinoma (AC) and non-cancerous intraepithelial metaplasia (IM) oesophageal tissue samples, measured on three different Raman instruments across three different locations. Spectra were corrected using system transfer spectral correction algorithms including wavenumber shift (offset) correction, instrument response correction and baseline removal. The results from this study indicate that the combined correction methods do minimize the instrument and sample quality variations within and between the instrument sites. However, more tissue samples of varying pathology states and greater tissue area coverage (per sample) are needed to properly assess the ability of Raman spectroscopy and system transferability algorithms over multiple instrument sites. PMID:27048868

  10. Design and implementation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of cancerous and healthy breast tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Greenberg, Joel A; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J

    2016-01-01

    A scatter imaging technique for the differentiation of cancerous and healthy breast tissue in a heterogeneous sample is introduced in this work. Such a technique has potential utility in intraoperative margin assessment during lumpectomy procedures. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of the imaging method for tumor classification using Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments. The coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging technique was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) images of breast tissue samples acquired through a single-position snapshot acquisition, without rotation as is required in coherent scatter computed tomography. We perform a quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the cancerous voxel classification using Monte Carlo simulations of the imaging system; describe our experimental implementation of coded aperture scatter imaging; show the reconstructed images of the breast tissue samples; and present segmentations of the 3-D images in order to identify the cancerous and healthy tissue in the samples. From the Monte Carlo simulations, we find that coded aperture scatter imaging is able to reconstruct images of the samples and identify the distribution of cancerous and healthy tissues (i.e., fibroglandular, adipose, or a mix of the two) inside them with a cancerous voxel identification sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. From the experimental results, we find that the technique is able to identify cancerous and healthy tissue samples and reconstruct differential coherent scatter cross sections that are highly correlated with those measured by other groups using x-ray diffraction. Coded aperture scatter imaging has the potential to provide scatter images that automatically differentiate cancerous and healthy tissue inside samples within a time on the order of a minute per slice. PMID:26962543

  11. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomy, Israel; Diz, Maria Del Pilar Estevez

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice. PMID:27192130

  12. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Gomy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice.

  13. Lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism: new insights in treatment and chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Thomas E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The essential fatty acids, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid play an important role in pancreatic cancer development and progression. These fatty acids are metabolized to eicosanoids by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. Abnormal expression and activities of both cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases have been reported in pancreatic cancer. In this article, we aim to provide a brief summary of (1 our understanding of the roles of these enzymes in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and progression; and (2 the potential of using cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors for pancreatic cancer treatment and prevention.

  14. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomy, Israel; Diz, Maria Del Pilar Estevez

    2016-05-13

    Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice. PMID:27192130

  15. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery. PMID:27229857

  16. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  17. Tetranectin positive expression in tumour tissue leads to longer survival in Danish women with ovarian cancer. Results from the 'Malova' ovarian cancer study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeran, Mel C; Rask, Lene; Høgdall, Claus K;

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to analyse Tetranectin (TN) expression in tumour tissues and TN serum concentration in 758 women with epithelial ovarian tumours. The second was to evaluate, whether TN tissue expression levels correlate with clinico-pathological parameters and prognosis of...... the disease. Using tissue arrays we analysed the expression levels in tissues from 166 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOTs) and 592 women with ovarian cancer (OC). A panel of three antibodies was used for immunohistochemistry: a polyclonal and two monoclonal antibodies. Serum TN was measured...... using the polyclonal antibody A-371. Univariate survival analyses stratified for chemotherapy showed that positive tissue TN as demonstrated by the polyclonal antibody indicated a significantly longer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0001) as well as cancer specific survival (CSS) (p < 0.0001). High serum...

  18. New methods for multimodal MS imaging of histological tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amstalden Van Hove, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    The insights derived from spatial localization of molecules in tissue sections are of great value for understanding and treating cancer and other diseases. These insights can relate to molecules linked to a disease as well as to drug molecules distributed across organs of interest. Mass spectrometry

  19. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. Methods mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. Results MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20. In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41 and 36.6% (15/41, while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41 and 14.6% (6/41. In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7 and 14.3% (1/7. The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P P Conclusion Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer. These genes can be used as one of the important indicators for early diagnosis, efficacy evaluation and prognostic determination of ovarian cancer.

  20. Claudin-7 indirectly regulates the integrin/FAK signaling pathway in human colon cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lei; Wang, Liyong; Sui, Leiming; Zhao, Huanying; Xu, Xiaoxue; Li, Tengyan; Wang, Xiaonan; Li, Wenjing; Zhou, Ping; Kong, Lu

    2016-08-01

    The claudin family of proteins is integral to the structure and function of tight junctions. The role of claudin-7 (Cldn-7, CLDN7) in regulating the integrin/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/ERK signaling pathway remains poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated differences in gene expression, primarily focusing on CLDN7 and integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway genes, between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry were utilized to verify the results of mRNA and protein expression, respectively. In silico analysis was used to predict co-regulation between Cldn-7 and integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway components, and the STRING database was used to analyze protein-protein interaction pairs among these proteins. Meta-analysis of expression microarrays in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database was used to identify significant correlations between Cldn-7 and components of predicted genes in the integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway. Our results showed marked cancer stage-specific decreases in the protein expression of Cldn-7, Gelsolin, MAPK1 and MAPK3 in colon cancer samples, and the observed changes for all proteins except Cldn-7 were in agreement with changes in the corresponding mRNA levels. Cldn-7 might indirectly regulate MAPK3 via KRT8 due to KRT8 co-expression with MAPK3 or CLDN7. Our bioinformatics methods supported the hypothesis that Cldn-7 does not directly regulate any genes in the integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway. These factors may participate in a common network that regulates cancer progression in which the MAPK pathway serves as the central node.

  1. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  2. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  3. New Insights into the Androgen-Targeted Therapies and Epigenetic Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit M. Godbole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR, a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC. Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  4. Promoter hypomethylation and reactivation of MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 genes in colorectal cancer cell lines and cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyung-Hee Kim; Jin-Sung Choi; Il-Jin Kim; Ja-Lok Ku; Jae-Gahb Park

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To verify the expression and methylation status of the MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 genes in colorectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines.METHODS: We evaluated promoter demethylation status of the MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 genes by RT-PCR analysis and methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR), as well as sequencing analysis, after sodium bisulfite modification in 32 colorectal cancer cell lines and 87 cancer tissues.RESULTS: Of the 32 cell lines,MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 expressions were observed in 59% and 66%, respectively. Subsequent to sodium bisulfite modification and MSPCR analysis, the promoter hypomethylation of MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 was confirmed in both at 81% each.Promoter hypomethylation of MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 in colorectal cancer tissues was observed in 43% and 77%,respectively. Hypomethylation of MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 genes in corresponding normal tissues were observed in 2% and 6%, respectively.CONCLUSION: The promoter hypomethylation of MAGE genes up-regulates its expression in colorectal carcinomas as well as in gastric cancers and might play a significant role in the development and progression of human colorectal carcinomas.

  5. Expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan-Hong Yi; Jing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines.Methods:Cancer tissue and adjacent normal lung tissue were collected and mRNA contents of Klf8 were detected; lung cancer A549 cell lines were cultured, and after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, cell cycle, cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were detected.Results:mRNA contents of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue were higher than those in adjacent normal lung tissue; after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, Klf8 mRNA inhibition rate was 74.31%; G0/G1 phase ratio of Klf8 siRNA group was higher than that of negative control siRNA group; ratios of S-phase and G2/M phase cells, mRNA contents of Cyclin D1 and number of cells invading to the outer side of the transwell microporous membrane were lower than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of CDH1 and CK18 as well as Snail and Slug of Klf8 siRNA group were higher than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of VIM and N-cadherin were lower than those of negative control siRNA group.Conclusion:The expression of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue abnormally elevates; downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines can inhibit malignant biological effect of cells, manifested as cell cycle arrest as well as the inhibition of cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition processes.

  6. Expression Levels of RFP in Normal and Cancer Human Tissues via Real-time RT-PCR Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Ret finger protein(RFP) is a member of the tripartite motif family, which is characterized by a conserved RING finger of motif, a B-box, and a coiled-coil domain(they are called RBCC generally). Although RFP was known to be an oncogene when its RBCC moiety was connected with a tyrosine kinase domain by DNA rearrangement, its biological function was not well defined. In this study, by using real-time RT-PCR, the RFP expressions in human and mouse normal tissues, and in the cervical squamous cell carcinoma, endometrial adenocarcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and brain cancer tissues were analyzed. The result of the study proved that the highest level of mRNA reverse transcription appeared in the normal testical tissue, whereas that in other normal tissues of human and mice were low. The mRNA reverse transcription level of RFP was higher in the endometrial adenocarcinoma tissue than in the cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue; the mRNA reverse transcription level of RFP in the gastric adenocarcinoma tissue was significantly higher than that in the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tissue. It was also found that the mRNA reverse transcription level of RFP in the brain cancer tissue was higher than that in the normal brain tissue. These results suggested that RFP could possibly be a useful molecular target for the development of new therapeutics for malignant tumors.

