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Sample records for cancer therapy evaluation

  1. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) seeks to improve the lives of cancer patients by finding better treatments, control mechanisms, and cures for cancer. CTEP funds a national program of cancer research, sponsoring clinical trials to evaluate new anti-cancer agents.

  2. Pathologic Evaluation of Breast Cancer after Neoadjuvant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol Keun; Jung, Woo-Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the most common cancers in women, has various treatment modalities. Neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) has been used in many clinical trials because it is easy to evaluate the treatment response to therapeutic agents in a short time period; consequently, NAT is currently a standard treatment modality for large-sized and locally advanced breast cancers, and its use in early-stage breast cancer is becoming more common. Thus, chances to encounter breast tissue from patients treated with NAT is increasing. However, systems for handling and evaluating such specimens have not been established. Several evaluation systems emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to increase the accuracy of breast cancer assessment. Thus, detailed and systematic evaluation of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings is important. In this review, we compare the major problems of each evaluation system and discuss important points for handling and evaluating NAT-treated breast specimens. PMID:27068026

  3. 76 FR 13404 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, is announcing the final revision of the NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation... Register of April 6, 2010 (FR Vol. 65, No. 65), the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Treatment..., Associate Director, Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and......

  4. Preclinical evaluation of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Gareth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bortezomib is a highly selective, reversible inhibitor of the 26S proteasome that is indicated for single-agent use in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least 2 prior therapies and are progressing on their most recent therapy. Clinical investigations have been completed or are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of bortezomib alone or in combination with chemotherapy in multiple myeloma, both at relapse and presentation, as well as in other cancer types. The antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenic, and antitumor activities of bortezomib result from proteasome inhibition and depend on the altered degradation of a host of regulatory proteins. Exposure to bortezomib has been shown to stabilize p21, p27, and p53, as well as the proapoptotic Bid and Bax proteins, caveolin-1, and inhibitor κB-α, which prevents activation of nuclear factor κB-induced cell survival pathways. Bortezomib also promoted the activation of the proapoptotic c-Jun-NH2 terminal kinase, as well as the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. The anticancer effects of bortezomib as a single agent have been demonstrated in xenograft models of multiple myeloma, adult T-cell leukemia, lung, breast, prostate, pancreatic, head and neck, and colon cancer, and in melanoma. In these preclinical in vivo studies, bortezomib treatment resulted in decreased tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis, as well as increased survival and tumor apoptosis. In several in vitro and/or in vivo cancer models, bortezomib has also been shown to enhance the antitumor properties of several antineoplastic treatments. Importantly, bortezomib was generally well tolerated and did not appear to produce additive toxicities when combined with other therapies in the dosing regimens used in these preclinical in vivo investigations. These findings provide a rationale for further clinical trials using bortezomib alone or in combination regimens with

  5. Imaging evaluation of liver cancer after radiofrequency ablation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiofrequency ablation has been an important means of the comprehensive therapy for liver cancers, especially for the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinomas. Radiofrequency ablation has already showed encouraging clinical effects. However, due to the limitation of ablation extent the remnants of tumor lesions or the recurrence of tumor are often seen. Therefore, it is very important to accurately evaluate the curative effect of radiofrequency ablation. This paper aims to summarize the evaluation of curative effect of radiofrequency ablation with different imaging methods, and to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these different imaging methods in order to provide a correct reference for taking reasonable imaging means to help make the proper clinical treatment. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of QOL in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients is an important theme. However, we do not have an established method to assess QOL in cancer patients during radiotherapy in Japan. We evaluated both the changes of QOL and the factors affecting QOL in radiotherapy patients. Three hundred fifty-five cancer patients, who filled in a questionnaire at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy between 1998 and 2001, were studied. We used The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs (QOL-ACD)'' devised by Kurihara et al, the Ministry of Health and Welfare. The QOL Questionnaire had five categories: physical activity, physical condition, mental state, social interaction, and face scale. The total score, sum of the score of five categories, were established synthetically (maximum score is 110). The mean of total QOL scores were 75.8, 77.6, and 78.2 at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy respectively. Patients with symptoms related to cancer had apparent improvement of QOL score. Patients receiving chemotherapy had a decreased QOL score at the end of radiotherapy. The score of physical condition was reduced improvement. It was suggested that radiotherapy could be performed without losing QOL of cancer patients, including older patients. However, patients receiving chemotherapy and those with head and neck cancer may lose their QOL, therefore, we should treat such patients carefully. (author)

  7. Evaluating complementary and alternative therapies for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassileth, B R

    1999-01-01

    "Complementary and alternative" therapies are actually a vast collection of disparate, unrelated regimens and products, ranging from adjunctive modalities that effectively enhance quality of life and promising antitumor herbal remedies now under investigation, to bogus therapies that claim to cure cancer and that harm not only directly, but also indirectly by encouraging patients to avoid or postpone effective cancer care. Complementary therapies such as music and massage, herbal teas to aid digestion and relieve nausea, yoga, tai chi, meditation, and the many other well-documented techniques that relieve stress and enhance well-being should be made available to patients to augment and ease the experience of cancer treatment and recovery. Many time-tested herbal and diet-based remedies are now being studied for their abilities to induce or extend remission without toxicity. At the same time, lack of government regulatory authority leaves consumers at the mercy of those who promote unproved remedies, scores of which the grocery store and pharmacy shelves. Many of these over-the-counter products contain harmful ingredients. Herb-drug interactions, only some of which are documented, occur with frequency and are sufficiently problematic to require that patients stop taking herbal remedies prior to surgery (to prevent interactions with anesthetics and anticoagulant effects); before radiation (due to potential for increased photosensitivity); and during courses of chemotherapy (to prevent product-drug interactions). Moreover, both good information and misinformation that appear in printed materials and on the Internet appeal to better educated consumers, who are, in fact, the most likely to try complementary and alternative methods. PMID:11198952

  8. Multicenter evaluation of rectal cancer reimaging post neoadjuvant (MERRION) therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanly, Ann M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of reimaging rectal cancer post-CRT (chemoradiotherapy) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pelvis for local staging and computed tomography of thorax, abdomen, and pelvis (CT TAP) to identify distant metastases.

  9. Radiation therapy in prostate cancer: evaluation of acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goals: The present work documents the increasing demand of curative intent radiation therapy (CIRT) for localized prostate cancer and assesses acute reactions caused by ionizing radiation to intrapelvic organs. Patients and methods: From January 1995 to December 2001, 166 patients with prostatic cancer received radiation therapy, 70% of them (n=116) with curative intent. Treatment was completed as planned in 108 patients: 55 with pelvic irradiation and prostatic boost (PRT), 42 with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 10 with a permanent 125 I implant (IPI) and 1 with combined radiotherapy. Patients were classified as at high- or low-risk according to tumor volume, Gleason score, regional lymph node status and pretreatment specific prostatic antigen level. High-risk patients were assigned to PRT and low-risk patients to local treatment only (either 3DCRT or IPI). Mean doses were 46 Gy for pelvis and 73 Gy for prostate with PRT; 75 Gy with 3DCRT and 127 Gy with IPI and combined radiation therapy. Acute rectal toxicity (ART) and acute urinary toxicity (AUT) were assessed according to the RTOG scale. Statistical analysis was performed with Fischer's exact test. Results: The proportion of patients receiving CIRT increased from 46% (n=28) in 1995-1998 to 84% (n=88) in 1999-2001; p < 0.0001. No patient developed ART or AUT beyond degree 2. ART was lower with 3DCRT (71% degree 0 or 1) than with PRT (45% degree 0 or 1); p= 0.0134. No significant difference was found in AUT. Conclusions: In recent years the demand for CIRT has almost doubled, with a concomitant decrease in palliative radiotherapy. In high-risk patients, pelvic irradiation increased mild and moderate ART, without compromising their life quality. None of the techniques employed was associated with severe acute toxicity. (author)

  10. Objective evaluation of the quality of voice following radiation therapy for T1 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiation therapy is commonly considered the treatment of choice for T1 glottic cancer. While it is generally believed that the quality of voice following irradiation is quite satisfactory, few studies have reported the results of objective assessment of voice after radiation therapy. Purpose: To objectively evaluate the quality of voice following radiation therapy for T1 glottic cancer. Materials and methods: The voices of 12 patients treated for T1 glottic cancer with radiation therapy were evaluated by acoustic analysis and speech aerodynamic studies. Eleven patients received between 6300 and 6665 cGy at a daily fraction size of 180-225 cGy. One patient received 7000 cGy at a daily fraction size of 200 cGy. Evaluation of the quality of voice was done 3 months to 7 years following completion of radiation therapy. Results: The number of patients who scored abnormal values for the measurements of fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer and harmonic to noise ratio was 2, 10, 4 and 3, respectively. The number of patients who scored abnormal values for transglottic airflow rate, subglottal pressure and glottal resistance was 12, 8 and 9, respectively. None of the studied patients scored normal values in all given tests. Conclusion: Although radiation therapy cures a high proportion of patients with T1 glottic cancer, the quality of voice does not return to normal following treatment

  11. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for Evaluation and Management of Cardiovascular Complications of Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Sean A; Dent, Susan; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Clarke, Brian; Davis, Margot K; Jassal, Davinder S; Johnson, Christopher; Lemieux, Julie; Paterson, Ian; Sebag, Igal A; Simmons, Christine; Sulpher, Jeffrey; Thain, Kishore; Thavendiranathan, Paaldinesh; Wentzell, Jason R; Wurtele, Nola; Côté, Marc André; Fine, Nowell M; Haddad, Haissam; Hayley, Bradley D; Hopkins, Sean; Joy, Anil A; Rayson, Daniel; Stadnick, Ellamae; Straatman, Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Modern treatment strategies have led to improvements in cancer survival, however, these gains might be offset by the potential negative effect of cancer therapy on cardiovascular health. Cardiotoxicity is now recognized as a leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. This guideline, authored by a pan-Canadian expert group of health care providers and commissioned by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, is intended to guide the care of cancer patients with established cardiovascular disease or those at risk of experiencing toxicities related to cancer treatment. It includes recommendations and important management considerations with a focus on 4 main areas: identification of the high-risk population for cardiotoxicity, detection and prevention of cardiotoxicity, treatment of cardiotoxicity, and a multidisciplinary approach to cardio-oncology. All recommendations align with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Key recommendations for which the panel provides a strong level of evidence include: (1) that routine evaluation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and optimal treatment of preexisting cardiovascular disease be performed in all patients before, during, and after receiving cancer therapy; (2) that initiation, maintenance, and/or augmentation of antihypertensive therapy be instituted per the Canadian Hypertension Educational Program guidelines for patients with preexisting hypertension or for those who experience hypertension related to cancer therapy; and (3) that investigation and management follow current Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure guidelines for cancer patients who develop clinical heart failure or an asymptomatic decline in left ventricular ejection fraction during or after cancer treatment. This guideline provides guidance to clinicians on contemporary best practices for the cardiovascular care of cancer patients. PMID:27343741

  12. 75 FR 17412 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property... Treatment and Diagnosis, is seeking comments on a proposed revision to its policy on intellectual property...) INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OPTION. The proposed policy, if finalized, would establish that potential applicants...

  13. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for kidney cancer Targeted therapies for kidney cancer Biologic therapy (immunotherapy) for kidney cancer Chemotherapy for kidney cancer Pain control for kidney cancer Treatment choices by stage for ...

  14. Significance and problems in evaluations of pathological responses to neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosumi, Masafumi

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy consists of systemic drug treatments before surgery for a primary cancer. Currently, several neoadjuvant therapy regimens for breast cancer that use various cytotoxic as well as endocrine-therapeutic and molecular-targeting agents have been performed in clinical practice and/or studies. In neoadjuvant therapy, pre-treatment pathological examination using materials obtained by a core needle biopsy (CNB) is necessary, and pathological diagnosis and evaluation of the biological status, such as hormone receptors and HER-2 over-expression are confirmed. In addition, CNB in the inter-phase of chemotherapy is also thought to be useful for assessment of therapeutic effects before regimens have been completed. After surgery, the therapeutic effects of neoadjuvant therapy have been mainly evaluated on the basis of pathological findings and a pathological complete response (pCR) is considered to be the main target of neoadjuvant therapy. Results of most of clinical studies including NSABP protocol B-18 and B-27 have confirmed the prognostic significance of pCR in neoadjuvant therapy and indicated the significance of pathological evaluation. However, universally accepted pathological response criteria have not been established, but evaluations of the main invasive tumor, intraductal components and regional lymph nodes are thought to be necessary. Additionally, evaluation of the effects below pCR also need examining in a study using a mild anti-cancer drug, such as hormone-therapeutic agent, and the survival outcomes of patients below pCR need to be examined and compared between each grade. PMID:16929118

  15. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); B. Sangro; Prieto, J.

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/pro-drug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition, gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy. These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reac...

  16. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  17. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  18. [Clinical evaluation of the efficacy of external therapies of traditional Chinese medicine in treatment of cancer pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shi-jie; Jia, Li-qun; Li, Pei-wen

    2011-01-01

    There lack scientific methods for evaluating the treatment of cancer pain with external therapies of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The level of clinical study in this field needs to be improved. The authors assert that when external therapies of TCM are applied to treat cancer pain, different types of cancer pain should be distinguished and treatment should be applied according to such a differentiation. Under this framework scientific evaluation can be conducted. The authors also assert that the findings of randomized, blinded and controlled trials should be given particular attention, and it is necessary to include titration of morphine into clinical trails of external therapies for the treatment of cancer pain, not only complying with the three-ladder principle for treating cancer pain suggested by the World Health Organization, but also not influencing the effect evaluation of external therapies of TCM on cancer pain. Patient diaries recording pain were revised as observation indexes. The primary indicator of efficacy was the pain intensity score and the secondary indicators were the equivalent of morphine and the remission rate of pain. The time to onset, remission duration and comparison of assessment of pain influence can mirror the characteristics of external therapies of TCM on cancer pain. PMID:21227027

  19. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions

  20. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anand, E-mail: as4351@columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions.

  1. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, van den, G.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the prostate cancer may be focally treated followed by careful post-treatment evaluation, and if necessary by focal re-treatment. During the past decades, the age of men at prostate cancer detection has decr...

  2. Evaluation of Online/Offline Image Guidance/Adaptation Approaches for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, An [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sun, Ying [Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liang, Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Yan, Di, E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate online/offline image-guided/adaptive treatment techniques for prostate cancer radiation therapy with daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: Three treatment techniques were evaluated retrospectively using daily pre- and posttreatment CBCT images on 22 prostate cancer patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (SV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. For each patient, a pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan with clinical target volume (CTV) = prostate + SV and planning target volume (PTV) = CTV + 3 mm was created. The 3 treatment techniques were as follows: (1) Daily Correction: The pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan was delivered after online CBCT imaging, and position correction; (2) Online Planning: Daily online inverse plans with 3-mm CTV-to-PTV margin were created using online CBCT images, and delivered; and (3) Hybrid Adaption: Daily Correction plus an offline adaptive inverse planning performed after the first week of treatment. The adaptive plan was delivered for all remaining 15 fractions. Treatment dose for each technique was constructed using the daily posttreatment CBCT images via deformable image registration. Evaluation was performed using treatment dose distribution in target and critical organs. Results: Treatment equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the CTV was within [85.6%, 100.8%] of the pretreatment planned target EUD for Daily Correction; [98.7%, 103.0%] for Online Planning; and [99.2%, 103.4%] for Hybrid Adaptation. Eighteen percent of the 22 patients in Daily Correction had a target dose deficiency >5%. For rectal wall, the mean ± SD of the normalized EUD was 102.6% ± 2.7% for Daily Correction, 99.9% ± 2.5% for Online Planning, and 100.6% ± 2.1% for Hybrid Adaptation. The mean ± SD of the normalized bladder EUD was 108.7% ± 8.2% for Daily Correction, 92.7% ± 8.6% for Online Planning, and 89.4% ± 10.8% for Hybrid

  3. Evaluation of Online/Offline Image Guidance/Adaptation Approaches for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate online/offline image-guided/adaptive treatment techniques for prostate cancer radiation therapy with daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: Three treatment techniques were evaluated retrospectively using daily pre- and posttreatment CBCT images on 22 prostate cancer patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (SV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. For each patient, a pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan with clinical target volume (CTV) = prostate + SV and planning target volume (PTV) = CTV + 3 mm was created. The 3 treatment techniques were as follows: (1) Daily Correction: The pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan was delivered after online CBCT imaging, and position correction; (2) Online Planning: Daily online inverse plans with 3-mm CTV-to-PTV margin were created using online CBCT images, and delivered; and (3) Hybrid Adaption: Daily Correction plus an offline adaptive inverse planning performed after the first week of treatment. The adaptive plan was delivered for all remaining 15 fractions. Treatment dose for each technique was constructed using the daily posttreatment CBCT images via deformable image registration. Evaluation was performed using treatment dose distribution in target and critical organs. Results: Treatment equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the CTV was within [85.6%, 100.8%] of the pretreatment planned target EUD for Daily Correction; [98.7%, 103.0%] for Online Planning; and [99.2%, 103.4%] for Hybrid Adaptation. Eighteen percent of the 22 patients in Daily Correction had a target dose deficiency >5%. For rectal wall, the mean ± SD of the normalized EUD was 102.6% ± 2.7% for Daily Correction, 99.9% ± 2.5% for Online Planning, and 100.6% ± 2.1% for Hybrid Adaptation. The mean ± SD of the normalized bladder EUD was 108.7% ± 8.2% for Daily Correction, 92.7% ± 8.6% for Online Planning, and 89.4% ± 10.8% for Hybrid

  4. Tumor therapy evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this program is to acquire data in order to evaluate the advantages of the proton spot scan technique compared to other forefront radiotherapy procedures, and to integrate the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of the life science department for human cancer therapy by testing it in veterinary radio-oncology. (author) 1 fig., 2 tab., 2 refs

  5. Tumor therapy evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, B.; Parvis, A. [Zurich Univ., Zurich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this program is to acquire data in order to evaluate the advantages of the proton spot scan technique compared to other forefront radiotherapy procedures, and to integrate the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of the life science department for human cancer therapy by testing it in veterinary radio-oncology. (author) 1 fig., 2 tab., 2 refs.

  6. Cancer gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Tatjana; Radulović Siniša

    2005-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy can be defined as transfer of nucleic acids into tumor or normal cells with aim to eradicate or reduce tumor mass by direct killing of cells, immunomodulation or correction of genetic errors, and reversion of malignant status. Initially started with lots of optimism and enthusiasm, cancer gene therapy has shown limited success in treatment of patients. This review highlights current limitations and almost endless possibilities of cancer gene therapy. The major difficulty i...

  7. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser therapy uses a very narrow, focused beam of light to shrink or destroy cancer cells. It ... to cut out tumors without damaging other tissue. Laser therapy is often given through a thin, lighted ...

  8. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Elias, Eldho

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nanotechnological-Based Systems for CancerIn vivo Spectroscopy for Detection and Treatment of GBM with NPt® ImplantationNanobiotechnology for Antibacterial Therapy and DiagnosisChitosan NanoparticlesSynthesis and Biomedical Application of Silver NanoparticlesRecent Advances in Cancer Therapy Using PhytochemicalsMitochondrial Dysfunction and Cancer: Modulation by Palladium-Lipoic Acid ComplexUnity of Mind and Body: The Concept of Life Purpose DominantThuja Occidentalis and Breast Cancer ChemopreventionAntioxidants and Com

  9. An evaluation of focal therapy in the treatment of localised prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, H. U.

    2014-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis I am proposing a paradigm shift in the management of men with localised prostate cancer involving destroying areas of prostate cancer alone – so-called focal therapy. By doing so, I propose that side-effects of whole-gland therapies will be reduced whilst maintaining cancer control. I have carried out a phased and structured programme of work to test this hypothesis. First, I review the literature to define the current problem faced by men with localised prostate cance...

  10. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaper, Frédéric L.W.V.J.; Reutelingsperger, Chris P., E-mail: c.reutelingsperger@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, MUMC, Universiteitssingel 50, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT). Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1–4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients.

  11. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT). Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1–4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients

  12. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P. Reutelingsperger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT. Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1–4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients.

  13. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Frédéric L W V J; Reutelingsperger, Chris P

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT). Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1-2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1-4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients. PMID:24216991

  14. Unproven (questionable) cancer therapies.

    OpenAIRE

    Brigden, M L

    1995-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients use some form of alternative treatment during the course of their illness. Alternative therapies are often started early in patients' illness, and their use is frequently not acknowledged to health care professionals. Some alternative therapies are harmful, and their promoters may be fraudulent. Persons who try alternative cancer therapies may not be poorly educated but may ultimately abandon conventional treatment. Recent attention has focused on aspects...

  15. Evaluation of the impact of the cancer therapy everolimus on the central nervous system in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Dubois

    Full Text Available Cancer and treatments may induce cognitive impairments in cancer patients, and the causal link between chemotherapy and cognitive dysfunctions was recently validated in animal models. New cancer targeted therapies have become widely used, and their impact on brain functions and quality of life needs to be explored. We evaluated the impact of everolimus, an anticancer agent targeting the mTOR pathway, on cognitive functions, cerebral metabolism, and hippocampal cell proliferation/vascular density in mice. Adult mice received everolimus daily for 2 weeks, and behavioral tests were performed from 1 week after the last treatment. Everolimus-treated mice displayed a marked reduction in weight gain from the last day of the treatment period. Ex vivo analysis showed altered cytochrome oxidase activity in selective cerebral regions involved in energy balance, food intake, reward, learning and memory modulation, sleep/wake cycle regulation, and arousal. Like chemotherapy, everolimus did not alter emotional reactivity, learning and memory performances, but in contrast to chemotherapy, did not affect behavioral flexibility or reactivity to novelty. In vivo hippocampal neural cell proliferation and vascular density were also unchanged after everolimus treatments. In conclusion, two weeks daily everolimus treatment at the clinical dose did not evoke alteration of cognitive performances evaluated in hippocampal- and prefrontal cortex-dependent tasks that would persist at one to four weeks after the end of the treatment completion. However, acute everolimus treatment caused selective CO modifications without altering the mTOR effector P70S6 kinase in cerebral regions involved in feeding behavior and/or the sleep/wake cycle, at least in part under control of the solitary nucleus and the parasubthalamic region of the hypothalamus. Thus, this area may represent a key target for everolimus-mediating peripheral modifications, which has been previously associated

  16. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  17. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for kidney cancer Targeted therapies for kidney cancer Biologic therapy (immunotherapy) for kidney cancer Chemotherapy for kidney cancer Pain control for kidney cancer Treatment choices by stage for ...

  18. Targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Neal Rosen; Carlos Arteaga

    2011-01-01

    With unprecedented understanding of molecular events underlying human cancer in this genomic era, a large number of drugs specifically targeting hypothesized oncogenic drivers to which tumors are potentially addicted to have been developed and continue to be developed. These targeted cancer therapies are being actively tested in clinical trials with mixed successes. This editorial provides an overview on successful targeted cancer drugs on the market and those drugs that are in late clinical development stages. Importantly, the article lays out main challenges in developing molecular targeted therapies and potential path forward to overcome these challenges, as well as opportunities for China in this new era of targeted agents. The editorial serves as an introduction to the Targeted Cancer Therapies serias that will review in depth of major pathways and drugs targeting these pathways to be published in the coming issues of the Chinese Journal of Cancer.

  19. siRNA-loaded cationic liposomes for cancer therapy: Development, characterization and efficacy evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Bo

    Cancer is a major health problem in the United States and many other parts of the world. However, cancer treatment is severely limited by the lack of highly effective cytotoxic agents and selective delivery methods which can serve as the "magic bullet" (first raised by Dr. Paul Ehrlich, the goal of targeting a specific location without causing harm to surrounding tissues or to more distant regions in the body). The revolutionary finding that tumors cannot grow beyond a microscopic size without dedicated blood supply provided a highly effective alternative for the treatment of cancer. Currently, anti-angiogenic therapy and the discovery of RNA interference makes it possible to treat some conditions by silencing disorder-causing genes of targeting cells which are otherwise difficult to eradicate with more conventional therapies. However, before siRNA technology could be widely used as a therapeutic approach, the construct must be efficiently and safely delivered to target cells. Strategies used for siRNA delivery should minimize uptake by phagocytes, enzymatic degradation by nucleases and should be taken up preferentially, if not specifically, by the intended cell population. Kinesin spindle proteins (KSP) are the motor proteins which play critical roles during mitosis. Different from tubulins which are also present in post-mitotic cells, such as axons, KSP is exclusively expressed in mitotic cells, which makes them the ideal target for anti-mitotics. In the present study, we intend to develop, characterize and evaluate a liposome-based delivery system which can deliver KSP siRNA selectively to the tumor vasculature (thus inhibiting angiogenesis, destroying tumor vasculature and eventually, eradicating tumor growth). We first developed ten different liposome preparation types with different compositions of lipids. Next, the capacity for loading siRNA and efficiency of targeting the tumor vascular supply was evaluated using relevant cellular and tumor models

  20. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    An essential part in cancer radiotherapy, is to direct a sufficiently high dose towards the tumour, without damaging the surrounding tissue. Different techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy have been developed, in order to reduce the dose to the normal tissue...

  1. Evaluation of 188Re-MAG2-RGD-bombesin for potential prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glu-RGD-bombesin (RGD-BBN) is a heterodimeric peptide that contains motifs recognizing both integrin αvβ3 and gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). We evaluated here 188Re (t1/2 = 16.9 h) labeled RGD-BBN as a potential agent for radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer. RGD-BBN was conjugated with S-benzoylmercaptoacetylglycylglycyl (MAG2), and then labeled with 99mTc or 188Re, respectively. The dual-receptor binding affinity of MAG2-RGD-BBN was investigated by a radioligand competition binding assay. Biodistribution study of 188Re-MAG2-RGD-BBN was carried out in normal BALB/c mice and PC-3 human prostate tumor-bearing nude mice. Gamma imaging studies were performed in PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice. Biodistribution in normal mice showed that both 99mTc and 188Re-labeled MAG2-RGD-BBN possessed high pancreas uptake due to the high GRPR expression of this organ. Gamma imaging with both 99mTc and 188Re-labeled RGD-BBN in PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated high tumor uptake. The PC-3 tumors were clearly visible at 1 postinjection, with high contrast to the contralateral background. The use of chelator MAG2 enables successful and high-yield 99mTc and 188Re radiolabeling of RGD-BBN with favorable tumor targeting specificity. Further optimization may allow potential clinical application of 188Re-MAG2-RGD-BBN for tumor-targeted radionuclide therapy

  2. Evaluation of Chinese version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-cheng ZHU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep questionnaire in measuring the quality of life in patients with primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC in China. Methods: FACT-Hep questionnaire was translated into Chinese and revised properly. From September 2005 to April 2006, one hundred and eighty patients with primary liver carcinoma were admitted and measured by using the Chinese version of FACT-Hep questionnaire, and the reliabilities, validities and responsibilities of the questionnaire were assessed.Results: Correlation coefficient was higher between items and dimension of their corresponding domain (0.593 3±0.165 2 than that between the items and other domains (0.274 9±0.192 2. Six principal constituents were extracted by factor analysis and represented all domains of the questionnaire. The combinations of components were consistent with what was expected. The correlation coefficient of criterion-related validity was 0.828. The test-retest reliability correlation coefficients of physical, social/family, emotion, function, symptom and total questionnaire were 0.731, 0.334, 0.953, 0.786, 0.785 and 0.801 respectively, and the values of Cronbach's alpha were 0.739 7, 0.419 3, 0.791 4, 0.825 0, 0.839 9 and 0.916 1, respectively. There were statistical differences in scores of FACT-Hep questionnaire in different PHC stages or in different Child-Pugh classes (P<0.05.Conclusion: The FACT-Hep questionnaire can measure the quality of life in patients with PHC with good reliability, validity and responsiveness; it can be used in assessing the disease-specific health-related quality of life of patients with hepatobiliary cancers.

  3. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  4. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  5. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: tns3b@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hegarty, Sarah E. [Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rabinowitz, Carol [Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Maio, Vittorio [Jefferson School of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hyslop, Terry [Department of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center & Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Louis, Daniel Z. [Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  6. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  7. Nano cancer therapy strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjul Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of deaths. Millions of people are diagnosed with cancer every year. Many cancer cells have a protein all over their surface, while healthy cells typically do not express the protein as strongly. By conjugating, or binding, the gold nanoparticles to an antibody the researchers were able to get the nanoparticles to attach themselves to the cancer cells which may help us unravel the inner workings of a cancer cell and produce better treatments. In terms of drug delivery systems, nano particles enable unique approaches for cancer treatment. A large number of nanoparticle delivery systems have been developed for cancer therapy and currently they are in the preclinical stages of development. More recently developed nanoparticles are demonstrating the potential sophistication of these delivery systems by incorporating multifunctional capabilities and targeting strategies in an effort to increase the efficacy of these systems against the most difficult cancer challenges. This article reviews the available preclinical and clinical nanoparticle technology platforms and their impact on cancer therapy.

  8. Treatment response evaluation with three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound for liver cancer after local therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Huixiong, E-mail: xuhuixiong@hotmail.co [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Ultrasound, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Lu Mingde, E-mail: lumd@21cn.co [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Xie Xiaohua; Xie Xiaoyan [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Ultrasound, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Kuang Ming [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Xu Zuofeng; Liu Guangjian; Wang Zhu; Chen Lida; Lin Manxia [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Ultrasound, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Objective: To investigate the potential usefulness of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) in evaluating the treatment response for liver cancer after local therapies. Methods: A total of 107 lesions in 95 consecutive patients with liver cancer underwent local therapies and thereafter received low acoustic power 3D-CEUS examination. The LOGIQ 9 ultrasound scanner and a volume transducer were used and the ultrasound contrast agent was SonoVue. The image quality of 3D-CEUS images was evaluated and the influence of 3D-CEUS to clinical outcome was investigated. Results: The image quality of 3D-CEUS was defined as high in 102 (102/107, 95.3%) lesions and common in 5 (5/107, 4.7%) lesions. 3D-CEUS did not change the diagnosis in any patient compared with 2D-CEUS. However, 3D-CEUS changed the management in 3 (2.8%) of 107 lesions, increased confidence but made no change in diagnosis in 85 (79.5%) lesions, added some information but did not change management or diagnosis in 15 (14.0%), and made no change in 4 (3.7%), respectively, in comparison with 2D-CEUS. Conclusion: 3D-CEUS enhances the diagnostic confidence in the majority of the patients and even changes the management in some patients. 3D-CEUS has potential usefulness in evaluating treatment response for liver cancer after local therapies.

  9. Treatment response evaluation with three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound for liver cancer after local therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the potential usefulness of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) in evaluating the treatment response for liver cancer after local therapies. Methods: A total of 107 lesions in 95 consecutive patients with liver cancer underwent local therapies and thereafter received low acoustic power 3D-CEUS examination. The LOGIQ 9 ultrasound scanner and a volume transducer were used and the ultrasound contrast agent was SonoVue. The image quality of 3D-CEUS images was evaluated and the influence of 3D-CEUS to clinical outcome was investigated. Results: The image quality of 3D-CEUS was defined as high in 102 (102/107, 95.3%) lesions and common in 5 (5/107, 4.7%) lesions. 3D-CEUS did not change the diagnosis in any patient compared with 2D-CEUS. However, 3D-CEUS changed the management in 3 (2.8%) of 107 lesions, increased confidence but made no change in diagnosis in 85 (79.5%) lesions, added some information but did not change management or diagnosis in 15 (14.0%), and made no change in 4 (3.7%), respectively, in comparison with 2D-CEUS. Conclusion: 3D-CEUS enhances the diagnostic confidence in the majority of the patients and even changes the management in some patients. 3D-CEUS has potential usefulness in evaluating treatment response for liver cancer after local therapies.

  10. A multi-centre prospective development study evaluating focal therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound for localised prostate cancer: The INDEX study.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, L.; Ahmed, H. U.; Kirkham, A; Allen, C.; Freeman, A; Barber, J; Hindley, R; Leslie, T.; Ogden, C.; Persad, R; Winkler, M.H.; Emberton, M; on behalf of the INDEX Study Group

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Focal therapy offers the possibility of cancer control, without the side effect profile of radical therapies. Early single centre prospective development studies using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have demonstrated encouraging genitourinary functional preservation and short-term cancer control. Large multi-centre trials are required to evaluate medium-term cancer control and reproduce functional recovery. We describe the study design of an investigator-led UK multi-ce...

  11. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  12. Evaluation on lung cancer patients' adaptive planning of TomoTherapy utilising radiobiological measures and Planned Adaptive module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fan-Chi; Shi, Chengyu; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy is a promising concept that allows individualised, dynamic treatment planning based on feedback of measurements. The TomoTherapy Planned Adaptive application, integrated to the helical TomoTherapy planning system, enables calculation of actual dose delivered to the patient for each treatment fraction according to the pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scan and image registration. As a result, new fractionation treatment plans are available if correction is necessary. In order to evaluate therealclinicaleffect,biologicaldoseis preferred to physical dose. A biological parameter, biologically effective uniform dose ([Formula: see text]), has the advantages of not only reporting delivered dose but also facilitating the analysis of dose-response relations, which link radiation dose to the clinical effect. Therefore, in this study, four lung patients' adaptive plans were evaluated using the [Formula: see text] in addition to physical doses estimated from the TomoTherapy Planned Adaptive module. Higher complication-free tumour control probability (P(+))(of about 8%) was observed in patients treated with larger dose-per-fraction by using the [Formula: see text] in addition to the physical dose. Moreover, a significant increase of 13.2% in the P(+) for the adaptive TomoTherapy plan in one of the lung cancer patients was also observed, which indicates the clinical benefit of adaptive TomoTherapy. PMID:20376282

  13. Quantitative evaluation of bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer during endocrine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahara, Jyunro [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-02-01

    A well-recognized difficulty in assessing the response to therapy for advanced prostate cancer is the infrequency of measurable metastatic disease. The most common metastatic site is bone, and it is manifested by diffuse ostoblastic lesions that cannot be measured reliably to allow for assessments of therapeutic benefits. We assessed the clinical usefulness of quantifying the extent of disease on bone scans in monitoring treatment response in patients with advance prostate cancer using computer-assisted image analysis. Percentage of the positive area on the bone scan (%PABS) was quantified automatically using a personal computer with the NIH Image program. Serial measurements of %PABS in 44 patients with bone metastasis from prostate cancer followed for a mean of 33 month (range 4 to 72) with hormonal therapy were compared with those of the extent of disease (EOD) grades in bone lesions and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels according to treatment response. Serial measurements of EOD grades and %PABS in 13 patients with partial response (PR) disease and those in 12 patients with progressive disease (PD) who did not show bone metastasis progression demonstrated a downward trend during the treatment. On the other hand, changes of EOD grades and %PABS in the remaining 19 patients with PD who showed bone metastasis progression demonstrated an upward trend. Estimated survival curves showed that %PABS was a useful prognostic indicator, with the patients who showed a 25% decline in %PABS surviving longer than the patients who showed a less than 25% decline in %PABS after treatment (p=0.0207). The %PABS is a simple and reproducible estimate of the percentage of the skeleton involving tumors in patients with advanced prostate cancer, and serial measurements of %PABS can assist in monitoring the treatment response in patients with bone metastatic prostate cancer. (author)

  14. Dietary evaluation of a low-iodine diet in Korean thyroid cancer patients preparing for radioactive iodine therapy in an iodine-rich region

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Dal Lae; Park, Young Joo; Paik, Hee-Young; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Seonyeong; Jung, Kyong Yeun; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Choi, Hun Sung; Song, Yoon Ju

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Despite the importance of a low-iodine diet (LID) for thyroid cancer patients preparing for radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, few studies have evaluated dietary intake during LID. This study evaluated the amount of dietary iodine intake and its major food sources during a typical diet and during LID periods for thyroid cancer patients preparing for RAI therapy, and examined how the type of nutrition education of LID affects iodine intake. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 92 d...

  15. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  16. PET/CT in therapy evaluation of patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Natasha Hemicke; Christensen, Tine Nøhr; Langer, Seppo W;

    2014-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT is a well documented and widespread used imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of patient with lung cancer. FDG-PET/CT is increasingly used for the assessment of treatment effects during and after chemotherapy. However, PET is not an accepted surrogate end-point for assessment...... of response rate in clinical trials. The aim of this review is to present current evidence on the use of PET in response evaluation of patients with lung cancer and to introduce the pearls and pitfalls of the PET-technology relating to response assessment. Based on this and relating to validation...... criteria, including stable technology, standardization, reproducibility and broad availability, the review discusses why, despite numerous studies on response assessment indicating a possible role for FDG-PET/CT, PET still has no place in guidelines relating to response evaluation in lung cancer....

  17. Evaluation of rucaparib and companion diagnostics in the PARP inhibitor landscape for recurrent ovarian cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Zachary B; Sood, Anil K; Coleman, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Rucaparib camsylate (CO-338; 8-fluoro-2-{4-[(methylamino)methyl]phenyl}-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-6H-azepino[5,4,3-cd]indol-6-one ((1S,4R)-7,7-dimethyl-2-oxobicyclo[2.2.1]hept-1-yl)methanesulfonic acid salt) is a PARP1, 2 and 3 inhibitor. Phase I studies identified a recommended Phase II dose of 600 mg orally twice daily. ARIEL2 Part 1 established a tumor genomic profiling test for homologous recombination loss of heterozygosity quantification using a next-generation sequencing companion diagnostic (CDx). Rucaparib received US FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation for treatment of platinum-sensitive BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer patients who received greater than two lines of platinum-based therapy. Comparable to rucaparib development, other PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, niraparib, veliparib and talazoparib, are developing CDx tests for targeted therapy. PARP inhibitor clinical trials and CDx assays are discussed in this review, as are potential PARP inhibitor combination therapies and likely resistance mechanisms. PMID:27087632

  18. Fertility and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-05-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life.

  19. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  20. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... way to evaluate the use of PDT for cancers of the brain, skin, prostate , cervix , and peritoneal cavity (the space in the abdomen that contains the intestines , stomach, and liver ). Other ... more specifically target cancer cells ( 1 , 3 , 5 ), and are activated by ...

  1. Preclinical evaluation of injectable sirolimus formulated with polymeric nanoparticle for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo HN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ha Na Woo1*, Hye Kyung Chung2*, Eun Jin Ju1, Joohee Jung1,3, Hye-Won Kang4, Sa-Won Lee4, Min-Hyo Seo4, Jin Seong Lee5, Jung Shin Lee1,6, Heon Joo Park7, Si Yeol Song1,8, Seong-Yun Jeong1, Eun Kyung Choi1,2,81Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, 2Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, 3College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women's University, Seoul, 4Department of Parenteral Delivery Program, Samyang Pharmaceuticals R&D, Daejeon, 5Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, 7Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Inha University, Inchon, 8Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea*These authors contributed equally to this studyAbstract: Nanoparticles are useful delivery vehicles for promising drug candidates that face obstacles for clinical applicability. Sirolimus, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin has gained attention for targeted anticancer therapy, but its clinical application has been limited by its poor solubility. This study was designed to enhance the feasibility of sirolimus for human cancer treatment. Polymeric nanoparticle (PNP–sirolimus was developed as an injectable formulation and has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that PNP–sirolimus has prolonged circulation in the blood. In addition, PNP–sirolimus preserved the in vitro killing effect of free sirolimus against cancer cells, and intravenous administration displayed its potent in vivo anticancer efficacy in xenograft tumor mice. In addition, PNP–sirolimus enhanced the radiotherapeutic efficacy of sirolimus both in vitro and in vivo. Clinical application of PNP–sirolimus is a promising strategy for human cancer treatment.Keywords: sirolimus, polymeric nanoparticle

  2. Breast cancer therapies weighed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even as the National Institutes of Health came under fire last week for giving short shrift to women in the institute's basic and clinical research programs, the report of a recent NIH consensus conference points up the need for more research on how to treat early breast cancer. Although the experts were able to agree on the best surgical treatment for women with early breast cancer, they couldn't resolve the more controversial issue of whether the patients should subsequently receive systemic treatment - chemotherapy or hormone therapy - to prevent recurrence of their disease. The panel reaffirmed that the removal of the lump and nearby lymph nodes, followed by irradiation, is just as effective as a mastectomy. But then came the contentious question: should women with early breast cancer, especially those without detectable lymph node metastases, receive drug therapy to prevent recurrence of the disease? Currently, 70% of such cancers are successfully treated with surgery and radiation alone. For this reason, about 2 years ago, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical alert saying that addition treatment with drugs or hormones is a credible therapeutic option worthy of careful attention for all early stage patients. This pronouncement engendered a storm of criticism. A consensus panel concluded that in cases where tumors are 1 centimeter or less in diameter and no lymph nodes are affected, the likelihood of recurrence is so small that the benefits of adjuvant therapy would be insignificant. But for the patients with larger tumors, the panel concluded that the decision is an individual one that depends on personal preferences and a variety of prognostic factors that can help to indicate whether a woman is at high risk of having a recurrence and should therefore have adjuvant therapy

  3. Cancer Therapy with Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Ad-4 Collaboration

    2005-10-01

    Starting in 2003 the AD-4/ACE collaboration has studied the biological effects of antiprotons annihilating in a human tissue like material on live V-79 Chinese Hamster cells. The main goal of the work is to prove the efficacy of antiprotons for cancer therapy. In this report we discuss a critical point to be considered carefully for all particle beam radiation therapies, namely the loss of primary particles from the beam on the way to a tumor seated some distance below the surface.

  4. Biotoxins in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kelle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for biological antitumor agents has been pursued for over half a century. Among the biological agents which have antitumoral activity, snake and scorpion venoms have been shown to possess a wide spectrum of biological activities. Venom components exhibit an antitumoral activity by means of direct cytolytic and cytostatic effects or indirect mechanisms such as amplifying of immune response against cancerous cells. These peptides constitute a potent antitumoral activity throughout their thrapeutic usages while they cause any significant side effects. Therefore it has been emphasized that natural venom peptides or their synthetic analogues will be valuable agents in replacement of classical antineoplastic drugs in cancer therapy in the future.

  5. Gene therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy for thyroid cancer include immunotherapy, suicide gene therapy, tumor suppressor replacement, 131I therapy by sodium/iodide symporter and antisense therapy and so on. Gene therapy has wide perspectives, but there are many problems need to be solved for clinical application

  6. Ototoxicity and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landier, Wendy

    2016-06-01

    Ototoxicity is a well-established toxicity associated with a subgroup of antineoplastic therapies that includes platinum chemotherapy, radiation or surgery involving the ear and auditory nerve, and supportive care agents such as aminoglycoside antibiotics and loop diuretics. The reported prevalence of ototoxicity in patients who have received potentially ototoxic therapy ranges from 4% to 90% depending on factors such as age of the patient population, agent(s) used, cumulative dose, and administration techniques. The impact of ototoxicity on subsequent health-related and psychosocial outcomes in these patients can be substantial, and the burden of morbidity related to ototoxic agents is particularly high in very young children. Considerable interindividual variability in the prevalence and severity of ototoxicity has been observed among patients receiving similar treatment, suggesting genetic susceptibility as a risk factor. The development and testing of otoprotective agents is ongoing; however, to the author's knowledge, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved otoprotectants are currently available. Prospective monitoring for ototoxicity allows for comparison of auditory outcomes across clinical trials, as well as for early detection, potential alterations in therapy, and auditory intervention and rehabilitation to ameliorate the adverse consequences of hearing loss. Cancer 2016;122:1647-58. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26859792

  7. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within the...

