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Sample records for cancer syndromes lynch

  1. Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colon cancer may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Cancer screening for people with Lynch syndrome If you ... et al. Milestones of Lynch syndrome: 1895-2015. Nature Reviews Cancer. http://www.nature.com/nrc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/ ...

  2. Surveillance for urinary tract cancer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Myrhøj, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an inherited multiorgan cancer syndrome, which when caused by a germline mutation in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes is known as Lynch syndrome (LS). Mutation carriers are at risk for developing cancers primarily in the colon, rectum and endom...

  3. Risks of lynch syndrome cancers for msh6 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Baglietto (Laura); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); J.G. Dowty (James); D.M. White (Darren); A. Wagner (Anja); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); A.H.J.T. Vriends (Anette); N.R. Cartwright (Nicola); R.A. Barnetson (Rebecca); S.M. Farrington (Susan); A. Tenesa (Albert); H. Hampel (Heather); D. Buchanan (Daniel); S. Arnold (Sven); J. Young (Joanne); M.D. Walsh (Michael); J. Jass (Jeremy); F.A. Macrae (Finlay); Y. Antill (Yoland); I.M. Winship (Ingrid); G.G. Giles (Graham); J. Goldblatt (Jack); S. Parry (Susan); G. Suthers (Graeme); B. Leggett (Barbara); M. Butz (Malinda); M. Aronson (Melyssa); J.N. Poynter (Jenny); J.A. Baron (John); L. Le Marchand (Loic); R. Haile (Robert); S. Gallinger (Steve); J.L. Hopper (John); J. Potter (John); A. de La Chapelle (Albert); H. Vasen (Hans); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.A. Jenkins (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Germline mutations in MSH6 account for 10%-20% of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers caused by hereditary DNA mismatch repair gene mutations. Because there have been only a few studies of mutation carriers, their cancer risks are uncertain. Methods: We identified 113 families

  4. Unusual presentation of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Veronica PCC

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynch Syndrome/HNPCC is a syndrome of cancer predisposition linked to inherited mutations of genes participating in post-replicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR. The spectrum of cancer associated with Lynch Syndrome includes tumours of the colorectum, endometrium, ovary, upper gastrointestinal tract and the urothelium although other cancers are rarely described. We describe a family of Lynch Syndrome with an hMLH1 mutation, that harbours an unusual tumour spectrum and its diagnostic and management challenges.

  5. Diagnosing Lynch Syndrome

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, J

    2016-11-01

    Lynch Syndrome, also known as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC), is a hereditary condition that increases an individual’s risk of developing a constellation of cancers. These most commonly arise in the colon, but also involve other solid organs such as the endometrium and ovaries in women, the stomach, brain and the skin. Ireland’s small population offers an opportunity to identify all those with Lynch Syndrome (LS) in the country, which would represent a powerful preventive opportunity to meaningfully impact on the incidence of cancer in Ireland.

  6. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas;

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  7. Risk of Cancer in Cases of Suspected Lynch Syndrome Without Germline Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Soler, María; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Guarinos, Carla; Zapater, Pedro; Castillejo, Adela; Barberá, Víctor Manuel; Juárez, Miriam; Bessa, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M; Clofent, Juan; Bujanda, Luis; Balaguer, Francesc; Reñé, Josep-Maria; de Castro, Luisa; Marín-Gabriel, José C.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims: Colorectal cancers (CRCs) with microsatellite instability (MSI) and a mismatch repair (MMR) immunohistochemical deficit without hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter are likely to be caused by Lynch syndrome. Some patients with these cancers have not been found to have pathogenic germline mutations and are considered to have Lynch-like syndrome (LLS). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of cancer in families of patients with LLS. Methods: We studied a population...

  8. Distinct gene expression profiles in ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Bartuma, Katarina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome represents a rare subset that typically presents at young age as early-stage tumors with an overrepresentation of endometrioid and clear cell histologies. We investigated the molecular profiles of Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer...... ovarian cancers. Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancers differed by 349 significantly deregulated genes, including PTPRH, BIRC3, SHH and TNFRSF6B. The genes involved were predominantly linked to cell growth, proliferation, and cell-to-cell signaling and interaction. When stratified...... for histologic subtype, hierarchical clustering confirmed distinct differences related to heredity in the endometrioid and serous subtypes. Furthermore, separate clustering was achieved in an independent, publically available data set. The distinct genetic signatures in Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic...

  9. Prevalence of Lynch syndrome and Lynch-like syndrome among patients with colorectal cancer in a Japanese hospital-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chika, Noriyasu; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Suzuki, Okihide; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Akagi, Kiwamu; Tamaru, Jun-Ichi; Okazaki, Yasushi; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2017-02-09

    We investigated the prevalence of Lynch syndrome and Lynch-like syndrome among Japanese colorectal cancer patients, as there have been no credible data from Japan. Immunohistochemical analyses for mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2) were carried out in surgically resected, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens obtained from 1,234 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients between March 2005 and April 2014. The presence/absence of the BRAF V600E mutation and hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter was analyzed where necessary. Genetic testing was finally undertaken in patients suspected as having Lynch syndrome. By the universal screening approach with immunohistochemical analysis for mismatch repair proteins followed by analyses for the BRAF V600E mutation and MLH1 promoter methylation status, 11 (0.9%) of the 1,234 patients were identified as candidates for genetic testing. Out of the 11 patients, 9 (0.7%) were finally diagnosed as having Lynch syndrome; the responsible genes included MLH1 (n = 1), MSH2 (n = 4), EPCAM (n = 1) and MSH6 (n = 3). The remaining two patients (0.2%) were regarded as having Lynch-like syndrome, since biallelic somatic deletion of the relevant mismatch repair genes was detected in the absence of germline mismatch repair alterations. None of the cases was identified as having germline MLH1 epimutation. The prevalence of Lynch syndrome among all newly diagnosed cases of colorectal cancer in Japan is in the same range as that recently reported by studies in Western population. The prevalence of Lynch-like syndrome seems to be extremely low.

  10. Guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis cancer).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Moslein, G.; Alonso, A.; Bernstein, I.; Bertario, L.; Blanco, I.; Burn, J.; Capella, G.; Engel, C.; Frayling, I.; Friedl, W.; Hes, F.J.; Hodgson, S.; Mecklin, J.P.; Moller, P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Parc, Y.; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L.; Sampson, J.R.; Stormorken, A.; Wijnen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. The discovery of these genes, 15 years ago,

  11. Cancer incidence and survival in Lynch syndrome patients receiving colonoscopic and gynaecological surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pål; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Estimates of cancer risk and the effects of surveillance in Lynch syndrome have been subject to bias, partly through reliance on retrospective studies. We sought to establish more robust estimates in patients undergoing prospective cancer surveillance. DESIGN: We undertook a multicentr...

  12. Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shia, Jinru; Holck, Susanne; Depetris, Giovanni;

    2013-01-01

    of interacting developments from the disciplines of clinical oncology, pathology, and molecular genetics, with each development serving to guide or enhance the next. The advancement of our understanding about the pathology of Lynch syndrome associated tumors exemplifies such intimate interplay among disciplines....... Today, accumulative knowledge has enabled surgical pathologists to detect tumors that are likely to be associated with Lynch syndrome, and the pathologist is playing an increasingly more important role in the care of these patients. The pathologist's ability is afforded primarily by information gained...... of such information. This article provides an overview of the development of histopathology and immunohistochemistry in Lynch syndrome-associated tumors, particularly in colorectal and endometrial cancers, and outlines the issues and current status of these specific pathologic aspects in not only the major tumors...

  13. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... for the translation of personalized genomics into targeted healthcare....

  14. Lynch Syndrome revision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sila Castellón Mortera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature regarding colon`s adenocarcinoma hereditary no poliposico or Lynch Syndrome is reviewed. The clinical characteristics, genetics and histologycal of colon´s adenocarcinoma hereditary, no poliposico are pointed out, so as the updated criteria approved in Amsterdam, for the diagnostic of patients with this Syndrome. The therapeutics is updated.

  15. HEREDITARY NON-POLYPOSIS COLORECTAL CANCER (LYNCH SYNDROME PADA WANITA UMUR 16 TAHUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asril Zahari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakKanker kolorektal menduduki peringkat ketiga jenis kanker yang paling sering terjadi di dunia. Sekitar 3% kasus kanker kolorektal merupakan jenis hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, yang sering muncul pada usia muda. Dilaporkan satu kasus di rumah sakit Dr. M. Djamil Padang, wanita berumur 16 tahun dengan keluhan nyeri perut kanan bawah. Didapatkan riwayat penyakit serupa pada kakek, bibi pasien dan enam anggota keluarga yang lain. Pada pemeriksaan fisik abdomen teraba massa dengan konsistensi keras dan terfiksir. Pada kolonoskopi dan biopsi ditemukan tumor jenis adenocarcinoma colon moderatly differentiated di fleksura hepatika dan polip di kolon sigmoid. Berdasarkan kriteria Amsterdam pasien didiagnosa Lynch syndrome. Pada Pasien dilakukan subtotal kolektomi, anastomose ileorectal dan kemoterapi ajuvan. Identifikasi genetik sedang dikerjakan untuk melihat adanya kelainan genetik pada pasien. Pasien melakukan skrining berkala untuk mencegah kanker HNPCC jenis yang lain.Kata kunci : Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome, Microsatellite instability, skrining.AbstractCarcinoma colorectal is the third most common type of cancer that occurs in the world. About 2% -3% of cases of colorectal cancer is hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, which often appear at a young age. Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria have been used to identify patients with Lynch syndrome.one case was reported at the Dr. M. Djamil Padang hospital, a 16-year-old girl with right lower abdominal pain. Obtained a history of similar disease in grandparents, aunts and six other family members. On physical examination found palpable fixed abdominal mass with hard consistency in the lower right abdomen. At colonoscopy and biopsy found a moderatly differentiated adenocarcinoma colon type at the hepatic flexure and the sigmoid colon polyp. Based on the Amsterdam criteria, patients diagnosed with HNPCC/Lynch

  16. Urinary Tract Cancer in Lynch Syndrome; Increased Risk in Carriers of MSH2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Therkildsen, Christina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2015-01-01

    nonpolyposis colorectal cancer registry was used to identify all 288 Lynch syndrome families in Denmark. Urothelial cancers that developed in mutation carriers and in their first-degree relatives were identified, mismatch-repair status was assessed, clinicopathologic variables were defined, and cumulative......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of urothelial cancer in the upper urinary tract and the bladder, determine the contribution from the different mismatch-repair genes, and define clinical characteristics of urothelial cancer in Lynch syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The national hereditary...... lifetime risks were determined. RESULTS: In total, 48 cancers of the ureter, 34 cancers of the renal pelvis, and 54 urinary bladder cancers developed at a mean age of 61 (24-89) years. The tumors were typically of high grade, showed loss of mismatch-repair protein expression in 90% of the tumors...

  17. [Founder mutation in Lynch syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajal, Andrea R; Piñero, Tamara A; Verzura, Alicia; Santino, Juan Pablo; Solano, Angela R; Kalfayan, Pablo G; Ferro, Alejandra; Vaccaro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent syndrome in hereditary colorectal cancer, a family-specific deleterious mutations in genes encoding DNA reparation proteins: MLH1 (mutL homolog 1), MSH2, MSH6 (mutS homolog 2 y 6, respectively), PMS2 (PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component) y MUTYH (mutY DNA glycosylase). The c.2252_2253delAA, p.Lys751Serfs*3 mutation in MLH1 gene segregates with a haplotype reported in the northern region of Italy and whose origin was attributed to a founder effect. This mutation co-segregates with typical characteristics of Lynch syndrome, including early age at onset and multiple primary tumors in the same individual, a high frequency of pancreatic cancer, high microsatellite instability and lack of PMS2 expression. This report describes a mutation in an Argentinian patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of uterus. Her first-degree relatives had a history of colon cancer diagnosed before 50 years, fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria I and Lynch syndrome II. The high pathogenicity associated to this mutation makes necessary the study of all members from families with hereditary cancer, allowing pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis, early assessment and the instauration of preventive treatments.

  18. Clinical problems of colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer cases with unknown cause of tumor mismatch repair deficiency (suspected Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan DD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel D Buchanan,1,2 Christophe Rosty,1,3,4 Mark Clendenning,1 Amanda B Spurdle,5 Aung Ko Win2 1Oncogenomics Group, Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 3Envoi Specialist Pathologists, Herston, QLD, Australia; 4School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia; 5Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory, Genetics and Computational Biology Division, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Carriers of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes have a high risk of developing numerous different cancers, predominantly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (known as Lynch syndrome. MMR gene mutation carriers develop tumors with MMR deficiency identified by tumor microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical loss of MMR protein expression. Tumor MMR deficiency is used to identify individuals most likely to carry an MMR gene mutation. However, MMR deficiency can also result from somatic inactivation, most commonly methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. As tumor MMR testing of all incident colorectal and endometrial cancers (universal screening is becoming increasingly adopted, a growing clinical problem is emerging for individuals who have tumors that show MMR deficiency who are subsequently found not to carry an MMR gene mutation after genetic testing using the current diagnostic approaches (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and who also show no evidence of MLH1 methylation. The inability to determine the underlying cause of tumor MMR deficiency in these "Lynch-like" or "suspected Lynch syndrome" cases has significant implications on the clinical management of these individuals and their relatives. When the

  19. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n = 69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (P = 0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients.

  20. Subtotal Colectomy for Colon Cancer Reduces the Need for Subsequent Surgery in Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Seppälä, Toni T; Järvinen, Heikki J; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2017-08-01

    The risk of metachronous colorectal cancer is high after surgical resection for first colon cancer in Lynch syndrome. This study aimed to examine whether extended surgery decreases the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer and improves long-term survival. This was a retrospective study. Data were collected from a nationwide registry. Two hundred forty-two Lynch syndrome pathogenic variant carriers who underwent surgery for a first colon cancer from 1984 to 2009 were included. Patients underwent standard segmental colectomy (n = 144) or extended colectomy (n = 98) for colon cancer. Patients were followed a median of 14.6 up to 25 years. Risk of subsequent colorectal cancer in either group, overall and disease-specific survival, and operative mortality were the primary outcomes measured. Subtotal colectomy decreased the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08-0.52; p = 0.001), compared with segmental resection. Subsequent colorectal cancer decreased in MLH1 carriers. The MSH2 carriers showed no statistical difference, possibly because of their small number. Disease-specific and overall survival within 25 years did not differ between the standard and extended surgeries (82.7% vs 87.2%, p = 0.76 and 47.2% vs 41.4%, p = 0.83). The cumulative risk of subsequent colorectal cancer was 20% in 10 years and 47% within 25 years after standard resection and 4% and 9% after extended surgery. The cumulative risk of metachronous colorectal cancer was 7% within 25 years after subtotal colectomy with ileosigmoidal anastomosis. One patient died of postoperative septicemia within 30 days after segmental colectomy. Data on surgical procedures were primarily collected retrospectively. Lynch syndrome pathogenic variant carriers may undergo subtotal colectomy to manage first colon cancer and avoid repetitive abdominal surgery and to reduce the remaining bowel to facilitate easier endoscopic surveillance. It provides no survival benefit, compared with segmental colon

  1. Molecular testing in colorectal cancer: diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chanjuan; Washington, Kay

    2012-06-01

    Currently, molecular testing in colorectal cancer (CRC) is aimed at detecting Lynch syndrome and predicting response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies. However, CRC is a complex disease, with at least 3 molecular pathways of carcinogenesis. The importance of the EGFR signaling pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis is underscored by the availability of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of some metastatic CRCs. Potentially, mutations in any of the genes in the EGFR signaling pathway may be associated with prognosis and may predict response to anti-EGFR or other targeted therapies. Although not currently the standard of care, molecular testing of CRCs is expanding to include mutational analysis of the genes in the EGFR pathway, in addition to more widely performed tests for identifying cancers with high microsatellite instability. Multiplex molecular prognostic panels for therapeutic decision making in stage II CRCs also represent expanding use of molecular testing for this common cancer.

  2. Guidelines on genetic evaluation and management of Lynch syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardiello, Francis M; Allen, John I; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Boland, C Richard; Burke, Carol A; Burt, Randall W; Church, James M; Dominitz, Jason A; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Levin, Theodore R; Lieberman, David A; Robertson, Douglas J; Syngal, Sapna; Rex, Douglas K

    2014-08-01

    The Multi-Society Task Force, in collaboration with invited experts, developed guidelines to assist health care providers with the appropriate provision of genetic testing and management of patients at risk for and affected with Lynch syndrome as follows: Figure 1 provides a colorectal cancer risk assessment tool to screen individuals in the office or endoscopy setting; Figure 2 illustrates a strategy for universal screening for Lynch syndrome by tumor testing of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer; Figures 3-6 provide algorithms for genetic evaluation of affected and at-risk family members of pedigrees with Lynch syndrome; Table 10 provides guidelines for screening at-risk and affected persons with Lynch syndrome; and Table 12 lists the guidelines for the management of patients with Lynch syndrome. A detailed explanation of Lynch syndrome and the methodology utilized to derive these guidelines, as well as an explanation of, and supporting literature for, these guidelines are provided.

  3. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DN...

  4. The Lynch syndrome: a management dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Amatucci, Chiara; Perotti, Bruno; Dezzi, Claudia; Girolami, Marco; Illuminati, Giulio; Angelici, Alberto M

    2013-05-01

    The case of a familial Lynch syndrome is reported. The criteria for early diagnosis, management and surveillance are briefly reviewed. A germline mutation of genes responsible for mismatch repair is at the basis of the Lynch syndrome. Carriers are predisposed to colorectal cancer and other tumors. Two members of the presently reported family developed colorectal cancer, whereas two others developed other neoplasms. The syndrome was confirmed in members of the same family with appropriate genetic workup. Clinical examination and endoscopy were consequently scheduled once-a-year. Given the high risk of neoplastic disease, such yearly controls can be proposed as the standard follow-up of this condition.

  5. Management of extracolonic tumours in patients with Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J; Mourits, Marian Je; Sijmons, Rolf H; Leliveld-Kors, Anna; Hollema, Harry; Kleibeuker, Jan H

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome, is responsible for 2-3% of all colorectal cancers. Lynch syndrome is also associated with a high risk of extracolonic cancers, including endometrial, stomach, small bowel, pancreas, biliary tract, ovary, urinary tract, brain, and skin can

  6. Prevalence of somatic mutl homolog 1 promoter hypermethylation in Lynch syndrome colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leticia; Muñoz, Jenifer; Cuatrecasas, Míriam; Quintanilla, Isabel; Leoz, Maria Liz; Carballal, Sabela; Ocaña, Teresa; López-Cerón, María; Pellise, Maria; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Jover, Rodrigo; Andreu, Montserrat; Carracedo, Angel; Xicola, Rosa Maria; Llor, Xavier; Boland, Clement Richard; Goel, Ajay; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) that have microsatellite instability (MSI) and mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) immunoloss are observed in 3 clinical scenarios: Lynch syndrome (LS), sporadic MSI CRC, and Lynch-like syndrome (LLS). v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutational analysis is used to differentiate LS from sporadic MSI CRC. The role of MLH1 promoter methylation status for the differential diagnosis of these clinical forms is not well established. The objectives of this study were: 1) to analyze MLH1 promoter methylation in MLH1-deficient CRCs by pyrosequencing, and 2) to assess its role in the differential diagnosis of MLH1-deficient CRCs. In total, 165 CRCs were analyzed, including LS (n = 19), MSI BRAF-mutated CRC (n = 37), MSI BRAF wild-type CRC (n = 60), and a control group of CRCs without MSI (microsatellite stable [MSS] CRC; n = 49). MLH1 promoter methylation status was analyzed by pyrosequencing, and the ability of different strategies to identify LS was assessed. The average ± standard deviation methylation in LS (9% ± 7%) was significantly lower than that in MSI BRAF-mutated CRC (42% ± 17%; P Cancer Society.

  7. Ovarian cancer linked to lynch syndrome typically presents as early-onset, non-serous epithelial tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartuma, Katarina; Bernstein, Inge; Malander, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Heredity is a major cause of ovarian cancer and during recent years the contribution from germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations linked to Lynch syndrome has gradually been recognized. METHODS: We characterized clinical features, tumor morphology and mismatch repair defects in all....... The underlying MMR gene mutations in these families affected MSH2 in 49%, MSH6 in 33% and MLH1 in 17%. Immunohistochemical loss of the corresponding MMR protein was demonstrated in 33/36 (92%) tumors analyzed. CONCLUSION: The combined data from our cohorts demonstrate that ovarian cancer associated with Lynch...

  8. Chromosome 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 Variants Modify Colorectal Cancer Risk in Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, Juul T.; Brohet, Richard M.; Van Eijk, Ronald; Jagmohan-Changur, Shanty; Middeldorp, Anneke; Tops, Carli M.; Van Puijenbroek, Mario; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Hes, Frederik J.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Menko, Fred H.; Van Os, Theo A. M.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Verhoef, Senno; Wagner, Anja; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Devilee, Peter; Morreau, Hans; Goldgar, David; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Houlston, Richard S.; Van Wezel, Tom; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims: Recent genome-wide association studies have identified common low-risk variants for colorectal cancer (CRC). To assess whether these influence CRC risk in the Lynch syndrome, we genotyped these variants in a large series of proven mutation carriers. Methods: We studied 675 individ

  9. Rectal Cancer Diagnosed after Cesarean Section in Which High Microsatellite Instability Indicated the Presence of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Okuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of rectal cancer with microsatellite instability (MSI that probably resulted from Lynch syndrome and that was diagnosed after Cesarean section. The patient was a 28-year-old woman (gravid 1, para 1 without a significant medical history. At 35 gestational weeks, vaginal ultrasonography revealed a 5 cm tumor behind the uterine cervix, which was diagnosed as a uterine myoma. The tumor gradually increased in size and blocked the birth canal, resulting in the patient undergoing an emergency Cesarean section. Postoperatively, the tumor was diagnosed as rectal cancer with MSI. After concurrent chemoradiation therapy, a lower anterior resection was performed. The patient’s family history revealed she met the criteria of the revised Bethesda guidelines for testing the colorectal tumor for MSI. Testing revealed that the tumor did indeed show high MSI and, combined with the family history, suggested this could be a case of Lynch syndrome. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering the possibility of Lynch syndrome in pregnant women with colorectal cancer, particularly those with a family history of this condition. We suggest that the presence of Lynch syndrome should also be considered for any young woman with endometrial, ovarian, or colorectal cancer.

  10. Barriers and Motivators for Referral of Patients with Suspected Lynch Syndrome to Cancer Genetic Services: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Y. Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the views of general practitioners and specialists on their referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services. Using a purposive maximum variation sampling strategy, we conducted semi-structured interviews face-to-face with 28 general practitioners and specialists in public or private hospitals and specialist clinics between March and August 2011. General practitioners and specialists were recruited in a major metropolitan area in Australia. Interview transcripts were reviewed by two independent researchers, and thematic analysis was performed using NVivo10 software. The main barriers and motivators identified were: (1 clinician-related (e.g., familiarity with Lynch syndrome and family history knowledge; (2 patient-related (e.g., patients’ interests and personal experience with cancer; and (3 organizational-related (e.g., access to services, guidelines and referral pathway. Referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services is motivated and hindered by a range of individual, interpersonal and organizational factors. In order to improve the care and quality of life of patients and family with suspected Lynch syndrome, further research is needed to develop supportive tools for clinicians.

  11. Estimating successive cancer risks in Lynch Syndrome families using a progressive three-state model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Briollais, Laurent; Green, Jane; Parfrey, Patrick; Kopciuk, Karen

    2014-02-20

    Lynch Syndrome (LS) families harbor mutated mismatch repair genes,which predispose them to specific types of cancer. Because individuals within LS families can experience multiple cancers over their lifetime, we developed a progressive three-state model to estimate the disease risk from a healthy (state 0) to a first cancer (state 1) and then to a second cancer (state 2). Ascertainment correction of the likelihood was made to adjust for complex sampling designs with carrier probabilities for family members with missing genotype information estimated using their family's observed genotype and phenotype information in a one-step expectation-maximization algorithm. A sandwich variance estimator was employed to overcome possible model misspecification. The main objective of this paper is to estimate the disease risk (penetrance) for age at a second cancer after someone has experienced a first cancer that is also associated with a mutated gene. Simulation study results indicate that our approach generally provides unbiased risk estimates and low root mean squared errors across different family study designs, proportions of missing genotypes, and risk heterogeneities. An application to 12 large LS families from Newfoundland demonstrates that the risk for a second cancer was substantial and that the age at a first colorectal cancer significantly impacted the age at any LS subsequent cancer. This study provides new insights for developing more effective management of mutation carriers in LS families by providing more accurate multiple cancer risk estimates.

  12. Interval colon cancer in a Lynch syndrome patient under annual colonoscopic surveillance: a case for advanced imaging techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxentenko Amy S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome confers increased risk for various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Colonoscopic surveillance programs have led to reduced incidence of colorectal cancer and reduced mortality from colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy every 1–2 years beginning at age 20–25, or 10 years earlier than the first diagnosis of colorectal cancer in a family, with annual colonoscopy after age 40, is the recommended management for mutation carriers. Screening programs have reduced colon cancer mortality, but interval cancers may occur. Case presentation We describe a 48-year-old woman with Lynch syndrome who was found to have an adenoma with invasive colorectal cancer within one year after a normal colonoscopy. Conclusion Our patient illustrates two current concepts about Lynch syndrome: 1 adenomas are the cancer precursor and 2 such adenomas may be “aggressive,” in the sense that the adenoma progresses more readily and more rapidly to carcinoma in this setting compared to usual colorectal adenomas. Our patient’s resected tumor invaded only into submucosa and all lymph nodes were negative; in that sense, she represents a success for annual colonoscopic surveillance. Still, this case does raise the question of whether advanced imaging techniques are advisable for surveillance colonoscopy in these high-risk patients.

  13. Differential expression of CK20, β-catenin, and MUC2/5AC/6 in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, Stefan; Klarskov, Louise; Nilbert, Mef

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer comprises Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Differences in genetics, demographics and histopathology have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is to characterize their immunoprofile of markers other...... than MMR proteins. METHODS: We compared the expression patterns of cytokeratins (CK7 and CK20), mucins (MUC2/5 AC/6), CDX2 and β-catenin in Lynch syndrome and FCCTX. RESULTS: Differences were identified for CK20 and nuclear β-catenin, which were significantly more often expressed in FCCTX than in Lynch...

  14. Aspirin, Ibuprofen, and the Risk for Colorectal Cancer in Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Dashti, Seyedeh Ghazaleh; Chau, Rowena; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Winship, Ingrid M.; Young, Joanne P.; Giles, Graham G.; Leggett, Barbara; Macrae, Finlay A.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Baron, John A.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inheritance of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 causes a high risk of colorectal and other cancers (Lynch Syndrome). Use of aspirin has been shown to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer for the general population as well as for MMR gene mutation carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether use of aspirin and ibuprofen in a nontrial setting is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers. Methods: We included 1858 participants in the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had been found to have a pathogenic germline mutation in a MMR gene (carriers). We used weighted Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: A total of 714 carriers (38%) were diagnosed with colorectal cancer at a mean age of 42.4 (standard deviation 10.6) years. A reduced risk of colorectal cancer was associated with aspirin use (for 1 month to 4.9 years: HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.90, P = .02; for ≥5 years: HR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.62, P = .003) and ibuprofen use (for 1 month to 4.9 years: HR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.79, P = .009; for ≥5 years: HR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.69, P = .007), compared with less than one month of use. Conclusion: Our results provide additional evidence that, for MMR gene mutation carriers, use of aspirin and ibuprofen might be effective in reducing their high risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:26109217

  15. Recognition of Lynch Syndrome Amongst Newly Diagnosed Colorectal Cancers at St. Paul’s Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Pi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is the most common cause of inherited colorectal cancer (CRC. In British Columbia, most centres still use clinical criteria (Amsterdam II, Revised Bethesda, or the BC Cancer Agency’s criteria to determine who should undergo further first-line testing in the form of microsatellite instability or immunohistochemistry staining. Given the limitations with this strategy, LS is thought to be underrecognized. Objective. To investigate whether LS is truly underrecognized when compared to the reported prevalence. Methods. A retrospective chart review of all CRC cases diagnosed at St. Paul’s Hospital from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. Results. 246 patients met inclusion criteria. 76% (83/109 with a family history of malignancy were unable to recall the specific malignancy or age of diagnosis. 18% (43/235 were only asked about a history of gastrointestinal related malignancy and 26% (65/246 met at least one of the three criteria but only 21% (13/63 received further investigation. Only 1.6% (4/246 had LS compared to the reported prevalence of 2–5% of all CRC cases. Conclusion. This data supports our hypothesis that LS is underrecognized. Issues at the patient, physician, and systems level need to be evaluated to determine where the limitations preventing appropriate testing are occurring.

  16. The Identification of Lynch Syndrome in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M Cremin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Lynch syndrome mutations in a Canadian hereditary cancer clinic population, and to determine the effectiveness of the program’s referral criteria and testing algorithm.

  17. Prevalence of Lynch syndrome in a Middle Eastern population with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siraj, Abdul K; Prabhakaran, Sarita; Bavi, Prashant; Bu, Rong; Beg, Shaham; Hazmi, Mohsen Al; Al-Rasheed, Maha; Al-Assiri, Mohammed; Sairafi, Rami; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Al-Sanea, Nasser; Uddin, Shahab; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2015-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS; hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) is a common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC). CRC is the most common cancer diagnosed among males in Saudi Arabia but to the authors' knowledge there is a lack of data regarding the prevalence of LS in patients with CRC. There currently are no clear guidelines for the selection criteria for these patients to screen for LS. A comprehensive molecular characterization was performed in a cohort of 807 CRC cases by immunohistochemical and microsatellite analysis using polymerase chain reaction. BRAF mutation screening, high CpG island methylator phenotype, and analysis for germline mutations were performed in 425 CRC samples. These were all high microsatellite instability (MSI-H) samples (91 cases), all low MSI samples (143 cases), and selected cases from the microsatellite stable group (191 cases) that met revised Bethesda guidelines. Polymerase chain reaction identified 91 MSI-H cases (11.3%) and sequencing revealed mismatch repair germline mutations in 8 CRC cases only. Of the total of 807 CRC cases, these 8 cases (0.99%) were MSI-H, met the revised Bethesda guidelines, and did not harbor BRAF mutations. The results of the current study confirmed cases of LS in approximately 1.0% of CRC samples and reflects the efficacy of screening among MSI-H cases that lack BRAF mutations. This comprehensive study from Saudi Arabia will help in implementing a universal screening/reflex testing strategy in a clinical setting in Saudi Arabia and in conducting a national screening program that benefits both patients and their relatives. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. Glioblastomas, astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas linked to Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, C; Ladelund, S; Rambech, E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain tumors represent a rare and relatively uncharacterized tumor type in Lynch syndrome. METHODS: The national Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Register was utilized to estimate the cumulative life-time risk for brain tumors in Lynch syndrome...... staining suggestive of the IDH1 R132H mutation. CONCLUSION: In Lynch syndrome brain tumors occurred in 14% of the families with significantly higher risks for individuals with MSH2 gene mutations and development of childhood brain tumors in individuals with constitutional MMR defects....

  19. Molecular testing for Lynch syndrome in people with colorectal cancer: systematic reviews and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowsill, Tristan; Coelho, Helen; Huxley, Nicola; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Briscoe, Simon; Frayling, Ian M; Hyde, Chris

    2017-09-01

    Inherited mutations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair (MMR) genes lead to an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), gynaecological cancers and other cancers, known as Lynch syndrome (LS). Risk-reducing interventions can be offered to individuals with known LS-causing mutations. The mutations can be identified by comprehensive testing of the MMR genes, but this would be prohibitively expensive in the general population. Tumour-based tests - microsatellite instability (MSI) and MMR immunohistochemistry (IHC) - are used in CRC patients to identify individuals at high risk of LS for genetic testing. MLH1 (MutL homologue 1) promoter methylation and BRAF V600E testing can be conducted on tumour material to rule out certain sporadic cancers. To investigate whether testing for LS in CRC patients using MSI or IHC (with or without MLH1 promoter methylation testing and BRAF V600E testing) is clinically effective (in terms of identifying Lynch syndrome and improving outcomes for patients) and represents a cost-effective use of NHS resources. Systematic reviews were conducted of the published literature on diagnostic test accuracy studies of MSI and/or IHC testing for LS, end-to-end studies of screening for LS in CRC patients and economic evaluations of screening for LS in CRC patients. A model-based economic evaluation was conducted to extrapolate long-term outcomes from the results of the diagnostic test accuracy review. The model was extended from a model previously developed by the authors. Ten studies were identified that evaluated the diagnostic test accuracy of MSI and/or IHC testing for identifying LS in CRC patients. For MSI testing, sensitivity ranged from 66.7% to 100.0% and specificity ranged from 61.1% to 92.5%. For IHC, sensitivity ranged from 80.8% to 100.0% and specificity ranged from 80.5% to 91.9%. When tumours showing low levels of MSI were treated as a positive result, the sensitivity of MSI testing increased but specificity fell. No end

  20. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    parent-child pairs in which age at the first cancer diagnosis was assessed. A paired t-test and a specifically developed bivariate model were used to assess a possible role of anticipation. RESULTS: Both methods revealed anticipation with children developing cancer mean 9.8 years (P ... parents using the paired t-test and 5.5 years (P ... to initiate surveillance programs at young age. It should also stimulate research into the genetic mechanisms that determine age at onset and whether the genetic instability that characterizes Lynch syndrome can be linked to anticipation....

  1. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes: Epidemiological studies on Peutz-Jeghers syndrome & Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.F. van Lier (Margot)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy among women after breast cancer, and the third most common malignancy among men after lung and prostate cancer in the European Union. In the Netherlands, approximately 10000 cases are diagnosed each year. CRC is moreover associ

  2. Surveillance colonoscopy practice in Lynch syndrome in the Netherlands: A nationwide survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan J Koornstra; Hans FA Vasen

    2007-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is the most common genetic disorder predisposing to colorectal cancer. As regular colonoscopic surveillance has been shown to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer, this strategy is recommended worldwide. Recently, several advances in colonoscopic techniques have improved detection rates of neoplasia in Lynch syndrome. In this nationwide survey, we evaluated current surveillance colonoscopy practices for Lynch syndrome in the Netherlands and the extent to which advanced techniques have been adopted in routine clinical practice.

  3. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer and lynch syndromes in a BRCA1/2 negative breast cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Scolastica W; Burgess, Kelly R; Cobleigh, Melody A; Alnajar, Hussein H; Gattuso, Paolo; Usha, Lydia

    2017-07-12

    Genetic counseling and testing is recommended for women with a personal and/or family history of breast and other cancers (ovarian, pancreatic, male breast and others). Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/2) are the most common causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Additional genetic counseling and testing with a multi-gene panel may be considered in breast cancer patients who tested negative for mutations in these two genes. In about 11% of BRCA1/2-negative patients, further genetic testing reveals pathogenic mutations in other high or moderate cancer risk genes. In 0.2% of cases, an individual may carry pathogenic mutations in more than one high penetrance gene (a double heterozygote). Finding one or more pathogenic mutations is important for cancer prevention in patients and/or their families. Here we present a case of a breast cancer patient who did not have a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 and had a family history of breast and stomach cancers. On an additional multi-gene panel testing, she was found to carry pathogenic mutations in the CDH1 and PMS2 genes, which cause Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer and Lynch syndromes, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such a double heterozygote. Clinical manifestations, genetics, and management of both syndromes are reviewed, including prophylactic surgery and screening for unaffected family members. Management challenges for a mutation carrier with advanced breast cancer are discussed. Our case supports the clinical utility of additional multi-gene panel testing for breast cancer patients who do not have a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 genes.

  4. The genetic basis of Lynch syndrome and its implications for clinical practice and risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stephanie A; Leininger, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon cancer, and accounts for as much as 3% of all colon and endometrial cancers. The identification and management of individuals with Lynch syndrome have evolved over the past 20 years, yet the syndrome remains vastly underdiagnosed. It is important for clinicians to recognize individuals and families who are at risk in order to be able to manage them appropriately and reduce their morbidity and mortality from this condition. This review will touch on the history of Lynch syndrome, the current knowledge of genotype-phenotype correlations, the cancers associated with Lynch syndrome, and management of individuals who are gene carriers.

  5. Current Hypotheses on How Microsatellite Instability Leads to Enhanced Survival of Lynch Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Drescher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-high are a cardinal feature of colorectal tumors from patients with Lynch Syndrome. Other key characteristics of Lynch Syndrome are that these patients experience fewer metastases and have enhanced survival when compared to patients diagnosed with microsatellite stable (MSS colorectal cancer. Many of the characteristics associated with Lynch Syndrome including enhanced survival are also observed in patients with sporadic MSI-high colorectal cancer. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that are utilized by the host to control colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome and why these same mechanisms fail in MSS colorectal cancers.

  6. The genetic basis of Lynch syndrome and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen SA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie A Cohen,1 Anna Leininger2 1Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment Program, St Vincent Health, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Minnesota Oncology, Woodbury, MN, USA Abstract: Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon cancer, and accounts for as much as 3% of all colon and endometrial cancers. The identification and management of individuals with Lynch syndrome have evolved over the past 20 years, yet the syndrome remains vastly underdiagnosed. It is important for clinicians to recognize individuals and families who are at risk in order to be able to manage them appropriately and reduce their morbidity and mortality from this condition. This review will touch on the history of Lynch syndrome, the current knowledge of genotype–phenotype correlations, the cancers associated with Lynch syndrome, and management of individuals who are gene carriers. Keywords: Lynch syndrome, hereditary cancer, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, mismatch repair, mismatch repair genes, immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability

  7. Role of new endoscopic techniques in Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jasmijn F.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is the most common hereditary condition predisposing for colorectal cancer. International guidelines recommend surveillance of the colorectum by colonoscopy every 1-2 years starting at the age of 20-25 years. This has been shown t

  8. Lynch syndrome: still not a familiar picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hes Frederik J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ line mutations in mismatch repair genes underlie Lynch syndrome and predispose carriers for colorectal carcinoma and malignancies in many other organ systems. Case presentation A large Lynch syndrome family with 15 affected family members and involvement in 7 organs is reported. It illustrates a lack of awareness and knowledge about this hereditary tumor syndrome among doctors as well as patients. None of the described family members underwent presymptomatic screening on the basis of the family history. Conclusion Hereditary features, like young age at diagnosis, multiple tumors in multiple organs and a positive family history, should lead to timely referral of suspected cases for genetic counseling and diagnostics. For Lynch syndrome, these features can be found in the Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria. Subsequently, early identification of mutation carriers might have diminished, at least in part, the high and early morbidity and mortality observed in this family.

  9. Sessile serrated polyps of the colorectum are rare in patients with Lynch syndrome and in familial colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S H; Lykke, E; Folker, M B

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the generally accepted carcinogenesis pathway of the microsatellite instabile high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) involves the traditional adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome, a serrate pathway involving serrate adenomas (SA) and sessile serrate polyps (SSP) characterize the spora......Whereas the generally accepted carcinogenesis pathway of the microsatellite instabile high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) involves the traditional adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome, a serrate pathway involving serrate adenomas (SA) and sessile serrate polyps (SSP) characterize...... the FCF, were considered examples of probable SSP. None of the 41 cases coded as adenoma possessed a morphology that qualified as SSP. The prevalence of SSP was not increased as compared to the background population and thus, this serrated lesion does not appear to play a tumorigenic role in Lynch...

  10. Decrease in mortality in Lynch syndrome families because of surveillance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.E. de; Hendriks, Y.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Boer, S.Y. de; Cats, A.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F.M.; Nelis, F.G.; Rookus, M.A.; Vasen, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Lynch syndrome family members have a high risk of developing colorectal (CRC), endometrial (EC), and other cancers. A large-scale surveillance program was introduced in The Netherlands in the late 1980s. The aims of the study were to evaluate the effectiveness of this program by a

  11. Sense of coherence and self-concept in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Ladelund, Steen; Carlsson, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Most individuals who learn about hereditary cancer manage well, but identification of subgroups who find this knowledge burdening would allow psychosocial intervention. The objective of the study was to assess sense of coherence (SOC) in individuals with Lynch syndrome with comparison to a genera...... population and correlation to self-concept....

