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Sample records for cancer targeted gene

  1. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  2. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    or immunotoxin therapy, natural vector-host tropisms must be altered. Recent improvements in monoclonal antibody (mAb) engineering have expanded the...endocytosis. To achieve targeted gene therapy or immunotoxin therapy, natural vector-host tropisms must be altered. Recent improvements in monoclonal...trafficking of monoclonal antibody- antigen to an endolysosomal pathway is important. After altering targeting specificities, prokaryotic and plant

  3. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  4. Revealing targeted therapy for human cancer by gene module maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, David J.; Nuyten, Dimitry S. A.; Regev, Aviv; Lin, Meihong; Adler, Adam S.; Segal, Eran; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2008-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is to match specific therapies to molecular targets in cancer. Genome-scale expression profiling has identified new subtypes of cancer based on consistent patterns of variation in gene expression, leading to improved prognostic predictions. However, how these new

  5. Targeting a Novel Vector for Breast Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bzik, David

    2002-01-01

    .... The primary purpose and scope of this IDEA award project is to experimentally examine approaches to safely target the Toxoplasma gondii parasite gene therapy vector to breast cancer tissue using...

  6. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy. PMID:17109514

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  8. Cancer therapeutic target genes identified on chromosome 20q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated quantitative genome data analysis was recently able to pinpoint 18 genes on human chromosome 20q that could potentially serve as novel molecular targets for cancer therapy. Researchers Antoine M Snijders and Jian-Hua Mao from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Biological Systems and Engineering Division in Berkeley, California, United States, in their study published by the journal Advances in Modern Oncology Research (AMOR sought to compare the amounts of individual mRNAs – messenger RNAs that specify the amino acid sequence of the protein products of gene expression – in cancerous human tissues with corresponding normal tissues. The duo conducted a meta-analysis of genes on chromosome 20q that are found to be consistently upregulated across different human tumor types, while collecting gene transcript data of normal and tumor tissues across 11 different tumor types including brain, breast, colon, gastric, head and neck, liver, lung, ovarian, cervix, pancreas, and prostate cancers. “We calculated the differential expression of all 301 genes present on chromosome 20q for which gene transcript data was available. We then filtered for genes that were upregulated in tumors by at least 1.5 fold (p < 0.05 in seven or more tumor types,” they said. The resulting analysis identified 18 genes – some such as AURKA, UBE2C, TPX2, FAM83D, ZNF217, SALL4 and MMP9 have been previously known to potentially cause cancer. The 18-gene signature is revealed by the study to have robustly elevated levels across human cancers. “We observed significant association of our signature with disease-free survival in all 18 independent data… These data indicated that our signature is broadly predictive for disease-free survival, independent of tumor type,” the researchers said. In certain cases, Snijders and Mao found that increased gene expression was associated with better prognosis. “For example, the increased expressions of MMP9 and

  9. STAT3 Target Genes Relevant to Human Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, Richard L.; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery, the STAT3 transcription factor has been extensively studied for its function as a transcriptional regulator and its role as a mediator of development, normal physiology, and pathology of many diseases, including cancers. These efforts have uncovered an array of genes that can be positively and negatively regulated by STAT3, alone and in cooperation with other transcription factors. Through regulating gene expression, STAT3 has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in many cellular processes including oncogenesis, tumor growth and progression, and stemness. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that STAT3 may behave as a tumor suppressor by activating expression of genes known to inhibit tumorigenesis. Additional evidence suggested that STAT3 may elicit opposing effects depending on cellular context and tumor types. These mixed results signify the need for a deeper understanding of STAT3, including its upstream regulators, parallel transcription co-regulators, and downstream target genes. To help facilitate fulfilling this unmet need, this review will be primarily focused on STAT3 downstream target genes that have been validated to associate with tumorigenesis and/or malignant biology of human cancers

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  11. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  12. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  13. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  14. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  15. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  16. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  17. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  18. Anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles containing IL12 and salmosin genes for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Seok; Kang, Seong Jae; Jeong, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hong Sung; Kim, Keun Sik; Park, Yong Serk

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-directed gene delivery is of major interest in the field of cancer gene therapy. Varied functionalizations of non-viral vectors have been suggested to enhance tumor targetability. In the present study, we prepared two different types of anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) immunonanoparticles containing pDNA, neutrally charged liposomes and cationic lipoplexes, for tumor-directed transfection of cancer therapeutic genes. Even though both anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles had a high binding affinity to the EGFR-positive cancer cells, the anti-EGFR immunolipoplex formulation exhibited approximately 100-fold higher transfection to the target cells than anti-EGFR immunoliposomes. The lipoplex formulation also showed a higher transfection to SK-OV-3 tumor xenografts in mice. Thus, IL12 and/or salmosin genes were loaded in the anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes and intravenously administered to mice carrying SK-OV-3 tumors. Co-transfection of IL12 and salmosin genes using anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes significantly reduced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Furthermore, combinatorial treatment with doxorubicin synergistically inhibited tumor growth. These results suggest that anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes containing pDNA encoding therapeutic genes could be utilized as a gene-transfer modality for cancer gene therapy.

  19. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  20. Targeted sequencing of cancer-related genes in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Won Han

    Full Text Available Recent advance in sequencing technology has enabled comprehensive profiling of genetic alterations in cancer. We have established a targeted sequencing platform using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology for clinical use, which can provide mutation and copy number variation data. NGS was performed with paired-end library enriched with exons of 183 cancer-related genes. Normal and tumor tissue pairs of 60 colorectal adenocarcinomas were used to test feasibility. Somatic mutation and copy number alteration were analyzed. A total of 526 somatic non-synonymous sequence variations were found in 113 genes. Among these, 278 single nucleotide variations were 232 different somatic point mutations. 216 SNV were 79 known single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dbSNP. 32 indels were 28 different indel mutations. Median number of mutated gene per tumor was 4 (range 0-23. Copy number gain (>X2 fold was found in 65 genes in 40 patients, whereas copy number loss (genes in 39 patients. The most frequently altered genes (mutation and/or copy number alteration were APC in 35 patients (58%, TP53 in 34 (57%, and KRAS in 24 (40%. Altered gene list revealed ErbB signaling pathway as the most commonly involved pathway (25 patients, 42%. Targeted sequencing platform using NGS technology is feasible for clinical use and provides comprehensive genetic alteration data.

  1. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer

  2. Identification of target genes of transcription factor activator protein 2 gamma in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailan, He; Shuanglin, Xiang; Xiangwen, Xiao; Daolong, Ren; Lu, Gan; Xiaofeng, Ding; Xi, Qiao; Xingwang, Hu; Rushi, Liu; Jian, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Activator protein 2 gamma (AP-2γ) is a member of the transcription factor activator protein-2 (AP-2) family, which is developmentally regulated and plays a role in human neoplasia. AP-2γ has been found to be overexpressed in most breast cancers, and have a dual role to inhibit tumor initiation and promote tumor progression afterwards during mammary tumorigensis. To identify the gene targets that mediate its effects, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to isolate AP-2γ binding sites on genomic DNA from human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. 20 novel DNA fragments proximal to potential AP-2γ targets were obtained. They are categorized into functional groups of carcinogenesis, metabolism and others. A combination of sequence analysis, reporter gene assays, quantitative real-time PCR, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis further confirmed the four AP-2γ target genes in carcinogenesis group: ErbB2, CDH2, HPSE and IGSF11. Our results were consistent with the previous reports that ErbB2 was the target gene of AP-2γ. Decreased expression and overexpression of AP-2γ in human breast cancer cells significantly altered the expression of these four genes, indicating that AP-2γ directly regulates them. This suggested that AP-2γ can coordinate the expression of a network of genes, involving in carcinogenesis, especially in breast cancer. They could serve as therapeutic targets against breast cancers in the future

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  4. Identification of downstream metastasis-associated target genes regulated by LSD1 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Ding, Jie; Wang, Ziwei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Xuejian; Du, Jiyi

    2017-03-21

    This study aims to identify downstream target genes regulated by lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in colon cancer cells and investigate the molecular mechanisms of LSD1 influencing invasion and metastasis of colon cancer. We obtained the expression changes of downstream target genes regulated by small-interfering RNA-LSD1 and LSD1-overexpression via gene expression profiling in two human colon cancer cell lines. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We screened out LSD1-target gene associated with proliferation, metastasis, and invasion from DEGs via Gene Ontology and Pathway Studio. Subsequently, four key genes (CABYR, FOXF2, TLE4, and CDH1) were computationally predicted as metastasis-related LSD1-target genes. ChIp-PCR was applied after RT-PCR and Western blot validations to detect the occupancy of LSD1-target gene promoter-bound LSD1. A total of 3633 DEGs were significantly upregulated, and 4642 DEGs were downregulated in LSD1-silenced SW620 cells. A total of 4047 DEGs and 4240 DEGs were upregulated and downregulated in LSD1-overexpressed HT-29 cells, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot validated the microarray analysis results. ChIP assay results demonstrated that LSD1 might be negative regulators for target genes CABYR and CDH1. The expression level of LSD1 is negatively correlated with mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine4(H3K4) at LSD1- target gene promoter region. No significant mono-methylation and dimethylation of H3 lysine9 methylation was detected at the promoter region of CABYR and CDH1. LSD1- depletion contributed to the upregulation of CABYR and CDH1 through enhancing the dimethylation of H3K4 at the LSD1-target genes promoter. LSD1- overexpression mediated the downregulation of CABYR and CDH1expression through decreasing the mono- and dimethylation of H3K4 at LSD1-target gene promoter in colon cancer cells. CABYR and CDH1 might be potential LSD1-target genes in colon

  5. Towards prostate cancer gene therapy: Development of a chlorotoxin-targeted nanovector for toxic (melittin) gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarokh, Zahra; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Nazari, Mahboobeh

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in men. Owing to shortcomings in the current treatments, other therapies are being considered. Toxic gene delivery is one of the most effective methods for cancer therapy. Cationic polymers are able to form stable nanoparticles via interaction with nucleic acids electrostatically. Branched polyethylenimine that contains amine groups has notable buffering capacity and the ability to escape from endosome through the proton sponge effect. However, the cytotoxicity of this polymer is high, and modification is one of the applicable strategies to overcome this problem. In this study, PEI was targeted with chlorotoxin (CTX) via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP) cross-linker. CTX can bind specifically to matrix metalloproteinase-2 that is overexpressed in certain cancers. Melittin as the major component of bee venom has been reported to have anti-cancer activity. This was thus selected to deliver to PC3 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that transfection efficiency of targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene also decreased cell viability of PC3 cells significantly while no toxic effects were observed on NIH3T3 cell line. Therefore, CTX-targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene could serve as an appropriate gene delivery system for prostate and other MMP-2 positive cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A meta analysis of pancreatic microarray datasets yields new targets as cancer genes and biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin C W Goonesekere

    Full Text Available The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC, which has a five year survival rate of less than 5%. Improved screening for earlier diagnosis, through the detection of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers provides the best hope of increasing the rate of curatively resectable carcinomas. Though many serum markers have been reported to be elevated in patients with PC, so far, most of these markers have not been implemented into clinical routine due to low sensitivity or specificity. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly upregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We demonstrate that the biological functions ascribed to these genes are clearly associated with PC and metastasis, and that that these genes exhibit a strong link to pathways involved with inflammation and the immune response. This investigation has yielded new targets for cancer genes, and potential biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. The candidate list of cancer genes includes protein kinase genes, new members of gene families currently associated with PC, as well as genes not previously linked to PC. In this study, we are also able to move towards developing a signature for hypomethylated genes, which could be useful for early detection of PC. We also show that the significantly upregulated 800+ genes in our analysis can serve as an enriched pool for tissue and serum protein biomarkers in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavroudi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The grim statistics speak for themselves with reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self-renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we

  9. Amplification of distant estrogen response elements deregulates target genes associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Yin; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Lan, Xun; Juan, Liran; Yan, Pearlly S; Labanowska, Jadwiga; Heerema, Nyla; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Yidong; Liu, Yunlong; Li, Lang; Li, Rong; Thompson, Ian M; Nephew, Kenneth P; Sharp, Zelton D; Kirma, Nameer B; Jin, Victor X; Huang, Tim H-M

    2013-08-12

    A causal role of gene amplification in tumorigenesis is well known, whereas amplification of DNA regulatory elements as an oncogenic driver remains unclear. In this study, we integrated next-generation sequencing approaches to map distant estrogen response elements (DEREs) that remotely control the transcription of target genes through chromatin proximity. Two densely mapped DERE regions located on chromosomes 17q23 and 20q13 were frequently amplified in estrogen receptor-α-positive luminal breast cancer. These aberrantly amplified DEREs deregulated target gene expression potentially linked to cancer development and tamoxifen resistance. Progressive accumulation of DERE copies was observed in normal breast progenitor cells chronically exposed to estrogenic chemicals. These findings may extend to other DNA regulatory elements, the amplification of which can profoundly alter target transcriptome during tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A PCA3 gene-based transcriptional amplification system targeting primary prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neveu, Bertrand; Jain, Pallavi; T?tu, Bernard; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Fr?d?ric

    2015-01-01

    Targeting specifically primary prostate cancer (PCa) cells for immune therapy, gene therapy or molecular imaging is of high importance. The PCA3 long non-coding RNA is a unique PCa biomarker and oncogene that has been widely studied. This gene has been mainly exploited as an accurate diagnostic urine biomarker for PCa detection. In this study, the PCA3 promoter was introduced into a new transcriptional amplification system named the 3-Step Transcriptional Amplification System (PCA3-3STA) and ...

  11. MicroRNA-373 functions as an oncogene and targets YOD1 gene in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Luo-Qiao; Zhang, Yue; Yan, Huan; Liu, Kai-Jiang, E-mail: liukaijiang@126.com; Zhang, Shu, E-mail: drzhangshu@126.com

    2015-04-10

    miR-373 was reported to be elevated in several tumors; however, the role of miR-373 in cervical cancer has not been investigated. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. The expression of miR-373 was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay in 45 cervical specimens and cervical cancer cell lines. The role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells was assessed by cell proliferation, colony formation in vitro as well as tumor growth assays in vivo with the overexpression of miR-373 or gene silencing. The functional target gene of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells was identified using integrated bioinformatics analysis, gene expression arrays, and luciferase assay. We founded that the expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cervical carcinoma cell lines when compared to the corresponding noncancerous tissues. Ectopic overexpression of miR-373 in human cervical cancer cells promoted cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas silencing the expression of miR-373 decreased the rate of cell growth. YOD1 was identified as a direct and functional target of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells. Expression levels of miR-373 were inversely correlated with YOD1 levels in human cervical cancer tissues. RNAi-mediated knockdown of YOD1 phenocopied the proliferation-promoting effect of miR-373. Moreover, overexpression of YOD1 abrogated miR-373-induced proliferation of cervical cancer cells. These results demonstrate that miR-373 increases proliferation by directly targeting YOD1, a new potential therapeutic target in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • The expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues. • miR-373 effects as oncogenic miRNA in cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. • miR-373 increases proliferation of cervical cancer cells by directly targeting YOD1.

  12. Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context

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    Hua-Sheng Chiu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are commonly dysregulated in tumors, but only a handful are known to play pathophysiological roles in cancer. We inferred lncRNAs that dysregulate cancer pathways, oncogenes, and tumor suppressors (cancer genes by modeling their effects on the activity of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins, and microRNAs in 5,185 TCGA tumors and 1,019 ENCODE assays. Our predictions included hundreds of candidate onco- and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs (cancer lncRNAs whose somatic alterations account for the dysregulation of dozens of cancer genes and pathways in each of 14 tumor contexts. To demonstrate proof of concept, we showed that perturbations targeting OIP5-AS1 (an inferred tumor suppressor and TUG1 and WT1-AS (inferred onco-lncRNAs dysregulated cancer genes and altered proliferation of breast and gynecologic cancer cells. Our analysis indicates that, although most lncRNAs are dysregulated in a tumor-specific manner, some, including OIP5-AS1, TUG1, NEAT1, MEG3, and TSIX, synergistically dysregulate cancer pathways in multiple tumor contexts. : Chiu et al. present a pan-cancer analysis of lncRNA regulatory interactions. They suggest that the dysregulation of hundreds of lncRNAs target and alter the expression of cancer genes and pathways in each tumor context. This implies that hundreds of lncRNAs can alter tumor phenotypes in each tumor context. Keywords: lncRNA, regulation, modulation, cancer gene, pan-cancer, noncoding RNA, microRNA, RNA-binding proteins, interactome

  13. Targeted sequencing of established and candidate colorectal cancer genes in the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort.

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    Raskin, Leon; Guo, Yan; Du, Liping; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Lindor, Noralane M; Gruber, Stephen B; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2017-11-07

    The underlying genetic cause of colorectal cancer (CRC) can be identified for 5-10% of all cases, while at least 20% of CRC cases are thought to be due to inherited genetic factors. Screening for highly penetrant mutations in genes associated with Mendelian cancer syndromes using next-generation sequencing (NGS) can be prohibitively expensive for studies requiring large samples sizes. The aim of the study was to identify rare single nucleotide variants and small indels in 40 established or candidate CRC susceptibility genes in 1,046 familial CRC cases (including both MSS and MSI-H tumor subtypes) and 1,006 unrelated controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort using a robust and cost-effective DNA pooling NGS strategy. We identified 264 variants in 38 genes that were observed only in cases, comprising either very rare (minor allele frequency cancer susceptibility genes BAP1, CDH1, CHEK2, ENG, and MSH3 . For the candidate CRC genes, we identified likely pathogenic variants in the helicase domain of POLQ and in the LRIG1 , SH2B3 , and NOS1 genes and present their clinicopathological characteristics. Using a DNA pooling NGS strategy, we identified novel germline mutations in established CRC susceptibility genes in familial CRC cases. Further studies are required to support the role of POLQ , LRIG1 , SH2B3 and NOS1 as CRC susceptibility genes.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

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    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associated with the utility of MSC-based therapy such as biosafety, immunoprivilege, transfection methods, and distribution in the host. PMID:22530882

  15. Viral Etiology Relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Human Breast Cancer and Target of Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Teng, Zhi Ping; Chen, Yun Xin; Shen, Dan Hua; Li, Jin Tao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-05-01

    To explore the viral etiology of human breast cancer to determine whether there are novel molecular targets for gene therapy of breast cancer and provide evidence for the research of gene therapy and vaccine development for breast cancer. PCR was used to screen HPV16 and HPV18 oncogenes E6 and E7 in the SKBR3 cell line and in 76 paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue samples. RNA interference was used to knock down the expression of HPV18 E6 and E7 in SKBR3 cells, then the changes in the expression of cell-cycle related proteins, cell viability, colony formation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression were determined. HPV18 oncogenes E6 and E7 were amplified and sequenced from the SKBR3 cells. Of the patient samples, 6.58% and 23.68% were tested to be positive for HPV18 E6 and HPV18 E7. In the cell culture models, the knockdown of HPV18 E6 and E7 inhibited the proliferation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression of SKBR3 cell. The knockdown also clearly affected the expression levels of cell cycle related proteins. HPV was a contributor to virus caused human breast cancer, suggesting that the oncogenes in HPV were potential targets for gene therapy of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  16. Methylation of polycomb target genes in intestinal cancer is mediated by inflammation.

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    Hahn, Maria A; Hahn, Torsten; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Esworthy, R Steven; Kim, Byung-Wook; Riggs, Arthur D; Chu, Fong-Fong; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2008-12-15

    Epigenetic changes are strongly associated with cancer development. DNA hypermethylation is associated with gene silencing and is often observed in CpG islands. Recently, it was suggested that aberrant CpG island methylation in tumors is directed by Polycomb (PcG) proteins. However, specific mechanisms responsible for methylation of PcG target genes in cancer are not known. Chronic infection and inflammation contribute to up to 25% of all cancers worldwide. Using glutathione peroxidase, Gpx1 and Gpx2, double knockout (Gpx1/2-KO) mice as a model of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing to intestinal cancer, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation in the mouse ileum during chronic inflammation, aging, and cancer. We found that inflammation leads to aberrant DNA methylation in PcG target genes, with 70% of the approximately 250 genes methylated in the inflamed tissue being PcG targets in embryonic stem cells and 59% of the methylated genes being marked by H3K27 trimethylation in the ileum of adult wild-type mice. Acquisition of DNA methylation at CpG islands in the ileum of Gpx1/2-KO mice frequently correlates with loss of H3K27 trimethylation at the same loci. Inflammation-associated DNA methylation occurs preferentially in tissue-specific silent genes and, importantly, is much more frequently represented in tumors than is age-dependent DNA methylation. Sixty percent of aberrant methylation found in tumors is also present in the inflamed tissue. In summary, inflammation creates a signature of aberrant DNA methylation, which is observed later in the malignant tissue and is directed by the PcG complex.

  17. Reprogramming of the ERRα and ERα target gene landscape triggers tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, Verena; Simon, Ronald; Schroeter, Petra; Schlotter, Magdalena; Anzeneder, Tobias; Büttner, Reinhard; Benes, Vladimir; Sauter, Guido; Burwinkel, Barbara; Nicholson, Robert I; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Deuschle, Ulrich; Zapatka, Marc; Heck, Stefanie; Lichter, Peter

    2015-02-15

    Endocrine treatment regimens for breast cancer that target the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) are effective, but acquired resistance remains a limiting drawback. One mechanism of acquired resistance that has been hypothesized is functional substitution of the orphan receptor estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) for ERα. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed ERRα and ERα in recurrent tamoxifen-resistant breast tumors and conducted a genome-wide target gene profiling analysis of MCF-7 breast cancer cell populations that were sensitive or resistant to tamoxifen treatment. This analysis uncovered a global redirection in the target genes controlled by ERα, ERRα, and their coactivator AIB1, defining a novel set of target genes in tamoxifen-resistant cells. Beyond differences in the ERα and ERRα target gene repertoires, both factors were engaged in similar pathobiologic processes relevant to acquired resistance. Functional analyses confirmed a requirement for ERRα in tamoxifen- and fulvestrant-resistant MCF-7 cells, with pharmacologic inhibition of ERRα sufficient to partly restore sensitivity to antiestrogens. In clinical specimens (n = 1041), increased expression of ERRα was associated with enhanced proliferation and aggressive disease parameters, including increased levels of p53 in ERα-positive cases. In addition, increased ERRα expression was linked to reduced overall survival in independent tamoxifen-treated patient cohorts. Taken together, our results suggest that ERα and ERRα cooperate to promote endocrine resistance, and they provide a rationale for the exploration of ERRα as a candidate drug target to treat endocrine-resistant breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. ABCF2, an Nrf2 target gene, contributes to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lingjie; Wu, Jianfa; Dodson, Matthew; Rojo de la Vega, Elisa Montserrat; Ning, Yan; Zhang, Zhenbo; Yao, Ming; Zhang, Donna D; Xu, Congjian; Yi, Xiaofang

    2017-06-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that NRF2 plays a key role in mediating cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. To further explore the mechanism underlying NRF2-dependent cisplatin resistance, we stably overexpressed or knocked down NRF2 in parental and cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells, respectively. These two pairs of stable cell lines were then subjected to microarray analysis, where we identified 18 putative NRF2 target genes. Among these genes, ABCF2, a cytosolic member of the ABC superfamily of transporters, has previously been reported to contribute to chemoresistance in clear cell ovarian cancer. A detailed analysis on ABCF2 revealed a functional antioxidant response element (ARE) in its promoter region, establishing ABCF2 as an NRF2 target gene. Next, we investigated the contribution of ABCF2 in NRF2-mediated cisplatin resistance using our stable ovarian cancer cell lines. The NRF2-overexpressing cell line, containing high levels of ABCF2, was more resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis compared to its control cell line; whereas the NRF2 knockdown cell line with low levels of ABCF2, was more sensitive to cisplatin treatment than its control cell line. Furthermore, transient overexpression of ABCF2 in the parental cells decreased apoptosis and increased cell viability following cisplatin treatment. Conversely, knockdown of ABCF2 using specific siRNA notably increased apoptosis and decreased cell viability in cisplatin-resistant cells treated with cisplatin. This data indicate that the novel NRF2 target gene, ABCF2, plays a critical role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, and that targeting ABCF2 may be a new strategy to improve chemotherapeutic efficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Somvanshi, Sonal; Patel, Ektaben; Chen, Ting-Wen; Singh, Vivek P; Zorman, Barry; Patil, Sagar L; Pan, Yinghong; Chatterjee, Sujash S; Sood, Anil K; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Sumazin, Pavel

    2018-04-03

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are commonly dysregulated in tumors, but only a handful are known to play pathophysiological roles in cancer. We inferred lncRNAs that dysregulate cancer pathways, oncogenes, and tumor suppressors (cancer genes) by modeling their effects on the activity of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins, and microRNAs in 5,185 TCGA tumors and 1,019 ENCODE assays. Our predictions included hundreds of candidate onco- and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs (cancer lncRNAs) whose somatic alterations account for the dysregulation of dozens of cancer genes and pathways in each of 14 tumor contexts. To demonstrate proof of concept, we showed that perturbations targeting OIP5-AS1 (an inferred tumor suppressor) and TUG1 and WT1-AS (inferred onco-lncRNAs) dysregulated cancer genes and altered proliferation of breast and gynecologic cancer cells. Our analysis indicates that, although most lncRNAs are dysregulated in a tumor-specific manner, some, including OIP5-AS1, TUG1, NEAT1, MEG3, and TSIX, synergistically dysregulate cancer pathways in multiple tumor contexts. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Properties of a Telomerase-Specific Cre/Lox Switch for Transcriptionally Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

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    Alan E. Bilsland

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase expression represents a good target for cancer gene therapy. The promoters of the core telomerase catalytic [human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT] and RNA [human telomerase RNA (hTR] subunits show selective activity in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This property can be harnessed to express therapeutic transgenes in a wide range of cancer cells. Unfortunately, weak hTR and hTERT promoter activities in some cancer cells could limit the target cell range. Therefore, strategies to enhance telomerasespecific gene therapy are of interest. We constructed a Cre/Lox reporter switch coupling telomerase promoter specificity with Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter activity, which is generally considered to be constitutively high. In this approach, a telomerase-specific vector expressing Cre recombinase directs excisive recombination on a second vector, removing a transcriptional blockade to CMV-dependent luciferase expression. We tested switch activation in cell lines over a wide range of telomerase promoter activities. However, Cre/Lox-dependent luciferase expression was not enhanced relative to expression using hTR or hTERT promoters directly. Cell-specific differences between telomerase and CMV promoter activities and incomplete sigmoid switch activation were limiting factors. Notably, CMV activity was not always significantly stronger than telomerase promoter activity. Our conclusions provide a general basis for a more rational design of novel recombinase switches in gene therapy.

  1. Prediction of novel target genes and pathways involved in irinotecan-resistant colorectal cancer.

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    Precious Takondwa Makondi

    Full Text Available Acquired drug resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan (the active metabolite of which is SN-38 is one of the significant obstacles in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC. The molecular mechanism or targets mediating irinotecan resistance are still unclear. It is urgent to find the irinotecan response biomarkers to improve CRC patients' therapy.Genetic Omnibus Database GSE42387 which contained the gene expression profiles of parental and irinotecan-resistant HCT-116 cell lines was used. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between parental and irinotecan-resistant cells, protein-protein interactions (PPIs, gene ontologies (GOs and pathway analysis were performed to identify the overall biological changes. The most common DEGs in the PPIs, GOs and pathways were identified and were validated clinically by their ability to predict overall survival and disease free survival. The gene-gene expression correlation and gene-resistance correlation was also evaluated in CRC patients using The Cancer Genomic Atlas data (TCGA.The 135 DEGs were identified of which 36 were upregulated and 99 were down regulated. After mapping the PPI networks, the GOs and the pathways, nine genes (GNAS, PRKACB, MECOM, PLA2G4C, BMP6, BDNF, DLG4, FGF2 and FGF9 were found to be commonly enriched. Signal transduction was the most significant GO and MAPK pathway was the most significant pathway. The five genes (FGF2, FGF9, PRKACB, MECOM and PLA2G4C in the MAPK pathway were all contained in the signal transduction and the levels of those genes were upregulated. The FGF2, FGF9 and MECOM expression were highly associated with CRC patients' survival rate but not PRKACB and PLA2G4C. In addition, FGF9 was also associated with irinotecan resistance and poor disease free survival. FGF2, FGF9 and PRKACB were positively correlated with each other while MECOM correlated positively with FGF9 and PLA2G4C, and correlated negatively with FGF2 and PRKACB after doing gene-gene

  2. SRC-2-mediated coactivation of anti-tumorigenic target genes suppresses MYC-induced liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaorong; Comerford, Sarah A.; York, Brian; O’Donnell, Kathryn A.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor in the world and the third leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. A Sleeping Beauty-mediated transposon mutagenesis screen previously identified mutations that cooperate with MYC to accelerate liver tumorigenesis. This revealed a tumor suppressor role for Steroid Receptor Coactivator 2/Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 2 (Src-2/Ncoa2) in liver cancer. In contrast, SRC-2 promotes survival and metastasis in prostate cancer cells, suggesting a tissue-specific and context-dependent role for SRC-2 in tumorigenesis. To determine if genetic loss of SRC-2 is sufficient to accelerate MYC-mediated liver tumorigenesis, we bred Src-2-/- mice with a MYC-induced liver tumor model and observed a significant increase in liver tumor burden. RNA sequencing of liver tumors and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed a set of direct target genes that are bound by SRC-2 and exhibit downregulated expression in Src-2-/- liver tumors. We demonstrate that activation of SHP (Small Heterodimer Partner), DKK4 (Dickkopf-4), and CADM4 (Cell Adhesion Molecule 4) by SRC-2 suppresses tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. These studies suggest that SRC-2 may exhibit oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity depending on the target genes and nuclear receptors that are expressed in distinct tissues and illuminate the mechanisms of tumor suppression by SRC-2 in liver. PMID:28273073

  3. Analysis of Deregulated microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gastric Cancer.

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    Simonas Juzėnas

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are widely studied non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression. MiRNAs are deregulated in different tumors including gastric cancer (GC and have potential diagnostic and prognostic implications. The aim of our study was to determine miRNA profile in GC tissues, followed by evaluation of deregulated miRNAs in plasma of GC patients. Using available databases and bioinformatics methods we also aimed to evaluate potential target genes of confirmed differentially expressed miRNA and validate these findings in GC tissues.The study included 51 GC patients and 51 controls. Initially, we screened miRNA expression profile in 13 tissue samples of GC and 12 normal gastric tissues with TaqMan low density array (TLDA. In the second stage, differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in a replication cohort using qRT-PCR in tissue and plasma samples. Subsequently, we analyzed potential target genes of deregulated miRNAs using bioinformatics approach, determined their expression in GC tissues and performed correlation analysis with targeting miRNAs.Profiling with TLDA revealed 15 deregulated miRNAs in GC tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa. Replication analysis confirmed that miR-148a-3p, miR-204-5p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 were consistently deregulated in GC tissues. Analysis of GC patients' plasma samples showed significant down-regulation of miR-148a-3p, miR-375 and up-regulation of miR-223-3p compared to healthy subjects. Further, using bioinformatic tools we identified targets of replicated miRNAs and performed disease-associated gene enrichment analysis. Ultimately, we evaluated potential target gene BCL2 and DNMT3B expression by qRT-PCR in GC tissue, which correlated with targeting miRNA expression.Our study revealed miRNA profile in GC tissues and showed that miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 are deregulated in GC plasma samples, but these circulating miRNAs showed relatively weak diagnostic performance as sole biomarkers

  4. Immunotherapy Targets Common Cancer Mutation

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    In a study of an immune therapy for colorectal cancer that involved a single patient, researchers identified a method for targeting the cancer-causing protein produced by a mutant form of the KRAS gene.

  5. miR-25 targets the modulator of apoptosis 1 gene in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tangwei; Chen, Weiqun; Kong, Deyong; Li, Xiaoyi; Lu, Hongda; Liu, Shuiyi; Wang, Jing; Du, Lili; Kong, Qingzhi; Huang, Xiaodong; Lu, Zhongxin

    2015-08-01

    To determine the role of miR-25 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we first detected miR-25 expression in clinical specimens and lung cancer cell lines by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The levels of miR-25 were elevated in the plasma of NSCLC patients and NSCLC cell lines. Transfection of A549 and 95-D cells with a miR-25 inhibitor resulted in reduced cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. Moreover, the modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP1) gene was identified as a novel target of miR-25. The ability of miR-25 to promote cell proliferation and block apoptosis is attributable to its effect on MOAP1 suppression. In addition, miR-25 antagomir significantly inhibited lung cancer growth via upregulation of MOAP1 in a mouse xenograft model. Collectively, these data demonstrate that miR-25 is an important biomarker for lung cancer, and miR-25 promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in NSCLC cells by negatively regulating MOAP1 expression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Three-layered polyplex as a microRNA targeted delivery system for breast cancer gene therapy

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    Li, Yan; Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojin; Chen, Jihua

    2017-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, play an important role in modulating cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Since miRNAs can regulate multiple cancer-related genes simultaneously, regulating miRNAs could target a set of related oncogenic genes or pathways. Owing to their reduced immune response and low toxicity, miRNAs with small size and low molecular weight have become increasingly promising therapeutic drugs in cancer therapy. However, one of the major challenges of miRNAs-based cancer therapy is to achieve specific, effective, and safe delivery of therapeutic miRNAs into cancer cells. Here we provide a strategy using three-layered polyplex with folic acid as a targeting group to systemically deliver miR-210 into breast cancer cells, which results in breast cancer growth being inhibited.

  7. siRNAs with decreased off-target effect facilitate the identification of essential genes in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Liu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Fang; Liu, Wensheng; Wang, Di; Dong, Encheng; Wang, Yu; Wu, Chung-I; Lu, Xuemei

    2015-08-28

    Since the essential genes are crucial to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, the interference of these genes is promising to be an option for cancer therapy to overcome heterogeneity. However, the essential genes are highly overestimated by RNA interference (RNAi) screenings, which is mainly caused by the pervasive off-target effect of small interference RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA). In the present study, we designed Match-Mismatch paired siRNAs to discriminate the on-target effect from off-target effect of siRNAs on cell viability. Only one of the 7 potential essential genes was validated as essential to cell viability, which demonstrates the high false positive rate in RNAi screenings. We modified the siRNA by introducing random nucleotides (N) into the guide strand to mitigate the off-target effect, without significantly compromising the on-target effect. The whole transcriptome profile analysis of cells transfected with siRNAs with or without Nindicates that siRNA-dN (with Ns on both the 2nd and the 18th bases of the guide strand) weakens the off-target effect by decreasing the unintended targets. The optimized siRNAs can be applied in the characterization of essential genes in cancer cells.

  8. Identification of RegIV as a novel GLI1 target gene in human pancreatic cancer.

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    Feng Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available GLI1 is the key transcriptional factor in the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer. RegIV is associated with regeneration, and cell growth, survival, adhesion and resistance to apoptosis. We aimed to study RegIV expression in pancreatic cancer and its relationship to GLI1.GLI1 and RegIV expression were evaluated in tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissues of pancreatic cancer patients and 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry (IHC, and the correlation between them. The GLI1-shRNA lentiviral vector was constructed and transfected into PANC-1, and lentiviral vector containing the GLI1 expression sequence was constructed and transfected into BxPC-3. GLI1 and RegIV expression were evaluated by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Finally we demonstrated RegIV to be the target of GLI1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA.The results of IHC and qRT-PCR showed that RegIV and GLI1 expression was higher in pancreatic cancer tissues versus adjacent normal tissues (p<0.001. RegIV expression correlated with GLI1 expression in these tissues (R = 0.795, p<0.0001. These results were verified for protein (R = 0.939, p = 0.018 and mRNA expression (R = 0.959, p = 0.011 in 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines. RegIV mRNA and protein expression was decreased (94.7±0.3%, 84.1±0.5%; respectively when GLI1 was knocked down (82.1±3.2%, 76.7±2.2%; respectively by the RNAi technique. GLI1 overexpression in mRNA and protein level (924.5±5.3%, 362.1±3.5%; respectively induced RegIV overexpression (729.1±4.3%, 339.0±3.7%; respectively. Moreover, CHIP and EMSA assays showed GLI1 protein bound to RegIV promotor regions (GATCATCCA in pancreatic cancer cells.GLI1 promotes RegIV transcription by binding to the RegIV gene promoter in pancreatic cancer.

  9. The study of irradiation combined with targeted suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xueguan; Milas, L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV, one of suicide gene therapy targeting to Integrin αv, can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts or not. Methods: When the diameter of tumor in 48 nude mice bearing DU145 prostate cancer in the right leg attained 6.0 mm (5.8-6.3 mm), the mice were entered into the experiment. There were 6 experimental groups (8 mice per group), including the control, radiotherapy only (RT), RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV only (Targeted, RGD-4C), AAVP HSV-TK/GCV (Non-targeted, non RGD-4C ), radiotherapy plus RGD- 4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV(XRT + RGD-4C) and radiotherapy plus AAVP HSV-TK/GCV group (XRT + Non RGD-4C). The effect of treatment was assessed by tumor growth delay ( the time required when tumor grew from 6.0 mm to 12.0 mm) and tumor cure. Results: Five mice died during the treatment course. There were 6 mice without tumor after treatment, including 1 in RT group, 1 in RGD-4C group, 1 in non RGD-4C group and 3 in XRT + RGD-4C group, respectively. For tumor growth delay analysis in 37 mice, the absolute growth delay (AGD) for RGD-4C, non RGD-4C and RT group was 24.4 ± 9.0, 22.6±11.3 and 28.3 ±5.5 days, respectively. When RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV or AAVP HSV-TK/GCV combined with radiotherapy, their AGD was 64.7±23.8 and 35.4±9.6 days, and nominal growth delay (NGD) was 40.3 ± 23.8 and 12.8 ± 9.6 days, respectively. The enhancement factor of RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV and AAVP HSV-TK/GCV for radiotherapy were 1.42 and 0.45. Conclusion: RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts. Further study is needed. (authors)

  10. MicroRNA genes and their target 3'-untranslated regions are infrequently somatically mutated in ovarian cancers.

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    Georgina L Ryland

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, including epithelial ovarian cancer. MiRNA function is most often achieved through binding to the 3'-untranslated region of the target protein coding gene. Mutation screening using massively-parallel sequencing of 712 miRNA genes in 86 ovarian cancer cases identified only 5 mutated miRNA genes, each in a different case. One mutation was located in the mature miRNA, and three mutations were predicted to alter the secondary structure of the miRNA transcript. Screening of the 3'-untranslated region of 18 candidate cancer genes identified one mutation in each of AKT2, EGFR, ERRB2 and CTNNB1. The functional effect of these mutations is unclear, as expression data available for AKT2 and EGFR showed no increase in gene transcript. Mutations in miRNA genes and 3'-untranslated regions are thus uncommon in ovarian cancer.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies the Dysregulation of Ultraviolet Target Genes in Human Skin Cancers.

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    Yao Shen

    Full Text Available Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR is a major risk factor for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. In addition to its mutagenic effect, UVR can also induce substantial transcriptional instability in skin cells affecting thousands of genes, including many cancer genes, suggesting that transcriptional instability may be another important etiological factor in skin photocarcinogenesis. In this study, we performed detailed transcriptomic profiling studies to characterize the kinetic changes in global gene expression in human keratinocytes exposed to different UVR conditions. We identified a subset of UV-responsive genes as UV signature genes (UVSGs based on 1 conserved UV-responsiveness of this subset of genes among different keratinocyte lines; and 2 UV-induced persistent changes in their mRNA levels long after exposure. Interestingly, 11 of the UVSGs were shown to be critical to skin cancer cell proliferation and survival. Through computational Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we demonstrated that a significant portion of the UVSGs were dysregulated in human skin squamous cell carcinomas, but not in other human malignancies. This highlights the potential and specificity of the UVSGs in clinical diagnosis of UV damage and stratification of skin cancer risk.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Biological Gene Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Cancer Therapy: Beyond Viral Vectors

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    Min, Jung Joon; Nguyen, Vu H. [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, California(United States)

    2010-04-15

    Cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases in the world. Problems including metastasis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have seriously limited the therapeutic effects of present clinical treatments. To overcome these limitations, cancer gene therapy has been developed over the last two decades for a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. So far, a number of genes and delivery vectors have been investigated, and significant progress has been made with several gene therapy modalities in clinical trials. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications. However, both have limitations and risks that restrict gene therapy applications, including the complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonarrival biological agents such as bacteria, bacteriophages, and bacteria-like particles. Recently, many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated, and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been employed to assess vector-mediated gene expression in living subjects. In this review, molecular imaging techniques for monitoring biological gene delivery vehicles are described, and the specific use of these methods at different steps is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging to gene therapy will eventually help to develop novel gene delivery vehicles for preclinical study and support the development of future human applications.

  13. A network-based drug repositioning infrastructure for precision cancer medicine through targeting significantly mutated genes in the human cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Junfei; Fooksa, Michaela; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-07-01

    Development of computational approaches and tools to effectively integrate multidomain data is urgently needed for the development of newly targeted cancer therapeutics. We proposed an integrative network-based infrastructure to identify new druggable targets and anticancer indications for existing drugs through targeting significantly mutated genes (SMGs) discovered in the human cancer genomes. The underlying assumption is that a drug would have a high potential for anticancer indication if its up-/down-regulated genes from the Connectivity Map tended to be SMGs or their neighbors in the human protein interaction network. We assembled and curated 693 SMGs in 29 cancer types and found 121 proteins currently targeted by known anticancer or noncancer (repurposed) drugs. We found that the approved or experimental cancer drugs could potentially target these SMGs in 33.3% of the mutated cancer samples, and this number increased to 68.0% by drug repositioning through surveying exome-sequencing data in approximately 5000 normal-tumor pairs from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Furthermore, we identified 284 potential new indications connecting 28 cancer types and 48 existing drugs (adjusted P < .05), with a 66.7% success rate validated by literature data. Several existing drugs (e.g., niclosamide, valproic acid, captopril, and resveratrol) were predicted to have potential indications for multiple cancer types. Finally, we used integrative analysis to showcase a potential mechanism-of-action for resveratrol in breast and lung cancer treatment whereby it targets several SMGs (ARNTL, ASPM, CTTN, EIF4G1, FOXP1, and STIP1). In summary, we demonstrated that our integrative network-based infrastructure is a promising strategy to identify potential druggable targets and uncover new indications for existing drugs to speed up molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All

  14. A New Target in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: EML4-ALK Fusion Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan WANG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It was only 3 years ago that the fusion gene between echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like4 (EML4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK has been identified in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. EML4-ALK is most often detected in never smokers with lung adenocarcinoma and has unique pathologic features. EML4-ALK fusion gene is oncogenic, which could be suppressed by ALK-inhibitor through blocking the downstream signaling passway of EML4-ALK. This review will focus on the molecular structure, function, biology, detection method and the diagnostic and therapeutic meaning of EML4-ALK of lung cancer.

  15. The Key Genes of Chronic Pancreatitis which Bridge Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Can be Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Li, Rui; Wang, Heping; Li, Lisha; Li, Huiyu; Li, Yulin

    2018-04-01

    An important question in systems biology is what role the underlying molecular mechanisms play in disease progression. The relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer needs further exploration in a system view. We constructed the disease network based on gene expression data and protein-protein interaction. We proposed an approach to discover the underlying core network and molecular factors in the progression of pancreatic diseases, which contain stages of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer core network and key factors were revealed and then verified by gene set enrichment analysis of pathways and diseases. The key factors provide the microenvironment for tumor initiation and the change of gene expression level of key factors bridge chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Some new candidate genes need further verification by experiments. Transcriptome profiling-based network analysis reveals the importance of chronic pancreatitis genes and pathways in pancreatic cancer development on a system level by computational method and they can be therapeutic targets.

  16. Genomic Copy Number Dictates a Gene-Independent Cell Response to CRISPR/Cas9 Targeting | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system enables genome editing and somatic cell genetic screens in mammalian cells. We performed genome-scale loss-of-function screens in 33 cancer cell lines to identify genes essential for proliferation/survival and found a strong correlation between increased gene copy number and decreased cell viability after genome editing. Within regions of copy-number gain, CRISPR/Cas9 targeting of both expressed and unexpressed genes, as well as intergenic loci, led to significantly decreased cell proliferation through induction of a G2 cell-cycle arrest.

  17. Genome expression analysis by suppression subtractive hybridization identified overexpression of Humanin, a target gene in gastric cancer chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi-Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany-Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Ebrahimifard, Farzaneh; Setayesh, Neda

    2014-01-08

    In cancer cells, apoptosis is an important mechanism that influences the outcome of chemotherapy and the development of chemoresistance. To find the genes involved in chemoresistance and the development of gastric cancer, we used the suppression subtractive hybridization method to identify the genes that are overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared to normal gastric tissues. In the suppression subtractive hybridization library we constructed, the most highly overexpressed genes were humanin isoforms. Humanin is a recently identified endogenous peptide that has anti-apoptotic activity and has been selected for further study due to its potential role in the chemoresistance of gastric cancer. Upregulation of humanin isoforms was also observed in clinical samples by using quantitative real-time PCR. Among the studied isoforms, humanin isoform 3, with an expression level of 4.166 ± 1.44 fold, was the most overexpressed isoform in GC. The overexpression of humanin in gastric cancer suggests a role for chemoresistance and provides new insight into the biology of gastric cancer. We propose that humanin isoforms are novel targets for combating chemoresistance in gastric cancer.