  8. Evaluation of long-term cosmetic results and complications following breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujishiro, Satsuki; Mitsumori, Michihide; Kokubo, Masaki; Nagata, Yasushi; Sasai, Keisuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Kodama, Hiroshi

    1999-12-01

    Long-term cosmetic outcomes and complications were evaluated in 109 patients with breast cancer who had been treated by breast conservation therapy. Patients received radiation therapy at Kyoto University Hospital following quadrantectomy and level II or III axillary node dissection. Factors that might influence long-term cosmetic results were also analyzed. Irradiation to the breast was administered in 2 Gy fractions, 5 times a week for a total of 50 Gy in all patients. Cobalt-60 {gamma}-rays were used in 108 patients with the exception of 1 patient who received 6 Mev X-ray. Some patients with positive or close margins received boost irradiation of 10 Gy using electron beams to the primary tumor bed. Cosmetic outcome was assessed by both a scoring method and breast retraction assessment (BRA). Forty-seven percent of patients were assessed as excellent to good before radiation therapy. The percent of excellent to good decreased shortly after termination of radiation therapy, but gradually improved and stabilized by 3 years. Seventy percent of patients showed a score of excellent to good 5 years after treatment. The average BRA of the 109 patients was 3.0 cm. This did not change between 3 and 5 years after treatment. A significant correlation between cosmetic score and BRA was shown at all follow-up times. Factors such as age over 50 years (p=0.008), tumor location in the outer quadrant (p=0.02) and boost irradiation (p=0.03) significantly affected the cosmetic score. Arm edema and restriction of shoulder movement were observed in 22% and 49% at the start of radiation therapy, these improved within approximately 3 years and 1 year after treatment, respectively. Mild skin change was observed in 60% of patients even 5 years after treatment. The results indicate that cosmetic outcome after breast conservation therapy is clinically acceptable, and the complication rate is low. (author)

  9. Evaluation of long-term cosmetic results and complications following breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term cosmetic outcomes and complications were evaluated in 109 patients with breast cancer who had been treated by breast conservation therapy. Patients received radiation therapy at Kyoto University Hospital following quadrantectomy and level II or III axillary node dissection. Factors that might influence long-term cosmetic results were also analyzed. Irradiation to the breast was administered in 2 Gy fractions, 5 times a week for a total of 50 Gy in all patients. Cobalt-60 γ-rays were used in 108 patients with the exception of 1 patient who received 6 Mev X-ray. Some patients with positive or close margins received boost irradiation of 10 Gy using electron beams to the primary tumor bed. Cosmetic outcome was assessed by both a scoring method and breast retraction assessment (BRA). Forty-seven percent of patients were assessed as excellent to good before radiation therapy. The percent of excellent to good decreased shortly after termination of radiation therapy, but gradually improved and stabilized by 3 years. Seventy percent of patients showed a score of excellent to good 5 years after treatment. The average BRA of the 109 patients was 3.0 cm. This did not change between 3 and 5 years after treatment. A significant correlation between cosmetic score and BRA was shown at all follow-up times. Factors such as age over 50 years (p=0.008), tumor location in the outer quadrant (p=0.02) and boost irradiation (p=0.03) significantly affected the cosmetic score. Arm edema and restriction of shoulder movement were observed in 22% and 49% at the start of radiation therapy, these improved within approximately 3 years and 1 year after treatment, respectively. Mild skin change was observed in 60% of patients even 5 years after treatment. The results indicate that cosmetic outcome after breast conservation therapy is clinically acceptable, and the complication rate is low. (author)

  10. Is PET/CT efficient tool to evaluate the response after stereotactic radiation therapy for pancreas cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pancreas cancer, to evaluate the efficacy of PET/CT as tool to check the response after stereotactic radiation therapy and to define functional imaging role of PET/CT as alterative tool of computed tomography. From November 2003 to December 2004, among locally advanced pancreas cancer patients treated by stereotactic radiation therapy using CyberKnife(CK), 14 were evaluated by PET/CT before and after treatment. Four patients took PET/CT one month after CK, 4 patients 2 months after CK, and 6 patients 3 months after CK as the first evaluation of treatment. All of patients were also evaluated by CT or CA19-9 tumor antigen with the range of 1-2 months after CK. In addition of PET/CT to CT, lymph node metastasis were revealed as positive in 4 patients who had negative finding on CT. Furthermore, patients who showed partial or complete response on PET/CT findings that checked within 3 months after CK have significantly longer median survival time than patients who showed no response or disease progression(13 months and 9 months, respectively). Responses based on CA19-9 tumor antigen or CT, however, showed no significant difference in terms of median survival time. PET/CT can provide more information for lymph node metastasis compared to CT alone. It is very helpful for delineation of tumor extent for CK planning. And initial response on PET/CT scan could be a significant prognostic factor rather than response on CA19-9 level or CT. In the future, more study is necessary to evaluate if PET/CT could substitute CT and finally CT could be omitted during follow-up period after CK

  11. SU-E-T-170: Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Proton Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Zhao, L; Ramirez, E; Singh, H; Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) errors in proton therapy planning of lung cancer. Methods: A lung cancer case treated at our center was used in this retrospective study. The original plan was generated using two proton fields (posterior-anterior and left-lateral) with XiO treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using uniform scanning proton therapy system. First, the computed tomography (CT) set of original lung treatment plan was re-sampled for rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) angles ranged from −5° to +5°, with an increment of 2.5°. Second, 12 new proton plans were generated in XiO using the 12 re-sampled CT datasets. The same beam conditions, isocenter, and devices were used in new treatment plans as in the original plan. All 12 new proton plans were compared with original plan for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and maximum dose to spinal cord (cord Dmax). Results: PTV coverage was reduced in all 12 new proton plans when compared to that of original plan. Specifically, PTV coverage was reduced by 0.03% to 1.22% for roll, by 0.05% to 1.14% for yaw, and by 0.10% to 3.22% for pitch errors. In comparison to original plan, the cord Dmax in new proton plans was reduced by 8.21% to 25.81% for +2.5° to +5° pitch, by 5.28% to 20.71% for +2.5° to +5° yaw, and by 5.28% to 14.47% for −2.5° to −5° roll. In contrast, cord Dmax was increased by 3.80% to 3.86% for −2.5° to −5° pitch, by 0.63% to 3.25% for −2.5° to −5° yaw, and by 3.75% to 4.54% for +2.5° to +5° roll. Conclusion: PTV coverage was reduced by up to 3.22% for rotational error of 5°. The cord Dmax could increase or decrease depending on the direction of rotational error, beam angles, and the location of lung tumor.

  12. SU-E-T-170: Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Proton Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) errors in proton therapy planning of lung cancer. Methods: A lung cancer case treated at our center was used in this retrospective study. The original plan was generated using two proton fields (posterior-anterior and left-lateral) with XiO treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using uniform scanning proton therapy system. First, the computed tomography (CT) set of original lung treatment plan was re-sampled for rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) angles ranged from −5° to +5°, with an increment of 2.5°. Second, 12 new proton plans were generated in XiO using the 12 re-sampled CT datasets. The same beam conditions, isocenter, and devices were used in new treatment plans as in the original plan. All 12 new proton plans were compared with original plan for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and maximum dose to spinal cord (cord Dmax). Results: PTV coverage was reduced in all 12 new proton plans when compared to that of original plan. Specifically, PTV coverage was reduced by 0.03% to 1.22% for roll, by 0.05% to 1.14% for yaw, and by 0.10% to 3.22% for pitch errors. In comparison to original plan, the cord Dmax in new proton plans was reduced by 8.21% to 25.81% for +2.5° to +5° pitch, by 5.28% to 20.71% for +2.5° to +5° yaw, and by 5.28% to 14.47% for −2.5° to −5° roll. In contrast, cord Dmax was increased by 3.80% to 3.86% for −2.5° to −5° pitch, by 0.63% to 3.25% for −2.5° to −5° yaw, and by 3.75% to 4.54% for +2.5° to +5° roll. Conclusion: PTV coverage was reduced by up to 3.22% for rotational error of 5°. The cord Dmax could increase or decrease depending on the direction of rotational error, beam angles, and the location of lung tumor

  13. Evaluation of photoneutron dose for prostate cancer radiation therapy by using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Ah [Dept. of Oncology, Catholic University of Korea Incheon St.Mary,s HospitaL, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Back, Geum Mun; Kim, Yeon Soo; Son, Soon Yong; Choi, Kwan Woo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Beong Gyu [Dept. of Radiological Science, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Hong [Dept. of Oncology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study is to provide basic information regarding photoneutron doses in terms of radiation treatment techniques and the number of portals in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by measuring the photoneutron doses. Subjects of experiment were 10 patients who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and have received radiation treatment for 5 months from September 2013 to January 2014 in the department of radiation oncology in S hospital located in Seoul. Thus, radiation treatment plans were created for 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Volumetric-Modulated Arc Radiotherapy (VMAT), IMRT 5, 7, and 9 portals. The average difference of photoneutron dose was compared through descriptive statistics and variance analysis, and analyzed influence factors through correlation analysis and regression analysis. In summarized results, 3D-CRT showed the lowest average photoneutron dose, while IMRT caused the highest dose with statistically significance (p <.01). The photoneutron dose by number of portals of IMRT was 4.37 ± 1.08 mSv in average and statistically showed very significant difference among the number of portals (p <.01). Number of portals and photoneutron dose are shown that the correlation coefficient is 0.570, highly statistically significant positive correlation (p <.01). As a result of the linear regression analysis of number of portals and photoneutron dose, it showed that photoneutron dose significantly increased by 0.373 times in average as the number of portals increased by 1 stage. In conclusion, this study can be expected to be used as a quantitative basic data to select an appropriate IMRT plans regarding photoneutron dose in radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

  14. Evaluation of photoneutron dose for prostate cancer radiation therapy by using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is to provide basic information regarding photoneutron doses in terms of radiation treatment techniques and the number of portals in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by measuring the photoneutron doses. Subjects of experiment were 10 patients who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and have received radiation treatment for 5 months from September 2013 to January 2014 in the department of radiation oncology in S hospital located in Seoul. Thus, radiation treatment plans were created for 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Volumetric-Modulated Arc Radiotherapy (VMAT), IMRT 5, 7, and 9 portals. The average difference of photoneutron dose was compared through descriptive statistics and variance analysis, and analyzed influence factors through correlation analysis and regression analysis. In summarized results, 3D-CRT showed the lowest average photoneutron dose, while IMRT caused the highest dose with statistically significance (p <.01). The photoneutron dose by number of portals of IMRT was 4.37 ± 1.08 mSv in average and statistically showed very significant difference among the number of portals (p <.01). Number of portals and photoneutron dose are shown that the correlation coefficient is 0.570, highly statistically significant positive correlation (p <.01). As a result of the linear regression analysis of number of portals and photoneutron dose, it showed that photoneutron dose significantly increased by 0.373 times in average as the number of portals increased by 1 stage. In conclusion, this study can be expected to be used as a quantitative basic data to select an appropriate IMRT plans regarding photoneutron dose in radiation treatment for prostate cancer

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nissen, Nicholas [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hendifar, Andrew [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wachsman, Ashley [Department of Cross-Sectional Imaging Interventional Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  16. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a 6 month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Haseen Farhana; Murray Liam J; O'Neill Roisin F; O'Sullivan Joe M; Cantwell Marie M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Treatment with Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer is associated with changes in body composition including increased fat and decreased lean mass; increased fatigue, and a reduction in quality of life. No study to date has evaluated the effect of dietary and physical activity modification on the side-effects related to ADT. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a 6-month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer surviv...

  17. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenčáková, A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purpose of explaining effective anti-tumor immune response. Another method is suicide gene therapy, based on introducing viral or bacterial agents to tumor cells, allowing the conversion of a non-toxic compound to a lethal medication. The application of intact suppressor genes to cancer cells will avert their neoplastic behavior and will induce tumor regression. Inhibition of angiogenesis is also a promising strategy for treating oncologic patients. Mesenchymal stem cells can also be used as vectors in targeted gene therapy. An increasing list of experimental evidence shows, that therapeutically modified mesenchymal stem cells in “gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy” can attack cancer tissue can kill tumor cells, cancer stem cells included. Bacteria are used as anti-cancer agents independently of in combination with conventional therapeutic methods.

  18. Evaluation of prognostic and predictive factors in breast cancer in Cuba. Its role in personalized therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of prognostic and predictive factors in breast cancer has allowed applying personalized therapeutic programs without achieving, still, the individualization for all patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of estrogen receptors, progesterone and HER2 along with the expression of the EGFR1 and ganglioside NglicolilGM3. 1509 patients found the frequency of expression of the aforementioned receivers, which were correlated with the morphological and General variables. It was compared the AcM recognition ior egf/r3 with a game of diagnosis - shopping, and the AcM 14F7 vitro tissue fresh and included in paraffin and in vivo labelled with 99mTc. It was obtained the frequency in Cuba of these prognostic and prediction markers of response, noting her hormone dependence of tumor associated with less aggressive features. The AcM 14F7 showed a broad recognition that was not correlated with prognostic factors, but was able to detect live in primary breast tumors. The ior egf/r3 exhibited 100% specificity and positive predictive value, as well as a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 68 and 73% respectively. The recognition of the AcM 14F7 and ior egf/r3 opens a new possibility of therapeutic directed against these targets for breast cancer (author)

  19. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Prostate Cancer Treatment Prostate cancer overview? What are my treatment options? What ... any new developments in treating my disease? Prostate cancer overview Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  20. Re-evaluate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in cancer - a preclinical therapeutic small animal model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Pande

    Full Text Available Tumor hypoxia is a known driver of angiogenesis that also facilitates tumor growth. Moreover, poorly oxygenated central tumor area remains relatively radio or chemo resistant. HBO therapy is known to elevate the levels of dissolved oxygen and eliminates tumor hypoxia. It has been one of the modalities in cancer treatment; therefore its optimization is important. In this experimental study, no cancer enhancing effect was seen during the course of HBO therapy; however, post therapy there was an accelerated growth and progression of tumor. HBO treated mice lived shorter and the response to therapy was dose & tumor volume dependent. HBO therapy probably exert its effect on the cancer proliferating cells through multiple pathways such as increased DNA damage, apoptosis & geno-toxicity leading to slow cancer progression while post therapy tumorigenic effect could be due to impaired DNA repair mechanism, mutagenic effect & aneuploidy as well as altered blood supply & nutrients. Tumor growth reached plateau with time and this finding validated theoretical model predicting tumor reaching an asymptotic limit. While, marked asymmetry observed in tumor volume progression or cancer cell proliferation rate in each of the experimental C3H mouse suggested a need for an alternate small animal pre-clinical cancer therapeutic model.

  1. Expression of lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor in human pancreatic cancer and its clinical evaluation of diagnosis and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-kai; TAO Chen-jie; WANG Wei-dong; L(U)Guang-mei; GONG Yong-ling

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid(LPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid with diverse effects in various cells, ranging from immediate morphological alteration to long lasting cellular function changes, such as induction of stimulation of cell proliferation, survival, drug resistance and motility. Like many other biomediators, LPA interacts with cells through specific cell surface receptors(G protein-coupled receptors). LPA1/Edg-2,LPA2/Edg-4 and LPA3/Edg-7, named as Edg/LP subfamily, are the three most common lysophosphatidic acid receptors. LPA plays a critical role as a general growth, survival and pro-angiogenic factor in the regulation of pathophysiological processes in vivo and in vitro. Recent literatures suggest that abnormalities in LPA metabolism and function in pancreatic cancer patients may contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease. Thus, LPA might be a potential target for clinical pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein we review the expression of LPA and its receptors in the carcinogenesis of human malignancies, with focus on human pancreatic cancer, and also clinical diagnosis and treatment has been evaluated.

  2. Biofield therapies and cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel G; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-02-01

    The public and healthcare professionals have become increasingly aware and accepting of the benefit in physical, psychological, social, and spiritual support for patients with cancer. Patients with cancer often seek nonpharmacologic interventions to complement conventional care and decrease the pain associated with cancer and its treatment. Most often referred to as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), these supportive therapies consist of a heterogeneous group of modalities used as adjuncts to allopathic health care. Biofield therapies are CAM modalities that involve the direction of healing energy through the hands to facilitate well-being by modifying the energy field of the body. This critical review of studies of biofield therapies emphasizes research using these modalities to decrease pain in patients with cancer. Although the therapies have demonstrated clinical efficacy, additional research is warranted. Oncology nurses should familiarize themselves with biofield therapies so they can offer informed recommendations to patients with cancer experiencing pain. PMID:22297006

  3. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in ... the affected area). Damage to the bowels, causing diarrhea and ... a second cancer caused by radiation exposure. Second cancers that develop ...

  4. Diagnostic imaging to detect and evaluate response to therapy in bone metastases from prostate cancer: current modalities and new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Laura; Bertoldo, Francesco; Boccardo, Francesco; Conti, Giario; Menchi, Ilario; Mungai, Francesco; Ricardi, Umberto; Bombardieri, Emilio

    2016-07-01

    Different therapeutic options for the management of prostate cancer (PC) have been developed, and some are successful in providing crucial improvement in both survival and quality of life, especially in patients with metastatic castration-resistant PC. In this scenario, diverse combinations of radiopharmaceuticals (for targeting bone, cancer cells and receptors) and nuclear medicine modalities (e.g. bone scan, SPECT, SPECT/CT, PET and PET/CT) are now available for imaging bone metastases. Some radiopharmaceuticals are approved, currently available and used in the routine clinical setting, while others are not registered and are still under evaluation, and should therefore be considered experimental. On the other hand, radiologists have other tools, in addition to CT, that can better visualize bone localization and medullary involvement, such as multimodal MRI. In this review, the authors provide an overview of current management of advanced PC and discuss the choice of diagnostic modality for the detection of metastatic skeletal lesions in different phases of the disease. In addition to detection of bone metastases, the evaluation of response to therapy is another critical issue, since it remains one of the most important open questions that a multidisciplinary team faces when optimizing the management of PC. The authors emphasize the role of nuclear modalities that can presently be used in clinical practice, and also look at future perspectives based on relevant clinical data with novel radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26956538

  5. Multimodality Therapy: Bone-Targeted Radioisotope Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Podoloff, Donald A.; Logothetis, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest that bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals can be used to treat prostate cancer bone metastasis and improve the clinical outcome of patients with advanced prostate cancer. It remains to be elucidated whether radiopharmaceuticals enhance the disruption of the onco-niche or the eradication of micrometastatic cells in the bone marrow. The purpose of this review is to investigate the role of bone-targeted radioisotope therapy in the setting of multimodality therapy for advanced prostate cancer. We examine available data and evaluate whether dose escalation, newer generations, or repeated dosing of radiopharmaceuticals enhance their antitumor effects and whether their combination with hormone ablative therapy, chemotherapy, or novel targeted therapy can improve clinical efficacy. PMID:20551894

  6. Strategies for combinational cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The countless pre-clinical studies and many clinical trials that have applied tumor antigen-based therapies for the cancer treatment, and although the necessary tumor-specific immune response may be elicited in tumor-bearing hosts, this was not sufficient for the positive therapeutic outcome since there are multiple mechanisms that tumors develop to escape immune surveillance. The tumor-mediated inhibitory mechanisms involve co-inhibitory receptor-ligand interactions, such as PD-1/ PD-L1, secretion of inhibitory molecules, such as TGFb, and recruitment of suppressive cells, such as regulatory T cells (Treg), myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC), etc. Therefore, we hypothesized that successful cancer immunotherapy requires not only induction and enhancement of effector immune response but also simultaneous targeting of suppressor arm of immune system, thus in addition to enhancing antigen-specific immunity using vaccines or radiation therapy, one should also target tumor-mediated immune suppression to improve the overall efficacy of therapy. We developed multiple strategies to target various tumor-mediated immune inhibitory mechanisms that can enhance anti-tumor immunity and restructure tumor microenvironment to allow effector cells generated due to vaccination or radiation therapy to function potently. We evaluated the immune and therapeutic efficacy of multiple combinational therapies, including blocking and agonist antibodies to co-inhibitory/co-stimulatory molecules, such as PD-1, PD-L1, OX40, CTLA-4, GITR, inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies to inhibitory cytokines/molecules, such as IL-10, TGFb, IDO, and small molecules for selective inhibition of Tregs. In addition to evaluation of anti-tumor efficacy we are also investigated cellular and molecular mechanisms of action for these agents when combined with vaccine or radiation therapy and exploring the interactions between compounds within combinational therapies in animal tumor models. We are

  7. Occupational therapy evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise...

  8. The evaluation of the radiation therapy of brain metastasis from lung cancer by means of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the effect of radiation therapy (RT) on 132 patients with brain metastasis from lung cancer between April 1978 and May 1987; evaluation was done by means of computed tomography (CT) scans. The CT findings of brain metastasis had some relationship to the histological types of lung cancer. Besides, the response to RT on CT images correlated with the histological diagnosis and the CT findings, both solid-contrast enhancement (S type) and ring-contrast enhancement (R type), of metastatic lesions. The results were as follows. A shrinkage of the brain metastases following RT was observed in 98.3% for small-cell carcinoma, in 75.0% for adenocarcinoma, and in 72.7% for squamous-cell carcinoma. The S type showed a better response to RT than did the R type, irrespective of their histological type, during RT. During RT, a decrease in tumor size was observed in the S type, while a decrease in the thickness of the ring wall, without any remarkable change in tumor size, was observed in the R type. In cases with small-cell carcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma, smaller metastatic lesions had greater effects than larger ones. After the completion of RT, a delayed effect was found on the follow-up CT in the cases with adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma in the S type and squamous-cell carcinoma in the R type showed the best delayed effect. (author)

  9. Esophagus Cancer: Palliative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in our document Guide to Controlling Cancer Pain . Nutritional support Nutrition is another concern for many patients with esophagus cancer. The cancer or its treatment might affect how you swallow ... supplements and information about your individual nutritional needs. ...

  10. An evaluation of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy versus intensity modulated radiation therapy in radical chemoradiation of esophageal cancer: A dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT can be used to reduce doses to normal thoracic structures than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT in treating esophageal cancer and to compare normal tissue complication probability (NTCP for lung between two treatment plans. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out from 2009 to 2011, in which 15 inoperable patients of esophageal cancer who were suitable for radical chemoradiation were enrolled. All patients were treated with 3DCRT. In first phase, patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT dose of 36Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks, along with concurrent weekly chemotherapy with cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil (5 FU. In second phase, boost dose of 18Gy in 10 fractions in 2 weeks was given. An IMRT plan was generated for each patient. Plan sum of both the 3D CRT and IMRT plans were compared. Doses to critical structures and NTCP for lung were compared between 3DCRT and IMRT plans. Results: The mean lung dose and volumes of lung receiving 20 Gy, 10 Gy, and 5 Gy (V20, V10, and V5 were significantly lower with 3DCRT plans as compared to IMRT plans. The mean dose to heart and spinal cord was higher in 3DCRT arm. There was no difference in dose distribution to the liver between the 3D CRT and IMRT techniques. The NTCP for lung was lower with 3D CRT than IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT technique needs further dosimetric study as well as further clinical trials before implication of this technique replacing 3D CRT technique with escalated dose for the treatment of esophageal cancer in our setup. IMRT using seven fields provided no improvement over 3DCRT.

  11. Ablation and Other Local Therapy for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for kidney cancer Targeted therapies for kidney cancer Biologic therapy (immunotherapy) for kidney cancer Chemotherapy for kidney cancer Pain control for kidney cancer Treatment choices by stage for ...

  12. Evaluation of the potential application of 2-acetylpyridine N4- phenyl thiosemicarbazones derivatives for cancer therapy and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the wide range of antineoplastic agents available, resistance of some types of cancer and toxicity to normal cells have been identified as the main causes of treatment failure and death. The lack of early and precise diagnosis is also responsible for reducing survival of cancer patients. In this context, the development of substances with low toxicity and therapeutic potential and/or diagnosis purpose, is the major tool in an attempt to increase the survival of patients and assure the safety and efficacy of treatment. Thiosemicarbazones (TSC) are a class of synthetic compounds that have several biological activities, including antitumor. Although several studies have shown the great potential of TSC as therapeutic and / or diagnostic agents, different chemical modifications performed on this class of molecules indicate new possibilities for applications and still require further studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential applicability of 2-acetylpyridine N-4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones derivatives for cancer therapy and diagnosis. The results showed that all 13 TSC tested were cytotoxic to breast and glioblastoma tumor cell lines, presenting higher in vitro antitumor activity than etoposide, an antineoplastic and inhibitor of topoisomerase II frequently used for cancer therapy. The TSC that have halogen or nitro on ortho position showed higher antitumor activity in vitro than their isomers with halogen or nitro on meta or para position of the phenyl group. H2Ac4oFPh and H2Ac4oClPh compounds showed the highest antitumor activity among all tested compounds, with IC50 in nanomolar order. These TSC induced cell death by apoptosis and oxidative stress was responsible, at least in part, for this type of cell death. The 5 mg.kg-1 H2Ac4oFPh dose, administered s.c., for 4 consecutive days, did not induce important toxicity; however, the same treatment protocol was not effective for tumor growth reduction in an animal model of brain tumor

  13. Chemosensory alterations and cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taste and olfaction provide sensory information and sensory pleasure. Cancer therapies affect both. Chemotherapy has not been shown to produce dramatic losses of taste or smell, but systematic studies on various chemotherapeutic agents and types of cancer are lacking. Radiation therapy does produce clear losses of both taste and smell. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy alter the pleasure produced by taste and smell through the formation of conditioned aversions. That is, foods consumed in proximity with the nausea of therapy come to be unpleasant. The impact of conditioned aversions can be diminished by providing a scapegoat food just before therapy. Alterations in foods may be beneficial to the cancer patient. Increasing the concentrations of flavor ingredients can compensate for sensory losses, and providing pureed foods that retain the cognitive integrity of a meal can benefit the patient who has chewing or swallowing problems

  14. Adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The management of colon and rectal cancer has changed dramatically over the last 25 years. The use of adjuvant therapies has become standard practice in locally advanced (stage Ⅲ and selected stage Ⅱ) colorectal cancer. Improved surgical techniques, chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy are resulting in higher cure rates and the development of agents targeting proliferative and angiogenic pathways offer further promise. Here we explore risk factors for local and distant recurrence after resection of colon and rectal cancer, and the role of adjuvant treatments. Discussion will focus on the evidence base for adjuvant therapies utilised in colorectal cancer, and the treatment of sub-groups such as the elderly and stage Ⅱ disease. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer in reduction of recurrence will be explored and the role and optimal methods for surveillance post-curative resection with or without adjuvant therapy will also be addressed.

  15. Gene therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chang-tai; Guo Xue-gang; Pan Bo-rong

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction We have reviewed the gene therapy in gastrointestinal diseases[1]. Gastric cancer is common in China[2~20] ,and its early diagnosis andtreatment are still difficult up to now[13~36]. The expression of anexogenous gene introduced by gene therapy into patients with gliomascan be monitored non- invasively by positron- emission tomography[4]. In recent years, gene study in cancer is a hotspot, and great progress hasbeen achieved[33~41].

  16. Recurrent non-small cell lung cancer: evaluation of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation as salvage therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a potential application as a salvage tool after failure of surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although several studies have evaluated the use of RFA in primary NSCLC, there is little literature on its potential application as a salvage tool. Purpose To evaluate CT-guided RFA employed as a salvage therapy for pulmonary recurrences of NSCLC after prior treatment with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or surgery. Material and Methods A retrospective computer database search yielded 33 patients with biopsy proven primary NSCLC who underwent CT-guided RFA of 39 recurrent tumors following surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy. Follow-up imaging was performed with CT and PET-CT. The endpoints of interest were progression-free survival (PFS) and time to local progression (TTLP). PFS and TTLP were compared by lesion size (<3 cm, ≥3 cm). Results The median PFS was 8 months. For patients with a tumor size <3 cm median PFS was 11 months, whereas the median PFS of patients with a tumor size ≥3 cm was 5 months. The difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.09). The median TTLP of all tumors was 14 months. TTLP of ablated tumors <3 cm in size was 24 months, compared to 8 months for ablated tumors ≥3 cm in size. The difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.07). Conclusion RFA of recurrent NSCLC may be a valuable salvage tool to achieve local tumor control, especially in tumors measuring <3 cm in size

  17. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

  18. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Wirth; Seppo Ylä-Herttuala

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy...

  19. Neurotoxicity Associated With Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Lee, Eva; Westcarth, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications can result from direct or indirect effects of cancer therapy. Treatment toxicity may affect both the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. Early recognition of these toxicities plays an important role in the management of patients with cancer.

  20. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose.

  1. Antiangiogenic gene therapy of cancer: recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Libutti Steven K; Blazer Dan G; Tandle Anita

    2004-01-01

    Abstract With the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and progression firmly established, considerable effort has been directed to antiangiogenic therapy as a new modality to treat human cancers. Antiangiogenic agents have recently received much widespread attention but strategies for their optimal use are still being developed. Gene therapy represents an attractive alternative to recombinant protein administration for several reasons. This review evaluates the potential advantages of gene t...

  2. An ultrasonographic evaluation of skin thickness in breast cancer patients after postmastectomy radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Baggarley Shaun; Lee Khai; Back Michael; Kaur Amarjit; Wong Sharon; Lu Jiade

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine the usefulness of ultrasonography in the assessment of post radiotherapy skin changes in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Methods Patients treated for postmastectomy radiotherapy in National University Hospital (NUH) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), Singapore between January 2004- December 2005 was recruited retrospectively. Ultrasound scan was performed on these Asian patients who had been treated to a total dose of 46-50 Gy with 1 cm bolus placed on ...

  3. Cancer Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have many choices to make about your cancer treatment. One choice you might be thinking about ... are acupuncture, chiropractic, and herbal medicines. People with cancer may use CAM to Help cope with the ...

  4. Using economic analysis to evaluate the potential of multimodality therapy for elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Development of new and expensive drugs with activity against pancreatic cancer has made economic considerations more relevant to treatment decision-making for advanced disease. Economic modeling can be used to explore the potential of such novel therapies and to inform clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of radiation plus fluorouracil (RT-FU) relative to no treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to determine the economic potential of radiation plus gemcitabine (RT-GEM), a novel regimen for this disease. We used the SEER-Medicare database to estimate effectiveness and costs supplemented by data from the literature where necessary. Results: Relative to no treatment, RT-FU was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $68,724/QALY in the base case analysis. Compared with RT-FU, the ICER for RT-GEM was below $100,000/QALY when the risk of dying with the new regimen was 1,000 subjects would be necessary to demonstrate this level of efficacy in a randomized trial. The ICER of RT-GEM was most sensitive to utility values, and, at lower efficacy levels, to costs of gemcitabine and treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: In elderly patients with LAPC, RT-FU is a cost-effective alternative to no treatment. The novel regimen of RT-GEM is likely to be cost-effective at any clinically meaningful benefit, but quality-of-life issues, drug acquisition, and toxicity-related costs may be relevant, especially at lower efficacy levels

  5. Evaluation of Ki-67 Staining Levels as an Independent Biomarker of Biochemical Recurrence After Salvage Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We recently published a scoring algorithm to predict biochemical recurrence (BCR) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) for prostate cancer. Currently, this algorithm is based on clinicopathologic features and does not incorporate information from tumor-based biomarkers. Herein, we evaluate the ability of Ki-67 staining in primary prostate cancer to independently aid in the prediction of BCR among men undergoing SRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 147 patients who were treated with SRT between July 1987 and July 2003 at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN; Jacksonville, FL; Scottsdale, AZ). Staining levels of Ki-67 in primary tumor samples were detected by use of a monoclonal antibody and quantified by use of a computer-assisted method. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association of Ki-67 staining and BCR in single-variable models and after multivariable adjustment. Results: The risk of BCR for men with tumors in the highest tertile of Ki-67 staining is approximately two times that for men with tumors in the lower two tertiles (relative risk, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.32; p = 0.005) after adjustment for the features in our original scoring algorithm. Further adjustment for additional covariates did not attenuate this association. Evidence from concordance index values supports that Ki-67 staining adds to the predictive ability of our existing scoring algorithm. Conclusions: Our data suggest that higher levels of Ki-67 staining are associated with increased risk of BCR after SRT, independent of existing clinicopathologic covariates. Future studies involving larger numbers of patients are required to validate these results and also explore possible means of combining this biomarker with existing prognostic tools.

  6. Formulation and preliminary evaluation of delivery vehicles for the boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Olusanya, Temidayo; Stich, Theresia; Higgins, Samantha Caroline; Lloyd, Rhiannon Eleanor Iris; Smith, James Richard; Fatouros, Dimitrios; Calabrese, Gianpiero; Pilkington, Geoffrey John; Tsibouklis, John

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a method for selectively destroying malignant (normally glioma) cells whilst sparing normal tissue1. Irradiation of 10B (large neutron capture cross-section) with thermal neutrons effects the nuclear fission reaction: 10B + 1n → → 7Li+ + α + γ; where the penetration of α-particles and 7Li+ is only 8 and 5 µm, respectively, i.e., within a single cell thickness, assuming 10B can be preferentially located within glioma cells2. Poor selectivity is the main ...

  7. Formulation and preliminary evaluation of delivery vehicles for the boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Olusanya, Temidayo Olajumoke Bolanle

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a method for selectively destroying malignant (normally glioma) cells whilst sparing normal tissue. Irradiation of 10B (large neutron capture cross-section) with thermal neutrons effects the nuclear fission reaction: 10B + 1n → → 7Li+ + α + γ; where the penetration of -particles and 7Li+ is only 8 and 5 μm, respectively, i.e., within a single cell thickness, assuming 10B can be preferentially located within glioma cells. Poor selectivity is the main r...

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of thymidine kinase 1-targeting carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs for boron neutron capture therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Hitesh K; Khalil, Ahmed; Ishita, Keisuke; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J; Wu, Lai-Chu; Ali, Tehane; Tiwari, Rohit; Byun, Youngjoo; Barth, Rolf F; Tjarks, Werner

    2015-07-15

    A library of sixteen 2nd generation amino- and amido-substituted carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs, designed as substrates and inhibitors of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) for potential use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer, was synthesized and evaluated in enzyme kinetic-, enzyme inhibition-, metabolomic-, and biodistribution studies. One of these 2nd generation carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs (YB18A [3]), having an amino group directly attached to a meta-carborane cage tethered via ethylene spacer to the 3-position of thymidine, was approximately 3-4 times superior as a substrate and inhibitor of hTK1 than N5-2OH (2), a 1st generation carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analog. Both 2 and 3 appeared to be 5'-monophosphorylated in TK1(+) RG2 cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Biodistribution studies in rats bearing intracerebral RG2 glioma resulted in selective tumor uptake of 3 with an intratumoral concentration that was approximately 4 times higher than that of 2. The obtained results significantly advance the understanding of the binding interactions between TK1 and carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs and will profoundly impact future design strategies for these agents. PMID:26087030

  9. Menopausal hormone therapy use and breast cancer risk in Australia: Findings from the New South Wales Cancer, Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagame, Usha; Banks, Emily; Sitas, Freddy; Canfell, Karen

    2016-04-15

    Randomised controlled trials and large-scale observational studies have found that current use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer; this risk is higher for oestrogen-progestagen combination therapy than for oestrogen-only therapy. Our study was designed to estimate MHT-associated breast cancer risk in a population of Australian women. Data were analysed for postmenopausal women with self-reported incident invasive breast cancer (n = 1,236) and cancer-free controls (n = 862), recruited between 2006 and 2014 into a large case-control study for all cancer types, the NSW CLEAR study. Information on past and current MHT use was collected from all participants, along with other lifestyle and demographic factors, using a self-administered questionnaire. Unmatched multivariable logistic regression was performed, adjusting for socio-demographic, reproductive and health behaviour variables, body mass index and breast screening history. Compared to never users of MHT, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for breast cancer in current users of any type of MHT was 2.09 (95% CI: 1.57-2.78; p studies, that current, but not past, use of MHT is associated with a substantially increased risk of breast cancer. PMID:26599391

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of a moving tumor target in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kang, Min Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2013-07-01

    Immobilization plays an important role in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The application of IMRT in lung cancer patients is very difficult due to the movement of the tumor target. Patient setup in radiation treatment demands high accuracy because IMRT employs a treatment size of a 1mm pixel unit. Hence, quality assurance of the dose delivered to patients must be at its highest. The radiation dose was evaluated for breathing rates of 9, 14, and 18 breaths per minute (bpm) for tumor targets moving up and down by 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm. The dose of the moving planned target volume (PTV) was measured by using a thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD) and Gafchromic™ EBT film. The measurement points were 1.0 cm away from the top, the bottom and the left and the right sides of the PTV center. The evaluated dose differences ranged from 94.2 to 103.8%, from 94.4 to 105.4%, and from 90.7 to 108.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. The mean values of the doses were 101.4, 99.9, and 99.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. Meanwhile, the evaluated dose differences ranged from 93.6 to 105.8%, from 95.9 to 111.5%, and from 96.2 to 111.7% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. The mean values of the doses were 102.3, 103.4, and 103.1% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. Therefore, we suggest that IMRT can be used in the treatment of lung cancer patients with vertical target movements within the range of 1.0 to 1.5 cm.

  11. Development and Evaluation of Nanoemulsions Containing Phthalocyanines for Use in Photodynamic Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senna, Juliana P; Ricci-Júnior, Eduardo; Mansur, Claudia R E

    2015-06-01

    This work reports the development of oil in water (o/w) nanoemulsions containing poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymer surfactant for the formulation of a delivery system for endovenous zinc and chloroaluminum phthalocyanines. A solubility study suggested clove oil and its combination with ethanol as the best candidates for the oil phase composition. The nanoemulsions were obtained using a high-pressure homogenizer and analyzed for droplet size to determine their short- and long-term stability. Formulations containing 7 and 10% oil phase and 12% surfactant presented higher stability and allowed the incorporation of a bigger amount of phthalocyanines in the formulation. Rheological analyses showed the prevailing Newtonian behavior of the nanoemulsions. Studies of toxicity and phototoxicity determined that the nanoemulsions produced were capable of inhibiting the growth of adenocarcinoma tumor cells. The nanoemulsions proved to be a good alternative for use in photodynamic therapy. PMID:26369031

  12. A prospective evaluation of Dignity Therapy in advanced cancer patients admitted to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Lise Jul; Chochinov, Harvey M; Kristjanson, Linda J;

    2014-01-01

    questionnaires were completed when patients received the generativity document (T1) and 2 weeks later (T2). Changes from baseline (T0) were measured in sense of dignity, Structured Interview for Symptoms and Concerns items, Patient Dignity Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and European...... purpose, dignity and will to live. Quality of life decreased (mean = -9 (95% confidence interval: -14.54; -2.49)) and depression increased (mean = 0.31 (0.06; 0.57)) on one of several depression measures. At T2 (n = 31), sense of dignity (mean = -0.52 (-1.01; -0.02)) and sense of being a burden to others...... (mean = -0.26 (-0.49; -0.02)) improved. Patients with children and lower performance status, emotional functioning and quality of life were more likely to report benefit.Conclusions:This study adds to the growing body of evidence supporting Dignity Therapy as a valuable intervention in palliative care...

  13. Clinical importance and significance of early evaluation of therapy response in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In solid tumors, especially in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the TNM staging is the only well defined pretherapeutic risk factor. TNM-staging has a significant impact on prognosis and survival and is used to determine therapeutic stratification. Although numerous molecular and immunologic pretherapeutic risk factors have been described in NSCLC, none of them has been translated into therapeutic stratification. Therefore, the identification of posttherapeutic risk factors in NSCLC is essential. Locally advanced NSCLC are currently treated with preoperative (neoadjuvant) induction regimens. It has been shown that systemic tumor control and long-term disease free survival is correlated with histologic tumor regression. First results are presented in this paper that PET may be highly predictive for histologic tumor regression and long term outcome in NSCLC stage III. These results may establish PET as the first noninvasive posttherapeutic risk factor in locally advanced NSCLC. (orig.)

  14. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    KamranAliAhmed; BrianJamesDavis; TorrenceMWilson; GregoryAWiseman; MarkJFederspiel; JohnCMorris

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our...

  15. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  16. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: evaluation of complications and influence of radiation timing on outcomes in a large, population-based cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hegarty

    Full Text Available To evaluate the influence of timing of salvage and adjuvant radiation therapy on outcomes after prostatectomy for prostate cancer.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1995-2007 who had one or more adverse pathological features after prostatectomy. The final cohort of 6,137 eligible patients included men who received prostatectomy alone (n = 4,509 or with adjuvant (n = 894 or salvage (n = 734 radiation therapy. Primary outcomes were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and erectile dysfunction events and survival after treatment(s.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events, but not erectile dysfunction. In adjusted models, earlier treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy was not associated with increased rates of genitourinary or erectile dysfunction events compared to delayed salvage radiation therapy. Early adjuvant radiation therapy was associated with lower rates of gastrointestinal events that salvage radiation therapy, with hazard ratios of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.95 for procedure-defined and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.59, 0.83 for diagnosis-defined events. There was no significant difference between ART and non-ART groups (SRT or RP alone for overall survival (HR = 1.13 95% CI = (0.96, 1.34 p = 0.148.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events. However, earlier radiation therapy is not associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal, genitourinary or sexual events. These findings oppose the conventional belief that delaying radiation therapy reduces the risk of radiation-related complications.

  17. Art therapy in cancer fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Rodrigues D'Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is the therapeutic use of artistic activity in the context of the professional relationship with people affected by disease, injury or by seeking personal development. This study aims to report the experience of art therapy activities with a group of patients and their caregivers in a university hospital. This is an experience report, in Fortaleza - CE, during September 2010 to February 2011. In the meetings, participated 49 people, who performed activities, using the methods of art therapy, like painting, cutting, drawing, collage, creative visualization and color therapy. In the assessments, after the groups, the participants demonstrated the effects of art therapy, which described that the intervention allowed speak from the process of facing life to cancer fight. It is concluded that the techniques of art therapy provided self-knowledge, self-esteem and redemption sense of well-being with relaxation, and promote happiness and reduce stress.

  18. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer: Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Moritz Pross; Wellner, Ulrich F.; Kim C Honselmann; Carlo Jung; Steffen Deichmann; Tobias Keck; Dirk Bausch

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature review for neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. We divided the results into resectable disease and local advanced pancreatic cancer. Results Neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer is safe. But currently no standard guidelines exist in neoadjuvant approaches on pancreatic cancer. For local advanced pancreatic cancer the available data tends to show a positive effect on survival rates for neoadjuvant approaches.

  19. The Role of Mammographic Calcification in the Neoadjuvant Therapy of Breast Cancer Imaging Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-jie Li; Canming Chen; Yajia Gu; Genhong Di; Jiong Wu; Guangyu Liu; ZhiMin Shao

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Investigate the patterns of mammographically detected calcifications before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) to determine their value for efficacy evaluation and surgical decision making. METHODS: 187 patients with malignant mammographic calcifications were followed to record the appearances and changes in the calcifications and to analyze their responses to NACT. RESULTS: Patients with calcifications had higher rates of hormonal receptor (HR) positive tumors (74.3% ver...