  12. Sessile serrated polyps of the colorectum are rare in patients with Lynch syndrome and in familial colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S H; Lykke, E; Folker, M B;

    2008-01-01

    (FCF) is addressed. Polyps coded as hyperplastic polyps (HP) from subjects with Lynch syndrome and FCF enrolled in the HNPCC-register at the Hvidovre University Hospital as well as adenomas from this population were retrieved and reviewed for features of SSP. Ninety-eight polyps coded as HP and 41...

  13. Psychological distress in newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients following microsatellite instability testing for Lynch syndrome on the pathologist's initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsbergen, K M; Prins, J B; Brunner, H G; van Duijvendijk, P; Nagengast, F M; van Krieken, J H; Ligtenberg, M; Hoogerbrugge, N

    2012-06-01

    According to the Dutch Guideline on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer published in 2008, patients with recently diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) should undergo microsatellite instability (MSI) testing by a pathologist immediately after tumour resection if they are younger than 50 years, or if a second CRC has been diagnosed before the age of 70 years, owing to the high risk of Lynch syndrome (MIPA). The aim of the present MIPAPS study was to investigate general distress and cancer-specific distress following MSI testing. From March 2007 to September 2009, 400 patients who had been tested for MSI after newly diagnosed CRC were recruited from 30 Dutch hospitals. Levels of general distress (SCL-90) and cancer-specific distress (IES) were assessed immediately after MSI result disclosure (T1) and 6 months later (T2). Response rates were 23/77 (30%) in the MSI-positive patients and 58/323 (18%) in the MSI-negative patients. Levels of general distress and cancer-specific distress were moderate. In the MSI-positive group, 27% of the patients had high general distress at T1 versus 18% at T2 (p = 0.5), whereas in the MSI-negative group, these percentage were 14 and 18% (p = 0.6), respectively. At T1 and T2, cancer-specific distress rates in the MSI-positive group and MSI-negative group were 39 versus 27% (p = 0.3) and 38 versus 36% (p = 1.0), respectively. High levels of general distress were correlated with female gender, low social support and high perceived cancer risk. Moderate levels of distress were observed after MSI testing, similar to those found in other patients diagnosed with CRC. Immediately after result disclosure, high cancer-specific distress was observed in 40% of the MSI-positive patients.

  14. Screening for urinary tract cancer with urine cytology in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrhøj, T; Andersen, M-B; Bernstein, I

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate if Urine Cytology (UC) is an appropriate screening procedure for detecting urinary tract neoplasia at an early stage in persons at risk in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer families. METHOD: In the National Danish HNPCC-register persons at risk...

  15. Quality of colonoscopy in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Yaron; Moeslein, Gabriela; Vasen, Hans F A; Karner-Hanusch, Judith; Lubinsky, Jan; Gasche, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) accounts for 2 - 4 % of all colorectal cancers. Affected family members have a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, or MSH6, and a lifetime risk for development of colorectal cancer of 25 - 75 %. Current guidelines recommend annual to biannual surveillance colonoscopy in mutation carriers. Several factors may predict failure to prevent interval cancer in LS: more lesions in the right colon; more flat ("non polypoid") and lateral growing polyps; small adenomas may already harbor high grade dysplasia or a high percentage of villous component and become advanced adenomas; there is a short duration of the adenoma - carcinoma sequence; synchronous lesions have high prevalence; patients are younger and less tolerant to colonoscopy (need more sedation); and repeated colonoscopies are needed for lifelong surveillance (patient experience is important for compliance). In order to prevent cancer in LS patients, surveillance colonoscopy should be performed in an endoscopic unit experienced with LS, every 1 - 2 years, starting at age 20 - 25 years, or 10 years younger than the age of first diagnosis in the family (whichever is first), and yearly after the age of 40 years. Colonoscopy in LS patients should be a very meticulous and precise procedure (i. e. taking sufficient withdrawal time, documentation of such warranted), with removal of all of the polyps, special attention to the right colon and alertness to flat lesions. Following quality indicators such as successful cleansing of the colon and removal of every polyp will probably improve prevention of interval cancers. At this moment, none of the new endoscopic techniques have shown convincing superiority over conventional high resolution white light colonoscopy.

  16. Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome in the first year of colorectal cancer: a review of the psychological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsbergen, Karin M; Prins, Judith B; Brunner, Han G; Kraaimaat, Floris W; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) receive genetic counselling within 1 year after diagnosis. Little is known whether specific subgroups are more vulnerable for genetic testing related distress. A literature review was conducted to identify the psychological impact of CRC in the first year, and the additional impact of genetic testing. The electronic databases of PubMed, PsychInfo, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify all reports published between January 1997 and October 2007 on the psychological impact of (1) CRC-diagnosis up to 1 year after treatment and of (2) genetic testing for Lynch syndrome in patients with CRC. Studies on the psychological impact of genetic testing in newly diagnosed patient with CRC were not available. Either CRC patients diagnosed several years ago were studied and the focus was also often on the psychological impact of genetic testing prior to DNA-test disclosure. They show that limitations in emotional and social functioning can persist up to 1 year after CRC treatment, especially in those with a stoma or diagnosed before age 60. Female patients and male patients diagnosed before age 50 appear to be more vulnerable to genetic test-related distress. It is well known that being treated for CRC has great impact on psychological functioning. Little is known about the psychological impact during the first year after diagnosis and very little is known about the additional psychological effect of genetic testing for hereditary cancer in this period. We found presumptive evidence that specific subgroups of patients with CRC are more vulnerable for genetic-testing-related distress.

  17. The mutational spectrum of Lynch syndrome in cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizidou, Maria A; Neophytou, Ioanna; Papamichael, Demetris; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Marcou, Yiola; Kakouri, Eleni; Ioannidis, Georgios; Philippou, Chrystalla; Spanou, Elena; Tanteles, George A; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer and is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Mutation carriers have an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other extracolonic tumours. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of mutations in the MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes within a cohort of Cypriot families that fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines. The study cohort included 77 patients who fulfilled at least one of the revised Bethesda guidelines. Mutational analysis revealed the presence of 4 pathogenic mutations, 3 in the MLH1 gene and 1 in the MSH2 gene, in 5 unrelated individuals. It is noted that out of the 4 pathogenic mutations detected, one is novel (c.1610delG in exon 14 of the MLH1) and has been detected for the first time in the Cypriot population. Overall, the pathogenic mutation detection rate in our patient cohort was 7%. This percentage is relatively low but could be explained by the fact that the sole criterion for genetic screening was compliance to the revised Bethesda guidelines. Larger numbers of Lynch syndrome families and screening of the two additional predisposition genes, PMS2 and EPCAM, are needed in order to decipher the full spectrum of mutations associated with Lynch syndrome predisposition in Cyprus.

  18. Fertility and apparent genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupart, Douglas; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark; Winship, Ingrid M; Goldberg, Paul; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-09-01

    Genetic anticipation is the phenomenon in which age of onset of an inherited disorder decreases in successive generations. Inconsistent evidence suggests that this occurs in Lynch syndrome. A possible cause for apparent anticipation is fecundity bias, which occurs if the disease adversely affects fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) on lifetime fertility in Lynch syndrome, and whether this can falsely create the appearance of genetic anticipation. A computer model simulated age of diagnosis of CRC in hypothetical Lynch syndrome carriers and their offspring. The model assumed similar age distribution of CRC across generations (i.e. that there was no true anticipation). Age distribution of CRC diagnosis, and lifetime fertility rates (grouped by age of diagnosis of CRC) were determined from the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR). Apparent anticipation was calculated by comparing ages of diagnosis of CRC in affected parent-child pairs. A total of 1,088 patients with CRC were identified from the ACCFR. Total lifetime (cohort) fertility was related to age of diagnosis of CRC (correlation coefficient 0.13, P = 0.0001). In the simulation, apparent anticipation was 1.8 ± 0.54 years (P = 0.0044). Observed apparent anticipation in the ACCFR cohort was 4.8 ± 1.73 years (P = 0.0064). There was no difference in apparent anticipation between the simulate d and observed parent-child pairs (P = 0.89). The appearance of genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome can be falsely created due to changes in fertility.

  19. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    . Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52......PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P

  20. Mutation spectrum in South American Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Nilbert, Mef; Wernhoff, Patrik;

    2013-01-01

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system.......Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system....

  1. Tumour spectrum of non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) on the island of Tenerife and influence of insularity on the clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Arana, V; Barrios, Y; Fernández-Peralta, A; Jiménez, A; Salido, E; González, F; González-Aguilera, J J

    2004-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a complex disease from a genetic point of view because both genetic and environmental factors interact in its development. Only familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) follows mendelian genetics, in that mutations of the APC gene lead to development of the tumours. Lynch syndrome is the most frequent form of hereditary colorectal cancer and appears to be associated with other types of extracolonic cancers. The genetic basis has been established as a defect in DNA mismatch repair genes, and there is genetic heterogeneity due to the involvement of several genes in this system. Germinal mutations in these genes predispose to appearance of the syndrome. The aim of this study is to describe the tumoral spectrum of 10 families, comprising a total of 488 individuals, from the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands) and to assess whether the geographical isolation of this population has changed any features of the tumoral spectrum of the syndrome in comparison with studies that cover larger geographical areas with more genetic exchange. From our results we can conclude that the genetic drift and consanguinity in this population with a demographic history of isolation did not significantly alter the tumoral spectrum of the syndrome. Our data confirm that families affected by Lynch syndrome are a high-risk population and should be closely monitored, since their careful supervision has been shown to be useful in preventing cancer. We also emphasize the importance of developing a complete family history that permits these families to be identified together with a mutational screening of DNA mismatch repair genes (mainly MLH1 and MSH2 genes) with the aim of a possible identification of members of a family that should be carefully monitored (the carriers of germline mutations in these genes), whereas the remaining members, originally, are no more at risk than the general population.

  2. The risk of extra-colonic, extra-endometrial cancer in the Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, Patrice; Vasen, Hans F A; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka;

    2008-01-01

    strategies for these less common cancers require accurate, age-specific risk estimation. We pooled data from 4 LS research centers in a retrospective cohort study, to produce absolute incidence estimates for these cancer types, and to evaluate several potential risk modifiers. After elimination of 135...... after the median year of birth (p evaluate...

  3. Frequent mismatch-repair defects link prostate cancer to Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Joost, Patrick; Therkildsen, Christina;

    2016-01-01

    were high-grade tumors with Gleason scores 8-10. Prostate cancer was associated with mutations in MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6 with loss of the respective mismatch repair protein in 69 % of the tumors, though a MSI-high phenotype was restricted to 13 % of the tumors. The cumulative risk of prostate cancer...

  4. The risk of extra-colonic, extra-endometrial cancer in the Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, Patrice; Vasen, Hans F A; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    persons missing crucial information, cohort included 6,041 members of 261 families with LS-associated MLH1 or MSH2 mutations. All were either mutation carriers by test, probable mutation carriers (endometrial/colorectal cancer-affected), or first-degree relatives of these. Among mutation carriers...... and probable carriers, urologic tract cancer (N = 98) had an overall lifetime risk (to age 70) of 8.4% (95% CI: 6.6-10.8); risks were higher in males (p families (p ... after the median year of birth (p families (p

  5. DNA mismatch repair deficiency in sporadic colorectal cancer and Lynch Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Poulogiannis, George; Frayling, Ian; Arends, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Abstract DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency is one of the best understood forms of genetic instability in colorectal cancer (CRC), and is characterised by the loss of function of the MMR pathway. Failure to repair replication-associated errors due to a defective MMR system allows persistence of mismatch mutations all over the genome, but especially in regions of repetitive DNA known as microsatellites, giving rise to the phenomenon of microsatellite instability (MSI). A high freq...

  6. Recurrence and Variability of Germline EPCAM Deletions in Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Roland P.; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Bodmer, Danielle; Hoenselaar, Eveline; Goossens, Monique; Haufe, Aline; Kamping, Eveline; Niessen, Renee C.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Redeker, Bert; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena; Kahl, Philip; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Stemmler, Susanne; Betz, Beate; Hutter, Pierre; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Culver, Julie O.; Graham, Tracy; Chan, Tsun L.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.; Schackert, Hans K.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we identified 3' end deletions in the EPCAM gene as a novel cause of Lynch syndrome. These truncating EPCAM deletions cause allele-specific epigenetic silencing of the neighboring DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 in tissues expressing EPCAM. Here we screened a cohort of unexplained Lynch-like

  7. Novel Implications in Molecular Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Liccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of total colorectal cancers are associated with known Mendelian inheritance, as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP and Lynch syndrome (LS. In these cancer types the clinical manifestations of disease are due to mutations in high-risk alleles, with a penetrance at least of 70%. The LS is associated with germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. However, the mutation detection analysis of these genes does not always provide informative results for genetic counseling of LS patients. Very often, the molecular analysis reveals the presence of variants of unknown significance (VUSs whose interpretation is not easy and requires the combination of different analytical strategies to get a proper assessment of their pathogenicity. In some cases, these VUSs may make a more substantial overall contribution to cancer risk than the well-assessed severe Mendelian variants. Moreover, it could also be possible that the simultaneous presence of these genetic variants in several MMR genes that behave as low risk alleles might contribute in a cooperative manner to increase the risk of hereditary cancer. In this paper, through a review of the recent literature, we have speculated a novel inheritance model in the Lynch syndrome; this could pave the way toward new diagnostic perspectives.

  8. How does genetic risk information for Lynch syndrome translate to risk management behaviours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emma; Robbins, Andrew; Jenkins, Mark; Flander, Louisa; Gaff, Clara; Keogh, Louise

    2017-01-01

    There is limited research on why some individuals who have undergone predictive genetic testing for Lynch syndrome do not adhere to screening recommendations. This study aimed to explore qualitatively how Lynch syndrome non-carriers and carriers translate genetic risk information and advice to decisions about risk managment behaviours in the Australian healthcare system. Participants of the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry who had undergone predictive genetic testing for Lynch syndrome were interviewed on their risk management behaviours. Transcripts were analysed thematically using a comparative coding analysis. Thirty-three people were interviewed. Of the non-carriers (n = 16), 2 reported having apparently unnecessary colonoscopies, and 6 were unsure about what population-based colorectal cancer screening entails. Of the carriers (n = 17), 2 reported they had not had regular colonoscopies, and spoke about their discomfort with the screening process and a lack of faith in the procedure's ability to reduce their risk of developing colorectal cancer. Of the female carriers (n = 9), 2 could not recall being informed about the associated risk of gynaecological cancers. Non-carriers and female carriers of Lynch syndrome could benefit from further clarity and advice about appropriate risk management options. For those carriers who did not adhere to colonoscopy screening, a lack of faith in both genetic test results and screening were evident. It is essential that consistent advice is offered to both carriers and non-carriers of Lynch syndrome.

  9. Clinicopathological Features of Endometrial Carcino-ma Associated with Lynch Syndrome in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingmei WANG; Fengxia XUE; Russell R. BROADDUS; Xia TAO; Susu XIE; Yanbin ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective To study the clinicopathoiogical characteristics of Lynch syn&ome-associated endometrial carcinoma in China.Methods Twenty-seven patients who fulfilled the Amsterdam Criteria Ⅱ were classified as having Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial carcinoma (Group A), and 331 patients without a family history of cancer were classified as having sporadic endometrial carcinoma (Group B).Results There were 81 malignancies in 27 Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial carcinoma families, including colorectal cancer (CRC, 24.7%), endometrial carcinoma (21.0%), liver (12.3%), stomach (9.9%), lung (6.2%), and breast (6.2%) cancers. Mean age at time of diagnosis was 49.7 years in Group A and 56.3 years in Group B (P=0.004). Second primary cancers occurred in 33.3% of patients in Group A and 5.1% in Group B (P<0.0001). "Ihe most common second primary cancers were colorectal cancer (44%) and ovarian cancer (22%). The percentage of obese patients was higher in Group A (P=0.013). There was no difference between the two groups in incidence of diabetes mellitns or hypertension or in histological type and FIGO stage. The 5-year survival rates for Group A and B were 96.2% and 79.6%, respectively. Prognosis for Group A was better than for Group B (P=0.045).Conclusion Some clinicopathologicai features of Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial carcinoma, such as early onset and multiple primary carcinomas, are similar in the Chinese and American/European populations. However, the Chinese population had a unique family cancer distribution that included lung and breast cancers. An increased number of grade 1 endometrioid tumors and a better prognosis imply better biobehavior in Chinese Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial carcinoma. Obesity may be a co-contributing factor for development of Lynch syndrome associated endometrial cancer in China.

  10. Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in Lynch syndrome: Report of two cases and discussion on Lynch syndrome behaviour and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, M R; Pennelli, G; Zane, M; Galuppini, F; Colletti, P M; Merante Boschin, I; Rubello, D

    2015-08-01

    We present here two cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in patients affected by Lynch syndrome (LS). The first case is a 47-year-old woman with typical hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome, reported with endometrial and ovarian carcinoma at age 43, and colon cancer at age 45. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and central node dissection in 2007, at 47years old, with a histological diagnosis of PTC (T1aN1a). Molecular genetics showed a germ-line mutation of the MLH1 gene, 1858 G>T(E620X), with substitution of glycine with a stop codon at position 620. This mutation has pathogenetic significance and was considered responsible for the various tumours of the HNPCC spectrum. In particular, in the same kindred, spanning 5 generations, there were 5 members with colorectal cancer, 4 with endometrial cancer, 3 with gastric and 2 with breast cancer. The second case is a 34-year-old man with typical HNPCC syndrome with colonic resection for colon cancer at age 21. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy with central and lateral node dissection in 2010, at age 34, with a histological diagnosis of PTC with nodal metastases (pT4N1b). Molecular genetic analysis showed a germ-line mutation of the MSH2 gene (thymine insertion at position 907). This mutation had pathogenetic significance and was considered responsible for HNPCC development. Two similar cases have been reported: a 39-year-old woman, and a 44-year-old woman, affected by HNPCC syndrome, with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma, respectively. We reviewed the Lynch syndrome literature on the history, genetics and expanding tumour spectrum of this condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Comprehensive population-wide analysis of Lynch syndrome in Iceland reveals founder mutations in MSH6 and PMS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Rafnar, Thorunn; Frankel, Wendy L

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes, is associated with increased cancer risk. Here using a large whole-genome sequencing data bank, cancer registry and colorectal tumour bank we determine the prevalence of Lynch syndrome, associated cancer risks...... hypermethylation or mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The population prevalence of Lynch syndrome is 0.442%. We discover a translocation disrupting MLH1 and three mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 that increase endometrial, colorectal, brain and ovarian cancer risk. We find thirteen mismatch repair variants...... and pathogenicity of several variants in the Icelandic population. We use colorectal cancer samples from 1,182 patients diagnosed between 2000-2009. One-hundred and thirty-two (11.2%) tumours are mismatch repair deficient per immunohistochemistry. Twenty-one (1.8%) have Lynch syndrome while 106 (9.0%) have somatic...

  12. Limited impact on self-concept in individuals with Lynch syndrome; results from a national cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Esplen, Mary Jane; Ladelund, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals seek genetic counseling and hereby learn about hereditary cancer in the family. Lynch syndrome is associated with an inherited high risk for colorectal and gynecological cancer, but knowledge about how family members at risk perceive their situation is limited....... We used the national Danish HNPCC register to collect data on self-concept from 413 individuals with Lynch syndrome. The recently developed Lynch syndrome self-concept scale contains 20 items within two subscales related to stigma-vulnerability and bowel symptom-related anxiety. Significantly higher...

  13. Lynch syndrome-associated extracolonic tumors are rare in two extended families with the same EPCAM deletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, H.T.; Riegert-Johnson, D.L.; Snyder, C.; Lynch, J.F.; Hagenkord, J.; Boland, C.R.; Rhees, J.; Thibodeau, S.N.; Boardman, L.A.; Davies, J.; Kuiper, R.P.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer syndrome showing a preponderance of colorectal cancer (CRC) in context with endometrial cancer and several other extracolonic cancers, which is due to pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Some

  14. [Management and Nursing care for a patient with Lynch syndrome: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Guevara Valtier, Milton Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death from cancer worldwide. Main interventions to reduce the impact are aimed to enhance prevention and early detection. Results of several studies show that tests such as the fecal occult blood test and colonoscopy are effective for early diagnosis. There are hereditary syndromes such as Lynch Syndrome that can lead to certain types of cancers, including bowel neoplasms, therefore early detection needs to be included as part of the treatment. In these cases, family genetic testing is recommended if the bowel cancer is diagnosed before 50 years old. A care plan including the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) and NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) was developed for a patient with suspected Lynch Syndrome. Nurses should be qualified to identify potential cases of cancer associated with this syndrome, and thus, reduce the likelihood that family members develop the disease, through genetic counseling and education of environmental risk factors.

  15. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome : a guideline for clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menko, Fred H.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M. J.; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M. A.; de Wert, Guido M. W. R.; Tibben, Aad

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the op

  16. Effect of aspirin or resistant starch on colorectal neoplasia in the Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Burn (John); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); J.-P. Mecklin (Jukka-Pekka); F.A. Macrae (Finlay); G. Möslein (Gabriela); S. Olschwang (Sylviane); M.-L. Bisgaard (Marie-Luise); R.S. Ramesar (Rajkumar); D. Eccles (Diana); E.R. Maher (Eamonn); L. Bertario (Lucio); H.J. Jarvinen (Heikki); A. Lindblom (Annika); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Lubinski (Jan); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); J.W.C. Ho (Judy); H. Vasen (Hans); L. Side (Lucy); H.J.W. Thomas (Huw ); R.J. Scott (Rodney); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); G. Barker (Gail); F. Elliott (Faye); J.R. Jass (Jeremy ); R. Fodde (Riccardo); H. Lynch (Henry); J.C. Mathers (John )

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Observational and epidemiologic data indicate that the use of aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal neoplasia; however, the effects of aspirin in the Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer) are not known. Resistant starch has been associated with an antineoplas

  17. Is surveillance of the small bowel indicated for Lynch syndrome families?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kate, G.L. ten; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Craanen, M.; Cats, A.; Menko, F.H.; Vasen, H.F.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small bowel cancer (SBC) is one of the tumours associated with Lynch syndrome (LS). To advise on screening for this tumour it is paramount to be informed about the lifetime risk. The aim of this study was to calculate the lifetime risk of SBC in LS and to identify possible risk factors.

  18. Is surveillance of the small bowel indicated for Lynch syndrome families?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, G. L.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Nagengast, F. M.; Craanen, M.; Cats, A.; Menko, F. H.; Vasen, H. F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Small bowel cancer (SBC) is one of the tumours associated with Lynch syndrome (LS). To advise on screening for this tumour it is paramount to be informed about the lifetime risk. The aim of this study was to calculate the lifetime risk of SBC in LS and to identify possible risk factors.

  19. Dietary patterns and colorectal adenomas in Lynch syndrome: the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.; Vasen, H.F.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a high risk of developing colorectal cancer due to mutations in mismatch repair genes. Because dietary factors, alone and in combination, influence sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, the association of dietary patterns with colorectal adenomas in L

  20. Dietary Patterns and Colorectal Adenomas in Lynch Syndrome The GEOLynch Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, Akke; Vasen, Hans F. A.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Kampman, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a high risk of developing colorectal cancer due to mutations in mismatch repair genes. Because dietary factors, alone and in combination, influence sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, the association of dietary patterns with colorectal adenomas in L

  1. A clinical scoring system to identify patients with sebaceous neoplasms at risk for the Muir-Torre variant of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Maegan E; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Thomas, Brittany C; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Purcell, Jennifer U; Hanson, Nancy B; Leppig, Kathleen A; Lim, Justin; Cappel, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    The Muir-Torre syndrome variant of Lynch syndrome is characterized by the presence of sebaceous neoplasms (adenoma, epithelioma/sebaceoma, carcinoma) and Lynch syndrome-associated cancers (colon, endometrial, and others). Several clinical scoring systems have been developed to identify patients with colon cancer at high risk of Lynch syndrome. However, no such system has been described for patients presenting with sebaceous neoplasms. Based on logistic regression analysis, a scoring system was developed for patients with sebaceous neoplasm to identify those with the highest likelihood of having Muir-Torre syndrome. The final version of the scoring system included variables such as age at presentation of initial sebaceous neoplasm, total number of sebaceous neoplasms, personal history of a Lynch-related cancer, and family history of Lynch-related cancers. Patients with a score of 3 or more were more likely to have Muir-Torre syndrome (28 of 29 patients), those with a score of 2 had intermediate likelihood (12 of 20 patients), and no patient with a score of 0 or 1 was diagnosed with Muir-Torre syndrome. The Mayo Muir-Torre syndrome risk scoring system appears to identify whether patients who present with sebaceous neoplasms are in need of further Lynch syndrome evaluation using easily ascertained clinical information. Abnormal mismatch repair gene immunohistochemistry of a sebaceous neoplasm is a poor predictor in regard to diagnosing Lynch syndrome.

  2. Isolated Loss of PMS2 Immunohistochemical Expression is Frequently Caused by Heterogenous MLH1 Promoter Hypermethylation in Lynch Syndrome Screening for Endometrial Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Aya; Sato, Naoki; Sugawara, Tae; Takahashi, Kazue; Kito, Masahiko; Makino, Kenichi; Sato, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Dai; Shirasawa, Hiromistu; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Wataru; Kumazawa, Yukiyo; Sato, Akira; Kumagai, Jin; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder mainly caused by a germline mutation in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) and is associated with increased risk for various cancers, particularly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (EC). Women with LS account for 2% to 6% of EC patients; it is clinically important to identify LS in such individuals for predicting and/or preventing additional LS-associated cancers. PMS2 germline mutation (PMS2-LS) is the rarest contribution to LS etiology among the 4 LS-associated MMR germline mutations, and its detection is complicated. Therefore, prudent screening for PMS2-LS is important as it leads to an efficient LS identification strategy. Immunohistochemistry is recommended as a screening method for LS in EC. Isolated loss of PMS2 (IL-PMS2) expression is caused not only by PMS2-LS but also by MLH1 germline mutation or MLH1 promoter hypermethylation (MLH-PHM). This study aimed to determine the association between MLH1-PHM and IL-PMS2 to avoid inappropriate genetic analysis. We performed MLH1 methylation analysis and MLH1/PMS2 germline mutation testing on the IL-PMS2 cases. By performing MMR-immunohistochemistry on 360 unselected ECs, we could select 8 (2.2%) cases as IL-PMS2. Heterogenous MLH1 staining and MLH1-PHM were detected in 4 of 8 (50%) IL-PMS2 tumors. Of the 5 IL-PMS2 patients who underwent genetic analysis, 1 had PMS2 germline mutation with normal MLH1 expression (without MLH1-PHM), and no MLH1 germline mutation was detected. We suggest that MLH1 promoter methylation analysis for IL-PMS2 EC should be performed to exclude sporadic cases before further PMS2 genetic testing.

  3. Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome: family communication and motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.M. Leenen (Celine); M.D. Heijer (Mariska den); C.A. van der Meer (Conny); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCurrent genetic counselling practice for Lynch syndrome (LS) relies on diagnosed index patients to inform their biological family about LS, referred to as the family-mediated approach. The objective of this study was to evaluate this approach and to identify factors influencing the uptak

  4. Revised guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (HNPCC) : Recommendations by a group of European experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, Hans F. A.; Blanco, Ignacio; Aktan-Collan, Katja; Gopie, Jessica P.; Alonso, Angel; Aretz, Stefan; Bernstein, Inge; Bertario, Lucio; Burn, John; Capella, Gabriel; Colas, Chrystelle; Engel, Christoph; Frayling, Ian M.; Genuardi, Maurizio; Heinimann, Karl; Hes, Frederik J.; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Karagiannis, John A.; Lalloo, Fiona; Lindblom, Annika; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Moller, Pal; Myrhoj, Torben; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Parc, Yann; de Leon, Maurizio Ponz; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Sampson, Julian R.; Stormorken, Astrid; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Tejpar, Sabine; Thomas, Huw J. W.; Rahner, Nils; Wijnen, Juul T.; Jaervinen, Heikki Juhani; Moeslein, Gabriela; Jarvinen, H.J.; Moslein, G.

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. In 2007, a group of European experts (the Mallorca group) published guidelines for th

  5. Effect of aspirin or resistant starch on colorectal neoplasia in the Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burn, John; Bishop, D Timothy; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    .4%) (relative risk, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.7 to 1.4). Advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers were evenly distributed in the two groups. The prevalence of serious adverse events was low, and the events were evenly distributed. CONCLUSIONS: The use of aspirin, resistant starch, or both for up to 4 years has no effect......BACKGROUND: Observational and epidemiologic data indicate that the use of aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal neoplasia; however, the effects of aspirin in the Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer) are not known. Resistant starch has been associated with an antineoplastic effect...... on the incidence of colorectal adenoma or carcinoma among carriers of the Lynch syndrome. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN59521990.)...

  6. Limited impact on self-concept in individuals with Lynch syndrome; results from a national cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Esplen, Mary Jane; Ladelund, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals seek genetic counseling and hereby learn about hereditary cancer in the family. Lynch syndrome is associated with an inherited high risk for colorectal and gynecological cancer, but knowledge about how family members at risk perceive their situation is limited...

  7. Body Mass Index Increases Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in Men With Lynch Syndrome : The GEOLynch Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, Akke; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Braem, Marieke G. M.; Hendriks, Jan C. M.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Kampman, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose High body mass index (BMI) is an established risk factor for sporadic colorectal cancer. Still, the influence of BMI on hereditary colorectal cancer (eg, Lynch syndrome [LS]), is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess whether BMI is associated with colorectal adenoma occurrence

  8. Lynch syndrome: barriers to and facilitators of screening and disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Kathy E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer with confirmed carriers at high risk for colorectal (CRC and extracolonic cancers. The purpose of the current study was to develop a greater understanding of the factors influencing decisions about disease management post-genetic testing. Methods The study used a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis as part of a multiphase project examining the psychosocial and behavioral impact of predictive DNA testing for Lynch syndrome. Individual and small group interviews were conducted with individuals from 10 families with the MSH2 intron 5 splice site mutation or exon 8 deletion. The data from confirmed carriers (n = 23 were subjected to re-analysis to identify key barriers to and/or facilitators of screening and disease management. Results Thematic analysis identified personal, health care provider and health care system factors as dominant barriers to and/or facilitators of managing Lynch syndrome. Person-centered factors reflect risk perceptions and decision-making, and enduring screening/disease management. The perceived knowledge and clinical management skills of health care providers also influenced participation in recommended protocols. The health care system barriers/facilitators are defined in terms of continuity of care and coordination of services among providers. Conclusions Individuals with Lynch syndrome often encounter multiple barriers to and facilitators of disease management that go beyond the individual to the provider and health care system levels. The current organization and implementation of health care services are inadequate. A coordinated system of local services capable of providing integrated, efficient health care and follow-up, populated by providers with knowledge of hereditary cancer, is necessary to maintain optimal health.

  9. Lynch syndrome: barriers to and facilitators of screening and disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Kathy E; Way, Christine Y; Fiander, Jacqueline J; Meadus, Robert J; Esplen, Mary Jane; Green, Jane S; Ludlow, Valerie C; Etchegary, Holly A; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2011-09-07

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer with confirmed carriers at high risk for colorectal (CRC) and extracolonic cancers. The purpose of the current study was to develop a greater understanding of the factors influencing decisions about disease management post-genetic testing. The study used a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis as part of a multiphase project examining the psychosocial and behavioral impact of predictive DNA testing for Lynch syndrome. Individual and small group interviews were conducted with individuals from 10 families with the MSH2 intron 5 splice site mutation or exon 8 deletion. The data from confirmed carriers (n = 23) were subjected to re-analysis to identify key barriers to and/or facilitators of screening and disease management. Thematic analysis identified personal, health care provider and health care system factors as dominant barriers to and/or facilitators of managing Lynch syndrome. Person-centered factors reflect risk perceptions and decision-making, and enduring screening/disease management. The perceived knowledge and clinical management skills of health care providers also influenced participation in recommended protocols. The health care system barriers/facilitators are defined in terms of continuity of care and coordination of services among providers. Individuals with Lynch syndrome often encounter multiple barriers to and facilitators of disease management that go beyond the individual to the provider and health care system levels. The current organization and implementation of health care services are inadequate. A coordinated system of local services capable of providing integrated, efficient health care and follow-up, populated by providers with knowledge of hereditary cancer, is necessary to maintain optimal health.

  10. Achieving behaviour change for detection of Lynch syndrome using the Theoretical Domains Framework Implementation (TDFI) approach: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Natalie; Long, Janet C; Debono, Deborah; Williams, Rachel; Salisbury, Elizabeth; O'Neill, Sharron; Eykman, Elizabeth; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Chin, Melvin

    2016-03-12

    Lynch syndrome is an inherited disorder associated with a range of cancers, and found in 2-5 % of colorectal cancers. Lynch syndrome is diagnosed through a combination of significant family and clinical history and pathology. The definitive diagnostic germline test requires formal patient consent after genetic counselling. If diagnosed early, carriers of Lynch syndrome can undergo increased surveillance for cancers, which in turn can prevent late stage cancers, optimise treatment and decrease mortality for themselves and their relatives. However, over the past decade, international studies have reported that only a small proportion of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome were referred for genetic consultation and possible genetic testing. The aim of this project is to use behaviour change theory and implementation science approaches to increase the number and speed of healthcare professional referrals of colorectal cancer patients with a high-likelihood risk of Lynch syndrome to appropriate genetic counselling services. The six-step Theoretical Domains Framework Implementation (TDFI) approach will be used at two large, metropolitan hospitals treating colorectal cancer patients. Steps are: 1) form local multidisciplinary teams to map current referral processes; 2) identify target behaviours that may lead to increased referrals using discussion supported by a retrospective audit; 3) identify barriers to those behaviours using the validated Influences on Patient Safety Behaviours Questionnaire and TDFI guided focus groups; 4) co-design interventions to address barriers using focus groups; 5) co-implement interventions; and 6) evaluate intervention impact. Chi square analysis will be used to test the difference in the proportion of high-likelihood risk Lynch syndrome patients being referred for genetic testing before and after intervention implementation. A paired t-test will be used to assess the mean time from the pathology test results to referral for high

  11. Validation of a Self-Concept Scale for Lynch Syndrome in Different Nationalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Domanska, Katarina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola;

    2011-01-01

    syndrome. We compared the performance of this scale in 591 mutation carriers from Denmark, Sweden and Canada. Principal component analysis identified two sets of linked statements-the first related to feeling different, isolated and labeled, and the second to concern and worry about bowel changes....... The scale performed consistently in the three countries. Minor differences were identified, with guilt about passing on a defective gene and feelings of losing one's privacy being more pronounced among Canadians, whereas Danes more often expressed worries about cancer. Validation of the Lynch syndrome self...

  12. Assessing Genetic Variants of Uncertain Significance: The Example of Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    variants of uncertain significance (VUS). This leads to anxiety in carriers and noncarrying relatives alike, as well as to an unnecessary burden to preventive healthcare. The establishment of procedures that enable the diagnostic assessment of VUSs in individuals are discussed and hereditary colorectal...... cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, is used as an example. This challenge is addressed by illustrating the importance of combining genetic and functional data in future strategies to assess VUS. The proposed strategies combine clinical genetic, analytical, functional and in silico approaches....

  13. 100 years lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bleiker, Eveline M A; Esplen, Mary Jane; Meiser, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    by an overview of important psychosocial issues identified in the past 20 years. The identification of mismatch repair genes in 1993-1994 made possible genetic counseling and testing for patients who had cancer and for potentially high-risk relatives without cancer. At that time, concerns were raised about......, reproductive technology utilization, and professional psychosocial support needs of members of families with LS. Finally, challenges for the future are discussed, including population screening and genomic testing....

  14. Role of the clinical pathology laboratory in the evaluation of endometrial carcinomas for Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Broaddus, Russell R

    2014-05-01

    Molecular diagnostic testing of endometrial carcinomas in the pathology laboratory has recently emerged as a key component of the clinical evaluation of Lynch syndrome in many centers. Testing modalities involve immunohistochemical and PCR-based analyses. This article outlines the routine application of these analyses, provides a practical guide for troubleshooting some of the common technical issues related to their performance, and reviews common pitfalls in their interpretation. Discrepancies between tissue testing and genetic testing results are discussed in the context of the current understanding of endometrial cancer biology. The merits of universal versus targeted tissue testing based on clinical patient history and histological tumor appearance are also addressed.

  15. Analysis of Families with Lynch Syndrome Complicated by Advanced Serrated Neoplasia: The Importance of Pathology Review and Pedigree Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael D; Buchanan, Daniel D; Walters, Rhiannon; Roberts, Aedan; Arnold, Sven; McKeone, Diane; Clendenning, Mark; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jillian; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Young, Graeme P; Macrae, Finlay; Drini, Musa; Woods, Michael O; Parry, Susan; Jass, Jeremy R; Young, Joanne P

    2009-01-01

    The identification of Lynch syndrome has been greatly assisted by the advent of tumour immunohistochemistry (IHC) for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, and by the recognition of the role of acquired somatic BRAF mutation in sporadic MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC). However, somatic BRAF mutation may also be present in the tumours in families with a predisposition to develop serrated polyps in the colorectum. In a subgroup of affected members in these families, CRCs emerge which demonstrate clear evidence of MMR deficiency with absent MLH1 staining and high-level microsatellite instability (MSI). This may result in these families being erroneously classified as Lynch syndrome or, conversely, an individual is considered “sporadic” due to the presence of a somatic BRAF mutation in a tumour. In this report, we describe two Lynch syndrome families who demonstrated several such inconsistencies. In one family, IHC deficiency of both MSH2 and MLH1 was demonstrated in tumours from different affected family members, presenting a confusing diagnostic picture. In the second family, MLH1 loss was observed in the lesions of both MLH1 mutation carriers and those who showed normal MLH1 germline sequence. Both families had Lynch syndrome complicated by an independently segregating serrated neoplasia phenotype, suggesting that in families such as these, tumour and germline studies of several key members, rather than of a single proband, are indicated to clarify the spectrum of risk. PMID:19241144

  16. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartuma Katarina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer. Methods Lynch syndrome represents a major type of hereditary colorectal and gynaecological cancer. We preformed open-ended interviews with 27 informants from 9 Lynch syndrome families. Inductive content analysis revealed three major themes: transition to a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations and individual roles. Results Family members described how learning about Lynch syndrome shifted focus from daily issues to concerns about cancer. Changes in communication related to difficulties in talking to children about heredity and informing new family members and distant relatives about an increased risk of cancer. Influence on relations was exemplified by family members taking on different roles, e.g. females often being responsible for coordinating information about heredity and providing support. Families in which members had experienced cancer at young age typically informed children soon after learning about heredity and at young age, whereas families with experience of cancer at higher age postponed information and thereby also genetic counselling. Conclusions Three major family perspectives are described in Lynch syndrome families; becoming a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations. Since these issues are central, our findings suggests that such family perspectives should be considered during genetic counselling in order to contribute to information spread, help family members cope with the increased risk, and motivate family members at risk to undergo surveillance.

  17. A de novo germline MLH1 mutation in a Lynch syndrome patient with discordant immunohistochemical and molecular biology test results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Airaud; Sébastien Küry; Isabelle Valo; Ingrid Maury; Dominique Bonneau; Olivier Ingster; Stéphane Bezieau

    2012-01-01

    We describe a patient with a Homo sapiens mutL homolog 1 (MLH1)-associated Lynch syndrome with previous diagnoses of two distinct primary cancers:a sigmoid colon cancer at the age of 39 years,and a right colon cancer at the age of 50 years.The mutation identified in his blood and buccal cells,c.1771delG,p.Asp591Ilefs*25,appears to be a de novo event,as it was not transmitted by either of his parents.This type of de novo event is rare in MLH1 as only three cases have been reported in the literature so far.Furthermore,the discordant results observed between replication error phenotyping and immunohistochemistry highlight the importance of the systematic use of both pre-screening tests in the molecular diagnosis of Lynch syndrome.