  18. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  19. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Anderson A, Yang GY, Arbeit JM, and Auborn KJ. Indole- 3-carbinol prevents cervical cancer in human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16) transgenic mice...AR-β-catenin complex in PCa progression, new therapeutic targets or biomarkers for PCa and CRPC may be identified. This grant also serves to train...condition 2 gives no background bands. F) Schematic of human PSA promoter and or β-catenin binding sites (TBE). G-H) Target specific PCR for PSA (G) or

  20. The SRY-HMG box gene, SOX4, is a target of gene amplification at chromosome 6p in lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina, P.P.; Castillo, S.D.; Blanco, S.; Sanz-Garcia, M.; Largo, C.; Alvarez, S.; Yokota, J.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Benitez, J.; Clevers, H.; Cigudosa, J.C.; Lazo, P.A.; Sanchez-Cespedes, M.

    2009-01-01

    The search for oncogenes is becoming increasingly important in cancer genetics because they are suitable targets for therapeutic intervention. To identify novel oncogenes, activated by gene amplification, we analyzed cDNA microarrays by high-resolution comparative genome hybridization and compared

  1. High efficiency of BRCA1 knockout using rAAV-mediated gene targeting: developing a pig model for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yonglun; Li, Juan; Liu, Ying; Lin, Lin; Du, Yutao; Li, Shengting; Yang, Huanming; Vajta, Gábor; Callesen, Henrik; Bolund, Lars; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt

    2011-10-01

    Germline inactivating mutations of the breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) predispose to breast cancer and account for most cases of familiar breast and/or ovarian cancer. The pig is an excellent model for medical research as well as testing of new methods and drugs for disease prevention and treatment. We have generated cloned BRCA1 knockout (KO) Yucatan miniature piglets by targeting exon 11 using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer by Handmade Cloning (HMC). We found a very high targeting rate of rAAV-mediated BRCA1 KO. Approximately 35% of the selected cells were BRCA1 targeted. One BRCA1 KO cell clone (5D1), identified by PCR and Southern blot, was used as nuclear donor for HMC. Reconstructed embryos were transferred to three recipient sows which gave birth to 8 piglets in total. Genotyping identified seven piglets as BRCA1 heterozygotes (BRCA1(+/∆11)), and one as wild type. The BRCA1 expression was decreased at the mRNA level in BRCA1(+/∆11) fibroblasts. However, all BRCA1(+/∆11) piglets died within 18 days after birth. The causes of perinatal mortality remain unclear. Possible explanations may include a combination of the BRCA1 haploinsufficiency, problems of epigenetic reprogramming, presence of the marker gene, single cell clone effects, and/or the special genetic background of the minipigs.

  2. Ovarian cancer targeted adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahasreshti, PJ; Kataram, M; Wu, HJ; Yalavarthy, LP; Carey, D; Dent, P; Chada, S; Alvarez, RD; Haisma, HJ; Fisher, PB; Curiel, DT

    Objective. We have previously shown that adenoviral-mediated melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (Ad.mda-7) therapy induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. However, the apoptosis induction was low and directly correlated with infectivity of Ad.mda-7. The objective of this study was to

  3. Passive tumour targeting of polymer-coated adenovirus for cancer gene therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fisher, K. D.; Green, N. K.; Hale, A.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Seymour, L. W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 15, 7-8 (2007), s. 546-551 ISSN 1061-186X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer-coated virus * passive targeting * cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.030, year: 2007

  4. Radiation targeted TNF gene therapy in TNF-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Theodore D.K.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Yu, Jenny; Yajnik, Santosh; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1997-01-01

    with Ad.Egr-TNF and 40 Gy lead to progressive reduction of the mean tumor volume to 17% of original at day 59. In the 40 Gy alone group, tumors initially regressed to 73% of the original volume at day 28, but subsequently regrew to 2.3 times the original volume by day 59. Ad.Egr-TNF alone had little or no effect on tumor growth. Conclusions: Although TNF has limited cytotoxic or radiosensitizing activity in human prostate cancer PC-3 cell line in vitro, radiation targeted gene therapy with Ad.Egr-TNF increases tumor control in xenografts. These results suggest indirect mechanisms may contribute to tumor cell killing in vivo. Preliminary histopathologic evaluation confirm the presence of TNF/radiation-induced vascular obliteration

  5. Interrogating differences in expression of targeted gene sets to predict breast cancer outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Sarah A; Brock, Guy N; Wittliff, James L

    2013-07-02

    Genomics provides opportunities to develop precise tests for diagnostics, therapy selection and monitoring. From analyses of our studies and those of published results, 32 candidate genes were identified, whose expression appears related to clinical outcome of breast cancer. Expression of these genes was validated by qPCR and correlated with clinical follow-up to identify a gene subset for development of a prognostic test. RNA was isolated from 225 frozen invasive ductal carcinomas,and qRT-PCR was performed. Univariate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for breast cancer mortality and recurrence were calculated for each of the 32 candidate genes. A multivariable gene expression model for predicting each outcome was determined using the LASSO, with 1000 splits of the data into training and testing sets to determine predictive accuracy based on the C-index. Models with gene expression data were compared to models with standard clinical covariates and models with both gene expression and clinical covariates. Univariate analyses revealed over-expression of RABEP1, PGR, NAT1, PTP4A2, SLC39A6, ESR1, EVL, TBC1D9, FUT8, and SCUBE2 were all associated with reduced time to disease-related mortality (HR between 0.8 and 0.91, adjusted p data sets for the gene expression, clinical, and combined models were 0.65, 0.63, and 0.65 for disease mortality and 0.64, 0.63, and 0.66 for disease recurrence, respectively. Molecular signatures consisting of five genes (PGR, GABRP, TBC1D9, SLC39A6 and LRBA) for disease mortality and of six genes (PGR, ESR1, GABRP, TBC1D9, SLC39A6 and LRBA) for disease recurrence were identified. These signatures were as effective as standard clinical parameters in predicting recurrence/mortality, and when combined, offered some improvement relative to clinical information alone for disease recurrence (median difference in C-values of 0.03, 95% CI of -0.08 to 0.13). Collectively, results suggest that these genes form the basis for a clinical

  6. Interrogating differences in expression of targeted gene sets to predict breast cancer outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres, Sarah A; Brock, Guy N; Wittliff, James L

    2013-01-01

    Genomics provides opportunities to develop precise tests for diagnostics, therapy selection and monitoring. From analyses of our studies and those of published results, 32 candidate genes were identified, whose expression appears related to clinical outcome of breast cancer. Expression of these genes was validated by qPCR and correlated with clinical follow-up to identify a gene subset for development of a prognostic test. RNA was isolated from 225 frozen invasive ductal carcinomas,and qRT-PCR was performed. Univariate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for breast cancer mortality and recurrence were calculated for each of the 32 candidate genes. A multivariable gene expression model for predicting each outcome was determined using the LASSO, with 1000 splits of the data into training and testing sets to determine predictive accuracy based on the C-index. Models with gene expression data were compared to models with standard clinical covariates and models with both gene expression and clinical covariates. Univariate analyses revealed over-expression of RABEP1, PGR, NAT1, PTP4A2, SLC39A6, ESR1, EVL, TBC1D9, FUT8, and SCUBE2 were all associated with reduced time to disease-related mortality (HR between 0.8 and 0.91, adjusted p < 0.05), while RABEP1, PGR, SLC39A6, and FUT8 were also associated with reduced recurrence times. Multivariable analyses using the LASSO revealed PGR, ESR1, NAT1, GABRP, TBC1D9, SLC39A6, and LRBA to be the most important predictors for both disease mortality and recurrence. Median C-indexes on test data sets for the gene expression, clinical, and combined models were 0.65, 0.63, and 0.65 for disease mortality and 0.64, 0.63, and 0.66 for disease recurrence, respectively. Molecular signatures consisting of five genes (PGR, GABRP, TBC1D9, SLC39A6 and LRBA) for disease mortality and of six genes (PGR, ESR1, GABRP, TBC1D9, SLC39A6 and LRBA) for disease recurrence were identified. These signatures were as effective as standard clinical

  7. Prognostic significance of let-7b expression in breast cancer and correlation to its target gene of BSG expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Li, Gui-Zhu; Wu, Zheng-Sheng; Meng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) are found in a wide range of species, and alterations of let-7 miRNA family member expression levels in humans are associated with various types of cancer. However, few researchers have reported alterations in let-7b levels in breast cancer (BC). Specifically, the use of altered let-7 expression as a prognostic biomarker is of particular interest and significance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether let-7b could be used as a biomarker of tumor progression and patient prognosis in BC and to determine the target gene of let-7b. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical pathological characteristics of 80 BC. We utilized digoxigenin-labeled locked nucleic acid-miRNA probes to detect let-7b expression in 80 BC and 22 benign breast disease (BBD) histologic specimens by in situ hybridization, and also detect the expression of BSG-a potential target gene of let-7b-by immunohistochemistry. We observed that the levels of let-7b expression in BBD were higher than in BC specimens (P BSG protein expression (P = 0.001). Breast cancer patients with low let-7b expression had poor prognoses, indicating let-7b might act as cancer suppressor gene in BC development and progression by inhibiting the expression of BSG.

  8. Ovarian cancer treatment with a tumor-targeting and gene expression-controllable lipoplex

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhi-Yao; Deng, Feng; Wei, Xia-Wei; Ma, Cui-Cui; Luo, Min; Zhang, Ping; Sang, Ya-Xiong; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Li; Qin, Han-Xiao; Shen, Ya-Li; Liu, Ting; Liu, Yan-Tong; Wang, Wei; Wen, Yan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of folate receptor alpha (FR?) and high telomerase activity are considered to be the characteristics of ovarian cancers. In this study, we developed FR?-targeted lipoplexes loaded with an hTERT promoter-regulated plasmid that encodes a matrix protein (MP) of the vesicular stomatitis virus, F-LP/pMP(2.5), for application in ovarian cancer treatment. We first characterized the pharmaceutical properties of F-LP/pMP(2.5). The efficient expression of the MP-driven hTERT promoter in ...

  9. Development of a Nature-Inspired Vector for Targeted Systemic Breast Cancer Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Pharmaceutical Sciences P.O. Box 646534, Wegner Hall 309 Pullman, WA 99164-6534 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...INTRODUCTION 1 Gene therapy is perceived as a ground-breaking new technology with the promise to cure 2 almost any disease , provided that we understand its...therapy of cancer, cardiovascular disease , wound 15 healing, and many other diseases . 16 17 MATERIALS AND METHODS 18 Cloning, expression, and

  10. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...Exp Neurol, 2006. 65(9): p. 846-54. 13. Msaouel, P ., A . Dispenzieri, and E . Galanis, Clinical testing of engineered oncolytic measles virus strains...using ex vivo gene transfer as vaccines for the treatment of genitourinary malignancies. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol, 2000. 46 Suppl: p. S67-72. 32

  11. Cancer Genes in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Telbany, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent “oncogenic drivers” in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug

  12. Analysis of a gene panel for targeted sequencing of colorectal cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Klaus Højgaard; Izarzugaza, Jose M.G; Sierakowska Juncker, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    stratification is necessary for the identification of the subset of patients likely responding to treatment, while sparing others from pernicious treatment. Targeted sequencing approaches may help in this regard, enabling rapid genetic investigation, and at the same time easily applicable in routine diagnosis....... We propose a set of guidelines for the identification, including variant calling and filtering, of somatic mutations driving tumorigenesis in the absence of matched healthy tissue. We also discuss the inclusion criteria for the generation of our gene panel. Furthermore, we evaluate the prognostic...... impact of individual genes, using Cox regression models in the context of overall survival and disease-free survival. These analyses confirmed the role of commonly used biomarkers, and shed light on controversial genes such as CYP2C8. Applying those guidelines, we created a novel gene panel...

  13. MicroRNA-181b inhibits glycolysis in gastric cancer cells via targeting hexokinase 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang-Qing; Yang, Yang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Dun; Xie, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-07

    Cancer cells usually utilize glucose as a carbon source for aerobic glycolysis, which is named as ``Warburg effect''. Recent studies have shown that MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of short and non-coding RNAs, play a role in the regulation of metabolic reprograming in cancer cells. In the present study, we report that miR-181b negatively regulates glycolysis in gastric cancer cells. Over-expression of miR-181b mimics reduces the glucose uptake and lactate production, while increasing the cellular ATP levels in NCI-N87 and MGC80-3 cells. At the molecular level, miR-181b directly inhibits the expression level of hexokinase 2 (HK2), a key enzyme that catalyzes the first step of glycolysis, through targeting its 3'-untranslated region. In addition, miR-181b represses cell proliferation and migration and is dramatically down-regulated in human gastric cancers. Therefore, our data disclose a novel function of miR-181b in reprogramming the metabolic process in gastric cancer.

  14. Multi-focal control of mitochondrial gene expression by oncogenic MYC provides potential therapeutic targets in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, Amanda R.; Adams, Clare M.; Zhang, Xiao-yong; Gennaro, Victoria J.; Pfeiffer, Harla K.; Mellert, Hestia S.; Seidel, Hans E.; Mascioli, Kirsten; Kaplan, Jordan; Gaballa, Mahmoud R.; Shen, Chen; Rigoutsos, Isidore; King, Michael P.; Cotney, Justin L.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Sharma, Suresh D.; Martinez, Ubaldo E.; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Thompson, James E.; Bradner, James E.; Cameron, Craig E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Eischen, Christine M.; McMahon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite ubiquitous activation in human cancer, essential downstream effector pathways of the MYC transcription factor have been difficult to define and target. Using a structure/function-based approach, we identified the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) locus as a critical downstream target of MYC. The multifunctional POLRMT enzyme controls mitochondrial gene expression, a process required both for mitochondrial function and mitochondrial biogenesis. We further demonstrate that inhibition of this newly defined MYC effector pathway causes robust and selective tumor cell apoptosis, via an acute, checkpoint-like mechanism linked to aberrant electron transport chain complex assembly and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Fortuitously, MYC-dependent tumor cell death can be induced by inhibiting the mitochondrial gene expression pathway using a variety of strategies, including treatment with FDA-approved antibiotics. In vivo studies using a mouse model of Burkitt's Lymphoma provide pre-clinical evidence that these antibiotics can successfully block progression of MYC-dependent tumors. PMID:27590350

  15. Identification of genes highly downregulated in pancreatic cancer through a meta-analysis of microarray datasets: implications for discovery of novel tumor-suppressor genes and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonesekere, Nalin C W; Andersen, Wyatt; Smith, Alex; Wang, Xiaosheng

    2018-02-01

    The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC), which has a 5-year survival rate of about 7%. Recent failures of targeted therapies inhibiting kinase activity in clinical trials have highlighted the need for new approaches towards combating this deadly disease. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly downregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We have used qRT-PCR to confirm the downregulation of selected genes in a panel of PC cell lines. This study has yielded several novel candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) including GNMT, CEL, PLA2G1B and SERPINI2. We highlight the role of GNMT, a methyl transferase associated with the methylation potential of the cell, and CEL, a lipase, as potential therapeutic targets. We have uncovered genetic links to risk factors associated with PC such as smoking and obesity. Genes important for patient survival and prognosis are also discussed, and we confirm the dysregulation of metabolic pathways previously observed in PC. While many of the genes downregulated in our dataset are associated with protein products normally produced by the pancreas for excretion, we have uncovered some genes whose downregulation appear to play a more causal role in PC. These genes will assist in providing a better understanding of the disease etiology of PC, and in the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  16. Targeted therapies for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kummar S, Murgo AJ, Tomaszewski JE, Doroshow JH. Therapeutic targeting of cancer cells: era of molecularly targeted agents. ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  17. RNAi mediated gene silencing of ITPA using a targeted nanocarrier: Apoptosis induction in SKBR3 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbgoo, Fahimeh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Nikkhah, Maryam; Kane, Eric G

    2017-08-01

    A pure nucleotide pool is required for high-fidelity DNA replication and prevention of carcinogenesis in living cells. Human inosine triphosphatase (ITPase), encoded by the ITPA gene, plays a critical role in maintaining the purity of the cellular nucleotide pool by excluding nucleotides that enhance mutagenesis. ITPase is a nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes the non-canonical nucleotides inosine triphosphate (ITP) and xanthine triphosphate (XTP). The monophosphate products of ITPase reactions are subsequently excluded from the nucleotide pool and the improper substitution of ITP and XTP into DNA and RNA is prevented. Previous studies show that deficiency in ITPA can suppress cellular growth and enhance DNA instability. In this study, we evaluated the influence of effective ITPA down-regulation on the induction of apoptosis in a human cancer cell line using folate-single wall nanotubes (SWNT) as a targeted nanocarrier. We assessed whether SWNT enhances IPTA-siRNA transfection efficiency in cancer cells using folate as a homing device. Since folate receptor is considerably overexpressed in cancer cells, conjugation of SWNTs to folate could enhance their cancer-specific penetrance. We found that nanocarrier mediated ITPA-siRNA transfection into SKBR3 cells caused significant reduction of ITPA mRNA expression level and complete down-regulation of the ITPase protein product. The silencing of ITPA led to promotion of apoptosis in SWNT-treated SKBR3 cancer cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Determining true HER2 gene status in breast cancers with polysomy by using alternative chromosome 17 reference genes: implications for anti-HER2 targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chun Hing; Hwang, Harry C; Goldstein, Lynn C; Kandalaft, Patricia L; Wiley, Jesse C; Kussick, Steven J; Gown, Allen M

    2011-11-01

    The ratio of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) to CEP17 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with the centromeric probe CEP17 is used to determine HER2 gene status in breast cancer. Increases in CEP17 copy number have been interpreted as representing polysomy 17. However, pangenomic studies have demonstrated that polysomy 17 is rare. This study tests the hypothesis that the use of alternative chromosome 17 reference genes might more accurately assess true HER2 gene status. In all, 171 patients with breast cancer who had HER2 FISH that had increased mean CEP17 copy numbers (> 2.6) were selected for additional chromosome 17 studies that used probes for Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA), and tumor protein p53 (TP53) genes. A eusomic copy number exhibited in one or more of these loci was used to calculate a revised HER2-to-chromosome-17 ratio by using the eusomic gene locus as the reference. Of 132 cases classified as nonamplified on the basis of their HER2:CEP17 ratios, 58 (43.9%) were scored as amplified by using alternative chromosome 17 reference gene probes, and 13 (92.9%) of 14 cases scored as equivocal were reclassified as amplified. Among the cases with mean HER2 copy number of 4 to 6, 41 (47.7%) of 86 had their HER2 gene status upgraded from nonamplified to amplified, and four (4.7%) of 86 were upgraded from equivocal to amplified. Our results support the findings of recent pangenomic studies that true polysomy 17 is uncommon. Additional FISH studies that use probes to the SMS, RARA, and TP53 genes are an effective way to determine the true HER2 amplification status in patients with polysomy 17 and they have important potential implications for guiding HER2-targeted therapy in breast cancer.

  19. Targeted cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyl transferase suicide gene therapy induces small cell lung cancer-specific cytotoxicity and tumor growth delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Gjetting, Torben; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2010-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant cancer for which there is no curable treatment. Novel therapies are therefore in great demand. In the present study we investigated the therapeutic effect of transcriptionally targeted suicide gene therapy for SCLC based on the yeast cytosine...... deaminase (YCD) gene alone or fused with the yeast uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (YUPRT) gene followed by administration of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) prodrug. Experimental design: The YCD gene or the YCD-YUPRT gene was placed under regulation of the SCLC-specific promoter insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1...

  20. Guanylyl cyclase C in colorectal cancer: susceptibility gene and potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jieru E; Li, Peng; Pitari, Giovanni M; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. While mechanisms underlying this disease have been elucidated over the past two decades, these molecular insights have failed to translate into efficacious therapy. The oncogenomic view of cancer suggests that terminal transformation reflects the sequential corruption of signal transduction circuits regulating key homeostatic mechanisms, whose multiplicity underlies the therapeutic resistance of most tumors to interventions targeting individual pathways. Conversely, the paucity of mechanistic insights into proximal pathophysiological processes that initiate and amplify oncogenic circuits preceding accumulation of mutations and transformation impedes development of effective prevention and therapy. In that context, guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the intestinal receptor for the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin, whose early loss characterizes colorectal transformation, has emerged as a component of lineage-specific homeostatic programs organizing spatiotemporal patterning along the crypt-surface axis. Dysregulation of GCC signaling, reflecting hormone loss, promotes tumorigenesis through reprogramming of replicative and bioenergetic circuits and genomic instability. Compensatory upregulation of GCC in response to hormone loss provides a unique translational opportunity for prevention and treatment of colorectal tumors by hormone-replacement therapy.

  1. Targeted cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyl transferase suicide gene therapy induces small cell lung cancer-specific cytotoxicity and tumor growth delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Gjetting, Torben; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2010-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant cancer for which there is no curable treatment. Novel therapies are therefore in great demand. In the present study we investigated the therapeutic effect of transcriptionally targeted suicide gene therapy for SCLC based on the yeast cytosine de...

  2. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  3. Lipocalin 2, a new GADD153 target gene, as an apoptosis inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsin, I-Lun; Hsiao, Yueh-Chieh; Wu, Ming-Fang; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Lin, Yu-Wen; Hsu, Chung-Ping; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is activated under severe cellular conditions. GADD153, a member of the C/EBP family, is an unfolded protein response (UPR) responsive transcription factor. Increased levels of lipocalin 2, an acute phase protein, have been found in several epithelial cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the function of lipocalin 2 in lung cancer cells under ER stress. Treatment with thapsigargin, an ER stress activator, led to increases in cytotoxicity, ER stress, apoptosis, and lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. GADD153 silencing decreased lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. On chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, ER stress increased GADD153 DNA binding to lipocalin 2 promoter. Furthermore, silencing of lipocalin 2 mitigated ER stress-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells. Our findings demonstrated that lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene that mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. Highlights: ► We demonstrate that Lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene. ► Lipocalin 2 mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. ► ER stress-induced lipocalin 2 expression is calcium-independent in A549 cells. ► Lipocalin 2 dose not play a major role in ER stress-induced autophagy.

  4. Targeted Exome Sequencing of Krebs Cycle Genes Reveals Candidate Cancer-Predisposing Mutations in Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, Laura; Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Richter, Susan; Contreras, Laura; Currás-Freixes, María; Pita, Guillermo; Letón, Rocío; Galarreta, Antonio; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Honrado, Emiliano; Jiménez, Scherezade; Maestre, Lorena; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2017-10-15

    Purpose: Mutations in Krebs cycle genes are frequently found in patients with pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas. Disruption of SDH, FH or MDH2 enzymatic activities lead to accumulation of specific metabolites, which give rise to epigenetic changes in the genome that cause a characteristic hypermethylated phenotype. Tumors showing this phenotype, but no alterations in the known predisposing genes, could harbor mutations in other Krebs cycle genes. Experimental Design: We used downregulation and methylation of RBP1, as a marker of a hypermethylation phenotype, to select eleven pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas for targeted exome sequencing of a panel of Krebs cycle-related genes. Methylation profiling, metabolite assessment and additional analyses were also performed in selected cases. Results: One of the 11 tumors was found to carry a known cancer-predisposing somatic mutation in IDH1 A variant in GOT2 , c.357A>T, found in a patient with multiple tumors, was associated with higher tumor mRNA and protein expression levels, increased GOT2 enzymatic activity in lymphoblastic cells, and altered metabolite ratios both in tumors and in GOT2 knockdown HeLa cells transfected with the variant. Array methylation-based analysis uncovered a somatic epigenetic mutation in SDHC in a patient with multiple pheochromocytomas and a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Finally, a truncating germline IDH3B mutation was found in a patient with a single paraganglioma showing an altered α-ketoglutarate/isocitrate ratio. Conclusions: This study further attests to the relevance of the Krebs cycle in the development of PCC and PGL, and points to a potential role of other metabolic enzymes involved in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytosol. Clin Cancer Res; 23(20); 6315-24. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. BTG1 expression correlates with pathogenesis, aggressive behaviors and prognosis of gastric cancer: a potential target for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hua-chuan; Li, Jing; Shen, Dao-fu; Yang, Xue-feng; Zhao, Shuang; Wu, Ya-zhou; Takano, Yasuo; Sun, Hong-zhi; Su, Rong-jian; Luo, Jun-sheng; Gou, Wen-feng

    2015-01-01

    Here, we found that BTG1 overexpression inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion, induced G2/M arrest, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis in BGC-823 and MKN28 cells (p < 0.05). BTG1 transfectants showed a higher mRNA expression of Cyclin D1 and Bax, but a lower mRNA expression of cdc2, p21, mTOR and MMP-9 than the control and mock (p < 0.05). After treated with cisplatin, MG132, paclitaxel and SAHA, both BTG1 transfectants showed lower mRNA viability and higher apoptosis than the control in both time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.05) with the hypoexpression of chemoresistance-related genes (slug, CD147, GRP78, GRP94, FBXW7 TOP1, TOP2 and GST-π). BTG1 expression was restored after 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment in gastric cancer cells. BTG1 expression was statistically lower in gastric cancer than non-neoplastic mucosa and metastatic cancer in lymph node (p < 0.05). BTG1 expression was positively correlated with depth of invasion, lymphatic and venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM staging and worse prognosis (p < 0.05). The diffuse-type carcinoma showed less BTG1 expression than intestinal- and mixed-type ones (p < 0.05). BTG1 overexpression suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting proliferation, enhancing autophagy and apoptosis in xenograft models. It was suggested that down-regulated BTG1 expression might promote gastric carcinogenesis partially due to its promoter methylation. BTG1 overexpression might reverse the aggressive phenotypes and be employed as a potential target for gene therapy of gastric cancer. PMID:26050197

  6. Targeted Therapies in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Dogan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common genital cancer in developed world. It is generally diagnosed in early stage and it has a favorable prognosis. However, advanced staged disease and recurrences are difficult to manage. There are some common genetic alterations related to endometrial carcinogenesis in similar fashion to other cancers. Personalized medicine, which means selection of best suited treatment for an individual, has gain attention in clinical care of patients in recent years. Targeted therapies were developed as a part of personalized or %u201Ctailored%u201D medicine and specifically acts on a target or biologic pathway. There are quite a number of molecular alteration points in endometrial cancer such as PTEN tumor suppressor genes, DNA mismatch repair genes, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and p53 oncogene which all might be potential candidates for tailored targeted therapy. In recent years targeted therapies has clinical application in ovarian cancer patients and in near future with the advent of new agents these %u201Ctailored%u201D drugs will be in market for routine clinical practice in endometrial cancer patients, in primary disease and recurrences as well.

  7. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistance......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  8. β-catenin-independent regulation of Wnt target genes by RoR2 and ATF2/ATF4 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshanenko, Oksana; Schwartz, Uwe; Kranz, Dominique; Rauscher, Benedikt; Linnebacher, Michael; Augustin, Iris; Boutros, Michael

    2018-02-16

    Wnt signaling is an evolutionarily conserved signaling route required for development and homeostasis. While canonical, β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is well studied and has been linked to many forms of cancer, much less is known about the role of non-canonical, β-catenin-independent Wnt signaling. Here, we aimed at identifying a β-catenin-independent Wnt target gene signature in order to understand the functional significance of non-canonical signaling in colon cancer cells. Gene expression profiling was performed after silencing of key components of Wnt signaling pathway and an iterative signature algorithm was applied to predict pathway-dependent gene signatures. Independent experiments confirmed several target genes, including PLOD2, HADH, LCOR and REEP1 as non-canonical target genes in various colon cancer cells. Moreover, non-canonical Wnt target genes are regulated via RoR2, Dvl2, ATF2 and ATF4. Furthermore, we show that the ligands Wnt5a/b are upstream regulators of the non-canonical signature and moreover regulate proliferation of cancer cells in a β-catenin-independent manner. Our experiments indicate that colon cancer cells are dependent on both β-catenin-dependent and -independent Wnt signaling routes for growth and proliferation.

  9. Chemosensitization of Human Renal Cell Cancer Using Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Antiapoptotic Gene Clusterin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zellweger

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal cell cancer (RCC is a chemoresistant disease with no active chemotherapeutic agent achieving objective response rates higher than 15%. Clusterin is a cell survival gene that increases in human renal tubular epithelial cells after various states of injury and disease. Downregulation of clusterin, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO, has recently been shown to increase chemosensitivity in several prostate cancer models. The objectives in this study were to evaluate clusterin expression levels in human RCC and normal kidney tissue, and to test whether clusterin ASO could also enhance chemosensitivity in human RCC Caki-2 cells both in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining was used to characterize clusterin expression in 67 RCC and normal kidney tissues obtained from radical nephrectomy specimens. Northern blot analysis was used to assess changes in clusterin mRNA expression after ASO and paclitaxel treatment. The effects of combined clusterin ASO and paclitaxel treatment on Caki-2 cell growth was examined using an MTT assay. Athymic mice bearing Caki-2 tumors were treated with clusterin ASO alone, clusterin ASO plus paclitaxel, and mismatch control oligonucleotides plus paclitaxel, over a period of 28 days with measurement of tumor volumes once weekly over 8 weeks. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry of normal and malignant kidney tissue sections of 67 patients demonstrated positive clusterin staining for almost all RCC (98% and an overexpression, compared to normal tissue, in a majority of RCC (69%. Clusterin ASO, but not mismatch control oligonucleotides, decreased clusterin mRNA expression in Caki-2 cells in a dosedependent and sequence-specific manner. Pretreatment of Caki-2 cells with clusterin ASO significantly enhanced chemosensitivity to paclitaxel in vitro. Characteristic apoptotic DNA laddering was observed after combined treatment with ASO plus paclitaxel, but not with either agent alone. In vivo

  10. Insertion of a nuclear factor kappa B DNA nuclear-targeting sequence potentiates suicide gene therapy efficacy in lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, F; Christensen, C L; Poulsen, T T

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer currently causes the majority of cancer-related deaths worldwide and new treatments are in high demand. Gene therapy could be a promising treatment but currently lacks sufficient efficiency for clinical use, primarily due to limited cellular and nuclear DNA delivery. In the present...... study, we investigated whether it was possible to exploit the endogenous nuclear-shuttling activity by the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) system, which is highly prominent in many cancers as well as lung cancer. We observed that insertion of a DNA nuclear-targeting sequence (DTS) recognized by NFκB could...... improve plasmid nuclear delivery and enhance the therapeutic effect of a validated transcriptionally cancer-targeted suicide gene therapy system. A clear correlation between the number of inserted NFκB-binding sites and the therapeutic effect of the suicide system was observed in both small cell lung...

  11. In silico analysis and DHPLC screening strategy identifies novel apoptotic gene targets of aberrant promoter hypermethylation in prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Therese M

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been implicated as a key survival mechanism in cancer, whereby promoter hypermethylation silences genes essential for many cellular processes including apoptosis. Limited data is available on the methylation profile of apoptotic genes in prostate cancer (CaP). The aim of this study was to profile methylation of apoptotic-related genes in CaP using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC).

  12. Hyaluronic Acid Conjugates as Vectors for the Active Targeting of Drugs, Genes and Nanocomposites in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arpicco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a naturally-occurring glycosaminoglycan and a major component of the extracellular matrix. Low levels of the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 are found on the surface of epithelial, hematopoietic, and neuronal cells; it is overexpressed in many cancer cells, and in particular in tumor-initiating cells. HA has recently attracted considerable interest in the field of developing drug delivery systems, having been used, as such or encapsulated in different types of nanoassembly, as ligand to prepare nano-platforms for actively targeting drugs, genes, and diagnostic agents. This review describes recent progress made with the several chemical strategies adopted to synthesize conjugates and prepare novel delivery systems with improved behaviors.

  13. A Putative Nononcogene Addiction Gene Target and Marker for Radiosensitivity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hydroxyurea, caffeine and ethyl methanesulphonate: implications for roles of RNases H in DNA replication...transcription invasion and growth of prostate cancer cell lines with RNASEH2A. (4) Radio-resistance of prostate cancer cells that over express RNASEH2A. (5...overexpressing RNASEH2A) were injected subcutaneously into SCID mice. As shown in Fig. 3, tumor growth was retarded in cells lacking RNASEH2A and accelerated in

  14. A Functional Genomics Approach to Identify Novel Breast Cancer Gene Targets in Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bennett, Craig B

    2005-01-01

    .... We identified conserved components of the CCR4 damage response network and many of these genes, including CCR4, DHHl, DEFi, HCMl, SPT4, SPT5, SUBi, YAF9, YAP3 and numerous components of the nuclear...

  15. Identification and Function of Ets Target Genes Involved in Lung Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    the biological processes driving metastasis, genetic mouse models of lung cancer with differing propensities of tumor cells to metastasize have been...with rotation. AG beads (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc.), BSA (100 μg/ml), and salmon sperm (500 μg/ml) were added to samples. Samples were rotated (4

  16. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-09-30

    A method for treatment and amelioration of breast, cervical, ovarian, endometrial, squamous cells, prostate cancer and melanoma in a patient comprising targeting Id-1 or Id-2 gene expression with a delivery vehicle comprising a product which modulates Id-1 or Id-2 expression.

  17. Minimal residual disease as the target for immunotherapy and gene therapy of cancer (Review)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan; Šímová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2005), s. 1377-1380 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7807; GA MZd(CZ) NR8004; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : residual tumour disease * gene therapy * cytokines Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2005

  18. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. MicroRNA-429 induces tumorigenesis of human non-small cell lung cancer cells and targets multiple tumor suppressor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Yaoguo; Xu, Shidong; Ma, Jianqun; Wu, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Jin, Shi; Cao, Shoubo [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • MiR-429 expression is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • MiR-429 inhibits PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression. • MiR-429 promotes metastasis and proliferation. • We report important regulatory mechanisms involved in NSCLC progression. • MiR-429 is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. - Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death globally. MicroRNAs are evolutionally conserved small noncoding RNAs that are critical for the regulation of gene expression. Aberrant expression of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-429 are often upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with normal lung tissues, and its expression level is also increased in NSCLC cell lines compared with normal lung cells. Overexpression of miR-429 in A549 NSCLC cells significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-429 inhibits these effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-429 down-regulates PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region of these target genes. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-429 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and metastasis of NSCLC cells and is a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  20. Recurrent targeted genes of hepatitis B virus in the liver cancer genomes identified by a next-generation sequencing-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ding

    Full Text Available Integration of the viral DNA into host chromosomes was found in most of the hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs. Here we devised a massive anchored parallel sequencing (MAPS method using next-generation sequencing to isolate and sequence HBV integrants. Applying MAPS to 40 pairs of HBV-related HCC tissues (cancer and adjacent tissues, we identified 296 HBV integration events corresponding to 286 unique integration sites (UISs with precise HBV-Human DNA junctions. HBV integration favored chromosome 17 and preferentially integrated into human transcript units. HBV targeted genes were enriched in GO terms: cAMP metabolic processes, T cell differentiation and activation, TGF beta receptor pathway, ncRNA catabolic process, and dsRNA fragmentation and cellular response to dsRNA. The HBV targeted genes include 7 genes (PTPRJ, CNTN6, IL12B, MYOM1, FNDC3B, LRFN2, FN1 containing IPR003961 (Fibronectin, type III domain, 7 genes (NRG3, MASP2, NELL1, LRP1B, ADAM21, NRXN1, FN1 containing IPR013032 (EGF-like region, conserved site, and three genes (PDE7A, PDE4B, PDE11A containing IPR002073 (3', 5'-cyclic-nucleotide phosphodiesterase. Enriched pathways include hsa04512 (ECM-receptor interaction, hsa04510 (Focal adhesion, and hsa04012 (ErbB signaling pathway. Fewer integration events were found in cancers compared to cancer-adjacent tissues, suggesting a clonal expansion model in HCC development. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were recurrent target genes by HBV integration including fibronectin 1 (FN1 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT1, two known recurrent target genes, and additional novel target genes such as SMAD family member 5 (SMAD5, phosphatase and actin regulator 4 (PHACTR4, and RNA binding protein fox-1 homolog (C. elegans 1 (RBFOX1. Integrating analysis with recently published whole-genome sequencing analysis, we identified 14 additional recurrent HBV target genes, greatly expanding the HBV recurrent target list

  1. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  2. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2012-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16 INK4a and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  3. Profiling cancer gene mutations in clinical formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tumor specimens using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangxuan; Chen, Liangjing; Sah, Sachin; Latham, Gary J; Patel, Rajesh; Song, Qinghua; Koeppen, Hartmut; Tam, Rachel; Schleifman, Erica; Mashhedi, Haider; Chalasani, Sreedevi; Fu, Ling; Sumiyoshi, Teiko; Raja, Rajiv; Forrest, William; Hampton, Garret M; Lackner, Mark R; Hegde, Priti; Jia, Shidong

    2014-04-01

    The success of precision oncology relies on accurate and sensitive molecular profiling. The Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel, a targeted enrichment method for next-generation sequencing (NGS) using the Ion Torrent platform, provides a fast, easy, and cost-effective sequencing workflow for detecting genomic "hotspot" regions that are frequently mutated in human cancer genes. Most recently, the U.K. has launched the AmpliSeq sequencing test in its National Health Service. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical application of the AmpliSeq methodology. We used 10 ng of genomic DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer (CRC) tumor specimens to sequence 46 cancer genes using the AmpliSeq platform. In a validation study, we developed an orthogonal NGS-based resequencing approach (SimpliSeq) to assess the AmpliSeq variant calls. Validated mutational analyses revealed that AmpliSeq was effective in profiling gene mutations, and that the method correctly pinpointed "true-positive" gene mutations with variant frequency >5% and demonstrated high-level molecular heterogeneity in CRC. However, AmpliSeq enrichment and NGS also produced several recurrent "false-positive" calls in clinically druggable oncogenes such as PIK3CA. AmpliSeq provided highly sensitive and quantitative mutation detection for most of the genes on its cancer panel using limited DNA quantities from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. For those genes with recurrent "false-positive" variant calls, caution should be used in data interpretation, and orthogonal verification of mutations is recommended for clinical decision making.

  4. Genome wide mapping reveals PDE4B as an IL-2 induced STAT5 target gene in activated human PBMCs and lymphoid cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna S Nagy

    Full Text Available IL-2 is the primary growth factor for promoting survival and proliferation of activated T cells that occurs following engagement of the Janus Kinase (JAK1-3/and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT 5 signaling pathway. STAT5 has two isoforms: STAT5A and STAT5B (commonly referred to as STAT5 which, in T cells, play redundant roles transcribing cell cycle and survival genes. As such, inhibition of STAT5 by a variety of mechanisms can rapidly induce apoptosis in certain lymphoid tumor cells, suggesting that it and its target genes represent therapeutic targets to control certain lymphoid diseases. To search for these molecules we aligned IL-2 regulated genes detected by Affymetrix gene expression microarrays with the STAT5 cistrome identified by chip-on-ChIP analysis in an IL-2-dependent human leukemia cell line, Kit225. Select overlapping genes were then validated using qRT(2PCR medium-throughput arrays in human PHA-activated PBMCs. Of 19 putative genes, one key regulator of T cell receptor signaling, PDE4B, was identified as a novel target, which was readily up-regulated at the protein level (3 h in IL-2 stimulated, activated human PBMCs. Surprisingly, only purified CD8+ primary T-cells expressed PDE4B, but not CD4+ cells. Moreover, PDE4B was found to be highly expressed in CD4+ lymphoid cancer cells, which suggests that it may represent a physiological role unique to the CD8+ and lymphoid cancer cells and thus might represent a target for pharmaceutical intervention for certain lymphoid diseases.

  5. Overexpression of the E2F target gene CENPI promotes chromosome instability and predicts poor prognosis in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavelu, Pulari U; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Vaidyanathan, Srividya; Nguyen, Thu H M; Dray, Eloise; Duijf, Pascal H G

    2017-09-22

    During cell division, chromosome segregation is facilitated by the mitotic checkpoint, or spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which ensures correct kinetochore-microtubule attachments and prevents premature sister-chromatid separation. It is well established that misexpression of SAC components on the outer kinetochores promotes chromosome instability (CIN) and tumorigenesis. Here, we study the expression of CENP-I, a key component of the HIKM complex at the inner kinetochores, in breast cancer, including ductal, lobular, medullary and male breast carcinomas. CENPI mRNA and protein levels are significantly elevated in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) but not in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast carcinoma. Well-established prognostic tests indicate that CENPI overexpression constitutes a powerful independent marker for poor patient prognosis and survival in ER+ breast cancer. We further demonstrate that CENPI is an E2F target gene. Consistently, it is overexpressed in RB1 -deficient breast cancers. However, CENP-I overexpression is not purely due to cell cycle-associated expression. In ER+ breast cancer cells, CENP-I overexpression promotes CIN, especially chromosome gains. In addition, in ER+ breast carcinomas the degree of CENPI overexpression is proportional to the level of aneuploidy and CENPI overexpression is one of the strongest markers for CIN identified to date. Our results indicate that overexpression of the inner kinetochore protein CENP-I promotes CIN and forecasts poor prognosis for ER+ breast cancer patients. These observations provide novel mechanistic insights and have important implications for breast cancer diagnostics and potentially therapeutic targeting.

  6. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog facilitates chromatin accessibility of the estrogen receptor α target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • H3K4me3 and Pol II binding at TFF1 promoter were reduced in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. • FLII is required for chromatin accessibility of the enhancer of ERalpha target genes. • Depletion of FLII causes inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 cells. - Abstract: The coordinated activities of multiple protein complexes are essential to the remodeling of chromatin structure and for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to the promoter in order to facilitate the initiation of transcription in nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII), a nuclear receptor coactivator, is associated with the SWI/SNF-chromatin remodeling complex during estrogen receptor (ER)α-mediated transcription. However, the function of FLII in estrogen-induced chromatin opening has not been fully explored. Here, we show that FLII plays a critical role in establishing active histone modification marks and generating the open chromatin structure of ERα target genes. We observed that the enhancer regions of ERα target genes are heavily occupied by FLII, and histone H3K4me3 and Pol II binding induced by estrogen are decreased in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments showed that depletion of FLII resulted in reduced chromatin accessibility of multiple ERα target genes. These data suggest FLII as a key regulator of ERα-mediated transcription through its role in regulating chromatin accessibility for the binding of RNA Polymerase II and possibly other transcriptional coactivators.

  7. The targeted gene (KDRP-CD/TK) therapy of breast cancer mediated by SonoVue and ultrasound irradiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-hua; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Li-hua; Tian, Shuang-ming; Qian, Ying; Chen, Li-rong; Zhang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy has become an effective therapy for breast cancer, and ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has become a popular topic in the gene therapy field. In this study, MCF-7 cells with the KDR promoter and LSl74T cells without the KDR promoter were transfected with the recombinant plasmid pEGFP-KDRP-CD/TK using UTMD. The recombinant plasmid pEGFP-KDRP-CD/TK was transfected into MCF-7 and LS174T cells successfully with no significant difference in transfection efficiency (p>0.05). By RT-PCR, the CD/TK fusion gene was shown to be expressed in MCF-7 cells but not expressed in LS174T cells. In a cytotoxicity experiment, transgenic MCF-7 cells were sensitive to the prodrugs 5-FC and GCV. When both 5-FC and GCV were administered, the rate of cellular inhibition was significantly greater than that achieved when only one of the prodrugs was administered (p<0.001). Moreover, the inhibition rates achieved administering 5-FC, GCV and both 5-FC and GCV were all significantly greater than the gene transfection rate of 21.92±3.64% (p<0.001). However, transgenic LS174T cells were not sensitive to any prodrug. These results demonstrated that UTMD is a safe, effective and targeted gene delivery system. Also, the KDR promoter can drive expression of the CD/TK double suicide gene target in MCF-7 cells, and the targeted killing effect of the KDRP-CD/TK gene on MCF-7 cells in vitro has good synergy with expression of the CD/TK fusion gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene Expression and Clinical Characteristics of Molecular Targeted Therapy 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in Shandong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli QIAO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Molecular targeted therapy has gradually become an important treatment for lung cancer, the aim of this research is to analyze the clinicopathologic features associated with the gene mutation status of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK, ROS proto-oncogene 1, receptor tyrosine kinase (ROS1 and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and determine the most likely populations to benefit from molecular target therapy treatment. Methods The mutation status of EGFR, EML4-ALK fusion gene, ROS1 and KARS gene were determined by Real-time PCR, the relationship between clinical pathologic features and concomitant gene were analyzed with χ2 test by SPSS software 19.0. Results A total of 514 specimens from Shandong tumor hospital were collected from NSCLC patients between January 2014 and May 2016. The total mutation rate of EGFR gene was 36.70%, major occurred in exon 19 (36.61% and exon 21 (51.36%, respectively, and EGFR mutations usually occurred in female, non-smoking and adenocarcinoma patients (P0.05. ROS1 fusion gene was detected in 136 cases, the positive rate was 3.67%, all patients were 60 years old, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. Only 23 samples were tested KARS gene mutations, two of them were positive and the positive rate was 8.70%. They all occurred in non-smoker and adenocarcinoma patients. No mutation was detected to coexist in EGFR, EML4-ALK and KARS gene mutation. Conclusion EGFR, EML4-ALK, ROS1 and KRAS defines different molecular subset of NSCLC with distinct characteristic, which provides a new option for the clinical treatment of patients with NSCLC.