  7. Quantifying glucose permeability and enhanced light penetration in ex vivo human normal and cancerous esophagus tissues with optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our pilot results on quantification of glucose (G) diffusion permeability in human normal esophagus and ESCC tissues in vitro by using OCT technique. The permeability coefficient of 40% aqueous solution of G was found to be (1.74±0.04)×10-5 cm/s in normal esophagus and (2.45±0.06)×10-5 cm/s in ESCC tissues. The results from this study indicate that ESCC tissues had a higher permeability coefficient compared to normal esophageal tissues, and the light penetration depths gradually increase with the increase of applied topically with G time for the normal esophageal and ESCC tissues. The results indicate that the permeability coefficient of G in cancer tissues was 1.41-fold than that in normal tissues, and the light penetration depth for the ESCC tissues is significantly smaller than that of normal esophagus tissues in the same time range. These results demonstrate that the optical clearing of normal and cancer esophagus tissues are improved after application of G

  8. Molecular profiling of signalling pathways in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Daniela; Hipp, Susanne; Malinowsky, Katharina; Böllner, Claudia; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    In most hospitals word-wide, histopathological cancer diagnosis is currently based on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. In the last few years new approaches and developments in patient-tailored cancer therapy have raised the need to select more precisely those patients, who will respond to personalised treatments. The most efficient way for optimal therapy and patient selection is probably to provide a tumour-specific protein network portrait prior to treatment. The discovery and characterisation of deregulated signalling molecules (e.g. human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, mitogen-activated protein kinases) are very promising candidates for the identification of new suitable therapy targets and for the selection of those patients who will receive the greatest benefit from individualised treatments. The reverse phase protein array (RPPA) is a promising new technology that allows quick, precise and simultaneous analysis of many components of a network. Importantly it requires only limited amounts of routine clinical material (e.g. FFPE biopsies) and can be used for absolute protein measurements. We and other research groups have described successful protein extraction from routine FFPE tissues. In this manuscript we show how these recent developments might facilitate the implementation of RPPA in clinical trials and routine settings.

  9. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  10. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  11. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors

  12. Effect of different BNCT protocols on DNA synthesis in precancerous and normal tissues in an experimental model of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported the therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in the treatment of oral cancer, employing the hamster cheek pouch model. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of these BNCT protocols on DNA synthesis in precancerous and normal tissue in this model and assess the potential lag in the development of second primary tumors in precancerous tissue. The data are relevant to potential control of field cancerized tissue and tolerance of normal tissue. We evaluated DNA synthesis in precancerous and normal pouch tissue 1-30 days post-BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 or BPA + GB-10 employing incorporation of bromo-deoxyuridine as an end-point. The BNCT-induced potential lag in the development of second primary tumors in precancerous tissue was monitored. A drastic, statistically significant reduction in DNA synthesis occurred in pacancerous tissue as early as 1 day post-BNCT and was sustained at virtually all time points until 30 days post-BNCT for all protocols. The histological categories evaluated individually within precancerous tissue (dysplasia, hyperplasia and NUMF [no unusual microscopic features]) responded similarly. DNA synthesis in normal tissue treated with BNCT oscillated around the very low pre-treatment values. A BNCT-induced lag in the development of second primary tumors was observed. BNCT induced a drastic fall in DNA synthesis in precancerous tissue that would be associated to the observed lag in the development of second primary tumors. The minimum variations in DNA synthesis in BNCT-treated normal tissue would correlate with the absence of normal tissue radiotoxicity. The present data would contribute to optimize therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of field-cancerized areas. (author)

  13. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study’s purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity (≥6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients

  14. Twist and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue as well as its correlation with epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Liu; Hong Li; Yu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the Twist and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue as well as its correlation with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Methods:Normal cervical tissue, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue and cervical cancer tissue were collected for study. ELISA kits were used to detect Twist, YB-1, E-cadherin,β-catenin, N-cadherin and Vimentin contents in cervical tissue, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect Twist and YB-1 expression levels in cervical tissue.Results:Twist and YB-1 contents, cell positive rate and immunohistochemical scores as well as N-cadherin and Vimentin contents in cervical cancer tissue and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue were significantly higher than those in normal cervical tissue while E-cadherin andβ-catenin contents were lower than those in normal cervical tissue; Twist and YB-1 contents, cell positive rate and immunohistochemical scores as well as N-cadherin and Vimentin contents in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue while E-cadherin andβ-catenin contents were lower than those in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue; the higher the Twist and YB-1 expression levels in cervical cancer tissue, the lower the E-cadherin andβ-catenin contents, and the higher the N-cadherin and Vimentin contents.Conclusions: Twist and YB-1 gene overexpression can promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition to be involved in the occurrence of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

  15. Visualizing the Histotripsy Process: Bubble Cloud-Cancer Cell Interactions in a Tissue-Mimicking Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Mancia, Lauren; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive ultrasonic ablation method that uses cavitation to mechanically fractionate tissue into acellular debris. With a sufficient number of pulses, histotripsy can completely fractionate tissue into a liquid-appearing homogenate with no cellular structures. The location, shape and size of lesion formation closely match those of the cavitation cloud. Previous work has led to the hypothesis that the rapid expansion and collapse of histotripsy bubbles fractionate tissue by inducing large stress and strain on the tissue structures immediately adjacent to the bubbles. In the work described here, the histotripsy bulk tissue fractionation process is visualized at the cellular level for the first time using a custom-built 2-MHz transducer incorporated into a microscope stage. A layer of breast cancer cells were cultured within an optically transparent fibrin-based gel phantom to mimic cells inside a 3-D extracellular matrix. To test the hypothesis, the cellular response to single and multiple histotripsy pulses was investigated using high-speed optical imaging. Bubbles were always generated in the extracellular space, and significant cell displacement/deformation was observed for cells directly adjacent to the bubble during both bubble expansion and collapse. The largest displacements were observed during collapse for cells immediately adjacent to the bubble, with cells moving more than 150-300 μm in less than 100 μs. Cells often underwent multiple large deformations (>150% strain) over multiple pulses, resulting in the bisection of cells multiple times before complete removal. To provide theoretical support to the experimental observations, a numerical simulation was conducted using a single-bubble model, which indicated that histotripsy exerts the largest strains and cell displacements in the regions immediately adjacent to the bubble. The experimental and simulation results support our hypothesis, which helps to explain the formation of the

  16. Combined HSP90 and kinase inhibitor therapy: Insights from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Harvey; Scroggins, Brad; Zuehlke, Abbey; Kijima, Toshiki; Beebe, Kristin; Mishra, Alok; Neckers, Len; Prince, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The merging of knowledge from genomics, cellular signal transduction and molecular evolution is producing new paradigms of cancer analysis. Protein kinases have long been understood to initiate and promote malignant cell growth and targeting kinases to fight cancer has been a major strategy within the pharmaceutical industry for over two decades. Despite the initial success of kinase inhibitors (KIs), the ability of cancer to evolve resistance and reprogram oncogenic signaling networks has reduced the efficacy of kinase targeting. The molecular chaperone HSP90 physically supports global kinase function while also acting as an evolutionary capacitor. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has compiled a trove of data indicating that a large percentage of tumors overexpress or possess mutant kinases that depend on the HSP90 molecular chaperone complex. Moreover, the overexpression or mutation of parallel activators of kinase activity (PAKA) increases the number of components that promote malignancy and indirectly associate with HSP90. Therefore, targeting HSP90 is predicted to complement kinase inhibitors by inhibiting oncogenic reprogramming and cancer evolution. Based on this hypothesis, consideration should be given by both the research and clinical communities towards combining kinase inhibitors and HSP90 inhibitors (H90Ins) in combating cancer. The purpose of this perspective is to reflect on the current understanding of HSP90 and kinase biology as well as promote the exploration of potential synergistic molecular therapy combinations through the utilization of The Cancer Genome Atlas. PMID:26070366

  17. Serum matrix metalloproteinase 2 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 2 in esophageal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groblewska, Magdalena; Mroczko, Barbara; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Niklinski, Jacek; Laudanski, Jerzy; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    The positive expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were found in esophageal cancer (EC) tissue and correlated with cancer stage and clinico-pathological features of tumor and patients' survival. However, little is known about serum levels of those proteins in EC patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic significance of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 serum levels in EC patients in relation to clinico-pathological features of cancer. The study included 53 EC patients and 92 healthy controls. The serum levels of MMP-2, TIMP-2 and classical tumor markers CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and SCC (squamous cell carcinoma antigen) were assayed. The prognostic values and diagnostic criteria for the biomarkers tested were defined. Serum levels of MMP-2, TIMP-2 in EC patients were significantly lower, whereas CEA and SCC significantly higher than in control group. The diagnostic sensitivity of TIMP-2 (57%) was higher than those for other biomarkers tested and increased in combination with SCC (70%). Area under ROC curve for TIMP-2 (0.8698) was larger than for other proteins. In Cox's univariate analysis only SCC serum levels were significant prognostic factors for EC patients' survival. The results suggest the limited value of serum analyses of MMP-2 for tumor staging and prognosis in EC and the better usefulness of TIMP-2 than MMP-2 as a tumor marker in the diagnosis of EC, especially in combined use with SCC.