  18. The Use of Social Media to Recruit Participants With Rare Conditions: Lynch Syndrome as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Chase, Allison M; Parker, Wendy M; Hennig, Kelsey; Sisson, Faith; Bruzzone, Linda L

    2017-01-23

    Social media is increasingly being used as a means of recruiting participants, particularly for investigators whose areas of interest involve rare conditions or hard-to-reach populations. However, much of the literature to date has focused on paid advertisement recruitment. We used Lynch syndrome (LS), a rare hereditary cancer syndrome, as a model to demonstrate the successful partnership between researchers and a Web-based patient education and advocacy organization to facilitate participant recruitment. Recruitment was undertaken in partnership with Lynch Syndrome International (LSI), an advocacy organization with a strong social media presence. After LSI published our study information, participants followed up via email or phone call. Following prescreening and consent, interested and eligible participants were then sent a secure survey link. Within 36 hours of a single Facebook post by the site administrators for LSI, over 150 individuals responded via phone or email. Sixty-five individuals were sent the survey link and 57 individuals completed the survey (88% response rate). Of note, these 57 individuals were geographically diverse within the Unites States, representing LS patients from 26 different states. This approach has several advantages, including recruitment through a trusted source outside of a clinical setting, higher response rates, and cost-effectiveness with a small research team in a relatively short amount of time. Overall, social media recruitment with a trusted online partner can be highly effective in hard-to-reach clinical populations, such as patients with LS. However, this approach requires additional effort for eligibility screening.

  19. Mismatch repair-deficient crypt foci in Lynch syndrome--molecular alterations and association with clinical parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Staffa

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, most frequently MLH1 and MSH2. Recently, MMR-deficient crypt foci (MMR-DCF have been identified as a novel lesion which occurs at high frequency in the intestinal mucosa from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers, but very rarely progress to cancer. To shed light on molecular alterations and clinical associations of MMR-DCF, we systematically searched the intestinal mucosa from Lynch syndrome patients for MMR-DCF by immunohistochemistry. The identified lesions were characterised for alterations in microsatellite-bearing genes with proven or suspected role in malignant transformation. We demonstrate that the prevalence of MMR-DCF (mean 0.84 MMR-DCF per 1 cm2 mucosa in the colorectum of Lynch syndrome patients was significantly associated with patients' age, but not with patients' gender. No MMR-DCF were detectable in the mucosa of patients with sporadic MSI-H colorectal cancer (n = 12. Microsatellite instability of at least one tested marker was detected in 89% of the MMR-DCF examined, indicating an immediate onset of microsatellite instability after MMR gene inactivation. Coding microsatellite mutations were most frequent in the genes HT001 (ASTE1 with 33%, followed by AIM2 (17% and BAX (10%. Though MMR deficiency alone appears to be insufficient for malignant transformation, it leads to measurable microsatellite instability even in single MMR-deficient crypts. Our data indicate for the first time that the frequency of MMR-DCF increases with patients' age. Similar patterns of coding microsatellite instability in MMR-DCF and MMR-deficient cancers suggest that certain combinations of coding microsatellite mutations, including mutations of the HT001, AIM2 and BAX gene, may contribute to the progression of MMR-deficient lesions into MMR-deficient cancers.

  20. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G;

    2011-01-01

    inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four-candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening, and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across...... to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families....... birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known...

  1. Evaluation of Lynch syndrome modifier genes in 748 MMR mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlle, Solene; Charbonnier, Françoise; Houivet, Estelle; Tinat, Julie; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Caron, Olivier; Benichou, Jacques; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Frebourg, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Several studies have reported that, in Lynch syndrome resulting from mutations of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, a CA repeat ≤17 within the IGF1 promoter, SNPs within the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene CYP1A1 and SNPs on 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 modify colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in MMR mutation carriers. We analysed the impact of these polymorphisms on CRC risk in 748 French MMR mutation carriers derived from 359 families. We also analysed the effect of the Novel 1 SNP (18q21), which has recently been shown to increase CRC risk in the general population. We observed a significant difference in the CRC-free survival time between males and females, between MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers and between MLH1 and MSH6, indicating that this series is representative of Lynch syndrome. In contrast, the univariate log-rank test, as well as multivariate Cox model analysis controlling for familial aggregation and mutated MMR gene, year of birth and gender showed that the polymorphic alleles tested were not associated with a significant CRC risk increase, neither on the entire sample nor among males and females. This discrepancy with previous reports might be explained both by the genetic heterogeneity between the different populations analysed and the allelic heterogeneity of the MMR mutations. We conclude that genotyping of these polymorphisms is not useful to evaluate CRC risk in MMR mutation carriers and to optimize their clinical follow-up.

  2. Syndrome de Lynch: à propos d'un cas et revue de la litterature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouguenouch, Laila; Samri, Imane; Belhassan, Khadija; Sayel, Hanane; Abbassi, Meriame; Bennis, Sanae; Benajah, Dafr Allah; Ibrahimi, Adil; Amarti, Afaf; Ouldim, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de Lynch, ou cancer colorectal héréditaire sans polypose ou HNPCC (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer), est la forme la plus fréquente de cancer colorectal héréditaire. Il conduit à une augmentation de la susceptibilité à développer des cancers, au premier rang le cancer colorectal, le cancer de l'endomètre chez les femmes, et dans une moindre mesure, d'autres cancers (ovaire, intestin grêle, estomac, voies excrétrices urinaires et hépatobiliaires). Ainsi, le risque cumulé de développer un cancer colorectal ou de l'endomètre à l’âge de 80 ans s’élève respectivement à 20 et 40%. Ces cancers sont caractérisés par leur contexte d'atteinte familiale, leur survenue à un âge précoce, ainsi que par le développement de cancers métachrones chez un même individu. Ce syndrome se transmet de manière autosomique dominante. Les gènes dont l'altération est associée à l'existence d'un syndrome HNPCC appartiennent à la famille des gènes de réparation des mésappariements de l'ADN (DNA mismatch repair ou MMR): MSH2, MLH1 et MSH6 sont impliqués, par ordre décroissant de fréquence, dans respectivement 35%, 25% et 2% des cas. Une surveillance coloscopique et gynécologique est proposée aux personnes porteuses d'une mutation constitutionnelle du gène MSH2, MLH1 ou MSH6. Nous rapportons une des premières observations marocaines d'un syndrome de Lynch dont la mutation constitutionnelle du gène MLH1 a été identifiée chez un des membres de la famille atteint d'un cancer du côlon. Suite à la demande d'autres sujets sains de la même famille, un diagnostic presymptomatique a été effectué conduisant à une stratégie de surveillance adaptée. A travers notre observation nous illustrons le rôle de l'oncogénétique dans la prise en charge des patients cancéreux et de leurs familles. PMID:27642480

  3. Development and validation of an instrument to measure the impact of genetic testing on self-concept in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esplen, M J; Stuckless, N; Gallinger, S

    2011-01-01

    with two dimensions identified through factor analysis: stigma/vulnerability and bowel symptom-related anxiety. The scale showed excellent reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.93), good convergent validity by a high correlation with impact of event scale (r(102) = 0.55, p self-esteem scale......Esplen MJ, Stuckless N, Gallinger S, Aronson M, Rothenmund H, Semotiuk K, Stokes J, Way C, Green J, Butler K, Petersen HV, Wong J. Development and validation of an instrument to measure the impact of genetic testing on self-concept in Lynch syndrome. A positive genetic test result may impact...... on a person's self-concept and affect quality of life. The purpose of the study was to develop a self-concept scale to measure such impact for individuals carrying mutations for a heritable colorectal cancer Lynch syndrome (LS). Two distinct phases were involved: Phase 1 generated specific colorectal self...

  4. Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome: family communication and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenen, Celine H M; Heijer, Mariska den; van der Meer, Conny; Kuipers, Ernst J; van Leerdam, Monique E; Wagner, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Current genetic counselling practice for Lynch syndrome (LS) relies on diagnosed index patients to inform their biological family about LS, referred to as the family-mediated approach. The objective of this study was to evaluate this approach and to identify factors influencing the uptake of genetic testing for LS. In 59 mutation carriers, 70 non carriers and 16 non-tested relatives socio-demographic characteristics, family communication regarding LS, experiences and attitudes towards the family-mediated approach and motivations for genetic testing, were assessed. The majority of all respondents (73 %) were satisfied with the family-mediated approach. Nevertheless, 59 % of the respondents experienced informing a family member and 57 % being informed by a family member as burdensome. Non-tested differed from tested respondents, in that they were younger, less closely related to the index patient and a lower proportion had children. The most important reasons for declining genetic testing were (1) anticipating problems with life insurance and mortgage, (2) being content with life as it is, and (3) not experiencing any physical complaints. In conclusion, the majority of respondents consider the current family-mediated information procedure acceptable, although the provision of information on LS by relatives may be burdensome. Special attention should be paid to communication of LS to more distant relatives.

  5. Identification of individuals at risk for Lynch syndrome using targeted evaluations and genetic testing: National Society of Genetic Counselors and the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer joint practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Scott M; Burt, Randall; Church, James; Erdman, Steve; Hampel, Heather; Holter, Spring; Jasperson, Kory; Kalady, Matt F; Haidle, Joy Larsen; Lynch, Henry T; Palaniappan, Selvi; Wise, Paul E; Senter, Leigha

    2012-08-01

    Identifying individuals who have Lynch syndrome (LS) involves a complex diagnostic work up that includes taking a detailed family history and a combination of various genetic and immunohistochemical tests. The National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CGA-ICC) have come together to publish this clinical practice testing guideline for the evaluation of LS. The purpose of this practice guideline is to provide guidance and a testing algorithm for LS as well as recommendations on when to offer testing. This guideline does not replace a consultation with a genetics professional. This guideline includes explanations in support of this and a summary of background data. While this guideline is not intended to serve as a review of LS, it includes a discussion of background information on LS, and cites a number of key publications which should be reviewed for a more in-depth understanding of LS. These guidelines are intended for genetic counselors, geneticists, gastroenterologists, surgeons, medical oncologists, obstetricians and gynecologists, nurses and other healthcare providers who evaluate patients for LS.

  6. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  7. The Use of Social Media to Recruit Participants With Rare Conditions: Lynch Syndrome as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Wendy M; Hennig, Kelsey; Sisson, Faith; Bruzzone, Linda L

    2017-01-01

    Background Social media is increasingly being used as a means of recruiting participants, particularly for investigators whose areas of interest involve rare conditions or hard-to-reach populations. However, much of the literature to date has focused on paid advertisement recruitment. Objective We used Lynch syndrome (LS), a rare hereditary cancer syndrome, as a model to demonstrate the successful partnership between researchers and a Web-based patient education and advocacy organization to facilitate participant recruitment. Methods Recruitment was undertaken in partnership with Lynch Syndrome International (LSI), an advocacy organization with a strong social media presence. After LSI published our study information, participants followed up via email or phone call. Following prescreening and consent, interested and eligible participants were then sent a secure survey link. Results Within 36 hours of a single Facebook post by the site administrators for LSI, over 150 individuals responded via phone or email. Sixty-five individuals were sent the survey link and 57 individuals completed the survey (88% response rate). Of note, these 57 individuals were geographically diverse within the Unites States, representing LS patients from 26 different states. Conclusions This approach has several advantages, including recruitment through a trusted source outside of a clinical setting, higher response rates, and cost-effectiveness with a small research team in a relatively short amount of time. Overall, social media recruitment with a trusted online partner can be highly effective in hard-to-reach clinical populations, such as patients with LS. However, this approach requires additional effort for eligibility screening. PMID:28115298

  8. Molecular profile of the Lynch Syndrome in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Hiljadnikova-Bajro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent type of hereditary colorectal cancer, the one occurring in the setting of the Lynch syndrome (LS is considered a phenotypic manifestation of a germline defect in the mismatch repair mechanism i.e. in the MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 gene. Aiming towards establishment of a standardized protocol involving molecular analyses for diagnosis of this syndrome and developing a unique national register of families with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in the Republic of Macedonia, we began a prospective study to reveal the genetic defects among Macedonian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC and identifying families with hereditary CRC. A total of 53 patients fulfilling the revised Bethesda criteria for MSI-genetic testing were compared to 350 patients with sporadic CRC. The results reveal significant differences in age at diagnosis (p=0.03, involvement of microsatellite instability (pG nonsense mutation with a possible founder effect in the Macedonian population, the MLH1 ex.3-12 deletion, as well as the c.244A>G mutation, IVS14- 19A>G and IVS4+65A>C changes in MLH1 without confirmed pathological significance. The observed high frequency (87.5% of the Ile219Val (c.655A>G variant in MLH1 among the LS suspects prompts further analyses to evaluate its involvement in the development of hereditary CRC by itself or as a risk modifying factor among the patients from the Republic of Macedonia.

  9. The role of religious and existential well-being in families with Lynch syndrome: prevention, family communication, and psychosocial adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bronwyn A; Hadley, Donald W; Koehly, Laura M

    2013-08-01

    This study explored the role of religious (RWB) and existential well-being (EWB) on psychosocial factors, support network characteristics, and screening practices in families with Lynch syndrome, also referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). Participants were individuals with Lynch syndrome associated cancers and their first-degree relatives at risk of inheriting an identified deleterious mutation. Analyses considered both family RWB and EWB norms and individual deviations from that norm. Analyses controlled for age, gender, cancer diagnosis, number of respondents, and network size. Higher family RWB was associated with increased depressive symptoms (p family EWB was related to decreased depression symptoms (p family EWB was associated with fecal occult blood testing (p family communication about genetic counselling and testing (p family-level effects. Individuals with lower EWB than their family had lower perceived risk for colorectal cancer (p communicated disease risk information to less family members (p family also had higher cancer worry (p family network and being aware of family characteristics which may impact individual adjustment to disease risk. Interventions considering family-level factors may provide efficient pathways to improving psychosocial factors, screening practices, communication about disease risk and genetic testing, and cancer prevention.

  10. Whole Gene Capture Analysis of 15 CRC Susceptibility Genes in Suspected Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M L Jansen

    Full Text Available Lynch Syndrome (LS is caused by pathogenic germline variants in one of the mismatch repair (MMR genes. However, up to 60% of MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cases are categorized as suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS because no pathogenic MMR germline variant can be identified, which leads to difficulties in clinical management. We therefore analyzed the genomic regions of 15 CRC susceptibility genes in leukocyte DNA of 34 unrelated sLS patients and 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors with a clear family history.Using targeted next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the entire non-repetitive genomic sequence, including intronic and regulatory sequences, of 15 CRC susceptibility genes. In addition, tumor DNA from 28 sLS patients was analyzed for somatic MMR variants.Of 1979 germline variants found in the leukocyte DNA of 34 sLS patients, one was a pathogenic variant (MLH1 c.1667+1delG. Leukocyte DNA of 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors was negative for pathogenic germline variants in the tested CRC susceptibility genes and for germline MLH1 hypermethylation. Somatic DNA analysis of 28 sLS tumors identified eight (29% cases with two pathogenic somatic variants, one with a VUS predicted to pathogenic and LOH, and nine cases (32% with one pathogenic somatic variant (n = 8 or one VUS predicted to be pathogenic (n = 1.This is the first study in sLS patients to include the entire genomic sequence of CRC susceptibility genes. An underlying somatic or germline MMR gene defect was identified in ten of 34 sLS patients (29%. In the remaining sLS patients, the underlying genetic defect explaining the MMRdeficiency in their tumors might be found outside the genomic regions harboring the MMR and other known CRC susceptibility genes.

  11. Gene variants of unknown clinical significance in Lynch syndrome. An introduction for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians referring patients for genetic testing for Lynch syndrome will sooner or later receive results for DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes reporting DNA changes that are unclear from a clinical point of view. These changes are referred to as variants of unknown, or unclear, clinical significance

  12. Prediction of MLH1 and MSH2 mutations in lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Balmana (Judith); D.H. Stockwell (David); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); E.M. Stoffel (Elena); A.M. Deffenbaugh (Amie); J.E. Reid (Julia); B. Ward (Brian); T. Scholl (Thomas); B. Hendrickson (Brant); J. Tazelaar (John); L.A. Burbidge (Lynn); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractContext: Lynch syndrome is caused primarily by mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2. Objectives: To analyze MLH1/MSH2 mutation prevalence in a large cohort of patients undergoing genetic testing and to develop a clinical model to predict the likelihood of finding a mutati

  13. Smoking increases the risk for colorectal adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Botma, A.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Kampman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a high risk of developing colorectal carcinomas and adenomas at a young age, due to inherited mutations in mismatch repair genes. We investigated whether modifiable lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol intake, increase this risk.

  14. Smoking Increases the Risk for Colorectal Adenomas in Patients With Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, Renate M.; Botma, Akke; Van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Kampman, Ellen

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a high risk of developing colorectal carcinomas and adenomas at a young age, due to inherited mutations in mismatch repair genes. We investigated whether modifiable lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol intake, increase this risk.

  15. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather;

    2008-01-01

    on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...

  16. Smoking increases the risk for colorectal adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Botma, A.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Kampman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a high risk of developing colorectal carcinomas and adenomas at a young age, due to inherited mutations in mismatch repair genes. We investigated whether modifiable lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol intake, increase this risk. M

  17. Smoking Increases the Risk for Colorectal Adenomas in Patients With Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, Renate M.; Botma, Akke; Van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Kampman, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a high risk of developing colorectal carcinomas and adenomas at a young age, due to inherited mutations in mismatch repair genes. We investigated whether modifiable lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol intake, increase this risk. METH

  18. Smoking increases the risk for colorectal adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Botma, A.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Vasen, H.F.; Kampman, E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a high risk of developing colorectal carcinomas and adenomas at a young age, due to inherited mutations in mismatch repair genes. We investigated whether modifiable lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol intake, increase this risk. METH

  19. The InSiGHT database : utilizing 100 years of insights into Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazzer, J. P.; Sijmons, R. H.; Woods, M. O.; Peltomaki, P.; Thompson, B.; Den Dunnen, J. T.; Macrae, F.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a historical overview of the online database (www.insight-group.org/mutations) maintained by the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours. The focus is on the mismatch repair genes which are mutated in Lynch Syndrome. APC, MUTYH and other genes are also an

  20. Educational and Psychosocial Support Needs in Lynch Syndrome: Implementation and Assessment of an Educational Workshop and Support Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corines, Marina J; Hamilton, Jada G; Glogowski, Emily; Anrig, Chris A; Goldberg, Rachael; Niehaus, Kate; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Harlan, Megan; Sheehan, Margaret R; Trottier, Magan; Ahsraf, Asad; Tran, Christina; Jacobs, Lauren; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Lincoln, Anne G; Robson, Mark E; Guillem, Jose G; Markowitz, Arnold J; Offit, Kenneth; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2017-04-01

    Few reports of educational and counseling support resources exist for Lynch syndrome (LS), a disorder requiring multi-organ cancer screening and specialized medical care throughout adult life. Here we describe the development and efficacy of two resources designed to address this need, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Clinical Genetics Service annual Lynch Syndrome Educational Workshop (LSEW), and a quarterly Lynch Syndrome Patient Advocacy Network (LSPAN) support group. The LSEW and LSPAN were implemented beginning in 2012. Participant survey data evaluating satisfaction, clarity, and unmet needs for each event were retrospectively analyzed and summarized using descriptive statistics. Annual LSEW attendance ranged from 53 to 75 total participants. LSEW year 1 participants indicated a need for a support group, and preferred in-person meetings at a frequency of every 3-6 months. For LSEW year 2-5 participants, >96 % reported satisfaction with the LSEW, and >82 % expressed interest in secure online support. Common themes for improvement included increased time for question and answer sessions and additional introductory genetics education. Responding LSPAN participants (n = 57 total survey responses in 11 meetings) found the meetings helpful (100 %), information clear (91 %), and presence of a genetic counselor useful (67 %). Desired discussion topics included coping with stress and anxiety, development of a support network, family communication about LS, genetic testing decisions, and bereavement. Following genetic counseling, a need exists for ongoing educational and emotional support in LS. Implementation of resources such as the LSEW and LSPAN is feasible and perceived as helpful by participants.

  1. Bayesian modeling for genetic anticipation in presence of mutational heterogeneity: a case study in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Nilbert, Mef; Moreno, Victor; Gruber, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenotype. In this article, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four-candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening, and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families.

  2. Is there evidence that we should screen the general population for Lynch syndrome with genetic testing? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Anya E R; Cadigan, R Jean; Henderson, Gail E; Evans, James P; Adams, Michael; Coker-Schwimmer, Emmanuel; Penn, Dolly C; Van Riper, Marcia; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Jonas, Daniel E

    2017-01-01

    Background The emerging dual imperatives of personalized medicine and technologic advances make population screening for preventable conditions resulting from genetic alterations a realistic possibility. Lynch syndrome is a potential screening target due to its prevalence, penetrance, and the availability of well-established, preventive interventions. However, while population screening may lower incidence of preventable conditions, implementation without evidence may lead to unintentional harms. We examined the literature to determine whether evidence exists that screening for Lynch-associated mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations leads to improved overall survival, cancer-specific survival, or quality of life. Documenting evidence and gaps is critical to implementing genomic approaches in public health and guiding future research. Materials and methods Our 2014–2015 systematic review identified studies comparing screening with no screening in the general population, and controlled studies assessing analytic validity of targeted next-generation sequencing, and benefits or harms of interventions or screening. We conducted meta-analyses for the association between early or more frequent colonoscopies and health outcomes. Results Twelve studies met our eligibility criteria. No adequate evidence directly addressed the main question or the harms of screening in the general population. Meta-analyses found relative reductions of 68% for colorectal cancer incidence (relative risk: 0.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.23–0.43, three cohort studies, 590 participants) and 78% for all-cause mortality (relative risk: 0.22, 95% confidence interval: 0.09–0.56, three cohort studies, 590 participants) for early or more frequent colonoscopies among family members of people with cancer who also had an associated MMR gene mutation. Conclusion Inadequate evidence exists examining harms and benefits of population-based screening for Lynch syndrome. Lack of evidence highlights the need

  3. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ortiz, Jose Miguel; Ayala-Madrigal, María de la Luz; Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Maciel-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Franco-Topete, Ramón Antonio; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucia; Rhees, Jennifer; Gutiérrez-Angulo, Melva

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS) is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC) and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC), and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del) and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs) in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel. PMID:27247567

  4. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  5. A Systematic Review on the Existing Screening Pathways for Lynch Syndrome Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Tognetto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLynch syndrome (LS is the most common hereditary colon cancer syndrome, accounting for 3–5% of colorectal cancer (CRC cases, and it is associated with the development of other cancers. Early detection of individuals with LS is relevant, since they can take advantage of life-saving intensive care surveillance. The debate regarding the best screening policy, however, is far from being concluded. This prompted us to conduct a systematic review of the existing screening pathways for LS.MethodsWe performed a systematic search of MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, and SCOPUS online databases for the existing screening pathways for LS. The eligibility criteria for inclusion in this review required that the studies evaluated a structured and permanent screening pathway for the identification of LS carriers. The effectiveness of the pathways was analyzed in terms of LS detection rate.ResultsWe identified five eligible studies. All the LS screening pathways started from CRC cases, of which three followed a universal screening approach. Concerning the laboratory procedures, the pathways used immunohistochemistry and/or microsatellite instability testing. If the responses of the tests indicated a risk for LS, the genetic counseling, performed by a geneticist or a genetic counselor, was mandatory to undergo DNA genetic testing. The overall LS detection rate ranged from 0 to 5.2%.ConclusionThis systematic review reported different existing pathways for the identification of LS patients. Although current clinical guidelines suggest to test all the CRC cases to identify LS cases, the actual implementation of pathways for LS identification has not been realized. Large-scale screening programs for LS have the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality for CRC, but coordinated efforts in educating all key stakeholders and addressing public needs are still required.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  7. Management strategies in Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis: a national healthcare survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Tomoki; Hamanaka, Michiko; Babaya, Akihito; Kimura, Kei; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fukumoto, Miki; Tsukamoto, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masafumi; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2017-02-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are major sources of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) and are associated with other malignancies. There is some heterogeneity in management strategies in Japan. We undertook a survey of management of hereditary CRC in hospitals that are members of the Japan Society of Colorectal Cancer Research. One hundred and ninety departments responded, of which 127 were from designated cancer care hospitals (DCCHs) according to the Japanese government. There were 25 488 operations for CRC in these departments in 2015. The DCCHs performed better with regard to usage of Japan Society of Colorectal Cancer Research guidelines, referring new CRC patients for LS screening, and having in-house genetic counselors and knowledge of treatment for LS. There were 174 patients diagnosed with LS and 602 undergoing follow-up in 2011-2015, which is fewer than the number expected from CRC operations in 2015. These numbers were not affected by whether the institution was a DCCH. Universal screening for LS was carried out in 8% of the departments. In contrast, 541 patients were diagnosed with FAP and 273 received preventive proctocolectomy/colectomy in 2011-2015. The DCCH departments undertook more surgery than non-DCCH departments, although most of the management, including surgical procedures and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, was similar. Management of desmoid tumor in the abdominal cavity differed according to the number of patients treated. In conclusion, there was heterogeneity in management of LS but not FAP. Most patients with LS may be overlooked and universal screening for LS is not common in Japan.

  8. Lynch syndrome and exposure to aristolochic acid in upper-tract urothelial carcinoma: its clinical impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Pierre; Seisen, Thomas; Mathieu, Romain; Shariat, Sharohkh F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current review was to describe the clinical risk for Lynch syndrome (LS) after exposure to aristolochic acid (AA) in cases of upper urinary-tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). A systematic review of the scientific literature was performed using the Medline database (National Library of Medicine, PubMed) using the following keywords: epidemiology, risk factor, AA, Balkan nephropathy (BNe), LS, hereditary cancer, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), mismatch repair genes, urothelial carcinomas, upper urinary tract, renal pelvis, ureter, Amsterdam criteria, genetic counselling, mismatch repair genes, genetic instability, microsatellite, and Bethesda guidelines. LS is a specific risk for UTUC, which is the third most frequent cancer (in its tumor spectrum) after colon and uterine lesions. Mutation of the MSH2 gene is the most commonly described cause of UTUC in LS. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and is guided by Bethesda and Amsterdam criteria. It is secondarily confirmed by immunohistochemical analyses of the tumor and a search for gene mutations. The presence of LS in patients with UTUC is a favorable prognosis factor for survival during follow-ups. AA is a specific environmental risk factor for UTUC and tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. It has been involved in the development of nephropathies in link with the Balkan disease and intake of Chinese herbal medicine. More broadly, the use of traditional plant medicines from the genus Aristolochia has created worldwide public-health concerns. UTUCs share common risk factors with other urothelial carcinomas such as tobacco or occupational exposure. However, these tumors have also specific risk factors such as AA exposure and LS that clinicians should be aware of because of their clinical implication in further management and follow-up.

  9. Prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations as a cause of Lynch syndrome in unselected versus selected consecutive series of patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, Adela; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Rodriguez-Soler, María; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Egoavil, Cecilia; Barberá, Victor M; Castillejo, María-Isabel; Guarinos, Carla; Martínez-de-Dueñas, Eduardo; Juan, María-Jose; Sánchez-Heras, Ana-Beatriz; García-Casado, Zaida; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Juárez, Miriam; Bujanda, Luis; Clofent, Juan; Llor, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Alenda, Cristina; Payá, Artemio; Jover, Rodrigo; Soto, José-Luis

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in the general population is unknown. We sought to analyse the prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in unselected and selected series of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients with diagnoses of CRC (n=2123) were included in the unselected group. For comparison, a group of 847 selected patients with CRC who fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines (rBG) were also included. Somatic and constitutional MLH1 methylation was assayed via methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of cases lacking MLH1 expression. Germline alterations in mismatch-repair (MMR) genes were assessed via Sanger sequencing and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Loss of MLH1 expression occurred in 5.5% of the unselected series and 12.5% of the selected series (pprevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in unselected cases of CRC. Therefore, MLH1 constitutional epimutation analysis should be conducted only for patients who fulfil the rBG and who lack MLH1 expression with methylated MLH1. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) Register is a national resource that registers families with hereditary colorectal cancer. HNPCC is the most common type of hereditary colorectal cancer and carries an increased risk of other tumor types. Genetic diagnostics has identif...

  11. MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in the analytical algorithm of Lynch syndrome: a cost-effectiveness study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausachs, Mireia; Mur, Pilar; Corral, Julieta; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Benito, Llúcia; Menéndez, Mireia; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Brunet, Joan; Iniesta, María Dolores; Gruber, Stephen B; Lázaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    The analytical algorithm of Lynch syndrome (LS) is increasingly complex. BRAF V600E mutation and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation have been proposed as a screening tool for the identification of LS. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness and cost-effectiveness of both somatic alterations to improve the yield of the diagnostic algorithm of LS. A total of 122 colorectal tumors from individuals with family history of colorectal cancer that showed microsatellite instability and/or loss of mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression were studied. MMR germline mutations were detected in 57 cases (40 MLH1, 15 MSH2 and 2 MSH6). BRAF V600E mutation was assessed by single-nucleotide primer extension. MLH1 promoter hypermethylation was assessed by methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a subset of 71 cases with loss of MLH1 protein. A decision model was developed to estimate the incremental costs of alternative case-finding methods for detecting MLH1 mutation carriers. One-way sensitivity analysis was performed to assess robustness of estimations. Sensitivity of the absence of BRAF mutations for depiction of LS patients was 96% (23/24) and specificity was 28% (13/47). Specificity of MLH1 promoter hypermethylation for depiction of sporadic tumors was 66% (31/47) and sensitivity of 96% (23/24). The cost per additional mutation detected when using hypermethylation analysis was lower when compared with BRAF study and germinal MLH1 mutation study. Somatic hypermethylation of MLH1 is an accurate and cost-effective pre-screening method in the selection of patients that are candidates for MLH1 germline analysis when LS is suspected and MLH1 protein expression is absent. PMID:22274583

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Different Genetic Testing Strategies for Lynch Syndrome in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Erh; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a significantly increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) and other cancers. Genetic screening for LS among patients with newly diagnosed CRC aims to identify mutations in the disease-causing genes (i.e., the DNA mismatch repair genes) in the patients, to offer genetic testing for relatives of the patients with the mutations, and then to provide early prevention for the relatives with the mutations. Several genetic tests are available for LS, such as DNA sequencing for MMR genes and tumor testing using microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical analyses. Cost-effectiveness analyses of different genetic testing strategies for LS have been performed in several studies from different countries such as the US and Germany. However, a cost-effectiveness analysis for the testing has not yet been performed in Taiwan. In this study, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of four genetic testing strategies for LS described in previous studies, while population-specific parameters, such as the mutation rates of the DNA mismatch repair genes and treatment costs for CRC in Taiwan, were used. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios based on discounted life years gained due to genetic screening were calculated for the strategies relative to no screening and to the previous strategy. Using the World Health Organization standard, which was defined based on Taiwan's Gross Domestic Product per capita, the strategy based on immunohistochemistry as a genetic test followed by BRAF mutation testing was considered to be highly cost-effective relative to no screening. Our probabilistic sensitivity analysis results also suggest that the strategy has a probability of 0.939 of being cost-effective relative to no screening based on the commonly used threshold of $50,000 to determine cost-effectiveness. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first cost-effectiveness analysis for evaluating different genetic testing strategies for LS in

  13. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case-Study in Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Philip S.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M. G.; Nilbert, Mef; Moreno, Victor M.; Gruber, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation sub-types known to be associated with the disease phenotype. In this paper, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case-study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair genes known to cause hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome. We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this study. Our model predicts family level anticipation effects which are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high risk families. PMID:21627626

  14. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); Kerr, Iain D., E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc., 320 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Min, Jinrong, E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada)

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  15. Predicting the impact of Lynch syndrome-causing missense mutations from structural calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V,; Stein, Amelie; Dinitzen, Alexander B.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate methods to assess the pathogenicity of mutations are needed to fully leverage the possibilities of genome sequencing in diagnosis. Current data-driven and bioinformatics approaches are, however, limited by the large number of new variations found in each newly sequenced genome, and often...... and for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, and perhaps other hereditary diseases.......Accurate methods to assess the pathogenicity of mutations are needed to fully leverage the possibilities of genome sequencing in diagnosis. Current data-driven and bioinformatics approaches are, however, limited by the large number of new variations found in each newly sequenced genome, and often...... do not provide direct mechanistic insight. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that saturation mutagenesis, biophysical modeling and co-variation analysis, performed in silico, can predict the abundance, metabolic stability, and function of proteins inside living cells. As a model system, we...

  16. Germline mutation analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 in Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohd Nizam Zahary; Gurjeet Kaur; Muhammad Radzi Abu Hassan; Harjinder Singh; Venkatesh R Naik; Ravindran Ankathil

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the protein expression profile of mismatch repair (MMR) genes in suspected cases of Lynch syndrome and to characterize the associated germline mutations.METHODS:Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples was performed to determine the protein expression profile of MMR protein.Germline mutation screening was carried out on peripheral blood samples.The entire exon regions of MLH1 and MSH2 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction,screened by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and analyzed by DNA sequencing to characterize the germline mutations.RESULTS:Three out of 34 tissue samples (8.8%) and four out of 34 tissue samples (11.8%) showed loss of nuclear staining by immunohistochemistry,indicating the absence of MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression in carcinoma cells,respectively.dHPLC analysis followed by DNA sequencing showed these samples to have germline mutations of MSH2 gene.However,no deleterious mutations were identified in any of the 19 exons or coding regions of MLH1 gene,but we were able to identify MLH1 promoter polymorphism,-93G >A (rs1800734),in 21 out of 34 patients (61.8%).We identified one novel mutation,transversion mutation c.2005G > C,which resulted in a missense mutation (Gly669Arg),a transversion mutation in exon 1,c.142G > T,which resulted in a nonsense mutation (Glu48Stop)and splice-site mutation,c.2006-6T > C,which was adjacent to exon 13 of MSH2 gene.CONCLUSION:Germline mutations were identified in four Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients.Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue proved to be a good pre-screening test before proceeding to germline mutation analysis of DNA MMR genes.

  17. Identification of patients at-risk for Lynch syndrome in a hospital-based colorectal surgery clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrícia Koehler-Santos; Mario Antonello Rosito; Patricia Ashton-Prolla; Jo(a)o Carlos Prolla; Patricia Izetti; Jamile Abud; Carlos Eduardo Pitroski; Silvia Liliana Cossio; Suzi Alves Camey; Cláudio Tarta; Daniel C Damin; Paulo Carvalho Contu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of a family history suggestive of Lynch syndrome (LS) among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) followed in a coloproctology outpatient clinic in Southern Brazil.METHODS: A consecutive sample of patients with CRC were interviewed regarding personal and family histories of cancer. Clinical data and pathology features of the tumor were obtained from chart review.RESULTS: Of the 212 CRC patients recruited, 61 (29%)reported a family history of CRC, 45 (21.2%) were diagnosed under age 50 years and 11 (5.2%) had more than one primary CRC. Family histories consistent with Amsterdam and revised Bethesda criteria for LS were identified in 22 (10.4%) and 100 (47.2%) patients,respectively. Twenty percent of the colorectal tumors had features of the high microsatellite instability phenotype,which was associated with younger age at CRC diagnosis and with Bethesda criteria (P < 0.001). Only 5.3% of the patients above age 50 years had been previously submitted for CRC screening and only 4% of patients with suspected LS were referred for genetic risk assessment.CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of patients with CRC were at high risk for LS. Education and training of health care professionals are essential to ensure proper management.

  18. A putative Lynch syndrome family carrying MSH2 and MSH6 variants of uncertain significance-functional analysis reveals the pathogenic one

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantelinen, Jukka; Hansen, Thomas V O; Kansikas, Minttu;

    2011-01-01

    Inherited pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the finding of a variant or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in affected family members complicates the risk assessment. Here, we describe a putative L...... identified VUS before predictive gene testing and genetic counseling are offered to a family.......Inherited pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the finding of a variant or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in affected family members complicates the risk assessment. Here, we describe a putative LS...... family carrying VUS in both MSH2 (c.2768T>A, p.Val923Glu) and MSH6 (c.3563G>A, p.Ser1188Asn). Two colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were studied for mutations and identified as carriers of both variants. In spite of a relatively high mean age of cancer onset (59.5 years) in the family, many CRC patients...

  19. Truncation of the MSH2 C-terminal 60 amino acids disrupts effective DNA mismatch repair and is causative for Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielders, Eva; Delzenne-Goette, Elly; Dekker, Rob; van der Valk, Martin; Te Riele, Hein

    2017-04-01

    Missense variants of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes pose a problem in clinical genetics as long as they cannot unambiguously be assigned as the cause of Lynch syndrome (LS). To study such variants of uncertain clinical significance, we have developed a functional assay based on direct measurement of MMR activity in mouse embryonic stem cells expressing mutant protein from the endogenous alleles. We have applied this protocol to a specific truncation mutant of MSH2 that removes 60 C-terminal amino acids and has been found in suspected LS families. We show that the stability of the MSH2/MSH6 heterodimer is severely perturbed, causing attenuated MMR in in vitro assays and cancer predisposition in mice. This mutation can therefore unambiguously be considered as deleterious and causative for LS.

  20. Dietary B vitamin and methionine intake and MTHFR C677T genotype on risk of colorectal tumors in Lynch syndrome : the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, Audrey Y.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Botma, Akke; Heine-Broring, Renate C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Harryvan, Jan L.; Winkels, Renate M.; Kampman, Ellen

    Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine, essential components of DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, may influence colorectal tumor (CRT) development. The impact of B vitamins on colorectal carcinogenesis in individuals with Lynch syndrome (LS) is unknown but is important given their high

  1. Ovarian metastasis from uveal melanoma with MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in a patient with germline MLH1 mutated Lynch syndrome: consequence or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, João; Pinto, Carla; Freitas, Micaela; Pinheiro, Manuela; Vizcaino, Rámon; Oliva, Esther; Teixeira, Manuel R; Jerónimo, Carmen; Bartosch, Carla

    2017-03-01

    Currently, uveal melanoma is not considered within the Lynch syndrome tumor spectrum. However, there are studies suggesting a contribution of microsatellite instability in sporadic uveal melanoma tumorigenesis. We report a 45-year-old woman who was referred for genetic counseling due to a family history of Lynch syndrome caused by a MLH1 mutation. She originally underwent enucleation of the right eye secondary to a uveal spindle cell melanoma diagnosed at age 25. The tumor recurred 22 years later presenting as an ovarian metastasis and concurrently a microscopic endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, grade 1/3 was diagnosed. Subsequent studies highlighted that the uveal melanoma showed high microsatellite instability and loss of MLH1 and PMS2 protein expression, with no MLH1 promoter methylation or BRAF mutation. Additionally, a GNAQ mutation was found. We conclude that our patient's uveal melanoma is most likely related to MLH1 germline mutation and thus Lynch syndrome related. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of uveal melanoma showing MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in the context of Lynch syndrome.

  2. Dietary B vitamin and methionine intake and MTHFR C677T genotype on risk of colorectal tumors in Lynch syndrome : the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, Audrey Y.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Botma, Akke; Heine-Broring, Renate C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Harryvan, Jan L.; Winkels, Renate M.; Kampman, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine, essential components of DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, may influence colorectal tumor (CRT) development. The impact of B vitamins on colorectal carcinogenesis in individuals with Lynch syndrome (LS) is unknown but is important given their high li

  3. Evaluating the performance of clinical criteria for predicting mismatch repair gene mutations in Lynch syndrome: a comprehensive analysis of 3,671 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Loeffler, Markus; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Pox, Christian; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Büttner, Reinhard; Propping, Peter; Engel, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Carriers of mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations have a high lifetime risk for colorectal and endometrial cancers, as well as other malignancies. As mutation analysis to detect these patients is expensive and time-consuming, clinical criteria and tumor-tissue analysis are widely used as pre-screening methods. The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance of commonly applied clinical criteria (the Amsterdam I and II Criteria, and the original and revised Bethesda Guidelines) and the results of tumor-tissue analysis in predicting MMR gene mutations. We analyzed 3,671 families from the German HNPCC Registry and divided them into nine mutually exclusive groups with different clinical criteria. A total of 680 families (18.5%) were found to have a pathogenic MMR gene mutation. Among all 1,284 families with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer, the overall mutation detection rate was 53.0%. Mutation frequencies and their distribution between the four MMR genes differed significantly between clinical groups (p small-bowel cancer (p small-bowel cancer were clinically relevant predictors for Lynch syndrome. © 2013 UICC.