  20. An ultrasonographic evaluation of skin thickness in breast cancer patients after postmastectomy radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the usefulness of ultrasonography in the assessment of post radiotherapy skin changes in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Patients treated for postmastectomy radiotherapy in National University Hospital (NUH) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), Singapore between January 2004- December 2005 was recruited retrospectively. Ultrasound scan was performed on these Asian patients who had been treated to a total dose of 46-50 Gy with 1 cm bolus placed on the skin. The ultrasound scans were performed blinded to the RTOG scores, and the skin thickness of the individually marked points on the irradiated chest wall was compared to the corresponding points on the non-irradiated breast. The mean total skin thickness inclusive of the epidermis and the dermis of the right irradiated chest wall was 0.1712 mm (± 0.03392 mm) compared with the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast which was 0.1845 mm (± 0.04089 mm; p = 0.007). The left irradiated chest wall had a mean skin thickness of 0.1764 mm (± 0.03184 mm) compared with the right non-irradiated breast which was 0.1835 mm (± 0.02584 mm; p = 0.025). These independent t-tests produced a significant difference of reduced skin thickness on the right irradiated chest wall, p = 0.007 (p < 0.05) and left irradiated chest wall p = 0.025 (p < 0.025) in comparison to the non-irradiated skin thickness investigating chronic skin reactions. Patients with grade 2 acute skin toxicity presented with thinner skin as compared to patients with grade 1 (p = 0.006). This study has shown that there is a statistically significant difference between the skin thicknesses of the irradiated chest wall and the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast and a predisposition to chronic reactions was found in patients with acute RTOG scoring of grade1 and grade 2

  1. Complications of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this chapter is to review systematically the toxicity of contemporary chemotherapy and irradiation on normal tissues of growing children. Whenever possible, the separate toxicity of chemotherapy, irradiation, and combination therapy is addressed. However, it is not always possible to quantitate specifically such reactions in the face of multiple drug therapy, which may enhance radiation injury or reactivate prior radiation injury. Prior detailed reviews have provided important sources of information concerning radiation injury for this more general discussion. The information provided will assist both the clinician and the radiologist in the recognition of early and late complications of therapy in pediatric oncology

  2. Neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachit; D; Shah; Anthony; D; Cassano; James; P; Neifeld

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is increasing in incidence more than any other visceral malignancy in North America. Adenocarcinoma has become the most common cell type. Surgery remains the primary treatment modality for locoregional disease. Overall survival with surgery alone has been dismal, with metastatic disease the primary mode of treatment failure after an R0 surgical resection. Cure rates with chemotherapy or radiation therapy alone have been disappointing as well. For these reasons, over the last decade multi-modality treatment has gained increasing acceptance as the standard of care. This review examines the present data and role of neoadjuvant treatment using chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by surgery for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  3. Epigenetic Therapy for Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Yan Zhong; Feng-Feng Cai; Corina Kohler; Wei-Jie Chen; Bei Zhang; Ming-Hong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations can control the progression of cancer. Genetic alterations are impossible to reverse, while epigenetic alterations are reversible. This advantage suggests that epigenetic modifications should be preferred in therapy applications. DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases have become the primary targets for studies in epigenetic therapy. Some DNA methylation inhibitors and histone deacetylation inhibitors are approved by the US Food and Drug Admini...

  4. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC...

  5. Targeted therapies for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be untrue. Possible side effects from targeted therapies include: Diarrhea Liver problems Skin problems such as rash, dry skin, and nail changes Problems with blood clotting and wound healing High blood pressure As with any treatment, you ...

  6. Adjuvant Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chakra P Chaulagain; Muhammad Wasif Saif; Goodman, Martin D.; John Ng

    2011-01-01

    There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. This year at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposiu...

  7. The role of mammographic calcification in the neoadjuvant therapy of breast cancer imaging evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-jie Li

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Investigate the patterns of mammographically detected calcifications before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT to determine their value for efficacy evaluation and surgical decision making. METHODS: 187 patients with malignant mammographic calcifications were followed to record the appearances and changes in the calcifications and to analyze their responses to NACT. RESULTS: Patients with calcifications had higher rates of hormonal receptor (HR positive tumors (74.3% versus 64.6% and HER2 positive tumors (51.3% versus 33.4%, p = 0.004 and a similar pathologic complete response (pCR rate compared to patients without calcifications (35.4% versus 29.8%. After NACT, the range of calcification decreased in 40% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 52.5%; the calcification density decreased in 15% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 77.5%; none of these change patterns were related to tumor response rate. No significant correlation was observed between the calcification appearance (morphology, distribution, range, diameter or density and tumor subtypes or pCR rates. Among patients with malignant calcifications, 54 showed calcifications alone, 40 occurred with an architectural distortion (AD and 93 with a mass. Calcifications were observed inside the tumor in 44% of patients and outside in 56%, with similar pCR rates and patterns of change. CONCLUSIONS: Calcification appearance did not clearly change after NACT, and calcification patterns were not related to pCR rate, suggesting that mammogram may not accurate to evaluate tumor response changes. Microcalcifications visible after NACT is essential for determining the extent of excision, patients with calcifications that occurred outside of the mass still had the opportunity for breast conservation.

  8. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal and postmenopau......CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal and...... postmenopausal women receiving different hormone therapies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationwide prospective cohort study including all Danish women aged 50 through 79 years from 1995 through 2005 through individual linkage to Danish national registers. Redeemed prescription data from the National Register of...... bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 909,946 women without hormone-sensitive cancer or bilateral oophorectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Ovarian cancer. RESULTS: In an average of 8.0 years of follow-up (7.3 million women-years), 3068 incident ovarian...

  9. FDG-PET in monitoring therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been used successfully for the staging and re-staging of breast cancer. Another significant indication is the evaluation of therapy response. Only limited data are available on the use of FDG-PET in breast cancer after radiation therapy. The same holds true for chemotherapy. Only the therapy response in locally advanced breast cancer after chemotherapy has been investigated thoroughly. Histopathological response could be predicted with an accuracy of 88-91% after the first and second courses of therapy. A quantitative evaluation is, of course, a prerequisite when FDG-PET is used for therapy monitoring. Only a small number of studies have focussed on hormone therapy. In this context, a flare phenomenon with increasing standardised uptake values after initiation of tamoxifen therapy has been observed. More prospective multicentre trials will be needed to make FDG-PET a powerful tool in monitoring chemotherapy in breast cancer. (orig.)

  10. FDG-PET in monitoring therapy of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Bender, H.; Palmedo, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been used successfully for the staging and re-staging of breast cancer. Another significant indication is the evaluation of therapy response. Only limited data are available on the use of FDG-PET in breast cancer after radiation therapy. The same holds true for chemotherapy. Only the therapy response in locally advanced breast cancer after chemotherapy has been investigated thoroughly. Histopathological response could be predicted with an accuracy of 88-91% after the first and second courses of therapy. A quantitative evaluation is, of course, a prerequisite when FDG-PET is used for therapy monitoring. Only a small number of studies have focussed on hormone therapy. In this context, a flare phenomenon with increasing standardised uptake values after initiation of tamoxifen therapy has been observed. More prospective multicentre trials will be needed to make FDG-PET a powerful tool in monitoring chemotherapy in breast cancer. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Treatment Setup of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of rotational setup errors in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of liver tumors and to investigate whether translational shifts can compensate for rotation. Methods and Materials: The positioning accuracy in 20 patients with liver malignancies treated with SBRT was reevaluated offline by matching the patients' cone-beam computed tomography (CT) scans (n=75) to the planning CT scans and adjusting the 3 rotational angles (pitch, roll, and yaw). Systematic and random setup errors were calculated. The dosimetric changes caused by rotational setup errors were quantified for both simulated and observed patient rotations. Dose distributions recalculated on the rotated CT scans were compared with the original planned doses. Translational corrections were simulated based on manual translational registration of the rotated images to the original CT scans. The correction efficacy was evaluated by comparing the recalculated plans with the original plans. Results: The systematic rotational setup errors were −0.06° ± 0.68°, −0.29° ± 0.62°, and −0.24° ± 0.61°; the random setup errors were 0.80°, 1.05°, and 0.61° for pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Analysis of CBCT images showed that 56.0%, 14.7%, and 1.3% of treated fractions had rotational errors of >1°, >2°, and >3°, respectively, in any one of the rotational axes. Rotational simulations demonstrated that the reduction of gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage was <2% when rotation was <3°. Recalculated plans using actual patient roll motions showed similar reduction (<2%) in GTV coverage. Translational corrections improved the GTV coverage to within 3% of the original values. For organs at risk (OAR), the dosimetric impact varied case by case. Conclusion: Actual rotational setup errors in SBRT for liver tumors are relatively small in magnitude and are unlikely to affect GTV coverage significantly. Translational corrections can be optimized to

  12. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  13. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, Mark; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Sara A; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2010-05-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor's vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  14. An evaluation of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy versus intensity modulated radiation therapy in radical chemoradiation of esophageal cancer: A dosimetric study

    OpenAIRE

    Soumik Ghosh; Rakesh Kapoor; Rajesh Gupta; Divya Khosla; Rakesh Kochhar; Oinam, Arun S.; Reena Sharma; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be used to reduce doses to normal thoracic structures than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in treating esophageal cancer and to compare normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung between two treatment plans. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out from 2009 to 2011, in which 15 inoperable patients of esophageal cancer who were suitable for radical chemoradiatio...

  15. Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is an informational bulletin about the problems associated with access to diagnosis and therapy of cancers in developing countries and the role of the Program of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) of the International Atomic Energy Agency

  16. Hadron accelerators in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadrontherapy Project (the largest project of this type in Europe) is then described, with reference to both the National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy and the design of two types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large number of hospitals. Finally, the radiation protection requirements are discussed. (author)

  17. Galectins in cancer: carcinogenesis, diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Ali Hasan; Alalawi, Zainab; Mirandola, Leonardo; Rakhshanda, Rahman; Dahlbeck, Scott; Nguyen, Diane; Jenkins, Marjorie; Grizzi, Fabio; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    A major breakthrough in the field of medical oncology has been the discovery of galectins and their role in cancer development, progression and metastasis. In this review article we have condensed the results of a number of studies published over the past decade in an effort to shed some light on the unique role played by the galectin family of proteins in neoplasia, and how this knowledge may alter the approach to cancer diagnosis as well as therapy in the future. In this review we have also emphasized the potential use of galectin inhibitors or modulators in the treatment of cancer and how this novel treatment modality may affect patient outcomes in the future. Based on current pre-clinical models we believe the use of galectin inhibitors/modulators will play a significant role in cancer treatment in the future. Early clinical studies are underway to evaluate the utility of these promising agents in cancer patients. PMID:25405163

  18. VEGF Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash S. Sukhramani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in systemic therapies, radiation oncology, and surgical techniques, many patients with cancer are still incurable. A novel therapeutic approach has been to target the vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs which are often mutated and/or over-expressed in many tumors. The ligands and receptors of VEGF family are well established as key regulators of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis processes. VEGF is a homodimeric, basic, 45 kDa glycoprotein specific for vascular endothelial cells. Specifically, VEGF participates in regulation of the female reproductive cycle, wound healing, inflammation, vascular permeability, vascular tone, hematopoiesis and also contributes to pathological angiogenesis disorders such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetic retinopathy and the neovascular form of macular degeneration. Thus, the role of VEGF has been extensively studied in the pathogenesis and angiogenesis of human cancers. Clinical trials have anti-VEGF therapies are effective in reducing tumor size, metastasis and blood vessel formation. Clinically, this may result in increased progression free survival, overall patient survival rate and will expand the potential for combinatorial therapies. The aim of present review is on the cellular responses of VEGF inhibitors and their implications for cancer therapy.

  19. Gene Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abaan, Ogan D.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy, being a novel treatment for many diseases, is readily applicable for the treatment of cancer patients. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. There are many clinical protocols for the treatment of breast cancer, and gene therapy is now being considered within current protocols. This review will focus on the basic concepts of cancer gene therapy strategies (suicide gene, tumor suppressor gene, anti-angiogenesis, immunotherapy, oncolytic viruses and ribozyme/antisens...

  20. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Zhan-Kui Liu

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is common in China, and its early diagnosis and treatment are difficult. In recent years great progress has been achieved in gene therapy, and a wide array of gene therapy systems for gastric cancer has been investigated. The present article deals with the general principles of gene therapy and then focuses on how these principles may be applied to gastric cancer.

  1. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons co...

  2. Targeted therapy: tailoring cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yan; Quentin Qiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies include small-molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies,have made treatment more tumor-specific and less toxic,and have opened new possibilities for tailoring cancer treatment.Nevertheless,there remain several challenges to targeted therapies,including molecular identification,drug resistance,and exploring reliable biomarkers.Here,we present several selected signaling pathways and molecular targets involved in human cancers including Aurora kinases,PI3K/mTOR signaling,FOXO-FOXM1 axis,and MDM2/MDM4-p53 interaction.Understanding the molecular mechanisms for tumorigenesis and development of drug resistance will provide new insights into drug discovery and design of therapeutic strategies for targeted therapies.

  3. Adjuvant Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakra P Chaulagain

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. This year at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium, the randomized phase III study presented by Uesaka et al. from Japan (Abstract #145 represents a newer paradigm of oral adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy in place of the traditional standard of care intravenous gemcitabine in terms of prolonging patients’ survival. Another study by Fan et al. (Abstract #269 examined the value of targeted therapy using erlotinib with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy. We present the summary of these two studies and discuss the potential impact on our clinical practice on this highly lethal cancer.

  4. Target Therapy in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarotti, Stefano; Lococo, Filippo; Froesh, Patrizia; Zappa, Francesco; Andrè, Dutly

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is an extremely heterogeneous disease, with well over 50 different histological variants recognized under the fourth revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) typing system. Because these variants have differing genetic and biological properties correct classification of lung cancer is necessary to assure that lung cancer patients receive optimum management. Due to the recent understanding that histologic typing and EGFR mutation status are important for target the therapy in lung adenocarcinoma patients there was a great need for a new classification that addresses diagnostic issues and strategic management to allow for molecular testing in small biopsy and cytology specimens. For this reason and in order to address advances in lung cancer treatment an international multidisciplinary classification was proposed by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS), further increasing the histological heterogeneity and improving the existing WHO-classification. Is now the beginning of personalized therapy era that is ideally finalized to treat each individual case of lung cancer in different way. PMID:26667341

  5. Biotoxins in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    İlker Kelle

    2007-01-01

    The search for biological antitumor agents has been pursued for over half a century. Among the biological agents which have antitumoral activity, snake and scorpion venoms have been shown to possess a wide spectrum of biological activities. Venom components exhibit an antitumoral activity by means of direct cytolytic and cytostatic effects or indirect mechanisms such as amplifying of immune response against cancerous cells. These peptides constitute a potent antitumoral activity throughout th...

  6. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gunturu, Krishna S; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.; Saif, M. Wasif

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer.

  7. Evaluation of sequential FDG-PET/CT for monitoring bone metastasis of breast cancer during therapy. Correlation between morphological and metabolic changes with tumor markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the significance of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) findings for evaluating the bone metastasis of breast cancer during therapy. Forty-seven patients with bone metastases from breast cancer who underwent sequential 18F-flourodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT studies during therapy were enrolled. A total of 771 lesions were identified. The changes in the PET and CT findings were compared with the tumor marker levels in each patient by calculating the weighted kappa value. The correlation between the PET and CT findings was examined for each lesion by an adjusted Chi-square test. The change in the tumor marker levels was substantially correlated with the PET findings and moderately correlated with the CT findings (weighted kappa=0.780 and 0.585 for quadratic weighting, respectively). An increase in FDG uptake was correlated with lytic changes on the CT images (62/65, 95.4%, p<0.05). Sclerotic changes suggested improvement, but sclerosis and progression occurred at the same time in some lesions. Changes of FDG uptake are useful for evaluating individual bone metastases in cases of breast cancer during therapy. Lytic change on CT images suggests progression of bone metastasis. The lysis-progression/sclerosis-improvement pattern was observed in the majority of subjects, but a sclerosis-progression pattern was also observed. The hybrid pattern of increase of FDG uptake on PET/lytic change on CT is most accurate to show progression of bone metastases. Assessments of these processes during therapy are necessary for the precise evaluation of bone metastases. (author)

  8. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and...... optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria...

  9. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard;

    2010-01-01

    optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria......ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and...

  10. [Radionuclide therapy for cancer--what's new?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mäenpää; Mikko, Tenhunen

    2012-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is radiation therapy, the effect of which is based on radiation damage in cancer cells. The most common radionuclide therapy for cancer is radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer. Two new forms of treatment have recently been initiated in Finland: 177lutetium octreotate therapy for neuroendocrine tumors, pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma as well as radioembolization (selective internal radiation therapy, SIRT) with 90yttrium-coated resin beads against liver metastases. Still in experimental use, 223radium chloride is a drug prolonging survival in prostate cancer that has metastasized to bone. The treatments require special knowledge and collaboration between several units. PMID:23210283

  11. Music therapy in supportive cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy i...

  12. Gensko zdravljenje raka: Cancer gene therapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Serša, Gregor; Čemažar, Maja; KOČEVAR, NINA

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy uses genes to treat diseases. Large amount of research is based on cancer because current methods for cancer treatment have limited efficiencyand unwanted side effects. In the following article we first presentthe basic principles of gene therapy. Next, we describe the main delivery systems, which are viral and non-viral, and then the main therapeuticstrategies of cancer gene therapy. These can be divided into immunological, where we take advantage of the immune system for cancer...

  13. Biotoxins for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cui-Cui; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, a number of studies have provided evidence that biotoxins present great potential as antitumor agents, such as snake venom, bee venom, some bacteria toxins and plant toxins, and thus could be used as chemotherapeutic agents against tumors. The biodiversity of venoms and toxins make them a unique source from which novel anticancer agent may be developed. Biotoxins, also known as natural toxins, include toxic substances produced by plants, animals and microorganisms. Here, we systematically list representative biological toxins that have antitumor properties, involving animal toxins, plant toxins, mycotoxins as well as bacterial toxins. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge involving biotoxins and the active compounds that have anti-cancer activity to induce cytotoxic, antitumor, immunomodulatory, and apoptotic effects in different tumor cells in vivo or in vitro. We also show insights into the molecular and functional evolution of biotoxins. PMID:24998537

  14. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  15. Interleukin-2 Therapy of Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 50, 3-4 (2004), s. 120-130. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/04/0492; GA AV ČR IAA5052203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : interleukin 2 * cancer therapy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.507, year: 2004

  16. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldufsky J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Joe Goldufsky,1 Shanthi Sivendran,3 Sara Harcharik,4 Michael Pan,4 Sebastian Bernardo,4 Richard H Stern,5 Philip Friedlander,4 Carl E Ruby,1,2 Yvonne Saenger,4 Howard L Kaufman1,2 Departments of 1Immunology & Microbiology and 2Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL, USA 3Hematology/Oncology Medical Specialists, Lancaster General Health, Lancaster, PA, USA, and Departments of 4Medical Oncology and 5Radiology, Tisch Cancer Institute, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. Keywords: cancer, gene therapy, oncolytic therapy, virus, treatment

  17. [Maintenance therapy for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shigeo; Kato, Shunsuke

    2014-08-01

    Some trials have demonstrated the benefits of maintenance chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer. In chemotherapeutic strategies for advanced colorectal cancer, chemotherapy-related toxicity prevention and quality of life(QOL)maintenance are more important than the introduction of a strong regimen, especially when additional surgery is not possible. In Japan, the combination of a folinic acid/5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin(FOLFOX)regimen and bevacizumab is a popular first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, despite its effectiveness, neuropathy or hand-foot syndrome after 5 or 6 cycles tends to lead to chemotherapy withdrawal. CAIRO3 trial reported the effectiveness of capecitabine and bevacizumab as a maintenance chemotherapy regimen. Additionally, the ML18147 trial demonstrated that bevacizumab beyond progression(BBP)prolonged overall survival(OS)and progression free survival(PFS)in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Although those trials demonstrated the effectiveness of continuous or maintenance bevacizumab administration, no trials have compared the effectiveness of cytotoxic drugs with bevacizumab as maintenance therapies. Moreover, controversy exists regarding the selection of drugs as a maintenance therapy and the identification of patients who would benefit from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132024

  18. Evaluation of docetaxel, CDDP and 5-FU combined therapy as second-line chemotherapy for esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined therapy of docetaxel (70 mg/m2, day 1) cisplatin (CDDP) (80 mg/m2, day 1) and 5- fluorouracil (FU) (800 mg/m2, day 1-5) is used as second-line chemotherapy for esophagus cancer. First-line chemotherapy for 32 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus is not effective, and early recurrences after chemotherapy were examined. Pretreatment surgery was used in 20 cases, radiation therapy in 19 and chemotherapy by 3.1 courses (1-9) on average. PR was found in 16 patients (response rate 50%) in the first course, MR in 2, NC in 6, and PD in 7 cases. Among 16 patients, one was of HCM patients. (auaspiration pneumonia and two by leukopenia. Thirteen patients received 3-5 courses. The operation was continuously enforced in three patients among 13, radiation therapy was added in three, and they survived for one year or more. Five for whom imaging became virtually impossible lived for six months or more. Additional treatment proved ineffective in 2, so it was discontinued. There were 18 lymph node examples of lesions effectively treated, 6 main lesions, 1 pulmonary metastasis and 1 bone metastasis. As for deleterious events, leukopenia was admitted in 95%. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was needed by 68% during use and 3 days on average. The CDDP+5-FU+docetaxel therapy was comparatively safe in patients with much pre-treatment and demonstrated a maximum effect at more than the expected rate. (author)

  19. Cold Atmospheric Plasma as an alternative therapy for cancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Hawley, Teresa; Stepp, Mary Ann; Keidar, Michael

    2012-10-01

    CAP (cold atmospheric plasma) is a technology, which is based on quasi-neutral ionized gas (plasma at low temperatures), which is being evaluated as an alternative or addition to existing cancer therapies. A recent study shows that CAP treatment can cause a significant reduction in tumor size in vivo. Thus the purpose of this study is to begin to identify the mechanism by which cancer cells are killed by CAP, i.e. to identify the mechanism of CAP action. CAP induced a robust ˜2-fold G2/M increase in two different types of cancer cells with different degrees of tumorigenicity. We hypothesize that the increased sensitivity of cancer cells to CAP treatment is caused by differences in the distribution of cancer cells and normal cells within the cell cycle. The expression of γH2A.X (pSer139), an oxidative stress reporter indicating S-phase damage, is enhanced specifically within CAP treated cells in the S phase of the cell cycle together with significant decrease in EdU-signal of DNA-replicating cells. Our data suggest that more tumorigenic cancer cells are better susceptible to CAP treatment.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of treatment related changes on multi-parametric MRI after laser interstitial thermal therapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Satish; Toth, Robert; Rusu, Mirabela; Sperling, Dan; Lepor, Herbert; Futterer, Jurgen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) has recently shown great promise as a treatment strategy for localized, focal, low-grade, organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Additionally, LITT is compatible with multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) which in turn enables (1) high resolution, accurate localization of ablation zones on in vivo MP-MRI prior to LITT, and (2) real-time monitoring of temperature changes in vivo via MR thermometry during LITT. In spite of rapidly increasing interest in the use of LITT for treating low grade, focal CaP, very little is known about treatment-related changes following LITT. There is thus a clear need for studying post-LITT changes via MP-MRI and consequently to attempt to (1) quantitatively identify MP-MRI markers predictive of favorable treatment response and longer term patient outcome, and (2) identify which MP-MRI markers are most sensitive to post-LITT changes in the prostate. In this work, we present the first attempt at examining focal treatment-related changes on a per-voxel basis (high resolution) via quantitative evaluation of MR parameters pre- and post-LITT. A retrospective cohort of MP-MRI data comprising both pre- and post- LITT T2-weighted (T2w) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) acquisitions was considered, where DWI MRI yielded an Apparent Diffusion Co-efficient (ADC) map. A spatially constrained affine registration scheme was implemented to first bring T2w and ADC images into alignment within each of the pre- and post-LITT acquisitions, following which the pre- and post-LITT acquisitions were aligned. Pre- and post-LITT MR parameters (T2w intensity, ADC value) were then standardized to a uniform scale (to correct for intensity drift) and then quantified via the raw intensity values as well as via texture features derived from T2w MRI. In order to quantify imaging changes as a result of LITT, absolute differences were calculated between the normalized pre- and post-LITT MRI parameters. Quantitatively

  1. Evaluation of Lentiviral-Mediated Expression of Sodium Iodide Symporter in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer and the Efficacy of In Vivo Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Ke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is one of the most deadly cancers. With intensive multimodalities of treatment, the survival remains low. ATC is not sensitive to 131I therapy due to loss of sodium iodide symporter (NIS gene expression. We have previously generated a stable human NIS-expressing ATC cell line, ARO, and the ability of iodide accumulation was restored. To make NIS-mediated gene therapy more applicable, this study aimed to establish a lentiviral system for transferring hNIS gene to cells and to evaluate the efficacy of in vitro and in vivo radioiodide accumulation for imaging and therapy. Lentivirus containing hNIS cDNA were produced to transduce ARO cells which do not concentrate iodide. Gene expression, cell function, radioiodide imaging and treatment were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that the transduced cells were restored to express hNIS and accumulated higher amount of radioiodide than parental cells. Therapeutic dose of 131I effectively inhibited the tumor growth derived from transduced cells as compared to saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that the lentiviral system efficiently transferred and expressed hNIS gene in ATC cells. The transduced cells showed a promising result of tumor imaging and therapy.

  2. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a 6 month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haseen Farhana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT for prostate cancer is associated with changes in body composition including increased fat and decreased lean mass; increased fatigue, and a reduction in quality of life. No study to date has evaluated the effect of dietary and physical activity modification on the side-effects related to ADT. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a 6-month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer survivors receiving ADT to minimise the changes in body composition, fatigue and quality of life, typically associated with ADT. Methods Men are recruited to this study if their treatment plan is to receive ADT for at least 6 months. Men who are randomised to the intervention arm receive a home-based tailored intervention to meet the following guidelines a ≥ 5 servings vegetables and fruits/day; b 30%-35% of total energy from fat, and Discussion The results of this study will provide detailed information on diet and physical activity levels in prostate cancer patients treated with ADT and will test the feasibility and efficacy of a diet and physical activity intervention which could provide essential information to develop guidelines for prostate cancer patients to minimise the side effects related to ADT. Trial registration ISRCTN trial number ISCRTN75282423

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of planning target volume margin reduction for prostate cancer via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the dosimetric benefits of the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system for the prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The cases of eleven patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer without a prostatectomy at our institution between October 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient, clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins were uniformly used: 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm. For each margin size, the IMRT plans were independently optimized by one medical physicist using Pinnalce3 (ver. 8.0.d, Philips Medical System, Madison, WI) in order to maintain the plan quality. The maximum geometrical margin (MGM) for every CT image set, defined as the smallest margin encompassing the rectum at least at one slice, was between 13 mm and 26 mm. The percentage rectum overlapping PTV (%V ROV ), the rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the mean rectal dose (%RD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. However the bladder NTCP remained around zero to some extent regardless of the increase of PTV margin while the percentage bladder overlapping PTV (%V BOV ) and the mean bladder dose (%BD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. Without relatively large rectum or small bladder, the increase observed for rectal NTCP, %RDmean and %BD mean per 1-mm PTV margin size were 1.84%, 2.44% and 2.90%, respectively. Unlike the behavior of the rectum or the bladder, the maximum dose on each femoral head had little effect on PTV margin. This quantitative study of the PTV margin reduction supported that IG-IMRT has enhanced the clinical effects over prostate cancer with the reduction of normal organ complications under the similar level of PTV control.

  4. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wirth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy, anti-angiogenic gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, gene therapy-based immune modulation, correction/compensation of gene defects, genetic manipulation of apoptotic and tumor invasion pathways, antisense, and RNAi strategies. Cancer types, which have been targeted with gene therapy, include brain, lung, breast, pancreatic, liver, colorectal, prostate, bladder, head and neck, skin, ovarian, and renal cancer. Currently, two cancer gene therapy products have received market approval, both of which are in China. In addition, the stimulation of the host’s immune system, using gene therapeutic approaches, has gained vast interest. The intention of this review is to point out the most commonly viral and non-viral vectors and methods used in cancer gene therapy, as well as highlight some key results achieved in clinical trials.

  5. Co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin liposomes: Development, characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Josimar O; Petrilli, Raquel; Topan, José Fernando; Antonio, Heriton Marcelo Ribeiro; Barcellos, Juliana Palma Abriata; Chesca, Deise L; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Tiezzi, Daniel G; Lee, Robert J; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2016-05-01

    Paclitaxel and rapamycin have been reported to act synergistically to treat breast cancer. Albeit paclitaxel is available for breast cancer treatment, the most commonly used formulation in the clinic presents side effects, limiting its use. Furthermore, both drugs present pharmacokinetics drawbacks limiting their in vivo efficacy and clinic combination. As an alternative, drug delivery systems, particularly liposomes, emerge as an option for drug combination, able to simultaneously deliver co-loaded drugs with improved therapeutic index. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and characterize a co-loaded paclitaxel and rapamycin liposome and evaluate it for breast cancer efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that a SPC/Chol/DSPE-PEG (2000) liposome was able to co-encapsulate paclitaxel and rapamycin with suitable encapsulation efficiency values, nanometric particle size, low polydispersity and neutral zeta potential. Taken together, FTIR and thermal analysis evidenced drug conversion to the more bioavailable molecular and amorphous forms, respectively, for paclitaxel and rapamycin. The pegylated liposome exhibited excellent colloidal stability and was able to retain drugs encapsulated, which were released in a slow and sustained fashion. Liposomes were more cytotoxic to 4T1 breast cancer cell line than the free drugs and drugs acted synergistically, particularly when co-loaded. Finally, in vivo therapeutic evaluation carried out in 4T1-tumor-bearing mice confirmed the in vitro results. The co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin pegylated liposome better controlled tumor growth compared to the solution. Therefore, we expect that the formulation developed herein might be a contribution for future studies focusing on the clinical combination of paclitaxel and rapamycin. PMID:26836480

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle-based cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jing; Huang Dong-Yan; Muhammad Zubair Yousaf; Hou Yang-Long; Gao Song

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with easily modified surfaces have been playing an important role in biomedicine.As cancer is one of the major causes of death,tremendous efforts have been devoted to advance the methods of cancer diagnosis and therapy.Recently,magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) that are responsive to a magnetic field have shown great promise in cancer therapy.Compared with traditional cancer therapy,magnetic field triggered therapeutic approaches can treat cancer in an unconventional but more effective and safer way.In this review,we will discuss the recent progress in cancer therapies based on MNPs,mainly including magnetic hyperthermia,magnetic specific targeting,magnetically controlled drug delivery,magnetofection,and magnetic switches for controlling cell fate.Some recently developed strategies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitoring cancer therapy and magnetic tissue engineering are also addressed.

  7. The use of phthalocyanines in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyokong, Tebello; Gledhill, Igle

    2013-03-01

    Phthalocyanines are synthetic analogues of porphyrins employed as photosensitizers in cancer therapy. We present the history of photodynamic therapy and developments in the use of phthalocyanines as photosensitizers. New efforts in the development of more cancer-specific phthalocyanines are presented. The combination of phthalocyanines with nanoparticles for "combination therapy" of cancer is also discussed. The nanoparticles employed are quantum dots, gold, and magnetic nanoparticles.

  8. Therapy in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Hyun Byun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Resistance of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs to high dose I-131 therapy is associated with high morbidity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We evaluated the role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the prediction of resistance to high dose I-131 therapy in patients with papillary thyroid cancer. Methods: The subjects were 307 patients who underwent total or near total thyroidectomy followed by high dose (5.55-6.66 GBq I-131 therapy. We divided the patients into three subgroups by visual assessment of regional LNs: FDG-avid LNs with a malignant shape on CT (PET/CT-positive group, FDG-avid LNs with a benign shape on CT (PET/CT-intermediate group and no FDG-avid lesion (PET/CT-negative group. We measured the maximum SUV (SUVmax of FDG-avid LNs in each patient. The presence or absence of focal increased uptake of I-131 was evaluated by whole body scan (WBS, and was denoted as WBS-positive group or WBS-negative group, respectively. Resistance to therapy was defined as presence of thyroglobulin (Tg in serum (Tg ≥1.0 ng/ml 3-6 months after I-131 therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the relationship between resistance to I-131 therapy and various clinico-pathologic variables. Results: PET/CT-positive, intermediate, and negative groups included 20 (6.5%, 44 (14.3% and 243 (79.2% patients, respectively. The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in the PET/CT-positive group than that of the PET/CT-intermediate group (4.6 vs. 2.7, P

  9. Sialoscintigraphy with Tc-99m pertechnetate in the evaluation of salivary gland function in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was an evaluation of salivary gland function after radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) using sialoscintigraphy with Tc-99m pertechnetate. We investigated 97 patients with thyroid cancer aged from 35 to 65 years. The patients were divided into two groups. First group consisted of 30 patients after total or subtotal thyroidectomy without RIT and symptoms of functional activity changes of salivary glands. Second group included 67 patients after thyroidectomy and following RIT. Administered therapeutic activities varied ranging from 1100 to 4720 MBq. We performed sialoscintigraphy in dynamic mode over a period of 30 minutes (1 frame per 20 sec) with stimulation of gland function at 20 min of study using lemon juice. For evaluation of salivary gland function we used wide spectrum of indices and activity-time curves obtained from zones of interest 'salivary glands'. From among the large number of indices determined in the study we could identify three most informative indices. These are 1. Coefficient of concentration (Cc), coefficient of excretion (Ce) and T-max. The mean values of all of these indices were significantly decreased in the patients belonging to the second group in comparison with first group. These are presented. Overall significant decrease in salivary gland function was detected (P < 0.05) following radioiodine therapy as compared to the control group

  10. [Recent advance in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Chikako; Watanabe, Toru

    2002-12-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to a significant improvement of disease-free and overall survival in addition to surgery and irradiation to the local disease. The adjuvant therapy to a patient is determined integrating the information on estimated risk of recurrence, benefit and harm of the therapy and the patient's value. In this review, the state of the art of adjuvant therapy is discussed from several aspects, such as interpretation and evaluation of risk, the best available evidences on adjuvant systemic therapy, the future direction of primary therapy for breast cancer, and patient-oriented decision making. PMID:12506467

  11. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended. PMID:27523418

  12. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials? What does statistical proof mean? How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting? Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine

  13. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26846804

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a "targeted" therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zeng; Liang-Fu Han

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology.In the past decade,such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible.In general,the term "targeted therapy" has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies.However,improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for "targeted" treatment,notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).In this review,the progress and controversies of SRS and SBRT are discussed to show the role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the ever evolving multidisciplinary care of cancer patients.

  15. Emerging therapies in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jyoti Nautiyal; Arun K Rishi; Adhip PN Majumdar

    2006-01-01

    Members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family, that include EGFR, ErbB-2/HER-2, ErbB-3/HER-3 and ErbB-4/HER-4, are frequently implicated in experimental models of epithelial cell neoplasia as well as in human cancers.Therefore, interference with the activation of these growth factor receptors represents a promising strategy for development of novel and selective anticancer therapies.Indeed, a number of inhibitors that target either EGFR or HER-2, with the exception of a few that target both;have been developed for treatment of epithelial cancers.Since most solid tumors express different ErbB receptors and/or their ligands, identification of inhibitor(s), targeting multiple EGFR family members may provide a therapeutic benefit to a broader patient population. Here we describe the significance of an ErbB family of receptors in epithelial cancers, and summarize different available therapeutics targeting these receptors. It also emphasizes the need to develop pan-ErbB inhibitors and discusses EGF-Receptor Related Protein, a recently isolated negative regulator of EGFR as a potential pan-ErbB therapeutic for a wide variety of epithelial cancers.

  16. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barry J.; Raja, Chand; Rizvi, Syed; Li, Yong; Tsui, Wendy; Zhang, David; Song, Emma; Qu, Chang Fa; Kearsley, John; Graham, Peter; Thompson, John

    2004-08-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The 213Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 µCi in human

  17. French multicentre clinical evaluation of helical TomoTherapy® for anal cancer in a cohort of 64 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess feasibility and toxicity of Helical TomoTherapy® for treating anal cancer patients. From 2007 to 2011, 64 patients were consecutively treated with TomoTherapy® in three centres for locally advanced squamous-cell anal carcinoma (T2 > 4 cm or N positive). Prescribed doses were 45 Gy to the pelvis including inguinal nodes and 59.4 Gy to the primary site and involved nodes with fractions of 1.8 Gy, five days a week. A positional Megavoltage Computed Tomography was performed before each treatment session. All acute and late toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up was 22.9 months. Fifty-four women and 10 men were treated (median age: 62 years). Nineteen patients (29.7 %) had T2, 16 patients (25.0 %) T3, and 27 patients (42.2 %) T4 tumours. Thirty-nine patients (60.9 %) had nodal involvement. Median tumour size was 45 mm (range, 10–110 mm). Seven patients had a colostomy before treatment initiation. Fifty-seven patients received concomitant chemotherapy (5-FU/cisplatin or 5-FU/mitomycin-based therapy). Forty-seven patients (73.4 %) experienced a complete response, 13 a partial response or local recurrence, and 11 had salvage surgery; among these, six became complete responders, three experienced metastatic failure, and two local failure. At least four patients experienced metastatic recurrence (concomitant to a local failure for one patient). The two-year overall survival was 85.6 % (95 %CI [71.1 %–93.0 %]), and the one-year disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival were 68.7 % (95 %CI [54.4 %–79.4]), and 75.5 % (95 %CI [60.7 %–85.3 %]) respectively. Overall survival, disease-free survival and colostomy free-survival were significantly better for women than men (p = 0.002, p = 0.004, and p = 0.002 respectively). Acute grade ≥3 toxicity included dermatologic (46.9 % of patients), gastrointestinal (20

  18. Liver cancer and selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    therapies based on its micro-particle technologies, which act as transport vehicles to deliver: 1. ionising radiation (ie. SIR-Spheres, which is used in Selective Internal Radiation Therapy or SIRT); 2. chemotherapy drugs (ie Dox-Spheres); and 3. materials that can generate heat within the cancer (ie. Thermo-Spheres). The original concepts underpinning the core technology commercialised by SIRTeX Medical were initially developed by prominent Australian liver surgeon Dr Bruce Gray and the Cancer Research Institute Inc (CRI) and have been published in the scientific literature. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy using SIR-Spheres has been refined over many years and has been the subject of several clinical trials. Two independent clinical trials are currently underway to evaluate the advantages of using SIR-Spheres in combination with two new anti-cancer drugs to improve the treatment of liver cancer. The first trial will test the efficacy of combining SIR-Spheres with an anti-cancer drug combination that includes irinotecan, a major new drug marketed by Pharmacia for the treatment of advanced bowel cancer. As SIR-Spheres is a novel form of radiotherapy proven to regress bowel cancer that has spread to the liver, it is important to evaluate the benefits of adding increasing doses of irinotecan to SIR-Spheres. Supported by Pharmacia, the trial is being conducted in Australia with a small number of patients, and is expected to be completed by the end of 2002. The second trial will test the use of SIR-Spheres in combination with the drug oxaliplatin - another major anti-cancer drug used for the treatment of advanced bowel cancer. Supported by French-based anti-cancer specialist Sanofi Synthelabo, this trial will be conducted both in Australia and several major cancer centres in Europe. SIRTeX Medical is also currently in the process of researching and developing Dox-Spheres and Thermo-Spheres. Both are based on the same micro-particle technology as SIR-Spheres, but are used to

  19. Cancer Stem Cells, Cancer Cell Plasticity and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be ...

  20. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and radiation enhancement using 1.9 nm gold particles: potential application for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High atomic number (Z) materials such as gold preferentially absorb kilovoltage x-rays compared to soft tissue and may be used to achieve local dose enhancement in tumours during treatment with ionizing radiation. Gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated as radiation dose enhancing agents in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we used multiple endpoints to characterize the cellular cytotoxic response of a range of cell lines to 1.9 nm gold particles and measured dose modifying effects following transient exposure at low concentrations. Gold nanoparticles caused significant levels of cell type specific cytotoxicity, apoptosis and increased oxidative stress. When used as dose modifying agents, dose enhancement factors varied between the cell lines investigated with the highest enhancement being 1.9 in AGO-1522B cells at a nanoparticle concentration of 100 μg ml-1. This study shows exposure to 1.9 nm gold particles to induce a range of cell line specific responses including decreased clonogenic survival, increased apoptosis and induction of DNA damage which may be mediated through the production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first study involving 1.9 nm nanometre sized particles to report multiple cellular responses which impact on the radiation dose modifying effect. The findings highlight the need for extensive characterization of responses to gold nanoparticles when assessing dose enhancing potential in cancer therapy.

  1. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and radiation enhancement using 1.9 nm gold particles: potential application for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, K. T.; Coulter, J. A.; Jain, S.; Forker, J.; McMahon, S. J.; Schettino, G.; Prise, K. M.; Currell, F. J.; Hirst, D. G.

    2010-07-01

    High atomic number (Z) materials such as gold preferentially absorb kilovoltage x-rays compared to soft tissue and may be used to achieve local dose enhancement in tumours during treatment with ionizing radiation. Gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated as radiation dose enhancing agents in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we used multiple endpoints to characterize the cellular cytotoxic response of a range of cell lines to 1.9 nm gold particles and measured dose modifying effects following transient exposure at low concentrations. Gold nanoparticles caused significant levels of cell type specific cytotoxicity, apoptosis and increased oxidative stress. When used as dose modifying agents, dose enhancement factors varied between the cell lines investigated with the highest enhancement being 1.9 in AGO-1522B cells at a nanoparticle concentration of 100 µg ml - 1. This study shows exposure to 1.9 nm gold particles to induce a range of cell line specific responses including decreased clonogenic survival, increased apoptosis and induction of DNA damage which may be mediated through the production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first study involving 1.9 nm nanometre sized particles to report multiple cellular responses which impact on the radiation dose modifying effect. The findings highlight the need for extensive characterization of responses to gold nanoparticles when assessing dose enhancing potential in cancer therapy.

  2. Radiation therapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has been used extensively in the management of patients with cancer of the esophagus. It has demonstrated an ability to cure a small minority of patients. Cure is likely to be limited to patients who have lesions less than 5 cm in length and have minimal, if any, involvement of lymph nodes. Esophagectomy is likely to cure a similar, small percentage of patients with the same presentation of minimal disease but has a substantial acute postoperative mortality rate and greater morbidity than irradiation. Combining surgery and either preoperative or postoperative irradiation may cure a small percentage of patients beyond the number cured with either modality alone. Radiation has demonstrated benefit as an adjuvant to surgery following the resection of minimal disease. However, radiation alone has never been compared directly with surgery for the highly select, minimal lesions managed by surgery. Radiation provides good palliation of dysphagia in the majority of patients, and roughly one third may have adequate swallowing for the duration of their illness when ''radical'' doses have been employed. Surgical bypass procedures have greater acute morbidity but appear to provide more reliable, prolonged palliation of dysphagia. Several approaches to improving the efficacy of irradiation are currently under investigation. These approahces include fractionation schedules, radiosensitizers, neutron-beam therapy, and helium-ion therapy

  3. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed fr...