  18. Efficacy analysis of first radioiodine ablation of residual thyroid tissue in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the influence of age, sex, type of surgery, pathologic type of the tumor, postoperative time to the administration and the dose of radioiodine, TSH level and the existence of radioiodine uptake beyond thyroid to first radioiodine ablation of residual thyroid tissue (RTT) in well-differentiated thyroid cancer after surgery. Methods: Eighty-five well-differentiated thyroid cancer patients after surgery were ablated of RTT with radioiodine from 1975 to 1998 and were followed up for 3 - 6 months after ablation. Using the absence of visible uptake compared with background as the criterion for successful ablation. Results: Fifty-eight of 85 patients (68.2%) had successful ablation of RTT after the first administration of radioiodine. The results were statistically related to the type of surgery, the time after surgery to the ablation and the dosage of radioiodine, TSH level and the simultaneous existence of radioiodine uptake in metastatic site in the patients gained successfully ablation (P < 0.05), there were no statistically significant relation with age, sex and pathologic type of tumor. Conclusions: In well-differentiated thyroid cancer, there would be better effect of first ablation of RTT with suitable dosage of radioiodine, total thyroidectomy, above 50 mU/L TSH level,ablation conducted within 3 months after surgery and radioiodine uptake found only in RTT. The effectiveness of first ablation of RTT possesses no relationship with the age, sex and the pathologic type of the tumor

  19. The role of CRKL in Breast Cancer Metastasis: Insights from Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Chafik, Abderrahim

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They are involved in key biological processes and then may play a major role in the development of human diseases including cancer, in particular their involvement in breast cancer metastasis has been confirmed. Recently, the authors of ref.(\\cite{key1} have found that miR-429 may have a role in the inhibition of breast cancer metastasis and have identified its target gene CRKL as a potential ca...

  20. Eliminating tissue-fold artifacts in histopathological whole-slide images for improved image-based prediction of cancer grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Kothari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Analysis of tissue biopsy whole-slide images (WSIs depends on effective detection and elimination of image artifacts. We present a novel method to detect tissue-fold artifacts in histopathological WSIs. We also study the effect of tissue folds on image features and prediction models. Materials and Methods: We use WSIs of samples from two cancer endpoints - kidney clear cell carcinoma (KiCa and ovarian serous adenocarcinoma (OvCa - publicly available from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We detect tissue folds in low-resolution WSIs using color properties and two adaptive connectivity-based thresholds. We optimize and validate our tissue-fold detection method using 105 manually annotated WSIs from both cancer endpoints. In addition to detecting tissue folds, we extract 461 image features from the high-resolution WSIs for all samples. We use the rank-sum test to find image features that are statistically different among features extracted from the same set of WSIs with and without folds. We then use features that are affected by tissue folds to develop models for predicting cancer grades. Results: When compared to the ground truth, our method detects tissue folds in KiCa with 0.50 adjusted Rand index (ARI, 0.77 average true rate (ATR, 0.55 true positive rate (TPR, and 0.98 true negative rate (TNR; and in OvCa with 0.40 ARI, 0.73 ATR, 0.47 TPR, and 0.98 TNR. Compared to two other methods, our method is more accurate in terms of ARI and ATR. We found that 53 and 30 image features were significantly affected by the presence of tissue-fold artifacts (detected using our method in OvCa and KiCa, respectively. After eliminating tissue folds, the performance of cancer-grade prediction models improved by 5% and 1% in OvCa and KiCa, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed connectivity-based method is more effective in detecting tissue folds compared to other methods. Reducing tissue-fold artifacts will increase the performance of cancer-grade prediction

  1. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MunJu eKim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  2. A comparative study of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 levels in plasma and tumour tissue from patients with primary breast cancer and in plasma from patients with metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Mueller, Volkmar; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been investigated as a potential tumour marker in breast cancer. Here we investigated the correlation between TIMP-1 in tumour tissue and plasma to evaluate whether TIMP-1 in plasma is actually a surrogate marker for TIMP-1 in primary.......6). Plasma levels of TIMP-1 in primary breast cancer patients were significantly lower than levels in patients with advanced disease (median 108.7 ng/ml, range 59.7-560.7; p findings suggest that TIMP-1 release into the blood might be controlled by an active mechanism. They also...

  3. Insights into pancreatic cancer etiology from pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. and the etiology of this highly lethal disease has not been well defined. To identify genetic susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer, we conducted pathway analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS data in 3,141 pancreatic cancer patients and 3,367 controls with European ancestry.Using the gene set ridge regression in association studies (GRASS method, we analyzed 197 pathways identified from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. We used the logistic kernel machine (LKM test to identify major contributing genes to each pathway. We conducted functional enrichment analysis of the most significant genes (P<0.01 using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID.Two pathways were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons (P<0.00025 and in replication testing: neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, (Ps<0.00002, and the olfactory transduction pathway (P = 0.0001. LKM test identified four genes that were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer after Bonferroni correction (P<1×10(-5: ABO, HNF1A, OR13C4, and SHH. Functional enrichment analysis using DAVID consistently found the G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway (including both neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction and olfactory transduction pathways to be the most significant pathway for pancreatic cancer risk in this study population.These novel findings provide new perspectives on genetic susceptibility to and molecular mechanisms of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti...

  5. New insights into the prevention and treatment of familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euhus, David M

    2011-03-15

    Individuals who inherit a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at very high risk for breast cancer but there are several strategies available for successfully managing this risk. Breast cancers that develop in the context of germline BRCA gene mutation present challenges for management but also opportunities. DNA damaging agents, like cisplatin, and the new class of drugs called PARP inhibitors exploit the underlying defect in DNA damage repair to great effect. PMID:21337561

  6. Recent insights into nanotechnology development for detection and treatment of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanath B; Kim S.; Lee K

    2016-01-01

    Buddolla Viswanath,1 Sanghyo Kim,1 Kiyoung Lee2 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon, Republic of Korea Abstract: The global incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is 1.3 million cases. It is the third most frequent cancer in males and females. Most CRCs are adenocarcinomas and often begin as a polyp on the inner wall of the rectum or colon. Some of these polyps become malignant, ev...

  7. Ovarian Cancer: Can Proteomics Give New Insights for Therapy and Diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Federico

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the ovarian proteomic profile represents a new frontier in ovarian cancer research, since this approach is able to enlighten the wide variety of post-translational events (such as glycosylation and phosphorylation. Due to the possibility of analyzing thousands of proteins, which could be simultaneously altered, comparative proteomics represent a promising model of possible biomarker discovery for ovarian cancer detection and monitoring. Moreover, defining signaling pathways in ovarian cancer cells through proteomic analysis offers the opportunity to design novel drugs and to optimize the use of molecularly targeted agents against crucial and biologically active pathways. Proteomic techniques provide more information about different histological types of ovarian cancer, cell growth and progression, genes related to tumor microenvironment and specific molecular targets predictive of response to chemotherapy than sequencing or microarrays. Estimates of specificity with proteomics are less consistent, but suggest a new role for combinations of biomarkers in early ovarian cancer diagnosis, such as the OVA1 test. Finally, the definition of the proteomic profiles in ovarian cancer would be accurate and effective in identifying which pathways are differentially altered, defining the most effective therapeutic regimen and eventually improving health outcomes.

  8. The gender perspective in cancer research and therapy: novel insights and on-going hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, Lucia; Buoncervello, Maria; Ascione, Barbara; Bellenghi, Maria; Matarrese, Paola; Carè, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents a leading cause of death whose incidence is steadily increasing worldwide due to the population aging. The Global Health Observatory of the World Health Organization reported that approximately 13% of all deaths are caused by cancer. In the 2012 the estimated total number of cancer deaths was 1.75 million, 56% in men and 44% in women. Gender is recognized to play a role in cancer incidence, progression and response to therapy. Besides anatomical and hormonal disparities, genetic differences should be considered when assessing the effects of gender on cancer. Accumulating evidence also support the existence of sex-driven differences in immune responses. Until today clinical trials and research in animal models have been gender unbalanced. In consideration of the differences between sexes observed in cancer, sex should represent an important stratification factor to be included in all randomized clinical trials for a better understanding of biological differences between men and women, which may yield improved targeted therapies. PMID:27364396

  9. Naturally occurring cancers in dogs: insights for translational genetics and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    Here, we briefly review the state of knowledge of human cancer genetics to elaborate on the need for different types of mammalian models, highlighting the strengths of the dog. Mouse models are unparalleled for their experimental tractability and rapid genetic manipulation but have some key limitations in the area of human relevance. Companion dog models are attractive, because they are genetically more similar to humans, share environmental exposures with their owners, suffer from the same diseases as humans, and receive a high level of health care. They are ideal for the study of chronic diseases, because they age five to eight times faster than humans and generally live to old age. In addition, each dog breed is on the order of 100-fold genetically simpler than the whole human or dog population. These traits make the dog ideal for the study of complex genetics of naturally occurring cancers. Here, we contrast the relative strengths of cancer genetics in humans and dogs. We propose that humans are most ideal for the study of somatic cancer genetics, whereas dogs are most ideal for germline genetics. That proposition is supported by comparison of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in human and canine cancer. One of the advantages of dog cancer GWASs is the ability to rapidly map complex traits, conduct fine mapping and identification of causative variation, and thus be in a position to move on to functional studies. We mention how these strengths of dog models will lead to rapid advances in translational medicine.