  4. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  5. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Randall W; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Jasperson, Kory; Klapman, Jason B; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Provenzale, Dawn; Rao, M Sambasiva; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    Mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by early diagnosis and by cancer prevention through polypectomy. These NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities and recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In addition, the guidelines provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome. Screening approaches for Lynch syndrome are also described.

  6. High Prevalence of Hereditary Cancer Syndromes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Ying, Jun; Bannon, Sarah A; Lynch, Patrick M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vilar, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Established guidelines recommend evaluation for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients younger than 50 years diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). This group has been well described in the literature; however, patients diagnosed as adolescents and young adults are not well represented in CRC studies. Here, we define the clinical profile, including the extent of hereditary cancer syndromes and family history of cancer, in patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 or younger. We reviewed patients who underwent genetic counseling at our institution during 5 years (2009 to 2013). Data were collected regarding demographics, clinicopathologic information, tumor and genetic testing, and family history. Patients with an identified hereditary cancer syndrome were compared with those without a syndrome. Of the 193 patients with evaluable data, 35% had an identifiable hereditary cancer syndrome, including 23 with Lynch syndrome, 22 with mutation-negative Lynch syndrome, 16 with familial adenomatous polyposis, two with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency, two with biallelic MUTYH mutations, and one with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Patients without a hereditary syndrome more frequently presented with metastatic disease, whereas patients with a syndrome were more likely to present at earlier stages and to have a family history of cancer. Nevertheless, a substantial proportion of the hereditary syndromes (19%) were diagnosed in individuals with no family history of the disease. We conclude that patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 years or younger should receive genetic counseling regardless of their family history and phenotype. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network…

  8. Phenotypic Heterogeneity by Germline Mismatch Repair Gene Defect in Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernâni-Eusébio, Jorge; Barbosa, Elisabete

    2016-10-01

    Introdução: A síndrome de Lynch é a forma hereditária mais comum de cancro colo-rectal, sendo também responsável por cancro do endométrio e de outros tipos. Associa-se a mutações germinativas nos genes de mismatch repair do ADN e a instabilidade de microssatélites. As mutações MLH1 e MSH2 têm um fenótipo de síndrome de Lynch ‘clássico’, sendo o MSH2 mais associado a cancro extra-cólico. Mutações do MSH6 e PMS2 têm um fenótipo atípico. A expressão clínica é heterogénea, existindo uma correlação entre o gene mismatch repair mutado e o padrão fenotípico. Material e Métodos: Análise retrospetiva dos dados clínicos de doentes que cumpriam os critérios de Amesterdão ou que tinha mutações nos genes mismatch repair, entre setembro de 2012 e outubro de 2015. Resultados: Identificámos 28 doentes. Dezassete tinham cancro colo-rectal sendo a localização no cólon direito predominante. Cinco tiveram cancro do endométrio (mediana da idade de diagnóstico – 53), sem qualquer mutação no MSH6. Cinco desenvolveram outros cancros. Todos os casos com mutações mismatch repair estudados tinham instabilidade de microssatélites. Discussão: Na maioria dos casos foi encontrada mutação no MSH2 apesar de o MLH1 ser descrito na literatura como o gene mais frequentemente mutado. Interessa dizer que os doentes com cancro colo-rectal não evidenciam uma tendência para ter muito infiltrado inflamatório. Na maioria dos casos foi realizada colectomia parcial apesar da incidência elevada de lesões síncronas e metácronas associadas. Histerectomia e anexectomia profilática foi realizada em doentes em menopausa/perimenopausa. Conclusão: O registo standardizado dos dados dos doentes poderá levar a um melhor acompanhamento e conhecimento desta síndrome. O uso das Guidelines de Bethesda poderá identificar novos casos que escapam aos critérios de Amesterdão. A pesquisa de instabilidade de microssatélites deve ser feita em muito maior n

  9. Population-Based Lynch Syndrome Screening by Microsatellite Instability in Patients ≤50: Prevalence, Testing Determinants, and Result Availability Prior to Colon Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlitz, Jordan J; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Liu, Yong; Blanton, Christine; Schmidt, Beth; Jessup, J Milburn; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Chen, Vivien W

    2015-07-01

    As there are no US population-based studies examining Lynch syndrome (LS) screening frequency by microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), we seek to quantitate statewide rates in patients aged ≤50 years using data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) project and identify factors associated with testing. Screening rates in this young, high-risk population may provide a best-case scenario as older patients, potentially deemed lower risk, may undergo testing less frequently. We also seek to determine how frequently MSI/IHC results are available preoperatively, as this may assist with decisions regarding colonic resection extent. Data from all Louisiana colorectal cancer (CRC) patients aged ≤50 years diagnosed in 2011 were obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry CER project. Registry researchers and physicians analyzed data, including pathology and MSI/IHC. Of the 2,427 statewide all-age CRC patients, there were 274 patients aged ≤50 years, representing health care at 61 distinct facilities. MSI and/or IHC were performed in 23.0% of patients. Testing-associated factors included CRC family history (Plocation (P<0.0370), and care at comprehensive cancer centers (P<0.0020) but not synchronous/metachronous CRC or MSI-like histology. Public hospital screening was disproportionately low (P<0.0217). Of those tested, MSI and/or IHC was abnormal in 21.7%. Of those with abnormal IHC, staining patterns were consistent with LS in 87.5%. MSI/IHC results were available preoperatively in 16.9% of cases. Despite frequently abnormal MSI/IHC results, LS screening in young, high-risk patients is low. Provider education and disparities in access to specialized services, particularly in underserved populations, are possible contributors. MSI/IHC results are infrequently available preoperatively.

  10. Evidence for classification of c.1852_1853AA>GC in MLH1 as a neutral variant for Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llor Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome (LS is an autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndrome characterized by early onset cancers of the colorectum, endometrium and other tumours. A significant proportion of DNA variants in LS patients are unclassified. Reports on the pathogenicity of the c.1852_1853AA>GC (p.Lys618Ala variant of the MLH1 gene are conflicting. In this study, we provide new evidence indicating that this variant has no significant implications for LS. Methods The following approach was used to assess the clinical significance of the p.Lys618Ala variant: frequency in a control population, case-control comparison, co-occurrence of the p.Lys618Ala variant with a pathogenic mutation, co-segregation with the disease and microsatellite instability in tumours from carriers of the variant. We genotyped p.Lys618Ala in 1034 individuals (373 sporadic colorectal cancer [CRC] patients, 250 index subjects from families suspected of having LS [revised Bethesda guidelines] and 411 controls. Three well-characterized LS families that fulfilled the Amsterdam II Criteria and consisted of members with the p.Lys618Ala variant were included to assess co-occurrence and co-segregation. A subset of colorectal tumour DNA samples from 17 patients carrying the p.Lys618Ala variant was screened for microsatellite instability using five mononucleotide markers. Results Twenty-seven individuals were heterozygous for the p.Lys618Ala variant; nine had sporadic CRC (2.41%, seven were suspected of having hereditary CRC (2.8% and 11 were controls (2.68%. There were no significant associations in the case-control and case-case studies. The p.Lys618Ala variant was co-existent with pathogenic mutations in two unrelated LS families. In one family, the allele distribution of the pathogenic and unclassified variant was in trans, in the other family the pathogenic variant was detected in the MSH6 gene and only the deleterious variant co-segregated with the disease in both

  11. Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma: frequent involvement of the left colon and rectum and late-onset presentation supports a universal screening approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Hu, Huankai; Bahary, Nathan; Dudley, Beth; Chiosea, Simon I; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2013-11-01

    The optimal strategy for screening patients with colorectal carcinoma for Lynch syndrome (LS) is a subject of continued debate in the literature with some advocating universal screening while others arguing for selective screening. We evaluated 1292 colorectal carcinomas for DNA mismatch repair protein abnormalities and identified 150 (11.6%) tumors demonstrating high-levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H). MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were divided into sporadic (112/1292, 8.7%) and LS/probable LS-associated (38/1292, 2.9%) groups based on BRAF V600E mutation, MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, cancer history, and germline mismatch repair gene mutation. All MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were analyzed for grade, location, and tumor histology. The utility of the revised Bethesda guidelines and published predictive pathology models for MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT and MSPath) were evaluated. Left-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were more frequently associated with LS compared with right-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (12/21, 57% versus 26/129, 20%, P = .0008). There was no significant difference in histology between sporadic MSI-H and LS/probable LS-associated colorectal carcinomas except for a slightly higher proportion of sporadic MSI-H tumors demonstrating tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (81% versus 61%, P = .015). Neither pathology predictive model identified all LS-associated colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT: 33/38, 87%; MSPath: 35/38, 92%). 12/117 (10%) MSI-H colorectal carcinomas identified in patients >60 years were LS/probable LS-associated. Our results demonstrate that models of predicting MSI-H fail to identify LS-associated colorectal carcinoma given their reliance on right-sided location. A significant proportion (32%) of LS-associated colorectal carcinoma is identified in patients >60 years. Finally, our results demonstrate similar morphologic features between LS-associated and sporadic MSI-H colorectal carcinomas.

  12. Functional testing strategy for coding genetic variants of unclear significance in MLH1 in Lynch syndrome diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Schäfer, Dieter; Langer, Deborah; Köger, Nicole; Wittmann, Margarethe; Aretz, Stefan; Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Trojan, Jörg; König, Rainer; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela; Plotz, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations in the MLH1 gene, but genetic variants of unclear significance frequently preclude diagnosis. Functional testing can reveal variant-conferred defects in gene or protein function. Based on functional defect frequencies and clinical applicability of test systems, we developed a functional testing strategy aimed at efficiently detecting pathogenic defects in coding MLH1 variants. In this strategy, tests of repair activity and expression are prioritized over analyses of subcellular protein localization and messenger RNA (mRNA) formation. This strategy was used for four unclear coding MLH1 variants (p.Asp41His, p.Leu507Phe, p.Gln689Arg, p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met). Expression was analyzed using a transfection system, mismatch repair (MMR) activity by complementation in vitro, mRNA formation by reverse transcriptase-PCR in carrier lymphocyte mRNA, and subcellular localization with dye-labeled fusion constructs. All tests included clinically meaningful controls. The strategy enabled efficient identification of defects in two unclear variants: the p.Asp41His variant showed loss of MMR activity, whereas the compound variant p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met had a defect of expression. This expression defect was significantly stronger than the pathogenic expression reference variant analyzed in parallel, therefore the defect of the compound variant is also pathogenic. Interestingly, the expression defect was caused additively by both of the compound variants, at least one of which is non-pathogenic when occurring by itself. Tests were neutral for p.Leu507Phe and p.Gln689Arg, and the results were consistent with available clinical data. We finally discuss the improved sensitivity and efficiency of the applied strategy and its limitations in analyzing unclear coding MLH1 variants.

  13. Functional characterization of MLH1 missense variants identified in Lynch Syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Liberti, Sascha Emilie; Lützen, Anne;

    2012-01-01

    localization and protein-protein interaction with the dimer partner PMS2 and the MMR-associated exonuclease 1. We show that a significant proportion of examined variant proteins have functional defects in either subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions, which is suspected to lead to the cancer...

  14. The MLH1 c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) Variant in Colorectal Cancer : Genetic Association Study in 18,723 Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abuli, Anna; Bujanda, Luis; Munoz, Jenifer; Buch, Stephan; Schafmayer, Clemens; Maiorana, Maria Valeria; Veneroni, Silvia; van Wezel, Tom; Liu, Tao; Westers, Helga; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Ocana, Teresa; Pique, Josep M.; Andreu, Montserrat; Jover, Rodrigo; Carracedo, Angel; Xicola, Rosa M.; Llor, Xavier; Castells, Antoni; Dunlop, Malcolm; Hofstra, Robert; Lindblom, Annika; Wijnen, Juul; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hampe, Jochen; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, being Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Lynch syndrome tumors develop mainly

  15. David Lynch (Sammelrezension)

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Ralfdieter Füller: Fiktion und Antifiktion. Die Filme David Lynchs und der Kulturprozeß im Amerika der 1980er und 90er Jahre.Stefan Höltgen: Spiegelbilder. Strategien der ästhetischen Verdoppelung in den Filmen von David Lynch

  16. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis, High Risk Individuals, and Individuals With No History of Cancer (Control)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma; Breastcancer; Leukemia; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Unknown Primary Tumor; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Vaginal Cancer

  17. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported.

  18. Triple synchronous primary malignancies of the colon, endometrium and kidney in a patient with Lynch syndrome treated via minimally invasive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Mendez

    2016-08-01

    It is important to consider hereditary cancer syndromes in women with a strong family history presenting with synchronous multiple primary malignancies. A multidisciplinary surgical approach is key to best practices and optimal patient outcomes.

  19. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartuma, Katarina; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which...... led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer....

  20. ACG clinical guideline: Genetic testing and management of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngal, Sapna; Brand, Randall E; Church, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Hampel, Heather L; Burt, Randall W

    2015-02-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the management of patients with hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes. The initial assessment is the collection of a family history of cancers and premalignant gastrointestinal conditions and should provide enough information to develop a preliminary determination of the risk of a familial predisposition to cancer. Age at diagnosis and lineage (maternal and/or paternal) should be documented for all diagnoses, especially in first- and second-degree relatives. When indicated, genetic testing for a germline mutation should be done on the most informative candidate(s) identified through the family history evaluation and/or tumor analysis to confirm a diagnosis and allow for predictive testing of at-risk relatives. Genetic testing should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling to ensure the patient's informed decision making. Patients who meet clinical criteria for a syndrome as well as those with identified pathogenic germline mutations should receive appropriate surveillance measures in order to minimize their overall risk of developing syndrome-specific cancers. This guideline specifically discusses genetic testing and management of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Cowden syndrome, serrated (hyperplastic) polyposis syndrome, hereditary pancreatic cancer, and hereditary gastric cancer.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in preparation for cell division (a process called DNA replication ). Mutations in any of these genes prevent the proper repair of DNA replication mistakes. As the abnormal cells continue to divide, ...

  2. A pooled analysis of the outcome of prospective colonoscopic surveillance for familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesher, David; Dove-Edwin, Isis; Sasieni, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance guidelines for the management of familial colorectal cancer (FCC), a dominant family history of colorectal cancer in which the polyposis syndromes and Lynch syndrome have been excluded, are not firmly established. The outcome of colonoscopic surveillance is studied using data from six...

  3. FROM FAMILIES SYNDROMES TO GENES… THE FIRST CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF HEREDITARY SYNDROMES PREDISPOSING TO CANCER: WHAT WAS THE BEGINNING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charité Ricker, MS, LCGC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for hereditary susceptibility to cancer is considered standard of care, as it impacts not only a clinician's understanding of cancer causation but also options for prevention and treatment. The roots of our current knowledge about hereditary cancer syndromes can be traced to early reports of families with striking cancer histories. The purpose of this article is to review the historical timeline of the two most commonly assessed hereditary cancer syndromes, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC and Lynch syndrome (LS. While many individuals identified with these syndromes today come from families similar to those seen in the early historical reports, our understanding of these syndromes, their expression and penetrance, has evolved over the years. In addition, the increased utilization of broad multi-gene panels continues to add to the complexity of defining associated phenotypes. These findings can lead to challenges with translating results to clinical management for patients and families, but also provide an opportunity to continue to gain understanding of the genetic underpinnings of cancer etiology.

  4. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: The rise and fall of a confusing term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeremy R Jass

    2006-01-01

    The term Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) is a poor descriptor of the syndrome described by Lynch. Over the last decade, the term has been applied to heterogeneous groups of families meeting limited clinical criteria, for example the Amsterdam criteria. It is now apparent that not all Amsterdam criteria-positive families have the Lynch syndrome. The term HNPCC has also been applied to clinical scenarios in which CRCs with DNA microsatellite instability are diagnosed but in which there is no vertical transmission of an altered DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene. A term that has multiple, mutually incompatible meanings is highly problematic, particularly when it may influence the management of an individual family. The Lynch syndrome is best understood as a hereditary predisposition to malignancy that is explained by a germline mutation in a DNA MMR gene. The diagnosis does not depend in an absolute sense on any particular family pedigree structure or age of onset of malignancy.Families with a strong family history of colorectal cancer that do not have Lynch syndrome have been grouped as 'Familial Colorectal Cancer Type-X'. The first step in characterizing these cancer families is to distinguish them from Lynch syndrome. The term HNPCC no longer serves any useful purpose and should be phased out.

  5. Syndromic Gastric Polyps : At the Crossroads of Genetic and Environmental Cancer Predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur in 1-4 % of patients undergoing gastroscopy. Although most are sporadic, some gastric polyps are part of an underlying hereditary syndrome. Gastric polyps can be seen in each of the well-known gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, but also in Lynch syndrome and in several rare n

  6. Do Surrealismo em David Lynch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Tavares

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O surrealismo, como a arte do seu tempo, propõe uma nova estética, capaz de extrair o belo do absurdo e de instaurar o desvio para que daí surja, de fato, o real. Através da análise de algumas obras de David Lynch e dos livros Les champs magnétiques de Breton e Philippe Soupault e Poisson soluble, de Breton, irei mostrar a pertinência da designação surrealista para a obra do cineasta norte-americano. Lynch, como os surrealistas, constrói uma operação dialética entre o racional/irracional. Ao mesmo tempo em que opera no campo artístico em direção à irracionalidade absoluta, Lynch não nega a sua inserção na sociedade. Acredito que o realizador, como os surrealistas, tenha conseguido encontrar um equilíbrio entre as duas formas de se estar no mundo, racional/irracional, jogando com suas antíteses. O prazer do jogo surrealista consiste em ir até as profundezas do inconsciente e retornar com matéria suficiente para fazer uma obra de arte.Surrealism, as the art of its time, proposes a new aesthetics, one that is able to extract the beautiful from the absurd and to establish the swerve from the standard, from which, in fact, the real comes through. Through the analysis of some works by David Lynch, of Breton and Soupault's Les champs magnétiques, and of Breton's Poisson soluble, I will attempt to show the relevance of the surrealist designation for the work of the American filmmaker. Lynch, like the surrealists, builds a dialectic operation between the rational and the irrational. While operating in the artistic field towards absolute irrationality, Lynch does not deny its role in society. It is my belief that the director, as the surrealists, has managed to find a balance between the two ways of being in the world: rational and irrational; by playing with their antitheses. The pleasure of the surrealist game is to go to the depths of the unconscious and return with sufficient material to make a work of art out of it.

  7. Diagnosis of Constitutional Mismatch Repair-Deficiency Syndrome Based on Microsatellite Instability and Lymphocyte Tolerance to Methylating Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodo, Sahra; Colas, Chrystelle; Buhard, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with bi-allelic germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2) develop a rare but severe variant of Lynch syndrome called constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD). This syndrome is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancers, lymphomas o...

  8. Familial Investigations of Childhood Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-11

    Acute Leukemia; Adenomatous Polyposis; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; AML; BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Carney Complex; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; DICER1 Syndrome; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Emberger Syndrome; Familial Acute Myeloid Leukaemia; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Fanconi Anemia; Familial Cancer; Familial Wilms Tumor; Familial Neuroblastoma; GIST; Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndrome; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Juvenile Polyposis; Li-Fraumeni Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; MDS; Melanoma Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Neuroblastoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type II; Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Noonan Syndrome and Other Rasopathy; Overgrowth Syndromes; Pancreatic Cancer; Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome; Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma; PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome; Retinoblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome; Tuberous Sclerosis; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

  9. Recommendations to improve identification of hereditary and familial colorectal cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasen, H F A; Möslein, G; Alonso, A;

    2010-01-01

    Familial colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for 10-15% of all CRCs. In about 5% of all cases, CRC is associated with a highly penetrant dominant inherited syndrome. The most common inherited form of non-polyposis CRC is the Lynch syndrome which is responsible for about 2-4% of all cases. Surveillan...

  10. Recommendations to improve identification of hereditary and familial colorectal cancer in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F. A.; Moeslein, G.; Alonso, A.; Aretz, S.; Bernstein, I.; Bertario, L.; Blanco, I.; Bulow, S.; Burn, J.; Capella, G.; Colas, C.; Engel, C.; Frayling, I.; Rahner, N.; Hes, F. J.; Hodgson, S.; Mecklin, J. -P.; Moller, P.; Myrhoj, T.; Nagengast, F. M.; Parc, Y.; de Leon, M. Ponz; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L.; Sampson, J. R.; Stormorken, A.; Tejpar, S.; Thomas, H. J. W.; Wijnen, J.; Lubinski, J.; Jarvinen, H.; Claes, E.; Heinimann, K.; Karagiannis, J. A.; Lindblom, A.; Dove-Edwin, I.; Mueller, H.

    2010-01-01

    Familial colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for 10-15% of all CRCs. In about 5% of all cases, CRC is associated with a highly penetrant dominant inherited syndrome. The most common inherited form of non-polyposis CRC is the Lynch syndrome which is responsible for about 2-4% of all cases. Surveillance

  11. New founding mutation in MSH2 associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome on the Island of Tenerife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Arana, Vicente; Barrios, Ysamar; Fernández-Peralta, Antonia; Herrera, Mercedes; Chinea, Nancy; Lorenzo, Nieves; Jiménez, Alejandro; Martín-López, Juana Victoria; González-Hermoso, Fernando; Salido, Eduardo; González-Aguilera, Juan J

    2006-12-01

    Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a hereditary syndrome with genetic heterogeneity. The disease is caused by mutations or epigenetic silencing in DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2 and MLH3, although the vast majority of cases correspond to mutations of MLH1 and MSH2. We herein describe a nucleotide change, c.2063T>G in exon 13 of the MSH2 gene, present in families that fulfill the Amsterdam criteria for Lynch syndrome and originate from northern Tenerife (Canary Islands-Spain). This mutation is expected to result in a nonconservative amino acid change, M688R, at the ATPase domain of the MSH2 protein. We found five large families with this mutation, and about half the individuals heterozygous for M688R developed malignancies by the sixth decade of life. In many cases analyzed, their tumors revealed loss of the normal allele, being homozygous for M688R. There is an evidence of historical isolation for the population studied, which could have favored a considerable genetic drift. The presence of the same mutation and the disease associated-haplotype conservation in families not directly related can be probably the consequence of a bottleneck in the founding of this population (rather than a relatively recent founding of the mutation).

  12. Body mass index increases risk of colorectal adenomas in men with lunch syndrome: the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.; Nagengast, F.M.; Braem, M.G.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Kampman, E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: High body mass index (BMI) is an established risk factor for sporadic colorectal cancer. Still, the influence of BMI on hereditary colorectal cancer (eg, Lynch syndrome [LS]), is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess whether BMI is associated with colorectal adenoma occurrence

  13. DNA mismatch repair deficiency and hereditary syndromes in Latino patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Charité N; Hanna, Diana L; Peng, Cheng; Nguyen, Nathalie T; Stern, Mariana C; Schmit, Stephanie L; Idos, Greg E; Patel, Ravi; Tsai, Steven; Ramirez, Veronica; Lin, Sonia; Shamasunadara, Vinay; Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2017-10-01

    The landscape of hereditary syndromes and clinicopathologic characteristics among US Latino/Hispanic individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. A total of 265 patients with CRC who were enrolled in the Hispanic Colorectal Cancer Study were included in the current study. Information regarding CRC risk factors was elicited through interviews, and treatment and survival data were abstracted from clinical charts. Tumor studies and germline genetic testing results were collected from medical records or performed using standard molecular methods. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53.7 years (standard deviation, 10.3 years), and 48.3% were female. Overall, 21.2% of patients reported a first-degree or second-degree relative with CRC; 3.4% met Amsterdam I/II criteria. With respect to Bethesda guidelines, 38.5% of patients met at least 1 criterion. Of the 161 individuals who had immunohistochemistry and/or microsatellite instability testing performed, 21 (13.0%) had mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (dMMR) tumors. dMMR tumors were associated with female sex (61.9%), earlier age at the time of diagnosis (50.4 ± 12.4 years), proximal location (61.9%), and first-degree (23.8%) or second-degree (9.5%) family history of CRC. Among individuals with dMMR tumors, 13 (61.9%) had a germline MMR mutation (MutL homolog 1 [MLH1] in 6 patients; MutS homolog 2 [MSH2] in 4 patients; MutS homolog 6 [MHS6] in 2 patients; and PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component [PMS2] in 1 patient). The authors identified 2 additional MLH1 mutation carriers by genetic testing who had not received immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability testing. In total, 5.7% of the entire cohort were confirmed to have Lynch syndrome. In addition, 6 individuals (2.3%) had a polyposis phenotype. The percentage of dMMR tumors noted among Latino individuals (13%) is similar to estimates in non-Hispanic white individuals. In the current study, the majority of

  14. Current perspectives between metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micucci, Carla; Valli, Debora; Matacchione, Giulia; Catalano, Alfonso

    2016-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies linked metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer. Although metabolic syndrome may not necessarily cause cancer, it is linked to poorer cancer outcomes including increased risk of recurrence and overall mortality. This review tends to discuss the major biological and physiological alterations involved in the increase of incidence and mortality of cancer patients affected by metabolic syndrome. We focus on metabolic syndrome-associated visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) pathway as well as estrogen signaling and inflammation. Several of these factors are also involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. A better understanding of the link between metabolic syndrome and cancer may provide new insight about oncogenesis. Moreover, prevention of metabolic syndrome - related alterations may be an important aspect in the management of cancer patients during simultaneous palliative care.

  15. Easy-to-use online referral test detects most patients with a high familial risk of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, N.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Currently only 12-30% of individuals with a high risk of Lynch syndrome, the most common hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome, are referred for genetic counselling. We assessed the sensitivity, usability and user experiences of a new online referral test aimed at improving referral of hi

  16. Modernization and Lynching in the New South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Smångs

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates an emerging body of historical scholarship that challenges prevailing views of the primacy of rural conditions in southern lynching by positing that it was symbiotically associated with the processes of modernization underway in the region in the decades around 1900. Statistical analyses of lynching data that differentiate among events according to communal participation, support, and ceremony in Georgia and Louisiana from 1882 to 1930 and local-level indices of modernization (urbanization, rural depopulation, industrialization, agricultural commercialization, and dissolution of traditional family roles yield results that both support and contradict such a modernization thesis of lynching. The findings imply that the consequences of the social transformation in the South coinciding with the lynching era were not uniform throughout the region with regard to racial conflict and violence and that broad arguments proposing an intrinsic connection between modernization and lynchings therefore are overstated.

  17. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  18. Beliefs about Cancer and Diet among Those Considering Genetic Testing for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Aunchalee E. L.; Upton, Rachel; Lee, Seungjin; Panter, Abby T.; Hadley, Don W.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention among individuals considering genetic testing for Lynch Syndrome. Design: Family-centered, cascade recruitment; baseline assessment of a longitudinal study. Setting: Clinical research setting. Participants: Participants were 390 persons, ages 18 and older, including persons…

  19. Beliefs about Cancer and Diet among Those Considering Genetic Testing for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Aunchalee E. L.; Upton, Rachel; Lee, Seungjin; Panter, Abby T.; Hadley, Don W.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention among individuals considering genetic testing for Lynch Syndrome. Design: Family-centered, cascade recruitment; baseline assessment of a longitudinal study. Setting: Clinical research setting. Participants: Participants were 390 persons, ages 18 and older, including persons…

  20. Diagnostic Application of hMLH1 Methylation in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagahide Matsubara

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC due to mismatch repair (MMR defect has distinct characteristics among unselected CRCs. These CRCs are biologically less aggressive and, thus, showing better prognosis but less sensitive to the 5FU-based chemotherapy. CRCs with MMR defect derive from both hereditary and sporadic reasons. Germline inactivation of MMR genes (hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH6, and hPMS2 underlies the hereditary CRC with MMR defect (Lynch syndrome and epigenetic silencing of hMLH1 gene causes the sporadic CRC with MMR defect. Hereditary and sporadic CRC with MMR defect can be detectable by microsatellite instability (MSI test or immunohistochemical analysis among general CRCs. Lynch syndrome can be diagnosed by the clinical criteria or by genetic test to detect pathogenic germline mutations in MMR genes. However, both clinical criteria and genetic test are inadequate for the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. Since genetic test for the diagnosis of the Lynch syndrome is expensive and not always identify pathogenic germline mutations, effective and inexpensive screening program is desirable. Here we propose a possible application of methylation test combined with MSI or pathological analysis as an effective and a cost-saving new strategy for screening of Lynch syndrome.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency The prevalence of this condition is uncertain; estimates range from ... A, Lynch HT, Lynch JF, Howe JR. Hereditary colorectal cancer-part II. Curr Probl Surg. 2005 May;42( ...

  2. The introduction of a choice to learn pre-symptomatic DNA test results for BRCA or Lynch syndrome either face-to-face or by letter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorwinden, J. S.; Jaspers, J. P. C.; ter Beest, J. G.; Kievit, Y.; Sijmons, R. H.; Oosterwijk, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In predictive DNA testing for hereditary cancer, test results should traditionally be disclosed face-to-face. Increasingly, however, counselees ask to receive their test result at home by letter. To compare the quality of genetic counselling in the traditional way to a procedure in which counselees

  3. The metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Esther C.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th; Gietema, Jourik A.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, as a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, may represent an important connection between cancer treatment and its common late effect of cardiovascular disease. Insight into the aetiology of the metabolic syndrome after cancer treatment might help to identify and treat cance

  4. The metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Esther C.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th; Gietema, Jourik A.

    The metabolic syndrome, as a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, may represent an important connection between cancer treatment and its common late effect of cardiovascular disease. Insight into the aetiology of the metabolic syndrome after cancer treatment might help to identify and treat

  5. Introduction to cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Rose B; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-12-02

    The last 30 years have witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, including those that predispose to hematopoietic malignancies. The identification and characterization of families affected by these syndromes is enhancing our knowledge of the oncologic and nononcologic manifestations associated with predisposing germ line mutations and providing insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. Here, we provide an overview of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, focusing on aspects relevant to the evaluation of patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Guidance is provided to facilitate recognition of these syndromes by hematologists/oncologists, including descriptions of the family history features, tumor genotype, and physical or developmental findings that should raise concern for an underlying cancer genetic syndrome. The clinical implications and management challenges associated with cancer susceptibility syndromes are also discussed.

  6. Shortened time interval between colorectal cancer diagnosis and risk testing for hereditary colorectal cancer is not related to higher psychological distress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Prins, J.B.; Brunner, H.G.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2011-01-01

    Current diagnostic practices have shortened the interval between colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis and genetic analysis for Lynch syndrome by MSI-testing. We studied the relation of time between MSI-testing since CRC diagnosis (MSI-CRC interval) and psychological distress. We performed a

  7. Predictive genetic testing in children: constitutional mismatch repair deficiency cancer predisposing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruwer, Zandrè; Algar, Ursula; Vorster, Alvera; Fieggen, Karen; Davidson, Alan; Goldberg, Paul; Wainwright, Helen; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Biallelic germline mutations in mismatch repair genes predispose to constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D). The condition is characterized by a broad spectrum of early-onset tumors, including hematological, brain and bowel and is frequently associated with features of Neurofibromatosis type 1. Few definitive screening recommendations have been suggested and no published reports have described predictive testing. We report on the first case of predictive testing for CMMR-D following the identification of two non-consanguineous parents, with the same heterozygous mutation in MLH1: c.1528C > T. The genetic counseling offered to the family, for their two at-risk daughters, is discussed with a focus on the ethical considerations of testing children for known cancer-causing variants. The challenges that are encountered when reporting on heterozygosity in a child younger than 18 years (disclosure of carrier status and risk for Lynch syndrome), when discovered during testing for homozygosity, are addressed. In addition, the identification of CMMR-D in a three year old, and the recommended clinical surveillance that was proposed for this individual is discussed. Despite predictive testing and presymptomatic screening, the sudden death of the child with CMMR-D syndrome occurred 6 months after her last surveillance MRI. This report further highlights the difficulty of developing guidelines, as a result of the rarity of cases and diversity of presentation.

  8. Immunohistochemical staining for p16 and BRAFV600E is useful to distinguish between sporadic and hereditary (Lynch syndrome-related) microsatellite instable colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissière-Michot, Florence; Frugier, Hélène; Ho-Pun-Cheung, Alexandre; Lopez-Crapez, Evelyne; Duffour, Jacqueline; Bibeau, Frédéric

    2016-08-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein analysis by immunohistochemistry (IHC) can identify colorectal cancer (CRC) with microsatellite instability (MSI). As MLH1-deficient CRC can be hereditary or sporadic, markers to distinguish between them are needed. MLH1 promoter methylation assay is the reference method; however, sometimes, it is challenging on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. We assessed by IHC the expression of BRAFV600E, p16, MGMT, and CDX2 in 55 MLH1-deficient MSI CRC samples (of which 8 had a germline MLH1 mutation) to determine whether this panel differentiates between sporadic and hereditary CRCs. We also analyzed MLH1 promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing and BRAF status by genotyping. None of the hereditary CRCs showed MLH1 methylation, BRAF mutation, BRAFV600E-positive immunostaining, or loss of p16 expression. We detected MLH1 promoter methylation in 67 % and a BRAF mutation in 42 % of CRC, all showing MLH1 promoter methylation. BRAFV600E IHC and BRAF genotyping gave concordant results in all but two samples. Loss of expression of p16 was found in 30 % of CRC with methylation of the MLH1 promoter, but its expression was retained in all non-methylated and part of MLH1-methylated tumors (100 % specificity, 30 % sensitivity). CDX2 and MGMT expression was not associated with MLH1 status. Thus, BRAFV600E and p16 IHC may help in differentiating sporadic from hereditary MLH1-deficient CRC with MSI. Specifically, p16 IHC might be used as a surrogate marker for MLH1 promoter methylation, because all p16-negative CRCs displayed MLH1 methylation, whereas hereditary CRCs were all p16-positive.

  9. Prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal cancer in Iran: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Esmaeilzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and hereditary factors and family history are responsible for the incidence and development of the disease in 20 to 30% of cases. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, is the most common hereditary form of CRC that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This study consisted of a systematic literature review of research articles that described the prevalence of HNPCC in Iranian patients with CRC. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Scopus, IranMedex, and Google Scholar databases to identify relevant articles that describe HNPCC or Lynch syndrome in patients with CRC in Iran. For this purpose, a keyword search of the following terms was employed: (((Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer OR HNPCC OR Lynch syndrome AND (colorectal cancer OR familial colorectal cancer OR colon cancer OR rectal cancer OR bowel cancer AND IRAN. All eligible documents were collected, and the desired data were qualitatively analyzed.Result: Of the 67 articles that were found via the initial database search, only 12 were deemed to be of relevance to the current study. These articles included a total population of 3237 and this sample was selected and qualitatively analyzed. The findings of the review revealed that the frequency of mutation in MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6 genes varied between 23.1% and 62.5% among the studied families. This indicated that HNPCC is linked with up to 5.5% of the total cases of colorectal cancers in Iran.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the hereditary form of HNPCC or Lynch syndrome is significantly high among patients with CRC in Iran

  10. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  11. Regulation of MLH1 mRNA and protein expression by promoter methylation in primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann; Byriel, Lene;

    2013-01-01

    In colorectal cancer MLH1 deficiency causes microsatellite instability, which is relevant for the patient's prognosis and treatment, and its putative heredity. Dysfunction of MLH1 is caused by sporadic gene promoter hypermethylation or by hereditary mutations as seen in Lynch Syndrome. The aim...

  12. Metabolic syndrome and breast cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezgen, G; Roach, E C; Kizilarslanoglu, M C; Petekkaya, I; Altundag, K

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed life-threatening cancer in women and the most important cause of cancer-related deaths among women. This disease is on the rise in Turkey. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disturbances including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and high blood sugar. Several studies have examined the association of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome with breast cancer. More recent studies have shown it to be an independent risk factor for breast cancer. It has also been associated with poorer prognosis, increased incidence, a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Basic research studies are now in progress to illuminate the molecular pathways and mechanisms that are behind this correlation. Given the fact that all of the components of metabolic syndrome are modifiable risk factors, preventive measures must be established to improve the outcome of breast cancer patients. In this review we set the background by taking into account previous studies which have identified the components of metabolic syndrome individually as breast cancer risk factors. Then we present the latest findings which elaborate possible explanations regarding how metabolic syndrome as a single entity may affect breast cancer risk.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Risk of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Katherine; Chiodini, Paolo; Colao, Annamaria; Lenzi, Andrea; Giugliano, Dario

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Available evidence supports the emerging hypothesis that metabolic syndrome may be associated with the risk of some common cancers. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer at different sites. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted an electronic search for articles published through October 2011 without restrictions and by reviewing reference lists from retrieved articles. Every included study was to repor...

  14. Medical image of the week: Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athale A

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 43-year-old woman with a history of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and recent treatment for pyelonephritis was transferred to our hospital for increasing shortness of breath. Four months prior to admission, she developed unprovoked bilateral deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary emboli (PE and was started on rivaroxaban at that time. At presentation, she was complaining of worsening shortness of breath, heavy menstrual bleeding and pain in her calves. CT angiography of chest showed multiple pulmonary emboli to the lower lobes and left upper lobe (Figure 1 and lower extremity venous Doppler showed extensive, acute deep vein thrombosis involving the femoral, popliteal and calf veins bilaterally. Rivaroxaban was held due to anemia and thrombocytopenia and there was concern for respiratory failure since she developed new DVT and PE. She was transfused with 1 unit of packed red blood cells and started on a heparin drip. She continued to have significant menorrhagia, the ...

  15. Long-term effect of aspirin on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer: an analysis from the CAPP2 randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burn, John; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Macrae, Finlay

    2011-01-01

    Observational studies report reduced colorectal cancer in regular aspirin consumers. Randomised controlled trials have shown reduced risk of adenomas but none have employed prevention of colorectal cancer as a primary endpoint. The CAPP2 trial aimed to investigate the antineoplastic effects of as...... of aspirin and a resistant starch in carriers of Lynch syndrome, the major form of hereditary colorectal cancer; we now report long-term follow-up of participants randomly assigned to aspirin or placebo....

  16. CDC Grand Rounds: Family History and Genomics as Tools for Cancer Prevention and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Juan L; Thomas, Cheryll C; Massetti, Greta M; Duquette, Debra; Avner, Lindsay; Iskander, John; Khoury, Muin J; Richardson, Lisa C

    2016-11-25

    Although many efforts in cancer prevention and control have routinely focused on behavioral risk factors, such as tobacco use, or on the early detection of cancer, such as colorectal cancer screening, advances in genetic testing have created new opportunities for cancer prevention through evaluation of family history and identification of cancer-causing inherited mutations. Through the collection and evaluation of a family cancer history by a trained health care provider, patients and families at increased risk for a hereditary cancer syndrome can be identified, referred for genetic counseling and testing, and make informed decisions about options for cancer risk reduction (1). Although hereditary cancers make up a small proportion of all cancers, the number of affected persons can be large, and the level of risk among affected persons is high. Two hereditary cancer syndromes for which public health professionals have worked to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality are hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome.

  17. Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Bas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Metabolic syndrome has gained increased attention in the last century after researchers identified its important role in cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Despite limited research into the relationship between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer (PCa, the precise relationship has not been elucidated due to lack of research into the specific factors associated with PCa. To fill this research gap, we evaluated the incidence of PCa in patients with metabolic syndrome and the relationship between metabolic syndrome and the parameters of PCa. Material and Method: We retrospectively evaluated the biochemical analyses of the serum parameters and pathological reports of 102 PCa patients diagnosed by transrectal ultrasound. After determining the incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with PCa, we divided the patients into two groups, those with and without a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. We then compared the serum PSA level, age, total prostate volume, Gleason score, triglyceride (TG level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (HDL-C, blood pressure, and fasting glucose level of the two groups. Results: We included 102 patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer in the present study. Among the 102 patients, 18 (17.6% were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. While the PSA levels of the PCa patients were found to be significantly lower in those with metabolic syndrome compared to those without metabolic syndrome (P=0.04, no difference was found between the groups regarding the other components of PCa (P>0.05. Discussion: Serum PSA level was found to be significantly lower in those with metabolic syndrome. This result leads us to consider whether prostate biopsy should be performed in patients with metabolic syndrome who have lower PSA levels than the levels currently specified for biopsy. Further research into the parameters of PCa needs to be conducted to confirm our findings.