  4. The impact of cancer therapy on cognition in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VictoriaMandilaras

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer and cancer therapy-related cognitive impairment (formerly known as chemobrain or chemo-fog are often described in the literature. In the past, studies have failed to prove the existence of cancer therapy-related cognitive dysfunction. However, more recently, prospective trials have shown that patients undergoing chemotherapy do display impairment in specific cognitive domains. Aging confers an increased risk of developing cancer, as well as cognitive impairment. The Geriatric Oncology clinic of the Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital in Montreal was founded in 2006 to address the unique needs of older cancer patients. We will describe two cases of cancer therapy-related cognitive impairment from our Geriatric Oncology clinic. The first case is that of a 75 year old male diagnosed with stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma who complained of forgetfulness since starting carboplatin-paclitaxel. The second case is that of a 65 year old female diagnosed with stage I, ER positive breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy followed by adjuvant CMF chemotherapy, radiation therapy and was on exemestane when she was evaluated. We will also briefly review the literature of cancer therapy-related cognitive impairment.

  5. Potential role of tetrandrine in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Jen

    2002-01-01

    Tetrandrine, a bisbenylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the dried root of Stephenia tetrandra S Moore, exhibits very broad pharmacological actions, including anti-tumor activity. The beneficial effects of tetrandrine on tumor cell cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, multidrug resistance, normal tissue radioprotection, and angiogenesis are most promising and deserve great attention. Tetrandrine has potential either as a tumoricidal agent or as an adjunct to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To evaluate the potential clinical efficacy of tetrandrine for cancer therapy,more mechanism-based pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic studies are required.

  6. Maintenance Therapies for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    NormandBlais

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of lung cancer had evolved during the last decade with the introduction of new chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies. However, the maximum benefit reached after first-line therapy is limited by the cumulative toxicity of platinum drugs and the subsequent deterioration in performance status in a high percentage of patients who end up receiving not more than one line of treatment. Maintenance therapy had been introduced and evaluated in many large randomized trials showing ...

  7. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  8. Contouring Guidelines for the Axillary Lymph Nodes for the Delivery of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer: Evaluation of the RTOG Breast Cancer Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, Michelle S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Usman, Asad A.; Neuschler, Erin I. [Department of Radiology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Small, William, E-mail: WMSMALL@lumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the axillary lymph nodes on pretreatment diagnostic computed tomography (CT) of the chest to determine their position relative to the anatomic axillary borders as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans available for 30 breast cancer patients with clinically involved lymph nodes were fused with simulation CT. Contouring of axillary levels I, II, and III according to the RTOG guidelines was performed. Measurements were made from the area of distal tumor to the anatomic borders in 6 dimensions for each level. Results: Of the 30 patients, 100%, 93%, and 37% had clinical involvement of levels I, II, and III, respectively. The mean number of lymph nodes dissected was 13.6. The mean size of the largest lymph node was 2.4 cm. Extracapsular extension was seen in 23% of patients. In 97% of patients, an aspect of the involved lymph node lay outside of the anatomic border of a level. In 80% and 83% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the cranial (1.78 ± 1.0 cm; range, 0.28-3.58 cm) and anterior (1.27 ± 0.92 cm; range, 0.24-3.58 cm) borders of level I, respectively. In 80% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the caudal border of level II (1.36 ± 1.0 cm, range, 0.27-3.86 cm), and 0% to 33% of patients had tumor extension outside the remaining borders of all levels. Conclusions: To cover 95% of lymph nodes at the cranial and anterior borders of level I, an additional clinical target volume margin of 3.78 cm and 3.11 cm, respectively, is necessary. The RTOG guidelines may be insufficient for coverage of axillary disease in patients with clinical nodal involvement who are undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, incomplete axillary dissection, or treatment with intensity modulated radiation therapy. In patients with pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans, fusion with

  9. Contouring Guidelines for the Axillary Lymph Nodes for the Delivery of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer: Evaluation of the RTOG Breast Cancer Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the axillary lymph nodes on pretreatment diagnostic computed tomography (CT) of the chest to determine their position relative to the anatomic axillary borders as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans available for 30 breast cancer patients with clinically involved lymph nodes were fused with simulation CT. Contouring of axillary levels I, II, and III according to the RTOG guidelines was performed. Measurements were made from the area of distal tumor to the anatomic borders in 6 dimensions for each level. Results: Of the 30 patients, 100%, 93%, and 37% had clinical involvement of levels I, II, and III, respectively. The mean number of lymph nodes dissected was 13.6. The mean size of the largest lymph node was 2.4 cm. Extracapsular extension was seen in 23% of patients. In 97% of patients, an aspect of the involved lymph node lay outside of the anatomic border of a level. In 80% and 83% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the cranial (1.78 ± 1.0 cm; range, 0.28-3.58 cm) and anterior (1.27 ± 0.92 cm; range, 0.24-3.58 cm) borders of level I, respectively. In 80% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the caudal border of level II (1.36 ± 1.0 cm, range, 0.27-3.86 cm), and 0% to 33% of patients had tumor extension outside the remaining borders of all levels. Conclusions: To cover 95% of lymph nodes at the cranial and anterior borders of level I, an additional clinical target volume margin of 3.78 cm and 3.11 cm, respectively, is necessary. The RTOG guidelines may be insufficient for coverage of axillary disease in patients with clinical nodal involvement who are undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, incomplete axillary dissection, or treatment with intensity modulated radiation therapy. In patients with pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans, fusion with

  10. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pietras, Richard J.; Weinberg, Olga K.

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of ...

  11. [Multimodal therapy in locally advanced gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölke, E; Peiper, M; Knoefel, W T; Baldus, S E; Schauer, M; Matuschek, C; Gerber, P A; Hoff, N-P; Budach, W; Gattermann, N; Erhardt, A; Scherer, A; Buhren, B A; Orth, K

    2011-10-01

    Locally advanced gastric cancers are characterized by poor prognosis. Clinical outcome can be improved if surgery becomes part of a multimodal treatment approach. The purpose of neoadjuvant treatment includes downsizing of the primary tumor, improvement of the T- and N- categories, and early therapy of micrometastasis. Several controlled clinical trials showed that neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as neoadjuvant combined radio-chemotherapy, especially for tumors of the gastroesophageal junction, can improve the rate of primary R0 resections, relapse-free survival, and overall survival. While patients with locally advanced tumors clearly benefit from this strategy, the approach is still controversial in patients with early stage disease. Nonresponders do not benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. Therefore, response evaluation and response prediction are of great importance. After successful neoadjuvant chemotherapy, patients should undergo gastrectomy with D(2)-lymphadenectomy because of a high probability of lymph node metastasis. This article summarizes current developments in this field. PMID:22009175

  12. Proton therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romaine; C; Nichols; Soon; Huh; Zuofeng; Li; Michael; Rutenberg

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly offered to patients with pancreatic malignancies although its ultimate utility is compromised since the pancreas is surrounded by exquisitely radiosensitive normal tissues, such as the duodenum, stomach, jejunum, liver, and kidneys. Proton radiotherapy can be used to create dose distributions that conform to tumor targets with significant normal tissue sparing. Because of this, protons appear to represent a superior modality for radiotherapy delivery to patients with unresectable tumors and those receiving postoperative radiotherapy. A particularly exciting opportunity for protons also exists for patients with resectable and marginally resectable disease. In this paper, we review the current literature on proton therapy for pancreatic cancer and discuss scenarios wherein the improvement in the therapeutic index with protons may have the potential to change the management paradigm for this malignancy.

  13. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers...

  14. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles as a delivery system for antisense therapy: evaluation against EGFR in T47D breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaei F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatemeh Talaei1, Ebrahim Azizi2, Rassoul Dinarvand3, Fatemeh Atyabi31Novel Drug Delivery Systems Lab, 2Molecular Research Lab, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 3Nanotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Thiolated chitosan has high transfection and mucoadhesive properties. We investigated the potential of two recently synthesized polymers: NAC-C (N-acetyl cysteine-chitosan and NAP-C (N-acetyl penicillamine-chitosan in anticancer drug delivery targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Doxorubicin (DOX and antisense oligonucleotide (ASOND-loaded polymer nanoparticles were prepared in water by a gelation process. Particle characterization, drug loading, and drug release were evaluated. To verify drug delivery efficiency in vitro experiments on a breast cancer cell line (T47D were performed. EGFR gene and protein expression was analyzed by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. A loading percentage of 63% ± 5% for ASOND and 70% ± 5% for DOX was achieved. Drug release data after 15 hours showed that ASOND and DOX were completely released from chitosan-based particles while a lower and more sustained release of only 22% ± 8% was measured for thiolated particles. In a cytosol simulated release medium/reducing environment, such as found intracellularly, polymer-based nanoparticles dissociated, liberating approximately 50% of both active substances within 7 hours. ASOND-loaded polymer nanoparticles had higher stability and high mucoadhesive properties. The ASOND-loaded thiolated particles significantly suppressed EGFR gene expression in T47D cells compared with ASOND-loaded chitosan particles and downregulated EGFR protein expression in cells. This study could facilitate future investigations into the functionality of NAP-C and NAC-C polymers as an efficient ASOND delivery system in vitro and in vivo

  15. Nanotechnology-driven cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, much efforts have been devoted to developing nanomaterials-based boron drugs for neutron capture therapy (NCT) and to date, a majority of the studies have proved reasonably promising. Conversely, further in vivo studies and clinical trails are needed to establish them as appropriate boron carriers; this is especially so with the relatively novel boron nanotubes and magnetic nanoparticles. More advanced forms of boron nanotubes can be anticipated as much interest in their synthesis as their future applications. Thus, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising treatment for malignant brain tumors as well as for other types of cancers, such as, liver, prostate, bladder, breasts, head and neck tumors. Current research focuses on both the design and synthesis of high boron containing compounds as BNCT agents, and the search for suitable delivery vehicles. To be suitable BNCT agents, the problem of their low water-solubility needs to be resolved by chemical modification. In the case of magnetic nanoparticles, strategies are required to counter their tendency of embolization and their unclear cytotoxicity must be resolved

  16. Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula Ghaneh; John Slavin; Robert Sutton; Mark Hartley; John P Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    The outlook for patients with pancreatic cancer has been grim. There have been major advances in the surgical treatment of pancreatic csncer, leading to a drsmatic reduction in post-operative mortality from the development of high volume specialized centres. This stimulated the study of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments in pancreatic cancer including chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy. Initial protocols have been based on the original but rather small GITSG study first reported in 1985. There have been two large European trials totalling over 600 patients (EORTC and ESPAC-1) that do not support the use of chemoradiation as adjuvant therapy. A second major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial (541 patients randomized) was some but not conclusive evidence for a survival benefit associated with chemotherapy. A third major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial was that the quality of life was not affected by the use of adjuvant treatments compared to surgery alone.The ESPAC-3 trial aims to assess the definitive use of adjuvant chemotherapy in a randomized controlled trial of 990 patients.

  17. Progress in gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KamranAliAhmed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  18. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:25840885

  19. Liposomal cancer therapy: exploiting tumor characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field: More than 10 million people worldwide are diagnosed with cancer each year, and the development of effective cancer treatments is consequently of great significance. Cancer therapy is unfortunately hampered by severe dose-limiting side effects that reduce the efficacy of...... cancer treatments. In the search for more effective cancer treatments, nanoparticle- based drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, that are capable of delivering their drug payload selectively to cancer cells are among the most promising approaches. Areas covered in this review: This review provides an...... overview of current strategies for improving the different stages of liposomal cancer therapy, which involve transporting drug-loaded liposomes through the bloodstream, increasing tumor accumulation, and improving drug release and cancer cell uptake after accumulation at the tumor target site. What the...

  20. CERN launches new cancer therapy initiative

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The first meeting of a new European network for research in cancer therapy was held at CERN, in February 2002. ENLIGHT, the European Network for Research in Light Ion Therapy aims to coordinate the development of a variety of projects at European facilities for "light ion therapy" - a form of radiation therapy that uses beams of the nuclei of lightweight atoms" (1/2 page).

  1. Evaluation of radiotherapy and combined therapy in cancer of the mucous membrane of the nasal auxillary sinuses and cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical data of 180 patients with cancer of the mucous membrane of the nasal auxillary sinuses and cavity were considered to give a comparative evaluations of the effect of treatment on delayed results and life span of the dead patients. No considerable influence of the treatment methods on delayed results and life span has been found (the difference is statistically insignificant). However good correlation has been found with the degree of tumor dissemination. The 5-year survival period in Stage 2 is 72-80%, in Stages 3, 4 17-25%. The effect of the fractionated dose technique has been studied in 113 patients, Stages 3 and 4, who were given radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. The correlation of the 5-year survival with the tumor stage, has also been established: in Stage 3, 14-20%, in Stage 4 6-10%. In the analysis of life span of the dead patients similar dependence on the treatment methods and dose fractionated technique has been obtained

  2. An Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus-Thymidine Kinase for Targeting Cancer Therapy: An in vitro Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-qun Zheng; Yin Xu; Yi-de Qin; Ren-jie Yang; Jun Han

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Oncolytic adenovirus, also called conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD), has been developed for the treatment of cancer. However, there is a tremendous need to enhance their antitumor efficacy. Here we wish to evaluate whether a strategy that combines the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase with oncolytic effects offers a therapeutic advantage.Methods: A novel adenovirus Ad-ETK containing a sequentially positioned promoter of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the coding sequence of E1A gene, an internal ribosome entry site sequence (IRES) and the coding sequence of herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) was constructed. Infection of various cells with Ad-ETK followed by RT-PCR confirmed the expression of E1A and HSV-TK. The oncolytic ability and synergism between oncolytic effects and HSV-TK system was measured. The infection efficiency was determined by flow cytometry.Results: Ad-ETK deliverys E1A and HSV-TK gene, which selectively replicates in hTERT-positive tumor cells, and the progeny virus can reach up to 150 IU/cell. Our in vitro study showed that Ad-ETK plus ganciclovir (GCV) induced an obvious cell death.Conclusion: An oncolytic adenovirus plus the HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene system resulted in a significant improvement in treatment efficacy and it may offer important considerations in the development and preclinical assessments of oncolytic virotherapy.

  3. Prospective economic evaluation of image-guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer in the framework of the national programme for innovative and costly therapies assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - The main objective of the economical study was to prospectively and randomly assess the additional costs of daily versus weekly patient positioning quality control in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), taking into account the modalities of the 3D-imaging: tomography (CBCT) or gold seeds implants. A secondary objective was to prospectively assess the additional costs of 3D versus 2D imaging with portal imaging for patient positioning controls. Patients and methods. - Economics data are issued from a multicenter randomized medico-economics trial comparing the two frequencies of patient positioning control during prostate IGRT. A prospective cohort with patient positioning control with PI (control group) was constituted for the cost comparison between 3D (IGRT) versus 2D imaging. The economical evaluation was focused to the radiotherapy direct costs, adopting the hospital's point of view and using a micro-costing method applied to the parameters that may lead to cost differences between evaluated strategies. Results. - The economical analysis included a total of 241 patients enrolled between 2007 and 2011 in seven centres, 183 in the randomized study (128 with CBCT and 55 with fiducial markers) and 58 in the control group. Compared to weekly controls, the average additional cost per patient of daily controls was euros 847 (CBCT) and euros 179 (markers). Compared to PI, the average additional cost per patient was euros 1392 (CBCT) and euros 997 (fiducial markers) for daily controls; euros 545 (CBCT) and euros 818 (markers) in case of weekly controls. Conclusion. - A daily frequency for image control in IGRT and 3D images patient positioning control (IGRT) for prostate cancer lead to significant additional cost compared to weekly control and 2D imaging (PI). Long-term clinical assessment will permit to assess the medico-economical ratio of these innovative radiotherapy modalities. (authors)

  4. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjees Hasan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  5. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Emma; El-Helw, Loaie; Hasan, Jurjees, E-mail: jurjees.hasan@christie.nhs.uk [Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust / Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-23

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  6. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer

  7. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  8. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50{approx}80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68{approx}120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin

  9. Chemoradiation therapy for anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoradiation therapy for anal cancer was carried out in 58 patients using low-dose, continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with or without continuous infusion of cisplatin (cDDP) and external beam irradiation (chemoXRT). Thirty-nine patients received 5-FU chemoXRT resulting in a local control rate of 50% in those receiving a total dose of 60 Gy. The actuarial local control rate at 2 years was 77% after chemoXRT alone; overall local control was 67% at 5 years. In 18 patients receiving 5-FU plus cisplatin with radiation doses of 54-55 Gy, actuarial local control was 85% at 2 years. Fifteen patients failed chemoXRT, 13 of whom had abdominoperineal resection for salvage; the overall local control rate was 93% (54/58). The actuarial survival at 5 years was 81% for the 5-FU chemoXRT group and 94% at 2 years for the 5-FU plus cisplatin chemoXRT group; median follow-up was 54 and 20 months, respectively. Diarrhea and nausea were the most frequent early reactions and were ameliorated by limiting the duration of chemotherapy to 5 days/week and by using XRT techniques to exclude the small bowel from the radiation portal. Serious late radiation complications have not been observed and may be related to XRT fraction and the use of protracted chemotherapy infusion. The absence of late morbidity coupled with the high local control rate by the use of this chemoXRT program is an area to investigate for improving the therapeutic ratio for the treatment of anal cancers. (author)

  10. Evaluation of a leaf position optimization tool for intensity modulated radiation therapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Since 1996, patients are treated at Ghent University Hospital with a multi-segment technique using MultiLeaf Collimators. The segments were obtained by using the Beam's eye view projections of the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OARs), after which the segments weights were optimized. To investigate if optimization of the leaf positions would further improve the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, a tool optimizing leaf positions and segment weights simultaneously, was developed. This tool is called SOWAT, which is the acronym for segment outline and weight adapting tool. Material and methods: The tool evaluates the effects of changing the position of each collimating leaf of all segments on the value of the objective function. Only changes that improve the value of the objective function are retained. Between December 1999 and January 2001, 30 head and neck patients were treated with IMRT. Two patient groups were distinguished: pharyngeal and laryngeal tumors (n=17) and sinonasal tumors (n=13). A specific set of physical endpoints was evaluated for each group. Dose statistics of the treatment plans without and with SOWAT were analyzed. Results: When using SOWAT for the pharyngeal and laryngeal cases, the PTV dose homogeneity increased with a median of 11% (range 2-27%), while the maximum dose to the spinal cord was decreased for 14 of the 17 patients. In four plans where parotid function preservation was a goal, the parotid mean dose was lower than 26 Gy in one plan without SOWAT, and in four plans with SOWAT. For the sinonasal tumors, the PTV dose homogeneity increased with a median of 7% (range 1-14%). SOWAT lowered the mean dose to 53 of the 63 optic pathway structures (retina, optic nerve and optic chiasm). SOWAT leaves the number of segments unchanged and has little or no effect on the delivery time. Conclusions: SOWAT is a powerful tool to perform the final optimization of IMRT plans, without

  11. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions

  12. Pre-operative MR evaluation of features that indicate the need of adjuvant therapies in early stage cervical cancer patients. A single-centre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Stefania, E-mail: stefania.rizzo@ieo.it [Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Calareso, Giuseppina [Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Maccagnoni, Sara; Angileri, Salvatore Alessio [Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, via A.di Rudinì 8, 20142 Milan (Italy); Landoni, Fabio [Division of Gynecology, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Raimondi, Sara; Pasquali, Elena [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Lazzari, Roberta [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, via A.di Rudinì 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Objectives: This study compared the MR measurement of minimum uninvolved cervical stroma and maximum stromal invasion, and the detection of positive lymph nodes with the pathological results. In addition, tumour type and grade were correlated with nodal status and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods: Patients who underwent surgery and MR at our centre for early stage cervical cancer (FIGO IA1-IIB) were included. Data recorded included: age, date of MR, clinical FIGO (International Federation of Gynacology and Obstetrics) stage, histological type and grade, adjuvant therapy, pre-surgical conisation. MR evaluation included: measurement of the minimum uninvolved stroma, maximum thickness of stromal involvement, presence and site of positive pelvic lymph nodes, calculation of ADC values. Statistical analysis was performed to compare MR and pathological results. The agreement between MR and pathology in measuring depth of stromal invasion was analysed by Bland–Altman plot, calculating the limits of agreement (LoA). Results: 113/217 patients underwent adjuvant therapies. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of MR in evaluation of minimum thickness of uninvolved cervical stroma were 88%, 75%, 70%, 90% and 80%; the same values in evaluation of pelvic positive lymph nodes were 64%, 85%, 65%, 84% and 78%. The mean difference between MR and pathological results in measuring maximum depth of stromal invasion was −0.65 mm (95% LoA: −9.37 mm; 8.07 mm). Depth of stromal invasion was strongly related to positive nodal status (p < 0.001). ADC values (available in 51/217 patients) were not associated with the features assessed. Conclusions: Pre-surgical MR is accurate (80%) in evaluating the minimum thickness of uninvolved cervical stroma; MR measurements of maximum depth of stromal invasion differed ±9 mm from the pathological results in 95% of cases. Furthermore, a strong association was found between

  13. Pre-operative MR evaluation of features that indicate the need of adjuvant therapies in early stage cervical cancer patients. A single-centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: This study compared the MR measurement of minimum uninvolved cervical stroma and maximum stromal invasion, and the detection of positive lymph nodes with the pathological results. In addition, tumour type and grade were correlated with nodal status and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods: Patients who underwent surgery and MR at our centre for early stage cervical cancer (FIGO IA1-IIB) were included. Data recorded included: age, date of MR, clinical FIGO (International Federation of Gynacology and Obstetrics) stage, histological type and grade, adjuvant therapy, pre-surgical conisation. MR evaluation included: measurement of the minimum uninvolved stroma, maximum thickness of stromal involvement, presence and site of positive pelvic lymph nodes, calculation of ADC values. Statistical analysis was performed to compare MR and pathological results. The agreement between MR and pathology in measuring depth of stromal invasion was analysed by Bland–Altman plot, calculating the limits of agreement (LoA). Results: 113/217 patients underwent adjuvant therapies. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of MR in evaluation of minimum thickness of uninvolved cervical stroma were 88%, 75%, 70%, 90% and 80%; the same values in evaluation of pelvic positive lymph nodes were 64%, 85%, 65%, 84% and 78%. The mean difference between MR and pathological results in measuring maximum depth of stromal invasion was −0.65 mm (95% LoA: −9.37 mm; 8.07 mm). Depth of stromal invasion was strongly related to positive nodal status (p < 0.001). ADC values (available in 51/217 patients) were not associated with the features assessed. Conclusions: Pre-surgical MR is accurate (80%) in evaluating the minimum thickness of uninvolved cervical stroma; MR measurements of maximum depth of stromal invasion differed ±9 mm from the pathological results in 95% of cases. Furthermore, a strong association was found between

  14. Anaplastic thyroid cancer, tumorigenesis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2010-03-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a fatal endocrine malignancy. Current therapy fails to significantly improve survival. Recent insights into thyroid tumorigenesis, post-malignant dedifferentiation and mode of metastatic activity offer new therapeutic strategies.

  15. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yifan; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Bueno, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Locally advanced (stage IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is confined to the chest, but requires more than surgery to maximize cure. Therapy given preoperatively is termed neoadjuvant, whereas postoperative therapy is termed adjuvant. Trimodality therapy (chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery) has become the standard treatment regimen for resectable, locally advanced NSCLC. During the past 2 decades, several prospective, randomized, and nonrandomized studies have explored various regimens for preoperative treatment of NSCLC. The evaluation of potential candidates with NSCLC for neoadjuvant therapy as well as the currently available therapeutic regimens are reviewed. PMID:27261916

  16. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  17. Characterization and evaluation of DOTA-conjugated Bombesin/RGD-antagonists for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Here we present the metallation, characterization, in vivo and in vitro evaluations of dual-targeting, peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals with utility for imaging and potentially treating prostate tumors by virtue of their ability to target the αVβ3 integrin or the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr). Methods: [RGD-Glu-6Ahx-RM2] (RGD: Arg-Gly-Asp; Glu: glutamic acid; 6-Ahx: 6-amino hexanoic acid; RM2: (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2)) was conjugated to a DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) bifunctional chelator (BFCA) purified via reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and radiolabeled with 111In or 177Lu. Natural-metallated compounds were assessed for binding affinity for the αVβ3 integrin or GRPr in human glioblastoma U87-MG and prostate PC-3 cell lines and stability prior to in vivo evaluation in normal CF-1 mice and SCID mice xenografted with PC-3 cells. Results: Competitive displacement binding assays with PC-3 and U87-MG cells revealed high to moderate binding affinity for the GRPr or the αVβ3 integrin (IC50 range of 5.39 ± 1.37 nM to 9.26 ± 0.00 nM in PC-3 cells, and a range of 255 ± 47 nM to 321 ± 85 nM in U87-MG cells). Biodistribution studies indicated high tumor uptake in PC-3 tumor-bearing mice (average of 7.40 ± 0.53% ID/g at 1 h post-intravenous injection) and prolonged retention of tracer (mean of 4.41 ± 0.91% ID/g at 24 h post-intravenous injection). Blocking assays corroborated the specificity of radioconjugates for each target. Micro-single photon emission computed tomography (microSPECT) confirmed favorable radiouptake profiles in xenografted mice at 20 h post-injection. Conclusions: [RGD-Glu-[111In-DO3A]-6-Ahx-RM2] and [RGD-Glu-[177Lu- DO3A]-6-Ahx-RM2] show favorable pharmacokinetic and radiouptake profiles, meriting continued evaluation for molecular imaging in murine U87-MG/PC-3

  18. Therapy for bone metastasis from different cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhang; Peng Tan; Baoguo Mi; Chao Song; Yi Deng; Hanfeng Guan

    2016-01-01

    The bone is the most common target organ of cancer metastasis. Bone metastasis leads to considerable morbidity due to skeletal-related events (SREs). These include bone pain, hypercalcemia, pathologic frac-tures, and compression of the spinal cord. Cancers such as those of the lung, breast, prostate, and kidney are more likely to cause SREs than other cancer types. Additionaly, some blood cancers, including multiple myeloma and lymphoma, frequently cause SREs. In this article, we review the conventional therapies for metastatic bone disease, including drug therapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Among osteoclast-targeting agents, bisphosphonates and nuclear factor kappa-B ligand inhibitors are the most widely used agents to prevent cancer-related bone loss. Unsealed radioisotopes are also considered promising in cancer therapy. Currently, iodine-131, strontium-89, and radium-223 are available for the treatment of bone metastasis. However, the treatments for blood cancers with SREs are diferent from those of other cancers. In those cases, new classes of agents including proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, monoclonal anti-bodies, and histone deacetylase inhibitors have shown remarkable eficacy. We also discuss the potential development of new therapies for these diseases.

  19. Radiation therapy of cancer of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to present the principles of radiation therapy of cancer of the lung, according to the experience of the Institute of Oncology in Krakow. The text was designed primarily for the radiotherapists involved in the treatment of cancer of the lung, and may be used as an auxiliary textbook for those preparing for the examination in radiotherapy. (author)

  20. uPAR as anti-cancer target: evaluation of biomarker potential, histological localization, and antibody-based therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin; Sørensen, Tine Thurison; Christensen, Ib J; Hoyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    action of several proteolytic systems in generation of a high proteolytic potential required for tissue remodeling processes. uPAR is additionally cleaved by uPA on the cell surface, liberating domain I, resulting in abrogated pericellular proteolysis. The expression of both uPAR and uPA is significantly...... hepatic fibrinolysis using mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse uPA or uPAR. These reagents will target uPA and uPAR in both stromal cells and cancer cells, and their therapeutic potential can now be assessed in syngenic mouse cancer models....

  1. Evaluation of the Metabolic Response to Cyclopamine Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts Using a Clinical PET-CT System1

    OpenAIRE

    Kayed, Hany; MEYER, Patrick; He, Yong; Kraenzlin, Bettina; Fink, Christian; Gretz, Norbert; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Sadick, Maliha

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We analyzed the effects of anti-hedgehog signaling on the 18F-FDG uptake of pancreatic cancer xenografts (PCXs) using a clinically implemented positron emission tomography (PET)-computer tomography (CT) scanner with high-resolution reconstruction. METHODS: PCXs from two pancreatic cancer cell lines were developed subcutaneously in nude mice and injected intraperitoneally with a low dose of cyclopamine for 1 week. 18F-FDG PET-CT was performed using a new-generation clinical PET-CT ...

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yigit, Mehmet V; Moore, Anna; Medarova, Zdravka

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is evolving as a new field that has a potentially high research and clinical impact. Medicine, in particular, could benefit from nanotechnology, due to emerging applications for noninvasive imaging and therapy. One important nanotechnological platform that has shown promise includes the so-called iron oxide nanoparticles. With specific relevance to cancer therapy, iron oxide nanoparticle-based therapy represents an important alternative to conventional chemotherapy, radiation, ...

  3. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objective: To analyze the feasibility of high dose assessing acute and late toxicities both rectal and genitourinary in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Between April 2006 and April 2008 90 patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with MRT technique in the Department of Radiotherapy. The analysis included 80 patients, 10 of them in treatment. The total dose received was 80 Gy. One patient received 70.2 Gy (because of previous pelvic radiotherapy). Age average: 65 (r 43-85 years). Stage: T1c: 43 p (53.75%), T2: 35 p (43.75%), T3: 1 p (1.25%). Score of Gleason 10 ng/ml and < ng / ml: 7 (8.75%). Hormone therapy: 34 p (42.5%). Results: Acute rectal toxicity: grade 0: 46 p (57.5%), grade 1: 23 p (28.75%), grade 2: 9 p (11.25%), grade 3: 1 p (1.25%). Acute genitourinary toxicity: Grade 0: 26 p (32.5%) Grade 1: 36 p (45%), Grade 2: 17 p (21.25%), Grade 3: 1 p (1.25%). Chronic toxicity (RTOG) (considering patients evaluated more than 6 months after the end of treatment): 19 patients showed no rectitis and 1 patient had mild symptoms. Urethritis: 19 patients had no symptoms, 1 patient grade 1. The PSA pretreatment average: 9.5 ng / ml (80 p). One month after treatment: 4.6 ng / ml. With an average follow-up of 8 m (r 2-22), there were no biochemical recurrence. One patient had bone metastases one year after the end of the treatment. No deaths for prostate cancer were noticed. Conclusions: IMRT is a safe and effective therapy with more precision than the 3D-CRT, which allows increase the dose without increasing the risk of complications. (authors)

  4. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    . During active cancer therapy, they should generally be evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. In this role, they act as biological response modifiers and adaptogens, potentially enhancing the efficacy of the so-called conventional therapies. Their effectiveness may be increased when multiple agents are used in optimal combinations. New designs for trials to demonstrate activity in human subjects are required. Although controlled trials might be preferred, smaller studies with appropriate end points and surrogate markers for antiangiogenic response could help prioritize agents for the larger resource-intensive phase 3 trials. PMID:16484711

  5. Network systems biology for targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted cancer therapies has arrived.However,due to the complexity of biological systems,the current progress is far from enough.From biological network modeling to structural/dynamic network analysis,network systems biology provides unique insight into the potential mechanisms underlying the growth and progression of cancer cells.It has also introduced great changes into the research paradigm of cancer-associated drug discovery and drug resistance.

  6. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jurjees Hasan; Loaie El-Helw; Emma Dean

    2010-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the a...

  7. Future Directions in Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Orchard-Webb

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a major disease burden that is essentially incurable at present. However significant understanding of the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer has been achieved through sequencing. This is allowing the rational design of therapeutics. The purpose of this review is to introduce the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer, explain the current state of molecular therapy and provide examples of the ongoing developments. These include improvements in chemotherapy, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines, immune checkpoint antibodies, and oncolytics.

  8. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    OpenAIRE

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, adv...

  9. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin cells called melanocytes that produce skin color ( melanin ). Radiation therapy is used mostly for melanomas that ... in addition to surgery, chemotherapy or biologic therapy. Hair Epidermis Dermis Subcutaneous Hair Follicle Vein Artery © ASTRO ...

  10. Dance as a therapy for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Gurbuz; Ogce, Filiz

    2005-01-01

    Even though the field of medicine has developed tremendously, the wide variety of cancer is still among chronic and life threatening disease today. Therefore, the specialists constantly research and try every possible way to find cure or preventive ways to stop its further development. For this reason, studies concerning the chronic disease such as cancer have been spread to many different fields. In this regard, many other alternative ways besides medicine, are used in prevention of cancer. Nutritional therapy, herbal therapy, sportive activities, art therapy, music therapy, dance therapy, imagery, yoga and acupuncture can be given as examples. Among these, dance/movement therapy which deals with individuals physical, emotional, cognitive as well as social integration is widely used as a popular form of physical activity. The physical benefits of dance therapy as exercise are well documented. Studies have shown that physical activity is known to increase special neurotransmitter substances in the brain (endorphins), which create a state of well-being. And total body movement such as dance enhances the functions of other body systems, such as circulatory, respiratory, skeletal, and muscular systems. Regarding its unique connection to the field of medicine, many researches have been undertaken on the effects of dance/movement therapy in special settings with physical problems such as amputations, traumatic brain injury, and stroke, chronic illnesses such as anorexia, bulimia, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, AIDS, and arthritis. Today dance/movement therapy is a well recognized form of complementary therapy used in hospitals as well as at the comprehensive clinical cancer centres. PMID:16236009

  11. Evaluation of Salivary Gland Dysfunction Using Salivary Gland Scintigraphy in Sjoegren's Syndrome Patients and in Thyroid Cancer Patients after Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Yeon; Jang, Su Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Jang, Sung June; Lee, Yun Jong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Salivary gland scintigraphy (SGS) provides an objective means of diagnosing salivary gland dysfunction in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) patients and in thyroid cancer patients after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. In the present study, SGS was performed in SS patients and in thyroid cancer patients post RAI, and scintigraphic parameters were compared. Twenty eight SS patients (males:females=1:27, age 53.3{+-}11.9 years), 28 controls (males:females=3.25, age 54.1{+-}10.1 years), and 92 thyroid cancer patients (males:females=28:64, age 46.2{+-}12.9) who had undergone a session of high dose RAI therapy (mean dose, 5.2{+-}1.5 GBq) were included. SGS was performed using Tc 99m pertechnetate (925MBq). Scintigraphic parameters (parotid uptake ratio PU, submandibular uptake ratio SU, percent age parotid excretion %PE, and percentage submandibular excretion %SE) were measured and compared for SS, thyroid cancer post RAI, and control patients. PU, SU, %SE, and %PE were all significantly lower in SS than in post RAI thyroid cancer of control patients (p<0.05), whereas only %PE was significantly lower in post RAI thyroid cancer patients than in controls (P<0.05). SU and %SE were found to be correlated with the unstimulated whole salivary flow rate. Scintigraphic parameters derived from SGS can play a crucial role in the detection of salivary gland dysfunction in SS patients and in post RAI thyroid cancer patients.

  12. Development of novel radiosensitizers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Akamatsu, K

    2002-01-01

    The novel radiosensitizers for cancer therapy, which have some atoms with large X-ray absorption cross sections, were synthesized. The chemical and radiation (X-rays, W target, 100kVp) toxicities and the radiosensitivities to LS-180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were also evaluated. 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylalcohol (PBBA) derivatives were not radiosensitive even around the maximum concentration. On the other hand, the hydrophilic sodium 2,4,6-triiodobenzoate (STIB) indicated meaningful radiosensitivity to the cells. Moreover, the membrane-specific radiosensitizers, cetyl fluorescein isthiocyanate (cetyl FITC), cetyl eosin isothiocyanate (cetyl br-FITC), cetyl erythrosin isothiocyanate (cetyl I-FITC), which aim for the membrane damage by X-ray photoabsorption on the target atoms, were localized in the plasma membrane. As the results of the colony formation assay, it was found that both cetyl FITC are similarly radiosensitive. In this report, we demonstrate the synthetic methods of the radiosensitizers, the...

  13. Focal Therapy, Differential Therapy, and Radiation Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Anudh K.; Ennis, Ronald D

    2012-01-01

    Focal and differential therapy represent an approach to improve the therapeutic ratio of prostate cancer treatments. This concept is a shift from treating the whole gland to intensely treating the portion of the gland that contains significant tumor. However, there are many challenges in the move towards focal approaches. Defining which patients are suitable candidates for focal therapy approaches is an area of significant controversy, and it is likely that additional data from imaging or det...

  14. [Gene therapy with cytokines against cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy is an excellent alternative for treatment of many diseases. Capacity to manipulate the DNA has allowed direct the gene therapy to correct the function of an altered gene, to increase the expression of a gene and to favour the activation of the immune response. This way, it can intend the use of the DNA like medication able to control, to correct or to cure many diseases. Gene therapy against cancer has an enormous potential, and actually the use of the DNA has increased to control diverse cancer in animal models, with very encouraging results that have allowed its applications in experimental protocols in human. This work concentrates a review of the foundations of the gene therapy and its application on cervical cancer, from the point of view of the alterations of the immune system focused on the tumour micro-environment, and the use of the cytokines as immunomodulators. PMID:16983992

  15. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    CERN Document Server

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, advances in ionizing radiation therapy are competitive to non-ionizing ones, as for example the laser light based therapy, resulting in a synergism that has revolutionized medicine. The use of non-invasive or minimally invasive (e.g. through flexible endoscopes) therapeutic procedures in the management of patients represents a very interesting treatment option. Moreover, as the major breakthrough in cancer management is the individualized patient treatment, new biophotonic techniques, e.g. photo-activated drug carriers, help...

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Soylu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the structured but flexible psychosocial interventions that could be applied to patients with cancer. In many studies the positive effects of cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing psychological morbidity and improving the quality of life of cancer patients have been shown. In this article, the contents and techniques of adapted cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with cancer and its effectiveness in commonly seen psychiatric disorders have been reviewed. The aim of this article is to contribute positively to physicians and nurses in Turkey for early detection of psychological distress and referral to the therapist that would clearly increase the quality of life of cancer patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 257-270

  17. Individually-tailored procedures of breast cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of clinical evaluation of 1007 case histories of breast cancer supplied from the Kazakh Republican Oncological Dispensary, Research Institute of Oncology and Radiation and Municipal Oncological Dispensary (Alma-Ata, 1960-1977), individually-tailored methods of therapy were developed. The procedures are based on such criteria as age, stage, localization, anatomical and histological characteristics of tumor

  18. Radionuclide molecular target therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer harms people's health or even lives severely. Currently, the morbidity and mortality of lung cancer are ascending all over the world. Accounting for 38.08% of malignant tumor caused death in male and 16% in female in cities,ranking top in both sex. Especially, the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer has not been obviously improved for many years. Recently, sodium/iodide transporter gene transfection and the therapy of molecular target drugs mediated radionuclide are being taken into account and become the new research directions in treatment of advanced lung cancer patients with the development of technology and theory for medical molecular biology and the new knowledge of lung cancer's pathogenesis. (authors)

  19. Overcoming Resistance to Targeted Therapies in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Keara L; Papafili, Anastasia; Lawler, Mark; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    The recent discovery of oncogenic drivers and subsequent development of novel targeted strategies has significantly added to the therapeutic armamentarium of anti-cancer therapies. Targeting BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or HER2 in breast cancer has led to practice-changing clinical benefits, while promising therapeutic responses have been achieved by precision medicine approaches in EGFR mutant lung cancer, colorectal cancer and BRAF mutant melanoma. However, although initial therapeutic responses to targeted therapies can be substantial, many patients will develop disease progression within 6-12 months. An increasing application of powerful omics-based approaches and improving preclinical models have enabled the rapid identification of secondary resistance mechanisms. Herein, we discuss how this knowledge has translated into rational, novel treatment strategies for relapsed patients in genomically selected cancer populations. PMID:26615134

  20. Randomised phase II trial (NCT00637975 evaluating activity and toxicity of two different escalating strategies for pregabalin and oxycodone combination therapy for neuropathic pain in cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Chiara Garassino

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neuropathic pain is commonly associated with cancer. Current treatments include combination opioid and adjuvant therapies, but no guidelines are available for dose escalation strategies. This phase II study compared the efficacy and tolerability of two dose escalation strategies for oxycodone and pregabalin combination therapy. METHODS: Patients (N = 75 with oncological neuropathic pain, previously untreated with pregabalin, were recruited in 5 Italian institutions between 2007 and 2010. Patients were randomised to two different dose escalation strategies (arm A; N = 38 oxycodone at a fixed dose with increasing pregabalin doses; (arm B; N = 37 pregabalin at a fixed dose with increasing oxycodone doses. Patients were evaluated from daily diaries and follow-ups at 3, 7, 10, and 14 days after beginning treatment with a numerical rating scale (NRS, neuropathic pain scale (SDN, and well-being scale (ESAS. The primary endpoint was a ≥1/3 reduction in pain (NRS; secondary endpoints included the time to analgesia and adverse effects. The study had a 90% probability of detecting the best strategy for a true difference of at least 15%. RESULTS: More patients in arm A (76% than arm B (64% achieved ≥1/3 overall pain reduction even after controlling for baseline factors (gender, baseline pain. Group A reported fewer side effects than group B; constipation 52.8% vs. 66.7%; nausea: 27.8% vs. 44.4%; drowsiness: 44.4% vs. 55.6%; confusion: 16.7% vs. 27.8%; itching: 8.3% vs. 19.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Both strategies effectively controlled neuropathic pain, but according to the adopted selection design arm A is preferable to arm B for pain control. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00637975.

  1. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  2. Trametes versicolor Mushroom Immune Therapy in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Standish, Leanna J.; WENNER, CYNTHIA A.; Sweet, Erin S.; Bridge, Carly; Nelson, Ana; Martzen, Mark; Novack, Jeffrey; Torkelson, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Data from multiple epidemiologic and clinical studies on immune effects of conventional cancer treatment and the clinical benefits of polysaccharide immune therapy suggest that immune function has a role in breast cancer prevention. Immune therapy utilizing the polysaccharide constituents of Trametes versicolor (Tv) as concurrent adjuvant cancer therapy may be warranted as part of a comprehensive cancer treatment and secondary prevention strategy.