  9. Targeting Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Ali Y; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Brown, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Chemical detoxification and physical destruction of aflatoxins in foods and feed commodities are mostly unattainable in a way that preserves the edibility of the food. Therefore, preventing mycotoxins in general and aflatoxins in particular from entering the food chain is a better approach. This requires early detection of the aflatoxin-causing organisms. Detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing fungi has always been a challenge, especially within species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. Culture-based methods require a high level of expertise and a list of sophisticated equipment. Furthermore, even for a trained taxonomist, species that are identical in morphology, physiology, and nutritional aspects can be challenging to classify. Fungal taxonomy has changed over the past few decades; more species are being reclassified, and new species are being described due to advances in sequencing and genome assembly. These developments make the use of PCR-based approaches practical, rapid, and more reliable for the identification of fungi to the species level. This chapter presents a variety of protocols to detect and quantify aflatoxin-producing fungi using mycotoxin biosynthesis pathway genes.

  10. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......' C, and clustered Dukes' D separately. Real-time PCR of 10 known genes and 5 ESTs demonstrated excellent reproducibility of the array-based findings. The most frequently altered genes belonged to functional categories of metabolism (22%), transcription and translation (11%), and cellular processes (9...

  11. MicroRNA-375 Functions as a Tumor-Suppressor Gene in Gastric Cancer by Targeting Recepteur d’Origine Nantais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence supports a fundamental role for microRNAs (miRNA in regulating cancer metastasis. Recently, microRNA-375 (miR-375 was reported to be downregulated in many types of cancers, including gastric cancer. Increase in the expression of Recepteur d’Origine Nantais (RON, a receptor tyrosine kinase, has been reported in tumors. However, the function of miR-375 and RON expression in gastric cancer metastasis has not been sufficiently studied. In silico analysis identified miR-375 binding sites in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTR of the RON-encoding gene. Expression of miR-375 resulted in reduced activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′-UTR fragments of RON-encoding mRNA, confirming that miR-375 directly targets the 3′-UTR of RON mRNA. Moreover, we found that overexpression of miR-375 inhibited mRNA and protein expression of RON, which was accompanied by the suppression of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in gastric cancer AGS and MKN-28 cells. Ectopic miR-375 expression also induced G1 cell cycle arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb. Knockdown of RON by RNAi, similar to miR-375 overexpression, suppressed tumorigenic properties and induced G1 arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of Rb. Thus, our study provides evidence that miR-375 acts as a suppressor of metastasis in gastric cancer by targeting RON, and might represent a new potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  12. Targets for molecular therapy of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-02-01

    Cancers of the skin encompass the first and second most common neoplasms in the United States, epidermal basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively, as well as the melanocytic malignancy, malignant melanoma (MM). Recently identified alterations in the function of specific genes in these cancers provide new potential therapeutic targets. These alterations affect conserved regulators of cellular proliferation and viability, including the Sonic Hedgehog, Ras/Raf, ARF/p53, p16(INK4A)/CDK4/Rb and NF-kappaB pathways. New modalities designed to target these specific proteins may represent promising approaches to therapy of human skin cancers.

  13. Eradication of large solid tumors by gene therapy with a T cell receptor targeting a single cancer-specific point mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisegang, Matthias; Engels, Boris; Schreiber, Karin; Yew, Poh Yin; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Idel, Christian; Arina, Ainhoa; Duraiswamy, Jaikumar; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Uckert, Wolfgang; Nakamura, Yusuke; Schreiber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancers usually contain multiple unique tumor-specific antigens produced by single amino acid substitutions (AAS) and encoded by somatic non-synonymous single nucleotide substitutions. We determined whether adoptively transferred T cells can reject large, well-established solid tumors when engineered to express a single type of T cell receptor (TCR) that is specific for a single AAS. Experimental Design By exome and RNA sequencing of an UV-induced tumor, we identified an AAS in p68 (mp68), a co-activator of p53. This AAS seemed to be an ideal tumor-specific neoepitope because it is encoded by a trunk mutation in the primary autochthonous cancer and binds with highest affinity to the MHC. A high-avidity mp68-specific TCR was used to genetically engineer T cells as well as to generate TCR-transgenic mice for adoptive therapy. Results When the neoepitope was expressed at high levels and by all cancer cells, their direct recognition sufficed to destroy intra-tumor vessels and eradicate large, long-established solid tumors. When the neoepitope was targeted as autochthonous antigen, T cells caused cancer regression followed by escape of antigen-negative variants. Escape could be thwarted by expressing the antigen at increased levels in all cancer cells or by combining T cell therapy with local irradiation. Therapeutic efficacies of TCR-transduced and TCR-transgenic T cells were similar. Conclusions Gene therapy with a single TCR targeting a single AAS can eradicate large established cancer but a uniform expression and/or sufficient levels of the targeted neoepitope or additional therapy are required to overcome tumor escape. PMID:26667491

  14. GTSE1: a novel TEAD4-E2F1 target gene involved in cell protrusions formation in triple-negative breast cancer cell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelitano, Debora; Leticia, Yamila Peche; Dalla, Emiliano; Monte, Martin; Piazza, Silvano; Schneider, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    GTSE1 over-expression has been reported as a potential marker for metastasis in various types of malignancies, including breast cancer. Despite this, the transcriptional regulation of this protein and the causes of its misregulation in tumors remain largely unknown. The aims of this work were to elucidate how GTSE1 is regulated at the transcriptional level and to clarify the mechanism underlying GTSE1-dependent cell functions in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, we identified GTSE1 as a novel target gene of the TEAD4 transcription factor, highlighting a role for the YAP and TAZ coactivators in the transcriptional regulation of GTSE1. Moreover, we found that TEAD4 controls the formation of cell protrusions required for cell migration through GTSE1, unveiling a relevant effector role for this protein in the TEAD-dependent cellular functions and confirming TEAD4 role in promoting invasion and metastasis in breast cancer. Finally, we highlighted a role for the pRb-E2F1 pathway in the control of GTSE1 transcription and observed that treatment with drugs targeting the pRb-E2F1 or YAP/TAZ-TEAD pathways dramatically downregulated the expression levels of GTSE1 and of other genes involved in the formation of metastasis, suggesting their potential use in the treatment of TNBC. PMID:28978043

  15. Targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Randall; Bauer, Lisa; Hoimes, Christopher; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-09-30

    Targeted nanoparticle imaging agents provide many benefits and new opportunities to facilitate accurate diagnosis of cancer and significantly impact patient outcome. Due to the highly engineerable nature of nanotechnology, targeted nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages including increased contrast sensitivity, binding avidity and targeting specificity. Considering the various nanoparticle designs and their adjustable ability to target a specific site and generate detectable signals, nanoparticles can be optimally designed in terms of biophysical interactions (i.e., intravascular and interstitial transport) and biochemical interactions (i.e., targeting avidity towards cancer-related biomarkers) for site-specific detection of very distinct microenvironments. This review seeks to illustrate that the design of a nanoparticle dictates its in vivo journey and targeting of hard-to-reach cancer sites, facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and interrogation of the most aggressive forms of cancer. We will report various targeted nanoparticles for cancer imaging using X-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and optical imaging. Finally, to realize the full potential of targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging, we will describe the challenges and opportunities for the clinical translation and widespread adaptation of targeted nanoparticles imaging agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeted Nanotechnology for Cancer Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Randall; Bauer, Lisa; Hoimes, Christopher; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-01-01

    Targeted nanoparticle imaging agents provide many benefits and new opportunities to facilitate accurate diagnosis of cancer and significantly impact patient outcome. Due to the highly engineerable nature of nanotechnology, targeted nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages including increased contrast sensitivity, binding avidity and targeting specificity. Considering the various nanoparticle designs and their adjustable ability to target a specific site and generate detectable signals, nanoparticles can be optimally designed in terms of biophysical interactions (i.e., intravascular and interstitial transport) and biochemical interactions (i.e., targeting avidity towards cancer-related biomarkers) for site-specific detection of very distinct microenvironments. This review seeks to illustrate that the design of a nanoparticle dictates its in vivo journey and targeting of hard-to-reach cancer sites, facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and interrogation of the most aggressive forms of cancer. We will report various targeted nanoparticles for cancer imaging using X-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and optical imaging. Finally, to realize the full potential of targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging, we will describe the challenges and opportunities for the clinical translation and widespread adaptation of targeted nanoparticles imaging agents. PMID:25116445

  17. Targeting deregulated epigenetic control in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2013-11-01

    Cancer is a multifaceted disease that involves acquisition of genetic mutations, deletions, and amplifications as well as deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms that fine-tune gene regulation. Key epigenetic mechanisms that include histone modifications, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing are often deregulated in a variety of cancers. Subnuclear localization of key proteins in the interphase nucleus and bookmarking of genes by lineage commitment factors in mitosis-a new dimension to epigenetic control of fundamental biological processes-is also modified in cancer. In this review, we discuss the various aspects of epigenetic control that are operative in a variety of cancers and their potential for risk assessment, early detection, targeted therapy, and personalized medicine. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Endocrine aspects of cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-02-01

    The field of cancer gene therapy is in continuous expansion, and technology is quickly moving ahead as far as gene targeting and regulation of gene expression are concerned. This review focuses on the endocrine aspects of gene therapy, including the possibility to exploit hormone and hormone receptor functions for regulating therapeutic gene expression, the use of endocrine-specific genes as new therapeutic tools, the effects of viral vector delivery and transgene expression on the endocrine system, and the endocrine response to viral vector delivery. Present ethical concerns of gene therapy and the risk of germ cell transduction are also discussed, along with potential lines of innovation to improve cell and gene targeting.

  19. Functional genomics and cancer drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Susan E; Boehm, Jesse S; Barbie, David A; Hahn, William C

    2010-06-01

    The recent development of technologies for whole-genome sequencing, copy number analysis and expression profiling enables the generation of comprehensive descriptions of cancer genomes. However, although the structural analysis and expression profiling of tumors and cancer cell lines can allow the identification of candidate molecules that are altered in the malignant state, functional analyses are necessary to confirm such genes as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Moreover, recent research suggests that tumor cells also depend on synthetic lethal targets, which are not mutated or amplified in cancer genomes; functional genomics screening can facilitate the discovery of such targets. This review provides an overview of the tools available for the study of functional genomics, and discusses recent research involving the use of these tools to identify potential novel drug targets in cancer.

  20. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  1. Targeting calcium signaling in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaochu Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular calcium ions (Ca2+ act as second messenger to regulate gene transcription, cell proliferation, migration and death. Accumulating evidences have demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is altered in cancer cells and the alteration is involved in tumor initiation, angiogenesis, progression and metastasis. Targeting derailed Ca2+ signaling for cancer therapy has become an emerging research area. This review summarizes some important Ca2+ channels, transporters and Ca2+-ATPases, which have been reported to be altered in human cancer patients. It discusses the current research effort toward evaluation of the blockers, inhibitors or regulators for Ca2+ channels/transporters or Ca2+-ATPase pumps as anti-cancer drugs. This review is also aimed to stimulate interest in, and support for research into the understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying the regulation of Ca2+ signaling in different cancer cells, and to search for novel therapies to cure these malignancies by targeting Ca2+ channels or transporters.

  2. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  3. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta-Zaragoza O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza,1 Víctor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales,1 Carlos Pérez-Plasencia,2,3 Jonathan Salazar-León,1 Claudia Gómez-Cerón,1 Vicente Madrid-Marina11Direction of Chronic Infections and Cancer, Research Center in Infection Diseases, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; 2Oncogenomics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Tlalpan, México; 3Biomedicine Unit, FES-Iztacala UNAM, México City, MéxicoAbstract: Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%–95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development.Keywords: Cervical cancer, clinical trials, gene therapy, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, siRNAs

  4. Transcriptome-wide analysis of UTRs in non-small cell lung cancer reveals cancer-related genes with SNV-induced changes on RNA secondary structure and miRNA target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Wenzel, Anne; Novotny, Peter; Tang, Xiaojia; Kalari, Krishna R; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Traditional mutation assessment methods generally focus on predicting disruptive changes in protein-coding regions rather than non-coding regulatory regions like untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs. The UTRs, however, are known to have many sequence and structural motifs that can regulate translational and transcriptional efficiency and stability of mRNAs through interaction with RNA-binding proteins and other non-coding RNAs like microRNAs (miRNAs). In a recent study, transcriptomes of tumor cells harboring mutant and wild-type KRAS (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) genes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been sequenced to identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs). About 40% of the total SNVs (73,717) identified were mapped to UTRs, but omitted in the previous analysis. To meet this obvious demand for analysis of the UTRs, we designed a comprehensive pipeline to predict the effect of SNVs on two major regulatory elements, secondary structure and miRNA target sites. Out of 29,290 SNVs in 6462 genes, we predict 472 SNVs (in 408 genes) affecting local RNA secondary structure, 490 SNVs (in 447 genes) affecting miRNA target sites and 48 that do both. Together these disruptive SNVs were present in 803 different genes, out of which 188 (23.4%) were previously known to be cancer-associated. Notably, this ratio is significantly higher (one-sided Fisher's exact test p-value = 0.032) than the ratio (20.8%) of known cancer-associated genes (n = 1347) in our initial data set (n = 6462). Network analysis shows that the genes harboring disruptive SNVs were involved in molecular mechanisms of cancer, and the signaling pathways of LPS-stimulated MAPK, IL-6, iNOS, EIF2 and mTOR. In conclusion, we have found hundreds of SNVs which are highly disruptive with respect to changes in the secondary structure and miRNA target sites within UTRs. These changes hold the potential to alter the expression of known cancer genes or genes

  5. Transcriptome-wide analysis of UTRs in non-small cell lung cancer reveals cancer-related genes with SNV-induced changes on RNA secondary structure and miRNA target sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Sabarinathan

    Full Text Available Traditional mutation assessment methods generally focus on predicting disruptive changes in protein-coding regions rather than non-coding regulatory regions like untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs. The UTRs, however, are known to have many sequence and structural motifs that can regulate translational and transcriptional efficiency and stability of mRNAs through interaction with RNA-binding proteins and other non-coding RNAs like microRNAs (miRNAs. In a recent study, transcriptomes of tumor cells harboring mutant and wild-type KRAS (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog genes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC have been sequenced to identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs. About 40% of the total SNVs (73,717 identified were mapped to UTRs, but omitted in the previous analysis. To meet this obvious demand for analysis of the UTRs, we designed a comprehensive pipeline to predict the effect of SNVs on two major regulatory elements, secondary structure and miRNA target sites. Out of 29,290 SNVs in 6462 genes, we predict 472 SNVs (in 408 genes affecting local RNA secondary structure, 490 SNVs (in 447 genes affecting miRNA target sites and 48 that do both. Together these disruptive SNVs were present in 803 different genes, out of which 188 (23.4% were previously known to be cancer-associated. Notably, this ratio is significantly higher (one-sided Fisher's exact test p-value = 0.032 than the ratio (20.8% of known cancer-associated genes (n = 1347 in our initial data set (n = 6462. Network analysis shows that the genes harboring disruptive SNVs were involved in molecular mechanisms of cancer, and the signaling pathways of LPS-stimulated MAPK, IL-6, iNOS, EIF2 and mTOR. In conclusion, we have found hundreds of SNVs which are highly disruptive with respect to changes in the secondary structure and miRNA target sites within UTRs. These changes hold the potential to alter the expression of known cancer genes

  6. Attenuation of the beta-catenin/TCF4 complex in colorectal cancer cells induces several growth-suppressive microRNAs that target cancer promoting genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepeler, T; Holm, A; Halvey, P

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is causally involved in the formation of most colorectal cancers (CRCs). Although detailed knowledge exists regarding Wnt-regulated protein-coding genes, much less is known about the possible involvement of non-coding RNAs. Here we used TaqMan Array...... as inferred from expression microarray and ChIP-chip data. A module of miRNAs induced by abrogated Wnt signaling in vitro was downregulated in two independent series of human primary CRCs (n=76) relative to normal adjacent mucosa (n=34). Several of these miRNAs (miR-145, miR-126, miR-30e-3p and miR-139-5p......RNAs are upregulated as a consequence of forced attenuation of Wnt signaling in CRC cells, and some of these miRNAs inhibit cell growth with concomitant suppression of several growth-stimulatory cancer-related genes....

  7. Targeted Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some cancers, the malignant cells are stimulated to divide continuously without being prompted to do so by ... use this content on your website or other digital platform? Our syndication services page shows you how. ...

  8. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...

  9. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fataneh Karandish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  10. The microbe-derived short chain fatty acid butyrate targets miRNA-dependent p21 gene expression in human colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shien Hu

    Full Text Available Colonic microbiota ferment non-absorbed dietary fiber to produce prodigious amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs that benefit the host through a myriad of metabolic, trophic, and chemopreventative effects. The chemopreventative effects of the SCFA butyrate are, in part, mediated through induction of p21 gene expression. In this study, we assessed the role of microRNA(miRNA in butyrate's induction of p21 expression. The expression profiles of miRNAs in HCT-116 cells and in human sporadic colon cancers were assessed by microarray and quantitative PCR. Regulation of p21 gene expression by miR-106b was assessed by 3' UTR luciferase reporter assays and transfection of specific miRNA mimics. Butyrate changed the expression of 44 miRNAs in HCT-116 cells, many of which were aberrantly expressed in colon cancer tissues. Members of the miR-106b family were decreased in the former and increased in the latter. Butyrate-induced p21 protein expression was dampened by treatment with a miR-106b mimic. Mutated p21 3'UTR-reporter constructs expressed in HCT-116 cells confirmed direct miR-106b targeting. Butyrate decreased HCT-116 proliferation, an effect reversed with the addition of the miR-106b mimic. We conclude that microbe-derived SCFAs regulate host gene expression involved in intestinal homeostasis as well as carcinogenesis through modulation of miRNAs.

  11. Hormonal Involvement in Breast Cancer Gene Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    and s ubsequently amp lified at the Yale University sequenc ing facility for Illumina sequencing. However, it required a lot of effort to obtain this...and Polyak K. (2008). Genome-wide functi onal synergy between amp lified and mutated genes in human breast cancer. Cancer Res. 68: 9532-9540...east cancer patient samples. Other co-amp lified genes, within the HER2 amplicon and/or at other regions, could serve as additional novel target s for

  12. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2005-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  13. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2006-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  14. Genetic nanomedicine: gene delivery by targeted lipoplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgüneş, Nejat; de Ilarduya, Conchita Tros

    2012-01-01

    Cationic liposome-DNA complexes (lipoplexes) are used for the delivery of plasmid DNA to cultured cells and various tissues in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the preparation and evaluation of plain and targeted lipoplexes, using targeting ligands, including epidermal growth factor and transferrin. Ligand-associated lipoplexes may be used to target DNA or other nucleic acid drugs to specific cells, particularly cancer cells that overexpress the receptors for the ligands. We provide examples of the enhancement of gene expression mediated by epidermal growth factor in murine and human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, and human hepatoblastoma and rat colon adenocarcinoma cells. We also summarize the studies on the use of transferrin-lipoplexes for enhancing gene delivery to cervical carcinoma, murine colon carcinoma, and African green monkey kidney cells. We outline two animal models in which transferrin-lipoplexes have been used for antitumor therapy by delivering either the gene encoding interleukin-12 or a suicide gene: a CT26 murine colon carcinoma, and a syngeneic, orthotopic murine oral squamous cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) gene is a potential target of miR-21-5p in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ya-Wen; Chou, Chia-Jung; Yang, Pei-Ming

    2018-03-01

    DNA 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) methylation, a key epigenetic mark, is critical for biological and pathological processes. Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in all tumor types and correlates with tumor suppressor gene silencing. DNA methylation is thought to be very stable, and active DNA demethylation remains a long-standing enigma. Recently, the ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of oxygenases are found to oxidize 5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), which is prerequisite for active DNA demethylation. Both TET1 expression and global 5-hmC content are significantly reduced in colorectal cancer (CRC), the top leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. However, the involving molecular mechanisms are still unclear. The oncogenic microRNA (miRNA) miR-21-5p has recently identified as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in CRC. In this study, TET1 was predicted as a novel target of miR-21-5p by using a web-based predictive software starBase v2.0. We found that the 3'-UTR region of TET1 gene contains a miR-21-5p-binding site. Examination of tumor tissues from CRC patients found that loss of TET1 was associated with the progression of CRC to advance stages. In addition, negative correlation of miR-21-5p and TET1 expression was also observed. Transfection of the synthetic miR-21-5p mimic or inhibitor into the colorectal cancer cells could inhibit or increase the TET1-3'-UTR luciferase activity, respectively. Our results demonstrate that TET1 is a potential target of miR-21-5p in CRC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cancer suicide gene therapy: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Saúl Abenhamar; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Martín, Ana; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan Antonio; Boulaiz, Houria

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is considered the second leading cause of death worldwide despite the progress made in early detection and advances in classical therapies. Advancing in the fight against cancer requires the development of novel strategies, and the suicide gene transfer to tumor cells is providing new possibilities for cancer therapy. In this manuscript, authors present an overview of suicide gene systems and the latest innovations done to enhance cancer suicide gene therapy strategies by i) improving vectors for targeted gene delivery using tissue specific promoter and receptors; ii) modification of the tropism; and iii) combining suicide genes and/or classical therapies for cancer. Finally, the authors highlight the main challenges to be addressed in the future. Even if many efforts are needed for suicide gene therapy to be a real alternative for cancer treatment, we believe that the significant progress made in the knowledge of cancer biology and characterization of cancer stem cells accompanied by the development of novel targeted vectors will enhance the effectiveness of this type of therapeutic strategy. Moreover, combined with current treatments, suicide gene therapy will improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer in the future.

  17. Enhanced MYC association with the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex mediated by the adenovirus E1A N-terminal domain activates a subset of MYC target genes highly expressed in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M; Green, Maurice

    2017-11-01

    The proto-oncogene MYC is a transcription factor over-expressed in many cancers and required for cell survival. Its function is regulated by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, such as the GCN5 complex and the NuA4/Tip60 complex. However, the roles of the HAT complexes during MYC function in cancer have not been well characterized. We recently showed that adenovirus E1A and its N-terminal 80 aa region, E1A 1-80, interact with the NuA4 complex, through the E1A TRRAP-targeting (ET) domain, and enhance MYC association with the NuA4 complex. We show here that the ET domain mainly targets the MYC-NuA4 complex. By global gene expression analysis using E1A 1-80 and deletion mutants, we have identified a panel of genes activated by targeting the MYC-NuA4 complex and notably enriched for genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and gene expression. A second panel of genes is activated by E1A 1-80 targeting of both the MYC-NuA4 complex and p300, and is enriched for genes involved in DNA replication and cell cycle processes. Both panels of genes are highly expressed in cancer cells. Since the ET domain is essential for E1A-mediated cellular transformation, our results suggest that MYC and the NuA4 complex function cooperatively in cell transformation and cancer.

  18. Predicting selective drug targets in cancer through metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Ori; Jerby, Livnat; Frezza, Christian; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2011-01-01

    The interest in studying metabolic alterations in cancer and their potential role as novel targets for therapy has been rejuvenated in recent years. Here, we report the development of the first genome-scale network model of cancer metabolism, validated by correctly identifying genes essential for cellular proliferation in cancer cell lines. The model predicts 52 cytostatic drug targets, of which 40% are targeted by known, approved or experimental anticancer drugs, and the rest are new. It further predicts combinations of synthetic lethal drug targets, whose synergy is validated using available drug efficacy and gene expression measurements across the NCI-60 cancer cell line collection. Finally, potential selective treatments for specific cancers that depend on cancer type-specific downregulation of gene expression and somatic mutations are compiled. PMID:21694718

  19. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hu; Zhu, Chen; Qin, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Li, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ju, Xiaobing; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Gu, Min, E-mail: medzhao1980@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yin, Changjun, E-mail: drcjyin@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression.

  20. Prostate tumor OVerexpressed-1 (PTOV1) down-regulates HES1 and HEY1 notch targets genes and promotes prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaña, Lide; Sesé, Marta; Cánovas, Verónica; Punyal, Yolanda; Fernández, Yolanda; Abasolo, Ibane; de Torres, Inés; Ruiz, Cristina; Espinosa, Lluís; Bigas, Anna; Y Cajal, Santiago Ramón; Fernández, Pedro L; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Thomson, Timothy M; Paciucci, Rosanna

    2014-03-31

    PTOV1 is an adaptor protein with functions in diverse processes, including gene transcription and protein translation, whose overexpression is associated with a higher proliferation index and tumor grade in prostate cancer (PC) and other neoplasms. Here we report its interaction with the Notch pathway and its involvement in PC progression. Stable PTOV1 knockdown or overexpression were performed by lentiviral transduction. Protein interactions were analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down and/or immunofluorescence. Endogenous gene expression was analyzed by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blotting. Exogenous promoter activities were studied by luciferase assays. Gene promoter interactions were analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP). In vivo studies were performed in the Drosophila melanogaster wing, the SCID-Beige mouse model, and human prostate cancer tissues and metastasis. The Excel package was used for statistical analysis. Knockdown of PTOV1 in prostate epithelial cells and HaCaT skin keratinocytes caused the upregulation, and overexpression of PTOV1 the downregulation, of the Notch target genes HEY1 and HES1, suggesting that PTOV1 counteracts Notch signaling. Under conditions of inactive Notch signaling, endogenous PTOV1 associated with the HEY1 and HES1 promoters, together with components of the Notch repressor complex. Conversely, expression of active Notch1 provoked the dismissal of PTOV1 from these promoters. The antagonist role of PTOV1 on Notch activity was corroborated in the Drosophila melanogaster wing, where human PTOV1 exacerbated Notch deletion mutant phenotypes and suppressed the effects of constitutively active Notch. PTOV1 was required for optimal in vitro invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth of PC-3 cells, activities counteracted by Notch, and for their efficient growth and metastatic spread in vivo. In prostate tumors, the overexpression of PTOV1 was associated with decreased expression of HEY1 and HES1, and this

  1. Targeting AAC-11 in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Audrey; Poyet, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1997, the antiapoptotic factor AAC-11 has rapidly gained attention due to its potential use in cancer therapy. Indeed, most cancer cells express elevated levels of AAC-11, which is now known to be involved in both tumor cells growth as well as sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this review, we examine the most recent evidence about the role of AAC-11 in cancer biology and the therapeutic perspectives associated with its specific targeting. For that purpose, literature dealing with AAC-11 in the PubMed database was reviewed from 1997 up to date. AAC-11 is an antiapoptotic gene that has the potential to be a target for anti-cancer therapy, and warrants further investigation. As its expression seems to predict unfavorable prognosis, at least in some cancers, it also may become a potent prognostic marker. Blocking AAC-11 function in cancer for therapeutic purposes might be of great interest. The recent report of efficient AAC-11 inhibiting peptides that sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs has raise the exciting notion that AAC-11 might be a druggable target and fueled the search for new therapeutic agents that could block AAC-11 function.

  2. Systemic siRNA Delivery via Peptide-Tagged Polymeric Nanoparticles, Targeting PLK1 Gene in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanoparticles were developed from a series of chemical reactions using chitosan, polyethylene glycol, and a cell-targeting peptide (CP15. The nanoparticles were complexed with PLK1-siRNA. The optimal siRNA loading was achieved at an N : P ratio of 129.2 yielding a nanoparticle size of >200 nm. These nanoparticles were delivered intraperitoneally and tested for efficient delivery, cytotoxicity, and biodistribution in a mouse xenograft model of colorectal cancer. Both unmodified and modified chitosan nanoparticles showed enhanced accumulation at the tumor site. However, the modified chitosan nanoparticles showed considerably, less distribution in other organs. The relative gene expression as evaluated showed efficient delivery of PLK1-siRNA (0.5 mg/kg with 50.7±19.5% knockdown (P=0.031 of PLK1 gene. The in vivo data reveals no systemic toxicity in the animals, when tested for systemic inflammation and liver toxicity. These results indicate a potential of using peptide-tagged nanoparticles for systemic delivery of siRNA at the targeted tumor site.

  3. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu [Department of Pharmacy, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Wang, Lin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Research Center for Medicinal Biotechnology, Shandong Academy of Medicinal Sciences, Jinan 250012 (China); Ma, Quanping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Fourth People’s Hospital of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Han, Bo, E-mail: boh@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4.

  4. Potential Therapeutic Modalities in Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithvi Sinha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of huge concerted efforts, the treatment of cancer, a disease frequently associated with genetic alterations caused due to hereditary or environmental factors, remains a challenge. The last few years have witnessed emergence of several innovative and effective modalities for the treatment of solid tumours and hematological malignancies. Gene therapy has shown enormous potential for cancer treatment, especially for metastatic cancers which unlike localized solid tumours, may not be amenable to surgery or other treatment options. Gene therapy aims to introduce a correct copy of the malfunctioning gene in the tumour environment by using viral or non-viral methods to impede or inhibit its growth. This review provides an overview of three main approaches for cancer gene therapy namely immunotherapy, oncolytic therapy and gene transfer therapy. Immunotherapy augments the host immune system in order to destroy cancer cells while oncolytic therapy uses genetically engineered viruses such as to effectively kill cancer cells. Clinical studies so far have shown that cells can be engineered to express gene products that can specifically target cancer cells and prevents their growth and metastasis. Though gene therapy for cancer is yet to see extensive clinical use, it is likely that in combination with other treatment modalities, it will help in controlling and possibly curing cancer in the near future.

  5. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  6. Detecting and Targeting Oncogenic Myc in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penn, Linda Z

    2007-01-01

    Deregulation of the cellular myc proto-oncogene is one of the strongest activators of tumorigenesis and understanding the target genes regulated by this transcription factor in cancer etiology will...

  7. Identification of Target Genes of the Steroid Hormone Receptor Co-Activator AIB1 (Amplified in Breast Cancer 1)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    List, Heinz-Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Steroid hormones play pivotal roles in the control of breast cancer proliferation and differentiation, The biological effects of these hormones are mediated through intracellular receptor proteins, e.g...

  8. Gene Therapy Targeting HIV Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuka Didigu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the unquestionable success of antiretroviral therapy (ART in the treatment of HIV infection, the cost, need for daily adherence, and HIV-associated morbidities that persist despite ART all underscore the need to develop a cure for HIV. The cure achieved following an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT using HIV-resistant cells, and more recently, the report of short-term but sustained, ART-free control of HIV replication following allogeneic HSCT, using HIV susceptible cells, have served to both reignite interest in HIV cure research, and suggest potential mechanisms for a cure. In this review, we highlight some of the obstacles facing HIV cure research today, and explore the roles of gene therapy targeting HIV entry, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the development of strategies to cure HIV infection.

  9. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  10. Global analysis of estrogen receptor beta binding to breast cancer cell genome reveals an extensive interplay with estrogen receptor alpha for target gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα and beta (ERβ are transcription factors (TFs that mediate estrogen signaling and define the hormone-responsive phenotype of breast cancer (BC. The two receptors can be found co-expressed and play specific, often opposite, roles, with ERβ being able to modulate the effects of ERα on gene transcription and cell proliferation. ERβ is frequently lost in BC, where its presence generally correlates with a better prognosis of the disease. The identification of the genomic targets of ERβ in hormone-responsive BC cells is thus a critical step to elucidate the roles of this receptor in estrogen signaling and tumor cell biology. Results Expression of full-length ERβ in hormone-responsive, ERα-positive MCF-7 cells resulted in a marked reduction in cell proliferation in response to estrogen and marked effects on the cell transcriptome. By ChIP-Seq we identified 9702 ERβ and 6024 ERα binding sites in estrogen-stimulated cells, comprising sites occupied by either ERβ, ERα or both ER subtypes. A search for TF binding matrices revealed that the majority of the binding sites identified comprise one or more Estrogen Response Element and the remaining show binding matrixes for other TFs known to mediate ER interaction with chromatin by tethering, including AP2, E2F and SP1. Of 921 genes differentially regulated by estrogen in ERβ+ vs ERβ- cells, 424 showed one or more ERβ site within 10 kb. These putative primary ERβ target genes control cell proliferation, death, differentiation, motility and adhesion, signal transduction and transcription, key cellular processes that might explain the biological and clinical phenotype of tumors expressing this ER subtype. ERβ binding in close proximity of several miRNA genes and in the mitochondrial genome, suggests the possible involvement of this receptor in small non-coding RNA biogenesis and mitochondrial genome functions. Conclusions Results indicate that the

  11. Deletion lengthening at chromosomes 6q and 16q targets multiple tumor suppressor genes and is associated with an increasingly poor prognosis in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Martina; Jung, Simon; Habib, Omar

    2017-01-01

    317 patients for 6q and 16q deletion length heterogeneity and found that the deletion expanded within 50-60% of 6q and 16q deleted cancers. Taken together, these data suggest continuous "deletion lengthening" as a key mechanism for prostate cancer progression leading to parallel down regulation......Prostate cancer is characterized by recurrent deletions that can considerably vary in size. We hypothesized that large deletions develop from small deletions and that this "deletion lengthening" might have a "per se" carcinogenic role through a combinatorial effect of multiple down regulated genes.......In vitroknockdown of 37 genes located inside the 6q12-q22 deletion region identified 4 genes with additive tumor suppressive effects, further supporting a role of the deletion size for cancer aggressiveness. Employing fluorescencein-situhybridization analysis on prostate cancer tissue microarrays, we determined...

  12. OncoDB.HCC: an integrated oncogenomic database of hepatocellular carcinoma revealed aberrant cancer target genes and loci

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Wen-Hui; Chao, Chuan-Chuan; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer; Jou, Yuh-Shan

    2006-01-01

    The OncoDB.HCC () is based on physical maps of rodent and human genomes containing quantitative trait loci of rodent HCC models and various human HCC somatic aberrations including chromosomal data from loss of heterozygosity and comparative genome hybridization analyses, altered expression of genes from microarray and proteomic studies, and finally experimental data of published HCC genes. Comprehensive integration of HCC genomic aberration data avoids potential pitfalls of data inconsistency...

  13. Polymorphisms in Non-coding RNA Genes and Their Targets Sites as Risk Factors of Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Pardini, Barbara; Vymetálková, Veronika; Naccarati, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 937, č. 2016 (2016), s. 123-149 ISSN 0065-2598 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-26535A; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08239S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : colorectal cancer * polymorphism * risk factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.881, year: 2016

  14. Noninvasive theranostic imaging of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy in liver cancer by folate-targeted quantum dot-based liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, D.; Li, J.; Pan, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, X.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, H.; Chen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Theranostics is emerging as a popular strategy for cancer therapy; thanks to the development of nano-technology. In this work, we have combined an HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene system and near-infrared quantum dots, as the former is quite effective in liver cancer treatment and the latter facilitates

  15. Nonviral Delivery Systems For Cancer Gene Therapy: Strategies And Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Le, Quoc-Viet; Park, Gyu Thae; Kwon, Taekhyun; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2018-01-19

    Gene therapy has been receiving widespread attention due to its unique advantage in regulating the expression of specific target genes. In the field of cancer gene therapy, modulation of gene expression has been shown to decrease oncogenic factors in cancer cells or increase immune responses against cancer. Due to the macromolecular size and highly negative physicochemical features of plasmid DNA, efficient delivery systems are an essential ingredient for successful gene therapy. To date, a variety of nanostructures and materials have been studied as nonviral gene delivery systems. In this review, we will cover nonviral delivery strategies for cancer gene therapy, with a focus on target cancer genes and delivery materials. Moreover, we will address current challenges and perspectives for nonviral delivery-based cancer gene therapeutics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Targeting the Circadian Clock to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two compounds that target components of the circadian clock killed several types of cancer cells in the lab and slowed the growth of brain cancer in mice without harming healthy cells, as this Cancer Currents post reports.

  17. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Barry J [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Raja, Chand [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Rizvi, Syed [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Li Yong [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Tsui, Wendy [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Zhang, David [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Song, Emma [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Qu, C F [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Kearsley, John [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Graham, Peter [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Thompson, John [Sydney Melanoma Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown 2050 NSW (Australia)

    2004-08-21

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The {sup 213}Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 {mu

  18. Targeted integration of genes in Xenopus tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Zhaoying; Tian, Dandan; Xin, Huhu

    2017-01-01

    With the successful establishment of both targeted gene disruption and integration methods in the true diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis, this excellent vertebrate genetic model now is making a unique contribution to modelling human diseases. Here, we summarize our efforts on establishing homologous...... recombination-mediated targeted integration in Xenopus tropicalis, the usefulness, and limitation of targeted integration via the homology-independent strategy, and future directions on how to further improve targeted gene integration in Xenopus tropicalis....

  19. Polymeric Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery for Lung Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amreddy, Narsireddy; Babu, Anish; Muralidharan, Ranganayaki; Munshi, Anupama; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, researchers have focused on targeted gene therapy for lung cancer, using nanoparticle carriers to overcome the limitations of conventional treatment methods. The main goal of targeted gene therapy is to develop more efficient therapeutic strategies by improving the bioavailability, stability, and target specificity of gene therapeutics and to reduce off-target effects. Polymer-based nanoparticles, an alternative to lipid and inorganic nanoparticles, efficiently carry nucleic acid therapeutics and are stable in vivo. Receptor-targeted delivery is a promising approach that can limit non-specific gene delivery and can be achieved by modifying the polymer nanoparticle surface with specific receptor ligands or antibodies. This review highlights the recent developments in gene delivery using synthetic and natural polymer-based nucleic acid carriers for lung cancer treatment. Various nanoparticle systems based on polymers and polymer combinations are discussed. Further, examples of targeting ligands or moieties used in targeted, polymer-based gene delivery to lung cancer are reviewed.

  20. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  1. Improved Targeting of Cancers with Nanotherapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Christian; Watson, Andre; Kaplinsky, Joseph John

    2017-01-01

    Targeted cancer nanotherapeutics offers numerous opportunities for the selective uptake of toxic chemotherapies within tumors and cancer cells. The unique properties of nanoparticles, such as their small size, large surface-to-volume ratios, and the ability to achieve multivalency of targeting...... ligands on their surface, provide superior advantages for nanoparticle-based drug delivery to a variety of cancers. This review highlights various key concepts in the design of targeted nanotherapeutics for cancer therapy, and discusses physicochemical parameters affecting nanoparticle targeting, along...... with recent developments for cancer-targeted nanomedicines....

  2. Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0461 TITLE: Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jose Silva CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0461 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) l 5d...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC, ~5% of all breast cancers ) is the most lethal form of breast cancer , presenting a 5- year

  3. Immuno-Oncology-The Translational Runway for Gene Therapy: Gene Therapeutics to Address Multiple Immune Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weß, Ludger; Schnieders, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Cancer therapy is once again experiencing a paradigm shift. This shift is based on extensive clinical experience demonstrating that cancer cannot be successfully fought by addressing only single targets or pathways. Even the combination of several neo-antigens in cancer vaccines is not sufficient for successful, lasting tumor eradication. The focus has therefore shifted to the immune system's role in cancer and the striking abilities of cancer cells to manipulate and/or deactivate the immune system. Researchers and pharma companies have started to target the processes and cells known to support immune surveillance and the elimination of tumor cells. Immune processes, however, require novel concepts beyond the traditional "single-target-single drug" paradigm and need parallel targeting of diverse cells and mechanisms. This review gives a perspective on the role of gene therapy technologies in the evolving immuno-oncology space and identifies gene therapy as a major driver in the development and regulation of effective cancer immunotherapy. Present challenges and breakthroughs ranging from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, gene-modified oncolytic viruses, combination cancer vaccines, to RNA therapeutics are spotlighted. Gene therapy is recognized as the most prominent technology enabling effective immuno-oncology strategies.

  4. Translational Research on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Mutations in Targeted Therapy for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan WANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To explore the significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations in targeted therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with advanced NSCLC admitted in Maternal and Child Health Care Center of Zibo City from Jan., 2011 to Jan., 2014 were performed with EGFR gene detection and then divided into 3 groups according to the detecting results. Patients in group A and group B were given oral gefitinib, 250 mg/d while patients in Group C with docetaxel, 75 mg/m2. Chemotherapy for 3 groups was discontinued until severe adverse reactions or disease progression occurred, or continuous treatment was considered to be unfavorable by the doctors, or patients asked for withdrawal from the study. The relationship between clinicopathological features and EGFR mutations were analyzed. The short-term and long-term efficacy and adverse drug reactions of 3 groups were observed. Results: Of the 31 cases with EGFR mutations, there were 16 cases (51.6% of mutations in exon 19, 14 (45.2% in exon 21 and 2 (6.45% in exon 18. No EGFR mutation was found in exon 20. EGFR mutations were associated with histological types of tumors and whether patients were smoking. The median follow-up time was 26 months and 62 patients were dead. None of CR was in 3 groups. The disease control rate (DCR in Group A was obviously higher than that in Group B ( χ 2 =9.382, P=0.002, which was also higher in Group C than that in Group B ( χ 2 =4.674, P=0.031. The 1-year survival rate in Group A was obviously higher than that in group B and group C ( P <0.05, or P<0.01 , which was prominently higher in Group C than that in Group B ( P <0.01 . The median progression-free survival (PFS and median overall survival (OS were the longest in Group A was and the shortest in Group B. The adverse reactions of two kinds of

  5. Cancer genes in lung cancer: racial disparities: are there any?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Telbany, Ahmed; Ma, Patrick C

    2012-07-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent "oncogenic drivers" in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug sensitivity

  6. Results of a phase I pilot clinical trial examining the effect of plant-derived resveratrol and grape powder on Wnt pathway target gene expression in colonic mucosa and colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Anthony V; Martinez, Micaela; Stamos, Michael J; Moyer, Mary P; Planutis, Kestutis; Hope, Christopher; Holcombe, Randall F

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol exhibits colon cancer prevention activity in animal models; it is purported to have this activity in humans and inhibit a key signaling pathway involved in colon cancer initiation, the Wnt pathway, in vitro. A phase I pilot study in patients with colon cancer was performed to evaluate the effects of a low dose of plant-derived resveratrol formulation and resveratrol-containing freeze-dried grape powder (GP) on Wnt signaling in the colon. Eight patients were enrolled and normal colonic mucosa and colon cancer tissue were evaluated by Wnt pathway-specific microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) pre- and post-exposure to resveratrol/GP. Based on the expression of a panel of Wnt target genes, resveratrol/GP did not inhibit the Wnt pathway in colon cancer but had significant (p < 0.03) activity in inhibiting Wnt target gene expression in normal colonic mucosa. The greatest effect on Wnt target gene expression was seen following ingestion of 80 g of GP per day (p < 0.001). These results were confirmed with qRT-PCR of cyclinD1 and axinII. The inhibitory effect of GP on Wnt signal throughput was confirmed in vitro with a normal colonic mucosa-derived cell line. These data suggest that GP, which contains low dosages of resveratrol in combination with other bioactive components, can inhibit the Wnt pathway in vivo and that this effect is confined to the normal colonic mucosa. Further study of dietary supplementation with resveratrol-containing foods such as whole grapes or GP as a potential colon cancer preventive strategy is warranted. NCT00256334

  7. Systemic Targeted Alpha Radiotherapy for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan B. J.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fundamental principles of internal targeted alpha therapy for cancer were established many decades ago.The high linear energy transfer (LET of alpha radiation to the targeted cancer cellscauses double strand breaks in DNA. At the same time, the short range radiation spares adjacent normal tissues. This targeted approach complements conventional external beam radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Such therapies fail on several fronts, such as lack of control of some primary cancers (e.g.glioblastoma multiformeand to inhibit the development of lethal metastatic cancer after successful treatment of the primary cancer. Objective: This review charts the developing role of systemic high LET, internal radiation therapy. Method: Targeted alpha therapy is a rapidly advancing experimental therapy that holds promise to deliver high cytotoxicity to targeted cancer cells. Initially thought to be indicated for leukemia and micrometastases, there is now evidence that solid tumors can also be regressed. Results: Alpha therapy may be molecular or physiological in its targeting. Alpha emitting radioisotopes such as Bi-212, Bi-213, At-211 and Ac-225 are used to label monoclonal antibodies or proteins that target specifc cancer cells. Alternatively, Radium-233 is used for palliative therapy of breast and prostate cancers because of its bone seeking properties. Conclusion: Preclinical studies and clinical trials of alpha therapy are discussed for leukemia, lymphoma, melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, bone metastases, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer and other cancers.

  8. Advances of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li MA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lungadenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lungcancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  9. Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

  10. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Targeting post-translational modifications of histones for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y-C; Hsieh, Y-H; Liao, C-C; Chong, L-W; Lee, C-Y; Yu, Y-L; Chou, R-H

    2015-10-30

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histones including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination, ADP ribosylation, and sumoylation, play important roles in different biological events including chromatin dynamics, DNA replication, and transcriptional regulation. Aberrant histones PTMs leads to abnormal gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation, followed by development of cancers. Therefore, targeting the enzymes required for specific histone PTMs holds a lot of potential for cancer treatment. In this review article, we retrospect the latest studies in the regulations of acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of histones. We also summarize inhibitors/drugs that target these modifications for cancer treatment.

  12. MHC Genes and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Shiv

    2000-01-01

    Tumors are believed to emerge only when immune surveillance fails. We wished to ascertain whether the failure to inherit putative protective alleles of HLA class II genes is linked to the development of breast cancer...