  18. Merrill Lynch kavandab äridelegatsiooni visiiti Eestisse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Investeerimispanga Merrill Lynch eestvedamisel kavandatakse mais ärimeeste visiiti Eestisse, ütles Jüri Mõis, kes viibis New Yorgis toimunud Maailmapanga seminaril "Omavalitsused rahvusvahelistel kapitaliturgudel"

  19. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

  20. Clinical phenotype and prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Zhi Zhang; Jian-Qiu Sheng; Shi-Rong Li; Hong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To descr ibe systematically the clinical characteristics and phenotype of HNPCC families and the prevalence of HNPCC in the general population of CRC patients in China.METHODS: HNPCC kindreds and CRC patients were from two sources. One was that we consecutively investigated kindreds and patients by ourselves. And the other was the published Chinese and foreign literature related to Chinese HNPCC syndrome. There were 142 HNPCC families fulfilling AC Ⅰ and/or AC Ⅱ including 57 families with detailed data, and 3874 general primary CRC patients in all. All statistical tests were two-sided.RESULTS: In AC Ⅰ families, the number of Lynch syndrome Ⅰ and Ⅱ families were 25 (47.2%) and 28 (52.8%)respectively. There were 215 patients (82.4%) with CRC,67 patients (25.7%) with extracolonic cancer and 50patients (19.2%) with multiple primary cancers. In all CRC patients, multiple primary CRC were in 41 patients (19.1%),and the first-CRC was right-sided colorectal cancer in 143 patients (66.5%) and rectal cancer in 44 patients (20.5%). 8.8% and 19.2% of the first cancer were CRC and extracolonic cancers. Among those patients whose first cancer was CRC, 66.8% and 19.9% were right-sided colorectal cancer and rectal cancer, respectively. The similar results were found in AC Ⅱ families. Normal distribution was only found in the distribution of the age of diagnosis of the first cancer in both AC Ⅰ families (coefficient of skewness: u = 0.81, 0.20<0.40<P<0.50;coefficient of kurtosis: u = 1.13, 0.20<P<0.40, α = 0.20)and AC Ⅱ families (coefficient of skewness: u = 0.63, P>0.5>0.20; coefficient of kurtosis: u = 0.84, 0.20<0.40<P<0.50,α = 0.20), but not found in the distribution of the age of diagnosis of the first CRC. When patients with HNPCC-associated cancer suffered from the first malignant tumor in HNPCC families diagnosed by AC Ⅰ and AC Ⅱ, the mean age and median age were 45.1±12.7 years and 44.0 years,45.2±12.7 years and 44.5 years

  1. Cancer related fatigue syndrome in neoplastic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Franc

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is one of the most important factors which has a considerable influence on treatment and the life quality of oncological patients. The fatigue syndrome is often diagnosed during cancer treatment and this syndrome is not related to the physical effort. Cancer related fatigue is a patient’s subjective, psychologically, physically and emotionally based feeling. It is disproportionate to patient’s daily activity. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains still unknown. However, on the basis of various questionnaires, it is possible to test the disease’s complex nature. Cancer related fatigue causes deterioration of patient’s life along with lower motivation to struggle with the disease. It is thought that the factor which increases the incidence of cancer related fatigue is a long-term use of drugs such as opioids, benzodiazepine, and medicines containing codeine, tranquilizers, anxiolytics and antidepressants. On the basis of the results, one can choose an appropriate treatment method for cancer related fatigue such as rehabilitation, psychotherapy or public assistance. A great number of patients consider excessive fatigue a typical concomitant symptom in neoplastic disease; therefore, they do not report it. It is of a paramount importance to make patients aware of the fact that cancer related fatigue is a serious disease which can be treated.

  2. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunlulu, Mehmet; Telci Caklili, Ozge; Oguz, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Growing data show the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) or its components with cancer development and cancer-related mortality. It is suggested that in MetS and cancer association, insulin resistance and insulin-like growth factor 1 system play a key role, especially adipokines secreted from visceral adipocytes, free fatty acids and aromatase activity contribute to this process. It is also reported that MetS has a link with colorectal, breast, endometrial, pancreas, primary liver and, although controversial, prostate cancer. Although every component of MetS is known to have an association with cancer development, it is still debated whether the effects of these components are additive or synergistic. On the other hand, in the association between MetS and cancer, the role of antidiabetic and antihypertensive treatments including thiazolidinedione, insulin, angiotensin receptor blockers is also suggested. The primary approach in MetS-cancer relation is to prevent risk factors. Life style changes including weight loss and a healthy diet are known to decrease cancer risk in normal population. It is postulated that an insulin-sensitizing agent, metformin, has cancer-preventing effects on diabetic patients. This review discusses the relationship between MetS and cancer from different aspects and examines this relationship in some of the cancers suggested to be linked with MetS.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Fujihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities and is defined as the presence of three or more of the following factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose. Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifested in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Adipose tissue, particularly visceral fat, is an important metabolic tissue as it secretes systemic factors that alter the immunologic, metabolic, and endocrine milieu and also promotes insulin resistance. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross-talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, adipocytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This paper synthesizes the evidence on key molecular mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link.

  4. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sanne M; Dandanell, Mette; Rasmussen, Lene J

    2013-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomi...... rearrangements. However, a large number of mutations, including missense, silent, and intronic variants, are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance.......Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomic...

  5. Trousseau's syndrome: cancer-associated thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Soichiro; Ono, Ryu; Fukuda, Kensuke; Sakayori, Masashi; Awano, Nobuyasu; Kondo, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Trousseau's syndrome (cancer-associated thrombosis) is the second leading cause of death in cancer patients, after death from cancer itself. The risk of a venous thromboembolism is 4- to 7-fold higher in patients with cancer than in those without cancer. The causes of this impaired coagulation are associated with general patient-related risk factors, and other factors that are specific to the particular cancer or treatment. It is important to assess the risk of thrombotic events in cancer patients and administer effective prophylaxis and treatment. Effective prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism reduces morbidity and mortality, and improves patients' quality of life. Low molecular weight heparin is the first-line treatment for venous thromboembolism, as an effective and safe means for prophylaxis and treatment, according to guidelines released by international scientific societies. Oral anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is preferable to no therapy. However, warfarin has low efficacy and is associated with high rates of recurrence. If low molecular weight heparin is unavailable, some guidelines recommend the use of vitamin K antagonists that have a target international normalized ratio in the range of 2-3, as acceptable alternatives. Novel oral anticoagulants that directly inhibit factor Xa or thrombin are promising for the prophylaxis of high-risk cancer patients and in the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, to date, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of these new anticoagulants.

  6. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and cancer linked by LKB1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Korsse (Susanne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPeutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentations, hamartomas presenting as gastrointestinal polyps, and an increased cancer risk.

  7. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Luo, Yun-quan; Wang, Wen-hai; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qi; Su, Shi-bing

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, also known as TCM ZHENG or TCM pattern, is an integral and essential part of TCM theory that helps to guide the design of individualized treatments. A TCM syndrome, in essence, is a characteristic profile of all clinical manifestations in one patient that can be readily identified by a TCM practitioner. In this article, the authors reviewed the presentations of TCM syndromes in seven common malignancies (liver, lung, gastric, breast, colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancers), the objectivity and the standardization of TCM syndrome differentiation, the evaluation of TCM syndrome modeling in cancer research, and syndrome differentiation-guided TCM treatment of cancers. A better understanding of TCM syndrome theory, as well as its potential biological basis, may contribute greatly to the clinical TCM diagnosis and the treatment of cancer.

  8. Metabolic syndrome and reproductive organ cancers: а review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Laktionov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the prevalence and association of reproductive organ cancers with metabolic syndrome. The latter has been found to increase a risk for cancer of the endometrium, breast, and prostate.

  9. Exclusion mapping of a third HNPCC locus in a large Lynch I kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morasse, J.; Khandjian, E.W.; Rousseau, F. [Hopital St-Francois d`Assise, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) accounts for 5-10% of all the cases of colorectal cancers. HNPCC can be classified in two clinical forms: (1) Hereditary Site-Specific Colorectal Cancer (HSSCC or Lynch I) and (2) colon cancer associated with extracolonic cancers (Lynch II). Segregation analyses show an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. In order to identify the HNPCC gene involved in a large Canadian kindred, we performed linkage analysis using microsatellites spanning 9 candidate regions. For all loci tested, the lod score data obtained were negative. Our results demonstrate that the genes hMSH1 and hMLH1 recently reported in HNPCC are not linked in this family. Five loci frequently altered in colorectal tumor cells, APC, MCC, K-ras, p53 and DCC and the DRA gene whose expression is confined to the colon mucosa cells and deregulated in colonic adenomas, are also unlinked to HNPCC susceptibility in this family. We have also excluded chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 11 and 17 as containing the cancer predisposition gene in this family.

  10. Immunotherapy and patients treated for cancer with microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Raphaël; Cohen, Romain; Cochereau, Delphine; Duval, Alex; Lascols, Olivier; Lopez-Trabada, Daniel; Afchain, Pauline; Trouilloud, Isabelle; Parc, Yann; Lefevre, Jérémie H; Fléjou, Jean-François; Svrcek, Magali; André, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a tumor phenotype linked to somatic or germline (Lynch syndrome) inactivating alterations of DNA mismatch repair genes. A broad spectrum of neoplasms exhibits MSI phenotype, mainly colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and gastric cancer. MSI tumors are characterized by dense immune infiltration and high load of tumor neo-antigens. Growing evidence is accumulating on the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition for patients treated for MSI solid tumors. We present a comprehensive overview of MSI phenotype, its biological landscape and current diagnostic methods. Then we focus on MSI as a predictive biomarker of response to immune checkpoint inhibition in the context of colorectal cancer and non-colorectal tumors.

  11. Pupazzi di neve. David Lynch fotografo e l’"Unheimliche"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Sebastiano Lanzi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available L’opera di David Lynch non si limita al cinema, come ha dimostrato l’esposizione del 2007 alla Fondation Cartier di Parigi, The Air is on Fire. Tuttavia gli studi teorici hanno trascurato ciò che gallerie e musei hanno evidenziato da tempo: il Lynch pittore, fotografo, musicista, artista poliedrico. L’articolo si focalizza su una serie fotografica, Snowmen, ed è tratto da una ricerca di Paolo Sebastiano Lanzi sulla figura di David Lynch fotografo. Alla luce del saggio di Freud sul Perturbante (Das Unheimliche, 1919 si interpretano gli Snowmen come immagini di morte. Si chiariscono alcuni aspetti della poetica dell’artista-regista, come l’inquietudine dell’Inland Empire o di certe idee care al Surrealismo. Lo studio della produzione fotografica di Lynch riempie un vuoto nell’analisi critica sul suo lavoro, che va necessariamente riconsiderato in una prospettiva più ampia.

  12. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but

  13. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but ef

  14. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but ef

  15. Cowden Syndrome Presenting as Breast Cancer: Imaging and Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae [Dept. of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Hyeong Gon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hye Shin [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Cowden syndrome is an uncommon, autosomal dominant disease which is characterized by multiple hamartomas of the skin, mucous membrane, brain, breast, thyroid, and gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis of Cowden syndrome implicates an increased risk of developing breast cancer. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with Cowden syndrome that presented as breast cancer with concomitant bilateral exuberant benign masses in both breasts.

  16. The MLH1 c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in colorectal cancer: genetic association study in 18,723 individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abulí

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, being Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Lynch syndrome tumors develop mainly as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair associated with germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. A significant proportion of variants identified by screening these genes correspond to missense or noncoding changes without a clear pathogenic consequence, and they are designated as "variants of uncertain significance", being the c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in the MLH1 gene a clear example. The implication of this variant as a low-penetrance risk variant for CRC was assessed in the present study by performing a case-control study within a large cohort from the COGENT consortium-COST Action BM1206 including 18,723 individuals (8,055 colorectal cancer cases and 10,668 controls and a case-only genotype-phenotype correlation with several clinical and pathological characteristics restricted to the Epicolon cohort. Our results showed no involvement of this variant as a low-penetrance variant for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility and no association with any clinical and pathological characteristics including family history for this neoplasm or Lynch syndrome.

  17. Metabolic syndrome, obesity, and the risk of cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzur, Rafael; Brenner, Ronen; Maor, Elad; Antebi, Maayan; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Segev, Shlomo; Sidi, Yechezkel; Kivity, Shaye

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its components are severe global health issues that are increasing in frequency as the prevalence of obesity increases. Various studies have established a correlation between metabolic syndrome and diseases including, diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and cardiovascular disease. In recent years, correlations have also been detected between obesity and metabolic syndrome and the prevalence of certain types of cancer. The current study examines whether obesity and metabolic syndrome components are risk factors for cancer among the adult population in Israel. A cohort study analysis was performed of 24,987 initially healthy men and women who underwent yearly medical assessments at the Institute for Medical Screening in the Sheba Medical Center. Data from the Institute for Medical Screening database was correlated with that from the Israel Cancer Center in the Ministry of Health updated to December 2013. The correlation between metabolic syndrome, obesity, and the overall risk of cancer as well as the risks of specific types of cancer were examined. Of 20,444 subjects for whom complete data were available, 1535 were diagnosed with cancer during the mean follow-up time of 104.3months. In a multi-variant analysis, no significant correlation was found between metabolic syndrome or obesity and the incidence of cancer. When the data were stratified by gender and cancer type, however, a significant association between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer in women was observed (P=0.03, HR=1.67, 95% CI=1.05-2.67). Metabolic syndrome correlates with higher than expected breast cancer incidence in women. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The molecular mechanisms between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Ya-yuan; Li, Zhi-rong; Luo, Dong-lin; Zhang, Xiao-hua

    2016-03-18

    Metabolic syndrome, which is extremely common in developed and some developing countries, is a clustering of at least three of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein levels. It has been proved that there is a strong association between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer. Metabolic syndrome could increase the risk of breast cancer and influence the prognosis of the breast cancer patients. Some characteristic of metabolic syndrome such as obesity and lack of physical exercise are all risk factors for developing breast cancer. The metabolic syndrome mainly include obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and each of them impacts the risk of breast cancer and the prognosis of the breast cancer patients in different ways. In this Review, we focus on recently uncovered aspects of the immunological and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of this highly prevalent and serious disease. These studies bring new insight into the complex associations between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer and have led to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that might enable a personalized approach in the management of this disease.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and risk of subsequent colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raluca Pais; Horatiu Silaghi; Alina Cristina Silaghi; Mihai Lucian Rusu; Dan Lucian Dumitrascu

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome and visceral obesity have an increasing prevalence and incidence in the general population. The actual prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is 24% in US population and between 24.6% and 30.9% in Europe. As demonstrated by many clinical trials (NAHANES Ⅲ, INTERHART) the metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition to cardiovascular disease, individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been linked to the development of cancer, particularly to colorectal cancer.Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem; in the year 2000 there was an estimated total of 944 717 incident cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed world-wide. This association is sustained by many epidemiological studies. Recent reports suggest that individuals with metabolic syndrome have a higher risk of colon or rectal cancer. Moreover, the clusters of metabolic syndrome components increase the risk of associated cancer. The physiopathological mechanism that links metabolic syndrome and colorectal cancer is mostly related to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Population and experimental studies demonstrated that hyperinsulinemia, elevated C-peptide, elevated body mass index, high levels of insulin growth factor-1, low levels of insulin growth factor binding protein-3, high leptin levels and low adiponectin levels are all involved in carcinogenesis. Understanding the pathological mechanism that links metabolic syndrome and its components to carcinogenesis has a major clinical significance and may have profound health benefits on a number of diseases including cancer, which represents a major cause of mortality and morbidity in our societies.

  20. The cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome: therapeutic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Karin F; Jatoi, Aminah

    2005-07-01

    The cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome is characterized by loss of weight, loss of appetite, overall decline in quality of life, and shortened survival in patients with advanced incurable cancer. It is highly prevalent. To date, treatment options that have been firmly established with good scientific evidence are limited to progestational agents and corticosteroids, both of which have been demonstrated to improve appetite but have otherwise failed to have a favorable impact on some of the other aspects of this syndrome. As the mechanisms behind this syndrome are further elucidated, more effective therapeutic strategies will likely emerge.

  1. Incidence of and survival after subsequent cancers in carriers of pathogenic MMR variants with previous cancer:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pål; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Today most patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) survive their first cancer. There is limited information on the incidences and outcome of subsequent cancers. The present study addresses three questions: (i) what is the cumulative incidence of a subsequent cancer; (ii) in which organs do...... subsequent cancers occur; and (iii) what is the survival following these cancers? DESIGN: Information was collated on prospectively organised surveillance and prospectively observed outcomes in patients with LS who had cancer prior to inclusion and analysed by age, gender and genetic variants. RESULTS: 1273...... patients with LS from 10 countries were followed up for 7753 observation years. 318 patients (25.7%) developed 341 first subsequent cancers, including colorectal (n=147, 43%), upper GI, pancreas or bile duct (n=37, 11%) and urinary tract (n=32, 10%). The cumulative incidences for any subsequent cancer from...

  2. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iúri Amorim de Santana

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer among men in Brazil. Recently, several studies have hypothesized a relationship between PCa and metabolic syndrome (MS. The aim here was to identify an association between MS and PCa. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, Fundação de Beneficência Hospital de Cirurgia (FBHC and Universidade Federal de Sergipe. METHODS: Laboratory and anthropometric parameters were compared between PCa patients (n = 16 and controls (n = 16. RESULTS: The PCa patients showed significantly greater frequency of MS than did the controls (p = 0.034. Serum glucose was higher and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was lower than in the controls, although without significant differences. There were significant differences in blood pressure (p = 0.029 and waist-to-hip ratio (p = 0.004. Pearson linear correlation showed a positive association between waist-to-hip ratio and prostate specific antigen (r = 0.584 and p = 0.028. Comparing subgroups with and without MS among the PCa patients, significant differences (p < 0.05 in weight, height, body mass index, hip circumference and lean body mass were observed, thus showing higher central obesity in those with MS. The serum glucose values were also higher in MS patients (p = 0.006, thus demonstrating that insulin resistance has a role in MS physiopathology. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that MS may exert an influence on the development of PCa. However, it would be necessary to expand the investigation field with larger sample sizes and cohorts studied, to test the hypothesis generated in this study.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in DDR-related cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovich, Alex; Graifer, Dmitry; Stefanovie, Barbora; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Given the key role of mitochondria in various cellular events, it is not surprising that mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) is seen in many pathological conditions, in particular cancer. The mechanisms defining MDF are not clearly understood and may involve genetic defects, misbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired autophagy (mitophagy), acquired mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA and inability of cells to cope with the consequences. The importance of MDF arises from its detection in the syndromes with defective DNA damage response (DDR) and cancer predisposition. Here, we will focus on the dual role of these syndromes in cancer predisposition and MDF with specific emphasis on impaired autophagy.

  4. [Bladder cancer at an early age in father and son].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsiannikov, D; Stöhr, R; Hartmann, A; Böttrich, R; Hengstler, J G; Golka, K

    2011-12-01

    Bladder cancer may be caused by external factors like tobacco smoking, but may also be familial. We report on a father and son who developed this tumour at the ages of 45 and 35. Testing various genetic markers including the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6, whose loss is associated with a higher risk for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, Lynch syndrome), did not point to a familial disease. Thus the heavy smoking habits of the two patients must be considered as causal.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik K; Early, Dayna

    2017-09-06

    This review describes the rationale for pancreatic cancer screening, outlines groups that are at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer, and summarizes the relative risk in each setting. We also review the methods available for performing pancreatic cancer screening and the recommended screening intervals. Several genetic mutations have been identified that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. Most are rare, however, and at-risk individuals are most often those with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer (with multiple family members affected) but no identifiable genetic mutation. Known genetic syndromes that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer include hereditary pancreatitis, familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Lynch syndrome, BRCA mutations, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genetic testing should be performed in conjunction with genetic counseling, and testing of an affected family member is preferred if possible.The goal of pancreatic cancer screening is to identify pancreatic cancer at an early, curable stage or, ideally, to identify precancerous lesions that can be resected to prevent the development of cancer. Imaging can be performed with either endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). These techniques are generally considered to be complementary, although an advantage of EUS is that cysts or solid lesions can be sampled at the time of the procedure. Published results of small cohorts of high-risk patients in pancreatic cancer screening programs have demonstrated a high prevalence of small cystic lesions identified on EUS or MRCP, which often represent side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Knowledge of conditions and syndromes that increase pancreatic cancer risk allows one to identify those patients that may benefit from pancreatic cancer screening. As we gather evidence from large, international, multicenter cohorts of patients at high-risk for pancreatic

  6. Long-term effect of resistant starch on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathers, John C; Movahedi, Mohammad; Macrae, Finlay

    2012-01-01

    have been done. We assessed the effect of resistant starch on the incidence of colorectal cancer. METHODS: In the CAPP2 study, individuals with Lynch syndrome were randomly assigned in a two-by-two factorial design to receive 600 mg aspirin or aspirin placebo or 30 g resistant starch or starch placebo......=0·95). No information on adverse events was gathered during post-intervention follow-up. INTERPRETATION: Resistant starch had no detectable effect on cancer development in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer. Dietary supplementation with resistant starch does not emulate the apparently...... protective effect of diets rich in dietary fibre against colorectal cancer. FUNDING: European Union, Cancer Research UK, Bayer Corporation, National Starch and Chemical Co, UK Medical Research Council, Newcastle Hospitals Trustees, Cancer Council of Victoria Australia, THRIPP South Africa, The Finnish Cancer...

  7. Risk of gynecologic cancers in Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boilesen, Astrid Elisabeth Bruun; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Bernstein, Inge

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Women in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families have an elevated risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer. The risk in Lynch syndrome families with known mutations in mismatch repair genes (MMR genes) seems to be higher than in familial colorectal cancer (CRC) families...... cancer. Lifetime risk was elevated four times in familial CRC families. In these families, frequency was correlated to the pedigree phenotype, with significantly higher frequency demonstrated in Amsterdam II families compared to Amsterdam I families and families suspected of HNPCC. A total of 39 cases...... of ovarian cancer were identified with a lifetime risk of three to four times the general population. No significant correlation was found between the frequency of ovarian cancer and MMR gene mutation status in the families. CONCLUSION: The benefit of surveillance concerning gynecological cancers seems...

  8. [Lemierre's syndrome as differential diagnosis of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt Jensen, Jacob; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2012-05-28

    Lemierre's syndrome is a disseminated infection which is usually caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. An oropharyngeal infection progresses to a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and later metastatic infections throughout the body occur. We present a clinical case in which a patient, initially presenting with symptoms characteristic of pulmonary cancer, turned out to have a rare variant of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum.

  9. MSH6 Mutations are Frequent in Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Families With Normal pMSH6 Expression as Detected by Immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Henrik; Larsen, K.L.; Thorlacius-Ussing, O.;

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant condition accounting for 2% to 4% of all colorectal cancer cases worldwide. Families with germ line mutations in 1 of 6 mismatch repair genes are known as Lynch syndrome families. The largest number...... of mutations has been detected in the mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2, but several mutations in MSH6 have also been demonstrated. AIM:: Whether HNPCC families are screened for mutations in mismatch repair genes often relies on their immunohistochemical profile. The aim of the present study was to evaluate...... this approach in Lynch families carrying mutations in MSH6. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Results of the screening of the MSH6 gene in HNPCC families were compared with those obtained on immunohistochemical protein analysis. RESULTS:: In 56 (7%) of 815 families, at least 1 MSH6 mutation, 23 definitively pathogenic...

  10. Ssk or Esw? -- the Bloor-Lynch Debate Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Philosophical discussions of rule-following in the later Wittgenstein (1953, 1967) are an important source of inspiration for the development of views on the social nature of scientific knowledge. Two major opposing views in this inquiry -- Bloor's sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) (1983, 1991, 1992, 1997) and Lynch's (1992, 1993) ethnomethodological studies of work (ESW) -- represent two positions derived from two different readings of Wittgenstein's later writings on rule-following. The aim of this paper is two-fold. One is to re-examine the noted Bloor-Lynch debate by considering Kusch's (2004) recent discussion of this debate. Another is to show that a new semantic framework of rule-following ascriptions based on a cognitive approach to the study of generics can be provided such that SSK and ESW are compatible in it (Leslie, 2009; Cheng, 2011).

  11. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and prostate cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hsing, Ann W; Sakoda, Lori C; Chua, Jr, Streamson

    2007-01-01

    Although obesity has been consistently linked to an increased risk of several malignancies, including cancers of the colon, gallbladder, kidney, and pancreas, its role in prostate cancer etiology remains elusive...

  12. Revised guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (HNPCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Blanco, Ignacio; Aktan-Collan, Katja

    2013-01-01

    important clinical questions. Then a systematic literature search was performed using the Pubmed database and manual searches of relevant articles. During the workshops the outcome of the literature search was discussed in detail. The guidelines described in this paper may be helpful for the appropriate...

  13. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte;

    2012-01-01

    . Also, identifying family members that do not carry the variant is important so they can be released from the intensive surveillance. Determining which genetic variants are pathogenic and which are neutral is a major challenge in clinical genetics. The profound mechanistic knowledge on the genetics...

  14. Metabolic Syndrome in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Waas (Marjolein)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOver 200,000 children under the age of fifteen are diagnosed with cancer worldwide every year. Cancer is the second most common cause of death among children between the ages of 1 and 14 years in developed countries, surpassed only by accidents.Nearly one third of the cancers diagnosed i

  15. Metabolic Syndrome in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Waas (Marjolein)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOver 200,000 children under the age of fifteen are diagnosed with cancer worldwide every year. Cancer is the second most common cause of death among children between the ages of 1 and 14 years in developed countries, surpassed only by accidents.Nearly one third of the cancers diagnosed i

  16. Impact of Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome, cancer and longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa; Vidiri, Maria Francesca; Moriconi, Eleonora; Marrone, Giulia; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; D’Urso, Gabriele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Rovella, Valentina; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Obesity symbolizes a major public health problem. Overweight and obesity are associated to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome and to adipose tissue dysfunction. The adipose tissue is metabolically active and an endocrine organ, whose dysregulation causes a low-grade inflammatory state and ectopic fat depositions. The Mediterranean Diet represents a possible therapy for metabolic syndrome, preventing adiposopathy or “sick fat” formation. The Mediterranean Diet exerts protective effects in elderly subjects with and without baseline of chronic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between cancer and obesity. In the US, diet represents amount 30-35% of death causes related to cancer. Currently, the cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Furthermore, populations living in the Mediterranean area have a decreased incidence of cancer compared with populations living in Northern Europe or the US, likely due to healthier dietary habits. The bioactive food components have a potential preventive action on cancer. The aims of this review are to evaluate the impact of Mediterranean Diet on onset, progression and regression of metabolic syndrome, cancer and on longevity. PMID:27894098

  17. Breast cancer risk and clinical implications for germline PTEN mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Joanne; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2017-08-01

    PTEN Hamartoma Tumor syndrome (PHTS) encompasses a clinical spectrum of heritable disorders including Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and Proteus and Proteus-like syndrome that are associated with germline mutations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. Breast cancer risk estimates (67-85 %) for women with germline PTEN mutations are similar to those quoted for patients with germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes. With PTEN on several germline gene testing panels, finding PTEN mutations and variants have increased exponentially. PHTS can be differentiated from other hereditary cancer syndromes including Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, and hamartomatous polyposis syndromes based on personal as well as family history. However, many of the benign features of CS are common in the general population, making the diagnosis of CS challenging. Breast cancer patients with an identified germline PTEN mutation are at increased risk of endometrial, thyroid, renal, and colorectal cancers as well as a second breast cancer. Increased screening for the various component cancers as well as predictive testing in first-degree relatives is recommended. Prophylactic mastectomy may be considered especially if breast tissue is dense or if repeated breast biopsies have been necessary. Management of women with breast cancer suspected of CS who test negative for germline PTEN mutations should be managed as per a mutation carrier if she meets CS diagnostic criteria, and should be offered enrollment in research to identify other predisposition genes.

  18. Risk of cancer among women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschau, Mathilde; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Jensen, Allan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and cancer, especially of the endometrium, breast and ovary. METHODS: The Danish National Patient Register was used to identify 12,070 in- and outpatients in whom PCOS was diagnosed when they were aged 9-49 years during...

  19. [Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Cancer Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Yasui, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Kuji, Shiho; Onozawa, Yusuke; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome(PRES)is a subacute neurological syndrome typically manifesting with headache, cortical blindness, and seizures. This syndrome is associated with risk factors such as malignant hypertension, eclampsia, and renal failure. Numerous case reports depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The direct causal mechanisms of PRES in cancer patients have not yet been identified. Cytotoxic chemotherapy may cause direct endothelial damage, which would impact the blood brain barrier. Angiogenesis inhibitors also cause elevation in blood pressure;this is significant, because PRES onset may be solely related to hypertension. An increased number of case reports involving new molecular targeted agent suggests that incidence of PRES as an oncological emergency may increase in the future.

  20. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Hyang Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that constitutes a medical emergency, but one that can be reversed with thiamine repletion if it is recognized early. Patients with cancer have a high risk of Wernicke encephalopathy because of malnutrition, the use of chemotherapeutic agents, and disease progression. Korsakoff syndrome can follow or accompany Wernicke encephalopathy. Although patients can recover from Wernicke encephalopathy via rapid repletion of thiamine, few patients recover from Korsakoff syndrome. Here, the case of a 76-year-old female patient who had primary peritoneal cancer and developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a result of prolonged nutritional imbalance and fast-growing tumor cells is reported. The patient's neurologic symptoms improved, but she did not recover from the psychiatric effects of the disease.

  1. Wernicke-korsakoff syndrome in primary peritoneal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hyang

    2013-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that constitutes a medical emergency, but one that can be reversed with thiamine repletion if it is recognized early. Patients with cancer have a high risk of Wernicke encephalopathy because of malnutrition, the use of chemotherapeutic agents, and disease progression. Korsakoff syndrome can follow or accompany Wernicke encephalopathy. Although patients can recover from Wernicke encephalopathy via rapid repletion of thiamine, few patients recover from Korsakoff syndrome. Here, the case of a 76-year-old female patient who had primary peritoneal cancer and developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a result of prolonged nutritional imbalance and fast-growing tumor cells is reported. The patient's neurologic symptoms improved, but she did not recover from the psychiatric effects of the disease.

  2. Geriatric syndromes in peri-operative elderly cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerchia, Marcella; Ceci, Moira; Locatelli, Carola; Gianni, Walter; Repetto, Lazzaro

    2010-09-01

    Due to the expanding geriatric population and the high incidence of cancer in this age group, there is an increased burden on clinical oncologists. Elderly patients suffer from one or more chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases, COPD, or diabetes. Besides affecting life expectancy, comorbid conditions may complicate major surgery. Accurate prediction of surgical risk is of paramount importance. Numerous papers have documented that older patients can undergo surgery with similar cancer related survival to younger patients. It has been demonstrated that age related variables are associated with an increased risk in post-surgical complications. The term "geriatric syndrome" needs further clinical evaluation and understanding. It is used to capture those clinical conditions in older persons that do not fit into discrete disease categories. Geriatric syndromes including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope and urinary incontinence, are among the most common conditions facing geriatricians. This article focuses on geriatric syndromes in post-surgical patients and their management.

  3. Hypercalcemia-leukocytosis syndrome associated with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Akio; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Takata, Ichiro; Gemba, Kenichi; Bessho, Akihiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Eguchi, Kenji; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Harada, Mine

    2004-03-01

    Hypercalcemia and leukocytosis are two of the most common paraneoplastic syndromes associated with various malignancies. Of note, concomitant manifestation of hypercalcemia and leukocytosis are occasionally observed in the same cancer patients. However, the relationship between these two paraneoplastic syndromes and clinical outcome is unclear. In the present study, we retrospectively investigated the occurrence of hypercalcemia (> or = 10.2 mg/dl after adjustment for serum albumin concentration), leukocytosis (> or = 14,000/mm3 with no evidence of infection) or both in lung cancer patients (1149 cases). There were 65 cases (5.7%) of hypercalcemia, 16 cases (1.4%) of leukocytosis and six cases (0.5%) of both hypercalcemia and leukocytosis at the time of first presentation. The occurrence of these two distinct paraneoplastic syndromes in the same patients was more frequent than could have been expected by chance alone (P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between the hypercalcemia-leukocytosis syndrome and performance status (P = 0.002). Survivals of patients with hypercalcemia alone (median survival time: MST 3.8 months, n = 59), leukocytosis alone (MST 1.9 months, n = 10), and the hypercalcemia-leukocytosis syndrome (MST 1.5 months, n = 6) were significantly shorter than those without them (MST 9.5 months, n = 1074; P < 0.001). Moreover, survival of patients with the hypercalcemia-leukocytosis syndrome was significantly shorter than that of patients with hypercalcemia alone (P = 0.013). On the other hand, there was no significant difference in survival between the hypercalcemia-leukocytosis syndrome and leukocytosis alone (P = 0.47). Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors using the Cox proportional hazards model could not demonstrate that the hypercalcemia-leukocytosis syndrome had independent prognostic significance. In conclusion, our results suggest that the hypercalcemia-leukocytosis syndrome is an additional clinical entity of paraneoplastic

  4. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tao, Meng-Hua, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-04-28

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  5. Penetrance of colorectal cancer among MLH1/MSH2 carriers participating in the colorectal cancer familial registry in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yun-Hee

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, responsible for the majority of Lynch Syndrome cancers, have been identified, predominantly MLH1 and MSH2, but the risk associated with these mutations is still not well established. The aim of this study is to provide population-based estimates of the risks of colorectal cancer (CRC by gender and mutation type from the Ontario population. Methods We analyzed 32 families segregating MMR mutations selected from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry and including 199 first-degree and 421 second-degree relatives. The cumulative risks were estimated using a modified segregation-based approach, which allows correction for the ascertainment of the Lynch Syndrome families and permits account to be taken for missing genotype information. Results The risks of developing CRC by age 70 were 60% and 47% among men and women carriers of any MMR mutation, respectively. Among MLH1 mutation carriers, males had significantly higher risks than females at all ages (67% vs. 35% by age 70, p-value = 0.02, while the risks were similar in MSH2 carriers (about 54%. The relative risk associated with MLH1 was almost constant with age (hazard ratio (HR varied between 5.5-5.1 over age 30–70, while the HR for MSH2 decreased with age (from 13.1 at age 30 to 5.4 at age 70. Conclusion This study provides a unique population-based study of CRC risks among MSH2/MLH1 mutation carriers in a Canadian population and can help to better define and understand the patterns of risks among members of Lynch Syndrome families.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and Cancer: Do they share common molecular pathways?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniou E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors including obesity, has emerged as a global health plague. A lot of epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that the metabolic syndrome is linked not only to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 but also to cancer development and progression. In this review the potential mechanisms tying the metabolic syndrome with cancer are presented. The role of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, the activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 pathway, and the induction of cytotoxic products are highlighted. Subsequent effects leading to oxidative stress, release of lipokines with signaling properties by adipocytes, development of a sustained systemic inflammation, production of inflammatory cytokines, and establishment of a tumorigenic environment are also discussed. The importance of the metabolic syndrome and obesity coupled with the deeper understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms has trigger intensive clinical research with an aim to prevent the risk of cancer and improve outcomes. Moreover, the need for lifestyle changes with increased physical activity and improved dietary quality has been emerged as urgent health priority.

  7. Rare and unusual endocrine cancer syndromes with mutated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-12-01

    The study of a number of rare familial syndromes associated with endocrine tumor development has led to the identification of genes involved in the development of these tumors. Major advances have expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of these rare endocrine tumors, resulting in the elucidation of causative genes in rare familial diseases and a better understanding of the signaling pathways implicated in endocrine cancers. Recognition of the familial syndrome associated with a particular patient's endocrine tumor has important implications in terms of prognosis, screening of family members, and screening for associated conditions.

  8. The Caring Business: Lynch Community Homes, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Robert

    This paper, one of a series of reports describing innovative practices in integrating people with disabilities into community life, describes the Lynch Community Homes in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Lynch Homes is a for-profit organization that provides homes and supportive services for approximately 75 people with severe and profound…

  9. Advancing Scholarship and Intellectual Productivity: An Interview with Clifford A. Lynch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brian L.

    2006-01-01

    In this second part of a two-part interview with Clifford A. Lynch, Executive Director of the Coalition for Networked Information, Lynch talks to Hawkins about the most provocative and exciting projects that are being developed in the field of networked information worldwide. He also talks on how institutional repositories are being currently…

  10. Miscellaneous syndromes and their management: occult breast cancer, breast cancer in pregnancy, male breast cancer, surgery in stage IV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfry, Alfred John

    2013-04-01

    Surgical therapy for occult breast cancer has traditionally centered on mastectomy; however, breast conservation with whole breast radiotherapy followed by axillary lymph node dissection has shown equivalent results. Patients with breast cancer in pregnancy can be safely and effectively treated; given a patient's pregnancy trimester and stage of breast cancer, a clinician must be able to guide therapy accordingly. Male breast cancer risk factors show strong association with BRCA2 mutations, as well as Klinefelter syndrome. Several retrospective trials of surgical therapy in stage IV breast cancer have associated a survival advantage with primary site tumor extirpation.

  11. Epigenetics and genetics in endometrial cancer: new carcinogenic mechanisms and relationship with clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer worldwide among females. An increased incidence and a younger age of patients are also predicted to occur, and therefore elucidation of the pathological mechanisms is important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, epigenetic mechanisms have been examined. Silencing of genes by DNA hypermethylation, hereditary epimutation of DNA mismatch repair genes and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs may underlie carcinogenesis in endometrial cancer. New therapies include targeting epigenetic changes using histone deacetylase inhibitors. Some cases of endometrial cancer may also be hereditary. Thus, patients with Lynch syndrome which is a hereditary disease, have a higher risk for developing endometrial cancer than the general population. Identification of such disease-related genes may contribute to early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer.

  12. Improving Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Related Cancer Outcomes through International Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Nokta

    2011-01-01

    @@ The spectrum of cancers seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected individuals is diverse and complex,and reflects an ever-changing HIV epidemic.In parts of the world where combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is available,HIV-infected patients are living longer and are less likely to die of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)defining malignancies within a year or two of developing AIDS.

  13. Familial pancreatic cancer: Concept, management and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Takaori, Kyoichi; Morizane, Chigusa; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Mizuma, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Wada, Keita; Hosoi, Hiroko; Yachida, Shinichi; Suzuki, Masami; Usui, Risa; Furukawa, Toru; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Takamitsu; Ueno, Makoto; Kiyozumi, Yoshimi; Hijioka, Susumu; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Terashima, Takeshi; Mizumoto, Masaki; Kodama, Yuzo; Torishima, Masako; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Ashida, Reiko; Kitano, Masayuki; Hanada, Keiji; Furukawa, Masayuki; Kawabe, Ken; Majima, Yoshiyuki; Shimosegawa, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) is broadly defined as two first-degree-relatives with pancreatic cancer (PC) and accounts for 4%-10% of PC. Several genetic syndromes, including Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), also have increased risks of PC, but the narrowest definition of FPC excludes these known syndromes. When compared with other familial tumors, proven genetic alterations are limited to a small proportion ( Caucasian) and a younger onset are common also in FPC. In European countries, “anticipation” is reported in FPC families, as with other hereditary syndromes; a trend toward younger age and worse prognosis is recognized in the late years. The resected pancreases of FPC kindred often show multiple pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) foci, with various K-ras mutations, similar to colorectal polyposis seen in the FAP patients. As with HBOC patients, a patient who is a BRCA mutation carrier with unresectable pancreatic cancer (accounting for 0%-19% of FPC patients) demonstrated better outcome following platinum and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor treatment. Western countries have established FPC registries since the 1990s and several surveillance projects for high-risk individuals are now ongoing to detect early PCs. Improvement in lifestyle habits, including non-smoking, is recommended for individuals at risk. In Japan, the FPC study group was initiated in 2013 and the Japanese FPC registry was established in 2014 by the Japan Pancreas Society. PMID:28246467

  14. “Silencio”: hearing loss in David Lynch's Mulholland Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allister Mactaggart

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In a filmmaking career replete with extraordinary images and sounds, David Lynch's Mulholland Drive (2001 stands out for attention as a striking and seemingly inexhaustible resource for analysis. In this article, this film is used to examine the specific ways in which Lynch uses pre-existing pop songs to wrap the spectator within the filmic soundscape. Nowhere is the complexity and uncanniness of pop music made more explicit than in Rebekah Del Rio's stunning performance of “Llorando (Crying” in the Club Silencio scene. The split between the singer's powerful performance and her subsequent collapse with the sound of the voice left hanging in the air marks a pivotal point in the film. This scene, coupled with other examples of feminine jouissance, is contrasted with the deadening roar of the master's voice, which solely demands obedience but is deaf to any reply. At the core of this article is an analysis of the status of the voice (and the gaze as examples of the Lacanian object a and its relationship to Marx's concept of surplus value. Mulholland Drive provides a powerful demonstration of how these concepts can be seen, heard, and felt in relation to film, and how sound can reverberate into the spaces and silences beyond the screen.