  10. New Insights on COX-2 in Chronic Inflammation Driving Breast Cancer Growth and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Honor J; Saunders, C; Ramsay, R G; Thompson, E W

    2015-12-01

    The medicinal use of aspirin stretches back to ancient times, before it was manufactured in its pure form in the late 19th century. Its accepted mechanistic target, cyclooxygenase (COX), was discovered in the 1970s and since this landmark discovery, the therapeutic application of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has increased dramatically. The most significant benefits of NSAIDs are in conditions involving chronic inflammation (CI). Given the recognized role of CI in cancer development, the use of long-term NSAID treatment in the prevention of cancer is an enticing possibility. COX-2 is a key driver of CI, and here we review COX-2 expression as a predictor of survival in various cancer types, including breast. Obesity and post-partum involution are natural inflammatory states that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. We outline the COX-2 mediated mechanisms contributing to the growth of cancers. We dissect the cellular mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and how COX-2 may induce this to facilitate tumor progression. Finally we examine the potential regulation of COX-2 by c-Myb, and the possible interplay between c-Myb/COX-2 in proliferation, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1α)/COX-2 in invasive pathways in breast cancer.

  11. The Janus-Faced Role of Antioxidants in Cancer Cachexia: New Insights on the Established Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Mohamad; Rébillard, Amélie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and excessive loss of skeletal muscle usually occur during cancer cachexia, leading to functional impairment and delaying the cure of cancer. The release of cytokines by tumor promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn regulate catabolic pathways involved in muscle atrophy. ROS also exert a dual role within tumor itself, as they can either promote proliferation and vascularization or induce senescence and apoptosis. Accordingly, previous studies that used antioxidants to modulate these ROS-dependent mechanisms, in cancer and cancer cachexia, have obtained contradictory results, hence the need to gather the main findings of these studies and draw global conclusions in order to stimulate more oriented research in this field. Based on the literature reviewed in this paper, it appears that antioxidant supplementation is (1) beneficial in cancer cachectic patients with antioxidant deficiencies, (2) most likely harmful in cancer patients with adequate antioxidant status (i.e., lung, gastrointestinal, head and neck, and esophageal), and (3) not recommended when undergoing radiotherapy. At the moment, measuring the blood levels of antioxidants may help to identify patients with systemic deficiencies. This approach is simple to realize but could not be a gold standard method for cachexia, as it does not necessarily reflect the redox state in other organs, like muscle. PMID:27642498

  12. Expression and Significance of gp96 and Immune-related Gene CTLA-4, CD8 in Lung Cancer Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan ZHENG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that gp96 plays an important role in specific cytotoxic immune response which is involved in anti-tumor effect in the body. The aim of this study is to investigate the biological significance of heat shock protein gp96 and immune-related gene CTLA-4, CD8 expressions in lung cancer tissues of different progressive stages. Methods We used Envision immunohistochemistry method to detect the levels of expression of gp96, CTLA-4, CD8 in tissue microarray, which contained 89 primary lung cancer tissues, 12 lymph node metastasis lung cancer tissues, 12 precancerous lesions and 10 normal lung tissues, and analyzed the relationship between their expressions and clinicopathological parameters. Results (1 The positive rate of gp96 in primary lung cancer was remarkably higher than that in precancerous lesion and normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of CTLA-4 in primary lung cancer tissue and precancerous lesion was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of CD8 in primary lung cancer tissue was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of gp96 in CD8-positive lymphocytes in the high expression group was less than that in the low group (P < 0.05. (2 The positive rate of gp96 was closely related to sex, differentiation and clinical stage (P < 0.05, but not to age, gross type, histological type and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. The positive rate of CTLA-4 was closely related to age and differentiation (P < 0.05, but not to sex, gross type, histological type, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. CD8 expression was related to clinical stage (P < 0.05, but not to sex, age, gross type, histological type, differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. The positive rates of gp96, CTLA-4 were higher than that of CD8 in squamous cell carcinoma and SCLC, respectively. (3 There was positive correlation between gp

  13. A tissue biomarker panel predicting systemic progression after PSA recurrence post-definitive prostate cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many men develop a rising PSA after initial therapy for prostate cancer. While some of these men will develop a local or metastatic recurrence that warrants further therapy, others will have no evidence of disease progression. We hypothesized that an expression biomarker panel can predict which men with a rising PSA would benefit from further therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-control design was used to test the association of gene expression with outcome. Systemic (SYS progression cases were men post-prostatectomy who developed systemic progression within 5 years after PSA recurrence. PSA progression controls were matched men post-prostatectomy with PSA recurrence but no evidence of clinical progression within 5 years. Using expression arrays optimized for paraffin-embedded tissue RNA, 1021 cancer-related genes were evaluated-including 570 genes implicated in prostate cancer progression. Genes from 8 previously reported marker panels were included. A systemic progression model containing 17 genes was developed. This model generated an AUC of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84-0.92. Similar AUCs were generated using 3 previously reported panels. In secondary analyses, the model predicted the endpoints of prostate cancer death (in SYS cases and systemic progression beyond 5 years (in PSA controls with hazard ratios 2.5 and 4.7, respectively (log-rank p-values of 0.0007 and 0.0005. Genes mapped to 8q24 were significantly enriched in the model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Specific gene expression patterns are significantly associated with systemic progression after PSA recurrence. The measurement of gene expression pattern may be useful for determining which men may benefit from additional therapy after PSA recurrence.

  14. Transforming Big Data into Cancer-Relevant Insight: An Initial, Multi-Tier Approach to Assess Reproducibility and Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD(2)) Network was established to accelerate the transformation of "Big Data" into novel pharmacologic targets, lead compounds, and biomarkers for rapid translation into improved patient outcomes. It rapidly became clear in this collaborative network that a key central issue was to define what constitutes sufficient computational or experimental evidence to support a biologically or clinically relevant finding. This article represents a first attempt to delineate the challenges of supporting and confirming discoveries arising from the systematic analysis of large-scale data resources in a collaborative work environment and to provide a framework that would begin a community discussion to resolve these challenges. The Network implemented a multi-tier framework designed to substantiate the biological and biomedical relevance as well as the reproducibility of data and insights resulting from its collaborative activities. The same approach can be used by the broad scientific community to drive development of novel therapeutic and biomarker strategies for cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(8); 675-82. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27401613

  15. Transforming Big Data into Cancer-Relevant Insight: An Initial, Multi-Tier Approach to Assess Reproducibility and Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD(2)) Network was established to accelerate the transformation of "Big Data" into novel pharmacologic targets, lead compounds, and biomarkers for rapid translation into improved patient outcomes. It rapidly became clear in this collaborative network that a key central issue was to define what constitutes sufficient computational or experimental evidence to support a biologically or clinically relevant finding. This article represents a first attempt to delineate the challenges of supporting and confirming discoveries arising from the systematic analysis of large-scale data resources in a collaborative work environment and to provide a framework that would begin a community discussion to resolve these challenges. The Network implemented a multi-tier framework designed to substantiate the biological and biomedical relevance as well as the reproducibility of data and insights resulting from its collaborative activities. The same approach can be used by the broad scientific community to drive development of novel therapeutic and biomarker strategies for cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(8); 675-82. ©2016 AACR.

  16. NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-related proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners--variation by occupational exposure and subtype of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Pesch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radon and arsenic are established pulmonary carcinogens. We investigated the association of cumulative exposure to these carcinogens with NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-specific proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Paraffin-embedded tissue of 147 miners was randomly selected from an autopsy repository by type of lung tissue, comprising adenocarcinoma (AdCa, squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC, and cancer-free tissue. Within each stratum, we additionally stratified by low or high level of exposure to radon or arsenic. Lifetime exposure to radon and arsenic was estimated using a quantitative job-exposure matrix developed for uranium mining. For 22 cancer-related proteins, immunohistochemical scores were calculated from the intensity and percentage of stained cells. We explored the associations of these scores with cumulative exposure to radon and arsenic with Spearman rank correlation coefficients (r(s. Occupational exposure was associated with an up-regulation of NOTCH1 (radon r(s = 0.18, 95% CI 0.02-0.33; arsenic: r(s = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.38. Moreover, we investigated whether these cancer-related proteins can classify lung cancer using supervised and unsupervised classification. MUC1 classified lung cancer from cancer-free tissue with a failure rate of 2.1%. A two-protein signature discriminated SCLC (HIF1A low, AdCa (NKX2-1 high, and SqCC (NKX2-1 low with a failure rate of 8.4%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that the radiation-sensitive protein NOTCH1 can be up-regulated in lung tissue from uranium miners by level of exposure to pulmonary carcinogens. We evaluated a three-protein signature consisting of a physiological protein (MUC1, a cancer-specific protein (HIF1A, and a lineage-specific protein (NKX2-1 that could discriminate lung cancer and its major subtypes with a low failure rate.