  13. Bioengineering Strategies for Designing Targeted Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    The goals of bioengineering strategies for targeted cancer therapies are (1) to deliver a high dose of an anticancer drug directly to a cancer tumor, (2) to enhance drug uptake by malignant cells, and (3) to minimize drug uptake by nonmalignant cells. Effective cancer-targeting therapies will require both passive- and active targeting strategies and a thorough understanding of physiologic barriers to targeted drug delivery. Designing a targeted therapy includes the selection and optimization of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle for passive accumulation in tumors, a targeting moiety for active receptor-mediated uptake, and stimuli-responsive polymers for control of drug release. The future direction of cancer targeting is a combinatorial approach, in which targeting therapies are designed to use multiple targeting strategies. The combinatorial approach will enable combination therapy for delivery of multiple drugs and dual ligand targeting to improve targeting specificity. Targeted cancer treatments in development and the new combinatorial approaches show promise for improving targeted anticancer drug delivery and improving treatment outcomes. PMID:23768509

  14. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1α targeted gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P<0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P<0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening for Novel Drug Targets in Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijwening, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer drugs are not specific enough, causing unwanted side effects and recurrence of treated tumors. Some modern cancer drugs, the so-called targeted therapeutics, specifically target tumor cells, while leaving normal and healthy cells unharmed. The aim of the research described in this thesis

  16. Cancer chemoprevention by targeting the epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Joseph; Plass, Christoph; Gerhauser, Clarissa

    2011-12-01

    The term "epigenetics" refers to modifications in gene expression caused by heritable, but potentially reversible, changes in DNA methylation and chromatin structure. Given the fact that epigenetic modifications occur early in carcinogenesis and represent potentially initiating events in cancer development, they have been identified as promising new targets for prevention strategies. The present review will give a comprehensive overview of the current literature on chemopreventive agents and their influence on major epigenetic mechanisms, that is DNA methylation, histone acetylation and methylation, and microRNAs, both in vitro and in rodent and human studies, taking into consideration specific mechanisms of action, target sites, concentrations, methods used for analysis, and outcome. Chemopreventive agents with reported mechanisms targeting the epigenome include micronutrients (folate, selenium, retinoic acid, Vit. E), butyrate, polyphenols (from green tea, apples, coffee, and other dietary sources), genistein and soy isoflavones, parthenolide, curcumin, ellagitannin, indol-3-carbinol (I3C) and diindolylmethane (DIM), mahanine, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), lycopene, sulfur-containing compounds from Allium and cruciferous vegetables (sulforaphane, phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), phenylhexyl isothiocyanate (PHI), diallyldisulfide (DADS), allyl mercaptan (AM)), antibiotics (mithramycin A, apicidin), pharmacological agents (celecoxib, DFMO, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and zebularine), compounds affecting sirtuin activity (resveratrol, dihydrocoumarin, cambinol), inhibitors of histone acetyl transferases (anacardic acid, garcinol, ursodeoxycholic acid), and relatively unexplored modulators of histone lysine methylation (chaetocin, polyamine analogues, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids). Their effects on global DNA methylation, tumor suppressor genes silenced by promoter methylation, histone modifications, and miRNAs deregulated during carcinogenesis have potential

  17. Targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sounni, Nor Eddine; Noel, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of the tumor microenvironment as an essential ingredient of cancer malignancy, therapies targeting the host compartment of tumors have begun to be designed and applied in the clinic. The malignant features of cancer cells cannot be manifested without an important interplay between cancer cells and their local environment. The tumor infiltrate composed of immune cells, angiogenic vascular cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, and cancer-associated fibroblastic cells contributes actively to cancer progression. The ability to change these surroundings is an important property by which tumor cells are able to acquire some of the hallmark functions necessary for tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Thus in the clinical setting the targeting of the tumor microenvironment to encapsulate or destroy cancer cells in their local environment has become mandatory. The variety of stromal cells, the complexity of the molecular components of the tumor stroma, and the similarity with normal tissue present huge challenges for therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment. These issues and their interplay are addressed in this review. After a decade of intensive clinical trials targeting cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, more recent investigations have shed light on the important role in cancer progression played by the noncellular stromal compartment composed of the extracellular matrix. A better understanding of how the tumor environment affects cancer progression should provide new targets for the isolation and destruction of cancer cells via interference with the complex crosstalk established between cancer cells, host cells, and their surrounding extracellular matrix. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  18. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  19. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  20. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Kotaro, E-mail: hif.panc@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Uto, Yoshihiro [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nagasawa, Hideko [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Hori, Hitoshi [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Shimada, Mitsuo [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  1. Targeting glucose metabolism in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Shannon E; Chen, Jing

    2014-03-15

    Nearly a century ago, Otto Warburg made the astute observation that the metabolic properties of cancer cells differ markedly from those of normal cells. Several decades passed before the concept of exploiting cancer cell metabolism came into clinical practice with the advent of chemotherapy, the underlying principle of which is to target rapidly dividing cells by interfering with critical processes that are all, on some level, driven by cell metabolism. Although chemotherapy can be quite effective, success rates are highly variable and the adverse effects associated with treatment often outweigh the benefits due to the fact that chemotherapy is indiscriminately cytotoxic against all rapidly dividing cells, cancerous or healthy. During the past several years, a more intricate understanding of cancer cell metabolism has permitted the development of targeted therapies that aim to specifically target cancer cells and spare healthy tissue by exploiting the altered metabolism of cancer cells. The identification of new metabolic targets and the subsequent development of small-molecule inhibitors of metabolic enzymes have demonstrated the utility and promise of targeting cancer cell metabolism as an anticancer strategy. This review summarizes recent advances in the identification and characterization of several metabolic enzymes as emerging anticancer targets. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  2. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Tsakraklides

    Full Text Available Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications.

  3. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis.

  4. T-cell target antigens across major gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Alba; Minutolo, Nicholas G; Robinson, John M; Powell, Daniel J

    2017-06-01

    Immunotherapies have achieved remarkable success in treating different forms of cancer including melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, bladder cancer, synovial cell sarcoma, and multiple myeloma using immune checkpoint blockade or gene-engineered T-cells. Although gynecologic cancers have not been historically classified as immunogenic tumors, growing evidence has shown that they are in fact able to elicit endogenous antitumor immune responses suggesting that patients with these cancers may benefit from immunotherapy. Modest clinical success has been accomplished in early trials using immunotherapeutic modalities for major gynecologic cancers including ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancer. Unlike solid cancers with high mutational burdens, or hematologic malignancies where target antigens are expressed homogenously and exclusively by tumor cells, identifying tumor-restricted antigens has been challenging when designing a T-cell targeted therapy for gynecologic tumors. Nevertheless, mounting preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that targeting shared, viral or patient-specific mutated antigens expressed by gynecologic tumors with T-cells may improve patient outcome. Here we review the strengths and weaknesses of targeting these various antigens, as well as provide insight into the future of immunotherapy for gynecologic cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Voltage-gated calcium channels: Novel targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nam Nhut; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chen, Chien-Fu; Sun, Zhengda; Lai, Ming-Derg; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2017-08-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) comprise five subtypes: The L-type; R-type; N-type; P/Q-type; and T-type, which are encoded by α 1 subunit genes. Calcium ion channels also have confirmed roles in cellular functions, including mitogenesis, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and metastasis. An association between VGCCs, a reduction in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis in prostate cancer cells has also been reported. Therefore, in the present study, the online clinical database Oncomine was used to identify the alterations in the mRNA expression level of VGCCs in 19 cancer subtypes. Overall, VGCC family genes exhibited under-expression in numerous types of cancer, including brain, breast, kidney and lung cancers. Notably, the majority of VGCC family members (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1A, CACNA1B, CACNA1E, CACNA1H and CACNA1I) exhibited low expression in brain tumors, with mRNA expression levels in the top 1-9% of downregulated gene rankings. A total of 5 VGCC family members (CACNA1A, CACNA1B, CACNA1E, CACNA1G and CACNA1I) were under-expressed in breast cancer, with a gene ranking in the top 1-10% of the low-expressed genes compared with normal tissue. In kidney and lung cancers, CACNA1S, CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1A and CACNA1H exhibited low expression, with gene rankings in the top 1-8% of downregulated genes. In conclusion, the present findings may contribute to the development of new cancer treatment approaches by identifying target genes involved in specific types of cancer.

  6. Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Clinical Cancer Res 2009;15(10):3574–3582. 37. de Bruin M, Miyake K, Litman T, Robey R, Bates SE. Reversal of resistance by GF120918 in cell lines...receptor type alpha in relation to cell type, malignancy, and differentiation in ovary, uterus, and cervix . Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1999;8(9... cancer . Steroids 2014. 242. Zafrani B, Aubriot MH, Mouret E, De Cremoux P, De Rycke Y, Nicolas A, Boudou E, Vincent- Salomon A, Magdelenat H, Sastre

  7. Targeting the epigenome with bioactive food components for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Thomas Prates; Moreno, Fernando Salvador; Ross, Sharon Ann

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic processes participate in cancer development and likely influence cancer prevention. Global DNA hypomethylation, gene promoter hypermethylation and aberrant histone post-translational modifications are hallmarks of neoplastic cells which have been associated with genomic instability and altered gene expression. Because epigenetic deregulation occurs early in carcinogenesis and is potentially reversible, intervention strategies targeting the epigenome have been proposed for cancer prevention. Bioactive food components (BFCs) with anticancer potential, including folate, polyphenols, selenium, retinoids, fatty acids, isothiocyanates and allyl compounds, influence DNA methylation and histone modification processes. Such activities have been shown to affect the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, death and differentiation that are frequently altered in cancer. Although the epigenome represents a promising target for cancer prevention with BFCs, few studies have addressed the influence of dietary components on these mechanisms in vivo, particularly on the phenotype of humans, and thus the exact mechanisms whereby diet mediates an effect on cancer prevention remains unclear. Primary factors that should be elucidated include the effective doses and dose timing of BFCs to attain epigenetic effects. Because diet-epigenome interactions are likely to occur in utero, the impact of early-life nutrition on cancer risk programming should be further investigated. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Identification and targeting of genes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Capelleveen, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to assess the relevance of variations in known and novel genes for CVD associated endpoints in order to ultimately identify therapeutic targets for the treatment of atherosclerosis. The type of research is truly translational; it nourishes on the

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a 14-gene risk score assay to target adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua A; Billings, Paul; Ramsey, Scott D; Dumanois, Robert; Carlson, Josh J

    2014-05-01

    Life Technologies has developed a 14-gene molecular assay that provides information about the risk of death in early stage non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer patients after surgery. The assay can be used to identify patients at highest risk of mortality, informing subsequent treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this novel assay. Patients and Methods. We developed a Markov model to estimate life expectancy, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs for testing versus standard care. Risk-group classification was based on assay-validation studies, and chemotherapy uptake was based on pre- and post-testing recommendations from a study of 58 physicians. We evaluated three chemotherapy-benefit scenarios: moderately predictive (base case), nonpredictive (i.e., the same benefit for each risk group), and strongly predictive. We calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and performed one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results. In the base case, testing and standard-care strategies resulted in 6.81 and 6.66 life years, 3.76 and 3.68 QALYs, and $122,400 and $118,800 in costs, respectively. The ICER was $23,200 per QALY (stage I: $29,200 per QALY; stage II: $12,200 per QALY). The ICER ranged from "dominant" to $92,100 per QALY in the strongly predictive and nonpredictive scenarios. The model was most sensitive to the proportion of high-risk patients receiving chemotherapy and the high-risk hazard ratio. The 14-gene risk score assay strategy was cost-effective in 68% of simulations. Conclusion. Our results suggest that the 14-gene risk score assay may be a cost-effective alternative to standard guideline-based adjuvant chemotherapy decision making in early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important gene regulators and are recognized as key players in tumorigenesis. miR-145 is reported to be down-regulated in several cancers, but knowledge of its targets in colon cancer remains limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate...... miRNA overexpression. Gene Ontology analysis showed an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell death, cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle, gene expression and cancer. A number of the identified miRNA targets have previously been implicated in cancer, including YES, FSCN1, ADAM17, BIRC2......, VANGL1 as well as the transcription factor STAT1. Both YES and STAT1 were verified as direct miR-145 targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study identifies and validates new cancer-relevant direct targets of miR-145 in colon cancer cells and hereby adds important mechanistic understanding of the tumor...

  11. Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0212 TITLE: Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David Takeda CONTRACTING...ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02215 REPORT DATE: November 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research...Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0212 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David Takeda 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  12. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3′-UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. ► A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. ► Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. ► Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  13. Screening Technologies for Target Identification in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michl, Patrick, E-mail: michlp@med.uni-marburg.de; Ripka, Stefanie; Gress, Thomas; Buchholz, Malte [Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, University Hospital, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldinger Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany)

    2010-12-29

    Pancreatic cancer exhibits an extraordinarily high level of resistance to almost any kind of systemic therapy evaluated in clinical trials so far. Therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently required. High-throughput screens have emerged as an important tool to identify putative targets for diagnosis and therapy in an unbiased manner. More than a decade ago, microarray technology was introduced to identify differentially expressed genes in pancreatic cancer as compared to normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and other cancer types located in close proximity to the pancreas. In addition, proteomic screens have facilitated the identification of differentially secreted proteins in body fluids of pancreatic cancer patients, serving as possible biomarkers. Recently, RNA interference-based loss-of-function screens have been used to identify functionally relevant genes, whose knock-down has impact on pancreatic cancer cell viability, thereby representing potential new targets for therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes recent results of transcriptional, proteomic and functional screens in pancreatic cancer and discusses potentials and limitations of the respective technologies as well as their impact on future therapeutic developments.

  14. Advances of Molecular Subtype and Targeted Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan SHAO

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of multiple molecular mechanisms underlying the development, progression, and prognosis of lung cancer, has created new opportunities for targeted therapy. Each subtype is associated with molecular tests that define the subtype and drugs that may have potential therapeutic effect on lung cancer. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR gene were discovered in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC, especially in adenocarcinomas. And they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC, and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers. At present, multiple molecular subtype of lung cancer and relevant targeted drugs are undering study. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular subtype of lung cancer and the related targeted therapy.

  15. Screening Technologies for Target Identification in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michl, Patrick; Ripka, Stefanie; Gress, Thomas; Buchholz, Malte

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer exhibits an extraordinarily high level of resistance to almost any kind of systemic therapy evaluated in clinical trials so far. Therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently required. High-throughput screens have emerged as an important tool to identify putative targets for diagnosis and therapy in an unbiased manner. More than a decade ago, microarray technology was introduced to identify differentially expressed genes in pancreatic cancer as compared to normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and other cancer types located in close proximity to the pancreas. In addition, proteomic screens have facilitated the identification of differentially secreted proteins in body fluids of pancreatic cancer patients, serving as possible biomarkers. Recently, RNA interference-based loss-of-function screens have been used to identify functionally relevant genes, whose knock-down has impact on pancreatic cancer cell viability, thereby representing potential new targets for therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes recent results of transcriptional, proteomic and functional screens in pancreatic cancer and discusses potentials and limitations of the respective technologies as well as their impact on future therapeutic developments

  16. Targeting mitosis for anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakin, Valery; Yen, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Basic research that has focused on achieving a mechanistic understanding of mitosis has provided unprecedented molecular and biochemical insights into this highly complex phase of the cell cycle. The discovery process has uncovered an ever-expanding list of novel proteins that orchestrate and coordinate spindle formation and chromosome dynamics during mitosis. That many of these proteins appear to function solely in mitosis makes them ideal targets for the development of mitosis-specific cancer drugs. The clinical successes seen with anti-microtubule drugs such as taxanes and the vinca alkaloids have also encouraged the development of drugs that specifically target mitosis. Drugs that selectively inhibit mitotic kinesins involved in spindle and kinetochore functions, as well as kinases that regulate these activities, are currently in various stages of clinical trials. Our increased understanding of mitosis has also revealed that this process is targeted by inhibitors of farnesyl transferase, histone deacetylase, and Hsp90. Although these drugs were originally designed to block cell proliferation by inhibiting signaling pathways and altering gene expression, it is clear now that these drugs can also directly interfere with the mitotic process. The increased attention to mitosis as a chemotherapeutic target has also raised an important issue regarding the cellular determinants that specify drug sensitivity. One likely contribution is the mitotic checkpoint, a failsafe mechanism that delays mitotic exit so that cells whose chromosomes are not properly attached to the spindle have extra time to correct their errors. As the biochemical activity of the mitotic checkpoint is finite, cells cannot indefinitely sustain the delay, as in cases where cells are treated with anti-mitotic drugs. When the mitotic checkpoint activity is eventually lost, cells will exit mitosis and become aneuploid. While many of the aneuploid cells may die because of massive chromosome imbalance

  17. A two-cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product inclusion body formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dual cassette reporter system capable of assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding. The present invention further relates to vectors and host cells comprising the dual cassette reporter system. In addition the invention relates to the use...... of the dual cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding....

  18. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  19. Anthocyanins: targeting of signaling networks in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Qureshi, Muhammad Zahid; Butt, Ghazala; Aras, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming progressively more understandable that phytochemicals derived from edible plants have shown potential in modelling their interactions with their target proteins. Rapidly accumulating in-vitro and in- vivo evidence indicates that anthocyanins have anticancer activity in rodent models of cancer. More intriguingly, evaluation of bilberry anthocyanins as chemopreventive agents in twenty-five colorectal cancer patients has opened new window of opportunity in translating the findings from laboratory to clinic. Confluence of information suggests that anthocyanins treated cancer cells reveal up-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. There is a successive increase in the research-work in nutrigenomics and evidence has started to shed light on intracellular-signaling cascades as common molecular targets for anthocyanins. In this review we bring to limelight how anthocyanins induced apoptosis in cancer cells via activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.

  20. Fusion gene microarray reveals cancer type-specificity among fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvf, Marthe; Thomassen, Gard O S; Bakken, Anne Cathrine; Celestino, Ricardo; Fioretos, Thoas; Lind, Guro E; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2011-05-01

    Detection of fusion genes for diagnostic purposes and as a guide to treatment is well-established in hematological malignancies, and the prevalence of fusion genes in epithelial cancers is also increasingly appreciated. To study whether established fusion genes are present within additional cancer types, we have used an updated version of our fusion gene microarray in a systematic survey of reported fusion genes in multiple cancer types. We assembled a comprehensive database of published fusion genes, including those reported only in individual studies and samples, and fusion genes resulting from deep sequencing of cancer genomes and transcriptomes. From the total set of 548 fusion genes, we designed 599,839 oligonucleotides, targeting both chimeric transcript junctions as well as sequences internal to each of the fusion gene partners. We investigated the presence of fusion genes in a series of 67 cell lines representing 15 different cancer types. Data from ten leukemia cell lines with known fusion gene status were used to develop an automated scoring algorithm, and in five cell lines the correct fusion gene was the top scoring hit, and one came second. Two additional fusion genes, BCAS4-BCAS3 in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line and CCDC6-RET in the TPC-1 thyroid cancer cell line were validated as true positive fusion transcripts. However, these fusion genes were not new to these cancer types, and none of 548 fusion genes were identified from a novel cancer type. We therefore find it unlikely that the assayed fusion genes are commonly present across multiple cancer types. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Sulforaphane Reverses the Expression of Various Tumor Suppressor Genes by Targeting DNMT3B and HDAC1 in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawwar Ali Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN may hinder carcinogenesis by altering epigenetic events in the cells; however, its molecular mechanisms are unclear. The present study investigates the role of SFN in modifying epigenetic events in human cervical cancer cells, HeLa. HeLa cells were treated with SFN (2.5 µM for a period of 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours for all experiments. After treatment, expressions of DNMT3B, HDAC1, RARβ, CDH1, DAPK1, and GSTP1 were studied using RT-PCR while promoter DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs was studied using MS-PCR. Inhibition assays of DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs and histone deacetylases (HDACs were performed at varying time points. Molecular modeling and docking studies were performed to explore the possible interaction of SFN with HDAC1 and DNMT3B. Time-dependent exposure to SFN decreases the expression of DNMT3B and HDAC1 and significantly reduces the enzymatic activity of DNMTs and HDACs. Molecular modeling data suggests that SFN may interact directly with DNMT3B and HDAC1 which may explain the inhibitory action of SFN. Interestingly, time-dependent reactivation of the studied TSGs via reversal of methylation in SFN treated cells correlates well with its impact on the epigenetic alterations accumulated during cancer development. Thus, SFN may have significant implications for epigenetic based therapy.

  2. Will nanotechnology influence targeted cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jan; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-04-01

    The rapid development of techniques that enable synthesis (and manipulation) of matter on the nanometer scale and the development of new nanomaterials will play a large role in disease diagnosis and treatment, specifically in targeted cancer therapy. Targeted nanocarriers are an intriguing means to selectively deliver high concentrations of cytotoxic agents or imaging labels directly to the cancer site. Often, solubility issues and an unfavorable biodistribution can result in a suboptimal response of novel agents even though they are very potent. New nanoparticulate formulations allow simultaneous imaging and therapy ("theranostics"), which can provide a realistic means for the clinical implementation of such otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review, we did not attempt to provide a complete overview of the rapidly enlarging field of nanotechnology in cancer; rather, we presented properties specific to nanoparticles and examples of their uses, which show their importance for targeted cancer therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gene therapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Eric M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-09-01

    Lung cancer patients suffer a 15% overall survival despite advances in chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This unacceptably low survival rate is due to the usual finding of advanced disease at diagnosis. However, multimodality strategies using conventional therapies only minimally improve survival rates even in early stages of lung cancer. Attempts to improve survival in advanced disease using various combinations of platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated that no regimen is superior, suggesting a therapeutic plateau and the need for novel, more specific, and less toxic therapeutic strategies. Over the past three decades, the genetic etiology of cancer has been gradually delineated, albeit not yet completely. Understanding the molecular events that occur during the multistep process of bronchogenic carcinogenesis may make these tasks more surmountable. During these same three decades, techniques have been developed which allow transfer of functional genes into mammalian cells. For example, blockade of activated tumor-promoting oncogenes or replacement of inactivated tumor-suppressing or apoptosis-promoting genes can be achieved by gene therapy. This article will discuss the therapeutic implications of these molecular changes associated with bronchogenic carcinomas and will then review the status of gene therapies for treatment of lung cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Bioinformatics for cancer immunotherapy target discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Barnkob, Mike Stein

    2014-01-01

    cancer immunotherapies has yet to be fulfilled. The insufficient efficacy of existing treatments can be attributed to a number of biological and technical issues. In this review, we detail the current limitations of immunotherapy target selection and design, and review computational methods to streamline...... therapy target discovery in a bioinformatics analysis pipeline. We describe specialized bioinformatics tools and databases for three main bottlenecks in immunotherapy target discovery: the cataloging of potentially antigenic proteins, the identification of potential HLA binders, and the selection epitopes...

  5. Immunologic Targeting Of Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.; Chen, M. R.; Linden, R.

    1989-06-01

    A number of laboratories have demonstrated that immunoconjugates may have potential in phototherapy of cancer. The phototoxic effectiveness of these conjugates may be increased by manipulation of irradiation parameters and by biochemical and immunologic modulation. Results from experiments aimed at potentiation of immunoconjugate photosensitization are presented.

  6. Targeting mitochondria for cancer treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří; Cifra, Michal; Jandová, Anna; Kučera, Ondřej; Šrobár, Fedor; Vrba, J.; Vrba, J.; Kobilková, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2012), s. 23-36 ISSN 1128-6598 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0649; GA ČR GAP102/10/0120 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Electromagnetic fields * Cellular biophysics * Cancer Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.750, year: 2012

  7. Targeting Conserved Genes in Alternaria Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, Miguel Ángel; López-Calleja, Inés María; González, Isabel; Martín, Rosario; García, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a molecular biology technique based on the detection of the fluorescence produced by a reporter molecule, which increases as the reaction proceeds proportionally to the accumulation of the PCR product within each amplification cycle. The fluorescent reporter molecules include dyes that bind to the double-stranded DNA (i.e., SYBR ® Green) or sequence-specific probes (i.e., Molecular Beacons or TaqMan ® Probes). Real-time PCR provides a tool for accurate and sensitive quantification of target fungal DNA. Here, we describe a TaqMan real-time PCR method for specific detection and quantification of Alternaria spp. The method uses Alternaria-specific primers and probe, targeting the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2 of the rRNA gene, and a positive amplification control based on 18S rRNA gene.

  8. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  9. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  10. BMI-1, a promising therapeutic target for human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, MIN-CONG; LI, CHUN-LI; CUI, JIE; JIAO, MIN; WU, TAO; JING, LI; NAN, KE-JUN

    2015-01-01

    BMI-1 oncogene is a member of the polycomb-group gene family and a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of BMI-1 has been identified in various human cancer tissues and is known to be involved in cancer cell proliferation, cell invasion, distant metastasis, chemosensitivity and patient survival. Accumulating evidence has revealed that BMI-1 is also involved in the regulation of self-renewal, differentiation and tumor initiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these biological processes remain unclear. The present review summarized the function of BMI-1 in different human cancer types and CSCs, and discussed the signaling pathways in which BMI-1 is potentially involved. In conclusion, BMI-1 may represent a promising target for the prevention and therapy of various cancer types. PMID:26622537

  11. Synthetic Genetic Targeting of Genome Instability in Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajesh, Babu V.; Guppy, Brent J.; McManus, Kirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death throughout the World. A limitation of many current chemotherapeutic approaches is that their cytotoxic effects are not restricted to cancer cells, and adverse side effects can occur within normal tissues. Consequently, novel strategies are urgently needed to better target cancer cells. As we approach the era of personalized medicine, targeting the specific molecular defect(s) within a given patient’s tumor will become a more effective treatment strategy than traditional approaches that often target a given cancer type or sub-type. Synthetic genetic interactions are now being examined for their therapeutic potential and are designed to target the specific genetic and epigenetic phenomena associated with tumor formation, and thus are predicted to be highly selective. In general, two complementary approaches have been employed, including synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, to target aberrant expression and/or function associated with tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, respectively. Here we discuss the concepts of synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, and explain three general experimental approaches designed to identify novel genetic interactors. We present examples and discuss the merits and caveats of each approach. Finally, we provide insight into the subsequent pre-clinical work required to validate novel candidate drug targets

  12. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  13. Unifying the genomics-based classes of cancer fusion gene partners: large cancer fusion genes are evolutionarily conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Libia M; Morton, Daniel T; Chen, Ren; Blanck, George

    2012-11-01

    Genes that fuse to cause cancer have been studied to determine molecular bases for proliferation, to develop diagnostic tools, and as targets for drugs. To facilitate identification of additional, cancer fusion genes, following observation of a chromosomal translocation, we have characterized the genomic features of the fusion gene partners. Previous work indicated that cancer fusion gene partners, are either large or evolutionarily conserved in comparison to the neighboring genes in the region of a chromosomal translocation. These results raised the question of whether large cancer fusion gene partners were also evolutionarily conserved. We developed two methods for quantifying evolutionary conservation values, allowing the conclusion that both large and small cancer fusion gene partners are more evolutionarily conserved than their neighbors. Additionally, we determined that cancer fusion gene partners have more 3' untranslated region secondary structures than do their neighbors. Coupled with previous algorithms, with or without transcriptome approaches, we expect these results to assist in the rapid and efficient use of chromosomal translocations to identify cancer fusion genes. The above parameters for any gene of interest can be accessed at www.cancerfusiongenes.com.

  14. RLIP76 Targeted Therapy for Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singhal, Jyotsana; Figarola, James; Horne, David; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent improvements in chemotherapeutic approaches to treating kidney cancer, this malignancy remains deadly if not found and removed at an early stage of the disease. Kidney cancer is highly drug-resistant, which may at least partially result from high expression of transporter proteins in the cell membranes of kidney cells. Although these transporter proteins can contribute to drug-resistance, targeting proteins from the ATP-binding cassette transporter family has not been effective in reversing drug-resistance in kidney cancer. Recent studies have identified RLIP76 as a key stress-defense protein that protects normal cells from damage caused by stress conditions, including heat, ultra-violet light, X-irradiation, and oxidant/electrophilic toxic chemicals, and is crucial for protecting cancer cells from apoptosis. RLIP76 is the predominant glutathione-electrophile-conjugate (GS-E) transporter in cells, and inhibiting it with antibodies or through siRNA or antisense causes apoptosis in many cancer cell types. To date, blocking of RLIP76, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, as a therapeutic strategy for kidney cancer has not yet been evaluated in human clinical trials, although there is considerable potential for RLIP76 to be developed as a therapeutic agent for kidney cancer. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying apoptosis caused by RLIP76 depletion, the role of RLIP76 in clathrin-dependent endocytosis deficiency, and the feasibility of RLIP76-targeted therapy for kidney cancer.

  15. Engineering liposomal nanoparticles for targeted gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, C; Gaskill, K; Pasley, S; Matosevic, S

    2017-08-01

    Recent mechanistic studies have attempted to deepen our understanding of the process by which liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material occurs. Understanding the interactions between lipid nanoparticles and cells is still largely elusive. Liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material faces systemic obstacles alongside entry into the cell, endosomal escape, lysosomal degradation and nuclear uptake. Rational design approaches for targeted delivery have been developed to reduce off-target effects and enhance transfection. These strategies, which have included the modification of lipid nanoparticles with target-specific ligands to enhance intracellular uptake, have shown significant promise at the proof-of-concept stage. Control of physical and chemical specifications of liposome composition, which includes lipid-to-DNA charge, size, presence of ester bonds, chain length and nature of ligand complexation, is integral to the performance of targeted liposomes as genetic delivery agents. Clinical advances are expected to rely on such systems in the therapeutic application of liposome nanoparticle-based gene therapy. Here, we discuss the latest breakthroughs in the development of targeted liposome-based agents for the delivery of genetic material, paying particular attention to new ligand and cationic lipid design as well as recent in vivo advances.

  16. Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    is ideal for optical imaging in vivo. In cell studies on a high-power fluorescent microscope we can see that the targeted dye 3 has a higher...theranostic. Currently we are scaling up the synthesis of this molecule, for photophysical measurements, cellular assays particularly light /dark...absorbs light optimally at a wavelength (around 500 nm) that is too short for efficient penetration of more than a few mm in tis- sue.43,44 To circumvent

  17. SNP-SNP interactions of three new pri-miRNAs with the target gene PGC and multidimensional analysis of H. pylori in the gastric cancer/atrophic gastritis risk in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Wu, Ye-Feng; Li, Ying; He, Cai-Yun; Sun, Li-Ping; Liu, Jing-Wei; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-04-26

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a multistep complex disease involving multiple genes, and gene-gene interactions have a greater effect than a single gene in determining cancer susceptibility. This study aimed to explore the interaction of the let-7e rs8111742, miR-365b rs121224, and miR-4795 rs1002765 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with SNPs of the predicted target gene PGC and Helicobacter pylori status in GC and atrophic gastritis (AG) risk. Three miRNA SNPs and seven PGC SNPs were detected in 2448 cases using the Sequenom MassArray platform. Two pairwise combinations of miRNA and PGC SNPs were associated with increased AG risk (let-7e rs8111742 - PGC rs6458238 and miR-4795 rs1002765 - PGC rs9471643). Singly, miR-365b rs121224 and PGC rs6912200 had no effect individually but in combination they demonstrated an epistatic interaction associated with AG risk. Similarly, let-7e rs8111742 and miR-4795 rs1002765 SNPs interacted with H. pylori infection to increase GC risk (rs8111742: Pinteraction = 0.024; rs1002765: Pinteraction = 0.031, respectively). A three-dimensional interaction analysis found miR-4795 rs1002765, PGC rs9471643, and H. pylori infection positively interacted to increase AG risk (Pinteraction = 0.027). Also, let-7e rs8111742, PGC rs6458238, and H. pylori infection positively interacted to increase GC risk (Pinteraction = 0.036). Furthermore, both of these three-dimensional interactions had a dosage-effect correspondence (Ptrend < 0.001) and were verified by MDR. In conclusion, the miRNAs SNPs (let-7e rs8111742 and miR-4795 rs1002765) might have more superior efficiency when combined with PGC SNPs and/or H. pylori for GC or AG risk than a single SNP on its own.

  18. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    we have developed models of mutant ER driven cancer in which to characterize gene expression. Specifically, tetracycline inducible MCF7 cells that...expression profiling. Figure 1: Degradation of WT and mutant ER with ARN810. MCF7 cells stably transfected with tet-inducible WT and mutant...mutant ER. MCF7 cells stably transfected with tet- inducible WT and mutant ER are treated for 24 hours with estradiol and gene expression profiling

  19. Gene transfer technology and genetic radioisotope targeting therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaqiong; Wang Zizheng

    2004-01-01

    With deeper cognition about mechanisms of disease at the cellular and molecular level, gene therapy has become one of the most important research fields in medical molecular biology at present. Gene transfer technology plays an important role during the course of gene therapy, and further improvement should be made about vectors carrying target gene sequences. Also, gene survey is needed during gene therapy, and gene imaging is the most effective method. The combination of gene therapy and targeted radiotherapy, that is, 'Genetic Radioisotope Targeting Therapy', will be a novel approach to tumor gene therapy

  20. Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy with AFP driving Apoptin gene shows potent antitumor effect in hepatocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kang-Jian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy and viral therapy are used for cancer therapy for many years, but the results are less than satisfactory. Our aim was to construct a new recombinant adenovirus which is more efficient to kill hepatocarcinoma cells but more safe to normal cells. Methods By using the Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy strategy, Apoptin, a promising cancer therapeutic gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus AD55 in which E1A gene was driven by alpha fetoprotein promoter along with a 55 kDa deletion in E1B gene to form AD55-Apoptin. The anti-tumor effects and safety were examined by western blotting, virus yield assay, real time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst33342 staining, Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, xenograft tumor model, Immunohistochemical assay, liver function analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay. Results The recombinant virus AD55-Apoptin has more significant antitumor effect for hepatocelluar carcinoma cell lines (in vitro than that of AD55 and even ONYX-015 but no or little impair on normal cell lines. Furthermore, it also shows an obvious in vivo antitumor effect on the Huh-7 liver carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with bigger beginning tumor volume till about 425 mm3 but has no any damage on the function of liver. The induction of apoptosis is involved in AD55-Apoptin induced antitumor effects. Conclusion The AD55-Apoptin can be a potential anti-hepatoma agent with remarkable antitumor efficacy as well as higher safety in cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy system.

  1. Iron chelators target both proliferating and quiescent cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frykn?s, M?rten; Zhang, Xiaonan; Bremberg, Ulf; Senkowski, Wojciech; Olofsson, Maria H?gg; Brandt, Peter; Persson, Ingmar; D?Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Schughart, Leoni Kunz; Linder, Stig; Larsson, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Poorly vascularized areas of solid tumors contain quiescent cell populations that are resistant to cell cycle-active cancer drugs. The compound VLX600 was recently identified to target quiescent tumor cells and to inhibit mitochondrial respiration. We here performed gene expression analysis in order to characterize the cellular response to VLX600. The compound-specific signature of VLX600 revealed a striking similarity to signatures generated by compounds known to chelate iron. Validation exp...

  2. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  3. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Arlhee; Leon, Kalet

    2011-01-01

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC

  4. Ornithine decarboxylase as a therapeutic target for endometrial cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Im Kim

    Full Text Available Ornithine Decarboxylase (ODC a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is often overexpressed in cancers and contributes to polyamine-induced cell proliferation. We noted ubiquitous expression of ODC1 in our published endometrial cancer gene array data and confirmed this in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA with highest expression in non-endometrioid, high grade, and copy number high cancers, which have the worst clinical outcomes. ODC1 expression was associated with worse overall survival and increased recurrence in three endometrial cancer gene expression datasets. Importantly, we confirmed these findings using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR in a validation cohort of 60 endometrial cancers and found that endometrial cancers with elevated ODC1 had significantly shorter recurrence-free intervals (KM log-rank p = 0.0312, Wald test p = 5.59e-05. Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO a specific inhibitor of ODC significantly reduced cell proliferation, cell viability, and colony formation in cell line models derived from undifferentiated, endometrioid, serous, carcinosarcoma (mixed mesodermal tumor; MMT and clear cell endometrial cancers. DFMO also significantly reduced human endometrial cancer ACI-98 tumor burden in mice compared to controls (p = 0.0023. ODC-regulated polyamines (putrescine [Put] and/or spermidine [Spd] known activators of cell proliferation were strongly decreased in response to DFMO, in both tumor tissue ([Put] (p = 0.0006, [Spd] (p<0.0001 and blood plasma ([Put] (p<0.0001, [Spd] (p = 0.0049 of treated mice. Our study indicates that some endometrial cancers appear particularly sensitive to DFMO and that the polyamine pathway in endometrial cancers in general and specifically those most likely to suffer adverse clinical outcomes could be targeted for effective treatment, chemoprevention or chemoprevention of recurrence.

  5. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  6. Computational optimisation of targeted DNA sequencing for cancer detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; McGranahan, Nicholas; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent progress thanks to next-generation sequencing technologies, personalised cancer medicine is still hampered by intra-tumour heterogeneity and drug resistance. As most patients with advanced metastatic disease face poor survival, there is need to improve early diagnosis. Analysing...... detection. Dividing 4,467 samples into one discovery and two independent validation cohorts, we show that up to 76% of 10 cancer types harbour at least one mutation in a panel of only 25 genes, with high sensitivity across most tumour types. Our analyses demonstrate that targeting "hotspot" regions would...

  7. Targeted radionuclide therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M; Da Silva, R; Gravekamp, C; Libutti, S K; Abraham, T; Dadachova, E

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic malignancies, the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, have an aggressive behavior with poor prognosis, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 4%. It is typically a silent malignancy until patients develop metastatic disease. Targeted radionuclide therapies of cancer such as radiolabeled peptides, which bind to the receptors overexpressed by cancer cells and radiolabeled antibodies to tumor-specific antigens provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy and external beam radiation of metastatic cancers. Multiple clinical trials of targeted radionuclide therapy of pancreatic cancer have been performed in the last decade and demonstrated safety and potential efficacy of radionuclide therapy for treatment of this formidable disease. Although a lot of progress has been made in treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled (90)Y and (177)Lu somatostatin peptide analogs, pancreatic adenocarcinomas remain a major challenge. Novel approaches such as peptides and antibodies radiolabeled with alpha emitters, pre-targeting, bispecific antibodies and biological therapy based on the radioactive tumorlytic bacteria might offer a potential breakthrough in treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  8. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Junji; Okusaka, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important

  9. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuse, Junji, E-mail: jfuruse@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8611 (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-05-03

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important.

  10. Targeting embryonic signaling pathways in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Pamela Jo; Speranza, Giovanna; Dansky Ullmann, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The embryonic signaling pathways (ESP), Hedgehog, Notch and Wnt, are critical for the regulation of normal stem cells and cellular development processes. They are also activated in the majority of cancers. ESP are operational in putative cancer stem cells (CSC), which drive initial tumorigenesis and sustain cancer progression and recurrence in non-CSC bulk subpopulations. ESP represent novel therapeutic targets. A variety of inhibitors and targeting strategies are being developed. This review discusses the rationale for targeting ESP for cancer treatment, as well as specific inhibitors under development; mainly focusing on those approaching clinical use and the challenges that lie ahead. The data sources utilized are several database search engines (PubMed, Google, Clinicaltrials.gov), and the authors' involvement in the field. CSC research is rapidly evolving. Expectations regarding their therapeutic targeting are rising quickly. Further definition of what constitutes a true CSC, proper validation of CSC markers, a better understanding of cross-talk among ESP and other pathways, and interactions with tumor non-CSC and the tumor microenvironment are needed. The appropriate patient population, the right clinical setting and combination strategies to test these therapies, as well as the proper pharmacodynamic markers to measure, need to be further established.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng; An, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression. (paper)

  12. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this case, the ...

  13. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this.

  14. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is

  15. Therapeutic targeting of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello eMaugeri-Saccà

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent breakthroughs in translational oncology are opening new perspectives for the treatment of cancer. The advent of targeted therapies has provided the proof-of-concept to selectively turn-off deregulated oncogenic proteins, while the identification and validation of predictive biomarkers of response has allowed to improve, at least in some cases, their performance. Moreover, a subpopulation of tumor-propagating cells has been identified from many solid and hematological tumors. These cells share functional properties of normal stem cells, and are commonly referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs. It is emerging that CSCs are defended against broadly-used anticancer agents by means of different, partly interconnected, mechanisms. However, CSCs rely on specific pathways involved in self-renewal that can be pharmacologically antagonized by experimental molecular targeted agents, some of which have recently entered early phases of clinical development. Here, we discuss the spectrum of pharmacological strategies under clinical or preclinical development for CSCs targeting.

  16. Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) survivin is indispensable for survival of HER2 gene-amplified breast cancer cells with primary resistance to HER1/2-targeted therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cufi, Silvia; Torres-Garcia, Violeta Zenobia [Unit of Translational Research, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Girona, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Girona Biomedical Research Institute, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Sauri-Nadal, Tamara; Barco, Sonia Del [Girona Biomedical Research Institute, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Medical Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Girona, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni [Girona Biomedical Research Institute, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Department of Anatomical Pathology, Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Brunet, Joan [Girona Biomedical Research Institute, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Medical Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Girona, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Martin-Castillo, Begona [Girona Biomedical Research Institute, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Unit of Clinical Research, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Girona, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Menendez, Javier A., E-mail: jmenendez@idibgi.org [Unit of Translational Research, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Girona, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Girona Biomedical Research Institute, Avenida de Francia S/N, E-17007 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} Intrinsic trastuzumab resistance occurs in {approx}70% of metastatic HER2 + breast carcinomas (BC). {yields} Approximately 15% of early HER2 + BC relapse in spite of treatment with trastuzumab-based therapies. {yields} HER2-independent downstream pro-survival pathways might underlie trastuzumab refractoriness. {yields} Survivin is indispensable for proliferation and survival of HER2 + BC unresponsive to HER2-targeted therapies ab initio. {yields} Survivin antagonists may clinically circumvent the occurrence of de novo resistance to HER2-directed drugs. -- Abstract: Primary resistance of HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas (BC) to HER-targeted therapies can be explained in terms of overactive HER2-independent downstream pro-survival pathways. We here confirm that constitutive overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) survivin is indispensable for survival of HER2-positive BC cells with intrinsic cross-resistance to multiple HER1/2 inhibitors. The IC{sub 50} values for the HER1/2 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib, erlotinib and lapatinib were up to 40-fold higher in trastuzumab-unresponsive JIMT-1 cells than in trastuzumab-naive SKBR3 cells. ELISA-based and immunoblotting assays demonstrated that trastuzumab-refractory JIMT-1 cells constitutively expressed {approx}4 times more survivin protein than trastuzumab-responsive SKBR3 cells. In response to trastuzumab, JIMT-1 cells accumulated {approx}10 times more survivin than SKBR3 cells. HER1/2 TKIs failed to down-regulate survivin expression in JIMT-1 cells whereas equimolar doses of HER1/HER2 TKIs drastically depleted survivin protein in SKBR3 cells. ELISA-based detection of histone-associated DNA fragments confirmed that trastuzumab-refractory JIMT-1 cells were intrinsically protected against the apoptotic effects of HER1/2 TKIs. Of note, when we knocked-down survivin expression using siRNA and then added trastuzumab, cell proliferation and colony formation were completely

  17. Targeted Cancer Therapy with Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibo Cai Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, a member of the TNF superfamily, was the first cytokine to be evaluated for cancer biotherapy. However, the clinical use of TNF-α is severely limited by its toxicity. Currently, TNF-α is administered only through locoregional drug delivery systems such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated hepatic perfusion. To reduce the systemic toxicity of TNF-α, various strategies have been explored over the last several decades. This review summarizes current state-of-the-art targeted cancer therapy using TNF-α. Passive targeting, cell-based therapy, gene therapy with inducible or tissue-specific promoters, targeted polymer-DNA complexes, tumor pre-targeting, antibody-TNF-α conjugate, scFv/TNF-α fusion proteins, and peptide/TNF-α fusion proteins have all been investigated to combat cancer. Many of these agents are already in advanced clinical trials. Molecular imaging, which can significantly speed up the drug development process, and nanomedicine, which can integrate both imaging and therapeutic components, has the potential to revolutionize future cancer patient management. Cooperative efforts from scientists within multiple disciplines, as well as close partnerships among many organizations/entities, are needed to quickly translate novel TNF-α-based therapeutics into clinical investigation.

  18. Targeting Mcl-1 for Radiosensitization of Pancreatic Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Wei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify targets whose inhibition may enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer, we previously conducted an RNAi library screen of 8,800 genes. We identified Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, as a target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemoradiation. In the present study we investigated Mcl-1 inhibition by either genetic or pharmacological approaches as a radiosensitizing strategy in pancreatic cancer cells. Mcl-1 depletion by siRNA produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells in association with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage, but only minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. We next tested the ability of the recently identified, selective, small molecule inhibitor of Mcl-1, UMI77, to radiosensitize in pancreatic cancer cells. UMI77 caused dissociation of Mcl-1 from the pro-apoptotic protein Bak and produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells, but minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Radiosensitization by UMI77 was associated with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Importantly, UMI77 did not radiosensitize normal small intestinal cells. In contrast, ABT-737, an established inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w, failed to radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells suggesting the unique importance of Mcl-1 relative to other Bcl-2 family members to radiation survival in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these results validate Mcl-1 as a target for radiosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells and demonstrate the ability of small molecules which bind the canonical BH3 groove of Mcl-1, causing displacement of Mcl-1 from Bak, to selectively radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells.