  3. Samarium-153 therapy for prostate cancer: the evaluation of urine activity, staff exposure and dose rate from patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the excretion of Samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetra-methylphosphonic acid (153Sm-EDTMP) in urine and to calculate the dose rate of its retention in the body as a function of time and the dose received by the skin of laboratory staff's finger. Urine samples were collected from 11 patients after intravenous injection of 153Sm-EDTMP. The measurements of dose rate were performed. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were used for absorbed dose measurements. Effective half-lives that were calculated from urine sample measurements were found as 7.1±3 h within the first 24 h. Whole body dose rates before collecting urine of patients were 60.0 ± 15.7 μSv h-1 for within 1 h following 153Sm-EDTMP administration. The highest finger radiation dose is to the right-hand thumb (3.8 ± 2 mGy). The results of the study imply that patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP therapy should be kept a minimum of 8 h in an isolated room at hospital and that one staff should give therapy at most two patients per week. (authors)

  4. In-vitro and in-vivo evaluation of pH-responsive polymeric micelles in a photodynamic cancer therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, J; Brasseur, N; van Lier, J E; Lenaerts, V; Le Garrec, D; Leroux, J C

    2001-02-01

    pH-sensitive polymeric micelles of randomly and terminally alkylated N-isopropylacrylamide copolymers were prepared and characterized. Aluminium chloride phthalocyanine (AlClPc), a second generation sensitizer for the photodynamic therapy of cancer, was incorporated in the micelles by dialysis. Their photodynamic activities were evaluated in-vitro against EMT-6 mouse mammary tumour cells and in-vivo against EMT-6 tumours implanted intradermally on each hind thigh of Balb/c mice. pH-sensitive polymeric micelles were found to exhibit greater cytotoxicity in-vitro than control Cremophor EL formulations. In the presence of chloroquine, a weak base that raises the internal pH of acidic organelles, in-vitro experiments demonstrated the importance of endosomalllysosomal acidity for the pH-sensitive polymeric micelles to be fully effective. Biodistribution was assessed by fluorescence of tissue extracts after intravenous injection of 2 micromol kg(-1) AlClPc. The results revealed accumulation of AlClPc polymeric micelles in the liver, spleen and lungs, with a lower tumour uptake than AlClPc Cremophor EL formulations. However, polymeric micelles exhibited similar activity in-vivo to the control Cremophor EL formulations, demonstrating the higher potency of AlClPc polymeric micelles when localized in tumour tissue. It was concluded that polymeric micelles represent a good alternative to Cremophor EL preparations for the vectorization of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:11273011

  5. 乳腺癌内分泌治疗的疗效评价%Evaluation of endocrine therapy on breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁小笋

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨乳腺癌内分泌治疗的临床效果。方法:收治乳腺癌患者80例,分为对照组和试验组,两组均给予常规手术治疗,而试验组又给予乳腺癌内分泌治疗。结果:试验组治疗有效率明显好于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:乳腺癌内分泌治疗可以提高治疗效果,改善患者生活质量。%Objective:To investigate the clinical effect of endocrine therapy on breast cancer.Methods:80 patients with breast cancer were selected.They were divided into the control group and the experimental group.Patients in the two groups were given conventional surgical treatment,and the experimental group also received breast cancer endocrine therapy.Results:The effective rate of the experimental group was significantly better than that of the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:Endocrine therapy on breast cancer can improve the treatment effect and improve the life quality of patients.

  6. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    OpenAIRE

    Yadollah Omidi; Jaleh Barar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub­stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods: Essential information on gene therapy o...

  7. Personalized Therapy of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bryan J; Kalemkerian, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with distinct clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Despite robust responses to initial chemotherapy and radiation, the prognosis of patients with SCLC remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10 %. Despite the fact that numerous molecularly targeted approaches have thus far failed to demonstrate clinical utility in SCLC, further advances will rely on better definition of the biological pathways that drive survival, proliferation and metastasis. Recent next-generation, molecular profiling studies have identified many new therapeutic targets in SCLC, as well as extreme genomic instability which explains the high degree of resistance. A wide variety of anti-angiogenic agents, growth factor inhibitors, pro-apoptotic agents, and epigenetic modulators have been evaluated in SCLC and many studies of these strategies are on-going. Perhaps the most promising approaches involve agents targeting cancer stem cell pathways and immunomodulatory drugs that interfere with the PD1 and CTLA-4 pathways. SCLC offers many barriers to the development of successful therapy, including limited tumor samples, inadequate preclinical models, high mutational burden, and aggressive tumor growth which impairs functional status and hampers enrollment on clinical trials. PMID:26703804

  8. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  9. Targeted anti-cancerous therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowning decades of efforts in fundamental and applied research, the first generation of targeted anti cancerous drugs is now on the market. Drugs coming from a new approach, conceived from molecular knowledge of cancer and directed against beforehand identified targets. In theory: a miracle of precision and technical success. In practice: a new sources of questions and new problems. (N.C.)

  10. Epigenetic Therapy in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Stephen V.; Fabbri, Muller; Gitlitz, Barbara J.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic deregulation of gene function has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis and is one of the mechanisms contributing to the development of lung cancer. The inherent reversibility of epigenetic alterations makes them viable therapeutic targets. Here, we review the therapeutic implications of epigenetic changes in lung cancer, and recent advances in therapeutic strategies targeting DNA methylation and histone acetylation.

  11. Evaluation of Tumor Shape Variability in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Over the Course of Radiation Therapy Using Implanted Gold Markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga, E-mail: o.vrieze@nki.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kranen, Simon Robert van; Beek, Suzanne van; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brekel, Michiel Wilhelmus Maria van den [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coenraad Robert Nico [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiotherapy, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies tumor shape variability in head-and-neck cancer patients during radiation therapy using implanted markers. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with oropharyngeal tumors treated with (chemo)radiation were included. Helical gold markers (0.35 Multiplication-Sign 2 mm, 3-10/patient, average 6) were implanted around the tumor. Markers were identified on planning computed tomography (CT) and daily cone beam CT (CBCT). After bony anatomy registration, the daily vector length on CBCT in reference to the planning CT and daily marker movement perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) surface at planning CT (d{sub normal}) of each marker were analyzed. Time trends were assessed with linear regression of the {sub markers}. In 2 patients, 2 markers were implanted in normal tissue to evaluate migration by measuring intermarker distances. Results: Marker implantation was feasible without complications. Three-dimensional vectors (4827 measurements, mean 0.23 cm, interquartile ratio 0.24 cm) were highest in base of tongue sublocalization (P<.001) and bulky tumors (vectors exceeded 0.5 cm in 5.7% [0-20 mL], 12.0% [21-40 mL], and 21.7% [{>=}41 mL], respectively [P<.001] of measurements). The measured inward time trend in 11/27 patients correlated with the visual observed marker pattern. In patients with an outward trend (5/27) or no trend (11/27), visual observation showed predominantly an inhomogeneous pattern. Remarkably, in 6 patients, outward marker movement was observed in the posterior pharyngeal wall. The difference in distance between normal tissue markers (1 SD) was 0.05-0.06 cm without time trend, indicating that implanted markers did not migrate. Conclusions: During head-and-neck radiation therapy, normal tissue markers remained stable. Changes in position of tumor markers depended on sublocalization and tumor volume. Large differences in marker patterns between patients as well as within patients were observed

  12. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  13. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G. (Department of Molecular and Tumour Radiobiology, National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary))

    2008-12-15

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  14. Nano antibody therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology, refers to highly specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing disease or repairing damaged tissues, such as bone, muscle, or nerve. Nanotechnology can have an early, paradigm-changing impact on how clinicians will detect cancer in its earliest stages. Exquisitely sensitive devices constructed of nanoscale components-such as nanocantilevers, nanowires and nanochannels-offer the potential for detecting even the rarest molecular signals associated with malignancy. One of the most pressing needs in clinical oncology is for imaging agents that can identify tumors that are far smaller than is possible with today's technology, at a scale of 100,000 cells rather than 1,000,000,000 cells. A new approach in nanotechnology for treating cancer incorporates nano iron particles and attaches them to an antibody that has targets only cancer cells and not healthy cells. The treatment works in two steps. This treatment is an ingenious way to make localized tumor ablation a systemic treatment. The advantages are incredible. There are absolutely no side effects from this treatment. It is not painful or even uncomfortable. The iron particles get flushed harmlessly from the body. It is not a drug and so the cancer cannot build up a resistance to the treatment. It is a systematic treatment; even cancer cells and tumors that are not known about get heated up and ablated. This treatment can even be used to enhance imaging of the cancer because once the cancer cells are coated with the iron particles, they are easy to identify. Everything depends on how reliably the antibodies target cancer cells and not healthy cells. When used in conjunction with other systemic treatments, such as vaccine treatments, we could be looking at a time when even advanced cancers can be brought under control. (author)

  15. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for lower rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murotani, Masahiro; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Takami, Motohisa [Toyonaka Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    To identify appropriate candidates with rectal cancer for preoperative chemoradiation therapy, the local recurrence rate and clinicopathological characteristics of 232 patients with rectal cancer undergoing curative resection in our department were investigated. The local recurrence rates were 3.8%, 10.8% and 16.5% in the Rs, Ra and Rb lesions, respectively. Regarding lower (Rb) rectal cancer, depth of lesion (>a{sub 1}) and nodal metastasis consisted of high factors for local recurrence. Basing on these results, entery criteria for preoperative chemoradiation therapy were established, and concurrent chemoradiation therapy with fluorouracil and cisplatin was delivered preoperatively in 9 primary cases of locally advanced rectal cancer and 3 cases with local recurrence. A partial response was obtained in 7 of 12 cases with a response rate of 58%, size-reduction of the distant metastatic lesions was found in 2 cases, and clinical symptoms were improved in all cases. The histological responses of the 6 resected cases were Grade 2 in 2 cases and Grade 1b in 4 cases. The toxicities of this chemoradiation regimen were well tolerable. As a postoperative complication, infection of the perineal wound was most frequent. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy with the present regimen would be a useful adjuvant treatment for advanced lower rectal cancer. (author)

  16. Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy. Ask your doctor for more information. For women undergoing reconstruction, post- mastectomy radiation may affect your options for reconstruction or the cosmetic outcome. Discuss with your surgeon and radiation oncologist ...

  17. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Robson; David G. Hirst

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these stra...

  18. Art therapy in cancer fight

    OpenAIRE

    Érica Rodrigues D'Alencar; Ângela Maria Alves e Souza; Thábyta Silva de Araújo; Francisca de Melo Beserra; Marta Maria Rodrigues Lima; Andreia Farias Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Art therapy is the therapeutic use of artistic activity in the context of the professional relationship with people affected by disease, injury or by seeking personal development. This study aims to report the experience of art therapy activities with a group of patients and their caregivers in a university hospital. This is an experience report, in Fortaleza - CE, during September 2010 to February 2011. In the meetings, participated 49 people, who performed activities, using the methods of a...

  19. Exercise as Prescription Therapy: Benefits in Cancer and Hypertensive Patients

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Exercise therapy in patients with metabolic chronic disease produces several positive response. This study aims to verify the effects of fast walking associated to a resistance exercise to reduce cardiovascular risk factor. METHODS: Two groups of subjects (10 cancer survivors and 19 hypertensive patients) were evaluated by 6-Minute Walking Test (6MWT), bioimpedance, , the Sit & Reach Test (S&R) evaluate the flexibility, Handgrip and 30’’ Chair Test for muscu...

  20. Novel Therapies for Pediatric Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Macy, Margaret E.; Sawczyn, Kelly K.; Garrington, Timothy P.; Graham, Douglas K.; Gore, Lia

    2008-01-01

    The current high cure rates for children diagnosed with cancer can in part be attributed to emphasis on large cooperative group clinical trials. The significant improvement in pediatric cancer survival over the last few decades is the result of optimized chemotherapy drug dosing, timing, and intensity; however, further alterations in traditional chemotherapy agents are unlikely to produce substantially better outcomes. Furthermore, there remains a subset of patients who have a very poor progn...

  1. The autophagic paradox in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W K K; Coffelt, S B; Cho, C H; Wang, X J; Lee, C W; Chan, F K L; Yu, J; Sung, J J Y

    2012-02-23

    Autophagy, hallmarked by the formation of double-membrane bound organelles known as autophagosomes, is a lysosome-dependent pathway for protein degradation. The role of autophagy in carcinogenesis is context dependent. As a tumor-suppressing mechanism in early-stage carcinogenesis, autophagy inhibits inflammation and promotes genomic stability. Moreover, disruption of autophagy-related genes accelerates tumorigenesis in animals. However, autophagy may also act as a pro-survival mechanism to protect cancer cells from various forms of cellular stress. In cancer therapy, adaptive autophagy in cancer cells sustains tumor growth and survival in face of the toxicity of cancer therapy. To this end, inhibition of autophagy may sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents and ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, in certain circumstances, autophagy mediates the therapeutic effects of some anticancer agents. Data from recent studies are beginning to unveil the apparently paradoxical nature of autophagy as a cell-fate decision machinery. Taken together, modulation of autophagy is a novel approach for enhancing the efficacy of existing cancer therapy, but its Janus-faced nature may complicate the clinical development of autophagy modulators as anticancer therapeutics. PMID:21765470

  2. Melatonin in pathogenesis and therapy of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra T

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone secreted by the pineal gland to transduce the body′s circadian rhythms. An internal 24 hour time keeping system (biological clock regulated by melatonin, controls the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin production is a highly conserved evolutionary phenomenon. The indole hormone is synthesized in the pinealocytes derived from photoreceptors. Altered patterns and/or levels of melatonin secretion have been reported to coincide with sleep disorders, jetlag, depression, stress, reproductive activities, some forms of cancer and immunological disorders. Lately, the physiological and pathological role of melatonin has become a priority area of investigation, particularly in breast cancer, melanoma, colon cancer, lung cancer and leukemia. According to the ′melatonin hypothesis′ of cancer, the exposure to light at night (LAN and anthropogenic electric and magnetic fields (EMFs is related to the increased incidence of breast cancer and childhood leukaemia via melatonin disruption. Melatonin′s hypothermic, antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties, attribute it to an immunomodulator and an oncostatic agent as well. Many clinical studies have envisaged the potential therapeutic role of melatonin in various pathophysiological disorders, particularly cancer. A substantial reduction in risk of death and low adverse effects were reported from various randomized controlled trials of melatonin treatment in cancer patients. This review summarizes the physiological significance of melatonin and its potential role in cancer therapy. Furthermore, the article focuses on melatonin hypothesis to represent the cause-effect relationship of the three aspects: EMF, LAN and cancer.

  3. Gene Therapy in Oral Cancer: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, M. Sathish; Masthan, K.M.K.; Babu, N. Aravindha; Dash, Kailash Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the use of DNA as an agent to treat disease. Gene therapy aims at the insertion of a functional gene into the cells of a patient for the correction of an inborn error of metabolism, to alter or repair an acquired genetic abnormality, and to provide new function to the cell. Many experiments have been done with respect to its application in various diseases.Today, most of the gene therapy studies are aimed at cancer and hereditary diseases which are linked to genetic defects. C...

  4. Evaluation of the efficacyof aminolevulinic acid-dependent photodynamic therapy on melanoma cancer cells treated with tocopherol succinate (in-vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Kouchesfahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Photodynamic therapy (PDT using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA to produce an intracellular photo-sensitizer, a protoporphyrin molecule IX (PPIX which absorbs light and targets cells, is a promising cancer treatment. Unfortunately, treatment failures are still a common occurrence when ALA is used. In this study, in order to enhance the efficacy of ALA-dependent photodynamic therapy, the effects of photodynamic therapy on melanoma cancer cells were studied after treating them with tocopherol succinate.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study melanoma cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium for 24 h. then, cells were treated with tocopherol succinate (6μm/ml. After 48 and 72 hours, the mediums were replaced by serum-free medium in the darkness, with ALA, 0.1mg/ml and then cells incubated for 4h. After that, cells were irradiated by using Nd: YAG laser (532 nm. After 24h, cell survival was measured by the MTT assay.Results: Twenty-four hours after PDT, among compared groups, pretreated cells with tocopherol succinate showed significant lower cell viability than control group. Conclusion: Induction of differentiation by using tocopherol succinate augmented intracellular PPIX accumulation in cells treated with ALA. Therefore phototoxic cell death after exposure to 532nm light enhances significantly in tocopherol succinate-pretreated cells. This study suggests that tocopherol succinate may act as a biological enhancer of ALA based photodynamic therapy

  5. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  6. Breast cancer stem-like cells and breast cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niansong Qian; Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita; Masakazu Toi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Until the early 1990s, human cancers were considered a morphologically heterogeneous population of cells. In 1997, Bonnet et al[1] demonstrated that a small population of leukemia cells was able to differentiate in vivo into leukemic blasts, indicating that the leukemic clone was organized as a hierarchy; this was subsequently denoted as cancer stem like cells (CSCs). CSCs are cancer cells that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells and have the specific ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer. One reason for the failure of traditional anti tumor therapies might be their inability to eradicate CSCs. Therefore, therapies must identify and destroy CSCs in both primary and metastatic tumors.

  7. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Bali; Deepika Bali; Ashutosh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction...

  8. Protein nanomedicines for cancer diagnostics and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results and applications of the work on anti-cancer therapy using nanomedicines at the Amrita Centre for Nanosciences are presented. Proteins have been selected as having good potential for clinical translation and are excellent carriers for drugs, provide good release kinetics and are also amenable for fluorescent tagging with multiple functionalities for diagnostic purposes. (author)

  9. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T; Jeon, Christie Y; Pandol, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  10. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  11. Heterogeneity of liver cancer and personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Hongyang

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an extraordinarily heterogeneous malignant disease among the tumors that have so far been identified. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arises most frequently in the setting of chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis, and takes a variety of course in individual patients to process to tumor. The risk factors such as HBV and/or HCV infections, aflatoxin infection, abuse alcohol intake, metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are closely related to the environmental and genetic susceptibilities to HCC. The consequent resulting genomic instability, molecular and signal transduction network disorders and microenvironmental discrepancies are characterized by the extraordinary heterogeneity of liver cancer. The histology-based definition of the morphological heterogeneity of liver cancer has been modified and refined to treat patients with targeted therapies, but this still cannot solve all the problems. Lack of consistent outcome for anticancer agents and conventional therapies in liver cancer treatment calls for assessing the benefits of new molecularly targeted drugs and combined therapy, under the heterogeneity condition of tumor. The present review article will provide the complex mechanism and phenotype of liver cancer heterogeneity, and help us to execute precision medicine in a really personalized manner. PMID:26213370

  12. Apoptosis : Target of cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, CG; Epping, M; Kruyt, FAE; Giaccone, G

    2002-01-01

    Recent knowledge on apoptosis has made it possible to devise novel approaches, which exploit this process to treat cancer. In this review, we discuss in detail approaches to induce tumor cell apoptosis, their mechanism of action, stage of development, and possible drawbacks. Finally, the obstacles y

  13. Palliative Therapy for Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect a person’s quality of life, when possible. Biliary stent or biliary catheter If cancer is blocking a duct that ... diagnosed? ”) or, in some cases, during surgery. A stent is a small metal or plastic tube that keeps the duct open ...

  14. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells: Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) bind to estrogen receptors , preventing estrogen from binding. Examples of SERMs approved by the FDA are tamoxifen (Nolvadex®), ... called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs), inhibit an enzyme ...

  15. Drug targeting in cancer therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říhová, Blanka; Strohalm, Jiří; Hoste, K.; Jelínková, Markéta; Hovorka, Ondřej; Kovář, Marek; Plocová, Daniela; Šírová, Milada; Šťastný, Marek; Ulbrich, Karel

    Chiang Mai : Chiang Mai University, 2000, s. 35-40. [Takeo Wada Cancer Research Symposium. Chiang Mai (TH), 30.11.2000-01.12.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GV307/96/K226; GA MZd NC5050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * antitumor immunity Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  16. Enhancing Immune Responses for Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-An Xue; Hans J Stauss

    2007-01-01

    Although the immune system possesses the means to respond to cancer, it often fails to control the spread of malignancy. Nonetheless, equipping endogenous immunity to release a strong antitumor response has significant advantages over conventional therapies. This review explores some of the options available to accomplish this,focusing first on vaccinations with tumor antigens to stimulate the immune system and empower stronger antitumor responses. We then compare and contrast the so-far limited clinical success of vaccination with the well-documented curative potential of adoptive therapy using T lymphocytes transfer. Finally, we highlight novel approaches using T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer strategy to exploit allogeneic T cell repertoires in conjunction with receptors selected in vitro for defined MHC/peptide combinations, as a basis for antigen-specific gene therapy of cancers.

  17. Measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation of high definition dose evaluation for nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) simulation using a high definition (HD) phantom was used to evaluate the dose distribution in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Around nasopharyngeal cavity, there exists many small volume organs-at-risk (OARs) such as the optic nerves, auditory nerves, cochlea, and semicircular canal which necessitate the use of a high definition phantom for accurate and correct dose evaluation. The aim of this research was to study the advantages of using an HD phantom for MBMC simulation in NPC patients treated with IMRT. The MBMC simulation in this study was based on the IMRT treatment plan of three NPC patients generated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) using a calculation grid of 2 mm2. The NPC tumor was treated to a cumulative dose of 7000 cGy in 35 fractions using the shrinking-field sequential IMRT (SIMRT) method. The BEAMnrc MC Code was used to simulate a Varian EX21 linear accelerator treatment head. The HD phantom contained 0.5 × 0.5 × 1 mm3 voxels for the nasopharyngeal area and 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm3 for the rest of the head area. An efficiency map was obtained for the amorphous silicon aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to adjust the weighting of each particle in the phase-space file for each IMRT beam. Our analysis revealed that small volume organs such as the eighth cranial nerve, semicircular canal, cochlea and external auditory canal showed an absolute dose difference of ≥200 cGy, while the dose difference for larger organs such as the parotid glands and tumor was negligible for the MBMC simulation using the HD phantom. The HD phantom was found to be suitable for Monte Carlo dose volume analysis of small volume organs. - Highlights: • HD dose evaluation for IMRT of NPC patients have been verified by the MC method. • MC results shows higher

  18. [Localized prostate cancer Focal Therapy: "A la carte" Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares Espinós, E; Barret, E; Sivaraman, A; Pérez-Reggeti, J I; Sánchez-Salas, R; Rozet, F; Galiano, M; Cathelineau, X

    2016-07-01

    Focal therapy has settled as an alternative to radical treatment in selected cases of localized prostate cancer. The selection of patients who are candidates for focal therapy is based on imaging diagnosis relying on multiparametric MRI and image fusion techniques. Thanks to the oncological results and safety profiles of initial series, various energy sources have been developed over the last years. The availability of multiple types of energy sources for focal therapy, commits us to evaluate what type of energy would be the optimal depending on patient's profile and type of lesion. A unique energy for focal therapy would be ideal, but facing the research of the various types of energy we must identify which one is recommended for each lesion. With the experience of our center in different approaches of focal therapy we propose the "A LA CARTE" MODEL based on localization of the lesion. We present the criteria the "a la carte" model is based on, supported by the published evidence on the use of different ablative therapies for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Lesion localization, technical characteristics of each type of energy, patient's profile and secondary effects must be considered in every choice of focal therapy. PMID:27416638

  19. Advanced metrology for cancer therapy. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical treatments play a central role in cancer therapy. Metrology is reasonably well-established for only some of these techniques: several modern forms of treatment (IMRT, hadron therapy, HITU, brachytherapy) suffer from the limited support of traceable metrology which restricts the success of these techniques. The European Union recognised this deficit and identified metrology for health as one of the first four Targeted Programmes in the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), running from 2008 to 2011. The programme included two EMRP projects which address metrology for cancer therapy: - project T2.J06 deals with brachytherapy - project T2.J07 deals with external beam cancer therapy using ionising radiation and highintensity ultrasound Primary measurement standards applicable to modern treatment conditions are being developed under both projects, together with measurement techniques which are meant as a basis of future protocols for dosimetry, treatment planning and monitoring. This three-day scientific conference provides a platform for the presentation of current developments in clinical measurement techniques for cancer therapy, together with the achievements of these projects, under the headings: - Primary and secondary standards of absorbed dose to water for IMRT and brachytherapy - 3D dose distributions and treatment planning for IMRT and brachytherapy - Hadron therapy (protons and carbon ions) - High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound (HITU) The aim of the conference is to provide a forum for the exchange of information and expertise in the community of medical physicists and metrologists at the European level. The conference programme includes 4 keynote talks by invited speakers as well as 59 proffered papers and posters.

  20. Gold nanocages for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Laura; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Locarno, Silvia A.; Macchi, Chiara; D'Alfonso, Laura; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Magni, Paolo; Collini, Maddalena; Romeo, Sergio; Chirico, Giuseppe; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanocages (AuNCs) have been shown to be a useful tool both for imaging and hyperthermia therapy of cancer, thanks to their outstanding optical properties, low toxicity and facile functionalization with targeting molecules, including peptides and antibodies. In particular, hyperthermia is a minimally invasive therapy which takes advantage of the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles to efficiently convert the absorbed light into heat. Here, we use AuNCs for the selective targeting and imaging of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we report the hyperthermic effect characterization of the AuNCs both in solution and internalized in cells. Prostate cancer cells were irradiated at different exposure times, with a pulsed near infrared laser, and the cellular viability was evaluated by confocal microscopy.

  1. Oligonucleotide-based theranostic nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Reza; Ozpolat, Bulent; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2016-05-01

    Theranostic approaches, combining the functionality of both therapy and imaging, have shown potential in cancer nanomedicine. Oligonucleotides such as small interfering RNA and microRNA, which are powerful therapeutic agents, have been effectively employed in theranostic systems against various cancers. Nanoparticles are used to deliver oligonucleotides into tumors by passive or active targeting while protecting the oligonucleotides from nucleases in the extracellular environment. The use of quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles and tagging with contrast agents, like fluorescent dyes, optical or magnetic agents and various radioisotopes, has facilitated early detection of tumors and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we review the advantages of theranostic applications in cancer therapy and imaging, with special attention to oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. PMID:27102380

  2. Two cases with radiation-induced cancers after radiation therapy for cancer of the maxillary sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experienced 2 patients with malignant non-epithelial tumors that developed following an incubation stage of 10 years or more after radiation therapy for cancer of the maxillary sinus. In Patient 1, the primary cancer was unclear, but it was speculated that this patient had been treated for cancer of the maxillary sinus. In patient 2, cancer of the maxillary sinus had been treated in our hospital. In patient 1, the secondary cancer was a malignant histiocytoma of the parapharyngeal space. In patient 2, the secondary cancer was a spindle cell sarcoma in the maxillary sinus. According to the classification of the probability of radiation-induced cancer after treatment for malignant tumors, the probability was evaluated as A in Patient 2, and B or higher in Patient 1. In the two patients, radiation-induced cancer was strongly suggested. For treatment, extended surgery was indicated, as a rule. In Patient 1, radical neck dissection was performed. In patient 2, tumorectomy was performed several times. Concerning the prognosis, Patient 1 is alive without cancer, but Patient 2 died of intracranial invasion by tumor. The invasion of the tumor and histological type may have influenced the prognosis. The incidence of radiation-induced cancer is considered to be 1% or less. However, radiation therapy-related late disorder must be considered. (author)

  3. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U.; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G.; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed.

  4. Cancer therapy with particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, Ugo

    1999-01-01

    This review paper is devoted to conventional radiotherapy and to hadron therapy. In this therapeutical modality, proposed by R. R. Wilson in 1946, the physical selectivity of proton and light ion beams is used to irradiate tissues very close to organs at risk, which cannot be irradiated (the brain and the spinal cord for instance). Also fast neutrons are employed, but they are not suitable for a truly conformal irradiation. Carbon ions have the added advantage, with respect to protons, of the high density of ionization at the end of the range in matter. This property is very valuable for the control of tumours which are radioresistant to both X-rays and protons. After clarifying the general principles, a review is presented of the world hadron therapy centres which are running or are in the design and construction stage. (33 refs).

  5. Evaluating the Effects of Aluminum-Containing and Non-Aluminum Containing Deodorants on Axillary Skin Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer: A 3-Armed Randomized Controlled Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Lucy, E-mail: Lucy.lewis@curtin.edu.au [Centre for Nursing Research, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Nursing and Midwifery Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Carson, Sharron [Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Bydder, Sean [Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Athifa, Mariyam [School of Nursing and Midwifery Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Williams, Anne M. [School of Nursing and Midwifery Curtin University, Perth (Australia); School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Bremner, Alexandra [School of Population Health, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Deodorant use during radiation therapy for breast cancer has been controversial as there are concerns deodorant use may exacerbate axillary skin toxicity. The present study prospectively determined the use of both aluminum-containing and non aluminum containing deodorants on axillary skin toxicity during conventionally fractionated postoperative radiation therapy for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: This 3-arm randomized controlled study was conducted at a single center, tertiary cancer hospital between March 2011 and April 2013. Participants were randomized to 1 of 2 experimental groups (aluminum-containing deodorant and soap or non–aluminum containing deodorant and soap) or a control group (soap). A total of 333 participants were randomized. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate and compare the odds of experiencing high levels of sweating and skin toxicity in each of the deodorant groups to the odds in the control group. The study evaluated a range of endpoints including objective measurements of axilla sweating, skin toxicity, pain, itch and burning. Quality of life was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Radiation characteristics were similar across all groups. Patients in the deodorant groups did not report significantly different ratings for axillary pain, itch, or burning compared with the control group. Patients in the aluminum-containing deodorant group experienced significantly less sweating than the control; the odds of their sweating being barely tolerable and frequently or always interfering with their daily activities was decreased by 85% (odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.91). Conclusions: We found no evidence that the use of either aluminum-containing or non–aluminum containing deodorant adversely effects axillary skin reaction during conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for breast cancer. Our analysis also suggests patients in the aluminum-containing deodorant arm had

  6. Evaluating the Effects of Aluminum-Containing and Non-Aluminum Containing Deodorants on Axillary Skin Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer: A 3-Armed Randomized Controlled Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Deodorant use during radiation therapy for breast cancer has been controversial as there are concerns deodorant use may exacerbate axillary skin toxicity. The present study prospectively determined the use of both aluminum-containing and non aluminum containing deodorants on axillary skin toxicity during conventionally fractionated postoperative radiation therapy for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: This 3-arm randomized controlled study was conducted at a single center, tertiary cancer hospital between March 2011 and April 2013. Participants were randomized to 1 of 2 experimental groups (aluminum-containing deodorant and soap or non–aluminum containing deodorant and soap) or a control group (soap). A total of 333 participants were randomized. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate and compare the odds of experiencing high levels of sweating and skin toxicity in each of the deodorant groups to the odds in the control group. The study evaluated a range of endpoints including objective measurements of axilla sweating, skin toxicity, pain, itch and burning. Quality of life was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Radiation characteristics were similar across all groups. Patients in the deodorant groups did not report significantly different ratings for axillary pain, itch, or burning compared with the control group. Patients in the aluminum-containing deodorant group experienced significantly less sweating than the control; the odds of their sweating being barely tolerable and frequently or always interfering with their daily activities was decreased by 85% (odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.91). Conclusions: We found no evidence that the use of either aluminum-containing or non–aluminum containing deodorant adversely effects axillary skin reaction during conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for breast cancer. Our analysis also suggests patients in the aluminum-containing deodorant arm had

  7. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  8. Principia of cancer therapy, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When given concomitantly with the regimen for rescue of radiation dermatitis consisting of urokinase, glutathione, vitamin C, flavin adenine dinucleotide and cytochrome c, the peroral administration of zinc was seen to be beneficial in the treatment of radiation-related, undermining ulcers, either a neurogenic and decubital ulcer complicating the radiotherapy or radiation skin cancer with painful ulcers. The zinc element may thus be essential in various processes of wound healing and repair of the DNA damage as related to the radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Ming; Yuanming Feng; Huan Liu; Ying Zhang; Li Zhou; Jun Deng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at our institution in the past seven years. Methods and Materials A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercia...

  10. Evaluation of 4-dimensional Computed Tomography to 4-dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Deformable Image Registration for Lung Cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate 2 deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for the purpose of contour mapping to support image-guided adaptive radiation therapy with 4-dimensional cone-beam CT (4DCBCT). Methods and Materials: One planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and 7 weekly 4DCBCT scans were acquired for 10 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients. The gross tumor volume was delineated by a physician in all 4D images. End-of-inspiration phase planning 4DFBCT was registered to the corresponding phase in weekly 4DCBCT images for day-to-day registrations. For phase-to-phase registration, the end-of-inspiration phase from each 4D image was registered to the end-of-expiration phase. Two DIR algorithms—small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) and Insight Toolkit diffeomorphic demons (DEMONS)—were evaluated. Physician-delineated contours were compared with the warped contours by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric distance, and false-positive and false-negative indices. The DIR results are compared with rigid registration of tumor. Results: For day-to-day registrations, the mean DSC was 0.75 ± 0.09 with SICLE, 0.70 ± 0.12 with DEMONS, 0.66 ± 0.12 with rigid-tumor registration, and 0.60 ± 0.14 with rigid-bone registration. Results were comparable to intraobserver variability calculated from phase-to-phase registrations as well as measured interobserver variation for 1 patient. SICLE and DEMONS, when compared with rigid-bone (4.1 mm) and rigid-tumor (3.6 mm) registration, respectively reduced the average symmetric distance to 2.6 and 3.3 mm. On average, SICLE and DEMONS increased the DSC to 0.80 and 0.79, respectively, compared with rigid-tumor (0.78) registrations for 4DCBCT phase-to-phase registrations. Conclusions: Deformable image registration achieved comparable accuracy to reported interobserver delineation variability and higher accuracy than rigid-tumor registration. Deformable image registration

  11. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spallone, Giulia; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.costanzo@uniroma2.it [Department of Dermatology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00199, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-03

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC), representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC). The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  12. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Spallone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC, representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC. The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  13. Late injury of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, P.W. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. FLouis, MO (United States); Russell, A. [Radiological Associates, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bruner, D. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-30

    The purpose of this article is to review the late effects of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract. The anatomic sites detailed are the vulva, vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. The available pathophysiology is discussed. Clinical syndromes are presented. Tolerance doses of irradiation for late effects are rarely presented in the literature and are reviewed where available. Management strategies for surgical, radiotherapeutic, and chemotherapeutic late effects are discussed. Endpoints for evaluation of therapeutic late effects have been formulated utilizing the symptons, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) format. Late effects on the female reproductive tract from cancer therapy should be recognized and managed appropriately. A grading system for these effects is presented. Endpoints for late effects and tolls for the evaluation need to be further developed. 61 refs., 9 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Late injury of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to review the late effects of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract. The anatomic sites detailed are the vulva, vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. The available pathophysiology is discussed. Clinical syndromes are presented. Tolerance doses of irradiation for late effects are rarely presented in the literature and are reviewed where available. Management strategies for surgical, radiotherapeutic, and chemotherapeutic late effects are discussed. Endpoints for evaluation of therapeutic late effects have been formulated utilizing the symptoms, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) format. Late effects on the female reproductive tract from cancer therapy should be recognized and managed appropriately. A grading system for these effects is presented. Endpoints for late effects and tolls for the evaluation need to be further developed

  15. A Novel Method to Evaluate Local Control of Lung Cancer in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Treatment Using 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathriarachchi, Vindu Wathsala

    An improved method is introduced for prediction of local tumor control following lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET). A normalized background-corrected tumor maximum Standard Uptake Value (SUVcmax) is introduced using the mean uptake of adjacent aorta (SUVref), instead of the maximum uptake of lung tumor (SUVmax). This method minimizes the variations associated with SUVmax and objectively demonstrates a strong correlation between the low SUVcmax (PET scans, therefore such inclusion is not recommended for assessing local tumor control of post lung SBRT.

  16. The results of the treatment of various morphological types of ENT skin cancer by photodynamic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Volgin V.N.; Stranadko E.F.; Kagoyants R.V.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses one of the urgent problems of modern oncology — the question of treatment of skin cancer (SC). The experience of the new promising method of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of patients with primary and recurrent skin cancer. Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of patients with primary and recurrent skin cancer (SC). Materials. The Main Military Clinical Hospital SC treatment of upper respiratory tract with PDT pe...

  17. New targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andrada; Petrusel, Livia; Seicean, Radu

    2015-05-28

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis with a median survival of 4-6 mo and a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Despite therapy with gemcitabine, patient survival does not exceed 6 mo, likely due to natural resistance to gemcitabine. Therefore, it is hoped that more favorable results can be obtained by using guided immunotherapy against molecular targets. This review summarizes the new leading targeted therapies in pancreatic cancers, focusing on passive and specific immunotherapies. Passive immunotherapy may have a role for treatment in combination with radiochemotherapy, which otherwise destroys the immune system along with tumor cells. It includes mainly therapies targeting against kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, insulin growth factor-1 receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR and hepatocyte growth factor receptor. Therapies against DNA repair genes, histone deacetylases, microRNA, and pancreatic tumor tissue stromal elements (stromal extracellular matric and stromal pathways) are also discussed. Specific immunotherapies, such as vaccines (whole cell recombinant, peptide, and dendritic cell vaccines), adoptive cell therapy and immunotherapy targeting tumor stem cells, have the role of activating antitumor immune responses. In the future, treatments will likely include personalized medicine, tailored for numerous molecular therapeutic targets of multiple pathogenetic pathways. PMID:26034349

  18. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Pietras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell–cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies

  19. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Richard J; Weinberg, Olga K

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies, including ovarian, non

  20. Neuropilins: A New Target for Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent investigations highlighted strong similarities between neural crest migration during embryogenesis and metastatic processes. Indeed, some families of axon guidance molecules were also reported to participate in cancer invasion: plexins/semaphorins/neuropilins, ephrins/Eph receptors, netrin/DCC/UNC5. Neuropilins (NRPs) are transmembrane non tyrosine-kinase glycoproteins first identified as receptors for class-3 semaphorins. They are particularly involved in neural crest migration and axonal growth during development of the nervous system. Since many types of tumor and endothelial cells express NRP receptors, various soluble molecules were also found to interact with these receptors to modulate cancer progression. Among them, angiogenic factors belonging to the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family seem to be responsible for NRP-related angiogenesis. Because NRPs expression is often upregulated in cancer tissues and correlated with poor prognosis, NRPs expression might be considered as a prognostic factor. While NRP1 was intensively studied for many years and identified as an attractive angiogenesis target for cancer therapy, the NRP2 signaling pathway has just recently been studied. Although NRP genes share 44% homology, differences in their expression patterns, ligands specificities and signaling pathways were observed. Indeed, NRP2 may regulate tumor progression by several concurrent mechanisms, not only angiogenesis but lymphangiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. In view of their multiples functions in cancer promotion, NRPs fulfill all the criteria of a therapeutic target for innovative anti-tumor therapies. This review focuses on NRP-specific roles in tumor progression

  1. The use of biofield therapies in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Beverly

    2007-04-01

    Biofield therapies form a subcategory of the domain of energy therapies, as defined by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Specific biofield therapies addressed in this article include Therapeutic Touch, Healing Touch, Polarity Therapy, Reiki, and Qigong. This article will identify core concepts in biofield therapies, review controlled trials of the use of biofield therapies with patients with cancer, describe the process of biofield therapies implementation in one cancer center, and suggest research to benefit not only patients with cancer but also family members and oncology professionals. PMID:17573275

  2. [Photodynamic therapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, C.B.; Specht, Lena; Kirkegaard, J.;

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment for head and neck cancer. The principle of the treatment is a photochemical reaction initiated by light activation of a photosensitizer, which causes the death of the exposed tissue. This article presents the modes of action of PDT and the techniques as...... well as the clinical procedure. A critical review of the literature is also presented, regarding treatment results of the different techniques and indications for treatments. The possibilities for PDT for head and neck cancer in Denmark are mentioned Udgivelsesdato: 2006/6/5...

  3. Therapeutic potential of snake venom in cancer therapy: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Vivek Kumar; Brahmbhatt, Keyur; Bhatt, Hardik; Parmar, Utsav

    2013-02-01

    Many active secretions produced by animals have been employed in the development of new drugs to treat diseases such as hypertension and cancer. Snake venom toxins contributed significantly to the treatment of many medical conditions. There are many published studies describing and elucidating the anti-cancer potential of snake venom. Cancer therapy is one of the main areas for the use of protein peptides and enzymes originating from animals of different species. Some of these proteins or peptides and enzymes from snake venom when isolated and evaluated may bind specifically to cancer cell membranes, affecting the migration and proliferation of these cells. Some of substances found in the snake venom present a great potential as anti-tumor agent. In this review, we presented the main results of recent years of research involving the active compounds of snake venom that have anticancer activity. PMID:23593597

  4. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  5. Focal therapy for prostate cancer: The current status

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Susan; Taneja, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In an era of increasing prostate cancer incidence and earlier detection, the assessment of clinical significance of prostate cancer is critical. Minimally invasive therapies are increasingly being investigated in localized prostate cancer. Methods and results In this review, we discuss the current status of magnetic resonance imaging targeted fusion prostate biopsy and focal therapy for prostate cancer, its rationale, and techniques. Conclusion Focal therapy offers a promising outlook...

  6. Duration of short-course androgen suppression therapy and the risk of death as a result of prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Amico, Anthony V

    2011-12-10

    We evaluated whether the duration of androgen suppression therapy (AST) had an impact on the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with unfavorable-risk prostate cancer (PC) within established Gleason score (GS) categories.

  7. Status of particle therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current standard treatment for lung cancer, the most common type of cancer worldwide, depends on disease stage. Surgery is the treatment of choice for early-stage tumors, but radiotherapy is a good option for those with early-stage tumors who cannot undergo surgery, and radiotherapy in conjunction with chemotherapy is the standard of care for locally advanced tumors. Although advances in photon (x-ray)-based radiotherapy involving three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy allow radiation doses to be escalated beyond the traditional limit of 60 Gy, this dose is not considered to be sufficient for tumor eradication. Moreover, the improvements in local control and survival conferred by concurrent chemotherapy come at the cost of considerable toxicity owing to inadvertent irradiation of surrounding normal tissues, and this toxicity often limits the radiation dose that can be delivered. Unfortunately for patients with locally advanced lung cancer, local control and survival remain poor. Attempts to improve clinical outcomes for patients with lung cancer have led to the use of charged particle therapy in an effort to exploit the physical properties of such particles to escalate the dose to the tumor while simultaneously limiting the dose to nearby structures, thereby enhancing the therapeutic ratio and potentially improving cancer cure rates. This review summarizes the rationale for and challenges associated with the use of charged particles for lung cancer therapy and reviews the clinical experience to date with using protons and carbon ions for early-stage and locally advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer

  8. Multifunctional Delivery Systems for Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    McErlean, Emma M.; McCrudden, Cian M; McCarthy, Helen O.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines key concepts with respect to cancer gene therapy and the current issues with respect to non-viral delivery. The biological and molecular barriers that need to be overcome before effective non-viral delivery systems can be appropriately designed for oncology applications are highlighted and ways to overcome these are discussed. Strategies developed to evade the immune response are also described and targeted gene delivery is examined with the most effective strategies hig...