  17. Gelatin-based Hydrogel Degradation and Tissue Interaction in vivo: Insights from Multimodal Preclinical Imaging in Immunocompetent Nude Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondera, Christoph; Hauser, Sandra; Krüger-Genge, Anne; Jung, Friedrich; Neffe, Axel T.; Lendlein, Andreas; Klopfleisch, Robert; Steinbach, Jörg; Neuber, Christin; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels based on gelatin have evolved as promising multifunctional biomaterials. Gelatin is crosslinked with lysine diisocyanate ethyl ester (LDI) and the molar ratio of gelatin and LDI in the starting material mixture determines elastic properties of the resulting hydrogel. In order to investigate the clinical potential of these biopolymers, hydrogels with different ratios of gelatin and diisocyanate (3-fold (G10_LNCO3) and 8-fold (G10_LNCO8) molar excess of isocyanate groups) were subcutaneously implanted in mice (uni- or bilateral implantation). Degradation and biomaterial-tissue-interaction were investigated in vivo (MRI, optical imaging, PET) and ex vivo (autoradiography, histology, serum analysis). Multimodal imaging revealed that the number of covalent net points correlates well with degradation time, which allows for targeted modification of hydrogels based on properties of the tissue to be replaced. Importantly, the degradation time was also dependent on the number of implants per animal. Despite local mechanisms of tissue remodeling no adverse tissue responses could be observed neither locally nor systemically. Finally, this preclinical investigation in immunocompetent mice clearly demonstrated a complete restoration of the original healthy tissue. PMID:27698944

  18. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  19. Post-radiation changes in oral tissues - An analysis of cancer irradiation cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Ashokkumar Pandya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation, commonly employed as neoadjuvant, primary, and adjuvant therapy for head and neck cancer causes numerous epithelial and stromal changes, prominent among which is fibrosis with its early and late consequences. Very little is known about the true nature of the fibrosed tissue and the type of fibers accumulated. Radiotherapy affects the supporting tumor stroma often resulting in a worsening grade of tumor post-radiation. Aim: To study epithelial, neoplastic, stromal, and glandular changes in oral cavity induced by radiation therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC using special stains. Materials and Methods: The study included 27 samples of recurrent OSCC following completion of radiotherapy (recurrence within an average span of 11 months, and 26 non-irradiated cases of OSCC. Patients with a history of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy were not included in the study. The epithelial changes assessed included epithelial atrophy, apoptosis, necrosis, dysplasia, and neoplasia. The connective tissue was evaluated for amount of fibrosis, quality of fibers (using picrosirius red staining, fibrinous exudate, necrosis, pattern of invasion, vessel wall thickening, and salivary gland changes. The aforementioned changes were assessed using light and polarizing microscopy and tabulated. Statistical Analysis: Epithelial and connective tissue parameters were compared between the irradiated and non-irradiated cases using chi square and t-tests. Results: Epithelial and connective tissue parameters were found to be increased in irradiated patients. Pattern of invasion by tumor cells varied from strands and  cords between the two groups studied. The effect of radiation was seen to reflect on the maturity of fibers and the regularity of their distribution.

  20. Expression of a plant-associated human cancer antigen in normal,premalignant and malignant esophageal tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Fu; Ping Qu; Mo Li; Hai-Mei Tian; Zhen-Hai Zheng; Xin-Wen Zheng; Wei Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between the expression profiles of a plant-associated human cancer antigen and carcinogenesis of esophagus and its significance. METHODS: We analyzed expression of a plant-associated human cancer antigen in biopsy specimens of normal (n=29),mildly hyperplastic (n=29), mildly (n=30), moderately (n=27)and severely dysplastic (n=29) and malignant esophageal (n=30) tissues by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The plant-associated human cancer antigen was mainly confined to the cytoplasm and showed diffuse type of staining. Positive staining was absent or weak in normal (0/30) and mildly hyperplastic tissue samples (2/29), while strong staining was observed in severe dysplasia (23/29) and carcinoma in situ (24/30). There was significant difference of its expression between normal mucosa and severely dysplastic tissues (P<0.001) or carcinoma in situ (P<0.001). Significant difference was also observed between mild dysplasia and severe dysplasia (P<0.001) or carcinomain situ (P<0.001). An overall trend toward increased staining intensity with increasing grade of dysplasia was found. There was a linear correlation between grade of lesions and staining intensity (r=0.794,P<0.001). Samples from esophageal cancer showed no higher levels of expression than those in severely dysplastic lesions (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: The abnormal expression of this plantassociated human cancer antigen in esophageal lesions is a frequent and early finding in the normal-dysplasiacarcinoma sequence in esophageal carcinogenesis. It might contribute to the carcinogenesis of esophageal cancer. The abnormal expression of this plant-associated human cancer antigen in esophageal lesion tissues may serve as a potential new biomarker for early identification of esophageal cancer.

  1. The Proliferative Activity of Mammary Epithelial Cells in Normal Tissue Predicts Breast Cancer Risk in Premenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sung Jin; Oh, Hannah; Peterson, Michael A; Almendro, Vanessa; Hu, Rong; Bowden, Michaela; Lis, Rosina L; Cotter, Maura B; Loda, Massimo; Barry, William T; Polyak, Kornelia; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2016-04-01

    The frequency and proliferative activity of tissue-specific stem and progenitor cells are suggested to correlate with cancer risk. In this study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and the frequency of mammary epithelial cells expressing p27, estrogen receptor (ER), and Ki67 in normal breast tissue. We performed a nested case-control study of 302 women (69 breast cancer cases, 233 controls) who had been initially diagnosed with benign breast disease according to the Nurses' Health Studies. Immunofluorescence for p27, ER, and Ki67 was performed on tissue microarrays constructed from benign biopsies containing normal mammary epithelium and scored by computational image analysis. We found that the frequency of Ki67(+) cells was positively associated with breast cancer risk among premenopausal women [OR = 10.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.12-48.0]. Conversely, the frequency of ER(+) or p27(+) cells was inversely, but not significantly, associated with subsequent breast cancer risk (ER(+): OR = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.33-1.50; p27(+): OR = 0.89, 95% CI, 0.45-1.75). Notably, high Ki67(+)/low p27(+) and high Ki67(+)/low ER(+) cell frequencies were significantly associated with a 5-fold higher risk of breast cancer compared with low Ki67(+)/low p27(+) and low Ki67(+)/low ER(+) cell frequencies, respectively, among premenopausal women (Ki67(hi)/p27(lo): OR = 5.08, 95% CI, 1.43-18.1; Ki67(hi)/ER(lo): OR = 4.68, 95% CI, 1.63-13.5). Taken together, our data suggest that the fraction of actively cycling cells in normal breast tissue may represent a marker for breast cancer risk assessment, which may therefore impact the frequency of screening procedures in at-risk women. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1926-34. ©2016 AACR.

  2. Altered expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and its regulatory genes in gastric cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihan Wang

    Full Text Available Tissue hypoxia induces reprogramming of cell metabolism and may result in normal cell transformation and cancer progression. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α, the key transcription factor, plays an important role in gastric cancer development and progression. This study aimed to investigate the underlying regulatory signaling pathway in gastric cancer using gastric cancer tissue specimens. The integration of gene expression profile and transcriptional regulatory element database (TRED was pursued to identify HIF-1α ↔ NFκB1 → BRCA1 → STAT3 ← STAT1 gene pathways and their regulated genes. The data showed that there were 82 differentially expressed genes that could be regulated by these five transcription factors in gastric cancer tissues and these genes formed 95 regulation modes, among which seven genes (MMP1, TIMP1, TLR2, FCGR3A, IRF1, FAS, and TFF3 were hub molecules that are regulated at least by two of these five transcription factors simultaneously and were associated with hypoxia, inflammation, and immune disorder. Real-Time PCR and western blot showed increasing of HIF-1α in mRNA and protein levels as well as TIMP1, TFF3 in mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues. The data are the first study to demonstrate HIF-1α-regulated transcription factors and their corresponding network genes in gastric cancer. Further study with a larger sample size and more functional experiments is needed to confirm these data and then translate into clinical biomarker discovery and treatment strategy for gastric cancer.

  3. Interaction between fragile histamine triad and protein kinase C alpha in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interaction between fragile histamine triad (FHIT) and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Methods FHIT and PKCα double positive samples were screened by immunohistochemical staining from 13 human non-small cell lung cancer tissues. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed by using anti-FHIT and anti-PKCα. The immune precipitate was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results Immune precipitate staining detection showed that 3 samples out of...

  4. Novel Insights into the Role of Caveolin-2 in Cell- and Tissue-Specific Signaling and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Sowa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Caveolin-2 is one of the major protein components of cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich flask-shaped invaginations of plasma membrane caveolae. A new body of evidence suggests that caveolin-2 plays an important, and often more direct, role than caveolin-1 in regulating signaling and function in a cell- and tissue type-specific manner. The purpose of this paper is to primarily focus on discussing how these recent discoveries may help better understand the specific contribution of caveolin-2 to lipid raft- and caveolae-regulated cell/tissue-specific signaling and functions.

  5. Narrowing Resection of Parametrial Tissues Is Feasible in Low-Risk Cases of Stage IA2-IB1 Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Lian; Liu, Xiao-Xia; Cao, Guan-Shu; Ju, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is the standard surgical treatment for patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer, but the wide excision increases the complications. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the feasibility of narrowing resection of parametrial tissues in stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospectively analyzed the pathological and clinical data of patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in OB/GYN Hospital, Fudan University, China from Jan 2008 to Dec 2011. The affected factors of parametrial metastases and outcomes were discussed. The single factor analysis was made with χ2 test, and the relationship of the resection width of parametrial tissues and the patients' outcomes was analyzed with χ2 test and log-rank. P-values cancer in 513 patients during the follow-up period (from 2 months to 66 months, averaged 39 months). The low-risk factors included diameter of tumor ≤2cm, depth of cervical myometrial invasionrisk factors. Whether the resection width of parametrial tissues ≥3cm or not had no statistically significant effect on progression free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) of low-risk patients. D2-40 and CD31 were related with parametrial metastases, but not with recurrence or outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The resection width of parametrial tissues has no effect on PFS and OS of low-risk patients, and narrowing resection of parametrial tissues (<3cm) is feasible.