  15. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: Clinical and molecular aspects of recently identified kidney cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Baba, Masaya; Hasumi, Yukiko; Furuya, Mitsuko; Yao, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that predisposes patients to develop fibrofolliculoma, lung cysts and bilateral multifocal renal tumors, histologically hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, oncocytoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The predominant forms of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome-associated renal tumors, hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma are typically less aggressive, and a therapeutic principle for these tumors is a surgical removal with nephron-sparing. The timing of surgery is the most critical element for postoperative renal function, which is one of the important prognostic factors for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome patients. The folliculin gene (FLCN) that is responsible for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome was isolated as a novel tumor suppressor for kidney cancer. Recent studies using murine models for FLCN, a protein encoded by the FLCN gene, and its two binding partners, folliculin-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1) and folliculin-interacting protein 2 (FNIP2), have uncovered important roles for FLCN, FNIP1 and FNIP2 in cell metabolism, which include AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated energy sensing, Ppargc1a-driven mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a hereditary hamartoma syndrome, which is triggered by metabolic alterations under a functional loss of FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 complex, a critical regulator of kidney cell proliferation rate; a mechanistic insight into the FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 pathway could provide us a basis for developing new therapeutics for kidney cancer.

  16. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of aggressive prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, Juan; Ropero, Jordi; Planas, Jacques; Bastarós, Juan M; Delgado, Gueisy; Placer, José; Celma, Anna; de Torres, Inés M; Carles, Joan; Reventós, Jaume; Doll, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Metabolic syndrome can identify patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide and is associated with increased age, obesity and hypogonadism. The association between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer development has not been studied comprehensively, and published studies report divergent results. This study indicates that tumours detected in men with metabolic syndrome are more aggressive than those detected in men without this condition. To further examine the association between metabolic syndrome (MS), prostate cancer (PC) detection risk and tumour aggressiveness. From 2006 to 2010, 2408 men not receiving 5α-reductase inhibitors were scheduled for prostatic biopsy due to PSA above 4 ng/mL and/or abnormal digital rectal examination. MS was evaluated according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults, Adult Treatment Panel III definition. Tumour aggressiveness was evaluated through biopsy Gleason score, clinical stage and risk of biochemical recurrence after primary treatment. The rates of PC detection were 34.5% and 36.4% respectively in men with and without MS, P = 0.185. High grade PC rates (Gleason score 8-10) were 35.9% and 23.9% respectively, P 20) were 38.5% and 33.0% respectively, P = 0.581. Multivariate analysis confirmed that MS was not associated with the risk of PC detection but it was associated with an increased risk of high grade tumours (odds ratio 1.75, 95% CI 1.26-2.41), P < 0.001. MS seems not be associated with an increased risk of PC detection but it is associated with an increased risk of more aggressive tumours. © 2012 BJU International.

  17. Two Cases of Endometrial Cancer in Twin Sisters with Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra Y. Koh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two cases of endometrial cancer (EC occurring in nulligravid twin sisters with myotonic dystrophy. Both tested negative for Lynch syndrome and both were treated with laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although EC tends to run in families, the diagnosis in itself is not considered sufficient cause for screening or prophylactic measures in close relatives. However, the presence of additional risk factors, such as nulligravidity and myotonic dystrophy in the underlying cases, may call for extra vigilance in first-degree family members.

  18. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  19. Dubin-Johnson syndrome coinciding with colon cancer and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticova, Eva; Elleder, Milan; Hulkova, Helena; Luksan, Ondrej; Sauer, Martin; Wunschova-Moudra, Irena; Novotny, Jan; Jirsa, Milan

    2013-02-14

    Hyperbilirubinemia has been presumed to prevent the process of atherogenesis and cancerogenesis mainly by decreasing oxidative stress. Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, inherited disorder characterized by biphasic, predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinemia with no progression to end-stage liver disease. The molecular basis in Dubin-Johnson syndrome is absence or deficiency of human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter MRP2/cMOAT caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation(s) in ABCC2 located on chromosome 10q24. Clinical onset of the syndrome is most often seen in the late teens or early adulthood. In this report, we describe a case of previously unrecognized Dubin-Johnson syndrome caused by two novel pathogenic mutations (c.2360_2366delCCCTGTC and c.3258+1G>A), coinciding with cholestatic liver disease in an 82-year-old male patient. The patient, suffering from advanced atherosclerosis with serious involvement of coronary arteries, developed colorectal cancer with nodal metastases. The subsequent findings do not support the protective role of Dubin-Johnson type hyperbilirubinemia.

  20. Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Seung Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC and colorectal cancer (CRC. Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4. A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians.

  1. Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Woo Ho; Kwak, Yoonjin; Koh, Jiwon; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Chang, Mee Soo; Han, Hye Seung; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Hwal Woong; Chang, Hee Kyung; Choi, Young Hee; Park, Ji Y.; Gu, Mi Jin; Lhee, Min Jin; Kim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hee Sung; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2017-01-01

    With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4). A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians. PMID:28219002

  2. [Kartagener syndrome with lung cancer and mediastinal tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masafumi; Arai, Hidenori; Noguchi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sakamoto, Yoshio; Oka, Teruaki

    2010-05-01

    A 71-year-old man was admitted to Kanto Central Hospital with hemoptysis. He had had chronic sinusitis and deafness since childhood. Situs inversus, bronchiectasia, and diffuse panbronchiolitis had been also diagnosed at the age of 59. Chest computed tomography demonstrated a 5-cm mass in the anterior mediastinum as well as a 4-cm mass in the upper lobe of the right lung. A transbronchial lung biopsy of the right lung tumor revealed squamous cell carcinoma. Electron microscopic examination of the bronchial epithelial cilia revealed a total defect of both inner and outer dynein arms, leading to a diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia. Biopsy of the mediastinal tumor was not performed. After concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the lung cancer decreased in size partial remission (PR) and the mediastinal tumor disappeared complete remission (CR). Later, a cavity formed in the tumor, where a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection occurred. He died 1 year after the diagnosis of lung cancer was established. There have been 5 reported cases of Kartagener syndrome complicated with lung cancer, but to the best of our knowledge there have been no reports of Kartagener syndrome with mediastinal tumor.

  3. Association between Birt Hogg Dube syndrome and cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ludovici, Giorgia; Donati, Pietro; Cavaliere, Francesco; DE Marchis, Maria Laura; Ferroni, Patrizia; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2010-03-01

    The Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome (BHD) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis predisposing patients to developing fibrofolliculoma, trichodiscoma and acrochordon. The syndrome is caused by germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, encoding the folliculin tumor-suppressor protein. Numerous mutations have been described in the FLCN gene, the most frequent occurring within a C8 tract of exon 11. This hypermutability is probably due to a slippage in DNA polymerase during replication, resulting in gains/losses of repeat units, causing cancer predisposition. The main phenotypic manifestations related to this disease are lung cysts, leading to pneumothorax, and a 7-fold increased risk for renal neoplasia, although other neoplastic manifestations have been described in BHD-affected individuals. Of particular interest is the often reported genotype/phenotype correlation between FLCN mutations and risk of colon or breast cancer. This paper describes our current knowledge on the association between BHD and cancer predisposition and briefly summarizes our experience in this field.

  4. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Gardner Syndrome Request Permissions Gardner Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 06/2014 What is Gardner syndrome? Gardner syndrome is a subtype of familial ...

  5. Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome: psychological effect on the patient and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClement, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The majority of patients with advanced cancer experience weight loss, reduced appetite, fatigue, and weakness. Chronic nausea and early satiety may also occur. This constellation of symptoms is known as the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome. Together with cancer pain, cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome has been identified as 1 of the 2 most frequent and devastating problems affecting individuals with advanced malignancies. Research examining the issue of cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome has been conducted; however, such work is largely biomedical in orientation. In contrast, the psychologic dimensions of the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome experience from the perspective of terminally ill patients and their family members is less well explored or described. The ability to provide psychosocial support to patients and families requires that caregivers appreciate the psychologic effect of cancer anorexia and cachexia on these individuals. This article examines that effect in light of existing knowledge and discusses the clinical implications arising from this work.

  6. Roles of Oxidative Stress in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS has received extensive attention in the last two decades, because of the discovery that abnormal oxidation status was related to patients with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, cancer, and neurological diseases. OS is considered as a potential inducing factor in the pathogenesis of PCOS, which is one of the most common complex endocrine disorders and a leading cause of female infertility, affecting 4%–12% of women in the world, as OS has close interactions with PCOS characteristics, just as insulin resistance (IR, hyperandrogenemia, and chronic inflammation. It has also been shown that DNA mutations and alterations induced by OS are involved in cancer pathogenesis, tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and so on. Furthermore, recent studies show that the females with PCOS are reported to have an increasing risk of cancers. As a result, the more serious OS in PCOS is regarded as an important potential incentive for the increasing risk of cancers, and this study aims to analyze the possibility and potential pathogenic mechanism of the above process, providing insightful thoughts and evidences for preventing cancer potentially caused by PCOS in clinic.

  7. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  8. The metabolic syndrome in long-term cancer survivors, an important target for secondary preventive measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, J; Smit, AJ; Postma, A; Sleijfer, DT; Gietema, JA

    2002-01-01

    With increasing numbers of cancer survivors, attention has been drawn to long-term complications of curative cancer treatment, including a range of metabolic disorders. These metabolic disorders often resemble the components of the so-called metabolic syndrome, or syndrome X, which is an important r

  9. The basic mechanisms the influence of metabolic syndrome on the risk and prognosis of breast cancer (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Schepotin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer and metabolic syndrome remains one of the most urgent problems of modern medicine worldwide. In this review, highlights the molecular pathways that underlie the negative impact of metabolic syndrome on the risk and prognosis of breast cancer. A better understanding of these pathways will help to optimize prevention and treatment of breast cancer in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  10. Endometrial Cancer and a Family History of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Linda S.; Nelson, Harold E.; Stidley, Christine A.; Dong, Yan; Round, Pamela J.; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Friedenreich, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lynch Syndrome (LS), an inherited genetic syndrome, predisposes to cancers such as colorectal and endometrial. However, the risk for endometrial cancer (EC) in women not affected by LS, but with a family history of cancer, is currently unknown. We examined the association between a family history of cancer and the risk for EC in non-LS patients. Methods This population-based case-control study included 519 EC cases and 1015 age-matched controls and took place in Alberta, Canada between 2002 and 2006. Information about risk factors, including family history of cancer in first and second degree relatives, was ascertained via in-person interviews. Microsatellite instability (MSI) status of tumor tissue was assessed to determine involvement of DNA mismatch repair genes. Results A first or second degree family history of uterine cancer was modestly associated with the risk for overall EC [odds ratio (OR), 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9,1.9], and the risks were similar for MSI+ cancer (OR= 1.5, 95%CI=0.7, 3.3) and MSI- cancer (OR= 1.3, 95%CI=0.8, 2.4). Although consistent, these associations were modest and not significant. In contrast, the risk for MSI+ cancer was elevated with a reported family history of colorectal cancer (OR= 1.4, 95%CI=1.0, 2.2), but not for MSI- cancer. Conclusions A family history of uterine cancer may be modestly associated with EC risk in non-LS patients regardless of MSI status, suggesting that risk was not related to inherited defects in the MMR gene pathway. These results provide preliminary support for an EC-specific genetic syndrome. PMID:23632205

  11. Media lynching in Romanian mass media and politics. Definition and short explanations

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Novăcescu

    2013-01-01

    The Monitoring Report of justice in Romania, published by the European Commission in late January of this year, has sparked an intense controversy in Romanian politics between the president of Romania and the prime minister of the country, which has focused on the mediatic lynching who was practiced against the judges and the anti-corruption prosecutors. This article defines and analyzes the mediatic lynching and its specific features that distinguish it from a press campaign.

  12. Media lynching in Romanian mass media and politics. Definition and short explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Novăcescu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Monitoring Report of justice in Romania, published by the European Commission in late January of this year, has sparked an intense controversy in Romanian politics between the president of Romania and the prime minister of the country, which has focused on the mediatic lynching who was practiced against the judges and the anti-corruption prosecutors. This article defines and analyzes the mediatic lynching and its specific features that distinguish it from a press campaign.

  13. Association of liver steatosis with colorectal cancer and adenoma in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Enrico; Lamazza, Antonietta; De Masi, Ercole; Schillaci, Alberto; Crocetti, Daniele; Antoniozzi, Angelo; Sterpetti, Antonio V; De Toma, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been identified as a risk factor for colorectal cancer and adenoma. The aim of our study was to assess the risk of colorectal cancer and adenoma in an adult Italian population with metabolic syndrome. Ninety patients with metabolic syndrome were prospectively compared against a matched population without the syndrome to assess the prevalence of colorectal adenoma. Another 1,500 patients undergoing screening colonoscopy were prospectively analyzed: 134 patients with metabolic syndrome and colorectal adenoma were compared against a group of 108 patients with colorectal adenoma without metabolic syndrome to assess the prevalence of cancer. The study was performed from January 2008 until December 2010. Data were analyzed from March to June 2011. The prevalence of colorectal adenoma was twice as high in patients with metabolic syndrome. The incidence of cancer was higher in patients with colorectal adenoma and metabolic syndrome. Associated obesity and liver steatosis were the only factors with independent statistical value. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for adenoma and cancer degeneration when obesity is present. Associated liver steatosis is a significant risk factor for colorectal cancer. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Refeeding syndrome in a vegan patient with stage IV gastric cancer: a novel case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Teresa V; Moss, Rebecca A

    2015-03-01

    The refeeding syndrome encompasses the complex physiologic state that occurs in malnourished patients who receive nutrition after a period of decreased oral intake. The hallmark of the syndrome is hypophosphatemia, though other electrolyte imbalances and severe fluid shifts are commonly involved. Patients with newly diagnosed malignancies and those undergoing treatment for malignancies are at increased risk for developing the refeeding syndrome, however there are few reported cases or other data in the oncology literature regarding this syndrome in cancer patients.

  15. [VEGF in the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome in patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weryńska, Bozena; Kosacka, Monika; Gołecki, Marcin; Jankowska, Renata

    2006-01-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome( CACS) occurs in 30-80% of patients with cancer. CACS is connected with poor prognosis and higher risk of treatment complications. CACS belongs to the common cause of death in cancer patients. Main role in the development of this syndrome play cytokines like TNF, interleukin 1 and 6 and interferon alpha and gamma. The importance of a lot of other substances is still unknown. VEGF promotes new vessels development,enhance vascular permeability and plays a role in inflammatory reaction. The aim of this study was comparison of VEGF levels in patients with lung cancer with and without CACS and in control group. The serum levels of VEGF were measured by ELISA method. The VEGF was significatly higher in patients with lung cancer then in control group (p = 0.004). There were no correlations between VEGF and weight lost, histological type and stage of disease. This suggest that VEGF doesnt play a role in development of CACS.

  16. Interrelationship between microsatellite instability and microRNA in gastrointestinal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Yamamoto; Yasushi Adachi; Hiroaki Taniguchi; Hiroaki Kunimoto; Katsuhiko Nosho; Hiromu Suzuki; Yasuhisa Shinomura

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing understanding of the roles that microsatellite instability (MSI) plays in Lynch syndrome (by mutations) and sporadic (by mainly epigenetic changes) gastrointestinal (GI) and other cancers.Deficient DNA mismatch repair (MMR) results in the strong mutator phenotype known as MSI,which is the hallmark of cancers arising within Lynch syndrome.MSI is characterized by length alterations within simple repeated sequences called microsatellites.Lynch syndrome occurs primarily because of germline mutations in one of the MMR genes,mainly MLH1 or MSH2,less frequently MSH6,and rarely PMS2.MSI is also observed in about 15% of sporadic colorectal,gastric,and endometrial cancers and in lower frequencies in a minority of other cancers where it is often associated with the hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene.miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are critical in many biological processes and cellular pathways.There is accumulating evidence to support the notion that theinterrelationship between MSI and miRNA plays a key role in the pathogenesis of GI cancer.As a possible new mechanism underlying MSI,overexpression of miR-155 has been shown to downregulate expression of MLH1,MSH2,and MSH6.Thus,a subset of MSI-positive (MSI+)cancers without known MMR defects may result from miR-155 overexpression.Target genes of frameshift mutation for MSI are involved in various cellular functions,such as DNA repair,cell signaling,and apoptosis.A novel class of target genes that included not only epigenetic modifier genes,such as HDAC2,but also miRNA processing machinery genes,including TARBP2 and XPO5,were found to be mutated in MSI+ GI cancers.Thus,a subset of MSI+ colorectal cancers (CRCs) has been proposed to exhibit a mutated miRNA machinery phenotype.Genetic,epigenetic,and transcriptomic differences exist between MSI+ and MSI-cancers.Molecular signatures of miRNA expression apparently have the potential to

  17. Optimal management of cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Argilés

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Josep M Argilés, Mireia Olivan, Sílvia Busquets, Francisco Javier López-SorianoDepartament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: According to a recent consensus, cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with underlying illness and characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The prominent clinical feature of cachexia is weight loss. Cachexia occurs in the majority of cancer patients before death and it is responsible for the deaths of 22% of cancer patients. Although bodyweight is the most important endpoint of any cachexia treatment, body composition, physical performance and quality of life should be monitored. From the results presented here, one can speculate that a single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful. The objectives of any therapeutic combination are two-fold: an anticatabolic aim directed towards both fat and muscle catabolism and an anabolic objective leading to the synthesis of macromolecules such as contractile proteins.Keywords: wasting, cancer, anorexia, nutraceuticals, drugs

  18. Bloom syndrome complicated by colonic cancer in a young Tunisian woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjazia, Elhem; Turki, Hajer; Atig, Amira; Khalifa, Mabrouk; Letaief, Amel; Bahri, Fethi; Braham, Ahlem

    2011-10-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by chromosomal instability leading to a high risk of cancer at an early age. The diagnosis should be considered in patients with short stature, photosensitivity, variable degrees of immunodeficiency, and hypogonadism. We report a 19-year-old woman, with history of dysmorphic features and recurrent infections. The diagnosis of bloom syndrome was made and confirmed cytogenetically at the age of 14 years. She developed a colon cancer revealed by venous thrombosis and anemia. She died after 15 days of the cancer diagnosis. This is the first registrated case of confirmed Bloom syndrome in Tunisian population.

  19. Incidence of myofascial pain syndrome in breast cancer surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Lacomba, María; Mayoral del Moral, Orlando; Coperias Zazo, José Luís; Gerwin, Robert D; Goñí, Alvaro Zapico

    2010-05-01

    Pain after breast cancer therapy is a recognized complication found to have an adverse impact on patient's quality of life, increasing psychosocial distress. In recent years, case reports about myofascial pain syndrome are emerging in thoracic surgery as a cause of postsurgery pain. Myofascial pain syndrome is a regional pain syndrome characterized by myofascial trigger points in palpable taut bands of skeletal muscle that refers pain a distance, and that can cause distant motor and autonomic effects. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of myofascial pain syndrome prospectively 12 months after breast cancer surgery. Each participant was assessed preoperatively, postoperatively between day 3 and day 5, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. A physical therapist, expert in the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome, performed follow-up assessments. Pain descriptions by the patients and pain pattern drawings in body forms guided the physical examination. The patients were not given any information concerning myofascial pain or other muscle pain syndromes. One year follow-up was completed by 116 women. Of these, 52 women developed myofascial pain syndrome (44.8%, 95% confidence interval: 35.6, 54.3). Myofascial pain syndrome is a common source of pain in women undergoing breast cancer surgery that includes axillary lymph node dissection at least during the first year after surgery. Myofascial pain syndrome is one potential cause of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors who have undergone this kind of surgery.

  20. Reevaluation of RINT1 as a breast cancer predisposition gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Thompson, Ella R; Rowley, Simone M; McInerny, Simone; Devereux, Lisa; Goode, David; Investigators, LifePool; Wong-Brown, Michelle W; Scott, Rodney J; Trainer, Alison H; Gorringe, Kylie L; James, Paul A; Campbell, Ian G

    2016-09-01

    Rad50 interactor 1 (RINT1) has recently been reported as an intermediate-penetrance (odds ratio 3.24) breast cancer susceptibility gene, as well as a risk factor for Lynch syndrome. The coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of RINT1 were sequenced in 2024 familial breast cancer cases previously tested negative for BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutations and 1886 population-matched cancer-free controls using HaloPlex Targeted Enrichment Assays. Only one RINT1 protein-truncating variant was detected in a control. No excess was observed in the total number of rare variants (truncating and missense) (28, 1.38 %, vs. 27, 1.43 %. P > 0.999) or in the number of variants predicted to be pathogenic by various in silico tools (Condel, Polyphen2, SIFT, and CADD) in the cases compared to the controls. In addition, there was no difference in the incidence of classic Lynch syndrome cancers in RINT1 rare variant-carrying families compared to RINT1 wild-type families. This study had 90 % power to detect an odds ratio of at least 2.06, and the results do not provide any support for RINT1 being a moderate-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene, although larger studies will be required to exclude more modest effects. This study emphasizes the need for caution before designating a cancer predisposition role for any gene based on very rare truncating variants and in silico-predicted missense variants.

  1. Pediatric cancer and Li-Fraumeni/Li-Fraumeni-like syndromes: a review for the pediatrician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rossi Giacomazzi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: cancer is the second leading cause of death in children between the ages of 0 and 14 years, corresponding to approximately 3% of all cases diagnosed in Brazil. A significant percentage (5-10% of pediatric cancers are associated with hereditary cancer syndromes, including Li-Fraumeni/Li-Fraumeni-like syndromes (LFS/LFL, both of which are caused by TP53 germline mutations. Recent studies have shown that a specific TP53 mutation, known as p.R337H, is present in 1 in 300 newborns in Southern and Southeast Brazil. In addition, a significant percentage of children with LFS/LFL spectrum tumors in the region have a family history compatible with LFS/LFL. Objective: to review clinical relevant aspects of LFS/LFL by our multidisciplinary team with focus on pediatric cancer. Methods: the NCBI (PubMed and SciELO databases were consulted using the keywords Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome and pediatric cancer; and all manuscripts published between 1990 and 2014 using these keywords were retrieved and reviewed. Conclusion: although LFS/LFL is considered a rare disease, it appears to be substantially more common in certain geographic regions. Recognition of population- specific risks for the syndrome is important for adequate management of hereditary cancer patients and families. In Southern and Southeastern Brazil, LFS/ LFL should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cancer, especially if within the spectrum of the syndrome. Due to the complexities of these syndromes, a multidisciplinary approach should be sought for the counseling, diagnosis and management of patients and families affected by these disorders. Pediatricians and pediatric oncologists in areas with high prevalence of hereditary cancer syndromes have a central role in the recognition and proper referral of patients and families to genetic cancer risk evaluation and management programs.

  2. A longitudinal study of the metabolic syndrome and risk of colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Kim, Mimi Y; Peters, Ulrike; Stefanick, Marcia; Hou, Lifang; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Messina, Catherine; Shikany, James M; Rohan, Thomas E

    2012-07-01

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of diabetes and coronary heart disease. Although higher BMI and other related factors have been frequently associated with colorectal cancer, whether the metabolic syndrome is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer is unclear. We therefore assessed the association of the metabolic syndrome with the risk of colorectal cancer in a subsample of participants of the Women's Health Initiative who had repeated measurements of the components of the syndrome at baseline and during follow-up. Women with diabetes at baseline enrollment were excluded. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) at baseline and in time-dependent analyses. Among 4862 eligible women, 81 incident cases of colorectal cancer were identified over a median follow-up of 12 years. Presence of the metabolic syndrome at baseline was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.30-3.53) and colon cancer (HR 2.28, 95% CI 1.31-3.98). These associations were largely explained by positive associations of serum glucose and systolic blood pressure with both outcomes. Time-dependent covariate analyses supported the baseline findings. Our results suggest that the positive association of the metabolic syndrome with risk of colorectal cancer is largely accounted for by serum glucose levels and systolic blood pressure. The biological mechanism underlying these associations remains to be clarified.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and Risks of Colon and Rectal Cancer : The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Jenab, Mazda; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Jansen, Eugene; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Fedirko, Veronika; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Riboli, Elio; Romaguera, Dora; Overvad, Kim; Ostergaard, Jane Nautrup; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Morois, Sophie; Masala, Giovanna; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Bamia, Christina; Peeters, Petra H.; Rodriguez, Laudina; Buckland, Genevieve; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Barricarte, Aurelio; Hallmans, Goran; Palmqvist, Richard; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Allen, Naomi E.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Pischon, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is purportedly related to risk of developing colorectal cancer; however, the association of MetS, as defined according to recent international criteria, and colorectal cancer has not been yet evaluated. In particular, it remains unclear to what extent the MetS components in

  4. Metabolic Syndrome and Risks of Colon and Rectal Cancer : The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Jenab, Mazda; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Jansen, Eugene; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Fedirko, Veronika; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Riboli, Elio; Romaguera, Dora; Overvad, Kim; Ostergaard, Jane Nautrup; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Morois, Sophie; Masala, Giovanna; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Bamia, Christina; Peeters, Petra H.; Rodriguez, Laudina; Buckland, Genevieve; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Barricarte, Aurelio; Hallmans, Goran; Palmqvist, Richard; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Allen, Naomi E.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Pischon, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is purportedly related to risk of developing colorectal cancer; however, the association of MetS, as defined according to recent international criteria, and colorectal cancer has not been yet evaluated. In particular, it remains unclear to what extent the MetS components in

  5. [Genetic cancer syndromes and reproductive choice: dialogue between parents and politicians on preimplantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niermeijer, M.F.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Page-Christiaens, G.C.; Wert, G.M.W.R. de

    2008-01-01

    Genetic cancer syndromes have identical clinical severity, limited therapeutic options, reduced life expectancy, and risks of genetic transmission, as do other genetic or congenital diseases for which prenatal genetic diagnosis or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is allowed in the

  6. Reproductive hormones and metabolic syndrome in 24 testicular cancer survivors and their biological brothers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, M.; Jorgensen, N.; Juul, A.

    2017-01-01

    cancer survivors included, 24 had a biological brother who accepted to participate in the study. Serum levels of reproductive hormones and prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to International Diabetes Federation Criteria and National Cholesterol Education Program (Adult Treatment Panel III...

  7. [Genetic cancer syndromes and reproductive choice: dialogue between parents and politicians on preimplantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niermeijer, M.F.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Page-Christiaens, G.C.; Wert, G.M.W.R. de

    2008-01-01

    Genetic cancer syndromes have identical clinical severity, limited therapeutic options, reduced life expectancy, and risks of genetic transmission, as do other genetic or congenital diseases for which prenatal genetic diagnosis or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is allowed in the Netherlands

  8. A longitudinal study of the metabolic syndrome and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Kim, Mimi; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Khandekar, Janu; Ko, Marcia G; McTiernan, Anne; Neuhouser, Marian L; Parker, Donna R; Shikany, James M; Stefanick, Marcia L; Thomson, Cynthia A; Rohan, Thomas E

    2009-07-01

    The metabolic syndrome, characterized by abdominal obesity, high blood glucose levels, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Several studies have examined the association of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome with breast cancer; to date, however, no study has assessed the metabolic syndrome per se in relation to breast cancer risk. Furthermore, previous studies have relied only on baseline assessment of components of the syndrome. Therefore, we assessed the association of the metabolic syndrome with the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer among women in the 6% sample of subjects in the Women's Health Initiative clinical trial and the 1% sample of women in the observational study who had repeated measurements of the components of the syndrome during follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of breast cancer risk with the presence of the metabolic syndrome, as well as its components, at baseline and in time-dependent analyses. After exclusion of women with diabetes, among 4,888 women with baseline measurements, 165 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained over a median of 8 years of follow-up. The presence of the metabolic syndrome at baseline was not associated with altered risk. Of the individual components measured at baseline, diastolic blood pressure showed a borderline positive association with breast cancer. In time-dependent covariate analyses, however, certain scenarios indicated a positive association between the metabolic syndrome and breast cancer, due primarily to positive associations with serum glucose, serum triglycerides, and diastolic blood pressure.

  9. Breast Cancer Presents with a Paraneoplastic Neurologic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Coelho Barata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes (PNS pose quite an uncommon neurological complication, affecting less than 1% of patients with breast cancer. Nearly one third of these patients lack detectable onconeural antibodies (ONAs, and improvement in neurologic deficits with concomitant cancer treatments is achieved in less than 30% of cases. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old, premenopausal woman presented with facial paralysis on the central left side accompanied by a left tongue deviation, an upward vertical nystagmus, moderate spastic paraparesis, dystonic posturing of the left foot, lower limb hyperreflexia and bilateral extensor plantar reflex. After ruling out all other potential neurologic causes, PNS was suspected but no ONAs were found. A PET-CT scan detected increased metabolism in the right breast, as well as an ipsilateral thoracic interpectoral adenopathy. Core biopsy confirmed the presence of an infiltrating duct carcinoma. After breast surgery, the neurologic symptoms disappeared. One week later, the patient was readmitted to the hospital with a bilateral fatigable eyelid ptosis, and two weeks later, there was a noticeable improvement in eyelid ptosis, accompanied by a rapid and progressive development of lower spastic paraparesis. She started adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy with marked clinical and neurological improvement, and by the end of radiotherapy, there were no signs of neurologic impairment. Conclusion: This case study highlights the importance of a high level of vigilance for the detection of PNS, even when ONAs are not detected, as the rapid identification and treatment of the underlying tumor offers the best chance for a full recovery.

  10. Metformin in the treatment of breast cancer among patients with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is one of the most common cancer among women worldwide. In 2005, the International Diabetes Federation (International Diabetes Federation) declared metabolic syndrome is one of the main problems of modern medicine, as it increases the total mortality and the prevalence has reached pandemic levels. Several studies have shown that the metabolic disorders associated with metabolic syndrome, affect the carcinogenesis of BC. Improving the efficiency of chemotherapy in patients w...

  11. Plummer-Vinson syndrome complicated by gastric cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T; Susami, E; Ebihara, T

    1990-06-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome has been brought to attention as a precancerous lesion of hypopharyngeal and cervical lesions of the esophagus, but that involving the stomach is uncommon. We report a case of Plummer-Vinson syndrome with gastric cancer. A brief literature review of this disorder is presented, and possible causes in this unusual case are discussed.

  12. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7–9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:27775259

  13. Association between Nutrient Intake and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Shin, Eung-Jin; Yeom, Jeong-Won; Park, Yoon-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of nutritional status according to metabolic syndrome in colorectal cancer patients. The subjects were divided into 2 groups (metabolic syndrome group and normal group) according to the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome in 143 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and their lifestyle and nutritional status were analyzed. Recall method was used for the dietary survey, and metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of 3 or more of waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and blood pressure. This study showed that the metabolic syndrome group had a low age, a high body mass index (BMI), and a high drinking rate. The intake of energy, protein, fat, calcium, and phosphorus was significantly higher in the metabolic syndrome group than in the normal group, and the intake of β-carotene, vitamin C, and folic acid was significantly low. The intake of cholesterol, fatty acid, saturated fatty acid, and polyunsaturated fatty acid was also higher in the metabolic syndrome group. Higher BMI, alcohol consumption, intake of fat, total fatty acid or saturated fatty acid increased the risk of metabolic syndrome, but fiber, vitamin C, or folic acid intake lowered the risk.Weight management and balanced nutritional intake should be emphasized to prevent metabolic syndrome and to improve the condition in patients with colorectal cancer.

  14. Association between Nutrient Intake and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eung-Jin; Yeom, Jeong-Won; Park, Yoon-Hyung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of nutritional status according to metabolic syndrome in colorectal cancer patients. The subjects were divided into 2 groups (metabolic syndrome group and normal group) according to the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome in 143 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and their lifestyle and nutritional status were analyzed. Recall method was used for the dietary survey, and metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of 3 or more of waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and blood pressure. This study showed that the metabolic syndrome group had a low age, a high body mass index (BMI), and a high drinking rate. The intake of energy, protein, fat, calcium, and phosphorus was significantly higher in the metabolic syndrome group than in the normal group, and the intake of β-carotene, vitamin C, and folic acid was significantly low. The intake of cholesterol, fatty acid, saturated fatty acid, and polyunsaturated fatty acid was also higher in the metabolic syndrome group. Higher BMI, alcohol consumption, intake of fat, total fatty acid or saturated fatty acid increased the risk of metabolic syndrome, but fiber, vitamin C, or folic acid intake lowered the risk.Weight management and balanced nutritional intake should be emphasized to prevent metabolic syndrome and to improve the condition in patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:28168180

  15. Association between metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Salonia, Andrea; Autorino, Riccardo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Capogrosso, Paolo; Damiano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of several metabolic abnormalities, its prevalence is increasing worldwide. To summarize the most recent evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome, its components and the oncological outcomes in bladder cancer patients, a National Center for Biotechnology Information PubMed search for relevant articles either published or e-published up to March 2014 was carried out by combining the following Patient population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome terms: metabolic syndrome, obesity, body mass index, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, bladder cancer, risk, mortality, cancer specific survival, disease recurrence and progression. Metabolic syndrome is a complex, highly prevalent disorder, and central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension are its main components. Published findings would suggest that metabolic syndrome per se might be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in male patients, but it did not seem to confer a risk of worse prognosis. Considering the primary components of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia), available data are uncertain, and it is no possible to reach a conclusion yet on either a direct or an indirect association with bladder cancer risk and prognosis. Only with regard to type 2 diabetes mellitus, available data would suggest a potential negative correlation. However, as the evaluation of bladder cancer risk and prognosis in patients with metabolic disorders is certainly complex, further studies are urgently required to better assess the actual role of these metabolic disorders. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Management of Axillary Web Syndrome after Breast Cancer: Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Clarissa Medeiros da; Deitos, Julia; Siqueira, Thais Cristina; Palú, Marina; Heck, Ailime Perito Feiber

    2017-07-12

    Axillary web syndrome is characterized as a physical-functional complication that impacts the quality of life of women who have undergone treatment for breast cancer. The present study aims to verify the physiotherapy treatment available for axillary web syndrome after surgery for breast cancer in the context of evidence-based practice. The selection criteria included papers discussing treatment protocols used for axillary web syndrome after treatment for breast cancer. The search was performed in the MEDLINE, Scopus, PEDro and LILACS databases using the terms axillary web syndrome, lymphadenectomy and breast cancer, focusing on women with a previous diagnosis of breast cancer who underwent surgery with lymphadenectomy as part of their treatment. From the 262 studies found, 4 articles that used physiotherapy treatment were selected. The physiotherapy treatment was based on lymphatic drainage, tissue mobilization, stretching and strengthening. The four selected articles had the same outcome: improvement in arm pain and shoulder function and/or dissipation of the axillary cord. Although axillary web syndrome seems to be as frequent and detrimental as other morbidities after cancer treatment, there are few studies on this subject. The publications are even scarcer when considering studies with an interventional approach. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to support the rehabilitation resources for axillary web syndrome. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  17. Metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer associations: biochemical and pathophysiological evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Palo, Rossella; Lamantia, Elvira; Castaldo, Luigi; Nocerino, Flavia; Ametrano, Gianluca; Cappuccio, Francesca; Malzone, Gabriella; Montanari, Micaela; Vanacore, Daniela; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pepe, Maria Filomena; Berretta, Massimiliano; D'Aniello, Carmine; Perdonà, Sisto; Muto, Paolo; Botti, Gerardo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; De Falco, Francesco; Maiolino, Piera; Caraglia, Michele; Montella, Maurizio; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-05-02

    This review summarizes the main pathophysiological basis of the relationship between metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptor exposure and prostate cancer that is the most common cancer among men in industrialized countries. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and hormonal factors having a central role in the initiation and recurrence of many western chronic diseases including hormonal-related cancers and it is considered as the world's leading health problem in the coming years. Many biological factors correlate metabolic syndrome to prostate cancer and this review is aimed to focus, principally, on growth factors, cytokines, adipokines, central obesity, endocrine abnormalities and exposure to specific endocrine disruptors, a cluster of chemicals, to which we are daily exposed, with a hormone-like structure influencing oncogenes, tumor suppressors and proteins with a key role in metabolism, cell survival and chemo-resistance of prostate cancer cells. Finally, this review will analyze, from a molecular point of view, how specific foods could reduce the relative risk of incidence and recurrence of prostate cancer or inhibit the biological effects of endocrine disruptors on prostate cancer cells. On the basis of these considerations, prostate cancer remains a great health problem in terms of incidence and prevalence and interventional studies based on the treatment of metabolic syndrome in cancer patients, minimizing exposure to endocrine disruptors, could be a key point in the overall management of this disease.

  18. Metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer associations: biochemical and pathophysiological evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Palo, Rossella; Lamantia, Elvira; Castaldo, Luigi; Nocerino, Flavia; Ametrano, Gianluca; Cappuccio, Francesca; Malzone, Gabriella; Montanari, Micaela; Vanacore, Daniela; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pepe, Maria Filomena; Berretta, Massimiliano; D'Aniello, Carmine; Perdonà, Sisto; Muto, Paolo; Botti, Gerardo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; De Falco, Francesco; Maiolino, Piera; Caraglia, Michele; Montella, Maurizio; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes the main pathophysiological basis of the relationship between metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptor exposure and prostate cancer that is the most common cancer among men in industrialized countries. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and hormonal factors having a central role in the initiation and recurrence of many western chronic diseases including hormonal-related cancers and it is considered as the worlds leading health problem in the coming years. Many biological factors correlate metabolic syndrome to prostate cancer and this review is aimed to focus, principally, on growth factors, cytokines, adipokines, central obesity, endocrine abnormalities and exposure to specific endocrine disruptors, a cluster of chemicals, to which we are daily exposed, with a hormone-like structure influencing oncogenes, tumor suppressors and proteins with a key role in metabolism, cell survival and chemo-resistance of prostate cancer cells. Finally, this review will analyze, from a molecular point of view, how specific foods could reduce the relative risk of incidence and recurrence of prostate cancer or inhibit the biological effects of endocrine disruptors on prostate cancer cells. On the basis of these considerations, prostate cancer remains a great health problem in terms of incidence and prevalence and interventional studies based on the treatment of metabolic syndrome in cancer patients, minimizing exposure to endocrine disruptors, could be a key point in the overall management of this disease. PMID:28389628

  19. Women with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome are at increased risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlin, Pelle; Windh, Per; Lauritzen, Claes; Emanuelsson, Monica; Grönberg, Henrik; Stenman, Göran

    2007-07-01

    The Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is an autosomal, dominantly inherited craniosynostosis caused by mutations in the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor gene TWIST1. This syndrome has hitherto not been associated with an increased risk of cancer. However, recent studies, using a murine breast tumor model, have shown that Twist may act as a key regulator of metastasis and that the gene is overexpressed in subsets of sporadic human breast cancers. Here, we report a novel association between the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and breast cancer. In 15 Swedish Saethre-Chotzen families, 15 of 29 (52%) women carriers over the age of 25 had developed breast cancer. At least four patients developed breast cancer before 40 years of age, and five between 40 and 50 years of age. The observed cases with breast cancer (n = 15) are significantly higher than expected (n = 0.89), which gives a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 16.80 (95% CI 1.54-32.06). Our finding of a high frequency of breast cancer in women with the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome identifies breast cancer as an important and previously unrecognized symptom characteristic of this syndrome. The results strongly suggest that women carriers of this syndrome would benefit from genetic counseling and enrolment in surveillance programs including yearly mammography. Our results also indicate that the TWIST1 gene may be a novel breast cancer susceptibility gene. Additional studies are, however, necessary to reveal the mechanism by which TWIST1 may predispose to early onset breast cancer in Saethre-Chotzen patients.