  9. Radiation Therapy of Maxillary Sinus Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Maxillary sinus cancers usually are locally advanced and involve the structures around sinus. It is uncommon for this cancer to spread to the regional lymphnodes. For this reason, local control is of paramount important for cure. A policy of combined treatment is generally accepted as the most effective means of enhancing cure rates. This paper reports our experience of a retrospective study of 31 patients treated with radiation therapy alone and combination therapy of surgery and radiation. Materials and Methods: Between July 1974 and January 1992, 47 patients with maxillary sinus cancers underwent either radiation therapy alone or combination therapy of surgery and radiation. Of these, only 31 patients were eligible for analysis. The distribution of clinical stage by the AJCC system was 26%(8/31) for T2 and 74%(23/31) for T3 and T4. Eight patients had palpable lymphadenopathy at diagnosis. Primary site was treated by Cobalt-60 radiation therapy using through a 45 .deg. wedge-pair technique. Elective neck irradiation was not routinely given. Of these 8 patients, the six who had clinically involved nodes were treated with definite radiation therapy. The other two patients had received radical neck dissection. The twenty-two patients were treated with radiation alone and 9 patients were treated with combination radiation therapy. The RT alone patients with RT dose less than 60 Gy were 9 and those above 60 Gy were 13. Results: The overall 5 year survival rate was 23.8%. The 5 year survival rate by T-stage was 60.5% and 7.9% for T2 and T3, 4 respectively. Statistical significance was found by T-stage (p30.1). The 5 year survival rate for RT alone and combination RT was 22.5% and 27.4%, respectively. The primary local control rate was 65%(20/31). Conclusion: This study did not show significant difference in survival between RT alone and combination RT. There is still much controversy with regard to which treatment is optimum. Improved RT technique and

  10. Adenoviral gene therapy in gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nima Khalighinejad; Hesammodin Hariri; Omid Behnamfar; Arash Yousefi; Amir Momeni

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. With current therapeutic approaches the prognosis of gastric cancer is very poor, as gastric cancer accounts for the second most common cause of death in cancer related deaths. Gastric cancer like almost all other cancers has a molecular genetic basis which relies on disruption in normal cellular regulatory mechanisms regarding cell growth, apoptosis and cell division. Thus novel therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy promise to become the alternative choice of treatment in gastric cancer. In gene therapy, suicide genes, tumor suppressor genes and anti-angiogenesis genes among many others are introduced to cancer cells via vectors.Some of the vectors widely used in gene therapy are Adenoviral vectors. This review provides an update of the new developments in adenoviral cancer gene therapy including strategies for inducing apoptosis, inhibiting metastasis and targeting the cancer cells.

  11. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  12. Minimally invasive local therapies for liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Golas, Benjamin J; Yeung, Vincent W; Madoff, David C

    2014-12-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors are an increasing global health problem, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) now being the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Systemic treatment options for HCC remain limited, with Sorafenib as the only prospectively validated agent shown to increase overall survival. Surgical resection and/or transplantation, locally ablative therapies and regional or locoregional therapies have filled the gap in liver tumor treatments, providing improved survival outcomes for both primary and metastatic tumors. Minimally invasive local therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. For patients with low volume disease, these therapies have now been established into consensus practice guidelines. This review highlights technical aspects and outcomes of commonly utilized, minimally invasive local therapies including laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), irreversible electroporation (IRE), and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In addition, the role of combination treatment strategies utilizing these minimally invasive techniques is reviewed. PMID:25610708

  13. Minimally invasive local therapies for liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Li; Josephine Kang; Benjamin J Golas; Vincent W Yeung; David C Madoff

    2014-01-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors are an increasing global health problem, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) now being the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Systemic treatment options for HCC remain limited, with Sorafenib as the only prospectively validated agent shown to increase overall survival. Surgical resection and/or transplantation, locally ablative therapies and regional or locoregional therapies have iflled the gap in liver tumor treatments, providing improved survival outcomes for both primary and metastatic tumors. Minimally invasive local therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. For patients with low volume disease, these therapies have now been established into consensus practice guidelines. This review highlights technical aspects and outcomes of commonly utilized, minimally invasive local therapies including laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), irreversible electroporation (IRE), and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In addition, the role of combination treatment strategies utilizing these minimally invasive techniques is reviewed.

  14. Minimally invasive local therapies for liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors are an increasing global health problem, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) now being the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Systemic treatment options for HCC remain limited, with Sorafenib as the only prospectively validated agent shown to increase overall survival. Surgical resection and/or transplantation, locally ablative therapies and regional or locoregional therapies have filled the gap in liver tumor treatments, providing improved survival outcomes for both primary and metastatic tumors. Minimally invasive local therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. For patients with low volume disease, these therapies have now been established into consensus practice guidelines. This review highlights technical aspects and outcomes of commonly utilized, minimally invasive local therapies including laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), irreversible electroporation (IRE), and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In addition, the role of combination treatment strategies utilizing these minimally invasive techniques is reviewed

  15. Controversies in proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Curtis; Henderson, Randal H; Hoppe, Bradford S; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, R Charles; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2016-08-01

    Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer has been a subject of controversy over the past two decades. Because of its dosimetric advantages when compared to conventional radiation, PT has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in the management of prostate cancer by decreasing toxicity and improving disease control. Nevertheless, its higher costs and the current lack of level I evidence documenting improved clinical outcomes have led some to question its cost-effectiveness. A number of new PT centers have been built over the past decade, leading many stakeholders, including patients, physicians, and insurers, to demand comparative effectiveness data to support its current use. In this review, we summarize the results of recently published studies that support the safety and efficacy of PT in the treatment of prostate cancer. We also review the available cost-effectiveness data for PT and discuss the future of PT, including the current randomized trial comparing PT to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and the need for additional research that may help to establish the relative benefit of PT when compared to photon-based radiation therapy. PMID:27558255

  16. Harnessing Endogenous Systems for Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauber, Thomas Christopher Bogh

    In the recent decade, two strategies in particular have attracted attention due to the prospect of significantly improving cancer treatment: Gene silencing therapy and immunotherapy. Both strategies work by manipulating endogenous mechanisms and theoretically promise very strong effect on the...... immunotherapy (Project II). Transfer into the clinic of therapies based on gene silencing by siRNA delivered by synthetic vectors has yet to happen. A major reason is the lack of efficiency in the delivery process, partly due to insufficient understanding of cellular uptake and processing of the si...... to the conventional PEIs. However, lipid conjugation did not sufficiently reduce the inherent toxicity associated with high molecular weight PEI, and lipid conjugation of bPEI did also not change the ability of bPEI to affect lysosomal pH as a function of time. In contrast to gene silencing therapy...

  17. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeuti...

  18. Digital pathology in personalized cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcial Garcia Rojo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of small molecule inhibitors of growth factor receptors, and the discovery of somatic mutations of the thyrosine kinase domain, have resulted in new paradigms for cancer therapy. Digital microscopy is an important tool for surgical pathologists. The achievements in the digital pathology field have modified the workflow of pathomorphology labs, enhanced the pathologist’s role in diagnostics, and increased their contribution to personalized targeted medicine. Digital image analysis is now available in a variety of platforms to improve quantification performance of diagnostic pathology. We here describe the state of digital microscopy as it applies to the field of quantitative immunohistochemistry of biomarkers related to the clinical personalized targeted therapy of breast cancer, non-small lung cancer and colorectal cancer: HER-2, EGFR, KRAS and BRAF genes. The information is derived from the experience of the authors and a review of the literature. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 570–578

  19. Modulating autophagy: a strategy for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Lin Li; Shao-Liang Han; Xia Fan

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process in which long-lived proteins,damaged cell organelles,and other cellular particles are sequestered and degraded.This process is important for maintaining the cellular microenvironment when the cell is under stress.Many studies have shown that autophagy plays a complex role in human diseases,especially in cancer,where it is known to have paradoxical effects.Namely,autophagy provides the energy for metabolism and tumor growth and leads to cell death that promotes tumor suppression.The link between autophagy and cancer is also evident in that some of the genes that regulate carcinogenesis,oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,participate in or impact the autophagy process.Therefore,modulating autophagy will be a valuable topic for cancer therapy.Many studies have shown that autophagy can inhibit the tumor growth when autophagy modulators are combined with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.These findings suggest that autophagy may be a potent target for cancer therapy.

  20. Cytotoxic and targeted therapy for hereditary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2016-01-01

    There is a number of drugs demonstrating specific activity towards hereditary cancers. For example, tumors in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers usually arise via somatic inactivation of the remaining BRCA allele, which makes them particularly sensitive to platinum-based drugs, PARP inhibitors (PARPi), mitomycin C, liposomal doxorubicin, etc. There are several molecular assays for BRCA-ness, which permit to reveal BRCA-like phenocopies among sporadic tumors and thus extend clinical indications for the use of BRCA-specific therapies. Retrospective data on high-dose chemotherapy deserve consideration given some unexpected instances of cure from metastatic disease among BRCA1/2-mutated patients. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is characterized by high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H), increased antigenicity and elevated expression of immunosuppressive molecules. Recent clinical trial demonstrated tumor responses in HNPCC patients treated by the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab. There are successful clinical trials on the use of novel targeted agents for the treatment or rare cancer syndromes, e.g. RET inhibitors for hereditary medullary thyroid cancer, mTOR inhibitors for tumors arising in patients with tuberous sclerosis (TSC), and SMO inhibitors for basal-cell nevus syndrome. Germ-line mutation tests will be increasingly used in the future for the choice of the optimal therapy, therefore turnaround time for these laboratory procedures needs to be significantly reduced to ensure proper treatment planning. PMID:27555886

  1. Recent advances in radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with an increasing incidence. Most patients with well-differentiated thyroid caner have a favorable prognosis with high survival rate. While surgery and radioiodine therapy is sufficient treatment for the majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, a minority of these patients experiences progressive, life-threatening growth and metastatic spread of the disease. Because there is no prospective controlled study to evaluate the differences of management of thyroid cancer, it is hard to choose the best treatment option. And there are still lots of controversies about the management of this disease, such as surgical extent, proper use of radioiodine for remnant ablation and therapy, use of rhTSH instead of withdrawal of thyroid hormone, long-term follow-up strategy, thyroglobulin as a tumor marker, etc. In this review, recent data related to these conflicting issues and recent advances in diagnosis, radioiodine therapy and long-term monitoring of well-differentiated thyroid cancer are summarized

  2. “Smart”nanomaterials for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LE; GUYADER; Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Recent development in nanotechnology has provided new tools for cancer therapy and diagnostics.Because of their small size,nanoscale devices readily interact with biomolecules both on the cell surface and inside the cell.Nanomaterials,such as fullerenes and their derivatives,are effective in terms of interactions with the immune system and have great potential as anticancer drugs.Comparatively,other nanomaterials are able to load active drugs to cancer cells by selectively using the unique tumor environment,such as their enhanced permeability,retention effect and the specific acidic microenvironment.Multifunctional and multiplexed nanoparticles,as the next generation of nanoparticles,are now being extensively investigated and are promising tools to achieve personalized and tailored cancer treatments.

  3. Efficacy of cow urine therapy on various cancer patients in Mandsaur District, India - A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of cow urine therapy on cancer patients in 8 days camp at Mandsaur district was carried out. The object of this survey was to evaluate efficacy of cow urine therapy on various cancer patients who were reported across from different state of India. Total 68 cancer patients reported during the survey from 8 April 2007 to 15 April 2007. A questionnaire was developed to assess the efficacy of cow urine therapy. During survey, out of 68 patients, 7.35% patients withdraw themselves from the treatment and 63 (92.64% patients continued the therapy. There was a high proportion (30.87% of throat cancer and the other prevalent cancer was breast cancer (14.70% followed by cervix and uterine cancer (5.88%, buccal cavity cancer and sinus (4.41% lung cancer, lymphoma and bone cancer (2.94%, both throat and buccal (5.88% and other cancer (8.82%, respectively. The symptoms (pain, inflammation, burning sensation, difficulty in swallowing, irritation, etc. of cancer patients were categorized into severe, moderate and mild categories, respectively. Intensive study of the data of cancer patients revealed that the degree of severe, moderate and mild symptoms were 82.16%, 15.8% and 1.58% on the first day and 7.9%, 55.3% and 36.34% on the eighth day, respectively. It was evaluated that patients who were receiving cow urine therapy since 2-3 months were most benefited. Hence, this traditional therapy may really a boon to cancer patients.

  4. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Methods: Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, H...

  5. Radionuclide therapy of endocrine-related cancer; Nuklearmedizinische Therapie endokriner Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Nuklearmedizin, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the established radionuclide therapies for endocrine-related cancer that already have market authorization or are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Radioiodine therapy is still the gold standard for differentiated iodine-avid thyroid cancer. In patients with bone and lung metastases (near) total remission is seen in approximately 50 % and the 15-year survival rate for these patients is approximately 90 %. In contrast to the USA, meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy has market approval in Europe. According to the current literature, in the setting of advanced stage neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, radiological remission can be achieved in > 30 % and symptom control in almost 80 % of the treated patients. Somatostatin receptor targeted radionuclide therapies (e.g. with DOTATATE or DOTATOC) demonstrated promising results in phase 2 trials, reporting progression-free survival in the range of 24-36 months. A first phase 3 pivotal trial for intestinal carcinoids is currently recruiting and another trial for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is planned. Radiopharmaceuticals based on glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) or minigastrins are in the early evaluation stage for application in the treatment of insulinomas and medullary thyroid cancer. In general, radiopharmaceutical therapy belongs to the group of so-called theranostics which means that therapy is tailored for individual patients based on molecular imaging diagnostics to stratify target positive or target negative tumor phenotypes. (orig.) [German] Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber die etablierten sowie weitere vielversprechende, aktuell im Rahmen von Studien eingesetzte nuklearmedizinische Therapiemoeglichkeiten diverser endokrinologischer Neoplasien. Die Radiojodtherapie ist unveraendert die Therapie der Wahl beim differenzierten, jodspeichernden Schilddruesenkarzinom. Im metastasierten Stadium sind in ca. 50 % der Faelle noch

  6. HIFU as a Neoadjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, P.; Xing, F.; Huang, X.; Zhu, H.; Lo, H. W.; Zhong, X.; Pruitt, S.; Robertson, C.

    2011-09-01

    To broaden the application spectrum of HIFU in cancer therapy, we performed a pilot experiment to evaluate the potential of using HIFU as a neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Mice bearing wild-type B16F10 melanoma inoculated subcutaneously were either untreated (control) or treated by HIFU, CPA-7 or HIFU+CPA-7 before surgical resection of the primary tumor two days after HIFU treatment. The animals were then followed for four weeks or up to the humane endpoint to determine local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival rate. The results demonstrate that animals treated by HIFU+CPA-7 (which is a small molecule that suppresses STAT3 activity) had a significantly lower recurrence rate, and slower growth of the recurrent tumor, with concomitantly higher survival rate, followed by those treated with CPA-7 and HIFU, respectively. Immunological assays revealed that CPA-7 treatment could significantly lower STAT3, and subsequently, Treg activities. In particular, the combination of HIFU and CPA-7 can induce a much stronger anti-tumor immune response than HIFU or surgery alone, as assessed by CTL and IFN-γ secretion. Overall, our results suggest that HIFU in combination with immunotherapy strategies has the potential to be used as a neoadjuvant therapy to prime the host with a strong anti-tumor immune response before surgical resection of the primary tumor. This multimodality, combinational therapy has the potential to greatly broaden the range of HIFU applications in cancer therapy with lower tumor recurrence and improved survival rate.

  7. A critical evaluation of secondary cancer risk models applied to Monte Carlo dose distributions of 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional conformal and hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, A.; Bochud, F.; Moeckli, R.

    2014-08-01

    The comparison of radiotherapy techniques regarding secondary cancer risk has yielded contradictory results possibly stemming from the many different approaches used to estimate risk. The purpose of this study was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different available risk models applied to detailed whole-body dose distributions computed by Monte Carlo for various breast radiotherapy techniques including conventional open tangents, 3D conformal wedged tangents and hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). First, organ-specific linear risk models developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII committee were applied to mean doses for remote organs only and all solid organs. Then, different general non-linear risk models were applied to the whole body dose distribution. Finally, organ-specific non-linear risk models for the lung and breast were used to assess the secondary cancer risk for these two specific organs. A total of 32 different calculated absolute risks resulted in a broad range of values (between 0.1% and 48.5%) underlying the large uncertainties in absolute risk calculation. The ratio of risk between two techniques has often been proposed as a more robust assessment of risk than the absolute risk. We found that the ratio of risk between two techniques could also vary substantially considering the different approaches to risk estimation. Sometimes the ratio of risk between two techniques would range between values smaller and larger than one, which then translates into inconsistent results on the potential higher risk of one technique compared to another. We found however that the hybrid IMRT technique resulted in a systematic reduction of risk compared to the other techniques investigated even though the magnitude of this reduction varied substantially with the different approaches investigated. Based on the epidemiological data available, a reasonable

  8. The Results of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Despite apparently complete resection of cancer of the rectum, local recurrence rate was high. Radiation therapy has been used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy as an adjunct to surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic factors, survival rate and local recurrence rate of the rectal cancer who had received postoperative radiation therapy by retrospective analysis. Method: From 1982 to 1990, 63 patients with cancer of the rectum surgically staged as B2 or C disease received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after curative resection of tumor for cure. Postoperative radiation therapy was given to the whole pelvis (mean dose: 5040 cGy in 5-6weeks) and perineum was included in irradiated field in case of abdominoperineal resection. Results: Three-year actuarial survival rate was 73.2% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 62.9% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate was 69.5% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 56.8% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate in anterior resection was 77.8% and 44.4% in abdominoperineal resection. The local recurrence rate was 15.9% and distant failure rate was 20.6%. Severe late complication was small bowel obstruction in 6 patients and surgery was required in 4 patients (6.3%). The prognostic factors were stage (p=0.0221) and method of surgery(p=0.0414) (anterior resection vs abdominoperineal resection). Conclusion: This study provides evidence supporting the use of postoperative radiation therapy for reducing the local recurrence rate in patients who have had curative resection of rectal cancer with involvement of perirectal fat or regional nodes or both (stage B2 and C)

  9. The Results of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Purpose: Despite apparently complete resection of cancer of the rectum, local recurrence rate was high. Radiation therapy has been used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy as an adjunct to surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic factors, survival rate and local recurrence rate of the rectal cancer who had received postoperative radiation therapy by retrospective analysis. Method: From 1982 to 1990, 63 patients with cancer of the rectum surgically staged as B2 or C disease received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after curative resection of tumor for cure. Postoperative radiation therapy was given to the whole pelvis (mean dose: 5040 cGy in 5-6weeks) and perineum was included in irradiated field in case of abdominoperineal resection. Results: Three-year actuarial survival rate was 73.2% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 62.9% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate was 69.5% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 56.8% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate in anterior resection was 77.8% and 44.4% in abdominoperineal resection. The local recurrence rate was 15.9% and distant failure rate was 20.6%. Severe late complication was small bowel obstruction in 6 patients and surgery was required in 4 patients (6.3%). The prognostic factors were stage (p=0.0221) and method of surgery(p=0.0414) (anterior resection vs abdominoperineal resection). Conclusion: This study provides evidence supporting the use of postoperative radiation therapy for reducing the local recurrence rate in patients who have had curative resection of rectal cancer with involvement of perirectal fat or regional nodes or both (stage B2 and C)

  10. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Oesophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for oesophageal cancer is based on data from 42 randomized trials and 2 meta-analyses. A total of 44 scientific articles are included, involving 5,772 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There is fairly strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy does not improve the survival in patients with potentially resectable oesophageal cancer. There is moderate evidence that preoperative chemo-radiotherapy has no beneficial impact on the survival of patients with potentially resectable oesophageal cancer. There is no scientific evidence that postoperative radiotherapy improves survival in patients with resectable oesophageal cancer. The documentation is, however, poor, consisting of only three randomized trials. There is fairly strong evidence that concomitant (but not sequential) chemo-radiotherapy gives significantly better survival rate than radiotherapy alone in inoperable oesophageal cancer. The results of the reported clinical trials are, however, conflicting, and no solid conclusion can be drawn. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy has been compared with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in two randomized studies with conflicting results and no firm conclusion can be drawn

  11. Multimodality Treatment for Patients with Node-Positive Prostate Cancer: the Role of Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Satoru; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Watanabe, Yui; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoko; Takada, Akinori; Ii, Noriko; Sakuma, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the secondary most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Although numerous prospective randomized trial have been conducted to guide the management of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer, few clinical trials targeting node-positive prostate cancer have been reported. Therefore, there are still controversies in the optimal management of node-positive prostate cancer. Recently, efficacy of multimodality treatment, including radiation therapy (RT), for such patients has been reported in several articles. The results indicate potential benefit of RT both in adjuvant therapy after prostatectomy and in definitive therapy for node-positive prostate cancer. The aim in this article was to summarize the current evidence for RT and evaluate the role in multimodality treatment for patients with node-positive prostate cancer. PMID:27221830

  12. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuse, Junji, E-mail: jfuruse@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8611 (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-05-03

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important.

  13. Tumor microenvironment and cancer therapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu

    2016-09-28

    Innate resistance to various therapeutic interventions is a hallmark of cancer. In recent years, however, acquired resistance has emerged as a daunting challenge to anticancer treatments including chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapy, which abolishes the efficacy of otherwise successful regimens. Cancer cells gain resistance through a variety of mechanisms in both primary and metastatic sites, involving cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors, but the latter often remains overlooked. Mounting evidence suggests critical roles played by the tumor microenvironment (TME) in multiple aspects of cancer progression particularly therapeutic resistance. The TME decreases drug penetration, confers proliferative and antiapoptotic advantages to surviving cells, facilitates resistance without causing genetic mutations and epigenetic changes, collectively modifying disease modality and distorting clinical indices. Recent studies have set the baseline for future investigation on the intricate relationship between cancer resistance and the TME in pathological backgrounds. This review provides an updated outline of research advances in TME biology and highlights the prospect of targeting the TME as an essential strategy to overcome cancer resistance and improve therapeutic outcomes through precise intervention. In the long run, continued inputs into translational medicine remain highly desired to achieve durable responses in the current era of personalized clinical oncology. PMID:26272180

  14. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Ann Stepp, Mary [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States); Trink, Barry [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  15. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important

  16. Systems immune monitoring in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenplate, Allison R; Johnson, Douglas B; Ferrell, P Brent; Irish, Jonathan M

    2016-07-01

    Treatments that successfully modulate anti-cancer immunity have significantly improved outcomes for advanced stage malignancies and sparked intense study of the cellular mechanisms governing therapy response and resistance. These responses are governed by an evolving milieu of cancer and immune cell subpopulations that can be a rich source of biomarkers and biological insight, but it is only recently that research tools have developed to comprehensively characterize this level of cellular complexity. Mass cytometry is particularly well suited to tracking cells in complex tissues because >35 measurements can be made on each of hundreds of thousands of cells per sample, allowing all cells detected in a sample to be characterized for cell type, signalling activity, and functional outcome. This review focuses on mass cytometry as an example of systems level characterization of cancer and immune cells in human tissues, including blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and primary tumours. This review also discusses the state of the art in single cell tumour immunology, including tissue collection, technical and biological quality controls, computational analysis, and integration of different experimental and clinical data types. Ex vivo analysis of human tumour cells complements both in vivo monitoring, which generally measures far fewer features or lacks single cell resolution, and laboratory models, which incur cell type losses, signalling alterations, and genomic changes during establishment. Mass cytometry is on the leading edge of a new generation of cytomic tools that work with small tissue samples, such as a fine needle aspirates or blood draws, to monitor changes in rare or unexpected cell subsets during cancer therapy. This approach holds great promise for dissecting cellular microenvironments, monitoring how treatments affect tissues, revealing cellular biomarkers and effector mechanisms, and creating new treatments that productively engage the immune system to

  17. Nanotechnology; its significance in cancer and photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Gaeeni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, developments in nanotechnology have provided a new field in medicine called “Nanomedicine”. Nanomedicine has provided new tools for photodynamic therapy. Quantum dots (QDs are approximately spherical nanoparticles that have attracted broad attention and have been used in nanomedicine applications. QDs have high molar extinction coefficients and photoluminescence quantum yield, narrow emission spectra, broad absorption, large effective stokes shifts. QDs are more photostable and resistant to metabolic degradation. These photosensitizing properties can be used as photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT. PDT has been recommended for its unique characteristic, such as low side effect and more efficiency. Therefore, nanomedicine leads a promising future for targeted therapy in cancer tumor. Furthermore, QDs have recently been applied in PDT, which will be addressed in this review letter. Also this review letter evaluates key aspects of nano-particulate design and engineering, including the advantage of the nanometer scale size range, biological behavior, and safety profile.

  18. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  19. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfa Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy.

  20. Bacteria in cancer therapy: a novel experimental strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Medhi B; Prakash A; Byrav DS Prasad; Joshi R; Patyar S; Das BK

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Resistance to conventional anticancer therapies in patients with advanced solid tumors has prompted the need of alternative cancer therapies. Moreover, the success of novel cancer therapies depends on their selectivity for cancer cells with limited toxicity to normal tissues. Several decades after Coley's work a variety of natural and genetically modified non-pathogenic bacterial species are being explored as potential antitumor agents, either to provide direct tumoricidal effects or...

  1. Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in Cancer Research & Discovery Stories of ... Editorial Board Integrative Therapies Editorial Board Levels of Evidence Levels of Evidence: Treatment Levels of Evidence: Supportive & ...

  2. Adenoviral gene therapy in gastric cancer: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Khalighinejad, Nima; Hariri, Hesammodin; Behnamfar, Omid; Yousefi, Arash; Momeni, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. With current therapeutic approaches the prognosis of gastric cancer is very poor, as gastric cancer accounts for the second most common cause of death in cancer related deaths. Gastric cancer like almost all other cancers has a molecular genetic basis which relies on disruption in normal cellular regulatory mechanisms regarding cell growth, apoptosis and cell division. Thus novel therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy promi...

  3. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ...

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a “targeted” therapy for cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liang-Fu Han; Ming Zeng

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology. In the past decade, such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible. In general, the term "targeted therapy" has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies. However, improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for "targeted" treatment, notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and ste...

  5. Novel Polypeptide-Based Biomaterials for Prostate Cancer Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Mayle, Kristine M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among American men, and current therapies are nonspecific with many negative side effects. As described in Chapter 1, these side effects are generally due to inadvertent harm to healthy cells, and therefore, the development of targeted therapies can improve patient welfare, as well as improve the efficacy of current therapies. Furthermore, the materials used for these therapies should be biocompatible and avoid undesired immu...

  6. Photoacoustic imaging and temperature measurement for photothermal cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Jignesh; Park, Suhyun; Aglyamov, Salavat; Larson, Timothy; Ma, Li; Sokolov, Konstantin; Johnston, Keith; Milner, Thomas; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2008-01-01

    Photothermal therapy is a noninvasive, targeted, laser-based technique for cancer treatment. During photothermal therapy, light energy is converted to heat by tumor-specific photoabsorbers. The corresponding temperature rise causes localized cancer destruction. For effective treatment, however, the presence of photoabsorbers in the tumor must be ascertained before therapy and thermal imaging must be performed during therapy. This study investigates the feasibility of guiding photothermal ther...

  7. Radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine (I-131) therapy has been in use for the treatment of thyroid diseases for the past six decades. However its use in therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer is still controversial. This is because thyroid cancers are generally slow growing tumours, with low mortality and normal survival. Long term follow-up studies for two to three decades to record recurrence and mortality and to establish definite conclusions on the acceptable modes of treatment are recommended. As the incidence of the disease is very low, a large number of cases to establish good statistical data is required. Most published reports deal with a small series of cases and hence are not statistically significant. In order to overcome these deficiencies, reports are now being published on collated data obtained from several centres. Here again the problems encountered are the differing protocols for treatment with radioiodine, the indications for treatment which may include or exclude ablation of residual thyroid tissue, cervical nodal metastases and distal metastases. The administered doses of radioiodine for ablation of residual thyroid tissue and metastatic disease also vary from centre to centre. The most reliable conclusions regarding treatment protocol encountered in radioiodine treatment are obtained from studies reported on a large series of patients followed over a period of 3 decades or more from a single institute with a more or less unchanged protocol of treatment. Such studies are few. These reports from a handful of centres around the world are the most referred and cited studies. This paper portrays a comprehensive global practice of radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, along with some practical aspects of the treatment and a few pertinent information based on the local experience at the Radiation Medicine Centre, Mumbai, which probably has one of the largest experiences in this aspect of thyroid cancer management in the world. (author)

  8. Curative radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has experienced an extremely rapid development in recent years. Important improvements such as the introduction of multileaf collimators and computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning software have enabled three dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3DCRT). The development of treatment planning systems and technology for brachytherapy has been very rapid as well. Development of accelerators with integrated on-board imaging equipment and technology, for example image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has further improved the precision with reduced margins to adjacent normal tissues. This has, in turn, led to the possibility to administer even higher doses to the prostate than previously. Although radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy have been used for the last decades as curative treatment modalities, still there are no randomized trials published comparing these two options. Outcome data show that the two treatment modalities are highly comparable when used for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  9. Proton therapy of cancer: Potential clinical advantages and cost-effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, Jonas; Ekman, Mattias [Stockholm Health Economics, Stockholm (Sweden); Rehn Ericsson, Suzanne [Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology; Joensson, Bengt [Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    Proton therapy may offer potential clinical advantages compared with conventional radiation therapy for many cancer patients. Due to the large investment costs for building a proton therapy facility, however, the treatment cost with proton radiation is higher than with conventional radiation. It is therefore important to evaluate whether the medical benefits of proton therapy are large enough to motivate the higher costs. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of proton therapy in the treatment of four different cancers: left-sided breast cancer, prostate cancer, head and neck cancer, and childhood medulloblastoma. A Markov cohort simulation model was created for each cancer type and used to simulate the life of patients treated with radiation. Cost and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) were used as primary outcome measures. The results indicated that proton therapy was cost-effective if appropriate risk groups were chosen. The average cost per QALY gained for the four types of cancer assessed was about Euro 10,130. If the value of a QALY was set to Euro 55,000, the total yearly net benefit of treating 925 cancer patients with the four types of cancer was about Euro 20.8 million. Investment in a proton facility may thus be cost-effective. The results must be interpreted with caution, since there is a lack of data, and consequently large uncertainties in the assumptions used.

  10. Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Gall Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sirohi, Bhawna; Singh, Ashish; Jagannath, P.; Shrikhande, Shailesh V.

    2014-01-01

    Gall bladder cancer is a common cancer in the Ganges belt of North-eastern India. In view of incidental diagnosis of gall bladder cancer by physicians and surgeons, the treatment is not optimised. Most patients present in advanced stages and surgery remains the only option to cure. This review highlights the current evidence in advances in systemic therapy of gall bladder cancer.

  11. Advanced strategies in liposomal cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jensen, Simon Skøde; Jørgensen, Kent

    2005-01-01

    Tumor specific drug delivery has become increasingly interesting in cancer therapy, as the use of chemotherapeutics is often limited due to severe side effects. Conventional drug delivery systems have shown low efficiency and a continuous search for more advanced drug delivery principles is...... therefore of great importance. In the first part of this review, we present current strategies in the drug delivery field, focusing on site-specific triggered drug release from liposomes in cancerous tissue. Currently marketed drug delivery systems lack the ability to actively release the carried drug and......, none of them have yet led to marketed drugs and are still far from achieving this goal. The most advanced and prospective technologies are probably the prodrug strategies where nontoxic drugs are carried and activated specifically in the malignant tissue by overexpressed enzymes. In the second part of...

  12. Carbon materials for drug delivery & cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes and graphene are both low-dimensional sp2 carbon nanomaterials exhibiting many unique physical and chemical properties that are interesting in a wide range of areas including nanomedicine. Since 2004, carbon nanotubes have been extensively explored as drug delivery carriers for the intracellular transport of chemotherapy drugs, proteins, and genes. In vivo cancer treatment with carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated in animal experiments by several different groups. Recently, graphene, another allotrope of carbon, has also shown promise in various biomedical applications. In this article, we will highlight recent research on these two categories of closely related carbon nanomaterials for applications in drug delivery and cancer therapy, and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this rapidly growing field.

  13. Systemic therapy for patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Recent modalities and strategies have increased the complexity of treatment choice in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), and therefore all cases should be assessed at a multidisciplinary conference. Adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months increases the chance of cure by absolutely 5 % in stage II...... and 10–15 % in stage III. Targeted therapy is not recommended in the adjuvant setting. Treatment options in patients with non- resectable CRC are based on the extent of disease (resectable/potential resectable/non-resectable) and symptoms. Surgery fi rst or chemotherapy fi rst in patients with...

  14. Novel therapies in genitourinary cancer: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenhong

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, new treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC has been a spotlight in the field of cancer therapeutics. With several emerging agents branded as 'targeted therapy' now available, both medical oncologists and urologists are progressively more hopeful for better outcomes. The new remedies may provide patients with improved survival and at the same time less toxicity when compared to traditional cytotoxic agents. This article will center on current and emerging treatment strategies for advanced RCC and other GU malignancies with updates from 2008 annual ASCO meeting.

  15. Cancer of endometrium and prolonged estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont-smith, M; Meigs, J V; Graham, R M; Gilbert, H H

    1946-07-01

    A causal link between prolonged estrogen (E) therapy and endometrial cancer is argued for in this report of a case who was treated with large amounts of estrogenic substances almost continuously for an 8-year period. In 1919 a 25-year-old woman was admitted with asthma of 1-year duration. Asthma onset had been very severe, requiring administration of epinephrine hydrochloride every few hours and frequent hospital observation. In 1928, the patient was amenorrheic for 8 months; in 1936, she experienced amenorrhea for 4 months. In 1937 (patient now 45 years old), the relationship between amenorrhea and increased severity of asthma was suspected. At this time, the patient also complained of hot flashes and sweats. Treatment with estrogenic substances was begun in 1937 and continued through 1945. 3 unusual features were noted during therapy: 1) persistence of hot flashes; 2) persistence of high urine titers of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) despite adequate E doses; and 3) absence of bleeding when E was temporarily withdrawn. By 1945, endometrial cancer had been identified by vaginal smear and verified by biopsy. Because of the previous absence of respose of FSH to prolonged E therapy, Es were omitted for 4 weeks, and after this period the vaginal smear showed complete absence of intrinsic estrogenic stimulation, and the urine titer of FSH was high. E given for 10 days caused moderate pituitary inhibition. Determination of 17-keto-steroids made before and after therapy was abnormally low. Except for the state of chronic illness and the continuous administration of asthma medication (chronic alarm reaction?), there is no explanation of carcinoma grade 2. PMID:12334535

  16. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  17. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  18. Pancreatic cancer planning: Complex conformal vs modulated therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Katherine L; Witek, Matthew E; Chen, Hongyu; Showalter, Timothy N; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Harrison, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    To compare the roles of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) therapy as compared to simple and complex 3-dimensional chemoradiotherpy (3DCRT) planning for resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. In all, 12 patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (8) or neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (4) were evaluated retrospectively. Radiotherapy planning was performed for 4 treatment techniques: simple 4-field box, complex 5-field 3DCRT, 5 to 6-field IMRT, and single-arc VMAT. All volumes were approved by a single observer in accordance with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Pancreas Contouring Atlas. Plans included tumor/tumor bed and regional lymph nodes to 45Gy; with tumor/tumor bed boosted to 50.4Gy, at least 95% of planning target volume (PTV) received the prescription dose. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for multiple end points, treatment planning, and delivery time were assessed. Complex 3DCRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans significantly (p group of patients with cancer. PMID:26831922

  19. Neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal cancer. Indication and efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some approaches such as adjuvant chemotherapy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy have been tried to improve the efficacy of treatment for resectable esophageal cancer patients. The usefullness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, has remained a matter of controversy. However, there is a report from JCOG9907 in Japan that two courses of neoadjuvant 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin (5-FU/CDDP) improved the survival of esophageal squamous cell cancer patients. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has not had a consistent evaluation because of the varying results of each trial. But from the results of meta-analysis and CALGB9781, the neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy called ''trimodality therapy'' has been a standard treatment in the United States. We should evaluate whether there would be similar effectiveness in Japan, where the histology and operative approach are different. Some approaches such as DNA microarray and proteomics, which can predict the treatment effect, are being tried. (author)

  20. Comparative evaluation of early and late whole body scan images post-therapy with I131 in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: In order to reduce the period of time between the therapy with I131 and the acquisition of images for Whole Body Scan (WBS), the aim of this investigation is the comparison of WBS images acquired early (4th-6th days) and late (10th-15th days). Materials and Methods: 15 patients whit the diagnosis of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (Follicular and Papillary) were included in the study. All of them received a therapeutic dose of Iodine 131 of 100 mCi. WBS images were obtained in one early control -4th - 6th day- and after 10-15 days post-therapy -late control-, using an SPECT system General Electric Starcam 3200 AC/T. The WB images were acquired in 512x128 matrix for anterior and posterior views. Their evaluation was performed blind and independently by 3 Nuclear Medicine Physicians, classifying the cases according a checklist 'with changes or without changes'. The signification of the results was evaluated by McNemar non parametric Test, using a significance level alfa=0.05. Results: 60% of patients showed some change between early and late controls. The change consisted of important descending or complete disappearance of I131 uptake focus in late control comparing with early evaluation. In the 33.3% of cases (44% of focus) is possible to observe total disappearance of focus described early. In 4 patients there were extra thyroidal metastasis, they didn't present reduction in their intensity of uptake and in one case the focus increased the uptake. Likewise, there was possible to determine the frequency of observation for the uptaking of Iodine 131 in normal sites. Conclusion: The changes observed between early and late evaluations an unacceptable loss of information which support the idea in order to evaluate with WBS images to the patient early (4th-6th day). This change is very appreciated in order to reduce the period between the therapy and control and it's a favourable support for the aim of this investigation

  1. Evaluation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Prognostic Marker for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important protein involved in the process of angiogenesis that has been found to correlate with relapse-free and overall survival in breast cancer, predominantly in locally advanced and metastatic disease. A paucity of data is available on the prognostic implications of VEGF in early-stage breast cancer; specifically, its prognostic value for local relapse after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to assess VEGF expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with BCT and to correlate the clinical and pathologic features and outcomes with overexpression of VEGF. Methods and Materials: After obtaining institutional review board approval, the paraffin specimens of 368 patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT between 1975 and 2005 were constructed into tissue microarrays with twofold redundancy. The tissue microarrays were stained for VEGF and read by a trained pathologist, who was unaware of the clinical details, as positive or negative according the standard guidelines. The clinical and pathologic data, long-term outcomes, and results of VEGF staining were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 6.5 years. VEGF expression was positive in 56 (15%) of the 368 patients. Although VEGF expression did not correlate with age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, histologic type, family history, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or HER-2 status, a trend was seen toward increased VEGF expression in the black cohort (26% black vs. 13% white, p = .068). Within the margin-negative cohort, VEGF did not predict for local relapse-free survival (RFS) (96% vs. 95%), nodal RFS (100% vs. 100%), distant metastasis-free survival (91% vs. 92%), overall survival (92% vs. 97%), respectively (all p >.05). Subset analysis revealed that VEGF was highly predictive of local RFS in node-positive, margin

  2. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  3. Oral mucositis in myelosuppressive cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, J B; Schubert, M M

    1999-09-01

    Because the etiology of mucositis is multifactorial , approaches to prevention and management have also been multifactorial. Effective prevention and management of mucositis will reduce the pain and suffering experienced during cancer treatment. Oropharyngeal pain in cancer patients frequently requires systemic analgesics, adjunctive medications, physical therapy, and psychologic therapy in addition to oral care and topical treatments. Good oral hygiene reduces the severity of oral mucositis and does not increase the risk of bacteremia. Current approaches to management include frequent oral rinsing with saline or bicarbonate rinses, maintaining excellent oral hygiene, and using topical anesthetics and analgesics. Cryotherapy is a potential adjunctive approach in some cases. There are a number of approaches that appear to represent viable candidates for further study. Biologic response modifiers offer the potential for prevention and for acceleration of healing. Various cytokines will enter clinical trials in the near future; these offer the potential for reduction of epithelial cell sensitivity to the toxic effects of cancer therapy or for stimulation of repair of the damaged tissue. Other approaches include the use of medications to reduce exposure of the oral mucosa to chemotherapeutic drugs that are secreted in saliva. Antimicrobial approaches have met with conflicting results, little effect being seen with chlorhexidine and systemic antimicrobials in the prevention of mucositis in radiation patients. In patients with BMT and patients with leukemia, chlorhexidine may not be effective in preventing mucositis, although there may be reduction in oral colonization by Candida. Initial studies of topical antimicrobials that affect the gram-negative oral flora have shown reductions in ulcerative mucositis during radiation therapy but have not been assessed in leukemia/BMT. Among other approaches that require further study are low-energy lasers and anti

  4. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  5. Multifunctional nanoparticles for prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandratre, Shantanu S; Dash, Alekha K

    2015-02-01

    The relapse of cancer after first line therapy with anticancer agents is a common occurrence. This recurrence is believed to be due to the presence of a subpopulation of cells called cancer stem cells in the tumor. Therefore, a combination therapy which is susceptible to both types of cells is desirable. Delivery of this combinatorial approach in a nanoparticulate system will provide even a better therapeutic outcome in tumor targeting. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize nanoparticulate system containing two anticancer agents (cyclopamine and paclitaxel) having different susceptibilities toward cancer cells. Both drugs were entrapped in glyceryl monooleate (GMO)-chitosan solid lipid as well as poly(glycolic-lactic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity studies were performed on DU145, DU145 TXR, and Wi26 A4 cells. The particle size of drug-loaded GMO-chitosan nanoparticles was 278.4 ± 16.4 nm with a positive zeta potential. However, the PLGA particles were 234.5 ± 6.8 nm in size with a negative zeta potential. Thermal analyses of both nanoparticles revealed that the drugs were present in noncrystalline state in the matrix. A sustained in vitro release was observed for both the drugs in these nanoparticles. PLGA blank particles showed no cytotoxicity in all the cell lines tested, whereas GMO-chitosan blank particles showed substantial cytotoxicity. The types of polymer used for the preparation of nanoparticles played a major role and affected the in vitro release, cytotoxicity, and uptake of nanoparticles in the all the cell lines tested. PMID:25190362

  6. Pancreatic cancer vaccine: a unique potential therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paola Cappello, Moitza Principe, Francesco Novelli Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, Center for Experimental Research and Medical Studies, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is a lethal disease and is one of the cancers that is most resistant to traditional therapies. Historically, neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy has provided any significant increase in the survival of patients with PDA. Despite intensive efforts, any attempts to improve the survival in the past 15 years have failed. This holds true even after the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their involvement in pathways that are considered to be important in PDA development and progression. Recently, however, FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin treatment has provided a limited survival advantage in patients with advanced PDA. Therefore, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the survival rate of patients with PDA. Results from the last 10 years of research in the field of PDA have helped to identify new immunological targets and develop new vaccines that are capable of stimulating an immune response. In addition, the information obtained about the role of the tumor microenvironment in suppressing the immune response and the possibility of targeting PDA microenvironment to limit immune suppression and enhance the response of effector T-cells has opened new avenues for treating this incurable disease. The time is ripe for developing new therapeutic approaches that are able to effectively counteract the progression and spreading of PDA. This review discusses the potential prospects in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer through vaccination and its combination therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, targeting of the tumor microenvironment, and inhibition of immunological

  7. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna V

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanna Sanna, Nicolino Pala, Mario SechiDepartment of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Laboratory of Nanomedicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, ItalyAbstract: Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for

  8. Autophagy Therapeutic Potential of Garlic in Human Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Yung-Lin; Raghu, Rajasekaran; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Liu, Chun-Ting; Lin, Shu-Hsi; Lai, Yi-Syuan; Cheng, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Shih-Hang; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is one of the deadliest diseases against humans. To tackle this menace, humans have developed several high-technology therapies, such as chemotherapy, tomotherapy, targeted therapy, and antibody therapy. However, all these therapies have their own adverse side effects. Therefore, recent years have seen increased attention being given to the natural food for complementary therapy, which have less side effects. Garlic (Dà Suàn; Allium sativum), is one of most powerful food used in many o...