  6. Comparison of microRNA deep sequencing of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and fresh frozen cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Meng

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs regulate several aspects of tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Most cancer tissues are archived formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE. While microRNAs are a more stable form of RNA thought to withstand FFPE-processing and degradation there is only limited evidence for the latter assumption. We examined whether microRNA profiling can be successfully conducted on FFPE cancer tissues using SOLiD ligation based sequencing. Tissue storage times (2-9 years appeared to not affect the number of detected microRNAs in FFPE samples compared to matched frozen samples (paired t-test p>0.7. Correlations of microRNA expression values were very high across microRNAs in a given sample (Pearson's r = 0.71-0.95. Higher variance of expression values among samples was associated with higher correlation coefficients between FFPE and frozen tissues. One of the FFPE samples in this study was degraded for unknown reasons with a peak read length of 17 nucleotides compared to 21 in all other samples. The number of detected microRNAs in this sample was within the range of microRNAs detected in all other samples. Ligation-based microRNA deep sequencing on FFPE cancer tissues is feasible and RNA degradation to the degree observed in our study appears to not affect the number of microRNAs that can be quantified.

  7. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Mengele, K.; Schueren, E. van der; Sweep, C.G.J.; Foekens, J.A.; Brunner, N.; Laabs, J.; Malik, A.; Harbeck, N.

    2007-01-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk asses

  8. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigbeder, Alice; Vélot, Lauriane; James, D Andrew; Bisson, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    A precisely controlled network of protein-protein interactions constitutes the basis for functional signaling pathways. This equilibrium is more often than not disrupted in cancer cells, by the aberrant expression or activation of oncogenic proteins. Therefore, the analysis of protein interaction networks in cancer cells has become crucial to expand our comprehension of the molecular underpinnings of tumor formation and progression. This protocol describes a sample preparation method for the analysis of signaling complexes by mass spectrometry (MS), following the affinity purification of a protein of interest from a cancer cell line or a solid tumor. In particular, we provide a spin tip-based protease digestion procedure that offers a more rapid and controlled alternative to other gel-based and gel-free methods. This sample preparation protocol represents a useful strategy to identify protein interactions and to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that contribute to a given cancer phenotype. PMID:27581032

  9. Remodeling of central metabolism in invasive breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue – a GC-TOFMS based metabolomics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budczies Jan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in energy metabolism of the cells are common to many kinds of tumors and are considered a hallmark of cancer. Gas chromatography followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS is a well-suited technique to investigate the small molecules in the central metabolic pathways. However, the metabolic changes between invasive carcinoma and normal breast tissues were not investigated in a large cohort of breast cancer samples so far. Results A cohort of 271 breast cancer and 98 normal tissue samples was investigated using GC-TOFMS-based metabolomics. A total number of 468 metabolite peaks could be detected; out of these 368 (79% were significantly changed between cancer and normal tissues (p80%. Two-metabolite classifiers, constructed as ratios of the tumor and normal tissues markers, separated cancer from normal tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. Specifically, the cytidine-5-monophosphate / pentadecanoic acid metabolic ratio was the most significant discriminator between cancer and normal tissues and allowed detection of cancer with a sensitivity of 94.8% and a specificity of 93.9%. Conclusions For the first time, a comprehensive metabolic map of breast cancer was constructed by GC-TOF analysis of a large cohort of breast cancer and normal tissues. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that spectrometry-based approaches have the potential to contribute to the analysis of biopsies or clinical tissue samples complementary to histopathology.

  10. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    1999-01-01

    -assisted microscope, which allowed semi-automated quantification of cells within a fixed area. Total white cells and individual counts of eosinophils, neutrophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were evaluated in every tumour specimen. Stratification into four groups with similar numbers of events was used...... age ( p=0.0003), and tumour location in the rectum predicted poor survival, while high counts of eosinophils ( p=0.006) and mast cells ( p=0.02) predicted good survival. Tumour-associated eosinophilia and mastocytosis appear to be independent prognostic variables in colorectal cancer. Future studies...... should investigate the potential biological role of tumour tissue eosinophils and mast cells in the modulation of tumour growth....

  11. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-4 Triggers Apoptosis in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Floria; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Espinosa, Magali; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Maldonado, Vilma; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4 (TIMP-4) is a member of extracellular matrix (ECM) metalloproteinases inhibitors that has pleiotropic functions. However, TIMP-4 roles in carcinogenesis are not well understood. Cell viability and flow cytometer assays were employed to evaluate cell death differences between H-Vector and H-TIMP-4 cell lines. Immunobloting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR were used to evaluate the expression of apoptosis regulators. We showed that TIMP-4 has apoptosis-sensitizing effects towards several death stimuli. Consistent with these findings, regulators of apoptosis from Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAP), FLICE-like inhibitor proteins (FLIP) and Bcl-2 family members were modulated by TIMP-4. In addition, TIMP-4 knockdown resulted in cell survival increase after serum deprivation, as assessed by clonogenic cell analyses. This report shows that TIMP-4 regulates carcinogenesis through apoptosis activation in cervical cancer cells. Understanding TIMP-4 effects in tumorigenesis may provide clues for future therapies.

  12. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-4 Triggers Apoptosis in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floria Lizarraga

    Full Text Available Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4 (TIMP-4 is a member of extracellular matrix (ECM metalloproteinases inhibitors that has pleiotropic functions. However, TIMP-4 roles in carcinogenesis are not well understood. Cell viability and flow cytometer assays were employed to evaluate cell death differences between H-Vector and H-TIMP-4 cell lines. Immunobloting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR were used to evaluate the expression of apoptosis regulators. We showed that TIMP-4 has apoptosis-sensitizing effects towards several death stimuli. Consistent with these findings, regulators of apoptosis from Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAP, FLICE-like inhibitor proteins (FLIP and Bcl-2 family members were modulated by TIMP-4. In addition, TIMP-4 knockdown resulted in cell survival increase after serum deprivation, as assessed by clonogenic cell analyses. This report shows that TIMP-4 regulates carcinogenesis through apoptosis activation in cervical cancer cells. Understanding TIMP-4 effects in tumorigenesis may provide clues for future therapies.

  13. ENO1 Protein Levels in the Tumor Tissues and Circulating Plasma Samples of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying ZHANG

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Proper tumor markers are useful to diagnosis, prognosis and treatment for lung cancer. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of alpha-enolase (ENO1 protein in the tumor tissues and peripheral plasma samples obtained from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, and evaluate its potential clinical significance. Methods The ENO1 protein levels in the tumor tissues and corresponding normal tissues from 16 cases of lung squamous cell carcinoma were analyzed by Western blot. The ENO1 protein levels in the plasma samples from 42 healthy individuals, 34 patients with lung benign disease and 84 patients with NSCLC were measured by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results For 87.5% (14/16 of the patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma, the ENO1 protein level in the tumor tissues was higher than that in the corresponding normal lung tissues. The ENO1 protein level in the plasma of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that in the plasma of healthy individuals (P=0.031 and patients with lung benign disease (P=0.019. Furthermore, the ENO1 protein level was significantly higher in the plasma of patients with lung adenocarcinoma than that of patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion The elevated levels of ENO1 protein in the tumor tissues and the plasma samples from NSCLC patients indicate ENO1 may be a candidate biomarker of lung cancer.

  14. Insights into genetic and epigenetic determinants with impact on vitamin D signaling and cancer association studies: The case of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregoire B Morand

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a key regulator of calcium metabolism and has been implicated as a cancer preventive agent. However, clinical studies have revealed conflicting results on its cancer preventive properties, attributed in part to multiple metabolic and regulatory factors susceptible to affect individual responses to exogenous vitamin D. Vitamin D is obtained from dietary sources and sun exposure, which depends on numerous parameters such as skin type, latitude, and lifestyle factors. Focusing on thyroid cancer, we document that genetic and epigenetic determinants can greatly impact individual response to vitamin D and may outweigh the classical clinical correlative studies that focus on sun exposure/dietary intake factors. In particular, genetic determinants innate to host intrinsic metabolic pathways such as highly polymorphic cytochromes P450s responsible for the metabolic activation of vitamin D are expressed in many organs, including the thyroid gland and can impact vitamin D interaction with its nuclear receptor (VDR in thyroid tissue. Moreover, downstream regulatory pathways in vitamin D signalling as well as VDR are also subject to wide genetic variability among human populations as shown by genome-wide studies. These genetic variations in multiple components of vitamin D pathways are critical determinants for the re-valuation of the potential preventive and anticancer properties of vitamin D in thyroid cancer.

  15. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20). In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41) and 36.6% (15/41), while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41) and 14.6% (6/41). In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7) and 14.3% (1/7). The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P < 0.05). Gene expression rate was not correlated with menopause or lymph node metastasis. Positive expression of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was positively correlated with tumor differentiation and the clinical stage of the ovarian cancer. In addition, the positive expression rate of BAGE was significantly higher in ovarian cancer patients with ascites (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression profiles of MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV3, A2780 and COC1 varied, but there was at least one gene expressed in each cell line. Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer

  16. Autofluorescence spectroscopy for multimodal tissues characterization in colitis-associated cancer murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorez, Hugo; Sablong, Raphaël.; Canaple, Laurence; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Gaillard, Sophie; Moussata, Driffa; Beuf, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this research project is to assess mice colon wall, using three optical modalities (conventional endoscopy, confocal endomicroscopy and optical spectroscopy) and endoluminal MRI. The study is done in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer that represent 13% of new cases of cancer, every year in western countries. An optical spectroscopic bench (autofluorescence and reflectance) was developed with a flexible fiber probe. This latter has been combined with a mini multi-purpose rigid endoscope and a confocal endomicroscope. The optical modalities were first used in vivo on SWISS mice. Then, a specific optical a phantom (containing two layers of distinct fluorophores) was developed in order to evaluate our two-channel spectroscopic probe as a basic depth-sensitive measurement tool. The preliminary results show the feasibility to combine such modalities in the same in vivo protocol. Conventional endoscopy is useful to depict inflammation along colon wall. Confocal endomicroscopy provides high-contrasted images of microvascularization. Measured optical spectra both depend on biochemical tissue content and layered structure of the medium. The light collected from one channel is not similar to the other, in terms of intensity and spectroscopic profile as the interaction with the medium observed volume is different. A comparative analysis of the spectra based on our in vitro model exhibits a strong correlation between simple index extracted from spectral data and two main phantom characteristics (fluorophore concentrations and superficial layer thickness). This work suggests that this technique could contribute to assess tissues alterations through autofluorescence spectroscopic measurement under endoscopy.