  19. Ganoderma lucidum targeting lung cancer signaling: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Balraj Singh; Navgeet; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-06-01

    Lung cancer causes huge mortality to population, and pharmaceutical companies require new drugs as an alternative either synthetic or natural targeting lung cancer. The conventional therapies cause side effects, and therefore, natural products are used as a therapeutic candidate in lung cancer. Chemical diversity among natural products highlights the impact of evolution and survival of fittest. One such neglected natural product is Ganoderma lucidum used for promoting health and longevity for a longer time. The major bioconstituents of G. lucidum are mainly terpenes, polysaccharides, and proteins, which were explored for various activities ranging from apoptosis to autophagy. The bioconstituents of G. lucidum activate plasma membrane receptors and initiate various downstream signaling leading to nuclear factor-κB, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, Akt, and mammalian target of rapamycin in cancer. The bioconstituents regulate the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle, immune response, apoptosis, and autophagy in lung cancer. This review highlights the inextricable role of G. lucidum and its bioconstituents in lung cancer signaling for the first time.

  20. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%–25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors. PMID:28333115

  1. Triple-negative breast cancer: new perspectives for targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomao F

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Federica Tomao,1 Anselmo Papa,2 Eleonora Zaccarelli,2 Luigi Rossi,2 Davide Caruso,2 Marina Minozzi,2 Patrizia Vici,3 Luigi Frati,4 Silverio Tomao21Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Policlinico “Umberto I”, Rome, 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Oncology Unit, Istituto Chirurgico Ortopedico Traumatologico, Latina, 3Division of Medical Oncology B, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Molecular Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Policlinico “Umberto I”, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, encompassing a large number of entities showing different morphological features and having clinical behaviors. It has became apparent that this diversity may be justified by distinct patterns of genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic aberrations. The identification of gene-expression microarray-based characteristics has led to the identification of at least five breast cancer subgroups: luminal A, luminal B, normal breast-like, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and basal-like. Triple-negative breast cancer is a complex disease diagnosed by immunohistochemistry, and it is characterized by malignant cells not expressing estrogen receptors or progesterone receptors at all, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Along with this knowledge, recent data show that triple-negative breast cancer has specific molecular features that could be possible targets for new biological targeted drugs. The aim of this article is to explore the use of new drugs in this particular setting, which is still associated with poor prognosis and high risk of distant recurrence and death.Keywords: basal-like breast cancer, estrogen–progesterone receptors, gene-expression microarray, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, chemotherapy, target therapy

  2. Identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo, Maria Victoria; Yelo, Estefania; Gimeno, Lourdes; Campillo, Jose Antonio; Parrado, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The PLZF gene encodes a BTB/POZ-zinc finger-type transcription factor, involved in physiological development, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this paper, we investigate proliferation, survival, and gene expression regulation in stable clones from the human haematopoietic K562, DG75, and Jurkat cell lines with inducible expression of PLZF. In Jurkat cells, but not in K562 and DG75 cells, PLZF induced growth suppression and apoptosis in a cell density-dependent manner. Deletion of the BTB/POZ domain of PLZF abrogated growth suppression and apoptosis. PLZF was expressed with a nuclear speckled pattern distinctively in the full-length PLZF-expressing Jurkat clones, suggesting that the nuclear speckled localization is required for PLZF-induced apoptosis. By microarray analysis, we identified that the apoptosis-inducer TP53INP1, ID1, and ID3 genes were upregulated, and the apoptosis-inhibitor TERT gene was downregulated. The identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes may have biological and clinical relevance in cancer typified by altered PLZF expression

  3. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  4. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  5. Development of genetic testing for breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer predisposition: a step closer to targeted cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, D M

    2011-12-01

    Individuals who inherit a high penetrance cancer susceptibility gene represent a population in which cancer diagnoses occur at younger ages and much more frequently than in the general population. Screening regimens aimed at early detection of cancer may reduce cancer mortality but in order to reduce cancer incidence, surgery and medical therapies have been advocated. In high genetic risk patients, either surgical or medical intervention may provide long term protection against cancer and at young ages co-morbidities will be low. The use of genetic testing for high risk predisposition genes to refine risk estimates and inform choices about cancer prevention is now readily available in many countries and routinely used to target cancer prevention strategies. Surgical approaches to cancer prevention are currently the mainstay in many conditions where a high risk is identified but medical prevention strategies also have demonstrated some efficacy in lowering cancer risk. Using the genetic status of an individual to target cancer treatment and prevent recurrence is increasingly gaining momentum as clinical trials involving known high risk gene carriers are now being conducted using both established cytotoxic drugs and novel targeted agents. Translation of new mechanistic insights into beneficial clinical care strategies requires more research. Robust evidence supporting medical approaches to cancer prevention in particular will require well designed large international collaborative clinical trials.

  6. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Spallone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC, representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC. The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  7. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  8. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spallone, Giulia; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.costanzo@uniroma2.it [Department of Dermatology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00199, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-03

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC), representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC). The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  9. Prostate Cancer Gene Discovery Using ROMA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William B

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that a subset of men who develop prostate cancer (PCa) do so as a result of an inherited chromosomal deletion or amplification affecting the function of one or more critical prostate cancer susceptibility genes...

  10. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  11. Radionuclide carriers for targeting of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula Sofou

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Stavroula SofouLaboratory for Drug Delivery Systems, Othmer-Jacobs Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY, USAAbstract: This review describes strategies for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides to tumor sites. Therapeutic approaches are summarized in terms of tumor location in the body, and tumor morphology. These determine the radionuclides of choice for suggested targeting ligands, and the type of delivery carriers. This review is not exhaustive in examples of radionuclide carriers for targeted cancer therapy. Our purpose is two-fold: to give an integrated picture of the general strategies and molecular constructs currently explored for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides, and to identify challenges that need to be addressed. Internal radiotherapies for targeting of cancer are at a very exciting and creative stage. It is expected that the current emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches for exploring such therapeutic directions should enable internal radiotherapy to reach its full potential.Keywords: cancer radiotherapy, targeted radiotherapy, radiotherapy of micrometastases, radiotherapy of solid tumors, radiotherapy of tumor vasculature

  12. Targeting neuroendocrine differentiation for prostate cancer radiosensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    progression. Prostate, 2007. 67(7): p. 764-73. 17. Deeble, P.D., et al., Interleukin-6- and cyclic AMP -mediated signaling potentiates neuroendocrine...intracellular cyclic AMP . Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 1994. 91(12): p. 5330-4. 25. Amorino, G.P. and S.J. Parsons, Neuroendocrine cells in prostate cancer...Aggarwal S, Kim SW, Ryu SH, Chung WC and Koo JS. Growth suppression of lung cancer cells by targeting cyclic AMP response ele- ment-binding protein

  13. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  14. Therapeutic targeting of cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Chi V; Hamaker, Max; Sun, Peng; Le, Anne; Gao, Ping

    2011-03-01

    In 1927, Otto Warburg and coworkers reported the increased uptake of glucose and production of lactate by tumors in vivo as compared with normal tissues. This phenomenon, now known as the Warburg effect, was recapitulated in vitro with cancer tissue slices exhibiting excessive lactate production even with adequate oxygen. Warburg's in vivo studies of tumors further suggest that the dependency of tumors in vivo on glucose could be exploited for therapy, because reduction of arterial glucose by half resulted in a four-fold reduction in tumor fermentation. Recent work in cancer metabolism indicates that the Warburg effect or aerobic glycolysis contributes to redox balance and lipid synthesis, but glycolysis is insufficient to sustain a growing and dividing cancer cell. In this regard, glutamine, which contributes its carbons to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been re-discovered as an essential bioenergetic and anabolic substrate for many cancer cell types. Could alterations in cancer metabolism be exploited for therapy? Here, we address this question by reviewing current concepts of normal metabolism and altered metabolism in cancer cells with specific emphasis on molecular targets involved directly in glycolysis or glutamine metabolism.

  15. Bacteria as vectors for gene therapy of cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baban, Chwanrow K

    2012-01-31

    Anti-cancer therapy faces major challenges, particularly in terms of specificity of treatment. The ideal therapy would eradicate tumor cells selectively with minimum side effects on normal tissue. Gene or cell therapies have emerged as realistic prospects for the treatment of cancer, and involve the delivery of genetic information to a tumor to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. However, there is still much to be done before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved, primarily developing the means of targeting genes to tumors safely and efficiently. An emerging family of vectors involves bacteria of various genera. It has been shown that bacteria are naturally capable of homing to tumors when systemically administered resulting in high levels of replication locally. Furthermore, invasive species can deliver heterologous genes intra-cellularly for tumor cell expression. Here, we review the use of bacteria as vehicles for gene therapy of cancer, detailing the mechanisms of action and successes at preclinical and clinical levels.

  16. Therapeutic targeting of Myc-reprogrammed cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, C V

    2011-01-01

    Studies from many laboratories document that the MYC oncogene produces a pleiotropic transcription factor, Myc, which influences genes driven by all three RNA polymerases to orchestrate nutrient import with biomass accumulation for cell division. Myc has been shown to activate genes involved in glycolysis, glutaminolysis, and mitochondrial biogenesis to provide ATP and anabolic substrates for cell mass accumulation. Myc stimulates ribosome biogenesis and orchestrates the energetic demand for biomass accumulation through its regulation of glucose and glutamine import and metabolism. When normal cells are deprived of nutrients, endogenous MYC expression diminishes and cells withdraw from the cell cycle. However, ectopic MYC-driven cancer cells are locked in a state of deregulated biomass accumulation, which renders them addicted to glucose and glutamine. This addictive state can be exploited for cancer therapy, because nutrient deprivation kills Myc-driven cells and inhibition of the Myc targets, lactate dehydrogenase A or glutaminase, diminishes tumor xenograft growth in vivo.

  17. Targeting Mitosis in Cancer: Emerging Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Thu, Kelsie L; Mason, Jacqueline M; Blaser, Heiko; Bray, Mark R; Mak, Tak W

    2015-11-19

    The cell cycle is an evolutionarily conserved process necessary for mammalian cell growth and development. Because cell-cycle aberrations are a hallmark of cancer, this process has been the target of anti-cancer therapeutics for decades. However, despite numerous clinical trials, cell-cycle-targeting agents have generally failed in the clinic. This review briefly examines past cell-cycle-targeted therapeutics and outlines how experience with these agents has provided valuable insight to refine and improve anti-mitotic strategies. An overview of emerging anti-mitotic approaches with promising pre-clinical results is provided, and the concept of exploiting the genomic instability of tumor cells through therapeutic inhibition of mitotic checkpoints is discussed. We believe this strategy has a high likelihood of success given its potential to enhance therapeutic index by targeting tumor-specific vulnerabilities. This reasoning stimulated our development of novel inhibitors targeting the critical regulators of genomic stability and the mitotic checkpoint: AURKA, PLK4, and Mps1/TTK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Vanna; Pala, Nicolino; Sechi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for successful tumor eradication.

  19. Prioritizing genes associated with prostate cancer development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlov, Ivan P; Logothetis, Christopher J; Sircar, Kanishka; Zhao, Hongya; Maity, Sankar N; Navone, Nora M; Gorlova, Olga Y; Troncoso, Patricia; Pettaway, Curtis A; Byun, Jin Young

    2010-01-01

    The genetic control of prostate cancer development is poorly understood. Large numbers of gene-expression datasets on different aspects of prostate tumorigenesis are available. We used these data to identify and prioritize candidate genes associated with the development of prostate cancer and bone metastases. Our working hypothesis was that combining meta-analyses on different but overlapping steps of prostate tumorigenesis will improve identification of genes associated with prostate cancer development. A Z score-based meta-analysis of gene-expression data was used to identify candidate genes associated with prostate cancer development. To put together different datasets, we conducted a meta-analysis on 3 levels that follow the natural history of prostate cancer development. For experimental verification of candidates, we used in silico validation as well as in-house gene-expression data. Genes with experimental evidence of an association with prostate cancer development were overrepresented among our top candidates. The meta-analysis also identified a considerable number of novel candidate genes with no published evidence of a role in prostate cancer development. Functional annotation identified cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, and cell motility as the top functions associated with prostate cancer development. We identified 10 genes--CDC2, CCNA2, IGF1, EGR1, SRF, CTGF, CCL2, CAV1, SMAD4, and AURKA--that form hubs of the interaction network and therefore are likely to be primary drivers of prostate cancer development. By using this large 3-level meta-analysis of the gene-expression data to identify candidate genes associated with prostate cancer development, we have generated a list of candidate genes that may be a useful resource for researchers studying the molecular mechanisms underlying prostate cancer development

  20. Targeting glia for bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-Qun; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Hui-Quan; Liu, Dai-Qiang; Chen, Shu-Ping; Ye, Da-Wei; Tian, Yu-Ke

    2016-11-01

    Bone cancer pain (BCP) remains to be a clinical challenge with limited pharmaceutical interventions. Therefore, novel therapeutic targets for the management of BCP are in desperate need. Recently, a growing body of evidence has suggested that glial cells may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of BCP. Areas covered: This review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding of glia in BCP and reveals the potential therapeutic targets in glia for BCP treatment. Expert opinion: Pharmacological interventions inhibiting the activation of glial cells, suppressing glia-derived proinflammatory cytokines, cell surface receptors, and the intracellular signaling pathways may be beneficial for the pain management of advanced cancer patients. However, these pharmacological interventions should not disrupt the normal function of glia cells since they play a vital supportive and protective role in the central nervous system.

  1. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Morris, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  2. Vectors and strategies for nonviral cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahle, Jessica; Walther, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review presents recent developments in the use of nonviral vectors and transfer technologies in cancer gene therapy. Tremendous progress has been made in developing cancer gene therapy in ways that could be applicable to treatments. Numerous efforts are focused on methods of attacking known and novel targets more efficiently and specifically. In parallel to progress in nonviral vector design and delivery technologies, important achievements have been accomplished for suicide, gene replacement, gene suppression and immunostimulatory therapies. New nonviral cancer gene therapies have been developed based on emerging RNAi (si/shRNA-, miRNA) or ODN. This review provides an overview of recent gene therapeutic strategies in which nonviral vectors have been used experimentally and in clinical trials. Furthermore, we present current developments in nonviral vector systems in association with important chemical and physical gene delivery technologies and their potential for the future. Nonviral gene therapy has maintained its position as an approach for treating cancer. This is reflected by the fact that more than 17% of all gene therapy trials employ nonviral approaches. Thus, nonviral vectors have emerged as a clinical alternative to viral vectors for the appropriate expression and delivery of therapeutic genes.

  3. Metastasis Targeted Therapies in Renal Cell Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    K. Fehmi Narter; Bora Özveren

    2018-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell cancer is a malignant disease and its treatment has been not been described clearly yet. These patients are generally symptomatic and resistant to current treatment modalities. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy are not curative in many of these patients. A multimodal approach consisting of cytoreductive nephrectomy, systemic therapy (immunotherapy or targeted molecules), and metastasectomy has been shown to be hopeful in prolonging the survival and improvi...

  4. Recessive Cancer Genes Engage in Negative Genetic Interactions with Their Functional Paralogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo D’Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genetic heterogeneity offers a wide repertoire of molecular determinants to be screened as therapeutic targets. Here, we identify potential anticancer targets by exploiting negative genetic interactions between genes with driver loss-of-function mutations (recessive cancer genes and their functionally redundant paralogs. We identify recessive genes with additional copies and experimentally test our predictions on three paralogous pairs. We confirm digenic negative interactions between two cancer genes (SMARCA4 and CDH1 and their corresponding paralogs (SMARCA2 and CDH3. Furthermore, we identify a trigenic negative interaction between the cancer gene DNMT3A, its functional paralog DNMT3B, and a third gene, DNMT1, which encodes the only other human DNA-methylase domain. Although our study does not exclude other causes of synthetic lethality, it suggests that functionally redundant paralogs of cancer genes could be targets in anticancer therapy.

  5. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ying

    Full Text Available Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients.Tissue microarray (TMA was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner.Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44% CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4-ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1. One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing.The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy.

  6. Targeting Cancer Metabolism: Dietary and Pharmacologic Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieri, Claudio; Casola, Stefano; Foiani, Marco; Pietrantonio, Filippo; de Braud, Filippo; Longo, Valter

    2016-12-01

    Most tumors display oncogene-driven reprogramming of several metabolic pathways, which are crucial to sustain their growth and proliferation. In recent years, both dietary and pharmacologic approaches that target deregulated tumor metabolism are beginning to be considered for clinical applications. Dietary interventions exploit the ability of nutrient-restricted conditions to exert broad biological effects, protecting normal cells, organs, and systems, while sensitizing a wide variety of cancer cells to cytotoxic therapies. On the other hand, drugs targeting enzymes or metabolites of crucial metabolic pathways can be highly specific and effective, but must be matched with a responsive tumor, which might rapidly adapt. In this review, we illustrate how dietary and pharmacologic therapies differ in their effect on tumor growth, proliferation, and metabolism and discuss the available preclinical and clinical evidence in favor of or against each of them. We also indicate, when appropriate, how to optimize future investigations on metabolic therapies on the basis of tumor- and patient-related characteristics. To our knowledge, this is the first review article that comprehensively analyzes the preclinical and preliminary clinical experimental foundations of both dietary and pharmacologic metabolic interventions in cancer therapy. Among several promising therapies, we propose treatment personalization on the basis of tumor genetics, tumor metabolism, and patient systemic metabolism.Cancer Discov; 6(12); 1315-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  8. Gene therapy in oral cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Sathish; Masthan, K M K; Babu, N Aravindha; Dash, Kailash Chandra

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy is the use of DNA as an agent to treat disease. Gene therapy aims at the insertion of a functional gene into the cells of a patient for the correction of an inborn error of metabolism, to alter or repair an acquired genetic abnormality, and to provide new function to the cell. Many experiments have been done with respect to its application in various diseases.Today, most of the gene therapy studies are aimed at cancer and hereditary diseases which are linked to genetic defects. Cancer usually occurs due to the production of multiple mutations in a single cell which cause it to proliferate out of control. Several methods such as surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been used widely to treat cancers. But, the cancer patients who are not helped by these therapies can be treated by gene therapy. The purpose of this article is to review the use and purpose of gene therapy in oral cancer.

  9. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches.

  10. Relevance of Fusion Genes in Pediatric Cancers: Toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupain, Célia; Harttrampf, Anne Catherine; Urbinati, Giorgia; Geoerger, Birgit; Massaad-Massade, Liliane

    2017-03-17

    Pediatric cancers differ from adult tumors, especially by their very low mutational rate. Therefore, their etiology could be explained in part by other oncogenic mechanisms such as chromosomal rearrangements, supporting the possible implication of fusion genes in the development of pediatric cancers. Fusion genes result from chromosomal rearrangements leading to the juxtaposition of two genes. Consequently, an abnormal activation of one or both genes is observed. The detection of fusion genes has generated great interest in basic cancer research and in the clinical setting, since these genes can lead to better comprehension of the biological mechanisms of tumorigenesis and they can also be used as therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of fusion genes and their particularities in pediatric cancers, as well as their relevance in murine models and in the clinical setting. We also point out the difficulties encountered in the discovery of fusion genes. Finally, we discuss future perspectives and priorities for finding new innovative therapies in childhood cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relevance of Fusion Genes in Pediatric Cancers: Toward Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Dupain

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cancers differ from adult tumors, especially by their very low mutational rate. Therefore, their etiology could be explained in part by other oncogenic mechanisms such as chromosomal rearrangements, supporting the possible implication of fusion genes in the development of pediatric cancers. Fusion genes result from chromosomal rearrangements leading to the juxtaposition of two genes. Consequently, an abnormal activation of one or both genes is observed. The detection of fusion genes has generated great interest in basic cancer research and in the clinical setting, since these genes can lead to better comprehension of the biological mechanisms of tumorigenesis and they can also be used as therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of fusion genes and their particularities in pediatric cancers, as well as their relevance in murine models and in the clinical setting. We also point out the difficulties encountered in the discovery of fusion genes. Finally, we discuss future perspectives and priorities for finding new innovative therapies in childhood cancer.

  12. Associations Between Cancer Predisposition Testing Panel Genes and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Shimelis, Hermela; Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N; Polley, Eric C; Na, Jie; Hallberg, Emily; Moore, Raymond; Thomas, Abigail; Lilyquist, Jenna; Feng, Bingjian; McFarland, Rachel; Pesaran, Tina; Huether, Robert; LaDuca, Holly; Chao, Elizabeth C; Goldgar, David E; Dolinsky, Jill S

    2017-09-01

    Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to an increased lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, the relevance of germline variants in other genes from multigene hereditary cancer testing panels is not well defined. To determine the risks of breast cancer associated with germline variants in cancer predisposition genes. A study population of 65 057 patients with breast cancer receiving germline genetic testing of cancer predisposition genes with hereditary cancer multigene panels. Associations between pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes and breast cancer risk were estimated in a case-control analysis of patients with breast cancer and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference controls. The women underwent testing between March 15, 2012, and June 30, 2016. Breast cancer risk conferred by pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes. The mean (SD) age at diagnosis for the 65 057 women included in the analysis was 48.5 (11.1) years. The frequency of pathogenic variants in 21 panel genes identified in 41 611 consecutively tested white women with breast cancer was estimated at 10.2%. After exclusion of BRCA1, BRCA2, and syndromic breast cancer genes (CDH1, PTEN, and TP53), observed pathogenic variants in 5 of 16 genes were associated with high or moderately increased risks of breast cancer: ATM (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 2.22-3.62), BARD1 (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.31-3.63), CHEK2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.31-1.67), PALB2 (OR, 7.46; 95% CI, 5.12-11.19), and RAD51D (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.21-7.88). Conversely, variants in the BRIP1 and RAD51C ovarian cancer risk genes; the MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN MRN complex genes; the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes; and NF1 were not associated with increased risks of breast cancer. This study establishes several panel genes as high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes and provides estimates of breast cancer risk associated with pathogenic variants in these genes among

  13. Bacterial Toxins for Oncoleaking Suicidal Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahle, Jessica; Walther, Wolfgang

    For suicide gene therapy, initially prodrug-converting enzymes (gene-directed enzyme-producing therapy, GDEPT) were employed to intracellularly metabolize non-toxic prodrugs into toxic compounds, leading to the effective suicidal killing of the transfected tumor cells. In this regard, the suicide gene therapy has demonstrated its potential for efficient tumor eradication. Numerous suicide genes of viral or bacterial origin were isolated, characterized, and extensively tested in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating their therapeutic potential even in clinical trials to treat cancers of different entities. Apart from this, growing efforts are made to generate more targeted and more effective suicide gene systems for cancer gene therapy. In this regard, bacterial toxins are an alternative to the classical GDEPT strategy, which add to the broad spectrum of different suicide approaches. In this context, lytic bacterial toxins, such as streptolysin O (SLO) or the claudin-targeted Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) represent attractive new types of suicide oncoleaking genes. They permit as pore-forming proteins rapid and also selective toxicity toward a broad range of cancers. In this chapter, we describe the generation and use of SLO as well as of CPE-based gene therapies for the effective tumor cell eradication as promising, novel suicide gene approach particularly for treatment of therapy refractory tumors.

  14. Targeted therapy for biliary tract cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Jason E; Zhu, Andrew X

    2012-07-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies, with a historically poor prognosis as a whole. Until recently, the development of effective therapeutics was hampered by the relatively low incidence, heterogeneity in patients and tumors, and correspondingly poor clinical trial enrollments. With the publication of the landmark phase III ABC-02 trial demonstrating the superiority of gemcitabine and cisplatin combination chemotherapy, the landscape changed for the development of new agents. Despite this progress, there are currently no approved targeted agents for BTC. This review will focus on recent developments in targeted therapeutics, directed against several key signaling pathways in BTC, including epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Data from recent phase I and II trials will be discussed, along with a preview of upcoming trials involving targeted therapies.

  15. Chromosomal position effects on AAV-mediated gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornea, Anda M; Russell, David W

    2010-06-01

    The effects of chromosomal position and neighboring genomic elements on gene targeting in human cells remain largely unexplored. To study these, we used a shuttle vector system in which murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based proviral targets present at different chromosomal locations and containing mutations in the neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene were corrected by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene targeting. Sixteen identical target loci present in HT-1080 human sarcoma cells were all successfully corrected by gene targeting. The gene targeting frequencies varied by as much as 10-fold, and there was a clear bias for correction of one of the targets in clones containing two target sites. The targeting frequency at each site was correlated to the proximity and density of various genomic elements, and we found a significant association of higher targeting frequencies at loci near a subset of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats (r = -0.55, P targeting frequencies at the target loci (r = 0.52, P targeting frequencies. Our results indicate that certain chromosomal positions are preferred sites for gene targeting in human cells.

  16. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer.

  17. Gene-carried hepatoma targeting complex induced high gene transfection efficiency with low toxicity and significant antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao QQ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing-Qing Zhao,1,2 Yu-Lan Hu,1 Yang Zhou,3 Ni Li,1 Min Han,1 Gu-Ping Tang,4 Feng Qiu,2 Yasuhiko Tabata,5 Jian-Qing Gao,11Institute of Pharmaceutics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 2Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 3Institute of Biochemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 4Institute of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 5Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, JapanBackground: The success of gene transfection is largely dependent on the development of a vehicle or vector that can efficiently deliver a gene to cells with minimal toxicity.Methods: A liver cancer-targeted specific peptide (FQHPSF sequence was successfully synthesized and linked with chitosan-linked polyethylenimine (CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT (CP/peptide. The structure of CPT was confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The particle size of CPT/DNA complexes was measured using laser diffraction spectrometry and the cytotoxicity of the copolymer was evaluated by methylthiazol tetrazolium method. The transfection efficiency evaluation of the CP copolymer was performed using luciferase activity assay. Cellular internalization of the CP/DNA complex was observed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The targeting specificity of the polymer coupled to peptide was measured by competitive inhibition transfection study. The liver targeting specificity of the CPT copolymer in vivo was demonstrated by combining the copolymer with a therapeutic gene, interleukin-12, and assessed by its abilities in suppressing the growth of ascites tumor in mouse model.Results: The results showed that the liver cancer-targeted specific peptide was successfully synthesized and linked with CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT. The composition of CPT

  18. Reversing multidrug resistance in breast cancer cells by silencing ABC transporter genes with nanoparticle-facilitated delivery of target siRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Ezharul; Li,; Chu,; Kunnath,Anil Philip

    2012-01-01

    Yong Tsuey Li,1 Ming Jang Chua,1 Anil Philip Kunnath,1 Ezharul Hoque Chowdhury,1,21Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, International Medical University (IMU), No 126, Jalan 19/155B, Bukit Jalil, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaBackground: Multidrug resistance, a major impediment to successful cancer chemotherapy, is the result of overexpression of ...

  19. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  20. Targeted therapy for esophagogastric cancers: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattak MA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad A Khattak,1 Hilary L Martin,2 Christos S Karapetis1,31Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, South Australia; 2Calvary Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaAbstract: The incidence of esophagogastric cancers is increasing rapidly in the Western population. Despite better understanding of the biology and intense research in the treatment of these cancers, the long-term survival remains poor both in the locally advanced and metastatic settings. The addition of combined modality strategies has resulted in modest improvement in 5-year survival rates. A number of biologic agents targeting epidermal-derived growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial derived growth factor and its receptor, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR are being currently evaluated in Phase II and III clinical trials. Some of these, like trastuzumab, cetuximab, and bevacizumab, have shown promising results. This review provides a brief overview of the recent developments in biologic agents for the treatment of esophagogastric cancers.Keywords: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, VEGF, trastuzumab, Her2- positive EGC

  1. Molecular Pathways: Fumarate Hydratase-Deficient Kidney Cancer: Targeting the Warburg Effect in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W. Marston; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk for development of cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type II papillary kidney cancer. HLRCC is characterized by germline mutation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH). FH-deficient kidney cancer is characterized by impaired oxidative phosphorylation and a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis, a form of metabolic reprogramming referred to as the Warburg effect. Increased glycolysis generates ATP needed for increased cell proliferation. In FH-deficient kidney cancer levels of AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, are decreased; resulting in diminished p53 levels, decreased expression of the iron importer, DMT1, leading to low cellular iron levels, and to enhanced fatty acid synthesis by diminishing phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, a rate limiting step for fatty acid synthesis. Increased fumarate and decreased iron levels in FH-deficient kidney cancer cells inactivate prolyl hydroxylases, leading to stabilization of HIF1α, and increased expression of genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and GLUT1 to provide fuel needed for rapid growth demands. Several therapeutic approaches for targeting the metabolic basis of FH-deficient kidney cancer are under development or are being evaluated in clinical trials, including the use of agents such as metformin, which would reverse the inactivation of AMPK, approaches to inhibit glucose transport, LDH-A, the anti-oxidant response pathway, the heme oxygenase pathway and approaches to target the tumor vasculature and glucose transport with agents such as bevacizumab and erlotinib. These same types of metabolic shifts, to aerobic glycolysis with decreased oxidative phosphorylation, have been found in a wide variety of other cancer types. Targeting the metabolic basis of a rare cancer such as fumarate hydratase

  2. Highly parallel identification of essential genes in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Biao; Cheung, Hiu Wing; Subramanian, Aravind; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Okamoto, Michael; Yang, Xiaoping; Hinkle, Greg; Boehm, Jesse S; Beroukhim, Rameen; Weir, Barbara A; Mermel, Craig; Barbie, David A; Awad, Tarif; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Nguyen, Tuyen; Piqani, Bruno; Li, Cheng; Golub, Todd R; Meyerson, Matthew; Hacohen, Nir; Hahn, William C; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M; Root, David E

    2008-12-23

    More complete knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer will improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas are systematically characterizing the structural basis of cancer, by identifying the genomic mutations associated with each cancer type. A powerful complementary approach is to systematically characterize the functional basis of cancer, by identifying the genes essential for growth and related phenotypes in different cancer cells. Such information would be particularly valuable for identifying potential drug targets. Here, we report the development of an efficient, robust approach to perform genome-scale pooled shRNA screens for both positive and negative selection and its application to systematically identify cell essential genes in 12 cancer cell lines. By integrating these functional data with comprehensive genetic analyses of primary human tumors, we identified known and putative oncogenes such as EGFR, KRAS, MYC, BCR-ABL, MYB, CRKL, and CDK4 that are essential for cancer cell proliferation and also altered in human cancers. We further used this approach to identify genes involved in the response of cancer cells to tumoricidal agents and found 4 genes required for the response of CML cells to imatinib treatment: PTPN1, NF1, SMARCB1, and SMARCE1, and 5 regulators of the response to FAS activation, FAS, FADD, CASP8, ARID1A and CBX1. Broad application of this highly parallel genetic screening strategy will not only facilitate the rapid identification of genes that drive the malignant state and its response to therapeutics but will also enable the discovery of genes that participate in any biological process.

  3. Perspective Insight into Future Potential Fusion Gene Transcript Biomarker Candidates in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryong Nam Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing has accelerated the discovery of a variety of new fusion gene types in clinical breast cancer samples by analyzing cancer genomes and transcriptomes. Although previous studies have focused on a few clinically validated oncogenic fusion genes as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in breast cancer, a perspective consideration has not been given thus far for a plethora of breast cancer fusion genes, which are being newly identified at an overwhelmingly increasing pace. In this perspective review, we discuss diverse fusion gene types recently identified in a variety of breast cancer subtypes, including breast clinical cancer samples in TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas database. This perspective review will confer fresh and promising guidance onto breast cancer surgeons, clinical oncologists, and tumor biologists in determining research directions for seeking and developing novel fusion gene biomarkers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutic treatment in upcoming years.

  4. Perspective Insight into Future Potential Fusion Gene Transcript Biomarker Candidates in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2018-02-07

    Next generation sequencing has accelerated the discovery of a variety of new fusion gene types in clinical breast cancer samples by analyzing cancer genomes and transcriptomes. Although previous studies have focused on a few clinically validated oncogenic fusion genes as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in breast cancer, a perspective consideration has not been given thus far for a plethora of breast cancer fusion genes, which are being newly identified at an overwhelmingly increasing pace. In this perspective review, we discuss diverse fusion gene types recently identified in a variety of breast cancer subtypes, including breast clinical cancer samples in TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) database. This perspective review will confer fresh and promising guidance onto breast cancer surgeons, clinical oncologists, and tumor biologists in determining research directions for seeking and developing novel fusion gene biomarkers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutic treatment in upcoming years.

  5. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  6. Integrins as Therapeutic Targets: Successes and Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Raab-Westphal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrins are transmembrane receptors that are central to the biology of many human pathologies. Classically mediating cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interaction, and with an emerging role as local activators of TGFβ, they influence cancer, fibrosis, thrombosis and inflammation. Their ligand binding and some regulatory sites are extracellular and sensitive to pharmacological intervention, as proven by the clinical success of seven drugs targeting them. The six drugs on the market in 2016 generated revenues of some US$3.5 billion, mainly from inhibitors of α4-series integrins. In this review we examine the current developments in integrin therapeutics, especially in cancer, and comment on the health economic implications of these developments.

  7. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  8. Rosamines targeting the cancer oxidative phosphorylation pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siang Hui Lim

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of energy metabolism is pivotal to cancer, so mitochondria are potential targets for anticancer therapy. A prior study has demonstrated the anti-proliferative activity of a new class of mitochondria-targeting rosamines. This present study describes in vitro cytotoxicity of second-generation rosamine analogs, their mode of action, and their in vivo efficacies in a tumor allografted mouse model. Here, we showed that these compounds exhibited potent cytotoxicity (average IC50<0.5 µM, inhibited Complex II and ATP synthase activities of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway and induced loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. A NCI-60 cell lines screen further indicated that rosamine analogs 4 and 5 exhibited potent antiproliferative effects with Log10GI50 = -7 (GI50 = 0.1 µM and were more effective against a colorectal cancer sub-panel than other cell lines. Preliminary in vivo studies on 4T1 murine breast cancer-bearing female BALB/c mice indicated that treatment with analog 5 in a single dosing of 5 mg/kg or a schedule dosing of 3 mg/kg once every 2 days for 6 times (q2d×6 exhibited only minimal induction of tumor growth delay. Our results suggest that rosamine analogs may be further developed as mitochondrial targeting agents. Without a doubt proper strategies need to be devised to enhance tumor uptake of rosamines, i.e. by integration to carrier molecules for better therapeutic outcome.

  9. Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS)-Mediated Radionuclide (131I, 188Re) Therapy of Liver Cancer After Transcriptionally Targeted Intratumoral in Vivo NIS Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutz, Kathrin; Willhauck, Michael J.; Wunderlich, Nathalie; Zach, Christian; Anton, Martina; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Göke, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We reported the therapeutic efficacy of 131I in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells stably expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) under the control of the tumor-specific α-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter. In the current study we investigated the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated in vivo NIS gene transfer followed by 131I and 188Re administration for the treatment of HCC xenografts. We used a replication-deficient adenovirus carrying the human NIS gene linked to the mouse AFP promoter (Ad5-AFP-NIS) for in vitro and in vivo NIS gene transfer. Functional NIS expression was confirmed by in vivo γ-camera imaging, followed by analysis of NIS protein and mRNA expression. Human HCC (HepG2) cells infected with Ad5-AFP-NIS concentrated 50% of the applied activity of 125I, which was sufficiently high for a therapeutic effect in an in vitro clonogenic assay. Four days after intratumoral injection of Ad5-AFP-NIS (3×109 plaque-forming units) HepG2 xenografts accumulated 14.5% injected dose (ID)/g 123I with an effective half-life of 13 hr (tumor-absorbed dose, 318 mGy/MBq 131I). In comparison, 9.2% ID/g 188Re was accumulated in tumors with an effective half-life of 12.8 hr (tumor-absorbed dose, 545 mGy/MBq). After adenovirus-mediated NIS gene transfer in HepG2 xenografts administration of a therapeutic dose of 131I or 188Re (55.5 MBq) resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival without a significant difference between 188Re and 131I. In conclusion, a therapeutic effect of 131I and 188Re was demonstrated in HepG2 xenografts after tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated in vivo NIS gene transfer. PMID:21488714

  10. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  11. Targeting lysyl oxidase for molecular imaging in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Melinda; Kuchar, Manuela; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Richter, Susan; Hamann, Ingrit; Wang, Monica; Vos, Larissa; Mackey, John R; Wuest, Frank; Löser, Reik

    2015-08-13

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX; ExPASy ENZYME entry: EC 1.4.3.13) and members of the LOX-like family, LOXL1-LOXL4, are copper-dependent enzymes that can modify proteins of the extracellular matrix. Expression of LOX is elevated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. LOX expression correlates with the level of tissue hypoxia, and it is known to play a critical role in breast cancer metastasis. The goal of the present study was to target LOX with (1) molecular probe fluorescent labeling to visualize LOX in vitro and (2) a radiolabeled peptide to target LOX in vivo in three different preclinical models of breast cancer. Gene expression of all five members of the LOX family was analyzed at the transcript level via microarray analysis using tissue biopsy samples from 176 patients with breast cancer. An oligopeptide sequence (GGGDPKGGGGG) was selected as a substrate-based, LOX-targeting structure. The peptide was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for confocal microscopy experiments with the murine breast cancer cell line EMT-6. In vivo molecular imaging experiments were performed using a C-terminal amidated peptide, GGGDPKGGGGG, labeled with a short-lived positron emitter, fluorine-18 ((18)F), for positron emission tomography (PET) in three different breast cancer models: EMT6, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The PET experiments were carried out in the presence or absence of β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), an irreversible inhibitor of LOX. Immunostaining experiments using a LOX-specific antibody on EMT-6 cells cultured under hypoxic conditions confirmed the elevation of LOX expression in these cells. An FITC-labeled oligopeptide, FITC-Ava-GGGDPKGGGGG-NH2, was found to be localized in different cellular compartments under these conditions. After injection of [(18)F]fluorobenzoate-GGGDPKGGGGG-NH2, radioactivity uptake was visible in all three breast cancer models in vivo. Tumor uptake was reduced by predosing the animals with 2 mg of BAPN 4 h or 24 h before injection of the

  12. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  13. Malignancy of Cancers and Synthetic Lethal Interactions Associated With Mutations of Cancer Driver Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Yue; Han, Ze-Guang; He, Kun-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The mutation status of cancer driver genes may correlate with different degrees of malignancy of cancers. The doubling time and multidrug resistance are 2 phenotypes that reflect the degree of malignancy of cancer cells. Because most of cancer driver genes are hard to target, identification of their synthetic lethal partners might be a viable approach to treatment of the cancers with the relevant mutations.The genome-wide screening for synthetic lethal partners is costly and labor intensive. Thus, a computational approach facilitating identification of candidate genes for a focus synthetic lethal RNAi screening will accelerate novel anticancer drug discovery.We used several publicly available cancer cell lines and tumor tissue genomic data in this study.We compared the doubling time and multidrug resistance between the NCI-60 cell lines with mutations in some cancer driver genes and those without the mutations. We identified some candidate synthetic lethal genes to the cancer driver genes APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 by comparison of their gene phenotype values in cancer cell lines with the relevant mutations and wild-type background. Further, we experimentally validated some of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted.We reported that mutations in some cancer driver genes mutations in some cancer driver genes such as APC, KRAS, or PIK3CA might correlate with cancer proliferation or drug resistance. We identified 40, 21, 5, 43, and 18 potential synthetic lethal genes to APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53, respectively. We found that some of the potential synthetic lethal genes show significantly higher expression in the cancers with mutations of their synthetic lethal partners and the wild-type counterparts. Further, our experiments confirmed several synthetic lethal relationships that are novel findings by our methods.We experimentally validated a part of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We plan to perform further experiments to validate

  14. Clinical targeting recombinant immunotoxins for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Meng Li,1,* Zeng-Shan Liu,1,* Xi-Lin Liu,1,* Qi Hui,2,* Shi-Ying Lu,1 Lin-Lin Qu,1 Yan-Song Li,1 Yu Zhou,1 Hong-Lin Ren,1 Pan Hu1 1Key Laboratory of Zoonosis Research, Ministry of Education, Institute of Zoonosis, College of Veterinary Medicine, China-Japan Union Hospital, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, 2School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs are proteins that contain a toxin fused to an antibody or small molecules and are constructed by the genetic engineering technique. RITs can bind to and be internalized by cells and kill cancerous or non-cancerous cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. A wide variety of RITs have been tested against different cancers in cell culture, xenograft models, and human patients during the past several decades. RITs have shown activity in therapy of several kinds of cancers, but different levels of side effects, mainly related to vascular leak syndrome, were also observed in the treated patients. High immunogenicity of RITs limited their long-term or repeat applications in clinical cases. Recent advances in the design of immunotoxins, such as humanization of antibody fragment, PEGylation, and modification of human B- and T-cell epitopes, are overcoming the above mentioned problems, which predict the use of these immunotoxins as a potential therapeutic method to treat cancer patients. Keywords: targeted therapy, hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, vascular leak syndrome, immunogenicity 

  15. Precision Nutrition for Targeting Lipid Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Portolés, Cristina; Fernández, Lara P; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2017-09-28

    Cancer is a multistage and multifactorial condition with genetic and environmental factors modulating tumorogenesis and disease progression. Nevertheless, cancer is preventable, as one third of cancer deaths could be avoided by modifying key risk factors. Nutrients can directly affect fundamental cellular processes and are considered among the most important risk factors in colorectal cancer (CRC). Red and processed meat, poultry consumption, fiber, and folate are the best-known diet components that interact with colorectal cancer susceptibility. In addition, the direct association of an unhealthy diet with obesity and dysbiosis opens new routes in the understanding of how daily diet nutrients could influence cancer prognosis. In the "omics" era, traditional nutrition has been naturally evolved to precision nutrition where technical developments have contributed to a more accurate discipline. In this sense, genomic and transcriptomic studies have been extensively used in precision nutrition approaches. However, the relation between CRC carcinogenesis and nutrition factors is more complex than originally expected. Together with classical diet-nutrition-related genes, nowadays, lipid-metabolism-related genes have acquired relevant interest in precision nutrition studies. Lipids regulate very diverse cellular processes from ATP synthesis and the activation of essential cell-signaling pathways to membrane organization and plasticity. Therefore, a wide range of tumorogenic steps can be influenced by lipid metabolism, both in primary tumours and distal metastasis. The extent to which genetic variants, together with the intake of specific dietary components, affect the risk of CRC is currently under investigation, and new therapeutic or preventive applications must be explored in CRC models. In this review, we will go in depth into the study of co-occurring events, which orchestrate CRC tumorogenesis and are essential for the evolution of precision nutrition paradigms

  16. Precision Nutrition for Targeting Lipid Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Aguirre-Portolés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a multistage and multifactorial condition with genetic and environmental factors modulating tumorogenesis and disease progression. Nevertheless, cancer is preventable, as one third of cancer deaths could be avoided by modifying key risk factors. Nutrients can directly affect fundamental cellular processes and are considered among the most important risk factors in colorectal cancer (CRC. Red and processed meat, poultry consumption, fiber, and folate are the best-known diet components that interact with colorectal cancer susceptibility. In addition, the direct association of an unhealthy diet with obesity and dysbiosis opens new routes in the understanding of how daily diet nutrients could influence cancer prognosis. In the “omics” era, traditional nutrition has been naturally evolved to precision nutrition where technical developments have contributed to a more accurate discipline. In this sense, genomic and transcriptomic studies have been extensively used in precision nutrition approaches. However, the relation between CRC carcinogenesis and nutrition factors is more complex than originally expected. Together with classical diet-nutrition-related genes, nowadays, lipid-metabolism-related genes have acquired relevant interest in precision nutrition studies. Lipids regulate very diverse cellular processes from ATP synthesis and the activation of essential cell-signaling pathways to membrane organization and plasticity. Therefore, a wide range of tumorogenic steps can be influenced by lipid metabolism, both in primary tumours and distal metastasis. The extent to which genetic variants, together with the intake of specific dietary components, affect the risk of CRC is currently under investigation, and new therapeutic or preventive applications must be explored in CRC models. In this review, we will go in depth into the study of co-occurring events, which orchestrate CRC tumorogenesis and are essential for the evolution of precision

  17. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene methylation need to be standardised, simplified and evaluated in external quality assurance programmes. It is concluded that methylated genes have the potential to provide a new generation of cancer biomarkers.

  19. Research progress in targeted therapy for liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAO Ping

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is a malignant tumor. The current operation or chemoradiotherapy cannot achieve a satisfactory effect, and relapse and metastasis are always big problems in the treatment of liver cancer. According to the recent theory of liver cancer stem cells, the genesis, development, relapse, metastasis, and prognosis of liver cancer are all related to liver cancer stem cells. If the liver cancer stem cells are treated by targeted therapy, which would reduce the number of or destroy the stem cells, the relapse, metastasis, and drug resistance after tumor resection may be reduced or eliminated. The progress in targeted therapy for liver cancer stem cells is reviewed here. Although there are many types of targeted therapies for liver cancer stem cells, it is still a key problem that the targeting is not strong enough, which needs to be solved urgently. Whether the dual- or multi-targeting would solve this problem still needs to be confirmed by further experimental studies.