  9. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy

  10. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Christina S., E-mail: cbaik2@u.washington.edu; Eaton, Keith D. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States)

    2012-09-25

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy.

  11. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D. Eaton

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy.

  12. Targeting Strategies for Multifunctional Nanoparticles in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Kyung Yu, Jinho Park, Sangyong Jon

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials offer new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticles harboring various functions including targeting, imaging, therapy, and etc have been intensively studied aiming to overcome limitations associated with conventional cancer diagnosis and therapy. Of various nanoparticles, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with superparamagnetic property have shown potential as multifunctional nanoparticles for clinical translation because they have been used...

  13. Evaluation of patient preferences towards treatment during extended hours for patients receiving radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer: A time trade-off study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To reduce the waiting time between diagnosis and the start of radiation therapy, some departments have introduced appointments outside of conventional working hours, but the inconvenience this may cause to patients is unknown. We examined, from the patient's perspective, whether reduced waiting times to treatment would be sufficient to trade off against potentially inconvenient appointment times. Method: We interviewed patients receiving radiation therapy at a major teaching hospital between January and May 2005. Two patient groups were considered: those treated during conventional working hours (8.30 am to 4.30 pm), and those treated outside these hours. Patients were asked to trade a reduction in waiting time to the start of treatment against treatment outside conventional working hours. Results: Of 129 patients interviewed, 77 were treated during conventional working hours and 52 outside these hours. Fifty-seven (44%) were male and 52 (40%) were aged over 60 years. To prefer treatment out of working hours, patients being treated during conventional working hours required a larger reduction in waiting time (odds ratio 2.36, 95% CI 0.97-5.76). Patients with curable disease and those who had made few changes in their lifestyle throughout the treatment were more likely to accept treatment outside of conventional working hours. Conclusion: It is impractical to satisfy the treatment-time preferences of all patients. However, many patients prefer treatment outside of normal treatment times if this would reduce the time until the start of radiation therapy. Evaluating the effect of waiting times on patients' perceptions of their disease control provides important information in allocating treatment hours and appointment times

  14. The changes in complete blood count in thyroid cancer patients treated with radioactive iodine ablation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bircan Sönmez; İsmail Doğan; Canan Yavruoğlu; Gamze Can; Mehmet Sönmez

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation therapy on the complete blood count (CBC) in thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred sixty four patients undergoing RAI ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy were included. CBC results were available from the patients’ medical records at the time of ablation and at the 1st, 6th, and 12th months after RAI therapy.Results: Hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC) and platelet...

  15. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  16. Gene Therapy of Cancer: Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Qian; Jesus Prieto

    2004-01-01

    Many malignancies lack satisfactory treatment and new therapeutic options are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a new modality to treat both inherited and acquired diseases based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. Different gene therapy strategies against cancers have been developed. A considerable number of preclinical studies indicate that a great variety of cancers are amenable to gene therapy. Among these strategies,induction of anti-tumorimmunity is the most promising approach. Gene therapy with cytokines has reached unprecedented success in preclinical models of cancer. Synergistic rather than additive effects have beendemonstrated by combination of gene transfer of cytokines/chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. Recent progress in vector technology and in imaging techniques allowing in vivo assessment of gene expression will facilitate the development of clinical applications of gene therapy, a procedure which may have a notorious impact in the management of cancers lacking effective treatment.

  17. Immuno-isolation in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Pasquale; Potter, Murray; Hirte, Hal; Chang, Patricia

    2006-04-01

    The implantation of genetically-modified non-autologous cells in immuno-protected microcapsules is an alternative to ex vivo gene therapy. Such cells delivering a recombinant therapeutic product are isolated from the host's immune system by being encapsulated within permselective microcapsules. This approach has been successful in pre-clinical animal studies involving delivery of hormone or enzymes to treat dwarfism, lysosomal storage disease, or hemophilia B. Recently, this platform technology has shown promise in the treatment for more complex diseases such as cancer. One of the earliest strategy was to augment the chemotherapeutic effect of a prodrug by implanting encapsulated cells that can metabolise prodrugs into cytotoxic products in close proximity to the cancer cells. More recent approaches include enhancing tumor cell death through immunotherapy, or suppressing tumor cell proliferation through anti-angiogenesis. These can be achieved by delivering single molecules of cytokines or angiostatin, respectively, by implanting microencapsulated cells engineered to secrete these recombinant products. Recent refinements of these approaches include genetic fusion of cytokines or angiostatin to additional functional groups with tumor targeting or tumor cell killing properties, thus enhancing the potency of the recombinant products. Furthermore, a COMBO strategy of implanting microencapsulated cells to deliver multiple products targeted to diverse pathways in tumor suppression also showed much promise. This review will summarise the application of microencapsulation of genetically-modified cells to cancer treatment in animal models, the efficacy of such approaches, and how these studies have led to better understanding of the biology of cancer treatment. The flexibility of this modular system involving molecular engineering, cellular genetic modification, and polymer chemistry provides potentially a huge range of application modalities, and a tremendous multi

  18. Hormone Replacement Therapy After Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueck AO

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, patient samples in all studies investigating hormone replacement therapy (HRT after breast cancer have been small.Therefore, HRT should only be used if alternatives such as specifically not contraindicated phytopreparations or selective sero-tonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are not effective. This is primarily due to forensic reasons since clinical data on the risk ofalternatives (based on present evidence are even more sparse. Regarding HRT, four prospective randomized studies and at least15 observational studies after breast cancer are available. Only the HABITS study shows an increased risk of relapse. The authorssuggest that this is probably associated with the relatively high number of patients with HRT treatment after ER-positive cancersas well as due to the preferred use of estrogen/progestin-combined preparations. Based on the results of the randomized pla-cebo-controlled study Women’s Health Initiative (WHI as well as of at least 12 observational studies, the progestin componentseems to be mainly responsible for the probability of increased diagnosis frequency of primary breast cancer. However, no dataare available on the impact of progestin on the use of combined HRT after breast cancer. However, also with estrogen only anincreased risk of relapse must be expected and patients should be informed about it. This has to be concluded due to biologicalplausibility and observational studies although the estrogen-only arm in WHI did not show any increased primary risk. Thus, anyform of HRT should only be performed in exceptional cases, and treatment duration should be as short as possible with thelowest effective dose.

  19. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  20. Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Wood, Bradford J.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Diaz, Annerleim Walton; Hoang, Anthony N.; Pinto, Peter A.; Peter L. Choyke; Türkbey, Barış

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of routine prostate specific antigen screening has led to the discovery of many small and low-grade prostate cancers which have a low probability of causing mortality. These cancers, however, are often treated with radical therapies resulting in long-term side effects. There has been increasing interest in minimally invasive focal therapies to treat these tumors. While imaging modalities have improved rapidly over the past decade, similar advances in image-guided therapy are now ...

  1. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: Is it promising?

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, Andreas P; Fechner, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. The therapeutic outcome of conventional therapies is inefficient. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a promising molecular alternative in the treatment of gastric cancer, including the replacement of defective tumor suppressor genes, the inactivation of oncogenes, the introduction of suicide genes, genetic immunotherapy, anti-angiogenetic gene therapy, and virotherapy. Improved molecular biological t...

  2. Risk of radiogenic second cancers following volumetric modulated arc therapy and proton arc therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechner, Laura A.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Zhang, Rui; Etzel, Carol; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2012-11-01

    Prostate cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy are at an increased risk to develop a radiogenic second cancer. Proton therapy has been shown to reduce the predicted risk of second cancer when compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, it is unknown if this is also true for the rotational therapies proton arc therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The objective of this study was to compare the predicted risk of cancer following proton arc therapy and VMAT for prostate cancer. Proton arc therapy and VMAT plans were created for three patients. Various risk models were combined with the dosimetric data (therapeutic and stray dose) to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer in the bladder and rectum. Ratios of ERR values (RRR) from proton arc therapy and VMAT were calculated. RRR values ranged from 0.74 to 0.99, and all RRR values were shown to be statistically less than 1, except for the value calculated with the linear-non-threshold risk model. We conclude that the predicted risk of cancer in the bladder or rectum following proton arc therapy for prostate cancer is either less than or approximately equal to the risk following VMAT, depending on which risk model is applied.

  3. Molecular MR imaging of cancer gene therapy. Ferritin transgene reporter takes the stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been actively investigated and made rapid progress in the past decade. Applied to cancer gene therapy, the technique's high spatial resolution allows evaluation of gene delivery into target tissues. Because noninvasive monitoring of the duration, location, and magnitude of transgene expression in tumor tissues or cells provides useful information for assessing therapeutic efficacy and optimizing protocols, molecular imaging is expected to become a critical step in the success of cancer gene therapy in the near future. We present a brief overview of the current status of molecular MR imaging, especially in vivo reporter gene imaging using ferritin and other reporters, discuss its application to cancer gene therapy, and present our research of MR imaging detection of electroporation-mediated cancer gene therapy using the ferritin reporter gene. (author)

  4. Personalized therapy in endometrial cancer: Challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Westin, Shannon N.; Broaddus, Russell R.

    2012-01-01

    Early stage endometrial cancer is generally curable. However, progress in the treatment of advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer has been limited. This has led to a shift from the use of traditional chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy regimens to the promising area of targeted therapy, given the large number of druggable molecular alterations found in endometrial cancer. To maximize the effects of directed targeted therapy, careful molecular characterization of the endometrial tumor ...

  5. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Jyothi Thundimadathil

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to convent...

  6. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jae Heon Kim; Hong Jun Lee; Yun Seob Song

    2014-01-01

    Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new ...

  7. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney K; Halldén G

    2016-01-01

    Katrina Sweeney, Gunnel Halldén Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Abstract: Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms t...

  8. Adjuvant Therapy of Colon Cancer: Current Status and Future Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Options for the adjuvant therapy of resected stage III colon cancer have expanded beyond the previously well-accepted standard of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with leucovorin. The Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT) study confirmed that capecitabine (Xeloda) is at least as effective and is less toxic than a bolus 5-FU and leucovorin regimen for patients with stage III colon cancer. This study, in addition to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) C-06, which...

  9. Measurement of tumor volume by PET to evaluate prognosis in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated by non-surgical therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) seem to have disparity in prognosis. Accurate prediction of prognosis could be useful in the future to predict individual risk and to develop more aggressive or alternative treatment strategies. Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in patients with NSCLC. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 120 patients with pathologically proven NSCLC (61 squamous cell carcinomas and 59 adenocarcinomas) who underwent pretreatment 18F-FDG PET. MTV and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) for the primary tumors were measured by 18F-FDG PET. Pretreatment variables (age, sex, American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] stage, histological type, SUVmax, and MTV) were analyzed to identify their correlation with two-year survival. To further evaluate and compare the predictive value of PET parameters, MTV, and SUVmax, time-dependent receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used. Results: In the univariate analysis, AJCC stage, histological type, MTV, and SUVmax of primary tumor were significant predictors of survival. On multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors associated with decreased two-year survival were AJCC stage (hazard ratio [HR] 2.236, P 0.003), histological type (HR 2.038, P = 0. 004), and MTV (HR 1.016, P 0.001). SUVmax was not a significant factor (HR 0.96, P = 0.490). On time-dependent ROC analysis, MTV showed good predictive performance for two-year survival consistently better than SUVmax. Conclusion: MTV, a volumetric parameter of 18F-FDG PET, is an important independent prognostic factor for survival and a better predictor of survival than SUVmax for the primary tumor in patients with advanced NSCLC

  10. Evaluation of paclitaxel and carboplatin versus combination chemotherapy with fluorouracil doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as a neoadjuvant therapy in patients with inoperable breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the results of patients with locally advanced breast cancer receiving two different regimens Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide (FAC) and Paclitaxel and Carboplatin. Study Design: Comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The Oncology Department, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (INMOL), Lahore, from March 2007 to September 2008. Methodology: Patients with inoperable locally advanced breast cancer of stage were included. Sixteen patients were given FAC regimen and 9 patients were given Paclitaxel and Carboplatin, each combination was cycled after 21 days for four times. Before enrollment, detailed medical histories, physical examinations and performance status assessments were done as well as post chemotherapy evaluation with regular follow-up visits was done. Complete Response (CR, 100%) is defined as the disappearance of all known disease parameter i.e. disappearance in detectable tumour size, node free disease and surgery is possible. Paratial Response (PR, > 50%) was defined by 50% or greater decrease in the sum of the areas of bidimensionally measured lesions i.e. change of N2 to N1 or no status and some surgical procedure is possible to down stage the disease. Minor Response (MR) was defined as a decrease in the tumour insufficient to quality for partial resp once. Static disease or no evaluable reflected no significant change in disease and no evidence of new disease. Progression of disease (> 25%) was defined as a 25% or greater increase in the area of any lesion > 2 cm or in the sum of the products of the individual lesions or the appearance of new malignant lesions, surgery not possible. Results: Twenty five patients completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Sixteen (66%) patients received FAC and 9 (37%) patients received PC chemotherapy. Overall CR (breast and axilla) was 54%, PR was 16% and minor response (MR) was 8%. FAC treatment induced more emesis, mucositis, alopecia and cardiotoxicity. No death occurred

  11. New and emerging combination therapies for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esophageal cancer comprises two different histological forms – squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC). While the incidence of AC has increased steeply in Western countries during the last few years, the incidence of SCC is fairly stable. Both forms differ in pathogenesis and response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Plenty of studies have evaluated new chemotherapy combination regimens in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative setting. In addition, new radiation and chemoradiation protocols have been investigated. Finally, molecular-targeted therapy has been included in several new randomized prospective trials. Therefore, this review presents new data on this topic and critically discusses promising approaches towards a more effective treatment in a disease with a grim prognosis

  12. Conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective review of 402 patients with stage I or II invasive breast carcinoma treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy between 1979 and 1992 w as done. Disease free and actuarial survival rates, local, regional and distant recurrence rates and treatment related acute and chronic complications were evaluated according to stage. The technique and dose of radiotherapy were assessed in relation to stage of the disease, status of margin of lumpectomy and cosmetic results. Treatment related morbidity was minimal and overall cosmetic results were excellent. In stage 0 (in situ), I and II survival at 12 years has been 100%, 90% and 80% respectively. It is concluded that breast conservation treatment is an appropriate method of primary therapy, along with radiation therapy, for women with Stage I and II breast cancer

  13. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for ovarian cancer is based on data from six randomized trials. Moreover, data from one prospective study and three retrospective studies were used. In total, 10 scientific articles are included, involving 1,282 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 15,042 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized in the following points: There is no scientific documentation supporting adjuvant radiotherapy for early-stage, low-risk patients. No studies have been reported where adjuvant radiotherapy has been compared with no adjuvant therapy in early-stage, high-risk patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy, either whole abdominal irradiation or intraperitoneal P32, has been compared with adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage, high-risk patients. There is no scientific evidence to show that there is a difference in efficacy. There is some evidence to suggest that adjuvant radiotherapy after radical surgery leads to an increase in disease-free survival rate for patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. There is little documentation on long-term side effects (second malignancy) after adjuvant radiotherapy and no conclusions can be drawn

  14. Bladder preservation using chemoradiation therapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the long-term results and molecular markers of outcome with selective organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer using chemoradiation therapy. We examined locally invasive bladder cancer in 32 patients (30 men, 2 women; mean age at treatment 68.1 years) who underwent bladder-sparing protocols in the Department of Urology at Sumitomo Hospital between 2000 and 2005. The clinical stage was T2, T3, and T4 in 13, 16, and 3 patients, respectively. Our protocol includes aggressive transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and 46 Gy radiotherapy (2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the pelvis with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy (20 mg/body/day, 5 days/week, the first and fourth week, intravenously). The initial evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), urine cytology, and cystoscopy with a biopsy. During follow-up, if the patients developed superficial recurrence, they was treated with TURBT and intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), while patients with invasive recurrence were advised to undergo a salvage cystectomy. We examined the association between the expression of the Bcl-2 family in pretreatment TUR specimens and patient outcome. The mean follow-up was 54.6 months. The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that bladder preservation was achieved in 27 patients (84.4%). The actuarial local control rate with an intact bladder was 56.3% (18 patients) at 3 years. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 90.6, 84.0, and 66.9%, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 75.0, 67.2, and 33.3% in T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Bcl-x positivity was significantly associated with a poor cancer-specific survival rate (log-rank test, p=0.038). Chemoradiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer can achieve survival rates similar to those in patients treated with radical cystectomy, with successful bladder preservation. Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-x is a

  15. Combined modality therapy for stage ⅠB cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiuan; Qian Shao; Yang Xingsheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the current approaches for multimodality therapy for stage ⅠB cervical cancer. Methods:The relevant literature has served as a source for identified high or intermediate risks and management of stage ⅠB cervical cancer. Result:The high risks include pelvic lymph node metastasis (PLNM), positive resection margin (PRM), and the in-volvement of parametrium (IPM). The intermediate risks include deep stromal invasion (DSI), bulky tumor size ( BTS), lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI). Adeno-carcinomatous histo-type is the new risk feature relevant to poor prognoses. Both radical hysterectomy plus bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection(PLND) and radical radiotherapy have proven to be equally effec-tive. Surgery is more performed for stage ⅠB1 disease;radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is preferable for stage ⅠB2 disease. For patients with one high risk or two of intermediate risks, radical hysterectomy plus PLND followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy can improve overall survival(OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Conclusion:The management should be indi-vidualized for stage ⅠB cervical cancer. The optimized multidisciplinary therapy can benefit pa-tients with the best cure and minimum morbidity and complications.

  16. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m2/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Results: Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3 N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Conclusions: Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further

  17. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    A. I. Neimark; M. A. Tachalov; B. A. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) patients treated with HIFU (n = 28) and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = ...

  18. Hormonal replacement therapy and gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The problem of quality of life and lifestyle in elderly women is today a very important social problem all over the world but particularly in rich western countries. Life expectancy of the population will be longer and longer in the future and for both females and males the biological involution correlated with the aging process must be delayed. The gonadal hormones stimulate the healthy state of the entire body (heart, skin, brain, bones, urogenital apparatus and so on) and consequently hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) is mandatory. In women the biological clock of menopause allows us to intervene at the right time, with personalized estrogenic, estroprogestinic or estroandrogenic treatments. Health benefits and groundless risks allow today a careful hormonal management even in women treated for gynaecological cancers (breast and endometrium as well). PMID:10412612

  19. Current role of surgical therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan Swan; Thomas J Miner

    2006-01-01

    Surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment for gastric cancer. Since the inception of the gastrectomy for cancer of the stomach, there has been debate over the bounds of surgical therapy, balancing potential long-term survival with perioperative morbidity and mortality. This review delineates the current role of surgery in preoperative staging, curative resection, and palliative treatment for gastric cancer.

  20. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.A.J. van de Schoot

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and reduc

  1. Music therapy as part of the alternative-complementary therapy in cancer patients in hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios Athanassakis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the modern health problems of people living in developed countries. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches to cancer patients is constantly updated with new data. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the international literature referred to the application of music therapy in the treatment for pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Method and materials: The method of this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature on MEDLINE (2000-2010 database and using as key words music, music therapy, alternative-complementary therapy, cancer, children. Results: Music therapy, the last few years, seems to be one of the forms of alternative-complementary therapy for patients treated for cancer. Music therapy is applied as part of complementary therapy in pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Complementary-alternative methods are non-invasive, non-toxic, cheap, safe and can be easily used by the patients themselves. Primarily, the music therapy aimed to the reduction of the emotional trauma and the feeling of the pain during the process of the treatment (radiotherapy, chemotherapy, other painful procedures but also in the whole patients life. Conclusions: Scientific bibliographic databases research concerning the music therapy in patients with cancer seem encouraging, especially in children. Nevertheless, the further study of the role of the music during hospitalization in the outcome of the treatment is essential

  2. Evaluation of radiation therapy factors in prophylactic central nervous system irradiation for childhood leukemia: a report from the Children's Cancer Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of six different types of central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis were studied in two successive Children's Cancer Study Group clinical trials of children with acute leukemia. Radiation therapy doses and technical factors were analyzed in relation to survival, relapse-free survival, bone marrow and CNS relapse rates, and the toxicities encountered in 656 study children. They were randomized among: (1) 2400 rad to the craniospinal axis (CS) and 1200 rad to the abdomen and gonad, (2) 2400 rad CS, and (3) 2400 rad to the cranium (Cr) + IT/MTX. Hematologic, gastrointestinal and infectious disease compilations were highest in group 1. The patients were divided into low and high risk categories, defined as those with initial white blood cell counts below and above 20,000/cu mm for outcome analyses. No statistically significant differences were detected in the five-year rates for relapse-free survival or survival, nor fo CNS or bone marrow relapse among the 5 irradiated groups when equipment variables, total doses, field arrangements, fractionation, and protraction were analyzed. These results should be interpreted in the light of the group 4 children who had the highest CNS relapse rates (e.g., 33% for low risk patients vs 4 to 16% for their counterparts in the other 5 groups), but nonetheless had a generally similar bone marrow and survival experience. Exceptions to the foregoing are the better five-year survival rates of 64 and 73% respectively for group 3 and group 6 high-risk boys, contrasted with 25 to 42% for their counterparts in the other 4 groups

  3. Economic analysis of a phase III clinical trial evaluating the addition of total androgen suppression to radiation versus radiation alone for locally advanced prostate cancer (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 86-10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding hormone therapy to radiation for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, using a Monte Carlo simulation of a Markov Model. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 86-10 randomized patients to receive radiation therapy (RT) alone or RT plus total androgen suppression (RTHormones) 2 months before and during RT for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. A Markov model was designed with Data Pro (TreeAge Software, Williamstown, MA). The analysis took a payer's perspective. Transition probabilities from one state of health (i.e., with no disease progression or with hormone-responsive metastatic disease) to another were calculated from published rates pertaining to RTOG 86-10. Patients remained in one state of health for 1 year. Utility values for each health state and treatment were obtained from the literature. Distributions were sampled at random from the treatment utilities according to a second-order Monte Carlo simulation technique. Results: The mean expected cost for the RT-only treatments was $29,240 (range, $29,138-$29,403). The mean effectiveness for the RT-only treatment was 5.48 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (range, 5.47-5.50). The mean expected cost for RTHormones was $31,286 (range, $31,058-$31,555). The mean effectiveness was 6.43 QALYs (range, 6.42-6.44). Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed RTHormones to be within the range of cost-effectiveness at $2,153/QALY. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis resulted in a >80% probability that RTHormones is cost-effective. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that adding hormonal treatment to RT improves health outcomes at a cost that is within the acceptable cost-effectiveness range

  4. Emerging HIFU applications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ezekiel; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-05-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), is a promising, non-invasive modality for treatment of tumours in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging or diagnostic ultrasound guidance. HIFU is being used increasingly for treatment of prostate cancer and uterine fibroids. Over the last 10 years a growing number of clinical trials have examined HIFU treatment of both benign and malignant tumours of the liver, breast, pancreas, bone, connective tissue, thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and brain. For some of these emerging indications, HIFU is poised to become a serious alternative or adjunct to current standard treatments--including surgery, radiation, gene therapy, immunotherapy, and chemotherapy. Current commercially available HIFU devices are marketed for their thermal ablation applications. In the future, lower energy treatments may play a significant role in mediating targeted drug and gene delivery for cancer treatment. In this article we introduce currently available HIFU systems, provide an overview of clinical trials in emerging oncological targets, and briefly discuss selected pre-clinical research that is relevant to future oncological HIFU applications. PMID:25367011

  5. Senescence induction; a possible cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondoh Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cellular immortalization is a crucial step during the development of human cancer. Primary mammalian cells reach replicative exhaustion after several passages in vitro, a process called replicative senescence. During such a state of permanent growth arrest, senescent cells are refractory to physiological proliferation stimuli: they have altered cell morphology and gene expression patterns, although they remain viable with preserved metabolic activity. Interestingly, senescent cells have also been detected in vivo in human tumors, particularly in benign lesions. Senescence is a mechanism that limits cellular lifespan and constitutes a barrier against cellular immortalization. During immortalization, cells acquire genetic alterations that override senescence. Tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes are closely involved in senescence, as their knockdown and ectopic expression confer immortality and senescence induction, respectively. By using high throughput genetic screening to search for genes involved in senescence, several candidate oncogenes and putative tumor suppressor genes have been recently isolated, including subtypes of micro-RNAs. These findings offer new perspectives in the modulation of senescence and open new approaches for cancer therapy.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of multifield and single-field optimization for the treatment planning of spot-scanning proton therapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Liu, Wei; Wu, Richard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using multifield optimization (MFO) can generate highly conformal dose distributions, but it is more sensitive to setup and range uncertainties than SSPT using single-field optimization (SFO). The authors compared the two optimization methods for the treatment of head and neck cancer with bilateral targets and determined the superior method on the basis of both the plan quality and the plan robustness in the face of setup and range uncertainties.Methods: Four patients with head and neck cancer with bilateral targets who received SSPT treatment in the authors' institution were studied. The patients had each been treated with a MFO plan using three fields. A three-field SFO plan (3F-SFO) and a two-field SFO plan (2F-SFO) with the use of a range shifter in the beam line were retrospectively generated for each patient. The authors compared the plan quality and robustness to uncertainties of the SFO plans with the MFO plans. Robustness analysis of each plan was performed to generate the two dose distributions consisting of the highest and the lowest possible doses (worst-case doses) from the spatial and range perturbations at every voxel. Dosimetric indices from the nominal and worst-case plans were compared.Results: The 3F-SFO plans generally yielded D95 and D5 values in the targets that were similar to those of the MFO plans. 3F-SFO resulted in a lower dose to the oral cavity than MFO in all four patients by an average of 9.9 Gy, but the dose to the two parotids was on average 6.7 Gy higher for 3F-SFO than for MFO. 3F-SFO plans reduced the variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the targets by 22.8% compared to the MFO plans. Variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the organs at risk (OARs) varied between organs and between patients, although they were on average 9.2% less for the 3F-SFO plans than for the MFO plans. Compared with the MFO plans, the 2F-SFO plans showed a reduced dose to

  7. Appropriateness of using patient-derived xenograft models for pharmacologic evaluation of novel therapies for esophageal/gastro-esophageal junction cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorin Dodbiba

    Full Text Available The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR, and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55 in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32. Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04 and older patients (p=0.01. Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers.

  8. Locally advanced rectal cancer: diffusion-weighted MR tumour volumetry and the apparent diffusion coefficient for evaluating complete remission after preoperative chemoradiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hong Il [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young; Park, Seong Ho; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To evaluate DW MR tumour volumetry and post-CRT ADC in rectal cancer as predicting factors of CR using high b values to eliminate perfusion effects. One hundred rectal cancer patients who underwent 1.5-T rectal MR and DW imaging using three b factors (0, 150, and 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}) were enrolled. The tumour volumes of T2-weighted MR and DW images and pre- and post-CRT ADC{sub 150-1000} were measured. The diagnostic accuracy of post-CRT ADC, T2-weighted MR, and DW tumour volumetry was compared using ROC analysis. DW MR tumour volumetry was superior to T2-weighted MR volumetry comparing the CR and non-CR groups (P < 0.001). Post-CRT ADC showed a significant difference between the CR and non-CR groups (P = 0.001). The accuracy of DW tumour volumetry (A{sub z} = 0.910) was superior to that of T2-weighed MR tumour volumetry (A{sub z} = 0.792) and post-CRT ADC (A{sub z} = 0.705) in determining CR (P = 0.015). Using a cutoff value for the tumour volume reduction rate of more than 86.8 % on DW MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for predicting CR were 91.4 % and 80 %, respectively. DW MR tumour volumetry after CRT showed significant superiority in predicting CR compared with T2-weighted MR images and post-CRT ADC. (orig.)

  9. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: Is it promising?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas P Sutter; Henry Fechner

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. The therapeutic outcome of conventional therapies is inefficient. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a promising molecular alternative in the treatment of gastric cancer,including the replacement of defective tumor suppressor genes, the inactivation of oncogenes, the introduction of suicide genes, genetic immunotherapy, anti-angiogenetic gene therapy, and virotherapy. Improved molecular biological techniques and a better understanding of gastric carcinogenesis have allowed us to validate a variety of genes as molecular targets for gene therapy.This review provides an update of the new developments in cancer gene therapy, new principles, techniques,strategies and vector systems, and shows how they may be applied in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  10. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for breast cancer is based on data from 29 randomized trials, 6 meta-analyses and 5 retrospective studies. In total, 40 scientific articles are included, involving 41,204 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 285,982 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There is strong evidence for a substantial reduction in locoregional recurrence rate following postmastectomy radiation therapy to the chest wall and the regional nodal areas. There is strong evidence that postmastectomy radiation therapy increases the disease-free survival rate. There are conflicting data regarding the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy upon overall survival. There is strong evidence that breast cancer specific survival is improved by postmastectomy radiotherapy. There is strong evidence for a decrease in non-breast cancer specific survival after postmastectomy radiotherapy. There is some evidence that overall survival is increased by optimal postmastectomy radiation therapy. There is strong evidence that postmastectomy radiotherapy in addition to surgery and systemic therapy in mainly node-positive patients decreases local recurrence rate and improves survival. There is moderate evidence that the decrease in non-breast cancer specific survival is attributed to cardiovascular disease in irradiated patients. There are conflicting data whether breast conservation surgery plus radiotherapy is comparable to modified radical mastectomy alone in terms of local recurrence rate. There is strong evidence that breast conservation surgery plus radiotherapy is comparable to modified radical mastectomy alone in terms of disease-free survival

  11. Cognitive Therapy for Adjustment Disorder in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schuyler, Dean

    2004-01-01

    A DIAGNOSIS OF CANCER INTERRUPTS THE LIFE OF A PATIENT AND HIS OR HER FAMILY. Cancer treatment often entails continued investigation and therapy that typically has side effects and offers the repeated warning to be vigilant. Cancer is often a life-threatening illness. The field of psycho-oncology is well established, and clinical oncologists often have a good awareness of the psychological challenges cancer poses to their patients. Despite the nature of the stressor, it is important to note t...

  12. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  13. Gene Therapy: A Potential Approach for Cancer Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Boulis; Christina Krudy; Handy, Chalonda R.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is experienced by as many as 9 0 % of cancer patients at some point during the disease. This pain can be directly cancer related or arise from a sensory neuropathy related to chemotherapy. Major pharmacological agents used to treat cancer pain often lack anatomical specificity and can have off-target effects that create new sources of suffering. These concerns establish a need for improved cancer pain management. Gene therapy is emerging as an exciting prospect. This paper discus...

  14. Molecular Diagnosis for Personalized Target Therapy in Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jae Yong

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathway...

  15. The impact of Quercetin like flavonoid antioxidants on Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Akan, Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled consumption of medical plants may lead controversial result over the patients who are receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Especially, flavonoid free radical scavenger including chemical and plants may not be innocent as much as thought. Free radical scavenger antioxidant extracts uses for commonly for two aims; the prevention of cancer and therapy of cancer.In the light of recent developments the impact of antioxidant usage on cancer treatment and prevent...

  16. Surgical therapy for testicular cancer metastatic to the liver

    OpenAIRE

    Maluccio, Mary; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Goulet, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years improved cure rates have been achieved for testicular cancer. A better understanding of the biology of subtypes of testicular cancer and the introduction of surgical intervention has contributed greatly to how we currently approach a young man with testicular cancer. We describe here experience at our institution of the treatment, results and prognostic factors for testicular cancer metastases to the liver. Careful diagnostic work-up and planning of the therapy are required, i...

  17. Photodynamic therapy for cutaneous metastases of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Goranskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in w omen. Cutaneous metastases are observed in 20 % pa- tients with breast cancer. 36 breast cancer patients with cutaneous metastases were treated with photodynamic therapy in the de partment of laser and photodynamic therapy MRRC. Complete regression was obtained in 33.9 %, partial — in 39 % of cases, the stabilization achieved in 25.4 %, progression noted in 1.7 %. The objective response was obtained in 72.9 % of cases, treatment effect — in 97.4 %. Photodynamic therapy has good treatment results of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer with a small number of side effects.

  18. Perspectives of Nanotechnology in Minimally Invasive Therapy of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer, the most common type of cancer among women in the western world, affects approximately one out of every eight women over their lifetime. In recognition of the high invasiveness of surgical excision and severe side effects of chemical and radiation therapies, increasing efforts are made to seek minimally invasive modalities with fewer side effects. Nanoparticles (<100 nm in size have shown promising capabilities for delivering targeted therapeutic drugs to cancer cells and confining the treatment mainly within tumors. Additionally, some nanoparticles exhibit distinct properties, such as conversion of photonic energy into heat, and these properties enable eradication of cancer cells. In this review, current utilization of nanostructures for cancer therapy, especially in minimally invasive therapy, is summarized with a particular interest in breast cancer.

  19. Occupational Therapy for Adults With Cancer: Why It Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Williams, Grant R; Campbell, Claudine; Munoz, Lauro A; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-03-01

    Adults with cancer may be at risk for limitations in functional status and quality of life (QOL). Occupational therapy is a supportive service with the specific mission to help people functionally engage in life as safely and independently as possible with the primary goal of improving QOL. Unfortunately, for people with cancer, occupational therapy remains underused. The overall purpose of this review is to provide an understanding of what occupational therapy is and its relevance to patients with cancer, highlight the reasons to refer, and, last, provide general advice on how to access services. PMID:26865588

  20. The effect of cancer and its therapy upon fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences of radiation therapy and antineoplastic therapy on the fetus have been reviewed. There are certain general principles that have been summarized in this presentation. There is less information available on neoplasia and neonatal malformations induced by chemotherapy but there may be an increased risk. The delayed consequences of radiation and chemotherapy are not well known and more study is required. However, now that at least 21 cancers of the 100 human cancers are being cured or the lives of patients greatly prolonged who are of childbearing age, there is an urgency in studying the effects of cancer therapy on fertility. (Author)

  1. Targeted therapy for esophagogastric cancers: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattak MA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad A Khattak,1 Hilary L Martin,2 Christos S Karapetis1,31Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, South Australia; 2Calvary Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaAbstract: The incidence of esophagogastric cancers is increasing rapidly in the Western population. Despite better understanding of the biology and intense research in the treatment of these cancers, the long-term survival remains poor both in the locally advanced and metastatic settings. The addition of combined modality strategies has resulted in modest improvement in 5-year survival rates. A number of biologic agents targeting epidermal-derived growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial derived growth factor and its receptor, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR are being currently evaluated in Phase II and III clinical trials. Some of these, like trastuzumab, cetuximab, and bevacizumab, have shown promising results. This review provides a brief overview of the recent developments in biologic agents for the treatment of esophagogastric cancers.Keywords: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, VEGF, trastuzumab, Her2- positive EGC

  2. Sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for stage C prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty of 34 stage C cases have been treated by sequential estrogen and radiation in our hospital between 1980 and 1989 and half of them had actually been done staging operation. An average age was 69.3. Tumor differentiations were distributed well in 5 cases, moderately in 5 and poorly in 9. The other unknown differentiation case was diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology. Previously administered estrogens were diethylstilbestrol diphosphate in 15 cases and others in 5. Total doses of 70 Gy in 35 fractions were sequentially delivered to the prostate, involving if necessary the seminal vesicles over a seven-week period by bilateral 120deg pendel using linear accelerator. Radiation field was sized from 6 x 6 to 8 x 8 cm. Estrogens have been continuously administered following radiation in 11 cases. Therapeutic effects upon the prostate were evaluated by digital rectal palpation. Improvement rate and atrophy rate of the primary lesion were 94.4% and 50% respectively. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases and 3 of them recurred within 3 years after initiation of the treatment. Recurred sites were in primary lesion in 2 cases and in bone in two. Five year non-recurrence rate was 81% by Kaplan Meier's method. One of 3 who discontinued hormone administration during or immediately after radiotherapy had local recurrence after 65 months and the other 2 cases died of gastric cancer and unknown cause. Causes of 6 dead cases were one prostate cancer, one gastric cancer, one heart failure, one pneumonia and 2 unknown. The cancer death rate was 25% (1/4 cases). Five year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier's method was 59.0%. Our results support the view that the sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for the pathological stage C patients of the prostate cancer may be as preferable as radiation alone for the treatment of stage B prostate cancer. (J.P.N.)

  3. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment with Particle Beam Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Zargarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this century, cancer incidence has become one of the most significant problems concerning human. Conventional radiotherapy damage healthy tissue and in some cases may cause new primary cancers. This problem can be partially solved by hadron therapy which would be more effective and less harmful compared to other forms of radiotherapies used to treat some cancers. Although carbon ion and proton therapy both are effective treatments, they have serious differences which are mentioned in this paper and compared between the two methods. Furthermore, various treatments have been performed on head and neck cancer with hadrons so far will be discussed.

  4. Radiation therapy for brain metastasis from lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis for patients with brain metastasis from lung cancer following radiation therapy was evaluated. Seventy-eight patients received brain irradiation in the Osaka Prefectural Habikino Hospital between April 1985 and March 1989. Almost all patients had conventional radiotherapy of the whole brain, with a single dose of 2 or 3 Gy. Patients characteristics associated with favorable prognosis were as follows: Performance status of 0∼1, age≤49, female, histology of adenocarcinoma. Patients who received radiotherapy of 56 Gy10 or more, had longer survival time. The findings in the brain CT were evaluated, but the number, size, site of metastases, and mass effect to ventricular system were not related to the prognosis. The overall median survival was 3.5 months and the 1-year survival rate was 9.0%. Further clinical studies are necessary to improve the prognosis in brain metastases. (author)

  5. On dendritic cell-based therapy for cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morikazu Onji; Sk. Md. Fazle Akbar

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most prevalent antigen-presenting cell in vivo, had been widely characterized in the last three decades. DCs are present in almost all tissues of the body and play cardinal roles in recognition of microbial agents,autoantigens, allergens and alloantigen. DCs process the microbial agents or their antigens and migrate to lymphoid tissues to present the antigenic peptide to lymphocytes. This leads to activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. Initially, it was assumed that DCs are principally involved in the induction and maintenance of adaptive immune responses, but now it is evident that DCs also have important roles in innate immunity. These features make DCs very good candidates for therapy against various pathological conditions including malignancies. Initially, DC-based therapy was used in animal models of cancers. Data from these studies inspired considerable optimism and DC-based therapies was started in human cancers 8 years ago. In general,DC-based therapy has been found to be safe in patients with cancers, although few controlled trials have been conducted in this regard. Because the fundamentals principles of human cancers and animal models of cancers are different, the therapeutic efficacy of the ongoing regime of DC-based therapy in cancer patients is not satisfactory. In this review, we covered the various aspects that should be considered for developing better regime of DC-based therapy for human cancers.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of mPEG–SN38 and mPEG–PLA–SN38 micelles for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jing Xie,1 Xiaomin Zhang,2 Meiyu Teng,1 Bo Yu,2 Shuang Yang,1 Robert J Lee,1,3 Lesheng Teng1 1College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, 2Hangzhou PushiKang Biotechnology Co., Ltd, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin (SN38 is a potent topoisomerase inhibitor and a metabolite of irinotecan. Its clinical development has been hampered by its poor solubility. To address this problem, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol-2000 (mPEG2K–SN38 and mPEG2K–poly(lactide (PLA1.5K–SN38 conjugates were prepared and then dispersed into an aqueous medium to form micelles. Physicochemical characteristics of SN38–polymer conjugate micelles, for example, micelle diameter, zeta potential, morphology, and drug content, were then evaluated. The results showed that the mean diameters of mPEG2K–SN38 and mPEG2K–PLA1.5K–SN38 micelles were ~130 and 20 nm, respectively. These two micelles had similar drug contents. mPEG2K–PLA1.5K–SN38 micelles were more homogeneous than mPEG2K–SN38 micelles. Moreover, in vitro drug release behavior of the micelles was studied by high performance liquid chromatography. SN38 release from mPEG2K–SN38 micelles was much faster than from mPEG2K–PLA1.5K–SN38 micelles. In vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and apoptosis assays of the SN38–polymer conjugate micelles were carried out on BEL-7402 human liver cancer cells. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor tumor efficacy studies were carried out in a nude mouse xenograft model derived from BEL-7402 cells. The results showed that mPEG2K–PLA1.5K–SN38 micelles were significantly more effective than mPEG2K–SN38 micelles in tumor inhibition, and the inhibitory effect of mPEG2K–PLA1.5K–SN38 micelles on tumor growth was significantly greater than that of mPEG2K–SN38 micelles (1,042 vs 1,837 mm at 30 days. In conclusion, m

  7. Leuprolide acetate 1-, 3- and 6-monthly depot formulations in androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer in nine European countries: evidence review and economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wex J

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jaro Wex,1 Manpreet Sidhu,2 Isaac Odeyemi,2 Ahmed M Abou-Setta,1 Peny Retsa,2 Bertrand Tombal31PharmArchitecture Limited, London, UK; 2Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd, Chertsey, UK; 3Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, BelgiumObjective: Leuprolide is an established luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone (LHRH agonist used as first-line treatment in advanced prostate cancer. As different formulations and dosing schedules are likely to have economic implications, we aimed to evaluate their efficacy, safety, and costs in nine European countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Netherlands, Poland, and Portugal.Methods: Database searches identified 13 clinical trials of leuprolide 1- (1 M, 3- (3 M and 6-monthly (6 M. Only data on leuprolide with Atrigel were compared for all three formulations, which had the same efficacy, safety, and adherence. Cost-minimization analysis accounting for cost of Eligard®, specialist consultations, and diagnostics during up to 12 months follow-up was conducted. The perspective was that of public payers.Results: No significant differences were observed in the percentages of intention-to-treat patients achieving testosterone levels ≤ 50 ng/dL following treatment with Eligard® 1 M (93.3%, 3 M (98.3%, and 6 M (97.3% (P > 0.05, and adverse event profiles of the three formulations were comparable. Overall, 6 M was the least expensive, with average total annual costs from €788 (Belgium to €1839 (Portugal. The 3 M option was between 2.5% (Hungary and 37.6% (Belgium more expensive than 6 M; 1 M formulation was the most expensive, with costs 15.5% and 151.6% more expensive than 6 M for those countries, respectively. The 3 M option was 11.2%–45.3% less expensive than 1 M. Total costs were associated with frequency of visits for injection and monitoring. The 1 M required twelve visits, 3 M 4.4–4.8 visits, and 6 M 2.1–2.3 visits. Up to 50% additional visits could be funded with the

  8. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  9. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavroudi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The grim statistics speak for themselves with reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self-renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we

  10. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients. PMID:27178335

  11. Risk-optimized proton therapy to minimize radiogenic second cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechner, Laura A; Eley, John G; Howell, Rebecca M;

    2015-01-01

    demonstrate the feasibility of risk-optimized proton therapy and to determine the combination of beam angles and fluence weights that minimizes the risk of second cancer in the bladder and rectum for a prostate cancer patient. We used 6 risk models to predict excess relative risk of second cancer. Treatment......Proton therapy confers substantially lower predicted risk of second cancer compared with photon therapy. However, no previous studies have used an algorithmic approach to optimize beam angle or fluence-modulation for proton therapy to minimize those risks. The objectives of this study were to...... planning utilized a combination of a commercial treatment planning system and an in-house risk-optimization algorithm. When normal-tissue dose constraints were incorporated in treatment planning, the risk model that incorporated the effects of fractionation, initiation, inactivation, repopulation and...