  20. Adherence to WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations and metabolic syndrome in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Eleonora; Gargano, Giuliana; Villarini, Anna; Traina, Adele; Johansson, Harriet; Mano, Maria Piera; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Simeoni, Milena; Consolaro, Elena; Mercandino, Angelica; Barbero, Maggiorino; Galasso, Rocco; Bassi, Maria Chiara; Zarcone, Maurizio; Zagallo, Emanuela; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Bellegotti, Manuela; Berrino, Franco; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), conventionally defined by the presence of at least three out of five dismetabolic traits (abdominal obesity, hypertension, low plasma HDL-cholesterol and high plasma glucose and triglycerides), has been associated with both breast cancer (BC) incidence and prognosis. We investigated the association between the prevalence of MetS and a score of adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recommendations for the prevention of cancer in a cross-sectional study of BC patients. The DIet and ANdrogen-5 study (DIANA-5) for the prevention of BC recurrences recruited 2092 early stage BC survivors aged 35-70. At recruitment, all women completed a 24-hour food frequency and physical activity diary on their consumption and activity of the previous day. Using these diaries we created a score of adherence to five relevant WCRF/AICR recommendations. The prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of MetS associated with the number of recommendations met were estimated using a binomial regression model. The adjusted PRs of MetS decreased with increasing number of recommendations met (p adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations is a major determinant of MetS and may have a clinical impact. © 2015 UICC.

  1. The prevalence of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome or hyperandrogenism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Nina Sofie Lillegaard; Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome may be associated with an increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer, but substantial evidence for this remains to be established. We investigated the prevalence of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer in a well characterized group of wome...

  2. Poland's Syndrome Complicated with Breast Cancer: Mammographic, Ultrasonographic, and Computed Tomographic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, J.; Zhang, S.; Shao, C.; Xu, M.; Chen, S.; Lu, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Fan, X.; Tu, J. (Dept. of Radiology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Medical College of Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou City (China))

    2008-05-15

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by unilateral chest wall hypoplasia and ipsilateral hand abnormalities. It has been reported in association with various malignancies and other developmental defects. We report here the case of a 58-year-old woman with Poland's syndrome who developed breast cancer in the ipsilateral normal breast. A review of the literature reveals that two studies of breast carcinoma associated with Poland's syndrome have been reported, but this paper is the first example of a carcinoma occurring in an otherwise normal breast associated with Poland's syndrome

  3. Metabolic syndrome and total cancer mortality in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G; Monahan, Patrick O; Murage, Mwangi J; Zhang, Jianjun

    2017-02-01

    Although metabolic syndrome incidence has substantially increased during the last few decades, it largely remains unclear whether this metabolic disorder is associated with total cancer mortality. The present study was carried out to investigate this important question. A total of 687 cancer deaths were identified from 14,916 participants in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey by linking them to the National Death Index database through December 31, 2006. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for total cancer mortality in relation to metabolic syndrome and its individual components. After adjustment for confounders, a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was associated with 33% elevated total cancer mortality. Compared with individuals without metabolic syndrome, those with 3, 4 and 5 abnormal components had HRs (95% CIs) of 1.28 (1.03-1.59), 1.24 (0.96-1.60), and 1.87 (1.34-2.63), respectively (p-trend = 0.0003). Systolic blood pressure and serum glucose were associated with an increased risk of death from total cancer [HR (95% CI) for highest vs. lowest quartiles: 1.67 (1.19-2.33), p-trend = 0.002 and 1.34 (1.04-1.74), p-trend = 0.003, respectively]. Overall null results were obtained for lung cancer mortality. The effects of metabolic syndrome and its components on non-lung cancer mortality were generally similar to, but somewhat larger than, those for total cancer mortality. Our study is among the first to reveal that metabolic syndrome is associated with increased total cancer mortality.

  4. Colorectal cancer association with metabolic syndrome and its components: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Chiodini, Paolo; Capuano, Annalisa; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Rafaniello, Concetta; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Giugliano, Dario

    2013-12-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the empirical evidence on the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. A systematic literature search of multiple electronic databases was conducted and complemented by cross-referencing to identify studies published before 31 October 2012. Every included study was to report risk estimates with 95 % confidence intervals for the association between metabolic syndrome and colorectal cancer (incidence or mortality). Core items of identified studies were independently extracted by two reviewers, and results were summarized by standard methods of meta-analysis. We identified 17 studies, which reported on 49 data sets with 11,462 cancer cases. Metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in both men (RR: 1.33, 95 % CI 1.18-1.50, and 1.36, 1.25-1.48, respectively) and women (RR: 1.41, 1.18-1.70, and 1.16, 1.03-1.30, respectively). The risk estimates changed little depending on type of study (cohort vs non cohort), populations (US, Europe, Asia), cancer site (colon and rectum), or definition of the syndrome. The risk estimates for any single factor of the syndrome were significant for higher values of BMI/waist (RR: 1.19, 95 % CI 1.10-1.28), dysglycemia (RR: 1.29, 1.11-1.49), and higher blood pressure (RR: 1.09, 1.01-1.18). Dysglycemia and/or higher BMI/waist explained most of the risk associated with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in both sexes. The risk conveyed by the full syndrome is not superior to the sum of its parts.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Increased Breast Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Bhandari; Kelley, George A; Hartley, Tara A.; Rockett, Ian R. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although individual metabolic risk factors are reported to be associated with breast cancer risk, controversy surrounds risk of breast cancer from metabolic syndrome (MS). We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between MS and breast cancer risk in all adult females. Methods. Studies were retrieved by searching four electronic reference databases [PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Science, and ProQu...

  6. Coronary ectasia in a man on breast cancer therapy presenting with acute coronary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist on the association between breast cancer treatments and coronary artery disease anatomy, particularly in males. We describe an unusual case of diffuse coronary ectasia in a man with breast cancer presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A 66-year-old man with breast cancer on paclitaxel, tamoxifen, and carboplatin chemotherapy regimen, presents with new onset chest pain. Electrocardiogram reveals anterolateral ST-segment depressions and elevated troponin I level. Emer...

  7. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  8. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  9. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  10. Vandetanib successfully controls medullary thyroid cancer-related Cushing syndrome in an adolescent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nella, A A; Lodish, M B; Fox, E; Balis, F M; Quezado, M M; Whitcomb, P O; Derdak, J; Kebebew, E; Widemann, B C; Stratakis, C A

    2014-09-01

    Ectopic Cushing syndrome due to ACTH secretion from metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to describe the first case of Cushing syndrome associated with MTC in a pediatric patient and the successful reversal of Cushing syndrome with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (vandetanib) therapy. A 17-year-old Brazilian adolescent presented with metastatic MTC and associated ACTH-dependent ectopic Cushing syndrome in the context of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B. When the patient was treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, rapid decrease in serum cortisol and improvement of clinical symptoms were observed. We describe the first pediatric case of clinical and biochemical improvement of paraneoplastic MTC-related Cushing syndrome after treatment with vandetanib. Vandetanib and possibly other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be a novel beneficial option in patients with neuroendocrine tumor-related ectopic Cushing syndrome.

  11. The Kids Are (Mostly) Alright: Second-Generation Assimilation--Comments on Haller, Portes and Lynch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Richard; Kasinitz, Philip; Waters, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the authors' comments on "Dreams Fulfilled, Dreams Shattered: Determinants of Segmented Assimilation in the Second Generation" by William Haller, Alejandro Portes and Scott M. Lynch. The overall well-being and integration of second-generation immigrant youth constitute an important topic for researchers and policy makers, one…

  12. Lynch, Urry and city marketing: Taking advantage of the city as a built and graphic image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, G-J.

    2009-01-01

    City marketing is usually addressed from the perspective of marketing theory. This article follows an alternative approach by exploring city marketing from the viewpoint of urban planning and the sociology of tourism. In his classic ‘The Image of the City’ (1960), planner Kevin Lynch found that peop

  13. Challenges in the identification of MSH6-associated colorectal cancer: rectal location, less typical histology, and a subset with retained mismatch repair function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    Identification of Lynch syndrome tumors is challenging. This relates particularly to MSH6-associated cases, which show reduced penetrance of colorectal cancer and a higher age at diagnosis. We recorded the clinical and morphologic features of 52 MSH6-associated colorectal cancers in comparison...... with MLH1/MSH2-mutant tumors and sporadic mismatch repair-deficient cancers. In the MSH6 subset, we confirmed a higher age (median, 56 y) at diagnosis and found a significantly larger proportion (25%) of rectal cancers. Presence of dirty necrosis was the sole histologic component that significantly...... differed between MSH6 and MLH1/MSH2 tumors. Compared with the sporadic mismatch repair-defective cohort, MSH6 cases had a lower prevalence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and Crohn-like reactions. Mismatch repair defects were identified in 92% of MSH6 tumors, with high concordance between microsatellite...

  14. Challenges in the Identification of MSH6-Associated Colorectal Cancer: Rectal Location, Less Typical Histology, and a Subset With Retained Mismatch Repair Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise Laurberg; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    2011-01-01

    Identification of Lynch syndrome tumors is challenging. This relates particularly to MSH6-associated cases, which show reduced penetrance of colorectal cancer and a higher age at diagnosis. We recorded the clinical and morphologic features of 52 MSH6-associated colorectal cancers in comparison...... with MLH1/MSH2-mutant tumors and sporadic mismatch repair-deficient cancers. In the MSH6 subset, we confirmed a higher age (median, 56 y) at diagnosis and found a significantly larger proportion (25%) of rectal cancers. Presence of dirty necrosis was the sole histologic component that significantly...... differed between MSH6 and MLH1/MSH2 tumors. Compared with the sporadic mismatch repair-defective cohort, MSH6 cases had a lower prevalence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and Crohn-like reactions. Mismatch repair defects were identified in 92% of MSH6 tumors, with high concordance between microsatellite...

  15. The post-perspectival: screens and time in David Lynch's Inland Empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Jerslev

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking Anne Friedberg's notion of the post-perspectival as the point of departure for her analysis of David Lynch's digitally shot and edited Inland Empire from 2006, Anne Jerslev argues that the film deconstructs continuous time and coherent space by constructing multiple planes of representation, multiple layerings of screens and, hence, multiple and fractured modes of perception. The article further suggests that the film's enigmatic structure might best be understood with reference to a new media genre like the website with its hyperlink structure. Finally, the article discusses how a sense of ubiquitous surveillance coalesces with the screen logic.Author Biography Anne Jerslev (PhD is Professor of Film and Media Studies at the Department of Media, Cognition and Communication, University of Copenhagen. Anne Jerslev has published and edited books in Danish and English and published dozens of articles in journals and anthologies in Danish, Scandinavian languages, German and English. Her first book was titled David Lynch i vore øjne (David Lynch in our eyes (1991; it was published in German in 1995 under the title David Lynch—mentale Landschaften. After the Lynch book she published books about cult movies, youth and media and media and intimacy. She has edited two volumes in English, Realism and Reality in Film and Media (2002, where she contributed a piece about Lars von Trier's The Idiots, and Performative Realism (co-edited with Rune Gade (2005. Her latest edited volume (co-edited with Christa Lykke Christensen is Hvor går grænsen? Brudflader i den moderne mediekultur [Are there no limits? The crossing of boundaries in contemporary media culture] (Copenhagen 2010. She is currently editing a volume about “Impure Cinema” together with professor Lúcia Nagib from the University of Leeds, which will appear in 2013. Her own contribution to the book is an article about David Lynch's Interview Project.

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froggatt, N.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)]|[Addenbrooke`s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Koch, D.J.; Barton, D.E. [Addenbrooke`s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HNPCC is estimated to account for 5-10% of all cases of colorectal cancer. Recently genes for HNPCC have been mapped to chromosomes 2p and 3p and candidate genes (hMSH2 and hMLH1) have been identified. We have investigated the molecular pathology of HNPCC by linkage analysis and direct mutation analysis. 14 HNPCC families were investigated for linkage to hMSH2 and hMLH1 with microsatellite markers at D2S119, D2S123, D2S136, D2S391, D2S378 and D3S1007, D3S1029, D3S1076, D3S1298, D3S1611, respectively. Overall the only significant linkage was obtained with D2S123 (Zmax=3.77 at {theta}=0.0), but locus heterogeneity was confirmed: linkage to hMSH2 and hMLH1 was excluded in 6 and 5 families, respectively. 3 families were uniformative for linkage/exclusion to either candidate gene, but no evidence for a third HNPCC locus could be detected. There was no correlation between clinical phenotype (Lynch type I or II) and the results of linkage analysis. No individual family gave a lod score of >3 with any marker, and only a minority of our HNPCC families have been suitable for genetic linkage analysis. We therefore screened affected individuals from 37 unrelated kindreds for mutations in hMSH2 and exons 3 and 4 of the APC gene. Mutation screening was performed using exon specific primers and SSCP analysis. No abnormalities were found in the APC exons suggesting that mutations in these APC 5{prime} exons are not a common cause of HNPCC. hMSH2 screening is continuing, and one missense mutation in a highly conserved codon 322 in exon 6 has been identified.

  17. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with esophageal and gastric cancers: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Sohei; Takayama, Tomoyoshi; Wakatsuki, Kohei; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Migita, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome (CCS) is a rare non-inherited gastrointestinal polyposis syndrome with characteristic ectodermal changes. We report an extremely unusual case of CCS associated with primary esophageal and gastric cancers. A 74-year-old Japanese man with symptoms of anorexia and diarrhea was found to have primary esophageal and gastric cancers, as well as multiple gastric and colonic polyps. Based on the physical findings of onychodystrophy and alopecia, we diagnosed CCS. Because of his age and nutritional status, we decided to perform total gastrectomy for gastric cancer and chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer, upon completion of which the patient was started on steroid therapy for the CCS. After 1 week of steroid therapy, the patient's watery diarrhea improved. We recommend that for patients with CCS, the therapeutic strategy be carefully considered based on the patient's nutritional status, the severity of the CCS, and the extent of gastrointestinal cancer.

  18. Gastric cancer occurring in a patient with Plummer-Vinson syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Han; Kim, Min-Chan; Jung, Ghap-Joong

    2005-11-28

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (sideropenic dysphagia) is characterized by dysphagia due to an upper esophageal or hypopharyngeal web in patients with chronic iron deficiency anemia. The main cause of dysphagia is the presence of the web in the cervical esophagus, and abnormal motility of the pharynx or esophagus is also found to play a significant role in this condition. This syndrome is thought to be precancerous because squamous cell carcinoma of hypopharynx, oral cavity or esophagus takes place in 10% of those patients suffering from this malady, but it is even more unusual that Plummer-Vinson syndrome should be accompanied by gastric cancer. We have reported here a case of a 43-year-old woman with Plummer-Vinson syndrome who developed stomach cancer and recovered after a radical total gastrectomy with D2 nodal dissection.

  19. Gastric cancer occurring in a patient with Plummer-Vinson syndrome: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ki-Han Kim; Min-Chan Kim; Ghap-Joong Jung

    2005-01-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (sideropenic dysphagia) is characterized by dysphagia due to an upper esophageal or hypopharyngeal web in patients with chronic iron deficiency anemia. The main cause of dysphagia is the presence of the web in the cervical esophagus,and abnormal motility of the pharynx or esophagus is also found to play a significant role in this condition.This syndrome is thought to be precancerous because squamous cell carcinoma of hypopharynx, oral cavity or esophagus takes place in 10% of those patients suffering from this malady, but it is even more unusual that Plummer-Vinson syndrome should be accompanied by gastric cancer. We have reported here a case of a43-year-old woman with Plummer-Vinson syndrome who developed stomach cancer and recovered after a radical total gastrectomy with D2 nodal dissection.

  20. Genetics of Endometrial Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Okuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancers exhibit a different mechanism of tumorigenesis and progression depending on histopathological and clinical types. The most frequently altered gene in estrogen-dependent endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors is PTEN. Microsatellite instability is another important genetic event in this type of tumor. In contrast, p53 mutations or Her2/neu overexpression are more frequent in non-endometrioid tumors. On the other hand, it is possible that the clear cell type may arise from a unique pathway which appears similar to the ovarian clear cell carcinoma. K-ras mutations are detected in approximately 15%–30% of endometrioid carcinomas, are unrelated to the existence of endometrial hyperplasia. A β-catenin mutation was detected in about 20% of endometrioid carcinomas, but is rare in serous carcinoma. Telomere shortening is another important type of genomic instability observed in endometrial cancer. Only non-endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors were significantly associated with critical telomere shortening in the adjacent morphologically normal epithelium. Lynch syndrome, which is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of cancer susceptibility and is characterized by a MSH2/MSH6 protein complex deficiency, is associated with the development of non-endometrioid carcinomas.

  1. Reproductive hormones and metabolic syndrome in 24 testicular cancer survivors and their biological brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A; Lauritsen, J; Kier, M G G; Mortensen, M S; Oturai, P S; Mortensen, J; Hojman, P; Helge, J W; Daugaard, G

    2017-07-01

    Testicular cancer survivors have impaired gonadal function and increased risk of metabolic syndrome when compared to healthy controls. However, because of the fetal etiology of testicular cancer, familial unrelated healthy men might not be an optimal control group. The objective of this study was to clarify if testicular cancer survivors have impaired gonadal function and increased risk of metabolic syndrome when compared to their biological brothers. A cross-sectional study of testicular cancer survivors (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02240966) was conducted between 2014 and 2016. Of 158 testicular cancer survivors included, 24 had a biological brother who accepted to participate in the study. Serum levels of reproductive hormones and prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to International Diabetes Federation Criteria and National Cholesterol Education Program (Adult Treatment Panel III) criteria comprised the main outcome measures of the study. Median age was similar in testicular cancer survivors and their biological brothers [44 years (IQR 39-50) vs. 46 (40-53) years respectively (p = 0.1)]. In testicular cancer survivors, follow-up since treatment was 12 years (7-19). Serum levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone were elevated (p ≤ 0.001), while total testosterone, free testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone were lower (p ≤ 0.001) in testicular cancer survivors than in their biological brothers. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was similar and apart from HDL-cholesterol, which was lower in testicular cancer survivors (p = 0.01); there were no differences in the individual components of the metabolic syndrome between testicular cancer survivors and their brothers. In conclusion, gonadal function was impaired in testicular cancer survivors, while we did not detect any difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between testicular cancer survivors and their biological brothers. © 2017 American

  2. Symposium introduction: metabolic syndrome and the onset of cancer1, 2, 3, 4

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jin-Rong; Blackburn, George L.; Walker, W. Allan

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders are among the most pressing of today’s health care concerns. Recent evidence from epidemiologic and basic research studies, as well as translational, clinical, and intervention studies, supports the emerging hypothesis that metabolic syndrome may be an important etiologic factor for the onset of cancer. On March 15–16, 2006, The Harvard Medical School Division of Nutrition hosted the symposium “Metabolic Syndrome and the Onset of Cancer” as a...

  3. Metabolic syndrome: a novel high-risk state for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Kousuke; Mutoh, Michihiro; Totsuka, Yukari; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2013-06-28

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and related disorders, including cancer, are steadily increasing in most countries of the world. However, mechanisms underlying the link between MS and colon carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In this review article we focus on the relationships between various individual associated conditions (obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus type 2 and hypertension) and colon cancer development, and demonstrate probable related factors revealed by in vivo and in vitro studies. Furthermore, molecules suggested to be involved in cancer promotion are addressed, and the potential for cancer prevention by targeting these molecules is discussed.

  4. Current and future care of patients with the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Many important advances have occurred in the field of cancer cachexia over the past decade, including progress in understanding the mechanisms of the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) and the development of promising pharmacologic and supportive care interventions. However, no approved agents for cancer cachexia currently exist, emphasizing the unmet need for an effective pharmacologic therapy. This article reviews the key elements of CACS assessment in daily practice, the contribution of nutritional impact symptoms (NIS), the evidence for current pharmacologic options, and promising anticachexia agents in perclinical and clinical trials. It also proposes a model for multimodality therapy and highlights issues pertinent to CACS in patients with pancreatic, gastric, and esophageal cancer.

  5. Gibraltar Experiment CTD data report, USNS Lynch, 1986-03-26 to 1986-04-19 (NODC Accession 8800167)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, ocean circulation, and chemical data were collected using CTD casts from the USNS LYNCH in the Gulf of Cadiz, Alboran Sea, and Strait of...

  6. Polycystic ovary syndrome and risk of endometrial cancer: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmak, Aytekin; Kokanali, Mahmut Kuntay; Guzel, Ali Irfan; Kara, Aydan; Topcu, Hasan Onur; Cavkaytar, Sabri

    2014-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common endocrinological disorder of reproductive age women with a prevalence of 5 to 8 %. The most common diagnostic criteria used for polycystic ovary syndrome are oligo- or an-ovulation, clinical and/ or biochemical signs of hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovaries. Hyperandrogenism results in increased estrogen levels and lack of cyclic progesterone due to anovulation and persistent stimulation of the endometrium may lead to endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma development. In this mini review, we aimed to evaluate the possible relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer.

  7. Pharmacologic therapy for the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome: A data-driven, practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Aminah

    2006-01-01

    The cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome occurs in over 80% of patients with incurable cancer and is associated with a poor prognosis and negative effects on quality of life. Educating patients and families plays an important role in its management, and caregivers sometimes forget that in select patients who are candidates for it, antineoplastic therapy can occasionally reverse some aspects of this syndrome. Patients may also benefit from appetite stimulants such as corticosteroids and progestational agents,and this review summarizes the benefits of using these agents as well as their contraindications.

  8. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a patient with Klinefelter’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H M R Hoque

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available H M R Hoque, A Kothari, H Hamed, I S FentimanHedley Atkins Breast Unit, Guys’ Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Synchronous bilateral male breast cancer (MBC is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The majority of MBC patients have no definable risk factors. We describe a case with Klinefelter’s syndrome, prior thymic irradiation, testicular surgery, and first degree family history in a 61-year-old male.Keywords: male breast cancer, Klinefelter’s syndrome, bilateral, risk factors

  9. Metastatic gastric cancer presenting with shoulder-hand syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massarotti Marco

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Shoulder-hand syndrome is a relatively rare clinical entity classified as a complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and consisting essentially of a painful 'frozen shoulder' with disability, swelling, vasomotor or dystrophic changes in the homolateral hand. The pathophysiology is not completely clear but a predominant 'sympathetic' factor affecting the neural and vascular supply to the affected parts seems to be involved. Shoulder-hand syndrome has been related to many surgical, orthopedic, neurological and medical conditions; it is more often seen after myocardial infarction, hemiplegia and painful conditions of neck and shoulder, such as trauma, tumors, cervical discogenic or intraforaminal diseases and shoulder calcific tendinopathy, but has also been associated with herpetic infections, brain and lung tumors, thoracoplasty and drugs including phenobarbitone and isoniazid. The diagnosis of shoulder-hand syndrome is primarily clinical, but imaging studies, particularly bone scintigraphy, may be useful to exclude other disorders. Case presentation We report the case of a 67-year-old woman who presented with shoulder-hand syndrome as the initial manifestation of gastric cancer which had metastasized to bone. Conclusion Wider investigations are advisable in patients with atypical shoulder-hand syndrome. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first case of shoulder-hand syndrome associated with metastatic gastric cancer.

  10. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Request Permissions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 12/2015 What is juvenile polyposis syndrome? Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a ...

  11. Completeness of pedigree and family cancer history for ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yedong; Lim, Myong Cheol; Seo, Sang Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Park, Sang Yoon

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the completeness of pedigree and of number of pedigree analysis to know the acceptable familial history in Korean women with ovarian cancer. Interview was conducted in 50 ovarian cancer patients for obtaining familial history three times over the 6 weeks. The completeness of pedigree is estimated in terms of familial history of disease (cancer), health status (health living, disease and death), and onset age of disease and death. The completion of pedigree was 79.3, 85.1, and 85.6% at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd time of interview and the time for pedigree analysis was 34.3, 10.8, and 3.1 minutes, respectively. The factors limiting pedigree analysis were as follows: out of contact with their relatives (38%), no living ancestors who know the family history (34%), dispersed family member because of the Korean War (16%), unknown cause of death (12%), reluctance to ask medical history of relatives (10%), and concealing their ovarian cancer (10%). The percentage of cancers revealed in 1st (2%) and 2nd degree (8%) relatives were increasing through surveys, especially colorectal cancer related with Lynch syndrome (4%). Analysis of pedigree at least two times is acceptable in Korean woman with ovarian cancer from the first study. The completion of pedigree is increasing, while time to take family history is decreasing during three time survey.

  12. Laugier-hunziker syndrome in a patient with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondratsch, Hannes; Feldmann, Robert; Steiner, Andreas; Breier, Friedrich

    2012-05-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare acquired disorder characterized by macular hyperpigmentation of the oral and occasionally genital mucosa as well as longitudinal melanonychia. It is considered a benign condition without systemic manifestation or malignant potential. We report on a woman who concomitantly developed Laugier-Hunziker syndrome and a carcinoma of the pancreas.

  13. A retrospective review of the metabolic syndrome in women diagnosed with breast cancer and correlation with estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Sarah V; Douglas Case, L; Lawrence, Julia A

    2012-01-01

    Women diagnosed with obesity and breast cancer have an increased risk of recurrence and death (Protani et al., Breast Cancer Res Treat 123:627-635, 1). Obesity is associated with the metabolic syndrome--a pathophysiologically distinct inflammatory process comprised of central obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and atherogenic dyslipidemia. The relationship of obesity as a risk factor for breast cancer is complex with a protective effect for younger women in contrast to a risk for older women (Kabat et al., Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 18:2046-2053, 2; Ursin et al., Epidemiology 6:137-141, 3). The metabolic syndrome has been associated with the risk of cancer, and pro-inflammatory circulating factors may be associated with risk of more aggressive breast cancer (Capasso et al., Cancer Biol Ther 10:1240-1243, 4; Healy et al., Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) 22:281-288, 5; Laukkanen et al., Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 13:1646-1650, 6). We conducted a retrospective review of 860 breast cancer patients to determine the relationship between estrogen receptor status and the metabolic syndrome. We collected the relevant metabolic diagnoses, medications, physical findings, and laboratory values and adapted the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria to define the metabolic syndrome retrospectively. No relationship was found between estrogen receptor status and the individual components of the metabolic syndrome. Based on findings in the medical records, 15% of the women with breast cancer had the metabolic syndrome, and 26% of the women were considered obese, 16% hyperglycemic, 54% hypertensive, and 30% dyslipidemic. The metabolic syndrome was associated with advanced age and African-American race (P metabolic syndrome was marginally associated with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (P = 0.054). Our findings do not support the concern that the metabolic syndrome may contribute to more biologically aggressive breast cancer.

  14. Weight Gain, Metabolic Syndrome, and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are Dietary Recommendations Supported by the Data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin E. Champ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, which can include weight gain and central obesity, elevated serum insulin and glucose, and insulin resistance, has been strongly associated with breast cancer recurrence and worse outcomes after treatment. Epidemiologic and prospective data do not show conclusive evidence as to which dietary factors may be responsible for these results. Current strategies employ low-fat diets which emphasize supplementing calories with increased intake of fruit, grain, and vegetable carbohydrate sources. Although results thus far have been inconclusive, recent randomized trials employing markedly different dietary strategies in noncancer patients may hold the key to reducing multiple risk factors in metabolic syndrome simultaneously which may prove to increase the long-term outcome of breast cancer patients and decrease recurrences. Since weight gain after breast cancer treatment confers a poor prognosis and may increase recurrence rates, large-scale randomized trials are needed to evaluate appropriate dietary interventions for our breast cancer patients.

  15. Differential diagnosis of small bowel occlusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ghiringhelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, and microsatellite instability (MSI. Patients with Lynch syndrome have a markedly increased risk of colorectal cancer. We report a case of a 28-year-old male with Lynch syndrome; the case allows to describe clinical manifestations and diagnostic criteria of this syndrome, and to underline the importance of genetics in the diagnosis of this disease.

  16. Unusual cause of ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone: Cushing syndrome attributable to small cell prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaikh, Omalkhaire M; Al-Mahfouz, Abdulraof A; Al-Hindi, Hindi; Mahfouz, Ali Bin; Alzahrani, Ali S

    2010-01-01

    To report a rare cause of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion leading to severe Cushing syndrome. We describe the clinical presentation and management of a case of Cushing syndrome attributable to ectopic ACTH secretion from small cell cancer of the prostate. In a 70-year-old man with hypertension and diabetes, congestive heart failure developed. He was found to have severe hypokalemia (serum potassium, 1.7 mEq/L) and a huge pelvic mass on a computed tomographic scan performed because of a complaint of urinary retention. Transurethral biopsy of the prostate showed features of small cell prostate cancer. Hormonal evaluation revealed a high urine free cortisol excretion of 6,214.5 microg/d (reference range, 36 to 137), confirming the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. A serum ACTH level was elevated at 316 ng/dL (reference range, 10 to 52). An overnight high-dose (8 mg orally) dexamethasone suppression test was positive (serum cortisol levels were 43.2 and 41 microg/dL before and after suppression, respectively), and magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland disclosed no abnormalities. A prostate biopsy specimen showed small cell prostate cancer with positive staining for ACTH. The tumor was found to be unresectable, and the poor condition of the patient did not allow for bilateral adrenalectomy. He was treated with ketoconazole and metyrapone, which yielded good temporary control of his Cushing syndrome (24-hour urine free cortisol decreased to 55.2 microg/d). He received 1 cycle of chemotherapy (etoposide and cisplatin), but he died 6 months later as a result of sepsis. Small cell prostate cancer is a rare subtype that can be associated with ectopic secretion of ACTH and severe Cushing syndrome. With this subtype of prostate cancer, Cushing syndrome should be considered and appropriately managed.

  17. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a patient with Klinefelter’s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fentiman, Ian

    2009-01-01

    H M R Hoque, A Kothari, H Hamed, I S FentimanHedley Atkins Breast Unit, Guys’ Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Synchronous bilateral male breast cancer (MBC) is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The majority of MBC patients have no definable risk factors. We describe a case with Klinefelter’s syndrome, prior thymic irradiation, testicular surgery, and first degree family history in a 61-year-old male.Keywords: male breast cancer...

  18. Doing Violence, Making Race: Southern Lynching and White Racial Group Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smångs, Mattias

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a theoretical framework of how intergroup violence may figure into the activation and maintenance of group categories, boundaries, and identities, as well as the mediating role played by organizations in such processes. The framework's analytical advantages are demonstrated in an application to southern lynchings. Findings from event- and community-level analyses suggest that "public" lynchings, carried out by larger mobs with ceremonial violence, but not "private" ones, perpetrated by smaller bands without public or ceremonial violence, fed off and into the racial group boundaries, categories, and identities promoted by the southern Democratic Party at the turn of the 20th century and on which the emerging Jim Crow system rested. Highlighting that racialized inequalities cannot be properly understood apart from collective processes of racial group boundary and identity making, the article offers clues to the mechanisms by which past racial domination influences contemporary race relations.

  19. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommering, Charlotte J; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jonker, Marianne A; Tops, Carli M J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Redeker, Egbert J W; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Moll, Annette C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands. Uptake for retinoblastoma (Rb) was compared with uptake for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC). A questionnaire was completed by all nine DNA-diagnostic laboratories assessing the number of independent mutation-positive families identified from the start of diagnostic testing until May 2013, and the number of PNDs performed for these syndromes within these families. Of 187 families with a known Rb-gene mutation, 22 had performed PND (11.8%), this was significantly higher than uptake for FAP (1.6%) and HBOC (<0.2%). For VHL (6.5%) and LFS (4.9%) the difference was not statistically significant. PND for Rb started 3 years after introduction of diagnostic DNA testing and remained stable over the years. For the other cancer syndromes PND started 10-15 years after the introduction and uptake for PND showed an increase after 2009. We conclude that uptake of PND for Rb was significantly higher than for FAP and HBOC, but not different from VHL and LFS. Early onset, high penetrance, lack of preventive surgery and perceived burden of disease may explain these differences.

  20. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in patients with cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Rahane, Sudhanshu; DeRosa, Antonio P; Ellis, Janet; Nicolson, Stephen E

    2016-04-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in patients with cancer is understudied. Much of what is known-that significant under-recognition and delays in treatment exist-comes from studies of alcohol misuse disorders or non-alcohol-related Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in patients. We investigated the frequency and associated features of cancer-related Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in the published literature. We included 90 articles reporting on 129 patients. Only 38 (30%) of 128 patients with data available exhibited the entire triad of classic features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia or nystagmus. Diagnosis during life was missed altogether in 22 (17%) of 128 patients. The operational diagnostic criteria (at least two of the following: nutritional deficiency, ocular signs, cerebellar signs, and either altered mental status or mild memory impairment), which are considered more reliable than the classical triad, were used in only nine (7%) cases, yet 120 (94%) met the operational criteria for diagnosis at the time of presentation when applied retroactively. Complete recovery was reported in only 47 (36%) cases. Given that oncologists or haematologists accounted for only 17 (19%) first authors among the articles included, it is important that oncologists are aware of the risk factors for cancer-related Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and that they are vigilant about diagnosing and treating the disease especially in the absence of alcohol misuse disorders.

  1. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Lung Cancer: A Rare Case of Malignancy Associated with AA Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueutin, Victor; Langlois, Anne-Lyse; Shehwaro, Nathalie; Elharraqui, Ryme; Rouvier, Philippe; Izzedine, Hassane

    2013-01-01

    Nonhematologic malignancies are rarely reported to be associated with AA amyloidosis. Although the association between renal cell carcinoma and systemic AA amyloidosis has been established, the evidence linking pulmonary cancer to AA amyloidosis is scarce. Here, a case of biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis complicated with nephrotic syndrome associated with lung carcinoma is reported.

  2. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Lung Cancer: A Rare Case of Malignancy Associated with AA Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gueutin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonhematologic malignancies are rarely reported to be associated with AA amyloidosis. Although the association between renal cell carcinoma and systemic AA amyloidosis has been established, the evidence linking pulmonary cancer to AA amyloidosis is scarce. Here, a case of biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis complicated with nephrotic syndrome associated with lung carcinoma is reported.

  3. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We ident...

  4. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a patient with Klinefelter’s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, H M R; Kothari, A.; Hamed, H.; Fentiman, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronous bilateral male breast cancer (MBC) is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The majority of MBC patients have no definable risk factors. We describe a case with Klinefelter’s syndrome, prior thymic irradiation, testicular surgery, and first degree family history in a 61-year-old male.

  5. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment.

  6. [Perspectives of prevention of postoperative neuropathic pain syndrome in cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipova, N A; Petrova, V V; Abuzarova, G R; Edeleva, N V; Belov, A V

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the anesthesiological problems in the prevention and therapy of neuropathic pain syndrome (NPS), including phantom pain syndrome (PPS) at different stages of surgical treatment in a cancer patient. A prospective study has been conducted; a protocol has been elaborated for the management of patients with preoperative chronic pain syndrome and those at a high risk for NPS after cancer operations associated with damage to nerve structures. A clinical case of successful therapy for severe NPS in a female patient after 4 surgical interventions, including exarticulation of the upper limb, is described. The undertaken prevention of NPS and its treatment policy that is based on the current views of the mechanisms responsible for this type of pain and included, in addition to opioid analgesics, different types of antineuropathic agents, including the recent generation anticonvulsant gabapentin (neurontin), are analyzed and investigated in detail.

  7. SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumaru, Katsuhiko; Nagai, Kazuki; Murakami, Takayuki; Andoh, Kazuo

    2010-08-31

    The authors describe a case of SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer. The patient had undergone transurethral resection (TUR) and was treated with BCG immunotherapy following TUR. Two years after treatment for bladder cancer, the patient had palmoplantar pustulosis, and in the past 1 month suffered from pain localised to the anterior chest wall. The bone scintigraphy showed a strong focal enrichment in the right chest wall, suggesting spondyloarthropathy rather than malignant disease. On the basis of clinical and scintigraphy findings, SAPHO syndrome was diagnosed. The patient was treated with topical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and symptoms improved. The authors suggest that SAPHO syndrome might be caused by an association with BCG immunotherapy.

  8. Hemoglobin levels as a component of the paraneoplastic syndrome in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslanagić Selma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some studies indicate that paraneoplastic syndrome may be the first sign of lung cancer and may serve in early detection of cancer. Namely, during the last ten years, an increasing importance is given to hematological paraneoplastic syndrome of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether hemoglobin levels have paraneoplastic nature in patients diagnosed with lung cancer prior to any form of therapy, and to examine its relationships with platelet count. The study included 239 patients with lung cancer who were hospitalized at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases, Clinical Center of Sarajevo, during the period from January 2005 to December 2008, and a control group of 60 healthy persons. The study did not include lung cancer patients with evident hemoptysis and patients who were under chemotherapy and/or were undergoing surgery. The results of our study have shown that the average hemoglobin for each histopathological type of lung cancer was significantly lower than the average hemoglobin in control group, except for large cell carcinoma. Lung cancers are classified according to the TNM classification. There were no significant differences in average hemoglobin between different stage of non small cell lung carcinoma as well as in average hemoglobin between limited and extended stage of small cell lung carcinoma. Our results also showed that there was a significant negative correlation between platelet count and hemoglobin levels. On the basis of our results we concluded that low hemoglobin in patients with lung cancer, with no evident hemoptysis, may have the character of paraneoplastic syndrome.

  9. Hemoglobin levels as a component of the paraneoplastic syndrome in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslanagić Selma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some studies indicate that paraneoplastic syndrome may be the first sign of lung cancer and may serve in early detection of cancer. Namely, during the last ten years, an increasing importance is given to hematological paraneoplastic syndrome of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether hemoglobin levels have paraneoplastic nature in patients diagnosed with lung cancer prior to any form of therapy, and to examine its relationships with platelet count. The study included 239 patients with lung cancer who were hospitalized at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases, Clinical Center of Sarajevo, during the period from January 2005 to December 2008, and a control group of 60 healthy persons. The study did not include lung cancer patients with evident hemoptysis and patients who were under chemotherapy and/or were undergoing surgery. The results of our study have shown that the average hemoglobin for each histopathological type of lung cancer was significantly lower than the average hemoglobin in control group, except for large cell carcinoma. Lung cancers are classified according to the TNM classification. There were no significant differences in average hemoglobin between different stage of non small cell lung carcinoma as well as in average hemoglobin between limited and extended stage of small cell lung carcinoma. Our results also showed that there was a significant negative correlation between platelet count and hemoglobin levels. On the basis of our results we concluded that low hemoglobin in patients with lung cancer, with no evident hemoptysis, may have the character of paraneoplastic syndrome.

  10. Insulin-Sensitizers, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Gynaecological Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretta, Rosa; Lanzolla, Giulia; Vici, Patrizia; Mariani, Luciano; Moretti, Costanzo

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical, early phase clinical trials and epidemiological evidence support the potential role of insulin-sensitizers in cancer prevention and treatment. Insulin-sensitizers improve the metabolic and hormonal profile in PCOS patients and may also act as anticancer agents, especially in cancers associated with hyperinsulinemia and oestrogen dependent cancers. Several lines of evidence support the protection against cancer exerted by dietary inositol, in particular inositol hexaphosphate. Metformin, thiazolidinediones, and myoinositol postreceptor signaling may exhibit direct inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. AMPK, the main molecular target of metformin, is emerging as a target for cancer prevention and treatment. PCOS may be correlated to an increased risk for developing ovarian and endometrial cancer (up to threefold). Several studies have demonstrated an increase in mortality rate from ovarian cancer among overweight/obese PCOS women compared with normal weight women. Long-term use of metformin has been associated with lower rates of ovarian cancer. Considering the evidence supporting a higher risk of gynaecological cancer in PCOS women, we discuss the potential use of insulin-sensitizers as a potential tool for chemoprevention, hypothesizing a possible rationale through which insulin-sensitizers may inhibit tumourigenesis. PMID:27725832

  11. Surgical management of hereditary colorectal cancer: surgery based on molecular analysis and family history Manejo quirúrgico del cáncer colorrectal hereditario: cirugía basadas en el análisis molecular y los antecedentes familiares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Perea

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of colorectal cancer (CRC is increasing. A proportion show a hereditary component, as in Lynch syndrome and Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, and a recently defined entity as well, namely, Familial Colorectal Cancer type X. The high probability to develop CRC in these groups may, at the time of recognition, change surgical management, including its timing or even the surgical technique. In some cases prophylactic surgery can play an important role. The possibility of using tools that allow recognition of the aforementioned syndromes, including microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair system proteins, and especially their mutations, is on the basis of therapeutic strategies that differ from those employed in sporadic CRC cases.