  20. Bioorthogonal Oxime Ligation MediatedIn VivoCancer Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Yin, Qian; Xu, Yunxiang; Zhou, Qin; Cai, Kaimin; Yen, Jonathan; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-04-01

    Current cancer targeting relying on specific biological interaction between cell surface antigen and respective antibody or its analogue has proven to be effective in the treatment of different cancers; however, this strategy has its own limitations, such as heterogeneity of cancer cells and immunogenicity of the biomacromolecule binding ligands. Bioorthogonal chemical conjugation has emerged as an attractive alternative to biological interaction for in vivo cancer targeting. Here, we report an in vivo cancer targeting strategy mediated by bioorthogonal oxime ligation. Oxyamine group, the artificial target, is introduced onto 4T1 murine breast cancer cells through liposome delivery and fusion. Poly(ethylene glycol) -polylactide (PEG-PLA) nanoparticle (NP) is surface-functionalized with aldehyde groups as targeting ligands. The improved in vivo cancer targeting of PEG-PLA NPs is achieved through specific and efficient chemical reaction between the oxyamine and aldehyde groups.

  1. Molecular targeting of gene therapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.; Advani, S.J.; Roizman, B.

    2001-01-01

    The full promise of gene therapy has been limited by the lack of specificity of vectors for tumor tissue as well as the lack of antitumor efficacy of transgenes encoded by gene delivery systems. In this paper we review our studies investigating two modifications of gene therapy combined with radiotherapy. The first investigations described include studies of radiation inducible gene therapy. In this paradigm, radio-inducible DNA sequences from the CarG elements of the Egr-1 promoter are cloned upstream of a cDNA encoding TNFa. The therapeutic gene (TNFa) is induced by radiation within the tumor microenvironment. In the second paradigm, genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is induced by ionizing radiation to proliferate within the tumor volume. These modifications of radiotherapy and gene therapy may enhance the efficacy of both treatments

  2. Cancer metabolism as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Surabhi; Adekola, Kehinde U A; Rosen, Steven T; Shanmugam, Mala

    2013-05-01

    Cancer is now recognized to be a disease arising from both genetic and metabolic abnormalities. In the mid-1900s, Otto Warburg described the phenomenon of elevated glucose consumption and aerobic glycolysis, and the dependence of cancer cells on this phenomenon for proliferation and growth. The Warburg effect has formed the basis of such diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities as positron emission tomography (PET); however, we have not yet capitalized on this phenomenon for therapy. Several mechanisms have now been shown to contribute to the Warburg effect.Ongoing studies are attempting to understand the reasons that tumor cells engage in aerobic glycolysis in lieu of oxidative phosphorylation, and the advantages that accrue to them as a result. In this review, we discuss known benefits to tumor cells from this metabolic switch, and we highlight key enzymes that play a role in aerobic glycolysis. We also describe novel therapeutic options targeting glucose metabolism and the importance of continuing to understand the metabolic plasticity of cancer.

  3. MicroRNA-134 regulates lung cancer cell H69 growth and apoptosis by targeting WWOX gene and suppressing the ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Tianjun [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 277, Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Gao, Fei [Ultrasound Department, Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi' an, No. 8, Wanshou Middle Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Feng, Sifang; Yang, Tian [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 277, Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Chen, Mingwei, E-mail: mingweichenxian@163.com [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 277, Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2015-08-28

    MicroRNAs have been shown to act as crucial modulators during carcinogenesis. Recent studies have implied that miR-134 expression associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype and invasive potential of NSCLC cells. Our study investigated the pathogenic implications of miR-134 in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Overexpression or inhibition MiR-134 expression by miR-134 mimics or miR-134 inhibitors (anti-miR-134) in SCLC cell lines was detected using qRT-PCR. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, MTT assays and flow cytometry were performed in order to clarify the growth and apoptosis of SCLC cells which had been transfected with miR-134 mimics or anti-miR-134. WWOX expression in H69 cells was detected by qRT-PCR and western blot, respectively. The results showed that overexpression miR-134 was significantly promoting SCLC cells growth and inhibit its apoptosis. In addition, reduced miR-134 expression was significantly correlated with cell growth inhibition and apoptosis promotion. Furthermore, transfection of miR-134 mimics into the SCLC cells markedly down-regulated the level of WWOX, whereas, anti-miR-134 up-regulated WWOX expression. We also found that overexpression WWOX attenuate miR-134 induced H69 cells growth, and promote cell apoptosis. Moreover, miR-134 promoted cell proliferation and inhibit apoptosis via the activation of ERK1/2 pathway. These findings suggest that miR-134 may be an ideal diagnostic and prognostic marker, and may be attributed to the molecular therapy of SCLC. - Highlights: • MiR-134 play roles in small cell lung cancer cell growth and apoptosis. • MiR-134 negative regulated the level of WWOX in H69 cells. • WWOX overexpression attenuate miR-134 induced H69 cells growth. • MiR-134 promotes cell growth via the activation of ERK1/2 pathway.

  4. Targeting Selectins and Their Ligands in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eNatoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer cells with increased evidence pointing to a role in tumor progression. In particular, aberrant sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids have been linked to increased immune cell evasion, drug evasion, drug resistance, tumor invasiveness, and vascular dissemination leading to metastases. Hypersialylation of cancer cells is largely the result of overexpression of sialyltransferases. Humans differentially express twenty different sialyltransferases in a tissue-specific manner, each of which catalyze the attachment of sialic acids via different glycosidic linkages (2-3; 2-6 or 2-8 to the underlying glycan chain. One important mechanism whereby overexpression of sialyltransferases contributes to an enhanced metastatic phenotype is via the generation of selectin ligands. Selectin ligand function requires the expression of sialyl-Lewis X and its structural-isomer sialyl-Lewis A, which are synthesized by the combined action of alpha 1-3-fucosyltransferases, 2-3-sialyltransferases, 1-4-galactosyltranferases, and N-acetyl--glucosaminyltransferases. The α2-3-sialyltransferases ST3Gal4 and ST3Gal6 are critical to the generation of functional E- and P-selectin ligands and overexpression of these sialyltransferases have been linked to increased risk of metastatic disease in solid tumors and poor outcome in multiple myeloma. Thus, targeting selectins and their ligands as well as the enzymes involved in their generation, in particular sialyltransferases, could be beneficial to many cancer patients. Potential strategies include sialyltransferase inhibition and the use of selectin antagonists, such as glycomimetic drugs and antibodies. Here, we review ongoing efforts to optimize the potency and selectivity of sialyltransferase inhibitors, including the potential for targeted delivery approaches, as well as evaluate the potential utility of selectin inhibitors, which are now in early clinical

  5. Mismatch repair gene expression in gastroesophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracea, Amelia; Angelescu, Cristina; Danciulescu, Mihaela; Ciurea, Marius; Ioana, Mihai; Burada, Florin

    2015-09-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes play a critical role in maintaining genomic stability, and the impairment of MMR machinery is associated with different human cancers, mainly colorectal cancer. The purpose of our study was to analyze gene expression patterns of three MMR genes (MSH2, MHS6, and EXO1) in gastroesophageal cancers, a pathology in which the contribution of DNA repair genes remains essentially unclear. A total of 45 Romanian patients diagnosed with sporadic gastroesophageal cancers were included in this study. For each patient, MMR mRNA levels were measured in biopsied tumoral (T) and peritumoral (PT) tissues obtained by upper endoscopy. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with specific TaqMan probes was used to measure gene expression levels for MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes. A significant association was observed for the investigated MMR genes, all of which were detected to be upregulated in gastroesophageal tumor samples when compared with paired normal samples. In the stratified analysis, the association was limited to gastric adenocarcinoma samples. We found no statistically significant associations between MMR gene expression and tumor site or histological grade. In our study, MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes were overexpressed in gastroesophageal cancers. Further investigations based on more samples are necessary to validate our findings.

  6. Optimizing prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions responsible for cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongying; Yuan, Huating; Hu, Jing; Xu, Chaohan; Liao, Gaoming; Yin, Wenkang; Xu, Liwen; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xinxin; Shi, Aiai; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun

    2017-12-12

    Increasing evidence suggests that the abnormality of microRNAs (miRNAs) and their downstream targets is frequently implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancers, however, the clinical benefit of causal miRNA-target interactions has been seldom studied. Here, we proposed a computational method to optimize prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions by combining transcriptome and clinical data from thousands of TCGA tumors across 16 cancer types. We obtained a total of 1,956 prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions between 112 miRNAs and 1,443 their targets. Interestingly, these key target genes are specifically involved in tumor progression-related functions, such as 'cell adhesion' and 'cell migration'. Furthermore, they are most significantly correlated with 'tissue invasion and metastasis', a hallmark of metastasis, in ten distinct types of cancer through the hallmark analysis. These results implicated that the prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions were highly associated with cancer metastasis. Finally, we observed that the combination of these key miRNA-target interactions allowed to distinguish patients with good prognosis from those with poor prognosis both in most TCGA cancer types and independent validation sets, highlighting their roles in cancer metastasis. We provided a user-friendly database named miRNATarget (freely available at http://biocc.hrbmu.edu.cn/miRNATar/), which provides an overview of the prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions across 16 cancer types.

  7. Significances of RET Fusion Gene in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, molecular target therapy has become a hot research direction of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. RET fusion gene with an identifiable clinical pathological features, is present in some subsets of lung cancer, and its treatment is effective by RET inhibitor, suggesting that RET fusion gene may be a new target for individualized treatment to the subgroup of NSCLC. This article reviews the structural characteristics of RET fusion gene and expression model in clinical samples, and treatment of NSCLC.

  8. S14 as a Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinlaw, William

    2004-01-01

    .... Our aims are first to develop a model of anti-S14 breast cancer therapy in mice. Intratumoral adenoviral delivery of an S14-antisense gene into human breast cancer cell xenografts caused a significant inhibition of tumor growth...

  9. Expression analysis of miRNA and target mRNAs in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X.R. [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Lu, P. [Gastrointestinal Surgery Department, People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou (China); Mei, J.Z.; Liu, G.J. [Medical Oncology Department, People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou (China); Fan, Q.X. [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to investigate miRNAs and related mRNAs through a network-based approach in order to learn the crucial role that they play in the biological processes of esophageal cancer. Esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (EAC)-related miRNA and gene expression data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and differentially expressed miRNAs and genes were selected. Target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted and their regulatory networks were constructed. Differentially expressed miRNA analysis selected four miRNAs associated with EAC and ESCC, among which hsa-miR-21 and hsa-miR-202 were shared by both diseases. hsa-miR-202 was reported for the first time to be associated with esophageal cancer in the present study. Differentially expressed miRNA target genes were mainly involved in cancer-related and signal-transduction pathways. Functional categories of these target genes were related to transcriptional regulation. The results may indicate potential target miRNAs and genes for future investigations of esophageal cancer.

  10. Targeting Deregulated Epigenetic Control in Cancer: Cancer Epigenomics as a Platform for Risk Assessment, Early Detection, Targeted Therapy and Potential for Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cancer is a multifaceted disease that involves acquisition of genetic mutations, deletions, and amplifications as well as deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms that fine-tune gene regulation. Key epigenetic mechanisms that include histone modifications, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing are often deregulated in a variety of cancers. Subnuclear localization of key proteins in the interphase nucleus and bookmarking of genes by lineage commitment factors in mitosis – a new dimension to epigenetic control of fundamental biological processes – is also modified in cancer. In this review, we discuss the various aspects of epigenetic control that are operative in a variety of cancers and their potential for risk assessment, early detection, targeted therapy and personalized medicine. PMID:23589100

  11. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cooperation and antagonism among cancer genes: the renal cancer paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Brugarolas, James

    2013-07-15

    It is poorly understood how driver mutations in cancer genes work together to promote tumor development. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) offers a unique opportunity to study complex relationships among cancer genes. The four most commonly mutated genes in RCC of clear-cell type (the most common type) are two-hit tumor suppressor genes, and they cluster in a 43-Mb region on chromosome 3p that is deleted in approximately 90% of tumors: VHL (mutated in ∼80%), PBRM1 (∼50%), BAP1 (∼15%), and SETD2 (∼15%). Meta-analyses that we conducted show that mutations in PBRM1 and SETD2 co-occur in tumors at a frequency higher than expected by chance alone, indicating that these mutations may cooperate in tumorigenesis. In contrast, consistent with our previous results, mutations in PBRM1 and BAP1 tend to be mutually exclusive. Mutation exclusivity analyses (often confounded by lack of statistical power) raise the possibility of functional redundancy. However, mutation exclusivity may indicate negative genetic interactions, as proposed herein for PBRM1 and BAP1, and mutations in these genes define RCC with different pathologic features, gene expression profiles, and outcomes. Negative genetic interactions among cancer genes point toward broader context dependencies of cancer gene action beyond tissue dependencies. An enhanced understanding of cancer gene dependencies may help to unravel vulnerabilities that can be exploited therapeutically. ©2013 AACR.

  13. Translational Hyperactivity as a Target for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Terrian, David

    2003-01-01

    ...) gene family contribute to the translational hyperactivity that accompanies the unrestrained cell cycle reentry and unlimited replicative potential of prostate cancer cells Experiments designed...

  14. In-silico discovery of cancer-specific peptide-HLA complexes for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanik, Ankur; Kirshner, Jessica R; MacDonald, Douglas; Thurston, Gavin; Lin, Hsin C; Murphy, Andrew J; Zhang, Wen

    2016-07-20

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) or Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I molecules bind to peptide fragments of proteins degraded inside the cell and display them on the cell surface. We are interested in peptide-HLA complexes involving peptides that are derived from proteins specifically expressed in cancer cells. Such complexes have been shown to provide an effective means of precisely targeting cancer cells by engineered T-cells and antibodies, which would be an improvement over current chemotherapeutic agents that indiscriminately kill proliferating cells. An important concern with the targeting of peptide-HLA complexes is off-target toxicity that could occur due to the presence of complexes similar to the target complex in cells from essential, normal tissues. We developed a novel computational strategy for identifying potential peptide-HLA cancer targets and evaluating the likelihood of off-target toxicity associated with these targets. Our strategy combines sequence-based and structure-based approaches in a unique way to predict potential off-targets. The focus of our work is on the complexes involving the most frequent HLA class I allele HLA-A*02:01. Using our strategy, we predicted the off-target toxicity observed in past clinical trials. We employed it to perform a first-ever comprehensive exploration of the human peptidome to identify cancer-specific targets utilizing gene expression data from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) and GTEx (Gene Tissue Expression), and structural data from PDB (Protein Data Bank). We have thus identified a list of 627 peptide-HLA complexes across various TCGA cancer types. Peptide-HLA complexes identified using our novel strategy could enable discovery of cancer-specific targets for engineered T-cells or antibody based therapy with minimal off-target toxicity.

  15. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  16. Recombinational Repair Genes and Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shima, Naoko

    2004-01-01

    To seek novel DNA double strand break (DSB) repair genes that may influence breast cancer risk, phenotype-based saeen for chromosome instability mutations in mice, successfully yielding four mutations...

  17. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  18. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-10

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  19. Targeting Prolyl Peptidases in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0025 TITLE: Targeting Prolyl Peptidases in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carl G. Maki, PhD...SUBTITLE Targeting Prolyl Peptidases in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0025 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...SUBJECT TERMS Triple negative breast cancer, Prolyl peptidases , Breast cancer treatment, Animal model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  20. A new electrospray method for targeted gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stephan; Ruzgys, Paulius; Tamò, Luca; Šatkauskas, Saulius; Geiser, Thomas; Gazdhar, Amiq; Hradetzky, David

    2018-03-05

    A challenge for gene therapy is absence of safe and efficient local delivery of therapeutic genetic material. An efficient and reproducible physical method of electrospray for localized and targeted gene delivery is presented. Electrospray works on the principle of coulombs repulsion, under influence of electric field the liquid carrying genetic material is dispersed into micro droplets and is accelerated towards the targeted tissue, acting as a counter electrode. The accelerated droplets penetrate the targeted cells thus facilitating the transfer of genetic material into the cell. The work described here presents the principle of electrospray for gene delivery, the basic instrument design, and the various optimized parameters to enhance gene transfer in vitro. We estimate a transfection efficiency of up to 60% was achieved. We describe an efficient gene transfer method and a potential electrospray-mediated gene transfer mechanism.

  1. Characterisation of genome-wide PLZF/RARA target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Spicuglia

    Full Text Available The PLZF/RARA fusion protein generated by the t(11;17(q23;q21 translocation in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is believed to act as an oncogenic transcriptional regulator recruiting epigenetic factors to genes important for its transforming potential. However, molecular mechanisms associated with PLZF/RARA-dependent leukaemogenesis still remain unclear.We searched for specific PLZF/RARA target genes by ChIP-on-chip in the haematopoietic cell line U937 conditionally expressing PLZF/RARA. By comparing bound regions found in U937 cells expressing endogenous PLZF with PLZF/RARA-induced U937 cells, we isolated specific PLZF/RARA target gene promoters. We next analysed gene expression profiles of our identified target genes in PLZF/RARA APL patients and analysed DNA sequences and epigenetic modification at PLZF/RARA binding sites. We identify 413 specific PLZF/RARA target genes including a number encoding transcription factors involved in the regulation of haematopoiesis. Among these genes, 22 were significantly down regulated in primary PLZF/RARA APL cells. In addition, repressed PLZF/RARA target genes were associated with increased levels of H3K27me3 and decreased levels of H3K9K14ac. Finally, sequence analysis of PLZF/RARA bound sequences reveals the presence of both consensus and degenerated RAREs as well as enrichment for tissue-specific transcription factor motifs, highlighting the complexity of targeting fusion protein to chromatin. Our study suggests that PLZF/RARA directly targets genes important for haematopoietic development and supports the notion that PLZF/RARA acts mainly as an epigenetic regulator of its direct target genes.

  2. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas.

  3. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Helen M

    2006-10-09

    The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required because of the potential importance of gene-gene interactions (epistasis), gene-environment interactions, and conditions that break the 'equal environments' assumption for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. A new model for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions is developed that abandons the assumptions of the classical twin study, including Fisher's (1918) assumption that genes act as risk factors for common traits in a manner necessarily dominated by an additive polygenic term. Provided there are no confounders, the model can be used to implement a top-down approach to quantifying the potential utility of genetic prediction and prevention, using twin, family and environmental data. The results describe a solution space for each disease or trait, which may or may not include the classical twin study result. Each point in the solution space corresponds to a different model of genotypic risk and gene-environment interaction. The results show that the potential for reducing the incidence of common diseases using environmental interventions targeted by genotype may be limited, except in special cases. The model also confirms that the importance of an individual's genotype in determining their risk of complex diseases tends to be exaggerated by the classical twin studies method, owing to the 'equal environments' assumption and the assumption of no gene-environment interaction. In addition, if phenotypes are genetically robust, because of epistasis, a largely environmental explanation for shared sibling

  4. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment.

  5. Gene therapy for meningioma: improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; van der Valk, Paul; Leonhart, Angelique M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Curiel, David T.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Gerritsen, Winald R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECT: Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  6. Gene therapy for meningioma : improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, CMF; Grill, J; Lamfers, MLM; Van der Valk, P; Leonhart, AM; Van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Vandertop, WP; Gerritsen, WR

    Object. Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  7. Targeted nanomedicines for the treatment of inflammatory disorders and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crielaard, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic value of various targeted nanomedicines was evaluated in several inflammatory disorders, including cancer, while exploring which nanocarrier may be most suitable for a specific therapeutic application. First, an overview of drug targeting systems presently available for

  8. TBC2target: A Resource of Predicted Target Genes of Tea Bioactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Yijun; Yang, Jian; Liao, Mingzhi; Bi, Shoudong; Xie, Zhongwen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Wan, Xiaochun

    2018-01-01

    Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages consumed worldwide. Numerous bioactive constituents of tea were confirmed to possess healthy benefits via the mechanisms of regulating gene expressions or protein activities. However, a complete interacting profile between tea bioactive compounds (TBCs) and their target genes is lacking, which put an obstacle in the study of healthy function of tea. To fill this gap, we developed a database of target genes of TBCs (TBC2target, http://camellia.ahau.edu.cn/TBC2target) based on a pharmacophore mapping approach. In TBC2target, 6,226 interactions between 240 TBCs and 673 target genes were documented. TBC2target contains detailed information about each interacting entry, such as TBC, CAS number, PubChem CID, source of compound (e.g., green, black), compound type, target gene(s) of TBC, gene symbol, gene ID, ENSEMBL ID, PDB ID, TBC bioactivity and the reference. Using the TBC-target associations, we constructed a bipartite network and provided users the global network and local sub-network visualization and topological analyses. The entire database is free for online browsing, searching and downloading. In addition, TBC2target provides a BLAST search function to facilitate use of the database. The particular strengths of TBC2target are the inclusion of the comprehensive TBC-target interactions, and the capacity to visualize and analyze the interacting networks, which may help uncovering the beneficial effects of tea on human health as a central resource in tea health community.

  9. TBC2target: A Resource of Predicted Target Genes of Tea Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihua Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages consumed worldwide. Numerous bioactive constituents of tea were confirmed to possess healthy benefits via the mechanisms of regulating gene expressions or protein activities. However, a complete interacting profile between tea bioactive compounds (TBCs and their target genes is lacking, which put an obstacle in the study of healthy function of tea. To fill this gap, we developed a database of target genes of TBCs (TBC2target, http://camellia.ahau.edu.cn/TBC2target based on a pharmacophore mapping approach. In TBC2target, 6,226 interactions between 240 TBCs and 673 target genes were documented. TBC2target contains detailed information about each interacting entry, such as TBC, CAS number, PubChem CID, source of compound (e.g., green, black, compound type, target gene(s of TBC, gene symbol, gene ID, ENSEMBL ID, PDB ID, TBC bioactivity and the reference. Using the TBC-target associations, we constructed a bipartite network and provided users the global network and local sub-network visualization and topological analyses. The entire database is free for online browsing, searching and downloading. In addition, TBC2target provides a BLAST search function to facilitate use of the database. The particular strengths of TBC2target are the inclusion of the comprehensive TBC-target interactions, and the capacity to visualize and analyze the interacting networks, which may help uncovering the beneficial effects of tea on human health as a central resource in tea health community.

  10. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  11. Targeting cancer metabolism: dietary and pharmacological interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieri, Claudio; Casola, Stefano; Foiani, Marco; Pietrantonio, Filippo; de Braud, Filippo; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Most tumors display oncogene-driven reprogramming of several metabolic pathways, which are crucial to sustain their growth and proliferation. In recent years, both dietary and pharmacological approaches that target deregulated tumor metabolism are beginning to be considered for clinical applications. Dietary interventions exploit the ability of nutrient-restricted conditions to exert broad biological effects, protecting normal cells, organs and systems, while sensitizing a wide variety of cancer cells to cytotoxic therapies. On the other hand, drugs targeting enzymes or metabolites of crucial metabolic pathways can be highly specific and effective, but must be matched with a responsive tumor, which might rapidly adapt. In this Review, we illustrate how dietary and pharmacological therapies differ in their effect on tumor growth, proliferation and metabolism, and discuss the available preclinical and clinical evidence in favor or against each of them. We also indicate, when appropriate, how to optimize future investigations on metabolic therapies on the basis of tumor- and patient-related characteristics. PMID:27872127

  12. Targeting aggressive cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Christina Seymour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12 to 15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem cells (GSCs within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggests that GSCs share critical signalling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse and achieve a cure for these patients.

  13. Multivariate Entropy Characterizes the Gene Expression and Protein-Protein Networks in Four Types of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Juarez-Flores

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an important urgency to detect cancer at early stages to treat it, to improve the patients’ lifespans, and even to cure it. In this work, we determined the entropic contributions of genes in cancer networks. We detected sudden changes in entropy values in melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, and squamous lung cell carcinoma associated to transitions from healthy controls to cancer. We also identified the most relevant genes involved in carcinogenic process of the four types of cancer with the help of entropic changes in local networks. Their corresponding proteins could be used as potential targets for treatments and as biomarkers of cancer.

  14. New targets for immunotherapy-based treatment of HPV-related cancers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the Center for Cancer Research and three other cancer research institutions show that immunotherapy treatments that resulted in complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer largely targeted two non-viral antigens. Read more…  

  15. MicroRNA-320 suppresses colorectal cancer by targeting SOX4, FOXM1, and FOXQ1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Hamam, Rimi; Shijun, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer causing high mortality rates world-wide. Delineating the molecular mechanisms leading to CRC development and progression, including the role of microRNAs (miRNAs), are currently being unravelled at a rapid rate. Here, we report frequent...... mice. Global gene expression analysis in CRC cells over-expressing miR-320c, combined with in silico prediction identified 84 clinically-relevant potential gene targets for miR-320 in CRC. Using a series of biochemical assays and functional validation, SOX4, FOXM1, and FOXQ1 were validated as novel...... levels of this gene panel (SOX4, FOXM1, and FOXQ1) in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) colorectal cancer data set (319 patients) revealed significantly poor disease-free survival in patients with elevated expression of this gene panel (P-Value: 0.0058). Collectively, our data revealed a novel role...

  16. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Vital Oncogenes and a New Molecular Genetic Paradigm for Cancer Initiation Progression and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been declared repeatedly that cancer is a result of molecular genetic abnormalities. However, there has been no working model describing the specific functional consequences of the deranged genomic processes that result in the initiation and propagation of the cancer process during carcinogenesis. We no longer need to question whether or not cancer arises as a result of a molecular genetic defect within the cancer cell. The legitimate questions are: how and why? This article reviews the preeminent data on cancer molecular genetics and subsequently proposes that the sentinel event in cancer initiation is the aberrant production of fused transcription activators with new molecular properties within normal tissue stem cells. This results in the production of vital oncogenes with dysfunctional gene activation transcription properties, which leads to dysfunctional gene regulation, the aberrant activation of transduction pathways, chromosomal breakage, activation of driver oncogenes, reactivation of stem cell transduction pathways and the activation of genes that result in the hallmarks of cancer. Furthermore, a novel holistic molecular genetic model of cancer initiation and progression is presented along with a new paradigm for the approach to personalized targeted cancer therapy, clinical monitoring and cancer diagnosis. PMID:27649156

  17. MicroRNA-613 represses prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion through targeting Frizzled7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei [Medical College of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an 710061 (China); Department of Urology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Li, Chan [Department of Ophthalmology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Duan, Wanli; Du, Shuangkuan; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Xing, Junping, E-mail: junpingxing@163.com [Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A growing number of studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may serve as potential therapeutic tools for cancer therapy. Frizzled7 (Fzd7), the most important receptor of the Wnt signaling pathway, is extensively involved in cancer development and progression. However, the role of Fzd7 in prostate cancer remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the expression of Fzd7 in prostate cancer and test whether modulating Fzd7 expression by miR-613 would have an impact on prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We found that Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer cell lines. Through bioinformatics analysis, Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613, which was validated by dual-luciferase reporter assays, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. By gain of function experiments, we showed that overexpression of miR-613 significantly suppressed prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore, miR-613 overexpression markedly downregulated the Wnt signaling pathway. Through a rescue experiment, we showed that overexpression of Fzd7 could abrogate the inhibitory effect of miR-613 on cell proliferation and invasion as well as Wnt signaling. Additionally, these results were further strengthened by data showing that miR-613 was significantly downregulated in prostate cancer tissues, exhibiting an inverse correlation with Fzd7 expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-613 functions as a tumor suppressor, partially through targeting Fzd7, and is a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer. • Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613. • MiR-613 negatively regulated prostate cancer by Fzd7. • MiR-613 inversely correlated with Fzd7 in prostate cancer.

  18. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  19. Influence networks based on coexpression improve drug target discovery for the development of novel cancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for novel molecularly targeted drugs will continue to rise as we move forward toward the goal of personalizing cancer treatment to the molecular signature of individual tumors. However, the identification of targets and combinations of targets that can be safely and effectively modulated is one of the greatest challenges facing the drug discovery process. A promising approach is to use biological networks to prioritize targets based on their relative positions to one another, a property that affects their ability to maintain network integrity and propagate information-flow. Here, we introduce influence networks and demonstrate how they can be used to generate influence scores as a network-based metric to rank genes as potential drug targets. Results We use this approach to prioritize genes as drug target candidates in a set of ER + breast tumor samples collected during the course of neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. We show that influential genes, those with high influence scores, tend to be essential and include a higher proportion of essential genes than those prioritized based on their position (i.e. hubs or bottlenecks) within the same network. Additionally, we show that influential genes represent novel biologically relevant drug targets for the treatment of ER + breast cancers. Moreover, we demonstrate that gene influence differs between untreated tumors and residual tumors that have adapted to drug treatment. In this way, influence scores capture the context-dependent functions of genes and present the opportunity to design combination treatment strategies that take advantage of the tumor adaptation process. Conclusions Influence networks efficiently find essential genes as promising drug targets and combinations of targets to inform the development of molecularly targeted drugs and their use. PMID:24495353

  20. Viroreplicative Gene Therapy Targeted to Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    3). The yeast enzyme is known to be optimally active at around 26°C, but has previously been shown to be stabilized in bacteria at 37°C by...with AZ3-RLuc-infected and 673 for those infected with AZ3-GLuc (Figure 1B). For normal diploid cells, this corresponds to 4.85 or 4.71 integrations

  1. Targeting apoptosis pathways in lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind M.; Hiltermann, T. Jeroen N.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease with a poor prognosis. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represent different forms of lung cancer that are associated with distinct genetic causes and display different responses to therapy in the clinic. Whereas SCLC is often

  2. Gene-Specific Demethylation as Targeted Therapy in MDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0161 TITLE: Gene-Specific Demethylation as Targeted Therapy in MDS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel G. Tenen, M.D...15JUN2016-14JUN2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gene-Specific Demethylation as Targeted Therapy in MDS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... magnetic beads capture all newly synthesized transcripts. To compare the transcriptional profiles under these conditions with our previous results, we

  3. Benchmarks for targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) needs to achieve certain benchmarks if t is to find its way into the clinic. This paper reviews the status of benchmarks for dose normalisation, microdosimetry, response of micrometastases to therapy, maximum tolerance doses and adequate supplies of alpha emitting radioisotopes. In comparing dose effect for different alpha immunoconjugates (IC), patients and diseases, it is appropriate to normalise dose according to specific factors that affect the efficacy of the treatment. Body weight and body surface area are two commonly used criteria. However, more advanced criteria are required, such as the volume of distribution. Alpha dosimetry presents a special challenge in clinical trials. Monte Carlo calculations can be used to determine specific energies, but these need validation. This problem could be resolved with micronuclei biological dosimetry and mutagenesis studies of radiation Jam age. While macroscopic disease can be monitored, the impact of therapy on subclinical microscopic disease is a real problem. Magnetic cell separation of cancer cells in the blood with magnetic microspheres coated with the targeting monoclonal antibody could provide the response data. Alpha therapy needs first to establish maximum tolerance doses for practical acceptance. This has been determined with 213Bi-IC for acute myelogenous leukaemia at ∼ I mCi/kg. The maximum tolerance dose has not yet been established for metastatic melanoma, but the efficacious dose for some melanomas is less than 0.3 mCi/kg and for intra-cavity therapy of GBM it is ∼ 0.14 mCi/kg for 211 At-Ie. In the case of Ra-223 for bone cancer, the emission of four alphas with a total energy of 27 MeV results in very high cytotoxicity and an effective dose of only ∼ 5 μCi/kg. The limited supplies of Ac-225 available after separation from Th-229 are adequate for clinical trials. However, should TAT become a clinical procedure, then new supplies must be found. Accelerator

  4. Rapid loss of intestinal crypts upon conditional deletion of the Wnt/Tcf-4 target gene c-Myc.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muncan, V.; Sansom, O.J.; Tertoolen, L.; Phesse, T.J.; Begthel, H.; Sancho, E.; Cole, A.M.; Gregorieff, A.; Alboran, I.M. de; Clevers, J.C.; Clarke, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of the mutationally activated Wnt cascade in colorectal cancer cell lines induces a rapid G1 arrest and subsequent differentiation. This arrest can be overcome by maintaining expression of a single Tcf4 target gene, the proto-oncogene c-Myc. Since colorectal cancer cells share many

  5. Targeted gene deletion in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollapour, M; Piper, P

    2001-01-30

    Yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces are notable agents of large-scale food spoilage. Despite the economic importance of these organisms, little is known about the stress adaptations whereby they adapt to many of the more severe conditions of food preservation. In this study it was shown that genes of Z. bailii, a yeast notable for its high resistances to food preservatives and ethanol, can be isolated by complementation of the corresponding mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was also discovered that the acquisition by S. cerevisiae of a single small Z. bailii gene (ZbYME2) was sufficient for the former yeast to acquire the ability to degrade two major food preservatives, benzoic acid and sorbic acid. Using DNA cassettes containing dominant selectable markers and methods originally developed for performing gene deletions in S. cerevisiae, the two copies of ZbYME2 in the Z. bailii genome were sequentially deleted. The resulting Zbyme2/Zbyme2 homozygous deletant strain had lost any ability to utilize benzoate as sole carbon source and was more sensitive to weak acid preservatives during growth on glucose. Thus, ZbYME2, probably the nuclear gene for a mitochondrial mono-oxygenase function, is essential for Z. bailii to degrade food preservatives. This ability to catabolize weak acid preservatives is a significant factor contributing to the preservative resistance of Z. bailii under aerobic conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that it is possible to delete in Z. bailii genes that are suspected as being important for growth of this organism in preserved foods and beverages. With the construction of further mutant of Z. bailii strains, a clearer picture should emerge of how this yeast adapts to the conditions of food preservation. This information will, in turn, allow the design of new preservation strategies. GenBank Accession Nos: ZbURA3 (AF279259), ZbTIM9 (AF279260), ZbYME2 (AF279261), ZbTRP1 (AF279262), ZbHHT1(AF296170). Copyright 2000 John

  6. Specific and Efficient Regression of Cancers Harboring KRAS Mutation by Targeted RNA Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Ju Hyun; Yang, Bitna; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2017-02-01

    Mutations in the KRAS gene, which persistently activate RAS function, are most frequently found in many types of human cancers. Here, we proposed and verified a new approach against cancers harboring the KRAS mutation with high cancer selectivity and efficient anti-cancer effects based on targeted RNA replacement. To this end, trans-splicing ribozymes from Tetrahymena group I intron were developed, which can specifically target and reprogram the mutant KRAS G12V transcript to induce therapeutic gene activity in cells. Adenoviral vectors containing the specific ribozymes with downstream suicide gene were constructed and then infection with the adenoviruses specifically downregulated KRAS G12V expression and killed KRAS G12V-harboring cancer cells additively upon pro-drug treatment, but it did not affect the growth of wild-type KRAS-expressing cells. Minimal liver toxicity was noted when the adenoviruses were administered systemically in vivo. Importantly, intratumoral injection of the adenoviruses with pro-drug treatment specifically and significantly impeded the growth of xenografted tumors harboring KRAS G12V through a trans-splicing reaction with the target RNA. In contrast, xenografted tumors harboring wild-type KRAS were not affected by the adenoviruses. Therefore, RNA replacement with a mutant KRAS-targeting trans-splicing ribozyme is a potentially useful therapeutic strategy to combat tumors harboring KRAS mutation. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epigenetic targets of bioactive dietary components for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeran, Syed M; Ahmed, Amiya; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2010-12-01

    The emergent interest in cancer epigenetics stems from the fact that epigenetic modifications are implicated in virtually every step of tumorigenesis. More interestingly, epigenetic changes are reversible heritable changes that are not due to the alteration in DNA sequence but have potential to alter gene expression. Dietary agents consist of many bioactive ingredients which actively regulate various molecular targets involved in tumorigenesis. We present evidence that numerous bioactive dietary components can interfere with various epigenetic targets in cancer prevention and therapy. These agents include curcumin (turmeric), genistein (soybean), tea polyphenols (green tea), resveratrol (grapes), and sulforaphane (cruciferous vegetables). These bioactive components alter the DNA methylation and histone modifications required for gene activation or silencing in cancer prevention and therapy. Bioactive components mediate epigenetic modifications associated with the induction of tumor suppressor genes such as p21(WAF1/CIP1) and inhibition of tumor promoting genes such as the human telomerase reverse transcriptase during tumorigenesis processes. Here, we present considerable evidence that bioactive components and their epigenetic targets are associated with cancer prevention and therapy which should facilitate novel drug discovery and development. In addition, remarkable advances in our understanding of basic epigenetic mechanisms as well as the rapid progress that is being made in developing powerful new technologies, such as those for sensitive and quantitative detection of epigenetic and epigenomic changes in cancer biology, hold great promise for novel epigenetic approaches to cancer prevention and therapy.

  8. Integrin α3β1 as a breast cancer target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaram, Sita; Dipersio, C Michael

    2011-10-01

    Integrin receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix have important roles in all stages of cancer progression and metastasis. Since the integrin family was discovered in the early 1980's, many studies have identified critical adhesion and signaling functions for integrins expressed on tumor cells, endothelial cells and other cell types of the tumor microenvironment, in controlling proliferation, survival, migration and angiogenesis. In recent years, the laminin-binding integrin α3β1 has emerged as a potentially promising anti-cancer target on breast cancer cells. Studies from the past decade that implicate integrins as promising anti-cancer targets and the development of integrin antagonists as anti-cancer therapeutics. Recent preclinical studies that have identified the laminin-binding integrin α3β1 as an appealing anti-cancer target and the knowledge gaps that must be closed to fully exploit this integrin as a therapeutic target for breast cancer. Although the tumor-promoting functions of α3β1 implicate this integrin as a promising therapeutic target on breast cancer cells, successful exploitation of this integrin as an anti-cancer target will require a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby it regulates specific tumor cell behaviors and the identification of the most appropriate α3β1 functions to antagonize on breast cancer cells.

  9. In silico mining identifies IGFBP3 as a novel target of methylation in prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Perry, A S

    2007-05-21

    Promoter hypermethylation is central in deregulating gene expression in cancer. Identification of novel methylation targets in specific cancers provides a basis for their use as biomarkers of disease occurrence and progression. We developed an in silico strategy to globally identify potential targets of promoter hypermethylation in prostate cancer by screening for 5\\' CpG islands in 631 genes that were reported as downregulated in prostate cancer. A virtual archive of 338 potential targets of methylation was produced. One candidate, IGFBP3, was selected for investigation, along with glutathione-S-transferase pi (GSTP1), a well-known methylation target in prostate cancer. Methylation of IGFBP3 was detected by quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 49\\/79 primary prostate adenocarcinoma and 7\\/14 adjacent preinvasive high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, but in only 5\\/37 benign prostatic hyperplasia (P < 0.0001) and in 0\\/39 histologically normal adjacent prostate tissue, which implies that methylation of IGFBP3 may be involved in the early stages of prostate cancer development. Hypermethylation of IGFBP3 was only detected in samples that also demonstrated methylation of GSTP1 and was also correlated with Gleason score > or =7 (P=0.01), indicating that it has potential as a prognostic marker. In addition, pharmacological demethylation induced strong expression of IGFBP3 in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our concept of a methylation candidate gene bank was successful in identifying a novel target of frequent hypermethylation in early-stage prostate cancer. Evaluation of further relevant genes could contribute towards a methylation signature of this disease.

  10. Inducement of radionuclides targeting therapy by gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Quanyong

    2001-01-01

    The author presents an overview of gene transfection methods to genetically induce tumor cells to express enhanced levels of cell surface antigens and receptors to intake radiolabeled antibody and peptide targeting and thus increase their therapeutic effect in radiotherapy. The current research include inducement of radioimmunotherapy through CEA gene transfection, inducement of iodine-131 therapy by sodium iodide symporter gene transfection and inducement of MIBG therapy by noradrenaline transporter gene transfection. These studies raise the prospect that gene-therapy techniques could be used to enable the treatment of a wide range of tumors with radiopharmaceuticals of established clinical acceptability

  11. Targeting Angiogenesis in Biliary Tract Cancers: An Open Option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Simone

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biliary tract cancers (BTCs are characterized by a bad prognosis and the armamentarium of drugs for their treatment is very poor. Although the inflammatory status of biliary tract represents the first step in the cancerogenesis, the microenvironment also plays a key role in the pathogenesis of BTCs, promoting tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Several molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and fibroblast growth factor (FGF, are involved in the angiogenesis process and their expression on tumor samples has been explored as prognostic marker in both cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer. Recent studies evaluated the genomic landscape of BTCs and evidenced that aberrations in several genes enrolled in the pro-angiogenic signaling, such as FGF receptor-2 (FGFR-2, are characteristic of BTCs. New drugs targeting the signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis have been tested in preclinical studies both in vitro and in vivo with promising results. Moreover, several clinical studies tested monoclonal antibodies against VEGF and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the VEGF and the MEK/ERK pathways. Herein, we evaluate both the pathogenic mechanisms of BTCs focused on angiogenesis and the preclinical and clinical data available regarding the use of new anti-angiogenic drugs in these malignancies.

  12. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  13. Emerging Drug Target In Pancreatic Cancer: Placing Sirtuin 1 on the Canvas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Pinho, Andreia V; Eling, Nils; Chantrill, Lorraine; Rooman, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 is a protein deacetylase that regulates a large number of proteins often functionally implicated in tumor development and progression. Its pleiotropic function has turned SIRT1 into an attractive chemotherapeutic target, underscored by very promising preclinical results with SIRT1 inhibitors in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we revisit the studies on SIRT1 as an emerging target for therapy in pancreatic cancer, a tumor with dismal outcomes for which currently few therapeutic options are available. We highlight those potential SIRT1 target genes that are commonly affected in pancreatic cancer according to recent genomic analyses.

  14. Expression of MAGE and BAGE genes in Japanese breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, T; Mori, M; Ueo, H; Sugimachi, K; Akiyoshi, T

    1997-04-01

    The MAGE and BAGE genes code for distinct antigens, which are recognized on melanoma cells as well as on other various tumor cells by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes. These antigens may thus constitute useful targets for specific immunotherapy, since no expression of MAGE or BAGE genes has been recognized in normal tissue except for the testis. We studied the MAGE-1, MAGE-3, and BAGE gene expression observed in 49 Japanese breast cancers. Gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Out of 49 tumor tissue specimens of primary breast cancers, the expression of MAGE-1, -3 and BAGE was recognized in 15 (31%), 12 (24%), and 4 (8%) tumors, respectively. The expression of MAGE and BAGE genes is not recognized in normal breast tissue. The expression of the MAGE-3 gene was frequently recognized in tumors with lymphatic and/or vascular vessel permeations. Either MAGE-1 or -3 gene expressions were induced in 1 of 3 MAGE-1 negative breast cell lines or 1 of 3 MAGE-3 negative breast cell lines by the treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. These findings suggest that: 1) the identification of such antigens coded by MAGE or BAGE genes may thus offer the possibility of using specific immunotherapy, and 2) the use of a demethylating agent may increase the number of patients who might be candidates for MAGE specific immunotherapy.

  15. The Prognostic 97 Chemoresponse Gene Signature in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matondo, Abel; Jo, Yong Hwa; Shahid, Muhammad; Choi, Tae Gyu; Nguyen, Minh Nam; Nguyen, Ngoc Ngo Yen; Akter, Salima; Kang, Insug; Ha, Joohun; Maeng, Chi Hoon; Kim, Si-Young; Lee, Ju-Seog; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Sung Soo

    2017-08-29

    Patient diagnosis and care would be significantly improved by understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum and taxane resistance in ovarian cancer. Here, we aim to establish a gene signature that can identify molecular pathways/transcription factors involved in ovarian cancer progression, poor clinical outcome, and chemotherapy resistance. To validate the robustness of the gene signature, a meta-analysis approach was applied to 1,020 patients from 7 datasets. A 97-gene signature was identified as an independent predictor of patient survival in association with other clinicopathological factors in univariate [hazard ratio (HR): 3.0, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.66-5.44, p = 2.7E-4] and multivariate [HR: 2.88, 95% CI 1.57-5.2, p = 0.001] analyses. Subset analyses demonstrated that the signature could predict patients who would attain complete or partial remission or no-response to first-line chemotherapy. Pathway analyses revealed that the signature was regulated by HIF1α and TP53 and included nine HIF1α-regulated genes, which were highly expressed in non-responders and partial remission patients than in complete remission patients. We present the 97-gene signature as an accurate prognostic predictor of overall survival and chemoresponse. Our signature also provides information on potential candidate target genes for future treatment efforts in ovarian cancer.