  17. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  18. Characterization and Clinical Implication of Th1/Th2/Th17 Cytokines Produced from Three-Dimensionally Cultured Tumor Tissues Resected from Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kiyomi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Several cytokines secreted from breast cancer tissues are suggested to be related to disease prognosis. We examined Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines produced from three-dimensionally cultured breast cancer tissues and related them with patient clinical profiles. METHODS: 21 tumor tissues and 9 normal tissues surgically resected from breast cancer patients were cultured in thermoreversible gelatin polymer–containing medium. Tissue growth and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine concentrations in the culture medium were analyzed and were related with hormone receptor expressions and patient clinical profiles. RESULTS: IL-6 and IL-10 were expressed highly in culture medium of both cancer and normal tissues. However, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-17A were not detected in the supernatant of the three-dimensionally cultured normal mammary gland and are seemed to be specific to breast cancer tissues. The growth abilities of hormone receptor–negative cancer tissues were significantly higher than those of receptor-positive tissues (P = 0.0383. Cancer tissues of stage ≥IIB patients expressed significantly higher TNF-α levels as compared with those of patients with stage tissues resected from breast cancer patients can grow in the three-dimensional thermoreversible gelatin polymer culture system and produce Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines. Hormone receptor–positive cancer tissues showed less growth ability. TNF-α is suggested to be a biomarker for the cancer stage.

  19. Molecular insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-related muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Diana; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Maciel, Elisabete; Santinha, Deolinda; Oliveira, Paula; Vitorino, Rui; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Nunes, Cláudia; Santos, Lúcio L; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics during cancer cachexia were previously suggested; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. So, the goal of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial phospholipid remodeling in cancer-related muscle wasting and its repercussions to respiratory chain activity and fiber susceptibility to apoptosis. An animal model of urothelial carcinoma induced by exposition to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) and characterized by significant body weight loss due to skeletal muscle mass decrease was used. Morphological evidences of muscle atrophy were associated to decreased respiratory chain activity and increased expression of mitochondrial UCP3, which altogether highlight the lower ability of wasted muscle to produce ATP. Lipidomic analysis of isolated mitochondria revealed a significant decrease of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin in BBN mitochondria, counteracted by increased phosphatidylcholine levels. Besides the impact on membrane fluidity, this phospholipid remodeling seems to justify, at least in part, the lower oxidative phosphorylation activity observed in mitochondria from wasted muscle and their increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Curiously, no evidences of lipid peroxidation were observed but proteins from BBN mitochondria, particularly the metabolic ones, seem more prone to carbonylation with the consequent implications in mitochondria functionality. Overall, data suggest that bladder cancer negatively impacts skeletal muscle activity specifically by affecting mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics and its interaction with proteins, ultimately leading to the dysfunction of this organelle. The regulation of phospholipid biosynthetic pathways might be seen as potential therapeutic targets for the management of cancer-related muscle wasting. PMID:24657703

  20. Molecular insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-related muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Diana; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Maciel, Elisabete; Santinha, Deolinda; Oliveira, Paula; Vitorino, Rui; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Nunes, Cláudia; Santos, Lúcio L; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics during cancer cachexia were previously suggested; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. So, the goal of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial phospholipid remodeling in cancer-related muscle wasting and its repercussions to respiratory chain activity and fiber susceptibility to apoptosis. An animal model of urothelial carcinoma induced by exposition to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) and characterized by significant body weight loss due to skeletal muscle mass decrease was used. Morphological evidences of muscle atrophy were associated to decreased respiratory chain activity and increased expression of mitochondrial UCP3, which altogether highlight the lower ability of wasted muscle to produce ATP. Lipidomic analysis of isolated mitochondria revealed a significant decrease of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin in BBN mitochondria, counteracted by increased phosphatidylcholine levels. Besides the impact on membrane fluidity, this phospholipid remodeling seems to justify, at least in part, the lower oxidative phosphorylation activity observed in mitochondria from wasted muscle and their increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Curiously, no evidences of lipid peroxidation were observed but proteins from BBN mitochondria, particularly the metabolic ones, seem more prone to carbonylation with the consequent implications in mitochondria functionality. Overall, data suggest that bladder cancer negatively impacts skeletal muscle activity specifically by affecting mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics and its interaction with proteins, ultimately leading to the dysfunction of this organelle. The regulation of phospholipid biosynthetic pathways might be seen as potential therapeutic targets for the management of cancer-related muscle wasting.

  1. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in colorectal cancer liver metastases is associated with vascular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Eefsen, Rikke Løvendahl; Bird, Nigel Charles;

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic growth by colorectal cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new microenvironment. This interaction results in three histological growth patterns of liver metastases: desmoplastic, pushing, and replacement. In primary colorectal cancer...... several proteases, involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components, are up-regulated. In liver metastases, their expression is growth pattern dependent. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is a strong prognostic marker in plasma from colorectal cancer patients......, with significant higher levels in patients with metastatic disease. We therefore wanted to determine the expression pattern of TIMP-1 in primary colorectal cancers and their matching liver metastases. TIMP-1 mRNA was primarily seen in α-smooth-muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells. In all primary tumors and liver...

  2. Deciphering Cell-to-Cell Communication in Acquisition of Cancer Traits: Extracellular Membrane Vesicles Are Regulators of Tissue Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Deep; Wijesinghe, Philip; Oenarto, Vici; Lu, Jamie F; Sampson, David D; Kennedy, Brendan F; Wallace, Vincent P; Bebawy, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Deciphering the role of cell-to-cell communication in acquisition of cancer traits such as metastasis is one of the key challenges of integrative biology and clinical oncology. In this context, extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important vectors in cell-to-cell communication and serve as conduits in the transfer of cellular constituents required for cell function and for the establishment of cellular phenotypes. In the case of malignancy, they have been shown to support the acquisition of common traits defined as constituting the hallmarks of cancer. Cellular biophysics has contributed to our understanding of some of these central traits with changes in tissue biomechanics reflective of cell state. Indeed, much is known about stiffness of the tissue scaffold in the context of cell invasion and migration. This article advances this knowledge frontier by showing for the first time that EVs are mediators of tissue biomechanical properties and, importantly, demonstrates a link between the acquisition of cancer multidrug resistance and increased tissue stiffness of the malignant mass. The methodology used in the study employed optical coherence elastography and atomic force microscopy on breast cancer cell monolayers and tumor spheroids. Specifically, we show here that the acquired changes in tissue stiffness can be attributed to the intracellular transfer of a protein complex comprising ezrin, radixin, moesin, CD44, and P-glycoprotein. This has important implications in facilitating mechano-transduced signaling cascades that regulate the acquisition of cancer traits, such as invasion and metastasis. Finally, this study also introduces novel targets and strategies for diagnostic and therapeutic innovation in oncology, with a view to prevention of metastatic spread and personalized medicine in cancer treatment. PMID:27501296

  3. Insights into radionuclide-induced lung cancer in people from life-span studies in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In life-span studies, beagle dogs were exposed one time by inhalation to an aerosol containing a beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclide in a relatively soluble or insoluble chemical form. After exposure dogs were observed for late-occurring biological effects. Lung cancer has been a predominant observation for radionuclides inhaled in a relatively insoluble form because most of the absorbed dose was delivered to the lung and contiguous tissues. Approximately 130 lung cancers were observed in dogs exposed to inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides; tumors occurred with absorbed doses to lung ranging from 1100 to 68,000 rads. With inhaled alpha emitters lung tumors occurred at doses between 530 and 8400 rads. Dose rate pattern was shown to be an important factor in the induction of lung cancer by inhaled beta emitters. Doses of low-LET irradiation delivered in a matter of days can be as much as 8 times more effective per unit of dose than radiation doses delivered over a more protracted period of time. Tumors also have occurred in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of dogs that inhaled relatively insoluble forms of beta emitters. From these studies, the risk of lung cancer from inhaled beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides was compared to determine the importance of LET and other dose-effect modifying factors on resulting risks and on extrapolation to human inhalation exposure. Attention also was given to the risk of cancer in tracheobronchial lymph nodes, on the basis of the results of these studies and the current ICRP computational method in which lymph nodes are included with lung for purposes of dose and risk calculation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Cancer Immunosurveillance by Tissue-Resident Innate Lymphoid Cells and Innate-like T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadi, Saïda; Chhangawala, Sagar; Whitlock, Benjamin M; Franklin, Ruth A; Luo, Chong T; Oh, Soyoung A; Toure, Ahmed; Pritykin, Yuri; Huse, Morgan; Leslie, Christina S; Li, Ming O

    2016-01-28

    Malignancy can be suppressed by the immune system in a process termed immunosurveillance. However, to what extent immunosurveillance occurs in spontaneous cancers and the composition of participating cell types remains obscure. Here, we show that cell transformation triggers a tissue-resident lymphocyte response in oncogene-induced murine cancer models. Non-circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes, derived from innate, T cell receptor (TCR)αβ, and TCRγδ lineages, expand in early tumors. Characterized by high expression of NK1.1, CD49a, and CD103, these cells share a gene-expression signature distinct from those of conventional NK cells, T cells, and invariant NKT cells. Generation of these lymphocytes is dependent on the cytokine IL-15, but not the transcription factor Nfil3 that is required for the differentiation of tumor-infiltrating NK cells, and IL-15 deficiency, but not Nfil3 deficiency, results in accelerated tumor growth. These findings reveal a tumor-elicited immunosurveillance mechanism that engages unconventional type-1-like innate lymphoid cells and type 1 innate-like T cells.