  12. Occupational Therapy Use by Older Adults With Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Cutchin, Malcolm P.; Weinberger,Morris; Meyer, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 27,131 older adults diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2007 found that survivors who used occupational therapy after diagnosis also had the highest levels of comorbidities.

  13. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  14. Cancer Alternative Therapies - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Cancer Alternative Therapies URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/canceralternativetherapies.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  15. Cancer incidence and novel therapies developed in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Iwasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the ministry of Health, Labour and welfare of Japan, Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan since 1981. [1] As per the data in 2010, in Japan, one in every three deaths was due to cancer. [2] The Japanese Government has introduced so far, three terms of 10 years strategies for Cancer control since 1984 till date. The budget allocated for cancer control in 2009 was 52.5 billion yen in Japan. [3] Lung is the leading site for cancer in both males and females in Japan. In males, following the lung, stomach, liver, colon and pancreas are other leading sites while in the females, stomach, colon, pancreas and breast are the other leading sites.[1] In 2006, the cancer incidence was 694,000 and the male cancer incidence was 1.4 times as large as that of females. The peak age for cancer deaths in males is their fifties while in the females it is the sixties among Japanese. In addition to the conventional treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, some of other therapies in practice in Japan are the Hyperthermia [4] that uses high temperatures to kill or damage the cancer cells, the Ion Beam therapy using proton beams [5] to damage the DNA of the cells as cancer cells have high rate of cell divisions and lesser ability to repair DNA damage, the molecular targeted therapies that interfere with a specific molecular target involved in tumour growth and progression [6] and most importantly the autologous cell based Immunotherapies. Modern Cancer Immunotherapy started in the 1970s in Japan. The immunopotentiators using compounds from Bacteria, Beta Glucans from fungi were the first forms of modern Immunotherapy. Then was the era of direct injection of cytokines such as Interleukins, Interferons etc. The adverse effects associated with the injection of cytokines led to development of cell based Immunotherapies in the 1980s. [7] Immuno-cell therapies involve isolation of immune cells which are then processed and re

  16. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  17. Natural health products and cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Doreen Oneschuk; Jawaid Younus

    2011-01-01

    Complementary therapies, notably natural health products such as herbs and vitamins, are frequently used by cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There is much controversy as to whether these natural health products should be taken during conventional cancer treatments. Supporters of this practice cite beneficial effects of the antioxidant properties, while opponents are concerned about the potential for natural health product-chemotherapy/radiation related negative in...

  18. Second malignancies after breast cancer: The impact of adjuvant therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Chunhui; Chen, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are potentially life-threatening late sequelae of the adjuvant therapy for breast cancer (BC). The increased risk of SMNs is associated with adjuvant chemotherapy (development of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome) and hormonal therapy (risk of uterine cancer secondary to tamoxifen treatment). Previous studies have demonstrated an increased risk of SMNs associated with alkylating agents, topoisomerase-II inhibitors, granulocyte-stim...

  19. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol; Amin Hajitou

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent dev...

  20. Lipid-coated gold nanocomposites for enhanced cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kang JH; Ko YT

    2015-01-01

    Ji Hee Kang, Young Tag Ko College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea Abstract: The aim of the work reported here was to develop lipid-coated multifunctional nanocomposites composed of drugs and nanoparticles for use in cancer therapy. We incorporated thermosensitive phospholipids onto the surface of anisotropic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to further enhance drug delivery, with possible additional applications for in vivo imaging and photothermal cancer therapy. Lipid-...

  1. Gene Therapy for Cancer Treatment: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Deanna; Burmester, James K.

    2006-01-01

    The broad field of gene therapy promises a number of innovative treatments that are likely to become important in preventing deaths from cancer. In this review, we discuss the history, highlights and future of three different gene therapy treatment approaches: immunotherapy, oncolytic virotherapy and gene transfer. Immunotherapy uses genetically modified cells and viral particles to stimulate the immune system to destroy cancer cells. Recent clinical trials of second and third generation vacc...

  2. Behaviors of Providers of Traditional Korean Medicine Therapy and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy for the Treatment of Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-Sang Yu; Chun-Bae Kim; Ki-Kyong Kim; Ji-Eun Lee; Min-Young Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide bac...

  3. The Evaluation Phase of Systemic Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caille, Philippe

    1982-01-01

    Describes the initial evaluation phase of family therapy, which clarifies the circular interaction maintaining the symptom, the family structure, and its relationship to the therapist. Suggests using first sessions to collect data and organize it meaningfully. Presents phenomenological and mythical models of family functioning as guides for…

  4. Cancer Treatment with Gene Therapy and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy methods have evolved remarkably in recent years which have resulted in more effective local tumor control with negligible toxicity of surrounding normal tissues. However, local recurrence and distant metastasis often occur following radiation therapy mostly due to the development of radioresistance through the deregulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inhibition of DNA damage repair mechanisms. Over the last decade, extensive progress in radiotherapy and gene therapy co...

  5. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub­stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods: Essential information on gene therapy of cancer were reviewed and discussed towards their clinical translations. Results: Gene transfer has been rigorously studied in vitro and in vivo, in which some of these gene therapy endeavours have been carried on towards translational investigations and clinical applications. About 65% of gene therapy trials are related to cancer therapy. Some of these trials have been combined with cell therapy to produce personalized medicines such as Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, marketed by Dendreon, USA for the treatment of asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Conclusion: Translational approach links two diverse boundaries of basic and clinical researches. For successful translation of geno­medicines into clinical applications, it is essential 1 to have the guidelines and standard operating procedures for development and application of the genomedicines specific to clinically relevant biomarker(s; 2 to conduct necessary animal experimental studies to show the “proof of concept” for the proposed genomedicines; 3 to perform an initial clinical investigation; and 4 to initiate extensive clinical trials to address all necessary requirements. In short, translational researches need to be refined to accelerate the geno­medicine development and clinical applications.

  6. Tetra-triethyleneoxysulfonyl substituted zinc phthalocyanine for photodynamic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyniak, Weronika; Ermilov, Eugeny A; Atilla, Devrim; Gürek, Ayşe Gül; Nitzsche, Bianca; Derkow, Katja; Hoffmann, Björn; Steinemann, Gustav; Ahsen, Vefa; Höpfner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as an effective and minimally invasive treatment option for several diseases, including some forms of cancer. However, several drawbacks of the approved photosensitizers (PS), such as insufficient light absorption at therapeutically relevant wavelengths hampered the clinical effectiveness of PDT. Phthalocyanines (Pc) are interesting PS-candidates with a strong light absorption in the favourable red spectral region and a high quantum yield of cancer cell destroying singlet oxygen generation. Here, we evaluated the suitability of tetra-triethyleneoxysulfonyl substituted zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) as novel PS for PDT. ZnPc-induced phototoxicity, induction of apoptosis as well as cell cycle arresting effects was studied in the human gastrointestinal cancer cell lines of different origin. Photoactivation of ZnPc-pretreated (1-10 μM) cancer cells was achieved by illumination with a broad band white light source (400-700 nm) at a power density of 10 J/cm(2). Photoactivation of ZnPc-loaded cells revealed strong phototoxic effects, leading to a dose-dependent decrease of cancer cell proliferation of up to almost 100%, the induction of apoptosis and a G1-phase arrest of the cell cycle, which was associated with decrease in cyclin D1 expression. By contrast, ZnPc-treatment without illumination did not induce any cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest or decreased cell growth. Antiangiogenic effects of ZnPc-PDT were investigated in vivo by performing CAM assays, which revealed a marked degradation of blood vessels and the capillary plexus of the chorioallantoic membrane of fertilized chicken eggs. Based on our data we think that ZnPc may be a promising novel photosensitizer for innovative PDT. PMID:26162500

  7. Functional nanomaterials for near-infrared-triggered cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Li, Chunxia; Cheng, Ziyong; Hou, Zhiyao; Huang, Shanshan; Lin, Jun

    2016-06-24

    The near-infrared (NIR) region (700-1100 nm) is the so-called transparency "therapeutic window" for biological applications owing to its deeper tissue penetration and minimal damage to healthy tissues. In recent years, various NIR-based therapeutic and interventional strategies, such as NIR-triggered drug delivery, photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT), are under research in intensive preclinical and clinical investigations for cancer treatment. The NIR control in these cancer therapy systems is considered crucial to boost local effective tumor suppression while minimizing side effects, resulting in improved therapeutic efficacy. Some researchers even predict the NIR-triggered cancer therapy to be a new and exciting possibility for clinical nanomedicine applications. In this review, the rapid development of NIR light-responsive cancer therapy based on various smartly designed nanocomposites for deep tumor treatments is introduced. In detail, the use of NIR-sensitive materials for chemotherapy, PTT as well as PDT is highlighted, and the associated challenges and potential solutions are discussed. The applications of NIR-sensitive cancer therapy modalities summarized here can highlight their potential use as promising nanoagents for deep tumor therapy. PMID:26971704

  8. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  9. State of the art of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has a critical role in the treatment of esophageal cancer. To improve the treatment outcome of radiotherapy, not only strengthening the treatment intensity but also decreasing the long term toxicity is needed. To reduce the long term cardiopulmonary toxicity of chemoradiation, JCOG is now running a clinical trial which combines three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and mild irradiation dose. New techniques of radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or particle therapy are also promising in both treatment intensity and decreased toxicity. (author)

  10. New Antibody Conjugates in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serengulam V. Govindan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of radiation, drugs, and protein toxins to cancers selectively with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs has been a topic of considerable interest and an area of continued development. Radioimmunotherapy (RAIT of lymphoma using directly labeled MAbs is of current interest after approval of two radiolabeled anti-CD20 MAbs, as illustrated with the near 100% overall response rate obtained in a recent clinical trial using an investigational radiolabeled anti-CD22 MAb, 90Y-epratuzumab. The advantage of pretargeted RAIT over directly labeled MAbs is continuing to be validated in preclinical models of lymphoma and solid tumors. Importantly, the advantages of combining RAIT with radiation sensitizers, with immunotherapy, or a drug conjugate targeting a different antigen are being studied clinically and preclinically. The area of drug-conjugated antibodies is progressing with encouraging data published for the trastuzumab-DM1 conjugate in a phase I clinical trial in HER2-positive breast cancer. The Dock-and-Lock platform technology has contributed to the design and the evaluation of complex antibody-cytokine and antibody-toxin conjugates. This review describes the advances made in these areas, with illustrations taken from advances made in the authors' institutions.

  11. Hadron Cancer Therapy: Role of Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, M. B.

    2000-06-20

    Recently it has become feasible to calculate energy deposition and particle transport in the body by proton and neutron radiotherapy beams, using Monte Carlo transport methods. A number of advances have made this possible, including dramatic increases in computer speeds, a better understanding of the microscopic nuclear reaction cross sections, and the development of methods to model the characteristics of the radiation emerging from the accelerator treatment unit. This paper describes the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved, and how the cross sections have been evaluated from theory and experiment, for use in computer simulations of radiation therapy. The simulations will allow the dose delivered to a tumor to be optimized, whilst minimizing the dos given to nearby organs at risk.

  12. Molecular diagnosis for personalized target therapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Yong

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathways have reinforced the discovery of treatment targets and personalized treatments. However, there are numerous challenges from cancer target discoveries to practical clinical benefits. Although there is a flood of biomarkers and target agents, only a minority of patients are tested and treated accordingly. Numerous molecular target agents have been under investigation for gastric cancer. Currently, targets for gastric cancer include the epidermal growth factor receptor family, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor axis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Deeper insights of molecular characteristics for gastric cancer has enabled the molecular classification of gastric cancer, the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the prediction of prognosis, the recognition of gastric cancer driver genes, and the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Not only have we deeper insights for the molecular diversity of gastric cancer, but we have also prospected both affirmative potentials and hurdles to molecular diagnostics. New paradigm of transdisciplinary team science, which is composed of innovative explorations and clinical investigations of oncologists, geneticists, pathologists, biologists, and bio-informaticians, is mandatory to recognize personalized target therapy. PMID:24156032

  13. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in combination with conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva; Svane, Inge Marie;

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with...... of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant...... phenotype can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma....

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted molecularly therapies of cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been known to be a significant factor in the development and growth of many types of cancers. It is now accepted that the EGFR signal transduction net work plays an important role in multiple tumorigenic processes, contributing to cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis, as well as protection from apoptosis. Recently, EGFR monoclonal antibodies (McAb) and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitors have been validated as new treatment approach for those EGFR-positive cancers and have shown activity aginst advanced, chemofractory cancers in clinical trials. This article focuses on three EGFR targeted molecularly therapies of cancers. (authors)

  15. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  16. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roses, Robert E., E-mail: Robert.Roses@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mamtani, Ronac [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Datta, Jashodeep [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  17. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered

  18. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  19. Sorafenib and sunitinib: novel targeted therapies for renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, Cheryl A; Goldspiel, Barry R

    2007-08-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a relatively uncommon malignancy, with 51,190 cases expected to be diagnosed in 2007. Localized disease is curable by surgery; however, locally advanced or metastatic disease is not curable in most cases and, until recently, had a limited response to drug treatment. Historically, biologic response modifiers or immunomodulating agents were tested in clinical trials based on observations that some cases of RCC can spontaneously regress. High-dose aldesleukin is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for advanced RCC; however, the drug is associated with a high frequency of severe adverse effects. Responses have been observed with low-dose aldesleukin and interferon alfa, but with little effect on overall survival. Sorafenib and sunitinib are novel therapies that target growth factor receptors known to be activated by the hypoxia-inducible factor and the Ras-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. These pathways are important in the pathophysiology of RCC. Sorafenib and sunitinib have shown antitumor activity as first- and second-line therapy in patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic RCC who have clear-cell histology. Although complete responses are not common, both drugs promote disease stabilization and increase progression-free survival. This information suggests that disease stabilization may be an important determinant for response in RCC and possibly other cancers. Sorafenib and sunitinib are generally well tolerated and are considered first- and second-line treatment options for patients with advanced clear cell RCC. In addition, sorafenib and sunitinib have shown promising results in initial clinical trials evaluating antitumor activity in patients who are refractory to other antiangiogenic therapy. The most common toxicities with both sorafenib and sunitinib are hand-foot syndrome, rash, fatigue, hypertension, and diarrhea. Research is directed toward defining the optimal use of these new agents. PMID:17655513

  20. Alopecia With Endocrine Therapies in Patients With Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Saggar, Vishal; Wu, Shenhong; Dickler, Maura N.; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the frequency of alopecia to cytotoxic chemotherapies has been well described, the incidence of alopecia during endocrine therapies (i.e., anti-estrogens, aromatase inhibitors) has not been investigated. We performed a systematic analysis of the literature to ascertain the incidence and risk for alopecia while receiving endocrine therapies and found that alopecia is a common yet underreported adverse event of endocrine-based cancer therapies.

  1. Aptamer-loaded Gold Nanoconstructs for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Duncan Hieu Minh

    Traditional cancer treatments, including chemotherapy, often cause severe side effects in patients. Targeted therapy where tumor cells are targeted via biomarkers overexpressed on the cell surface has been shown to reduce such adverse effects. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently the most common chemotherapeutic agents that bind with high affinity to these cancer markers. However, poor intratumoral uptake of mAb and release of drugs from mAb carriers have been the biggest challenge for this delivery method. As a result, recent work has focused on other strategies to improve the efficacy of drug delivery in targeted therapy. Among potential carriers for drug delivery, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have emerged as one of the most promising vehicles. This thesis describes the development of a drug delivery nanoconstruct that can both target cancer cells and induce therapeutic effects. The nanoconstructs are composed of gold nanostars (AuNS) as delivery vehicles loaded with the DNA aptamer AS1411 that can target the ubiquitous shuttle protein nucleolin (NCL) in various cancer cell types. The gold nanocarrier stabilizes the oligonucleotides for intracellular delivery and promotes high loading densities of the oligonucleotide drugs. We have investigated the interactions of the nanoconstruct with different subcellular compartments of the cancer cells. This physical phenomenon has shown to correlate with the biological activities such as apoptosis and cell death that happen in the cancer cells after incubation with the nanoconstructs. A thorough screening of the nanoconstructs in 13 different cancer cell lines is conducted to narrow down the potential targets for in vivo study. Before testing the in vivo efficacy, we evaluate the toxicity of the nanoconstructs in non-tumor animals, which confirms its safety for further in vivo applications. The accumulation of the nanoconstructs in two different cancerous tumors, however, suggests that further optimization of the design

  2. Repeated {sup 89}Sr therapy in breast cancer patient with multiple bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Soung; Yang, Weon Il; Kim, Byung Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Soung Woon [Korea Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    The single {sup 89}Sr therapy has been used for pain relief in patients with multiple bony metastases and it is known to be very effective without serious complications except mild bone marrow suppression. But usually repeated therapy is needed because it is not a completely curative therapy. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of repeated {sup 89}Sr therapy on therapeutic outcome compared to first therapy. This study was performed retrospectively with fifteen breast cancer patients treated more than twice with {sup 89}SrCl{sub 2} against multiple bony metastases. There were total 42 cases-there were eight, four, two and one patients treated twice, three times, four times and six times respectively. The time interval between therapy was 179.1{+-}107.5 (90-550) days. We scored zero to five about performance, analgesics, subjective pain, sleep pattern respectively and summed as the pain score (0-20). Before therapy and one month and three months after therapy the pain score was evaluated and blood leukocyte and platelet was estimated. Bone scan was performed before therapy and one, three and six months after therapy. The pain score was 6.5{+-}2.4 (2-10) before first therapy. Among 42 cases the pain score was improved in 22 cases (52.4%), not changed in 8 cases (19.0%) and aggravated in 12 cases (28.6%). The pain score was not affected by therapy number. Bone scan showed various changes without statistical correlation with pain score. One month after therapy blood leukocyte and platelet was decreased more than 20% than before therapy in six cases (28.6%) and seven cases (16.7%) among 21 cases, respectively. The leukocyte and platelet was not more decreased as increased therapy number. The repeated {sup 89}Sr therapy is not so different from the first therapy in effects and bone marrow suppression. Bone scan finding was independent to the pain score.

  3. Targeting p53 and its domains for cancer gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Julia Matissek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated proteins in human cancer and has been extensively targeted for cancer therapy. This resulted in wild type p53 gene therapeutic approval for the treatment of head and neck cancer in China. p53 mainly functions as a transcription factor and stimulates a variety of genes involved in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway by binding to p53 responsive elements as a t...

  4. Mitochondrial Peroxiredoxin III is a Potential Target for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Byoung Doo Rhee; Kyung Soo Ko; Jin Han; Sung-Ryul Lee; In-Sung Song; Nari Kim; Seung-Hun Jeong; Hyoung-Kyu Kim

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved either directly or indirectly in oncogenesis and the alteration of metabolism in cancer cells. Cancer cells contain large numbers of abnormal mitochondria and produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of ROS and the antioxidant capacity of the cell. Several cancer therapies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation, disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis and release cytochrome c, leading t...

  5. Topical therapies for skin cancer and actinic keratosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, T.; Rahman, K. M.; Thurston, D E; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The global incidence of skin cancer and actinic keratosis (AK) has increased dramatically in recent years. Although many tumours are treated with surgery or radiotherapy topical therapy has a place in the management of certain superficial skin neoplasms and AK. This review considers skin physiology, non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the relationship between AK and skin cancer and drugs administered topically for these conditions. The dermal preparations for management of NMSC and AK are discus...

  6. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one’s overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The ...

  7. HER2 status and breast cancer therapy: recent advances

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Debu

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype imparted by expression of the HER2 gene in breast cancer and progress made in modifying the disease's natural history through pharmacologically modulating its function has served as a paradigm for rationally targeted therapy and personalized medicine. About 20-25% of breast cancer cases are associated with HER2 gene amplification and overexpression, creating a distinct subtype of breast cancer that is associated with more aggressive behaviour, higher likelihood of overall and br...

  8. Controversies in the Adjuvant Therapy of Endometrial Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Mou Hsiao; Lin-Hung Wei

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Surgical treatment includes hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and an appropriate staging procedure. Relapse of endometrial cancer may occur in patients with high risk factors, such as old age, grade 3 cancer, deep myometrial invasion, and papillary serous and clear cell types. In recent years, several randomized trials reported the results of adjuvant therapy for patients with high risk factors. Nonethe...

  9. Therapeutic potential of snake venom in cancer therapy: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Vivek Kumar; Brahmbhatt, Keyur; Bhatt, Hardik; Parmar, Utsav

    2013-01-01

    Many active secretions produced by animals have been employed in the development of new drugs to treat diseases such as hypertension and cancer. Snake venom toxins contributed significantly to the treatment of many medical conditions. There are many published studies describing and elucidating the anti-cancer potential of snake venom. Cancer therapy is one of the main areas for the use of protein peptides and enzymes originating from animals of different species. Some of these proteins or pep...

  10. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer efficienc

  11. Immune checkpoint blockade therapy for bladder cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayoung

    2016-06-01

    Bladder cancer remains the most immunogenic and expensive malignant tumor in the United States today. As the 4th leading cause of death from cancer in United States, Immunotherapy blocking immune checkpoints have been recently been applied to many aggressive cancers and changed interventions of urological cancers including advanced bladder cancer. The applied inhibition of PD-1-PD-L1 interactions can restore antitumor T-cell activity and enhance the cellular immune attack on antigens. The overall goals of this short review article are to introduce current cancer immunotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors, and to provide new insight into the underlying mechanisms that block immune checkpoints in tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, this review will address the preclinical and clinical trials to determine whether bladder cancer patients could benefit from this new cancer therapy in near future. PMID:27326412

  12. Methionine enkephalin, its role in immunoregulation and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dingliang; Plotnikoff, Nicolas; Griffin, Noreen; Song, Tao; Shan, Fengping

    2016-08-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide has a crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. MENK is believed to have an immunoregulatory activity to have cancer biotherapy activity by binding to the opioid receptors on immune and cancer cells. Clinical trial studies in cancer patients have shown that MENK activates immune cells directly and by inhibiting regulatory T-cells (Tregs). MENK may also change the tumor microenvironment by binding to opioid receptor on or in cancer cells. All of these mechanisms of action have biologic significance and potential for use in cancer immunotherapy. Furthermore, they reveal a relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. Due to the apparent role of MENK in cancer therapy we reviewed herein, the research undertaken with MENK in recent years; which has advanced our understanding of the role MENK has in cancer progression and its relationship to immunity, supporting MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26927200

  13. Evaluation of the potential application of 2-acetylpyridine N4- phenyl thiosemicarbazones derivatives for cancer therapy and diagnosis; Avaliacao da potencial aplicacao de derivados de 2-acetilpiridina N-4 fenil tiossemicarbazonas em terapia e diagnostico oncologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio

    2013-08-01

    Despite the wide range of antineoplastic agents available, resistance of some types of cancer and toxicity to normal cells have been identified as the main causes of treatment failure and death. The lack of early and precise diagnosis is also responsible for reducing survival of cancer patients. In this context, the development of substances with low toxicity and therapeutic potential and/or diagnosis purpose, is the major tool in an attempt to increase the survival of patients and assure the safety and efficacy of treatment. Thiosemicarbazones (TSC) are a class of synthetic compounds that have several biological activities, including antitumor. Although several studies have shown the great potential of TSC as therapeutic and / or diagnostic agents, different chemical modifications performed on this class of molecules indicate new possibilities for applications and still require further studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential applicability of 2-acetylpyridine N-4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones derivatives for cancer therapy and diagnosis. The results showed that all 13 TSC tested were cytotoxic to breast and glioblastoma tumor cell lines, presenting higher in vitro antitumor activity than etoposide, an antineoplastic and inhibitor of topoisomerase II frequently used for cancer therapy. The TSC that have halogen or nitro on ortho position showed higher antitumor activity in vitro than their isomers with halogen or nitro on meta or para position of the phenyl group. H2Ac4oFPh and H2Ac4oClPh compounds showed the highest antitumor activity among all tested compounds, with IC{sub 50} in nanomolar order. These TSC induced cell death by apoptosis and oxidative stress was responsible, at least in part, for this type of cell death. The 5 mg.kg{sup -1} H2Ac4oFPh dose, administered s.c., for 4 consecutive days, did not induce important toxicity; however, the same treatment protocol was not effective for tumor growth reduction in an animal model of brain

  14. SEQUENTIAL TARGETED THERAPY FOR DISSEMINATED KIDNEY CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Matveev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is a standard treatment in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Stabilization is an expected response to targeted therapy. The main goal of targeted therapy is to improve progression-free survival. This purpose is served through the sequential use of targeted agents. First-line therapy agents in the good and intermediate MSKCC prognostic groups are antiangiogenic ones such as bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib; in the poor MSKCC prognostic group treatment of choice is an mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. The antiangiogenic agent axitinib and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus were proved to be effective as second-line therapy. Axitinib administration after anti-VEGF drugs is associated with cumulative toxicity. The efficacy of axitinib in sorafenib-refractory renal cell carcinoma has not been proven. So everolimus remains the agent of choice for second-line targeted therapy. The effect of repeated antiangiogenic therapy may be anticipated after everolimus therapy

  15. Natural health products and cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Oneschuk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Complementary therapies, notably natural health products such as herbs and vitamins, are frequently used by cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There is much controversy as to whether these natural health products should be taken during conventional cancer treatments. Supporters of this practice cite beneficial effects of the antioxidant properties, while opponents are concerned about the potential for natural health product-chemotherapy/radiation related negative interactions. This involves understanding the role and effect on metabolizing enzymes. This review will highlight the present evidence for both the beneficial and negative consequences of the use of natural health products during chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  16. Adoptive T cell therapy: Addressing challenges in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Cassian

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive T cell therapy involves the ex vivo selection and expansion of effector cells for the treatment of patients with cancer. In this review, the advantages and limitations of using antigen-specific T cells are discussed in counterpoint to vaccine strategies. Although vaccination strategies represent more readily available reagents, adoptive T cell therapy provides highly selected T cells of defined phenotype, specificity and function that may influence their biological behavior in vivo. Adoptive T cell therapy offers not only translational opportunities but also a means to address fundamental issues in the evolving field of cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Targeting cancer stem cells: a new therapy to cure cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yapeng; Fu, Liwu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been defined as cells within tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. They have been identified in blood, breast, brain, colon, melanoma, pancreatic, prostate, ovarian, lung cancers and so on. It is often considered to be associated with chemo-resistance and radio-resistance that lead to the failure of traditional therapies. Most therapies are directed at the fast growing tumor ...

  18. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration.

  19. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, A.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and reduce radiation-induced toxicities. First, the clinically implemented adaptive strategy was described and the dosimetric consequences of this adaptive strategy compared to conventional non-adaptive rad...

  20. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound as Salvage Therapy for Patients With Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Wan; Jung, U Seok; Suh, Yoon Seok; Jang, Hyun Jun; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byung Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the oncologic outcomes and postoperative complications of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) failure in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Between February 2002 and August 2010, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent salvage HIFU for transrectal ultrasound-guided, biopsy-proven locally recurred prostate cancer after EBRT failure (by ASTRO definition: ...

  1. Prostate cancer multimodal therapy involvement in couple life: Open, Robotic and HIFU approach

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeta Ioana Hirişcău; Doina Cosman; Ioan Coman

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer often results in significant physical side-effectsand associated psycho-social stressors that can interfere with the experience of sexual intimacy forcouples. Our study aims to evaluate couple’s sexual life and to determine any potential sexual dynamicdysfunctions which could occur before and after performing classic, robotic and HIFU radicalprostatectomy as a radical therapy in prostate cancer. The present article aims at the synopticpresentatio...

  2. Tumor Regression Grades: Can They Influence Rectal Cancer Therapy Decision Tree?

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa D. Santos; Cristina Silva; Anabela Rocha; Eduarda Matos; Carlos Nogueira; Carlos Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Background. Evaluating impact of tumor regression grade in prognosis of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Materials and Methods. We identified from our colorectal cancer database 168 patients with LARC who received neoadjuvant therapy followed by complete mesorectum excision surgery between 2003 and 2011: 157 received 5-FU-based chemoradiation (CRT) and 11 short course RT. We excluded 29 patients, the remaining 139 were reassessed for disease recurrence and survival; the sl...

  3. New directions in cellular therapy of cancer: a summary of the summit on cellular therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A summit on cellular therapy for cancer discussed and presented advances related to the use of adoptive cellular therapy for melanoma and other cancers. The summit revealed that this field is advancing rapidly. Conventional cellular therapies, such as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL, are becoming more effective and more available. Gene therapy is becoming an important tool in adoptive cell therapy. Lymphocytes are being engineered to express high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs, chimeric antibody-T cell receptors (CARs and cytokines. T cell subsets with more naïve and stem cell-like characteristics have been shown in pre-clinical models to be more effective than unselected populations and it is now possible to reprogram T cells and to produce T cells with stem cell characteristics. In the future, combinations of adoptive transfer of T cells and specific vaccination against the cognate antigen can be envisaged to further enhance the effectiveness of these therapies.

  4. Xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolution and cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田聆; 魏于全

    2001-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes for death of human beings to date, and cancer biotherapy (mainlyimmunotherapy and gene therapy) has become the most promising approach after surgical therapy, radiotherapy andchemotherapy. However, there are still many limitations on cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy; therefore great ef-fort is being made to develop new strategies. It has been known that, in the process of evolution, a number of genes, theso-called xenogeneic homologous genes, are well-conserved and show the structural and/or functional similarity betweenvarious species to some degree. The nucleotide changes between various xenogeneic homologous genes are derived frommutation, and most of them are neutral mutations. Considering that the subtle differences in xenogeneic homologousgenes can break immune tolerance, enhance the immunogenicity and induce autologous immune response so as to elimi-nate tumor cells, we expect that a strategy of inducing autoimmune response using the property of xenogeneic homologousgenes will become a new therapy for cancer. Moreover, this therapy can also be used in the treatment of other diseases,such as autoimmune diseases and AIDS. This article will discuss the xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolutionand cancer therapy.

  5. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  6. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in pro...

  7. Bacteria as vectors for gene therapy of cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baban, Chwanrow K

    2012-01-31

    Anti-cancer therapy faces major challenges, particularly in terms of specificity of treatment. The ideal therapy would eradicate tumor cells selectively with minimum side effects on normal tissue. Gene or cell therapies have emerged as realistic prospects for the treatment of cancer, and involve the delivery of genetic information to a tumor to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. However, there is still much to be done before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved, primarily developing the means of targeting genes to tumors safely and efficiently. An emerging family of vectors involves bacteria of various genera. It has been shown that bacteria are naturally capable of homing to tumors when systemically administered resulting in high levels of replication locally. Furthermore, invasive species can deliver heterologous genes intra-cellularly for tumor cell expression. Here, we review the use of bacteria as vehicles for gene therapy of cancer, detailing the mechanisms of action and successes at preclinical and clinical levels.

  8. Epigenetic therapy in gastrointestinal cancer: the right combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfatah, Eihab; Kerner, Zachary; Nanda, Nainika; Ahuja, Nita

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetics is a relatively recent field of molecular biology that has arisen over the past 25 years. Cancer is now understood to be a disease of widespread epigenetic dysregulation that interacts extensively with underlying genetic mutations. The development of drugs targeting these processes has rapidly progressed; with several drugs already FDA approved as first-line therapy in hematological malignancies. Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers possess high degrees of epigenetic dysregulation, exemplified by subtypes such as CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), and the potential benefit of epigenetic therapy in these cancers is evident. The application of epigenetic drugs in solid tumors, including GI cancers, is just emerging, with increased understanding of the cancer epigenome. In this review, we provide a brief overview of cancer epigenetics and the epigenetic targets of therapy including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. We discuss the epigenetic drugs currently in use, with a focus on DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, and explain the pharmacokinetic and mechanistic challenges in their application. We present the strategies employed in incorporating these drugs into the treatment of GI cancers, and explain the concept of the cancer stem cell in epigenetic reprogramming and reversal of chemo resistance. We discuss the most promising combination strategies in GI cancers including: (1) epigenetic sensitization to radiotherapy, (2) epigenetic sensitization to cytotoxic chemotherapy, and (3) epigenetic immune modulation and priming for immune therapy. Finally, we present preclinical and clinical trial data employing these strategies thus far in various GI cancers including colorectal, esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:27366224

  9. Cancer stem cells and resistance to chemo and radio therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Babar; Nie, Daotai

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumor initiating cells) are responsible for tumor initiation. If cancer treatment kills most of cancer cells in the stage of transit amplifying and differentiation without killing the stem cells, the surviving CSCs will eventually lead to recurrence of tumors. Studies have suggested that CSCs may be the primary mediators of resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, leading to failure in cancer therapy. Numerous targets are being investigated for their potential involvement in the self-renewal and chemo- and radio-resistance of cancer cells. However, despite the intensive efforts invested into characterizing the role of cancer stem cells, there is a sense of uncertainty regarding the identity and number of these cells as well as the implications in cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss the identification of CSCs by cell surface markers, the biology of CSCs, and the role of CSCs in resistance to radio- and chemo-therapy. This review will discuss the advances in targeting CSCs to improve the efficacy of chemo- and radio-therapy. PMID:22202026

  10. Precision medicine and personalized breast cancer: combination pertuzumab therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds K

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kerry Reynolds, Sasmit Sarangi, Aditya Bardia, Don S Dizon Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Trastuzumab (Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2, is the poster child for antibody-based targeted therapy in breast cancer. Pertuzumab, another humanized monoclonal antibody, binds to a different domain of HER2 and prevents the formation of HER2:HER3 dimers, which is the most potent heterodimer in the HER family. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab has synergistic activity, and is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy originally as first-line therapy for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in 2012, and more recently as neoadjuvant therapy for localized disease in 2013. Pertuzumab is the first neoadjuvant drug to receive accelerated approval by the FDA based on pathological complete response as the primary end point. In this article, we review the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and current role of pertuzumab in the management of breast cancer, as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions regarding the utility of pertuzumab as a personalized therapeutic option for HER2-positive breast cancer. In the coming years, we anticipate increased utilization of neoadjuvant trials for drug development, biomarker discovery, and validation, and envision conduct of personalized breast cancer clinics in which therapies will be routinely selected based on genetic alterations in the tumor. Regardless of the targeted therapy combinations employed based on tumor genomic profile, trastuzumab and pertuzumab will likely continue to form the backbone of the personalized regimen for HER2-positive breast cancer. Keywords: pertuzumab, HER2 breast cancer, personalized therapy

  11. Effect of radiation therapy on lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity of blood and saliva in oral cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is reported to induce oxidative stress in oral cancer patients. Saliva as a diagnostic tool has received increasing attention in recent years. Saliva analysis is proposed to be a noninvasive, sensitive tool for the evaluation of biological effects of radiation therapy in oral cancer. We aimed to assess the effect of radiation therapy on malondialdehyde, the marker of lipid peroxidation, and total antioxidant capacity in blood and saliva of oral cancer patients. We also aimed to assess the correlation between blood and saliva with respect to malonaldehyde (MDA) level and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Thirty, clinically diagnosed oral cancer patients visiting the Oncology Department were the subjects. Thirty age- and sex-matched normal, healthy controls were included. Blood and saliva samples were collected from controls, and from oral cancer patients before and after radiation therapy. The samples were analyzed for MDA and TAC by standard spectrophotometric methods. Oral cancer patients showed significantly higher MDA level and lower TAC in blood and saliva when compared to controls. One week after radiation therapy, there was significant increase in MDA and decrease in TAC in oral cancer patients. After the completion of radiation therapy of six weeks, MDA level decreased and TAC increased, restoring the values near-to-controls. The pattern of change in MDA and TAC was similar between blood and saliva. There was significant correlation between blood and saliva with respect to MDA and TAC in oral cancer patients. Oral cancer patients showed increased oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant capacity. After radiation therapy of one week, oxidative stress increased further, and after six weeks of radiation therapy there was amelioration of antioxidant status. Saliva could be a sensitive and convenient laboratory tool for diagnosis of oral cancer and evaluation of biological effects of radiation therapy. (author)

  12. Hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy in combination with surgery has an important role in the therapy of the head and neck cancer. We conducted a prospective study for patients with head and neck cancer treated with surgery and radiation to evaluate the effect of therapies on the thyroid gland, and to identify the factors that might influence the development of hypothyroidism. From September 1986 through December 1994, 71 patients with head and cancer treated with surgery and radiation were included in this prospective study. Patients' age ranged from 32 to 73 years with a median age of 58 years. There were 12 women and 59 men. Total laryngectomy with neck dissection was carried out in 45 patients and neck dissection alone in 26 patients. All patients were serially monitored for thyroid function before and after radiation therapy. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 40.6Gy to 60Gy with a median dose of 50Gy. The follow-up duration was 3 to 80 months. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism was 56.3% (40/71); 7 out of 71 patients (9.9%) developed clinical hypothyroidism and 33 patients (46.4%) developed subclinical hypothyroidism. No thyroid nodules, thyroid cancers, or hyperthyroidism was detected. The risk factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was a combination of surgery (total laryngectomy with neck dissection) and radiation therapy (P=0.0000). Four of 26 patients (15.4%) with neck dissection alone developed hypothyroidism while 36 of 45 patients (80%) with laryngectomy and neck dissection developed hypothyroidism. The hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy was a relatively common complication. The factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Evaluation of thyroid function before and after radiation therapy with periodic thyroid function tests is recommended for an early detection of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is

  13. CT findings of organizing pneumonia after radiation therapy in breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizing pneumonia is known as a rare complication after radiation therapy in breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer. CT findings consist of consolidation and ground-glass opacities including the irradiated lung and patchy infiltrates in the nonirradiated lung. Steroid therapy is very effective, but relapse is frequently seen. In relapsed disease, lesions tend to appear in the different site from prior lesions. Radiologists should notice that organizing pneumonia is one form of radiation lung injury with good prognosis. (author)

  14. Smart Multifunctional Theranostics: Simultaneous Diagnosis and Therapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical applications of advanced nanomedicines such as PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin and paclitaxel-albumin bioconjugates have significantly improved the cancer treatment strategies. However, these pharmaceuticals lack early detection and single cell tracking capabilities. Thus, engineering of smart multifunctional theranostics appear to be our next stepfor simultaneous diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Clinical translation of multifunctional theranostics appears to be dependent upon specificity of cancer biomarkers, biocompatibility of components used for formulation, and advancement of bioconjugation techniques. While many cancer biomarker candidates often fail to be used for clinical diagnosis/therapy because of their nonspecific functional expression in normal tissues, biocompatibility of materials used for bioconjugationalso needs to be approved. All these issues need to be fully addressed prior to the translation of smart multifunctional cancer theranostics.

  15. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  16. Personalized Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer related deaths in both men and women in the United States and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for over 85 % of all lung cancers. Survival of these patients has not significantly altered in over 30 years. This chapter initially discusses the clinical presentation of lung cancer patients. Most patients diagnosed with lung cancer due to symptoms have advanced stage cancer. Once diagnosed, lung cancer patients need imaging studies to assess the stage of the disease before decisions regarding therapy are finalized. The most important prognostic factors are stage of the disease and performance status and these factors also determine therapy. The chapter subsequently discusses management of each stage of the disease and the impact of several pathologic, clinical factors in personalizing therapy for each individual patient. Transition from chemotherapy for every patient to a more personalized approach based on histology and molecular markers has occurred in the management of advanced stage NSCLC. It is expected that such a personalized approach will extend to all stages of NSCLC and will likely improve the outcomes of all NSCLC patients. PMID:26703806

  17. Navigating cancer network attractors for tumor-specific therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin; Erler, Janine Terra;

    2012-01-01

    understanding of the processes by which genetic lesions perturb these networks and lead to disease phenotypes. Network biology will help circumvent fundamental obstacles in cancer treatment, such as drug resistance and metastasis, empowering personalized and tumor-specific cancer therapies.......Cells employ highly dynamic signaling networks to drive biological decision processes. Perturbations to these signaling networks may attract cells to new malignant signaling and phenotypic states, termed cancer network attractors, that result in cancer development. As different cancer cells reach...... these malignant states by accumulating different molecular alterations, uncovering these mechanisms represents a grand challenge in cancer biology. Addressing this challenge will require new systems-based strategies that capture the intrinsic properties of cancer signaling networks and provide deeper...

  18. The role of myeloid cells in cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engblom, Camilla; Pfirschke, Christina; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-07-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the ability to durably control cancer in some patients by manipulating T lymphocytes. These immunotherapies are revolutionizing cancer treatment but benefit only a minority of patients. It is thus a crucial time for clinicians, cancer scientists and immunologists to determine the next steps in shifting cancer treatment towards better cancer control. This Review describes recent advances in our understanding of tumour-associated myeloid cells. These cells remain less studied than T lymphocytes but have attracted particular attention because their presence in tumours is often linked to altered patient survival. Also, experimental studies indicate that myeloid cells modulate key cancer-associated activities, including immune evasion, and affect virtually all types of cancer therapy. Consequently, targeting myeloid cells could overcome limitations of current treatment options. PMID:27339708

  19. Music therapy as part of the alternative-complementary therapy in cancer patients in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Efstratios Athanassakis; Savvato Karavassiliadou

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the modern health problems of people living in developed countries. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches to cancer patients is constantly updated with new data. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the international literature referred to the application of music therapy in the treatment for pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Method and materials: The method of this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature on MEDLI...

  20. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy for Cancer - Our experience since 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Terunuma

    2012-01-01

    cells and peptide pulsed DCs. The principle behind combining NK cells and CTLs is a dual advantage approach combining the innate immune system and adaptive immune system wherein the CTLs will kill the MHC expressing cancer cells while NK cells will kill the MHC non-expressing cancer cells also. [10] In case of NK cells and DCs, DCs will in turn activate the CTLs thereby giving rise to the dual advantage mentioned above. We have recently suggested that the AIET using expanded NK cells, particularly in combination with monoclonal antibody drugs, may be very useful tool for cancer immunotherapy. [14] Our experience: In our studies in NOG SCID mice, activated NK cells were shown to reduce the size of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231 [15] and the volume of ascites also inhibiting lung metastasis of pleural effusion lymphoma (PEL cells. [16] In a primary lung adenocarcinoma patient where AIET was administered in combination with Hyperthermia, the CEA values decreased from 4.8 ng/ml to 1.6 ng/ml, the SLX decreased from 30 U/ml to 27 U/ml, the IAP reduced from 300 μg/ml to 221 μg/ml along with resolution of the lung lesions in four months. A 55 year old woman treated for invasive ductal carcinoma of breast presented with metastasis to the lungs. She was then treated with trastuzumab in combination with multiple injections of activated natural killer (NK cells (at two week intervals following which the tumor markers decreased. Progression free survival was 10 months. [11] Fifty-two patients with advanced cancers in organs like lung, breast, colon, prostate, liver, kidney, ovary etc, refractory to conventional therapy when treated with a combination of hyperthermia and NK cell-and CTL-based immune cell therapy with low-dose chemotherapy, in 18 of 52 patients, objective responses was observed including one complete response (CR and 17 partial responses (PR evaluated according to the to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST guidelines. Sixteen patients had stable