  16. Molecular pathways and therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Hensing, Thomas; Simon, George R.; Dennis, Phillip A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Bueno, Raphael; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Both histologically and molecularly lung cancer is heterogeneous. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the pathways involved in the various types of lung cancer with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the increasing number of actionable molecular targets. It describes the major pathways and molecular alterations implicated in the development and progression of non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma and squamous cancer), and of small cell carcinoma, emphasizing the molecular alterations comprising the specific blueprints in each group. The approved and investigational targeted therapies as well as the immune therapies, and clinical trials exploring the variety of targeted approaches to treatment of lung cancer are the main focus of this review. PMID:24722523

  17. Il2rg gene-targeted severe combined immunodeficiency pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Iwamoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoriko; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Misae; Mikawa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Aoki, Yuki; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Nahoko; Suzuki, Emi; Kubo, Masanori; Mimuro, Jun; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Madoiwa, Seiji; Sakata, Yoichi; Perry, Anthony C F; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Onishi, Akira

    2012-06-14

    A porcine model of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) promises to facilitate human cancer studies, the humanization of tissue for xenotransplantation, and the evaluation of stem cells for clinical therapy, but SCID pigs have not been described. We report here the generation and preliminary evaluation of a porcine SCID model. Fibroblasts containing a targeted disruption of the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene, Il2rg, were used as donors to generate cloned pigs by serial nuclear transfer. Germline transmission of the Il2rg deletion produced healthy Il2rg(+/-) females, while Il2rg(-/Y) males were athymic and exhibited markedly impaired immunoglobulin and T and NK cell production, robustly recapitulating human SCID. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, donor cells stably integrated in Il2rg(-/Y) heterozygotes and reconstituted the Il2rg(-/Y) lymphoid lineage. The SCID pigs described here represent a step toward the comprehensive evaluation of preclinical cellular regenerative strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0400 TITLE: Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0400 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...negative breast cancer, epigenetics , nuclear hormone receptor, estrogen Overall Project Summary Flavin-dependent, lysine-specific protein

  19. Targeting histone abnormality in triple negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0238 TITLE: Targeting histone abnormality in triple negative breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steffi...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting histone abnormality in triple negative breast cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0238 5c...PDXs). In addition, two teams collaborated in studying the functional role of LSD2 in breast cancer progression. The interactive studies between two

  20. Concordant and discordant regulation of target genes by miR-31 and its isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Chan

    Full Text Available It has been shown that imprecise cleavage of a primary or precursor RNA by Drosha or Dicer, respectively, may yield a group of microRNA (miRNA variants designated as "isomiR". Variations in the relative abundance of isoforms for a given miRNA among different species and different cell types beg the question whether these isomiRs might regulate target genes differentially. We compared the capacity of three miR-31 isoforms (miR-31-H, miR-31-P, and miR-31-M, which differ only slightly in their 5'- and/or 3'-end sequences, to regulate several known targets and a predicted target, Dicer. Notably, we found isomiR-31s displayed concordant and discordant regulation of 6 known target genes. Furthermore, we validated a predicted target gene, Dicer, to be a novel target of miR-31 but only miR-31-P could directly repress Dicer expression in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells, resulting in their enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin, a known attribute of Dicer knockdown. This was further supported by reporter assay using full length 3'-untranslated region (UTR of Dicer. Our findings not only revealed Dicer to be a direct target of miR-31, but also demonstrated that isomiRs displayed similar and disparate regulation of target genes in cell-based systems. Coupled with the variations in the distribution of isomiRs among different cells or conditions, our findings support the possibility of fine-tuning gene expression by miRNAs.

  1. Prostate cancer heterogeneity: Discovering novel molecular targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Massari, Francesco; Iacovelli, Roberto; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Giunchi, Francesca; Brunelli, Matteo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) shows a broad spectrum of biological and clinical behavior, which represents the epiphenomenon of an extreme genetic heterogeneity. Recent genomic profiling studies have deeply improved the knowledge of the genomic landscape of localized and metastatic PCa. The AR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways are the two most frequently altered, representing therefore interestingly targets for therapy. Moreover, somatic or germline aberrations of DNA repair genes (DRGs) have been observed at high frequency, supporting the potential role of platinum derivatives and PARP inhibitors as effective therapeutic strategies. In the future, the identification of driver mutations present at a specific stage of the disease, the classification PCa based on specific molecular alterations, and the selection of the most appropriate therapy based on biomarkers predictors of response represent the foundations for an increasingly more accurate personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TargetMine, an integrated data warehouse for candidate gene prioritisation and target discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-An Chen

    Full Text Available Prioritising candidate genes for further experimental characterisation is a non-trivial challenge in drug discovery and biomedical research in general. An integrated approach that combines results from multiple data types is best suited for optimal target selection. We developed TargetMine, a data warehouse for efficient target prioritisation. TargetMine utilises the InterMine framework, with new data models such as protein-DNA interactions integrated in a novel way. It enables complicated searches that are difficult to perform with existing tools and it also offers integration of custom annotations and in-house experimental data. We proposed an objective protocol for target prioritisation using TargetMine and set up a benchmarking procedure to evaluate its performance. The results show that the protocol can identify known disease-associated genes with high precision and coverage. A demonstration version of TargetMine is available at http://targetmine.nibio.go.jp/.

  3. KEAP1 loss modulates sensitivity to kinase targeted therapy in lung cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhibitors that target the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway have led to clinical responses in lung and other cancers, but some patients fail to respond and in those that do resistance inevitably occurs (Balak et al., 2006; Kosaka et al., 2006; Rudin et al., 2013; Wagle et al., 2011). To understand intrinsic and acquired resistance to inhibition of MAPK signaling, we performed CRISPR-Cas9 gene deletion screens in the setting of BRAF, MEK, EGFR, and ALK inhibition.

  4. Suppression of Prostate Cancer Metastasis by DPYSL3-Targeted saRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Benyi; Li, Changlin

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is the sole cause of cancer death and there is no curable means in clinic. Cellular protein CRMP4 (DPYSL3 gene) was previously defined as a metastasis suppressor in human prostate cancers since its expression is dramatically reduced in lymphatic metastatic diseases and DPYSL3 overexpression in prostate cancer cells significantly suppressed cancer cell migration and invasion. To develop a CRMP4-based antimetastasis therapeutic approach, the small activating RNA (saRNA) technique was utilized to enhance CRMP4 expression in prostate cancer cells. A total of 14 saRNAs were synthesized and screened in multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Two saRNAs targeting the isoform-2 promoter region were determined to have significant activating effect on DPYSL3 gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels. These saRNA also largely reduced prostate cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Most significantly, PSMA aptamer-mediated prostate cancer cell homing of these saRNAs blocked distal metastasis in an orthotopic nude mouse model. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that saRNA-based DPYSL3 gene enhancement is capable of suppressing tumor metastasis in prostate cancer, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for cancer management.

  5. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, M.L.; Verschure, P.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  6. Epigenetic Editing : targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  7. Epigenetic Modification of the Repair Donor Regulates Targeted Gene Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Humbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing design of vectors is critical to effective gene therapy. In targeted gene correction (TGC, cleavage of chromosomal DNA near a mutation stimulates homology-directed repair of a target gene using a donor provided in trans. We have systematically addressed epigenetic parameters of donor design, using a flow-based assay to quantify correction frequencies and expression levels of a green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene in a human cell line. We show that active transcription of the donor increased correction frequency by threefold, establishing that a proximal promoter enhances donor use. Conversely, CpG methylation of the donor diminished correction frequency and reduced expression of the repaired gene. However, bisulfite sequencing of the target revealed no transfer of methylation marks during repair with a methylated donor. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors can partially compensate for epigenetic inactivation, suggesting a role for class I and II HDACs in regulation of donor use. These results establish that epigenetic status of a trans-donor determines both the efficiency and outcome of gene correction, and identify and clarify parameters that should guide donor design for targeted gene therapy.

  8. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  9. TF Target Mapper: A BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Spek Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a powerful tool for examining gene regulation. Crosslinked chromatin is immunoprecipitated with antibodies against specific transcription factors, thus enriching for sequences bound in vivo by these factors in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Cloning and sequencing the immunoprecipitated sequences allows identification of transcription factor target genes. Routinely, thousands of such sequenced clones are used in BLAST searches to map their exact location in the genome and the genes located in the vicinity. These genes represent potential targets of the transcription factor of interest. Such bioinformatics analysis is very laborious if performed manually and for this reason there is a need for developing bioinformatic tools to automate and facilitate it. Results In order to facilitate this analysis we generated TF Target Mapper (Transcription Factor Target Mapper. TF Target Mapper is a BLAST search tool allowing rapid extraction of annotated information on genes around each hit. It combines sequence cleaning/filtering, pattern searching and BLAST searches with extraction of information on genes located around each BLAST hit and comparisons of the output list of genes or gene ontology IDs with user-implemented lists. We successfully applied and tested TF Target Mapper to analyse sequences bound in vivo by the transcription factor GATA-1. We show that TF Target Mapper efficiently extracted information on genes around ChIPed sequences, thus identifying known (e.g. α-globin and ζ-globin and potentially novel GATA-1 gene targets. Conclusion TF Target Mapper is a very efficient BLAST search tool that allows the rapid extraction of annotated information on the genes

  10. MiRNAs which target CD3 subunits could be potential biomarkers for cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Asghari Alashti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T-cells play an important role in the immune response and are activated in response to the presentation of antigens bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules participating with the T-cell receptor (TCR. T-cell receptor complexes also contain four CD3 (cluster of differentiation 3 subunits. The TCR-CD3 complex is vital for T-cell development and plays an important role in intervening cell recognition events. Since microRNAs (miRNAs are highly stable in blood serum, some of which may target CD3 molecules, they could serve as good biomarkers for early cancer detection. The aim of this study was to see whether there is a relationship between cancers and the amount of miRNAs -targeted CD3 molecules. METHODS: Bioinformatics tools were used in order to predict the miRNA targets for these genes. Subsequently, these highly conserved miRNAs were evaluated to see if they are implicated in various kinds of cancers. Consequently, human disease databases were used. According to the latest research, this study attempted to investigate the possible down- or upregulation of miRNAs cancer patients. RESULTS: We identified miRNAs which target genes producing CD3 subunit molecules. The most conserved miRNAs were identified for the CD3G gene, while CD247 and CD3EAP genes had the least number and there were no conserved miRNA associated with the CD3D gene. Some of these miRNAs were found to be responsible for different cancers, following a certain pattern. CONCLUSIONS: It is highly likely that miRNAs affect the CD3 molecules, impairing the immune system, recognizing and destroying cancer tumor; hence, they can be used as suitable biomarkers in distinguishing cancer in the very early stages of its development.

  11. Targeting the Ron-DEK Signaling Axis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    2014.173 INTRODUCTION Despite high survival rates for early-stage breast cancer , it is still the second leading cause of cancer - related deaths in the...164: 285–293. 37 Adams AK, Hallenbeck GE, Casper KA, Patil YJ, Wilson KM, Kimple RJ et al. DEK promotes HPV -positive and -negative head and neck cancer ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0194 TITLE: Targeting the Ron-DEK Signaling Axis in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Dr

  12. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekanova, Maria; Rathore, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients.

  13. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  14. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Nils; Duffy, M.J; Napieralski, R.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that meas......Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested...... that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2...... for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene...

  15. FGF receptor genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, D; Pineda, S; Michailidou, K

    2014-01-01

    Background:Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Genome-wide association studies have identified FGFR2 as a breast cancer susceptibility gene. Common variation in other fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors might also modify risk. We tested this hypothesis by studying...... was observed for SNPs in the FGF receptor genes. The strongest evidence in European women was for rs743682 in FGFR3; the estimated per-allele odds ratio was 1.05 (95% confidence interval=1.02-1.09, P=0.0020), which is substantially lower than that observed for SNPs in FGFR2.Conclusion:Our results suggest...

  16. The role of S100 genes in breast cancer progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Eadaoin

    2012-02-01

    The S100 gene family encode low molecular weight proteins implicated in cancer progression. In this study, we analyzed the expression of four S100 genes in one cohort of patients with breast cancer and 16 S100 genes in a second cohort. In both cohorts, the expression of S100A8 and S1009 mRNA level was elevated in high-grade compared to low-grade tumors and in estrogen receptor-negative compared to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. None of the S100 transcripts investigated were significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis. Notably, multiple S100 genes, including S100A1, S100A2, S100A4, S100A6, S100A8, S100A9, S100A10, S100A11, and S100A14 were upregulated in basal-type breast cancers compared to non-basal types. Using Spearman\\'s correlation analysis, several S100 transcripts correlated significantly with each other, the strongest correlation has been found between S100A8 and S100A9 (r = 0.889, P < 0.001, n = 295). Of the 16 S100 transcripts investigated, only S100A11 and S100A14 were significantly associated with patient outcome. Indeed, these two transcripts predicted outcome in the cohort of patients that did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy. Based on our findings, we conclude that the different S100 genes play varying roles in breast cancer progression. Specific S100 genes are potential targets for the treatment of basal-type breast cancers.

  17. The role of S100 genes in breast cancer progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Eadaoin

    2011-06-01

    The S100 gene family encode low molecular weight proteins implicated in cancer progression. In this study, we analyzed the expression of four S100 genes in one cohort of patients with breast cancer and 16 S100 genes in a second cohort. In both cohorts, the expression of S100A8 and S1009 mRNA level was elevated in high-grade compared to low-grade tumors and in estrogen receptor-negative compared to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. None of the S100 transcripts investigated were significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis. Notably, multiple S100 genes, including S100A1, S100A2, S100A4, S100A6, S100A8, S100A9, S100A10, S100A11, and S100A14 were upregulated in basal-type breast cancers compared to non-basal types. Using Spearman\\'s correlation analysis, several S100 transcripts correlated significantly with each other, the strongest correlation has been found between S100A8 and S100A9 (r = 0.889, P < 0.001, n = 295). Of the 16 S100 transcripts investigated, only S100A11 and S100A14 were significantly associated with patient outcome. Indeed, these two transcripts predicted outcome in the cohort of patients that did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy. Based on our findings, we conclude that the different S100 genes play varying roles in breast cancer progression. Specific S100 genes are potential targets for the treatment of basal-type breast cancers.

  18. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. ► Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. ► DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. ► The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 °C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) γH2AX immunostaining to detect γH2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 °C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 °C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by γH2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and telomere functions are denatured. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide direct evidence of hyperthermia induced gene amplification.

  19. IκBα mediates prostate cancer cell death induced by combinatorial targeting of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Sarah Louise; Centenera, Margaret Mary; Tilley, Wayne Desmond; Selth, Luke Ashton; Butler, Lisa Maree

    2016-01-01

    Combining different clinical agents to target multiple pathways in prostate cancer cells, including androgen receptor (AR) signaling, is potentially an effective strategy to improve outcomes for men with metastatic disease. We have previously demonstrated that sub-effective concentrations of an AR antagonist, bicalutamide, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, act synergistically when combined to cause death of AR-dependent prostate cancer cells. In this study, expression profiling of human prostate cancer cells treated with bicalutamide or vorinostat, alone or in combination, was employed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergistic action. Cell viability assays and quantitative real time PCR were used to validate identified candidate genes. A substantial proportion of the genes modulated by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat were androgen regulated. Independent pathway analysis identified further pathways and genes, most notably NFKBIA (encoding IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB and p53 signaling), as targets of this combinatorial treatment. Depletion of IκBα by siRNA knockdown enhanced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells, while ectopic overexpression of IκBα markedly suppressed cell death induced by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat. These findings implicate IκBα as a key mediator of the apoptotic action of this combinatorial AR targeting strategy and a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2188-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Targeting SR-BI for cancer diagnostics, imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha Amrita Rajora

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI plays an important role in trafficking cholesteryl esters between the core of high density lipoprotein and the liver. Interestingly, this integral membrane protein receptor is also implicated in the metabolism of cholesterol by cancer cells, whereby overexpression of SR-BI has been observed in a number of tumours and cancer cell lines, including breast and prostate cancers. Consequently, SR-BI has recently gained attention as a cancer biomarker and exciting target for the direct cytosolic delivery of therapeutic agents. This brief review highlights these key developments in SR-BI-targeted cancer therapies and imaging probes. Special attention is given to the exploration of high density lipoprotein nanomimetic platforms that take advantage of upregulated SR-BI expression to facilitate targeted drug-delivery and cancer diagnostics, and promising future directions in the development of these agents.

  1. Molecular MR imaging of cancer gene therapy. Ferritin transgene reporter takes the stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been actively investigated and made rapid progress in the past decade. Applied to cancer gene therapy, the technique's high spatial resolution allows evaluation of gene delivery into target tissues. Because noninvasive monitoring of the duration, location, and magnitude of transgene expression in tumor tissues or cells provides useful information for assessing therapeutic efficacy and optimizing protocols, molecular imaging is expected to become a critical step in the success of cancer gene therapy in the near future. We present a brief overview of the current status of molecular MR imaging, especially in vivo reporter gene imaging using ferritin and other reporters, discuss its application to cancer gene therapy, and present our research of MR imaging detection of electroporation-mediated cancer gene therapy using the ferritin reporter gene. (author)

  2. Highly preserved consensus gene modules in human papilloma virus 16 positive cervical cancer and head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglan; Cha, In-Ho; Kim, Ki-Yeol

    2017-12-26

    In this study, we investigated the consensus gene modules in head and neck cancer (HNC) and cervical cancer (CC). We used a publicly available gene expression dataset, GSE6791, which included 42 HNC, 14 normal head and neck, 20 CC and 8 normal cervical tissue samples. To exclude bias because of different human papilloma virus (HPV) types, we analyzed HPV16-positive samples only. We identified 3824 genes common to HNC and CC samples. Among these, 977 genes showed high connectivity and were used to construct consensus modules. We demonstrated eight consensus gene modules for HNC and CC using the dissimilarity measure and average linkage hierarchical clustering methods. These consensus modules included genes with significant biological functions, including ATP binding and extracellular exosome. Eigengen network analysis revealed the consensus modules were highly preserved with high connectivity. These findings demonstrate that HPV16-positive head and neck and cervical cancers share highly preserved consensus gene modules with common potentially therapeutic targets.

  3. Two novel approaches targeting cancer cell membrane for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yingzhu; Wang, Bochu; Cao, Yang; He, Rui

    2013-04-01

    Disruption of normal cell function by chemicals, UV radiation or viruses can cause various cancer. Drugs that have been developed for cancer therapy bind to various targets to correct disorder cell behavior, repair damaged DNA or promote cell apoptosis. However, there is rare study that focuses on cancer cell membrane as target. We propose two approaches for achieving our goal. One is to use phospholipase A2 (PLA2) to cleave phospholipid heads of the bilayer of cancer cells. Because PLA2 has unique Ca(2+) catalytic site and the pH of healthy tissue cells should be slightly alkaline at 7.2-7.5, it can be easily protected by CO3(2-) in the form of PLA2-CaCO3. While PLA2-CaCO3 accumulate in cancer cells in the acidic microenvironment of which the pH is below 7, it could be converted to active state (PLA2-Ca(2+)) which can intensively damage the cancer cell membrane. The other one is to use both monoclonal antibodies and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The internalization of targeted cancer cell antibodies could change the curvature of cell membrane from order state to disorder state, therefore strong detergent DMSO can destroy cancer cells at extreme low concentration. These two approaches present no harm for normal cells, therefore, drugs targeted cancer cell membrane might become a new and high effective clinical cancer therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  5. Tumor-specific RNA interference targeting Pokemon suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yining; Xu, Shuxiong; Wang, Xiangwei; Shi, Hua; Sun, Zhaolin; Yang, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    To explore the exact mechanism of Pokemon in prostate cancer. Pokemon is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is suppression of the p14ARF (alternate reading frame) tumor suppressor gene. Although Pokemon expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, the exact mechanism of the gene in prostate cancer is not clear. In the present study, prostate cancer cells were transfected with the specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression vector targeting Pokemon. The expression of Pokemon messenger RNA and its protein was detected by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The cell growth and cell apoptosis were also examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that specific RNA interference (RNAi) could decrease the expression levels of Pokemon gene messenger RNA and protein in prostate cancer cells. In addition, that specific RNAi significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and increased the apoptotic rate. In vivo experiments showed that specific RNAi inhibited the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells and significantly suppressed tumor growth. Therefore, an RNAi-targeted Pokemon gene strategy could be a potential approach to prostate cancer therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interactome of Radiation-Induced microRNA-Predicted Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenzin W. Lhakhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The microRNAs (miRNAs function as global negative regulators of gene expression and have been associated with a multitude of biological processes. The dysfunction of the microRNAome has been linked to various diseases including cancer. Our laboratory recently reported modulation in the expression of miRNA in a variety of cell types exposed to ionizing radiation (IR. To further understand miRNA role in IR-induced stress pathways, we catalogued a set of common miRNAs modulated in various irradiated cell lines and generated a list of predicted target genes. Using advanced bioinformatics tools we identified cellular pathways where miRNA predicted target genes function. The miRNA-targeted genes were found to play key roles in previously identified IR stress pathways such as cell cycle, p53 pathway, TGF-beta pathway, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, focal adhesion pathway, MAPK signaling, thyroid cancer pathway, adherens junction, insulin signaling pathway, oocyte meiosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and renal cell carcinoma pathway. Interestingly, we were able to identify novel targeted pathways that have not been identified in cellular radiation response, such as aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption, long-term potentiation, and neutrotrophin signaling pathways. Our analysis indicates that the miRNA interactome in irradiated cells provides a platform for comprehensive modeling of the cellular stress response to IR exposure.

  7. London forum targets Africa's cancer crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Africa stands on the brink of a cancer epidemic, with more than a million new cases a year by 2020. Raising awareness of the threat is one of the biggest challenges facing the global health community today. Finding solutions is an even greater one. The University of Oxford's Africa-Oxford Cancer Consortium (AfrOx), together with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), is assembling some of the world's most prominent cancer experts and policymakers in London, UK, on 10-11 May, 2007, to take up the challenge. Cancer care services in Africa are desperately limited. Life-saving radiotherapy, which is used effectively on more than 50% of cancer patients in the developed world, is available in only 21 of Africa's 53 countries, or to less than 20% of the total population. Lack of resources and basic infrastructure mean that millions of people have no access to cancer screening, early diagnosis, treatment or palliative care. Moreover, nearly 45% of cancer deaths in Africa are due to rampant viral infection, poor nutrition and widespread tobacco use. 'Many lives in Africa could be saved through prevention strategies and investments in comprehensive cancer control,' says Massoud Samiei, Head of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). 'PACT seeks to mobilize new resources and enable African countries to expand radiotherapy and cancer care in a sustainable manner.' The Cancer Control in Africa meeting will focus on Africa's deepening cancer crisis and develop strategies for much-needed national cancer control programmes. It will also act as a forum for cancer experts and health policymakers to evaluate priorities, guided by needs and available resources. By holding the meeting in London, the organizers hope to place the African problem at the forefront of the global health agenda and to enlist support and new funding from European governments to fight cancer in Africa through joint international programmes. 'We have a timely opportunity to

  8. London forum targets Africa's cancer crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Africa stands on the brink of a cancer epidemic, with more than a million new cases a year by 2020. Raising awareness of the threat is one of the biggest challenges facing the global health community today. Finding solutions is an even greater one. The University of Oxford's Africa-Oxford Cancer Consortium (AfrOx), together with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), is assembling some of the world's most prominent cancer experts and policymakers in London, UK, on 10-11 May, 2007, to take up the challenge. Cancer care services in Africa are desperately limited. Life-saving radiotherapy, which is used effectively on more than 50% of cancer patients in the developed world, is available in only 21 of Africa's 53 countries, or to less than 20% of the total population. Lack of resources and basic infrastructure mean that millions of people have no access to cancer screening, early diagnosis, treatment or palliative care. Moreover, nearly 45% of cancer deaths in Africa are due to rampant viral infection, poor nutrition and widespread tobacco use. 'Many lives in Africa could be saved through prevention strategies and investments in comprehensive cancer control,' says Massoud Samiei, Head of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). 'PACT seeks to mobilize new resources and enable African countries to expand radiotherapy and cancer care in a sustainable manner.' The Cancer Control in Africa meeting will focus on Africa's deepening cancer crisis and develop strategies for much-needed national cancer control programmes. It will also act as a forum for cancer experts and health policymakers to evaluate priorities, guided by needs and available resources. By holding the meeting in London, the organizers hope to place the African problem at the forefront of the global health agenda and to enlist support and new funding from European governments to fight cancer in Africa through joint international programmes. 'We have a timely opportunity to

  9. Gamma-Glutamylcyclotransferase: A Novel Target Molecule for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Kageyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT is one of the major enzymes involved in glutathione metabolism. However, its gene locus was unknown for many years. Recently, the gene for GGCT was found to be identical to C7orf24, which is registered as a hypothetical protein. Orthologs have been found in bacteria, plants, and nematodes as well as higher organisms, and the GGCT gene is highly preserved among a wide range of species. GGCT (C7orf24 was also reported as an upregulated protein in various cancers. Although the function of GGCT in cancer cells has not been determined, the following important activities have been reported: (1 high expression in various cancer tissues and cancer cell lines, (2 low expression in normal tissues, (3 inhibition of cancer cell proliferation via anti-GGCT RNAi, (4 inhibition of cancer cell invasion and migration via anti-GGCT RNAi, (5 an epigenetic transcriptional regulation in cancer cells, and (6 an antitumor effect in cancer-bearing xenograft mice. Therefore, GGCT is promising as a diagnostic marker and a therapeutic target for various cancers. This review summarizes these interesting findings.

  10. Hierarchical clustering of breast cancer methylomes revealed differentially methylated and expressed breast cancer genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Oncogenic transformation of normal cells often involves epigenetic alterations, including histone modification and DNA methylation. We conducted whole-genome bisulfite sequencing to determine the DNA methylomes of normal breast, fibroadenoma, invasive ductal carcinomas and MCF7. The emergence, disappearance, expansion and contraction of kilobase-sized hypomethylated regions (HMRs and the hypomethylation of the megabase-sized partially methylated domains (PMDs are the major forms of methylation changes observed in breast tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering of HMR revealed tumor-specific hypermethylated clusters and differential methylated enhancers specific to normal or breast cancer cell lines. Joint analysis of gene expression and DNA methylation data of normal breast and breast cancer cells identified differentially methylated and expressed genes associated with breast and/or ovarian cancers in cancer-specific HMR clusters. Furthermore, aberrant patterns of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI was found in breast cancer cell lines as well as breast tumor samples in the TCGA BRCA (breast invasive carcinoma dataset. They were characterized with differentially hypermethylated XIST promoter, reduced expression of XIST, and over-expression of hypomethylated X-linked genes. High expressions of these genes were significantly associated with lower survival rates in breast cancer patients. Comprehensive analysis of the normal and breast tumor methylomes suggests selective targeting of DNA methylation changes during breast cancer progression. The weak causal relationship between DNA methylation and gene expression observed in this study is evident of more complex role of DNA methylation in the regulation of gene expression in human epigenetics that deserves further investigation.

  11. Podoplanin - an emerging cancer biomarker and therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Harini; Rayes, Julie; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Genichiro; Retzbach, Edward P; Sheehan, Stephanie A; Takemoto, Ai; Chang, Yao-Wen; Yoneda, Kazue; Asai, Jun; Jensen, Lasse; Chalise, Lushun; Natsume, Atsushi; Goldberg, Gary S

    2018-03-25

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane receptor glycoprotein that is upregulated on transformed cells, cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and inflammatory macrophages that contribute to cancer progression. In particular, PDPN increases tumor cell clonal capacity, epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration, invasion, metastasis, and inflammation. Antibodies, CAR-T cells, biologics, and synthetic compounds that target PDPN can inhibit cancer progression and septic inflammation in preclinical models. This review describes recent advances in how PDPN may be used as a biomarker and therapeutic target for many types of cancer including glioma, squamous cell carcinoma, mesothelioma, and melanoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    claudin-3 and claudin-4 are expressed in subsets of aggressive prostate cancer. Finally, we produced our first two batches of nanoparticles during year...1 and we were able to show that these nanoparticles bind to prostate cancer cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, superparamagnetic iron oxide...degradable polymer that is approved by the FDA, and is used in the development of our nanoparticle system. Our nanoparticles encapsulate

  13. Virus-Targeted Therapeutic for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faller, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    .... Our approach initially involves investigation of EBV sequences in breast cancer cell lines and specimens, determination of whether treatment with Arginine Butyrate will induce the viral thymidine...

  14. Systematic Identification and Assessment of Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer Based on Genome-Wide RNA Interference Transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With accumulating public omics data, great efforts have been made to characterize the genetic heterogeneity of breast cancer. However, identifying novel targets and selecting the best from the sizeable lists of candidate targets is still a key challenge for targeted therapy, largely owing to the lack of economical, efficient and systematic discovery and assessment to prioritize potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe an approach that combines the computational evaluation and objective, multifaceted assessment to systematically identify and prioritize targets for biological validation and therapeutic exploration. We first establish the reference gene expression profiles from breast cancer cell line MCF7 upon genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi of a total of 3689 genes, and the breast cancer query signatures using RNA-seq data generated from tissue samples of clinical breast cancer patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Based on gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of 510 genes that when knocked down could significantly reverse the transcriptome of breast cancer state. We then perform multifaceted assessment to analyze the gene set to prioritize potential targets for gene therapy. We also propose drug repurposing opportunities and identify potentially druggable proteins that have been poorly explored with regard to the discovery of small-molecule modulators. Finally, we obtained a small list of candidate therapeutic targets for four major breast cancer subtypes, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+ and triple negative breast cancer. This RNAi transcriptome-based approach can be a helpful paradigm for relevant researches to identify and prioritize candidate targets for experimental validation.

  15. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekanova M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cekanova, Kusum Rathore Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. Keywords: mouse cancer model, companion animal cancer model, dogs, cats, molecular targets

  16. A target based approach identifies genomic predictors of breast cancer patient response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallett Robin M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of chemotherapy regimens in breast cancer patients is variable and unpredictable. Whether individual patients either achieve long-term remission or suffer recurrence after therapy may be dictated by intrinsic properties of their breast tumors including genetic lesions and consequent aberrant transcriptional programs. Global gene expression profiling provides a powerful tool to identify such tumor-intrinsic transcriptional programs, whose analyses provide insight into the underlying biology of individual patient tumors. For example, multi-gene expression signatures have been identified that can predict the likelihood of disease reccurrence, and thus guide patient prognosis. Whereas such prognostic signatures are being introduced in the clinical setting, similar signatures that predict sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy are not currently clinically available. Methods We used gene expression profiling to identify genes that were co-expressed with genes whose transcripts encode the protein targets of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. Results Here, we present target based expression indices that predict breast tumor response to anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy. Indeed, these signatures were independently predictive of chemotherapy response after adjusting for standard clinic-pathological variables such as age, grade, and estrogen receptor status in a cohort of 488 breast cancer patients treated with adriamycin and taxotere/taxol. Conclusions Importantly, our findings suggest the practicality of developing target based indices that predict response to therapeutics, as well as highlight the possibility of using gene signatures to guide the use of chemotherapy during treatment of breast cancer patients.

  17. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe June 2013 Print this issue Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer Send us your comments By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ... therapies for some patients. Endometrial cancer affects the lining ...

  18. Recurrent Fusion Genes in Leukemia: An Attractive Target for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Wu, Nan; Liu, Duo; Jin, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Since the first fusion gene was discovered decades ago, a considerable number of fusion genes have been detected in leukemia. The majority of them are generated through chromosomal rearrangement or abnormal transcription. With the development of techniques, high-throughput sequencing method makes it possible to detect fusion genes systematically in multiple human cancers. Owing to their biological significance and tumor-specific expression, some of the fusion genes are attractive diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) targeting BCR-ABL1 fusions have been widely used to treat CML. The combination of ATRA and ATO targeting PML-RARA fusions has proven to be effective in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Moreover, therapy with high dose cytarabine (HDAC) has significantly improved the prognosis of core binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, studies on fusion genes may benefit patients with leukemia by providing more diagnostic markers and therapies in the future. The presented review focuses on the history of fusion genes, mechanisms of formation, and treatments against specific fusion genes in leukemia.

  19. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  20. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffy, M.J.; Napieralski, R.; Martens, J.W.; Span, P.N.; Spyratos, F.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Brunner, N.; Foekens, J.A.; Schmitt, M.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that

  1. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schenk, E.; Essand, M.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Danielsson, A.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Hoeben, R.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Lindholm, L.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nilsson, B.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, J. L. M.; de Vrij, J.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Willemsen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 807-813 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  2. gene polymorphisms in Iranian prostate cancer subjects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-10-25

    Oct 25, 2010 ... 1Genetic Research Group, Molecular and Bioinformatics Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health ... GSTM1 (odds ratio 0.54, 95% CI 0.27 - 1.08) genes and higher risk of prostate cancer among Iranian ..... transferase; mechanism and relevance to variations in human risk.

  3. Mechanoresponsive stem cells to target cancer metastases through biophysical cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linan; Zhang, Shirley X; Liao, Wenbin; Farhoodi, Henry P; Wong, Chi W; Chen, Claire C; Ségaliny, Aude I; Chacko, Jenu V; Nguyen, Lily P; Lu, Mengrou; Polovin, George; Pone, Egest J; Downing, Timothy L; Lawson, Devon A; Digman, Michelle A; Zhao, Weian

    2017-07-26

    Despite decades of effort, little progress has been made to improve the treatment of cancer metastases. To leverage the central role of the mechanoenvironment in cancer metastasis, we present a mechanoresponsive cell system (MRCS) to selectively identify and treat cancer metastases by targeting the specific biophysical cues in the tumor niche in vivo. Our MRCS uses mechanosensitive promoter-driven mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based vectors, which selectively home to and target cancer metastases in response to specific mechanical cues to deliver therapeutics to effectively kill cancer cells, as demonstrated in a metastatic breast cancer mouse model. Our data suggest a strong correlation between collagen cross-linking and increased tissue stiffness at the metastatic sites, where our MRCS is specifically activated by the specific cancer-associated mechano-cues. MRCS has markedly reduced deleterious effects compared to MSCs constitutively expressing therapeutics. MRCS indicates that biophysical cues, specifically matrix stiffness, are appealing targets for cancer treatment due to their long persistence in the body (measured in years), making them refractory to the development of resistance to treatment. Our MRCS can serve as a platform for future diagnostics and therapies targeting aberrant tissue stiffness in conditions such as cancer and fibrotic diseases, and it should help to elucidate mechanobiology and reveal what cells "feel" in the microenvironment in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Inflammation as target in cancer therapy.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marelli, G.; Sica, A.; Vannucci, Luca; Allavena, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 35, August 2017 (2017), s. 57-65 ISSN 1471-4892 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cancer therapy * cancer-promoting inflammation * Tumour-Associated Macrophages Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 5.363, year: 2016

  5. Global gene expression analysis reveals reduced abundance of putative microRNA targets in human prostate tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs have taken centre stage in the field of human molecular oncology. Several studies have shown that miRNA profiling analyses offer new possibilities in cancer classification, diagnosis and prognosis. However, the function of miRNAs that are dysregulated in tumours remains largely a mystery. Global analysis of miRNA-target gene expression has helped illuminate the role of miRNAs in developmental gene expression programs, but such an approach has not been reported in cancer transcriptomics. Results In this study, we globally analysed the expression patterns of miRNA target genes in prostate cancer by using several public microarray datasets. Intriguingly, we found that, in contrast to global mRNA transcript levels, putative miRNA targets showed a reduced abundance in prostate tumours relative to benign prostate tissue. Additionally, the down-regulation of these miRNA targets positively correlated with the number of types of miRNA target-sites in the 3' untranslated regions of these targets. Further investigation revealed that the globally low expression was mainly driven by the targets of 36 specific miRNAs that were reported to be up-regulated in prostate cancer by a miRNA expression profiling study. We also found that the transcript levels of miRNA targets were lower in androgen-independent prostate cancer than in androgen-dependent prostate cancer. Moreover, when the global analysis was extended to four other cancers, significant differences in transcript levels between miRNA targets and total mRNA backgrounds were found. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis, along with further investigation, suggests that miRNA targets have a significantly reduced transcript abundance in prostate cancer, when compared with the combined pool of all mRNAs. The abnormal expression pattern of miRNA targets in human cancer could be a common feature of the human cancer transcriptome. Our study may help to shed new

  6. miRNA-135a promotes breast cancer cell migration and invasion by targeting HOXA10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yating; Zhang, Hongwei; Ma, Duan; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Huijun; Zhao, Jiayi; Xu, Cheng; Du, Yingying; Luo, Xin; Zheng, Fengyun; Liu, Rui

    2012-01-01

    miRNAs are a group of small RNA molecules regulating target genes by inducing mRNA degradation or translational repression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs correlates with various cancers. Although miR-135a has been implicated in several other cancers, its role in breast cancer is unknown. HOXA10 however, is associated with multiple cancer types and was recently shown to induce p53 expression in breast cancer cells and reduce their invasive ability. Because HOXA10 is a confirmed miR-135a target in more than one tissue, we examined miR-135a levels in relation to breast cancer phenotypes to determine if miR-135a plays role in this cancer type. Expression levels of miR-135a in tissues and cells were determined by poly (A)-RT PCR. The effect of miR-135a on proliferation was evaluated by CCK8 assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays, and target protein expression was determined by western blotting. GFP and luciferase reporter plasmids were constructed to confirm the action of miR-135a on downstream target genes including HOXA10. Results are reported as means ± S.D. and differences were tested for significance using 2-sided Student's t-test. Here we report that miR-135a was highly expressed in metastatic breast tumors. We found that the expression of miR-135a was required for the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, but not their proliferation. HOXA10, which encodes a transcription factor required for embryonic development and is a metastasis suppressor in breast cancer, was shown to be a direct target of miR-135a in breast cancer cells. Our analysis showed that miR-135a suppressed the expression of HOXA10 both at the mRNA and protein level, and its ability to promote cellular migration and invasion was partially reversed by overexpression of HOXA10. In summary, our results indicate that miR-135a is an onco-miRNA that can promote breast cancer cell migration and invasion. HOXA10 is a target gene for mi

  7. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.K. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); E. Castro (Elena); H. Lilja (Hans); A.J. Vickers (Andrew); D. Sjoberg (Daniel); M. Assel (Matthias); C.S. Foster; G. Mitchell (Gillian); K. Drew (Kate); L. Maehle; K. Axcrona; D.G. Evans (Gareth); B. Bulman; D. Eccles (Diana); D. McBride (Donna); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); H. Vasen (Hans); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); J. Ringelberg (Janneke); C. Cybulski (Cezary); D. Wokolorczyk (Dominika); C.G. Selkirk (Christina); P.J. Hulick (Peter); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); J. Lam (Jimmy); L. Taylor (Lorne); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); R.G.H.M. Cremers; G. Verhaegh (Gerald); W.A. van Zelst-Stams; J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. Salinas; J. Cook (Jackie); K. Rosario (Karyna); S.S. Buys (Saundra); T. Conner (Tom); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); J. Powers (Jacquelyn); P.J. Teixeira; S. Maia (Sofia); W.D. Foulkes (William); N. Taherian (Nassim); M.W.G. Ruijs (Marielle); A.T.H.-V. den Enden (Apollonia T. Helderman-Van); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); M.A. Adank (Muriel); L.J. Walker (Lisa); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Tucker (Kathryn); J. Kirk (Judy); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); M. Harris (Marion); F. Douglas (Fiona); G.J. Lindeman; J. Zgajnar (Janez); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); V. Clowes; R. Susman (Rachel); T. Ramon Y Cajal; N. Patcher (Nicholas); N. Gadea (Neus); A. Spigelman; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); A. Liljegren (Annelie); L. Side (Lucy); C. Brewer (Carole); A.F. Brady (Angela); A. Donaldson (Alan); V. Stefansdottir (Vigdis); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Chen-Shtoyerman (Rakefet); D. Amor (David); L. Copakova (Lucia); J. Barwell (Julian); V.N. Giri (Veda); A.C. Murthy (Adeline C.); N. Nicolai (Nicola); S.-H. Teo; T. Greenhalgh (Trisha); S. Strom; A. Henderson (Alex); J. McGrath (John); D. Gallagher (David); N.K. Aaronson (Neil); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); C.H. Bangma (Chris); D. Dearnaley (David); A. Costello (Anthony); J. Eyfjord; J. Rothwell (Jeanette); A. Falconer; H. Grönberg (Henrik); F. Hamdy (Freddie); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); V. Khoo; Z. Kote-Jarai; J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Axcrona; J. Melia; E.T. McKinley (Enid); A. Mitra (Anita); C. Moynihan; G. Rennert (Gad); M. Suri (Mohnish); P. Wilson; S.R. Killick; S.M. Moss (Sue); R. Eeles (Rosalind)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted

  8. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, E.K.; Page, E.C.; Castro, E.; Lilja, H.; Vickers, A.; Sjoberg, D.; Assel, M.; Foster, C.S.; Mitchell, G.; Drew, K.; Maehle, L.; Axcrona, K.; Evans, D.G.; Bulman, B.; Eccles, D.; McBride, D.; van Asperen, C.; Vasen, H.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Ringelberg, J.; Cybulski, C.; Wokolorczyk, D.; Selkirk, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Bojesen, A.; Skytte, A.B.; Lam, J.; Taylor, L.; Oldenburg, R.; Cremers, R.; Verhaegh, G.; van Zelst-Stams, W.A.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Blanco, I.; Salinas, M.; Cook, J.; Rosario, D.J.; Buys, S.; Conner, T.; Ausems, M.G.; Ong, K.R.; Hoffman, J.; Domchek, S.; Powers, J.; Teixeira, M.R.; Maia, S.; Foulkes, W.D.; Taherian, N.; Ruijs, M.; den Enden, A.T.; Izatt, L.; Davidson, R.; Adank, M.A.; Walker, L.; Schmutzler, R.; Tucker, K.; Kirk, J.; Hodgson, S.; Harris, M.; Douglas, F.; Lindeman, G.J.; Zgajnar, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Clowes, V.E.; Susman, R.; Ramón Y Cajal, T.; Patcher, N.; Gadea, N.; Spigelman, A.; van Os, T.; Liljegren, A.; Side, L.; Brewer, C.; Brady, A.F.; Donaldson, A.; Stefansdottir, V.; Friedman, E.; Chen-Shtoyerman, R.; Amor, D.J.; Copakova, L.; Barwell, J.; Giri, V.N.; Murthy, V.; Nicolai, N.; Teo, S.H.; Greenhalgh, L.; Strom, S.; Henderson, A.; McGrath, J.; Gallagher, D.; Aaronson, N.K.; Ardern-Jones, A.; Bangma, C.; Dearnaley, D.; Costello, P.; Eyfjord, J.; Rothwell, J.; Falconer, A.; Gronberg, H.; Hamdy, F.C.; Johannsson, O.; Khoo, V.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Lubinski, J.; Axcrona, U.; Melia, J.; McKinley, J.; Mitra, A.V.; Moynihan, C.; Rennert, G.; Suri, M.; Wilson, P.; Killick, E.; Moss, S.; Eeles, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  9. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, E.K.; Page, E.C.; Castro, E.; Lilja, H.; Vickers, A.; Sjoberg, D.; Assel, M.; Foster, C.S.; Mitchell, G.; Drew, K.; Maehle, L.; Axcrona, K.; Evans, D.G.; Bulman, B.; Eccles, D.; McBride, D.; Asperen, C. van; Vasen, H.; Kiemeney, B.; Ringelberg, J.; Cybulski, C.; Wokolorczyk, D.; Selkirk, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Bojesen, A.; Skytte, A.B.; Lam, J.; Taylor, L.; Oldenburg, R.; Cremers, R.; Verhaegh, G.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Blanco, I.; Salinas, M.; Cook, J; Rosario, D.J.; Buys, S.; Conner, T.; Ausems, M.G.; Ong, K.R.; Hoffman, J.; Domchek, S.; Powers, J.; Teixeira, M.R.; Maia, S.; Foulkes, W.D.; Taherian, N.; Ruijs, M.; Enden, A.T. den; Izatt, L.; Davidson, R.; Adank, M.A.; Walker, L.; Schmutzler, R.; Tucker, K.; Kirk, J.; Hodgson, S.; Harris, M.; Douglas, F.; Lindeman, G.J.; Zgajnar, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Clowes, V.E.; Susman, R.; Ramon, Y.C.T.; Patcher, N.; Gadea, N.; Spigelman, A.; Os, T. van; Liljegren, A.; Side, L.; Brewer, C.; Brady, A.F.; Donaldson, A.; Stefansdottir, V.; Friedman, E.; Chen-Shtoyerman, R.; Amor, D.J.; Copakova, L.; Barwell, J.; Giri, V.N.; Murthy, V.; Nicolai, N.; Teo, S.H.; Greenhalgh, L.; Strom, S.; Henderson, A.; McGrath, J.; Gallagher, D.; Aaronson, N.; Ardern-Jones, A.; Bangma, C.; Dearnaley, D.; Costello, P.; Eyfjord, J.; Rothwell, J.; Falconer, A.; Gronberg, H.; Hamdy, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  10. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers : Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Maehle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T.; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A.; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E.; Susman, Rachel; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F.; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J.; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N.; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V.; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  11. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T.; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A.; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E.; Susman, Rachel; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F.; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J.; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N.; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V.; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Eeles, Rosalind; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Taylor, Natalie; Pope, Jenny; Saya, Sibel; Martin, Sue; Keating, Diana; Petelin, Lara; Murphy, Morgan; Doherty, Rebecca; Pratt, Sarah; Murphy, Declan; Cleeve, Laurence; Miller, Cathy; Stapleton, Alan; Chong, Michael; Suthers, Graeme; Tucker, Katherine; Andrews, Lesley; Duffy, Jessica; Millard, Richard; Ward, Robyn; Williams, Rachel; Stricker, Phillip; Bowman, Michelle; Patel, Manish; O'Connell, Shona; Hunt, Clare; Smyth, Courtney; Frydenberg, Mark; Lindeman, Geoffrey; Shackleton, Kylie; McGaughran, Julie; Boon, Melanie; Pachter, Nicholas; Townshend, Sharron; Schofield, Lyn; Gleeson, Margaret; Scott, Rodney; Amor, David; Burke, Jo; Patterson, Briony; Bacic, Sonya; Swindle, Peter; Foulkes, William; Aprikian, Armen; Bojeson, Anders; Cruger, Dorthe; Osther, Palle; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Luedtke-Heckenkamp, Kerstin; Ochsendorf, Nicole; Fiddike, Kerstin; Sarin, Rajiv; Awatagiri, Kasturi; Ghonge, Sujata; Kowtal, Pradnya; Mulgund, Gouri; Bambury, Richard; Farrell, Michael; Gallagher, Fergal; Ben-Yehoshua, Sagi Josefsberg; Nissani, Rachel; Appelman, Zvi; Moriel, Evyatar; Radice, Paolo; Valdagni, Riccardo; Magnani, Tiziana; teo, Soo Hwang; Tan, Hui Meng; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Kiemeney, Bart; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Maehle, Lovise; Moller, Pal; Brennhovd, Bjorn; Medvik, Heidi; Hanslien, Eldbjørg; Ruijs, Mariëlle W. G.; Helderman- van den Enden, A. Paula T. J. M.; Teixeira, Manuel; Peixoto, Ana; Henrique, Rui; Oliveira, Jorge; Gonçalves, Nuno; Araújo, Luís; Seixas, Manuela; Souto, João Paulo; Nogueira, Pedro; Krajc, Mateja; Vrecar, Alenka; Salinas, Mónica; Capella, Gabriel; Fisas, David; Balmaña, Judith; Morote, Juan; Hjälm-Eriksson, Marie; Ekdahl, Karl-Johan; Carlsson, Stefan; Hanson, Helen; Shanley, Susan; Goh, Chee; Wiggins, Jennifer; Kohut, Kelly; van As, Nicholas; Thompson, Alan; Ogden, Chris; Borley, Nigel; Woodhouse, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Mercer, Catherine; Paterson, Joan; Clowes, Virginia; Taylor, Amy; Newcombe, Barbara; Halliday, Dorothy; Stayner, Barbara; Fleming-Brown, D.; Brice, Glen; Homfray, Tessa; Hammond, Carrie; Potter, Alison; Renton, Caroline; Searle, Anne; Hill, Kathryn; Goodman, Selina; Garcia, Lynda; Devlin, Gemma; Everest, Sarah; Nadolski, Maria; Jobson, Irene; Paez, Edgar; Tomkins, Sue; Pichert, Gabriella; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Weston, Michelle; Brady, Angela; Dorkins, Huw; Melville, Athalie; Kosicka-Slawinska, Monika; Cummings, Carole; Kiesel, Vicki; Bartlett, Marion; Randhawa, Kashmir; Ellery, Natalie; Male, Alison; Simon, Kate; Rees, Katie; Compton, Cecilia; Tidey, Lizzie; Nevitt, Louise; Ingram, Stuart; Rosario, Derek; Catto, James; Howson, Joanne; Chapman, Cyril; Cole, Trevor; Heaton, Tricia; Burgess, Lucy; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Cathy; Duncan, Alexis; Kockelbergh, Roger; Sattar, Ayisha; Kaemba, Beckie; Sidat, Zahirah; Patel, Nafisa; Siguake, Kas; Birt, Angela; Poultney, Una; Umez-Eronini, Nkem; Mom, Jaswant; Roberts, Gillian; Woodward, Anthony; Sutton, Vivienne; Cornford, Philip; Treherne, Katy; Griffiths, Julie; Cogley, Lyn; Hulick, Peter; Rubinstein, Wendy; Brendler, Charles; Helfand, Brian; McGuire, Michael; Kaul, Karen; Shevrin, Daniel; Weissman, Scott; Newlin, Anna; Vogel, Kristen; Weiss, Shelly; Goldgar, David; Venne, Vickie; Stephenson, Robert; Dechet, Christopher; Arun, Banu; Davis, John W.; Yamamura, Yuko; Giri, Veda; Gross, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  12. Extensive decoupling of metabolic genes in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Ed; Sander, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Tumorigenesis requires the re-organization of metabolism to support malignant proliferation. We examine how the altered metabolism of cancer cells is reflected in the rewiring of co-expression patterns among metabolic genes. Focusing on breast and clear-cell kidney tumors, we report the existence of key metabolic genes which act as hubs of differential co-expression, showing significantly different co-regulation patterns between normal and tumor states. We compare our findings to those from classical differential expression analysis, and counterintuitively observe that the extent of a gene's differential co-expression only weakly correlates with its differential expression, suggesting that the two measures probe different features of metabolism. Focusing on this discrepancy, we use changes in co-expression patterns to highlight the apparent loss of regulation by the transcription factor HNF4A in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, despite no differential expression of HNF4A. Finally, we aggregate the results of differential co-expression analysis into a Pan-Cancer analysis across seven distinct cancer types to identify pairs of metabolic genes which may be recurrently dysregulated. Among our results is a cluster of four genes, all components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which show significant loss of co-expression in tumor tissue, pointing to potential mitochondrial dysfunction in these tumor types.