  5. Fluorescent marker-based and marker-free discrimination between healthy and cancerous human tissues using hyper-spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Thomas; De Biasio, Martin; Leitner, Raimund

    2015-06-01

    Two problems are addressed in this paper (i) the fluorescent marker-based and the (ii) marker-free discrimination between healthy and cancerous human tissues. For both applications the performance of hyper-spectral methods are quantified. Fluorescent marker-based tissue classification uses a number of fluorescent markers to dye specific parts of a human cell. The challenge is that the emission spectra of the fluorescent dyes overlap considerably. They are, furthermore disturbed by the inherent auto-fluorescence of human tissue. This results in ambiguities and decreased image contrast causing difficulties for the treatment decision. The higher spectral resolution introduced by tunable-filter-based spectral imaging in combination with spectral unmixing techniques results in an improvement of the image contrast and therefore more reliable information for the physician to choose the treatment decision. Marker-free tissue classification is based solely on the subtle spectral features of human tissue without the use of artificial markers. The challenge in this case is that the spectral differences between healthy and cancerous tissues are subtle and embedded in intra- and inter-patient variations of these features. The contributions of this paper are (i) the evaluation of hyper-spectral imaging in combination with spectral unmixing techniques for fluorescence marker-based tissue classification, (ii) the evaluation of spectral imaging for marker-free intra surgery tissue classification. Within this paper, we consider real hyper-spectral fluorescence and endoscopy data sets to emphasize the practical capability of the proposed methods. It is shown that the combination of spectral imaging with multivariate statistical methods can improve the sensitivity and specificity of the detection and the staging of cancerous tissues compared to standard procedures.

  6. Coexpression of cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor and gastrin gene in human gastric tissues and gastric cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jiang Zhou; Man-Ling Chen; Qun-Zhou Zhang; Jian-Kun Hu; Wen-Ling Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the expression patterns of cholecystokininB (CCK-B)/gastrin receptor genes in matched human gastric carcinoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa of patients with gastric cancer, inflammatory gastric mucosa from patients with gastritis, normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients and a gastric carcinoma cell line (SGC-7901), and to explore their relationship with progression to malignancy of human gastric carcinomas.METHODS: RT-PCR and sequencing were employed to detect the mRNA expression levels of CCK-B receptor and gastrin gene in specimens from 30 patients with gastric carcinoma and healthy bordering non-cancerous mucosa, 10 gastritis patients and normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients as well as SGC-7901. The results were semi-quantified by normalizing it to the mRNA level of β-actin gene using Lab Image software. The sequences were analyzed by BLAST program. RESULTS: CCK-B receptor transcripts were detected in all of human gastric tissues in this study, including normal, inflammatory and malignant tissues and SGC-7901. However, the expression levels of CCK-B receptor in normal gastric tissues were higher than those in other groups (P<0.05),and its expressions did not correlate with the differentiation and metastasis of gastric cancer (P>0.05). On the other hand, gastrin mRNA was detected in SGC-7901 and in specimens obtained from gastric cancer patients (22/30) but not in other gastric tissues, and its expression was highly correlated with the metastases of gastric cancer (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Human gastric carcinomas and gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 cells coexpress CCK-B receptor and gastrin mRNA. Gastrin/CCK-B receptor autocrine or paracrine pathway may possibly play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer.

  7. Application of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS for Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Breast Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Small angle, between 3° and 10°, X ray scattering is predominantly coherent giving rise to diffraction effects that can be observed as constructive and destructive interferences. These interferences carry information about the molecular structure of the tissue and hence can be used to identify changes that occur due to cancer. Method: In this study an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction method was used. The optimum scattering angle, determined from a series of measurements on adipose breast tissue at several angles from 4 to 7.3 degrees, was found to be 6.5°. Once optimized the system was used to measure the diffraction profiles (corrected scattered intensity versus momentum transfer of a total of 99 breast tissue samples. The samples were both normal and tumour samples. Results: Adipose tissue showed a sharp, high intensity peak at low momentum transfer values of approximately 1.1nm-1. Adipose tissue, mixed tissue (adipose & fibroglandular and tumor have peaks at different values of momentum transfer that can be used to identify the tissue. Benign and malignant breast tissues can also be differentiated by both peak positions and peak heights. It was also observed that the results were reproducible even after the tissue had been preserved at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Conclusion: We were able to differentiate between normal, benign and malignant breast tissues by using energy dispersive small angle x-ray scattering.

  8. Tissue Biomarkers in Prognostication of Serous Ovarian Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binny Khandakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous ovarian cancer (SOC is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in females with poor prognosis because of advanced stage at presentation. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT is being used for management of advanced SOC, but role of tissue biomarkers in prognostication following NACT is not well established. The study was conducted on advanced stage SOC patients (n=100 that were treated either conventionally (n=50 or with NACT (n=50, followed by surgery. In order to evaluate the expression of tissue biomarkers (p53, MIB1, estrogen and progesterone receptors, Her-2/neu, E-cadherin, and Bcl2, immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative scoring were done following morphological examination. Following NACT, significant differences in tumor histomorphology were observed as compared to the native neoplasms. MIB 1 was significantly lower in cases treated with NACT and survival outcome was significantly better in cases with low MIB 1. ER expression was associated with poor overall survival. No other marker displayed any significant difference in expression or correlation with survival between the two groups. Immunophenotype of SOC does not differ significantly in samples from cases treated with NACT, compared to upfront surgically treated cases. The proliferating capacity of the residual tumor cells is less, depicted by low mean MIB1 LI. MIB 1 and ER inversely correlate with survival.

  9. Brain Metastasis in Bone and Soft Tissue Cancers: A Review of Incidence, Interventions, and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Shweikeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone and soft tissue malignancies account for a small portion of brain metastases. In this review, we characterize their incidence, treatments, and prognosis. Most of the data in the literature is based on case reports and small case series. Less than 5% of brain metastases are from bone and soft tissue sarcomas, occurring most commonly in Ewing’s sarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, and osteosarcoma. Mean interval from initial cancer diagnosis to brain metastasis is in the range of 20–30 months, with most being detected before 24 months (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, chordoma, angiosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, some at 24–36 months (malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and alveolar soft part sarcoma, and a few after 36 months (chondrosarcoma and liposarcoma. Overall mean survival ranges between 7 and 16 months, with the majority surviving < 12 months (Ewing’s sarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, angiosarcoma and chordomas. Management is heterogeneous involving surgery, radiosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. While a survival advantage may exist for those given aggressive treatment involving surgical resection, such patients tended to have a favorable preoperative performance status and minimal systemic disease.

  10. STUDY OF ECK GENE EXON-3 FROM HUMAN NORMAL TISSUE AND BREAST CANCER CELL LINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑶琛; 孔令洪; 王一理; 司履生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a method cloning the exon 3 of eck gene from normal tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line (a human breast cancer cell line)and study whether these genes exist mutant. Methods Designed a pair of specific primers and amplified the exon 3 of eck gene fragment from the extracted genomic DNA derived from normal epithelial cells from skin tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively by PCR technique. Transformed the E.coil. JM109 with recombinant plamids constructed by inserting the amplified fragments into medium vector pUCm-T and sequenced these amplified fragments after primary screening of endonuclease restriction digestion and PCR amplification. Results ① Obtained the genomic DNA of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ② Obtained the amplified fragments of human exon 3 of eck gene through PCR technique. ③ Obtained the cloning vectors of exon 3 of eck gene of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ④ ZR-75-1 cell line exists mutation of nucleotides. Conclusion Successfully established the method of cloning the human exon 3 of eck gene and found some mutations in the detected samples. This study lays a foundation for further studying the function of eck gene in tumorgenesis.

  11. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  12. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  13. Comparison of human papillomavirus detection between freshly frozen tissue and paraffin embedded tissue of invasive cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lloveras Belen; Alemany Laia; Quiros Beatriz; Sandin Sven; de Sanjose Silvia; Odida Michael; Quint Wim; Kleter Bernhard; Alejo Maria; van Doorn Leen-Jan; Weiderpass Elisabete

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) detection results comparing paraffin embedded cervical tissue and other cervical specimens have been done with varying degrees of agreement. However, studies comparing freshly frozen specimens and paraffin embedded specimens of invasive cervical carcinomas are lacking. The aim of the study was to compare HPV detection using SPF10 broad-spectrum primers PCR followed by DEIA and genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1) between freshly frozen cervical tissu...