  13. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miné-Hattab, Judith; Fleury, Geneviève; Prevost, Chantal; Dutreix, Marie; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-04-05

    Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA) polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases) in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  14. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Miné-Hattab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  15. Advances in sarcoma gene mutations and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Seebacher, Nicole A; Hornicek, Francis; Guo, Zheng; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2018-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare and complex malignancies that have been associated with a poor prognostic outcome. Over the last few decades, traditional treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy has not significantly improved outcomes for most types of sarcomas. In recent years, there have been significant advances in the understanding of specific gene mutations that are important in driving the pathogenesis and progression of sarcomas. Identification of these new gene mutations, using next-generation sequencing and advanced molecular techniques, has revealed a range of potential therapeutic targets. This, in turn, may lead to the development of novel agents targeted to different sarcoma subtypes. In this review, we highlight the advances made in identifying sarcoma gene mutations, including those of p53, RB, PI3K and IDH genes, as well as novel therapeutic strategies aimed at utilizing these mutant genes. In addition, we discuss a number of preclinical studies and ongoing early clinical trials in sarcoma targeting therapies, as well as gene editing technology, which may provide a better choice for sarcoma patient management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Targeting STING pathways for the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Chandra, Dinesh

    2015-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that stimulator of interferon genes (STING) ligand cyclic di-guanylate (c-di-GMP) is an excellent adjuvant in cancer vaccination but also induces immunogenic tumor cell death. Combination of both pathways resulted in a nearly complete elimination of the metastases in a breast cancer model. This study is discussed below.

  17. Targeted Approaches to Overcoming Endocrine Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    resistance in breast cancer: interrelationships among 14-3-3ζ, FOXM1, and a gene signature associated with mitosis Anna Bergamaschi, Barbara L Christensen...factor receptor signaling with repression of classic estrogen receptor genomic function. Cancer Res 2008, 68:826-833. 40. Carr JR, Park HJ, Wang Z, Kiefer

  18. Identification of recurrent FGFR3 fusion genes in lung cancer through kinome-centred RNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majewski, Ian J.; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Davidson, Nadia M.; Bosma, Astrid; Willems, Stefan M.; Horlings, Hugo M.; de Rink, Iris; Greger, Liliana; Hooijer, Gerrit Kj; Peters, Dennis; Nederlof, Petra M.; Hofland, Ingrid; de Jong, Jeroen; Wesseling, Jelle; Kluin, Roelof Jc; Brugman, Wim; Kerkhoven, Ron; Nieboer, Frank; Roepman, Paul; Broeks, Annegien; Muley, Thomas R.; Jassem, Jacek; Niklinski, Jacek; van Zandwijk, Nico; Brazma, Alvis; Oshlack, Alicia; van den Heuvel, Michel; Bernards, René

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic fusion genes that involve kinases have proven to be effective targets for therapy in a wide range of cancers. Unfortunately, the diagnostic approaches required to identify these events are struggling to keep pace with the diverse array of genetic alterations that occur in cancer.

  19. The tumor suppressor gene hypermethylated in cancer 1 is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenal, Mathias; Trinh, Emmanuelle; Britschgi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) gene encodes a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that cooperates with p53 to suppress cancer development. We and others recently showed that HIC1 is a transcriptional target of p53. To identify additional transcriptional regulators of HIC1, we screened...

  20. Targeting SRC Family Kinases in HSP90 in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Targeting SRC Family Kinases and HSP90 in Lung Cancer...COVERED Annual 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting SRC Family Kinases in HSP90 in Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nedd9, Src , HSP90

  1. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-06-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n = 4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments.

  2. Identification of valid reference genes for gene expression studies of human stomach cancer by reverse transcription-qPCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Byoung-Chan; Choi, Eun-Seok; Choi, Il-Ju; Lee, Yeon-Su; Goh, Sung-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful method for the analysis of gene expression. Target gene expression levels are usually normalized to a consistently expressed reference gene also known as internal standard, in the same sample. However, much effort has not been expended thus far in the search for reference genes suitable for the study of stomach cancer using RT-qPCR, although selection of optimal reference genes is critical for interpretation of results. We assessed the suitability of six possible reference genes, beta-actin (ACTB), glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), ribosomal subunit L29 (RPL29) and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) in 20 normal and tumor stomach tissue pairs of stomach cancer patients and 6 stomach cancer cell lines, by RT-qPCR. Employing expression stability analyses using NormFinder and geNorm algorithms we determined the order of performance of these reference genes and their variation values. This RT-qPCR study showed that there are statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in the expression levels of HPRT1 and 18S rRNA in 'normal-' versus 'tumor stomach tissues'. The stability analyses by geNorm suggest B2M-GAPDH, as best reference gene combination for 'stomach cancer cell lines'; RPL29-HPRT1, for 'all stomach tissues'; and ACTB-18S rRNA, for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. NormFinder also identified B2M as the best reference gene for 'stomach cancer cell lines', RPL29-B2M for 'all stomach tissues', and 18S rRNA-ACTB for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. The comparisons of normalized expression of the target gene, GPNMB, showed different interpretation of target gene expression depend on best single reference gene or combination. This study validated RPL29 and RPL29-B2M as the best single reference

  3. MicroRNA-gene signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Drakaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths and is characterized by early metastasis and pronounced resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Despite extensive esearch efforts, there is not any substantial progress regarding the identification of novel drugs against pancreatic cancer. Although the introduction of the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine improved clinical response, the prognosis of these patients remained extremely poor with a 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. Thus, the identification of the novel molecular pathways involved in pancreatic oncogenesis and the development of new and potent therapeutic options are highly desirable. Here, we describe how microRNAs control signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated during pancreatic oncogenesis. In addition, we provide evidence that microRNAs could be potentially used as novel pancreatic cancer therapeutics through reversal of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance or regulation of essential molecular pathways. Further studies should integrate the deregulated genes and microRNAs into molecular networks in order to identify the central regulators of pancreatic oncogenesis. Targeting these central regulators could lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer patients.

  4. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    since, in the absence of such knowledge, the development of effective therapeutic interventions to target CSCs and prevent cancer progression and...yes) (2) Presentations: a. 2016 Keystone Symposia- Stem Cells & Cancer, Breckenridge, “Epigenetic regulation promotes obesity related breast

  5. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2016-11-29

    Compositions for detecting and/or destroying cancer tumors and/or cancer cells via photodynamic therapy are disclosed, as well as methods of use thereof. The compositions comprise a linking protein or peptide attached to or otherwise physically associated with a carbon nanotube to form a targeted protein-carbon nanotube complex.

  6. Oncolytic Virotherapy Targeting Lung Cancer Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    resistant phenotype. Because cisplatin is highly mutagenic, it has an ability to quickly induce genetic changes in cancer cells usually resulting in... Mendelian selection and generation of cells that acquire a permanent resistant phenotype (8). We initially exposed both KLN205 and LLC1 to increasing...multiple epigenetic and genetic changes. Pharmacological reviews 64:706-721. 9. Siegel, R., D. Naishadham, and A. Jemal. 2013. Cancer statistics, 2013

  7. Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor that inhibits RET, FGFRs, VEGFRs and PDGFRs3. This drug is in the clinic and approved for treatment of advanced thyroid ...hypothesis is correct, treatment of men with lenvatinib may enhance long term treatment outcomes in men with more aggressive disease Fig 7. Lenvatinib... thyroid cancer and other solid tumors, Cancer Treat Rev 2016, 42:47-55 4. Yu W, Feng S, Dakhova O, Creighton CJ, Cai Y, Wang J, Li R, Frolov A, Ayala G

  8. Targeting Autophagy in ALK-Associated Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Frentzel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process, which is used by the cells for cytoplasmic quality control. This process is induced following different kinds of stresses e.g., metabolic, environmental, or therapeutic, and acts, in this framework, as a cell survival mechanism. However, under certain circumstances, autophagy has been associated with cell death. This duality has been extensively reported in solid and hematological cancers, and has been observed during both tumor development and cancer therapy. As autophagy plays a critical role at the crossroads between cell survival and cell death, its involvement and therapeutic modulation (either activation or inhibition are currently intensively studied in cancer biology, to improve treatments and patient outcomes. Over the last few years, studies have demonstrated the occurrence of autophagy in different Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK-associated cancers, notably ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, Neuroblastoma (NB, and Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS. In this review, we will first briefly describe the autophagic process and how it can lead to opposite outcomes in anti-cancer therapies, and we will then focus on what is currently known regarding autophagy in ALK-associated cancers.

  9. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers.

  10. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B.; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A.; Lizee, Gregory A.; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as “NLRC5” [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers. PMID:27162338

  11. Identification and characterization of DNAzymes targeting DNA methyltransferase I for suppressing bladder cancer proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangbo; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Nianhua; Yang, Xinghui; Zhang, Jin; He, Jiang; Li, Zhi; Sun, Lun-Quan, E-mail: lunquansun@csu.edu.cn

    2015-05-29

    Epigenetic inactivation of genes plays a critical role in many important human diseases, especially in cancer. A core mechanism for epigenetic inactivation of the genes is methylation of CpG islands in genome DNA, which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). The inhibition of DNMTs may lead to demethylation and expression of the silenced tumor suppressor genes. Although DNMT inhibitors are currently being developed as potential anticancer agents, only limited success is achieved due to substantial toxicity. Here, we utilized a multiplex selection system to generate efficient RNA-cleaving DNAzymes targeting DNMT1. The lead molecule from the selection was shown to possess efficient kinetic profiles and high efficiency in inhibiting the enzyme activity. Transfection of the DNAzyme caused significant down-regulation of DNMT1 expression and reactivation of p16 gene, resulting in reduced cell proliferation of bladder cancers. This study provides an alternative for targeting DNMTs for potential cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Identified DNMT1-targeted DNAzymes by multiplex selection system. • Biochemically characterized a lead DNAzyme with high kinetic efficiency. • Validated DNMT1-targeted DNAzyme in its enzymatic and cellular activities.

  12. Metabolic isoenzyme shifts in cancer as potential novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ononye, S N; Shi, W; Wali, V B; Aktas, B; Jiang, T; Hatzis, C; Pusztai, L

    2014-12-01

    The functional redundancy of metabolic enzyme expression may present a new strategy for developing targeted therapies in cancer. To satisfy the increased metabolic demand required during neoplastic transformations and proliferation, cancer cells may rely on additional isoforms of a metabolic enzyme to satisfy the increased demand for metabolic precursors, which could subsequently render cancer cells more vulnerable to isoform-specific inhibitors. In this review, we provide a survey of common isoenzyme shifts that have been reported to be important in cancer metabolism and link those to metabolic pathways that currently have drugs in various stages of development. This phenomenon suggests a potentially new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer by identifying shifts in the expression of metabolic isoenzymes between cancer and normal cells. We also delineate other putative metabolic isoenzymes that could be targets for novel targeted therapies for cancer. Changes in isoenzyme expression that occur during neoplastic transformations or in response to environmental pressure in cancer cells may result in isoenzyme diversity that may subsequently render cancer cells more vulnerable to isoform-specific inhibitors due to reliance on a single isoform to perform a vital enzymatic function.

  13. IGF1 Receptor Targeted Theranostic Nanoparticles for Targeted and Image-Guided Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M; Wang, Liya; Wang, Y Andrew; Chen, Hongyu; Kooby, David; Yu, Qian; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-08-25

    Overcoming resistance to chemotherapy is a major and unmet medical challenge in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Poor drug delivery due to stromal barriers in the tumor microenvironment and aggressive tumor biology are additional impediments toward a more successful treatment of pancreatic cancer. In attempts to address these challenges, we developed IGF1 receptor (IGF1R)-directed, multifunctional theranostic nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents into IGF1R-expressing drug-resistant tumor cells and tumor-associated stromal cells. These nanoparticles were prepared by conjugating recombinant human IGF1 to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying the anthracycline doxorubicin (Dox) as the chemotherapeutic payload. Intravenously administered IGF1-IONPs exhibited excellent tumor targeting and penetration in an orthotopic patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model of pancreatic cancer featuring enriched tumor stroma and heterogeneous cancer cells. IGF1R-targeted therapy using the theranostic IGF1-IONP-Dox significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic PDX tumors. The effects of the intratumoral nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic responses in the orthotopic pancreatic PDX tumors could be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with IONP-induced contrasts. Histological analysis showed that IGF1R-targeted delivery of Dox significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptotic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, further development of IGF1R-targeted theranostic IONPs and MRI-guided cancer therapy as a precision nanomedicine may provide the basis for more effective treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Radioiodine Therapy in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The First Targeted Therapy in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Key Chung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Iodide uptake across the membranes of thyroid follicular cells and cancer cells occurs through an active transport process mediated by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS. The rat and human NIS-coding genes were cloned and identified in 1996. Evaluation of NIS gene and protein expression is critical for the management of thyroid cancer, and several approaches to increase NIS levels have been tried. Identification of the NIS gene has provided a means of expanding its role in radionuclide therapy and molecular target-specific theragnosis (therapy and diagnosis using the same molecular target. In this article, we describe the relationship between NIS expression and the thyroid carcinoma treatment using I-131 and alternative therapeutic approaches.

  15. E2F target genes: unraveling the biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Ciro, Marco; Cocito, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are downstream effectors of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway and are required for the timely regulation of numerous genes essential for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Several laboratories have used genome-wide approaches to discover novel target...

  16. A novel mechanism for p53 to regulate its target gene ECK in signaling apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y Jenny; Wang, Jianli; Qiao, Changhong; Hei, Tom K; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W; Yin, Yuxin

    2006-10-01

    Transcription factor p53 regulates its target genes through binding to DNA consensus sequence and activating the promoters of its downstream genes. The conventional p53 consensus binding sequence was defined as two copies of the 10-bp motif 5'-PuPuPuC(A/T)(T/A)GPyPyPy-3' with a spacer of 0 to 13 bp, which exists in the regulatory regions of some p53 target genes. However, there is no such p53 consensus sequence in the promoters of a number of p53-responsive genes, suggesting that there might be other mechanisms whereby p53 transactivates the promoters of its target genes. We report here that p53 uses a novel binding mechanism to regulate the transcription of epithelial cell kinase (ECK), a receptor protein-tyrosine kinase implicated in signal transduction. We show that p53 binds to a 10-bp perfect palindromic decanucleotide (GTGACGTCAC) in the ECK promoter, activates the ECK promoter, and increases the transcription of ECK. This palindrome is required for p53-mediated transactivation of the ECK promoter. ECK is highly responsive to oxidative damage that leads to cell death. Ectopic expression of ECK causes spontaneous apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We found that ectopic expression of a mutant ECK fails to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Our findings show that p53 is a transcriptional regulator of ECK in mediating apoptosis. The discovery of the novel p53-binding motif in the promoter may lead to the identification of a new class of p53 target genes.

  17. Protein arginine deiminase 4: a target for an epigenetic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Jessica L; Causey, Corey P; Thompson, Paul R

    2011-02-01

    The recent approvals of anticancer therapeutic agents targeting the histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases have highlighted the important role that epigenetics plays in human diseases, and suggested that the factors controlling gene expression are novel drug targets. Protein arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is one such target because its effects on gene expression parallel those observed for the histone deacetylases. We demonstrated that F- and Cl-amidine, two potent PAD4 inhibitors, display micromolar cytotoxic effects towards several cancerous cell lines (HL-60, MCF7 and HT-29); no effect was observed in noncancerous lines (NIH 3T3 and HL-60 granulocytes). These compounds also induced the differentiation of HL-60 and HT29 cells. Finally, these compounds synergistically potentiated the cell killing effects of doxorubicin. Taken together, these findings suggest PAD4 inhibition as a novel epigenetic approach for the treatment of cancer, and suggest that F- and Cl-amidine are candidate therapeutic agents for this disease.

  18. Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells: A New Target for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglei Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal disease among all gynecologic malignancies and is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Although the standard combination of surgery and chemotherapy was initially effective in patients with ovarian cancer, disease relapse commonly occurred due to the generation of chemoresistance. It has been reported that cancer stem cells (CSCs are involved in drug resistance and cancer recurrence. Over the past decades, increasing studies have been done to identify CSCs from human ovarian cancer cells. The present paper will summarize different investigations on ovarian CSCs, including isolation, mechanisms of chemoresistance, and therapeutic approaches. Although there are still numerous challenges to translate basic research to clinical applications, understanding the molecular details of CSCs is essential for developing effective strategies to prevent ovarian cancer and its recurrence.

  19. Targeting the Synthetic Essential Kinases of Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    kinases in mitosis and tumorigenesis. Mol Cancer Res 2007, 5(1):1-10. 12. Kufer TA, Sillje HH, Korner R, Gruss OJ, Meraldi P, Nigg EA: Human TPX2 is...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0027 TITLE: Targeting the synthetic essential kinases of breast cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jen-Tsan...Targeting the synthetic essential kinases of breast cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0027 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  20. Skp2 is a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei eWang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among American women, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death for female in the United States. It has been known that several signaling pathways and various factors play critical roles in the development and progression of breast cancer, such as estrogen receptor, Notch, PTEN, Her2, PI3K/Akt, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Emerging evidence has shown that the F-box protein Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein 2 also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Therefore, in this brief review, we summarize the novel functions of Skp2 in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Moreover, we provide further evidence regarding the state of our knowledge toward the development of novel Skp2 inhibitors especially natural chemopreventive agents as targeted approach for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Functional profiling of microtumors to identify cancer associated fibroblast-derived drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horman, Shane R; To, Jeremy; Lamb, John; Zoll, Jocelyn H; Leonetti, Nicole; Tu, Buu; Moran, Rita; Newlin, Robbin; Walker, John R; Orth, Anthony P

    2017-11-21

    Recent advances in chemotherapeutics highlight the importance of molecularly-targeted perturbagens. Although these therapies typically address dysregulated cancer cell proteins, there are increasing therapeutic modalities that take into consideration cancer cell-extrinsic factors. Targeting components of tumor stroma such as vascular or immune cells has been shown to represent an efficacious approach in cancer treatment. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) exemplify an important stromal component that can be exploited in targeted therapeutics, though their employment in drug discovery campaigns has been relatively minimal due to technical logistics in assaying for CAF-tumor interactions. Here we report a 3-dimensional multi-culture tumor:CAF spheroid phenotypic screening platform that can be applied to high-content drug discovery initiatives. Using a functional genomics approach we systematically profiled 1,024 candidate genes for CAF-intrinsic anti-spheroid activity; identifying several CAF genes important for development and maintenance of tumor:CAF co-culture spheroids. Along with previously reported genes such as WNT, we identify CAF-derived targets such as ARAF and COL3A1 upon which the tumor compartment depends for spheroid development. Specifically, we highlight the G-protein-coupled receptor OGR1 as a unique CAF-specific protein that may represent an attractive drug target for treating colorectal cancer. In vivo , murine colon tumor implants in OGR1 knockout mice displayed delayed tumor growth compared to tumors implanted in wild type littermate controls. These findings demonstrate a robust microphysiological screening approach for identifying new CAF targets that may be applied to drug discovery efforts.

  2. Enzyme targeting strategies for prevention and treatment of cancer: Implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Adil, Mohd; Khan, Rosina; Dhadi, Surendar; Ahmad, Khurshid; Rabbani, Gulam; Bashir, Tufail; Imran, Mohammad Azhar; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Lee, Eun Ju; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Choi, Inho

    2017-12-14

    Extensive growth of cancer in humans is a major cause of death. Numerous studies are being conducted to improve the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer. Recent technological advancements in medical science and research indicate molecular target therapy holds much promise in cancer treatment. In the past, therapeutic and diagnostic targeting of non-glycolytic and glycolytic enzymes in cancer have been successful, and discoveries of biomarker enzymes in cancer hold promise for therapeutic treatments. In this review, we discuss the roles of several cancer-associated enzymes that could potentially act as therapeutic targets, and place special focus on non-glycolytic and glycolytic enzymes. This review indicates that the targeting of metabolic signaling offers a promising means of developing novel anti-cancer therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor initiating cells and chemoresistance: which is the best strategy to target colon cancer stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldino, Emanuela; Tesori, Valentina; Casalbore, Patrizia; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging body of evidence that chemoresistance and minimal residual disease result from selective resistance of a cell subpopulation from the original tumor that is molecularly and phenotypically distinct. These cells are called "cancer stem cells" (CSCs). In this review, we analyze the potential targeting strategies for eradicating CSCs specifically in order to develop more effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic colon cancer. These include induction of terminal epithelial differentiation of CSCs or targeting some genes expressed only in CSCs and involved in self-renewal and chemoresistance. Ideal targets could be cell regulators that simultaneously control the stemness and the resistance of CSCs. Another important aspect of cancer biology, which can also be harnessed to create novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents, is the Warburg effect, also known as aerobic glycolysis. Actually, little is yet known with regard to the metabolism of CSCs population, leaving an exciting unstudied avenue in the dawn of the emerging field of metabolomics.

  4. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  5. A Review: Phytochemicals Targeting JAK/STAT Signaling and IDO Expression in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumuggam, Niroshaathevi; Bhowmick, Neil A; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2015-06-01

    Cancer remains a major health problem worldwide. Among many other factors, two regulatory defects that are present in most cancer cells are constitutive activation of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway and the induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan degradation, through JAK/STAT signaling. Cytokine signaling activates STAT proteins in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival through modulation of target genes. Many phytochemicals can inhibit both JAK/STAT signaling and IDO expression in antigen-presenting cells by targeting different pathways. Some of the promising phytochemicals that are discussed in this review include resveratrol, cucurbitacin, curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, and others. It is now evident that phytochemicals play key roles in inhibition of tumor proliferation and development and provide novel means for therapeutic targeting of cancer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Distinct and competitive regulatory patterns of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    Full Text Available So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs and oncogenes (OCGs that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation.In this study, we developed a novel computational framework for identifying target genes of TSGs and OCGs using TFs as bridges through the integration of protein-protein interactions and gene expression data. We applied this pipeline to ovarian cancer and constructed a three-layer regulatory network. In the network, the top layer was comprised of modulators (TSGs and OCGs, the middle layer included TFs, and the bottom layer contained target genes. Based on regulatory relationships in the network, we compiled TSG and OCG profiles and performed clustering analyses. Interestingly, we found TSGs and OCGs formed two distinct branches. The genes in the TSG branch were significantly enriched in DNA damage and repair, regulating macromolecule metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis, while the genes in the OCG branch were significantly enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. Remarkably, their specific targets showed a reversed functional enrichment in terms of apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway: the target genes regulated by OCGs only were enriched in anti-apoptosis and the target genes regulated by TSGs only were enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway.This study provides the first comprehensive investigation of the interplay of TSGs and OCGs in a regulatory network modulated by TFs. Our application in ovarian cancer revealed distinct regulatory patterns of TSGs and OCGs, suggesting a competitive regulatory mechanism acting upon apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway through

  7. Targeting TMPRSS2 ERG in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    understanding of ERG mediated oncogenesis. We used a novel method to measure gene expression in a high throughput format to screen shRNAs and small... transformation by anchorage independent growth in soft agar (months 13-24 – 75% completed) 1e. Bioinformatic analysis of results correlating gene expression...2c, measure effect on invasion using transwell invasion assay, EMT using immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, and transformation by anchorage

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and Targeted Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally increased in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal cells. ROS plays a vital role in various cellular biological activities including proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and invasion. Besides, ROS participates in tumor microenvironment orchestration. The role of ROS is a doubled-edged sword in pancreatic cancer. The dual roles of ROS depend on the concentration. ROS facilitates carcinogenesis and cancer progression with mild-to-moderate elevated levels, while excessive ROS damages cancer cells dramatically and leads to cell death. Based on the recent knowledge, either promoting ROS generation to increase the concentration of ROS with extremely high levels or enhancing ROS scavenging ability to decrease ROS levels may benefit the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, when faced with oxidative stress, the antioxidant programs of cancer cells have been activated to help cancer cells to survive in the adverse condition. Furthermore, ROS signaling and antioxidant programs play the vital roles in the progression of pancreatic cancer and in the response to cancer treatment. Eventually, it may be the novel target for various strategies and drugs to modulate ROS levels in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26881012

  9. Optimizing target selection and development strategy in cancer treatment: the next wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sausville, Edward A

    2004-09-01

    Successful cancer treatments of the future are being developed with a focus on the molecular targets underlying the pathophysiology of neoplasia. Prominent targets which have emerged are those which are mutated in the course of a cancer's development, and mediate activation or release from suppression of pathways mediating proliferation or apoptosis. These arguably are "pathogenic" targets. However, equally important are targets which can be defined on the basis of "large scale" analysis techniques of gene or protein expression in tumors which define targets expressed as a result of a tumor's differentiation state or tissue of origin ("ontogenic" targets); targets mediating drug uptake or metabolism ("pharmacologic" targets), and "microenvironmental" targets mediating the alteration of tumor stromal elements. Irrespective of the nature of the molecular target which is the focus of new therapeutic efforts, target definition in susceptible tumors or patients ideally would be part of the development plan. In addition, an understanding of the therapeutic index which might be achieved in host vs tumor tissues using a surrogate or actual marker of drug effect ideally would be available from animal models and inform the development strategy in humans.

  10. Nanoparticle Drones to Target Lung Cancer with Radiosensitizers and Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Kumar, Rajiv; Moreau, Michele; Dabney, Raymond; Herman, Allen

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up a new, previously unimaginable world in cancer diagnosis and therapy, leading to the emergence of cancer nanomedicine and nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy. Smart nanomaterials (nanoparticle drones) can now be constructed with capability to precisely target cancer cells and be remotely activated with radiation to emit micrometer-range missile-like electrons to destroy the tumor cells. These nanoparticle drones can also be programmed to deliver therapeutic payloads to tumor sites to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we examine the state-of-the-art and potential of nanoparticle drones in targeting lung cancer. Inhalation (INH) (air) versus traditional intravenous ("sea") routes of navigating physiological barriers using such drones is assessed. Results and analysis suggest that INH route may offer more promise for targeting tumor cells with radiosensitizers and cannabinoids from the perspective of maximizing damage to lung tumors cells while minimizing any collateral damage or side effects.

  11. Targeting therapy-resistant cancer stem cells by hyperthermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oei, A L; Vriend, L E M; Krawczyk, P M

    2017-01-01

    Eradication of all malignant cells is the ultimate but challenging goal of anti-cancer treatment; most traditional clinically-available approaches fail because there are cells in a tumour that either escape therapy or become therapy-resistant. A subpopulation of cancer cells, the cancer stem cells...... (CSCs), is considered to be of particular significance for tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. CSCs are considered in particular to be therapy-resistant and may drive disease recurrence, which positions CSCs in the focus of anti-cancer research, but successful CSC-targeting therapies...... are limited. Here, we argue that hyperthermia - a therapeutic approach based on local heating of a tumour - is potentially beneficial for targeting CSCs in solid tumours. First, hyperthermia has been described to target cells in hypoxic and nutrient-deprived tumour areas where CSCs reside and ionising...

  12. Nanoparticle Drones to Target Lung Cancer with Radiosensitizers and Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred Ngwa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has opened up a new, previously unimaginable world in cancer diagnosis and therapy, leading to the emergence of cancer nanomedicine and nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy. Smart nanomaterials (nanoparticle drones can now be constructed with capability to precisely target cancer cells and be remotely activated with radiation to emit micrometer-range missile-like electrons to destroy the tumor cells. These nanoparticle drones can also be programmed to deliver therapeutic payloads to tumor sites to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we examine the state-of-the-art and potential of nanoparticle drones in targeting lung cancer. Inhalation (INH (air versus traditional intravenous (“sea” routes of navigating physiological barriers using such drones is assessed. Results and analysis suggest that INH route may offer more promise for targeting tumor cells with radiosensitizers and cannabinoids from the perspective of maximizing damage to lung tumors cells while minimizing any collateral damage or side effects.

  13. Genome-wide mapping of Polycomb target genes unravels their roles in cell fate transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Dietrich, Nikolaj; Pasini, Diego

    2006-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that are essential for embryonic development and stem cell renewal and are commonly deregulated in cancer. Here, we identify their target genes using genome-wide location analysis in human embryonic fibroblasts. We find...... that Polycomb-Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), PRC2, and tri-methylated histone H3K27 co-occupy >1000 silenced genes with a strong functional bias for embryonic development and cell fate decisions. We functionally identify 40 genes derepressed in human embryonic fibroblasts depleted of the PRC2 components (EZH2...... that PcGs are part of a preprogrammed memory system established during embryogenesis marking certain key genes for repressive signals during subsequent developmental and differentiation processes....

  14. Bookmarking target genes in mitosis: a shared epigenetic trait of phenotypic transcription factors and oncogenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Grandy, Rodrigo A; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2014-01-15

    The regulatory information for phenotype, proliferation, and growth of normal and tumor cells must be maintained through genome replication in the S phase and cell division during mitosis. Epigenetic mechanisms that include DNA methylation, posttranslational modifications of histones, selective utilization of histone variants, and inheritable RNA molecules play pivotal roles in maintaining cellular identity through mitotic divisions. Recent studies demonstrate that mitotic occupancy of genes, which are determinants of cell fate, growth, and proliferation, by lineage-restricted transcription factors is a key epigenetic mechanism for retention and transmission of cellular expression memory. Evidence is emerging for the presence of distinct transcriptional regulatory microenvironments in mitotic chromosomes in which the genes bookmarked for reactivation postmitotically reside. Importantly, some oncoproteins are present in mitotic microenvironments where they occupy target genes during mitosis and may contribute to perpetuating the transformed phenotype. We discuss emerging regulatory implications of epigenetically bookmarking genes during mitosis for physiologic control as well as for the onset and progression of cancer.

  15. Tumor-targeted nanomedicines for cancer theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Shi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs have multiple drawbacks, including severe side effects and suboptimal therapeutic efficacy. Nanomedicines assist in improving the biodistribution and the target accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs, and are therefore able to enhance the balance between efficacy and toxicity. Multiple different types of nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, including liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates and polymeric micelles, which rely on strategies such as passive targeting, active targeting and triggered release for improved tumor-directed drug delivery. Based on the notion that tumors and metastases are highly heterogeneous, it is important to integrate imaging properties in nanomedicine formulations in order to enable non-invasive and quantitative assessment of targeting efficiency. By allowing for patient pre-selection, such next generation nanotheranostics are useful for facilitating clinical translation and personalizing nanomedicine treatments. PMID:27865762

  16. Large scale RNAi screen in Tribolium reveals novel target genes for pest control and the proteasome as prime target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Julia; Dao, Van Anh; Majumdar, Upalparna; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schwirz, Jonas; Schultheis, Dorothea; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Leboulle, Gérard; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stanke, Mario; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-09-03

    Insect pest control is challenged by insecticide resistance and negative impact on ecology and health. One promising pest specific alternative is the generation of transgenic plants, which express double stranded RNAs targeting essential genes of a pest species. Upon feeding, the dsRNA induces gene silencing in the pest resulting in its death. However, the identification of efficient RNAi target genes remains a major challenge as genomic tools and breeding capacity is limited in most pest insects impeding whole-animal-high-throughput-screening. We use the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum as a screening platform in order to identify the most efficient RNAi target genes. From about 5,000 randomly screened genes of the iBeetle RNAi screen we identify 11 novel and highly efficient RNAi targets. Our data allowed us to determine GO term combinations that are predictive for efficient RNAi target genes with proteasomal genes being most predictive. Finally, we show that RNAi target genes do not appear to act synergistically and that protein sequence conservation does not correlate with the number of potential off target sites. Our results will aid the identification of RNAi target genes in many pest species by providing a manageable number of excellent candidate genes to be tested and the proteasome as prime target. Further, the identified GO term combinations will help to identify efficient target genes from organ specific transcriptomes. Our off target analysis is relevant for the sequence selection used in transgenic plants.

  17. Progress in Tissue Specimens Alternative for the Driver Genes Testing of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan SUN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Target treatment based on driver genes in advanced non-small cell lung cancer is very important currently. Tumor tissues is the gold standard for driver genes testing. However, most of patients could not get the gene information for lack of enough tissues. To explore the tissue specimens alternatives is a hot spot in clinical work. This report reviews the tissue specimen alternatives of driver gene testing in non-small cell lung cancer.

  18. [Progress in Tissue Specimens Alternative for the Driver Genes Testing of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Song, Zhengbo

    2015-06-01

    Target treatment based on driver genes in advanced non-small cell lung cancer is very important currently. Tumor tissues is the gold standard for driver genes testing. However, most of patients could not get the gene information for lack of enough tissues. To explore the tissue specimens alternatives is a hot spot in clinical work. This report reviews the tissue specimen alternatives of driver gene testing in non-small cell lung cancer.

  19. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Haybaeck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma (OC is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Response to platinum-based chemotherapy is poor in some patients and, thus, current research is focusing on new therapy options. The various histological types of OC are characterized by distinctive molecular genetic alterations that are relevant for ovarian tumorigenesis. The understanding of these molecular pathways is essential for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Purpose: We want to give an overview on the molecular genetic changes of the histopathological types of OC and their role as putative therapeutic targets. In Depth Review of Existing Data: In 2012, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitor, bevacizumab, was approved for OC treatment. Bevacizumab has shown promising results as single agent and in combination with conventional chemotherapy, but its target is not distinctive when analyzed before treatment. At present, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors and components of the EGFR pathway are in the focus of clinical research. Interestingly, some phytochemical substances show good synergistic effects when used in combination with chemotherapy. Conclusion: Ongoing studies of targeted agents in conjunction with chemotherapy will show whether there are alternative options to bevacizumab available for OC patients. Novel targets which can be assessed before therapy to predict efficacy are needed. The assessment of therapeutic targets is continuously improved by molecular pathological analyses on tumor tissue. A careful selection of patients for personalized treatment will help to reduce putative side effects and toxicity.

  20. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benada, Jan; Macůrek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2015), s. 1912-1937 ISSN 2218-273X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-34264S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : checkpoint * DNA damage response * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. Mitochondria as targets for cancer therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ralph, S.J.; Neužil, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2009), s. 9-28 ISSN 1613-4125 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Apoptosis * mitocans * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.356, year: 2009

  2. Targeting Neuroendocrine Differentiation for Prostate Cancer Radiosensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    doses when ACREB was expressed (Fig. 6A). Because clonogenic assay assesses the reproductive ability of cells after a single exposure, which is...29] Slovin SF. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer: a sheep in wolf’s clothing? Nat Clin Pract Urol. 2006;3:138-144. [30] Lilleby W

  3. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination. If these processes fail, senescent cells create ...

  4. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB: A metastatic mediator and emerging therapeutic target in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maric G

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Gordana Maric,1,2 April AN Rose,3 Matthew G Annis,1,2 Peter M Siegel1,2,4,5 1Goodman Cancer Research Centre, 2Department of Medicine, 3Faculty of Medicine, 4Department of Biochemistry, 5Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada Abstract: Molecularly targeted therapies are rapidly growing with respect to their clinical development and impact on cancer treatment due to their highly selective anti-tumor action. However, many aggressive cancers such as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC currently lack well-defined therapeutic targets against which such agents can be developed. The identification of tumor-associated antigens and the generation of antibody drug-conjugates represent an emerging area of intense interest and growth in the field of cancer therapeutics. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB has recently been identified as a gene that is over-expressed in numerous cancers, including TNBC, and often correlates with the metastatic phenotype. In breast cancer, GPNMB expression in the tumor epithelium is associated with a reduction in disease-free and overall survival. Based on these findings, glembatumumab vedotin (CDX-011, an antibody-drug conjugate that selectively targets GPNMB, is currently being investigated in clinical trials for patients with metastatic breast cancer and unresectable melanoma. This review discusses the physiological and potential pathological roles of GPNMB in normal and cancer tissues, respectively, and details the clinical advances and challenges in targeting GPNMB-expressing malignancies. Keywords: GPNMB, osteoactivin, breast cancer, antibody-drug conjugates, CDX-011

  5. The distribution of BRAF gene fusions in solid tumors and response to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Chmielecki, Juliann; Gay, Laurie; Johnson, Adrienne; Chudnovsky, Jacob; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Ali, Siraj M; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Roels, Steven; Miller, Vincent A; Nakamura, Brooke N; Gray, Adam; Wong, Michael K; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-02-15

    Although the BRAF V600E base substitution is an approved target for the BRAF inhibitors in melanoma, BRAF gene fusions have not been investigated as anticancer drug targets. In our study, a wide variety of tumors underwent comprehensive genomic profiling for hundreds of known cancer genes using the FoundationOne™ or FoundationOne Heme™ comprehensive genomic profiling assays. BRAF fusions involving the intact in-frame BRAF kinase domain were observed in 55 (0.3%) of 20,573 tumors, across 12 distinct tumor types, including 20 novel BRAF fusions. These comprised 29 unique 5' fusion partners, of which 31% (9) were known and 69% (20) were novel. BRAF fusions included 3% (14/531) of melanomas; 2% (15/701) of gliomas; 1.0% (3/294) of thyroid cancers; 0.3% (3/1,062) pancreatic carcinomas; 0.2% (8/4,013) nonsmall-cell lung cancers and 0.2% (4/2,154) of colorectal cancers, and were enriched in pilocytic (30%) vs. nonpilocytic gliomas (1%; p < 0.0001), Spitzoid (75%) vs. nonSpitzoid melanomas (1%; p = 0.0001), acinar (67%) vs. nonacinar pancreatic cancers (<1%; p < 0.0001) and papillary (3%) vs. nonpapillary thyroid cancers (0%; p < 0.03). Clinical responses to trametinib and sorafenib are presented. In conclusion, BRAF fusions are rare driver alterations in a wide variety of malignant neoplasms, but enriched in Spitzoid melanoma, pilocytic astrocytomas, pancreatic acinar and papillary thyroid cancers. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  6. Hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system enhances antitumor effects of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junye; Guo Yao; Guo Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system combined with radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer. Methods: The recombinant adenovirus Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD was constructed by DNA recombinant technique. Western blot was used to detect hypoxia-induced expression of bacterial cytosine deaminase (BCD). Cell growth inhibition assay was used to determine the sensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells MIA-PACA2 to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Tumor xenograft growth delay assays was used to evaluate the effects of Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC combined with radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer. Results: Western blot analysis demonstrated that hypoxia-induced BCD protein expression was achieved in MIA-PACA2 cells infected with Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD. With hypoxia treatment, the sensitivity of MIA-PACA2 cells infected with Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD to 5-FC significantly increased. Administration of either Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC or radiotherapy could inhibit the growth of MIA-PACA2 xenografts in nude mice. Moreover, combination of Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC could significantly enhance suppressing effects of radiotherapy on MIA-PACA2 xenografts. Conclusion: Hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC could enhance antitumor effects of radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer and can be used as a powerful adjunct to conventional radiotherapy. (authors)

  7. Inhalable magnetic nanoparticles for targeted hyperthermia in lung cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Wiedmann, Timothy S; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer (specifically, non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Poor response rates and survival with current treatments clearly indicate the urgent need for developing an effective means to treat NSCLC. Magnetic hyperthermia is a non-invasive approach for tumor ablation, and is based on heat generation by magnetic materials, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, when subjected to an alternating magnetic field. However, inadequate delivery of magnetic nanoparticles to tumor cells can result in sub-lethal temperature change and induce resistance while non-targeted delivery of these particles to the healthy tissues can result in toxicity. In our studies, we evaluated the effectiveness of tumor-targeted SPIO nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia of lung cancer. EGFR-targeted, inhalable SPIO nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized for targeting lung tumor cells as well as for magnetic hyperthermia-mediated antitumor efficacy in a mouse orthotopic model of NSCLC. Our results show that EGFR targeting enhances tumor retention of SPIO nanoparticles. Further, magnetic hyperthermia treatment using targeted SPIO nanoparticles resulted in significant inhibition of in vivo lung tumor growth. Overall, this work demonstrates the potential for developing an effective anticancer treatment modality for the treatment of NSCLC based on targeted magnetic hyperthermia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  9. Pan-Cancer Analysis of the Mediator Complex Transcriptome Identifies CDK19 and CDK8 as Therapeutic Targets in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brägelmann, Johannes; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Böhm, Diana; Deng, Mario; Queisser, Angela; Sanders, Christine; Syring, Isabella; Merseburger, Axel S; Vogel, Wenzel; Sievers, Eli