  12. Clinical experience of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiromichiMaeda; TakehrioOkabayashi; KazuhiroHanazaki; MichiyaKobayashi

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome caused by ovarian metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer, which was accompanied by peritoneal dissemination. A 58-year-old female patient presented with massive right pleural effusion, ascites and a huge pelvic mass. Under the diagnosis of an advanced ovarian tumor, bilateral oophorectomy was performed and sigmoidectomy was also carried out after intraoperative diagnosis of peritoneal dissemination involving the sigmoid colon. How- ever, immunohistochemical staining revealed that the ovarian lesions were metastasis from the primary advanced colon cancer. Postoperatively, ascites and pleural effusion subsided, and the diagnosis of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastatic ovarian tumor from colon cancer was determined. The patient is now undergoing a regimen of chemotherapy for colon cancer without recurrence of ascites or hydrothorax 10 mo after the surgery. Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastaticovarian tumor from colon cancer is rare but clinically important because long-term alleviation of symptoms can be achieved by surgical resection. This case report suggests that selected patients, even with peritoneal dissemination, may obtain palliation from surgical resection of metastatic ovarian tumors.

  13. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing intermittent androgen-deprivation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammadali Mohammadzadeh; Rezaei, Mohammadhadi Mohammadzadeh; Ghoreifi, Alireza; Kerigh, Behzad Feyzzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of metabolic syndrome in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), especially intermittent type, has not been completely evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate metabolic syndrome in men with PCa undergoing intermittent ADT. Methods: In this longitudinal study, we studied the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 190 patients who were undergoing intermittent ADT. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All metabolic parameters, including lipid profile, blood glucose, blood pressures, and waist circumferences of the patients were measured six and 12 months after treatment. Results: Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 6.74 years. The incidence of metabolic syndrome after six and 12 months was 6.8% and 14.7%, respectively. Analysis of various components of the metabolic syndrome revealed that patients had significantly higher overall prevalence of hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia in their six- and 12-month followups, but blood pressure has not been changed in the same period except for diastolic blood pressure after six months. Conclusions: Although there was an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving intermittent ADT, it was lower than other studies that treated the same patients with continuous ADT. Also it seems that intermittent ADT has less metabolic complications than continuous ADT and could be used as a safe alternative in patients with advanced and metastatic PCa. PMID:27695584

  14. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defining illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Shahabi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Centers for Disease Control currently report cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal and some head and neck cancers as human papillomavirus (HPV-associated cancers. Only cervical cancer is listed amongst acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS defining illnesses. All of these cancers may represent progression of the immunocompromised state with the inability to eradicate viral infection. This study reports the case of a 27-year old HIV positive female presenting with a persistent right vulvar exophytic lesion. High-risk HPV analysis and immunostaining for P16 were both positive. A biopsy of the lesion revealed invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiation and chemotherapy followed by a radical vulvectomy. During treatment, her CD4 T-lymphocyte count decreased to 120 advancing her condition from HIV to AIDS. This case suggests that all HPV-associated cancers should be included as AIDS defining illnesses.

  15. [Obesity and components of metabolic syndrome in Mexican women survivors of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos Manuel; de la Fuente-Vera, Tania Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that obesity and metabolic syndrome are frequent in cancer survivors. In our country, there is a lack of documentation with regards to this problem in women. Therefore, our aim is to establish the prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome components in surviving Mexican women. We elected women who received treatment for cancer with a surviving = 24 months. The data evaluated were demography, clinical anthropometry, blood pressure measurement, kind of cancer, surviving time, and comorbidities, as well as glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. We studied 107 women. Their average age was 60 ± 10 years, with a surviving time of 77 ± 43 months, and a body mass index of 31 ± 6 kg/m2. Their mean glucose level was 120 ± 58 mg/dL, cholesterol 228 ± 43 mg/dL, and triglycerides 207 ± 120 mg/dL. There were 55 (51 %) with glucose > 99 mg/dL, 85 (79 %) with cholesterol > 199 mg/dL, and 67 (63 %) with triglycerides > 149 mg/dL. Obesity (body mass index = 30 kg/m2) occurred in 49 (46 %) and metabolic syndrome in 27 (26 %). Due to a high prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome components were frequent.

  16. The Quintessence of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Syndrome and Its Distribution among Advanced Cancer Patients with Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wah Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is a common problem in advanced cancer patients; however, specific clinical guidelines on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM syndrome (Zhang are not yet available. In this cross-sectional study, the TCM syndromes distribution and their common symptoms and signs among 225 constipated advanced cancer patients were determined. Results showed that 127 patients (56.4% and 7 patients (3.1% were in deficient and excessive patterns, respectively, while 91 patients (40.4% were in deficiency-excess complex. The distributions of the five syndromes were: Qi deficiency (93.3%, Qi stagnation (40.0%, blood (Yin deficiency (28.9%, Yang deficiency (22.2%, and excess heat (5.8%. Furthermore, age, functional status, and level of blood haemoglobin were factors related to the type of TCM syndrome. A TCM prescription with the functions on replenishing the Deficiency, redirecting the flow of Qi stagnation and moistening the dryness caused by the blood (Yin deficiency can be made for the treatment of advance cancer patients with constipation. Robust trials are urgently needed for further justifying its efficacy and safety in evidence-based approaches.

  17. Hereditary breast cancer associated with Cowden syndrome-related PTEN mutation with Lhermitte-Duclos disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Fuyo; Ueda, Ai; Sato, Eiichi; Akimoto, Jiro; Kaise, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kimito; Hosonaga, Mari; Kawai, Yuko; Teraoka, Saeko; Okazaki, Miki; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Cowden syndrome is characterized by multiple hamartomas in various tissues, including the skin, brain, breast, thyroid, mucous membrane, and gastrointestinal tract, and is reported to increase the risk of malignant disease. We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman in whom a tumor was diagnosed in the left cerebellar hemisphere and treated by surgical resection. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation in exon 8 insertion was found in the brain tumor tissue and leukocytes. This finding supported the diagnosis of Cowden syndrome. She consequently developed endometrial cancer and underwent abdominal total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Four years later, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer was found in the right breast, and breast-conserving surgery with radiation therapy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed. Herein, we describe a patient who was diagnosed as having familial breast cancer associated with PTEN mutation-related Cowden syndrome. We also reviewed reports of this syndrome in the literature for disease appraisal.

  18. Netherton syndrome with multiple non-melanoma skin cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.M. van der Voort (Ella A.); E.P. Prens (Errol)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNetherton syndrome (NS) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis caused by SPINK-5 mutations. The SPINK-5 gene encodes the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI and is located on chromosome 5q32. Unopposed degradation of corneodesmosomes is the basis for a severely impaired skin barrier fu

  19. Cauda Equina Syndrome Secondary to Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis of Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Alkhotani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC is a diffuse or multifocal malignant infiltration of the pia matter and arachnoid membrane. The most commonly reported cancers associated with LMC are breast, lung, and hematological malignancies. Patients with LMC commonly present with multifocal neurological symptoms. We report a case of LMC secondary to gastroesophageal junction cancer present initially with cauda equina syndrome. A 51-year-old male patient with treated adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction presented with left leg pain, mild weakness, and saddle area numbness. Initial radiological examinations were unremarkable. Subsequently, he had worsening of his leg weakness, fecal incontinence, and urine retention. Two days later, he developed rapidly progressive cranial neuropathies including facial diplegia, sensorineural hearing loss, dysarthria, and dysphagia. MRI with and without contrast showed diffuse enhancement of leptomeninges surrounding the brain, spinal cord, and cauda equina extending to the nerve roots. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology was positive for malignant cells. The patient died within 10 days from the second presentation. In cancer patients with cauda equina syndrome and absence of structural lesion on imaging, LMC should be considered. To our knowledge, this is the first case of LMC secondary to gastroesophageal cancer presenting with cauda equina syndrome.

  20. Gastric cancer occurring in a patient with Plummer-Vinson syndrome: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, K; Akiyama, T; Tomita, F; Saitoh, H; Kosaka, T; Kita, I; Takashima, S

    1998-01-01

    We report herein the unusual case of a 59-year-old woman with Plummer-Vinson syndrome who developed gastric cancer. The patient had a longstanding history of dysphagia and iron deficiency anemia, for which she had sporadically taken iron supplements that improved the dysphagia to some extent, but not completely. Owing to her tolerance of the dysphagia, she had not been taking iron supplements for the past 17 years. On admission, she was in fair nutritional condition and not anemic. Blood chemistry results were all normal, including the serum iron level. Gastrointestinal radiographic series demonstrated cervical esophageal webs and advanced gastric cancer. Her dysphagia was successfully treated by endoscopic bougienage through the webs, and a distal partial gastrectomy with nodal dissection was performed. Histology of the resected stomach revealed atrophic mucosal change and, by chance, an adenomatous lesion in addition to adenocarcinoma. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she is now well, without any signs of recurrence. Although Plummer-Vinson syndrome is known to be associated with upper alimentary tract cancers, gastric cancer is extremely rare. A discussion on the etiology of Plummer-Vinson syndrome and its link with potential carcinogenesis follows this case report.

  1. Tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with metastatic colon cancer after treatment with oxaliplatin and 5-Fu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruo-Han Tseng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome in solid tumors is a rare occurrence, with a poor prognosis. We present the case of a patient of recurrent colon cancer who received chemotherapy with FOLFOX regimen (lencovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin with subsequent tumor lysis. We present a recurrent rectal cancer patient suffered from tumor lysis syndrome after salvage FOLFOX regimen. After treat with CVVH with improved conscious status. In this case report, we had review the tumor lysis in solid tumor.

  2. Dietary factors, metabolic syndrome and risks of breast cancer and type II diabetes in the E3N cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Fagherazzi, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer and type II diabetes are two of the main chronic diseases in women and are suspected to share common risk factors. But their etiologies are still partially unknown, in particular concerning some dietary factors and some parameters of the metabolic syndrome. If evidence is convincing that themetabolic syndrome is associated with an increased type II diabetes risk, questions remain unanswered regarding cholesterol level, anthropometric factors and breast cancer risk. The French E3...

  3. The metabolic syndrome and disturbances in hormone levels in long-term survivors of disseminated testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, J; Smit, AJ; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Sluiter, WJ; Hoekstra, HJ; Sleifer, DT; Gietema, JA

    2005-01-01

    Purpose The metabolic syndrome may be an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease in long-term survivors of testicular cancer (TC). We investigated the associations between hormone levels and the metabolic syndrome in these men. Patients and Methods We included TC patients cured by orchidect

  4. Prostate Cancer in a Male with Holt-Oram Syndrome: First Clinical Association of the TBX5 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Noel J; Rangaswamy, Guhan; Thirion, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.

  5. The metabolic syndrome and disturbances in hormone levels in long-term survivors of disseminated testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, J; Smit, AJ; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Sluiter, WJ; Hoekstra, HJ; Sleifer, DT; Gietema, JA

    2005-01-01

    Purpose The metabolic syndrome may be an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease in long-term survivors of testicular cancer (TC). We investigated the associations between hormone levels and the metabolic syndrome in these men. Patients and Methods We included TC patients cured by orchidect

  6. The metabolic syndrome and disturbances in hormone levels in long-term survivors of disseminated testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, J; Smit, AJ; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Sluiter, WJ; Hoekstra, HJ; Sleifer, DT; Gietema, JA

    2005-01-01

    Purpose The metabolic syndrome may be an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease in long-term survivors of testicular cancer (TC). We investigated the associations between hormone levels and the metabolic syndrome in these men. Patients and Methods We included TC patients cured by

  7. Prostate cancer in a male with Holt-Oram syndrome: first clinical association of the TBX5 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aherne, Noel J

    2013-08-05

    Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.

  8. A importância da suspeição clínica no diagnóstico e tratamento do câncer colorretal hereditário The importance of clinical suspicion on the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Valadão

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho relatamos o caso de um paciente portador de síndrome de Lynch (HNPCC que desenvolveu câncer retal metacrônico em curto intervalo de tempo após tratamento do tumor primário (câncer de cólon direito. O objetivo deste relato de caso é salientar a importância da suspeição clínica no diagnóstico de câncer colorretal hereditário e suas implicações terapêuticas.In this article we report the case of a patient with Lynch syndrome (HNPCC who developed metachronic rectal cancer in a short time interval after the primary tumor had been treated (right colon cancer. The objective of this case report is to point out the importance of clinical suspicion in the diagnosis of hereditary colorectal cancer and its therapeutics implications.

  9. Occipital condyle syndrome secondary to bone metastases from rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marruecos, J; Conill, C; Valduvieco, I; Vargas, M; Berenguer, J; Maurel, J

    2008-01-01

    Skull-base metastases are very unfrequent. Occipital condyle syndrome (OCS) is usually underdiagnosed. Until now few cases have been reported in the literature. We present a 71-year-old woman with metastatic rectum adenocarcinoma, with right occipital headache and ipsilateral hypoglossal palsy, diagnosed by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of OCS due to a skull-base metastasis and treated with radiation therapy.

  10. Growth signals, inflammation, and vascular perturbations: mechanistic links between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursting, Stephen D; Hursting, Marcie J

    2012-08-01

    Nearly 35% of adults and 20% of children in the United States are obese, defined as a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2). Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifesting in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This review synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with particular emphasis on obesity-associated enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes. These interrelated pathways represent possible mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-cancer link.

  11. Pathophysiology of anorexia in the cancer cachexia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeoke, Chukwuemeka Charles; Morley, John E

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia is commonly present in persons with cancer and a major component of cancer cachexia. There are multiple causes of anorexia in cancer. Peripherally, these can be due to (i) substances released from or by the tumour, e.g. pro-inflammatory cytokines, lactate, and parathormone-related peptide; (ii) tumours causing dysphagia or altering gut function; (iii) tumours altering nutrients, e.g. zinc deficiency; (iv) tumours causing hypoxia; (v) increased peripheral tryptophan leading to increased central serotonin; or (vi) alterations of release of peripheral hormones that alter feeding, e.g. peptide tyrosine tyrosine and ghrelin. Central effects include depression and pain, decreasing the desire to eat. Within the central nervous system, tumours create multiple alterations in neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and prostaglandins that modulate feeding. Many of these neurotransmitters appear to produce their anorectic effects through the adenosine monophosphate kinase/methylmalonyl coenzyme A/fatty acid system in the hypothalamus. Dynamin is a guanosine triphosphatase that is responsible for internalization of melanocortin 4 receptors and prostaglandin receptors. Dynamin is up-regulated in a mouse model of cancer anorexia. A number of drugs, e.g. megestrol acetate, cannabinoids, and ghrelin agonists, have been shown to have some ability to be orexigenic in cancer patients. PMID:26675762

  12. Prevalence of breast and colorectal cancer in Ashkenazi Jewish carriers of Fanconi anemia and Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N; Kedar, Inbal; Halpern, Gabrielle J; Shohat, Tamy; Magal, Nurit; Ludman, Mark D; Shohat, Mordechai

    2007-12-01

    Fanconi anemia complementation group C and Bloom syndrome, rare autosomal recessive disorders marked by chromosome instability, are especially prevalent in the Ashkenazi* Jewish community. A single predominant mutation for each has been reported in Ahshkenazi Jews: c.711+4A-->T (IVS4 +4 A-->T) in FACC and BLM(Ash) in Bloom syndrome. Individuals affected by either of these syndromes are characterized by susceptibility for developing malignancies, and we questioned whether heterozygote carriers have a similarly increased risk. To estimate the cancer rate among FACC and BLM(Ash) carriers and their families over three previous generations in unselected Ashkenazi Jewish individuals. We studied 42 FACC carriers, 28 BLM(Ash) carriers and 43 controls. The control subjects were Ashkenazi Jews participating in our prenatal genetic screening program who tested negative for FACC and BLM(Ash). All subjects filled out a questionnaire regarding their own and a three-generation family history of cancer. The prevalence rates of cancer among relatives of FACC, BLM(Ash) and controls were computed and compared using the chi-square test. In 463 relatives of FACC carriers, 45 malignancies were reported (9.7%) including 10 breast (2.2%) and 13 colon cancers (2.8%). Among 326 relatives of BLM(Ash) carriers there were 30 malignancies (9.2%) including 7 breast (2.1%) and 4 colon cancers (1.2%). Controls consisted of 503 family members with 63 reported malignancies (12.5%) including 11 breast (2.2%) and 11 colon cancers (2.2%). We found no significantly increased prevalence of malignancies among carriers in at least three generations compared to the controls.

  13. Architects of the genome: CHD dysfunction in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangzhi; Mills, Alea A

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is vital to normal cells, and its deregulation contributes to a spectrum of human ailments. An emerging concept is that aberrant chromatin regulation culminates in gene expression programs that set the stage for the seemingly diverse pathologies of cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes. However, the mechanisms responsible for such common etiology have been elusive. Recent evidence has implicated lesions affecting chromatin-remodeling proteins in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes, suggesting a common source for these different pathologies. Here, we focus on the chromodomain helicase DNA binding chromatin-remodeling family and the recent evidence for its deregulation in diverse pathological conditions, providing a new perspective on the underlying mechanisms and their implications for these prevalent human diseases.

  14. Distress, psychiatric syndromes, and impairment of function in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T; Moore, Caroline P; Collins, E Dale; Kearing, Stephen; Gillock, Karen L; Riggs, Raine L; Clay, Kate F; Ahles, Tim A

    2006-12-15

    Emotional distress and psychiatric syndromes are prevalent in the breast cancer population at large. However, to date there is a paucity of literature specifically concerning presurgical breast cancer patients. The authors assessed 236 newly diagnosed patients at the time of their presurgical consultation at the Comprehensive Breast Cancer Program of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, NH. Of patients in this study, 41% rated their distress in the clinically significant range on the Distress Thermometer (ie, >5, 0-10 scale). Nearly one-half (47%) of patients met established thresholds for positivity on 1 or more screens for distress or psychiatric disorders. Prevalence rates were 11% for major depression (60% of these patients were moderately severe to severely depressed) and were 10% for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emotional symptoms markedly interfered with daily function in both groups. Of depressed patients, 56% were already taking a psychotropic medication, yet they still met screening criteria for major depression. Emotional distress and psychiatric syndromes (major depression and PTSD) were prevalent in this population. Markedly impaired function was evident for both depressed and PTSD patients. Future research should refine current screening procedures and develop interventions to better address emotional distress and psychiatric disorders in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.

  15. [A Case of Pseudo-Meigs Syndrome Associated with Metachronous Ovarian Metastasis from Ascending Colon Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachi, Takafumi; Nishikawa, Shinsuke; Tokura, Tomohisa; Iwama, Masahiro; Akaishi, Takanobu; Umehara, Minoru; Umehara, Yutaka; Murata, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kenichi; Morita, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    We experienced a case of pseudo-Meigs syndrome associated with metachronous metastasis to the ovary from ascending colon cancer. A 65-year-old woman underwent curative surgery for ascending colon cancer at another hospital. A follow-up CT carried out 3 months after the surgery revealed a right ovarian tumor and a large amount of ascites. The patient was diagnosed with ovarian metastasis from ascending colon cancer with carcinomatous peritonitis. Palliative care was recommended, and she presented at our department for a second opinion. In spite of a large amount of ascites and pleural effusion, no disseminating tumor was detected on contrast-enhanced CT at our hospital, and we recommended that she undergo a diagnostic laparotomy. The laparotomy was negative for carcinomatous peritonitis and a right oophorectomy was performed. The histopathological findings indicated that the ovarian tumor was consistent with metastasis from ascending colon cancer. After the surgery, we initiated chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6+bevacizumab and the symptoms were well controlled. A follow-up CT carried out 11 months after the surgery revealed a left ovarian tumor and increased ascites, and the patient underwent a left oophorectomy. Then, chemotherapy with the same regimen was administered for 12 months, and she did not develop any signs of recurrence for 27 months after the surgery. Ovarian metastasis from colon cancer may occasionally cause pseudo-Meigs syndrome, and it is important to be aware of the usefulness of oophorectomy for the control of ascites and pleural effusion.

  16. Paraneoplastic stiff person syndrome: Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes of a rare disease from two cancer rehabilitation programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sean Robinson; Fu, Jack B

    2016-07-18

    Paraneoplastic stiff person syndrome is a rare, but debilitating, manifestation of cancer, characterized by painful extremities, truncal and facial spasms. The resultant functional impairment may necessitate comprehensive rehabilitation and symptom management. This case series describes the acute inpatient rehabilitation courses of 2 patients at different tertiary care referral cancer rehabilitation programmes, including work-up and diagnosis, medical management of symptoms, and functional outcomes. Both patients had a reduction in symptom burden and an improvement in motor function as a result of multidisciplinary acute inpatient rehabilitation.

  17. Cowden syndrome detected by FDG PET/CT in an endometrial cancer patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yun Hee; Lee, Hye Kyung [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Geon [Dept. of Radiology, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon Saint Mary' s Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple hamartomas in various tissues and cancers (breast, thyroid, and endometrium). We report CS of the esophagus and gastrointestinal tract that was incidentally detected by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) at postoperative surveillance in an endometrial cancer patient. PET/CT showed mildly increased FDG uptake along the entire esophagus and stomach. Upper GI endoscopy and histologic examination revealed glycogenic acanthosis of the esophagus and several hundred gastric polyps. In our case, increased FDG uptake of the esophageal wall contributed to the diagnosis of CS.

  18. Endometrial Cancer and Hypermethylation: Regulation of DNA and MicroRNA by Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji Banno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women worldwide. Therefore elucidation of the pathogenesis and development of effective treatment for endometrial cancer are important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic variation and mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, in recent years, epigenetic mechanisms that do not involve changes in DNA sequences have been examined. Studies aimed at detection of aberrant DNA hypermethylation in cancer cells present in microscopic amounts in vivo and application of the results to cancer diagnosis have also started. Breakdown of the DNA mismatch repair mechanism is thought to play a large role in the development of endometrial cancer, with changes in the expression of the hMLH1 gene being particularly important. Silencing of genes such as APC and CHFR, Sprouty 2, RASSF1A, GPR54, CDH1, and RSK4 by DNA hypermethylation, onset of Lynch syndrome due to hereditary epimutation of hMLH1 and hMSH2 mismatch repair genes, and regulation of gene expression by microRNAs may also underlie the carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial cancer. Further understanding of these issues may permit development of new therapies.

  19. Cancer risk in patients with manifest vascular disease: effects of smoking, obesity, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kruijsdijk, Rob C M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Peeters, Petra H M; Visseren, Frank L J

    2013-07-01

    Patients with vascular disease may be at increased risk of cancer because of shared risk factors and common pathogenesis. Patients with vascular disease (n = 6,172) were prospectively followed for cancer incidence. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence of the study population with that of the general population. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio's (HRs) of cancer were estimated for smoking status, pack-years, body mass index, waist circumference and visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and metabolic syndrome (MetS). During a median follow-up of 5.5 years, 563 patients were diagnosed with cancer. Patients with vascular disease were at increased risk of cancer [SIR = 1.19; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-1.29]. Specifically, risk of lung cancer (SIR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.31-1.83), as well as bladder cancer (SIR = 1.60; 95% CI, 1.11-2.24) and cancer of the lip, oral cavity, or pharynx in men (SIR = 1.51; 95% CI, 0.89-2.39), and colorectal (SIR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.11-2.53) and kidney cancer (SIR = 2.92; 95% CI, 1.05-6.38) in women was increased. A relation between smoking and cancer risk was observed (HR for current smokers = 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05-1.73), whereas an increase in VAT was associated with higher breast cancer risk in women (HR = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03-1.96). No relation between MetS and cancer risk was found. Patients with vascular disease have a 19% higher cancer risk compared to the general population. Smoking increased cancer risk and abdominal obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer in female patients with vascular disease. These results call for awareness of the increased cancer risk in patients with vascular disease among physicians and underline the necessity of lifestyle improvement not only for reducing cardiovascular risk.

  20. Rapidly Developed Multiple Face and Neck Skin Cancers in a Patient with Sjögren’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Lean San; Lai, Ji-Ching; Lian, Je Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Skin cancer Symptoms: Skin Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic, systemic disorder of an autoimmune nature, and its primary etiopathogenetic events are not known. Previous studies have found elevated incidence of malignancies in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome. However, there are few reports regarding the association of Sjögren’s syndrome with skin cancers, especially with multiple skin cancers developed within a short time. Case Report: We reported an unusual case of a patient with primary Sjögren’s syndrome who suffered from rapidly developed facial and neck skin cancers within two years. Conclusions: Sjögren’s syndrome associated with skin cancer is rare. Our case report suggests that Sjögren’s syndrome patients require continuous follow-up with conventional cancer examination, including skin biopsy for suspected skin lesions. PMID:28373638

  1. The effectiveness of b-lynch sutures in management of atonic postpartum haemorrhage during caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Kalkal

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This procedure proves to be a valuable addition for surgical treatment of atonic PPH and great advantage in young patients with restoration of future fertility with the added advantage of lesser time of application, lesser blood loss, lesser blood transfusion, lesser skill required. Thus, B-Lynch suturing can be adopted as a mid-step before resorting to uterine devascularisation or hysterectomy when medical line of management fails. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(9.000: 2915-2920

  2. Metformin in the treatment of breast cancer among patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Lyubota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is one of the most common cancer among women worldwide. In 2005, the International Diabetes Federation (International Diabetes Federation declared metabolic syndrome is one of the main problems of modern medicine, as it increases the total mortality and the prevalence has reached pandemic levels. Several studies have shown that the metabolic disorders associated with metabolic syndrome, affect the carcinogenesis of BC. Improving the efficiency of chemotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes taking biguanides compared with patients who used other hypoglycemic agents, it has become a premise for the study of the possible antitumor mechanism of action of metformin. Therefore, adequate correction of metabolic disturbances caused by metabolic syndrome may be an additional area of special treatment, as well as a measure of primary and secondary prevention of BC. Improving the efficiency of tumor therapy in patientswith type 2 diabetes taking biguanides compared with patients who used other hypoglycemic agents, it has become a prerequisite for the study of the possible antitumor mechanism of action of metformin. This paper presents the results of studying the effect of metformin on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant systemic therapy for BC patients with the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Acute Cavernous Sinus Syndrome from Metastasis of Lung Cancer to Sphenoid Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Zelenak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavernous sinus syndrome is a rare entity in oncology reported only in occasional case reports. Optimal therapy is thus poorly defined with rapidly progressive disease dominating the picture. Management includes prompt diagnosis, attempts at stabilization of cranial nerve function, and aggressive control of central pain syndrome. Here, we report cavernous sinus syndrome secondary to the original squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. With common presenting causes of this syndrome being infection, thrombosis or tumor, it might seem that metastatic tumor would be expected in a patient with a cancer diagnosis. What was not so expected was the extremely rapid progression from mild headache and mild trigeminal neuralgia with negative-contrast head CT to a massive, destructive lesion involving several skull bones and skull base, only 3 weeks later. In addition, the patient was severely immunosuppressed at the completion of induction chemotherapy. Infectious processes, although unlikely, were considered, as aggressive cancer therapy (including high-dose steroids and radiation therapy had no impact on this disease. Despite accurate localization, the aggressive nature of this disease with massive bone destruction and dural thickening limited any chance of a durable control. We discuss the process of evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of symptoms and the importance of a team approach to best palliate these unfortunate patients.

  4. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman H Suleiman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions-deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions-deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6. NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins.

  5. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Suleiman H; Koko, Mahmoud E; Nasir, Wafaa H; Elfateh, Ommnyiah; Elgizouli, Ubai K; Abdallah, Mohammed O E; Alfarouk, Khalid O; Hussain, Ayman; Faisal, Shima; Ibrahim, Fathelrahamn M A; Romano, Maurizio; Sultan, Ali; Banks, Lawrence; Newport, Melanie; Baralle, Francesco; Elhassan, Ahmed M; Mohamed, Hiba S; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions-deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions-deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6). NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins.

  6. Recognition and management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes Identificación y tratamiento de los síndromes de cáncer colorrectal hereditario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herráiz

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Over 1.900 colorectal tumors will arise in association with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome in Spain in 2009. The genetic defects responsible for the most common syndromes have been discovered in recent years. Genetic testing helps diagnose affected individuals and allows identification of individuals at-risk. Colonoscopy and prophylactic colectomy decrease colorectal cancer incidence and overall mortality in patients with hereditary colon cancer. Extracolonic tumors are frequent in these syndromes, so specific surveillance strategies should be offered.

  7. Axillary web syndrome following sentinel node biopsy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves Maldonado, S M; Pubul Núñez, V; Argibay Vázquez, S; Macías Cortiñas, M; Ruibal Morell, Á

    2016-01-01

    A 49 year-old woman diagnosed with infiltrating lobular breast carcinoma, underwent a right mastectomy and sentinel node biopsy (SLNB). The resected sentinel lymph nodes were negative for malignancy, with an axillary lymphadenectomy not being performed. In the early post-operative period, the patient reported an axillary skin tension sensation, associated with a painful palpable cord. These are typical manifestations of axillary web syndrome (AWS), a poorly known axillary surgery complication, from both invasive and conservative interventions. By presenting this case we want to focus the attention on a pathological condition, for which its incidence may be underestimated by not including it in SLNB studies. It is important for nuclear medicine physicians to be aware of AWS as a more common complication than infection, seroma, or lymphoedema, and to discuss this possible event with the patient who is consenting to the procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. An {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer study of the ordinary chondrite meteorite Lynch 001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elewa, Nancy N., E-mail: nancy.elewa@student.unsw.edu.au; Cadogan, J. M. [The University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy, School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences (Australia)

    2017-11-15

    The Lynch 001 meteorite was found in the Nullarbor Plain region of Western Australia in 1977. This meteorite is classified as an ordinary chondrite of the petrologic group L5/6 that has undergone ‘minor to moderate’ terrestrial weathering. Here, we characterize the Fe-bearing phases in this chondrite using {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy carried out over the temperature range 13 K to room temperature (295 K). The paramagnetic doublets of olivine, pyroxene and a superparamagnetic ferric phase dominate the room temperature Mössbauer spectrum. On the basis of the room temperature quadrupole splitting of the olivine component, we estimate its composition to be Fa {sub 30(5)}. Besides the paramagnetic ferric component, accounting for ∼15 % of the spectral area at room temperature, magnetically ordered ferric phases were also detected. The total relative proportion of the Fe {sup 3+} components allows us to estimate the terrestrial age of Lynch 001 to be 6,500 ± 1,500 yr, consistent with the value of 6,700 ± 1,300 yr determined by {sup 14}C dating.

  9. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of phenotypic heterogeneity and anticipation in Li–Fraumeni cancer predisposition syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ariffin, Hany; Hainaut,Pierre; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Choong, Soo Sin; Chan, Adelyne Sue Li; Tolkunov, Denis; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Kang, Wenfeng; Lim, Leon Li Wen; Krishnan, Shekhar; Chen, Kok-Siong; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Karsa, Mawar; Shamsani, Jannah; Levine, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Germ-line mutation in the tumor suppressor TP53 causes Li–Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a complex predisposition to multiple cancers. Types of cancers and ages at diagnosis vary among subjects and families, with apparent genetic anticipation: i.e., earlier cancer onset with successive generations. It has been proposed that anticipation is caused by accumulation of copy-number variations (CNV) in a context of TP53 haploinsufficiency. Using genome/exome sequencing, we found no evidence of increased ...

  10. Risk of endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, J A; Azizia, M. M.; Hardiman, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition affecting ∼8% of women. The objective of the present study was to quantify separately the risk of endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer and breast cancer in women with PCOS compared with non-PCOS controls, and quantify separately the risk to women of all ages as well as the risk to premenopausal women. METHODS We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Studies were eligible for inclusion if th...

  11. Radiotherapeutic concepts in cancer of unknown primary site; Strahlentherapeutische Konzepte beim CUP-Syndrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, D.; Debus, J.; Sterzing, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The term cancer of unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a group of entities which differ to a great extent regarding etiology, prognosis and therapeutic management. The aim of the study was an elaboration of the role of radiotherapy in CUP syndrome. Systematic literature search and specification of the available treatment options. Radiotherapy is an integral part of interdisciplinary management approaches for patients with CUP in both curative and palliative situations. Radio-oncological techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy increase the therapeutic window. Modern diagnostic modalities from radiology and nuclear medicine are the cornerstone of radiotherapeutic interventions, especially in terms of target volume definition and pretherapeutic staging. In the interdisciplinary setting radiation oncology offers the possibility of curative and often organ preserving approaches in patients with axillary and cervical CUP. In addition, improvement and preservation of quality of life can be achieved in patients with metastatic disease. Radiation oncology is a crucial component of the interdisciplinary management of patients with CUP. Therapeutic decisions in patients with CUP should be made in an interdisciplinary setting. (orig.) [German] Das Cancer-of-unknown-primary(CUP)-Syndrom fasst eine Gruppe von Erkrankungen zusammen, die durch eine ausgepraegte Heterogenitaet hinsichtlich Aetiologie, Therapie und Prognose gepraegt sind. Darstellung der Rolle der Strahlentherapie beim CUP-Syndrom. Systematische Literaturrecherche und Erlaeuterung der Behandlungsoptionen. Die Strahlentherapie ist beim CUP-Syndrom sowohl in adjuvanten und definitiven Therapiekonzepten wie auch in palliativer Intention etabliert. Technisch innovative Verfahren wie die intensitaetsmodulierte Radiotherapie und die stereotaktische Bestrahlung im Koerperstammbereich ermoeglichen eine Vergroesserung der therapeutischen Breite. Eine leistungsfaehige und moderne

  12. Detection of metabolic syndrome features among childhood cancer survivors: A target to prevent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Aparecida Siviero-Miachon

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Aparecida Siviero-Miachon1, Angela Maria Spinola-Castro1, Gil Guerra-Junior21Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of Sao Paulo – UNIFESP/EPM, Brazil; 2Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, State University of Campinas – FCM/UNICAMP, BrazilAbstract: Along with the growing epidemic of obesity, the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease morbidity, and mortality are increasing markedly. Several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension, and dyslipidemia commonly cluster together as a condition currently known as metabolic syndrome. Thus far, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction are the primary events of the metabolic syndrome. Several groups have recommended clinical criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in adults. Nonetheless, in what concerns children and adolescents, there are no unified definitions, and modified adult criteria have been suggested by many authors, despite major problems. Some pediatric disease states are at risk for premature cardiovascular disease, with clinical coronary events occurring very early in adult life. Survivors of specific pediatric cancer groups, particularly acute lymphocytic leukemia, central nervous system tumors, sarcomas, lymphomas, testicular cancer, and following bone marrow transplantation, may develop metabolic syndrome traits due to: hormonal deficiencies (growth hormone deficiency, thyroid dysfunction, and gonadal failure, drug or radiotherapy damage, endothelial impairment, physical inactivity, adipose tissue dysfunction, and/or drug-induced magnesium deficiency. In conclusion, some primary and secondary prevention remarks are proposed in order to reduce premature cardiovascular disease risk in this particular group of patients.Keywords: metabolic syndrome X, cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance, obesity, growth hormone

  13. [Correlation between mismatch repair proteins status and clinicopathological characteristics in sporadic colorectal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z T; Zhang, R X; Zhao, Y; Peng, J H; Lu, S X; Zhang, H Z; Ding, P R; Wu, X J; Lu, Z H; Li, L R; Wan, D S; Pan, Z Z; Chen, G

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To explore the expression of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in sporadic colorectal cancer (SCRC) patients, and its association with clinicopathological characteristics of SCRC. Methods: Patients with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer were consecutively recruited between December 2011 and June 2015 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The exclusion criteria included multiple primary colorectal tumors, hereditary colorectal cancer (including Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis), and the patients without the MMR proteins status tested. A total of 2 684 patients were included. Correlations of MMR proteins status and patients' demographics (including gender, age), tumor characteristics (site and differentiation) and TNM staging (excluding 315 SCRC patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy) were investigated. Results: The percentage of deficient MMR (dMMR) in these SCRC patients was 10.2%, and that of proficient MMR (pMMR) was 89.8%. The dMMR was more likely to be detected in younger (≤59 old years) SCRC patients compared to the elderly (>59 years) [12.7%(179/1 406)vs 7.5%(96/1 278), Pcolon cancer was significantly higher than that in left colon cancer and rectal cancer [22.7%(151/664)vs 7.2%(69/956)vs 5.2%(55/1 064), Pcolon mucinous adenocarcinoma among SCRC.

  14. Improvement of endometrial biopsy over transvaginal ultrasound alone for endometrial surveillance in women with Lynch syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritzen, L.H.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Oei, A.L.M.; Nagengast, F.M.; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Hullu, J.A. de

    2009-01-01

    In women with hereditary non polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) an annual gynaecological surveillance has been recommended because of an increased lifetime risk of developing endometrial and ovarian carcinoma. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of gynaecological surveillance with r

  15. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    , and this right truncation effect is more pronounced in children than in parents. In this study, we first review different statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation in affected parent-child pairs that address the issue of bias due to right truncation. Using affected parent-child pair data, we compare......Anticipation, manifested through decreasing age of onset or increased severity in successive generations, has been noted in several genetic diseases. Statistical methods for genetic anticipation range from a simple use of the paired t-test for age of onset restricted to affected parent-child pairs...... to a recently proposed random effects model which includes extended pedigree data and unaffected family members [Larsen et al., 2009]. A naive use of the paired t-test is biased for the simple reason that age of onset has to be less than the age at ascertainment (interview) for both affected parent and child...

  16. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2011-01-01

    Summary Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenoty...

  17. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    Anticipation, manifested through decreasing age of onset or increased severity in successive generations, has been noted in several genetic diseases. Statistical methods for genetic anticipation range from a simple use of the paired t-test for age of onset restricted to affected parent-child pairs......, and this right truncation effect is more pronounced in children than in parents. In this study, we first review different statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation in affected parent-child pairs that address the issue of bias due to right truncation. Using affected parent-child pair data, we compare...... to a recently proposed random effects model which includes extended pedigree data and unaffected family members [Larsen et al., 2009]. A naive use of the paired t-test is biased for the simple reason that age of onset has to be less than the age at ascertainment (interview) for both affected parent and child...

  18. Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome: Genetic Testing Identifies a Potentially Deadly Hereditary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sequencing can identify variants in a person’s genes—places where their genetic sequence differs from an expected sequence,” says Katie Lewis, a research coordinator at NIH’s National Human Genome ...

  19. Dendritic cell and macrophage infiltration in microsatellite-unstable and microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kathrin; Michel, Sara; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Nelius, Nina; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2011-09-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) is a hallmark of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal cancer (CRC). MSI-H CRC express immunogenic tumour antigens as a consequence of DNA mismatch repair deficiency-induced frameshift mutations. Consequently, frameshift antigen-specific immune responses are commonly observed in patients with Lynch syndrome-associated MSI-H CRC. Dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages play a crucial role in the induction and modulation of immune responses. We here analysed DC and macrophage infiltration in MSI-H and microsatellite-stable CRC. Sixty-nine CRC (MSI-H, n = 33; microsatellite-stable, n = 36) were examined for the density of tumour-infiltrating DC, Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells, and CD163-positive macrophages. In MSI-H lesions, S100-positive and CD163-positive cell counts were significantly higher compared to microsatellite-stable lesions (S100: epithelium P = 0.018, stroma P = 0.042; CD163: epithelium P < 0.001, stroma P = 0.046). Additionally, numbers of CD208-positive mature DC were significantly elevated in the epithelial compartment of MSI-H CRC (P = 0.027). High numbers of tumour-infiltrating Foxp3-positive T cells were detected in tumours showing a low proportion of CD208-positive, mature DC among the total number of S100-positive cells. Our study demonstrates that infiltration with DC, mature DC, and macrophages is elevated in MSI-H compared to microsatellite-stable CRC. The positive correlation of Foxp3-positive Treg cell density with a low proportion of mature DC suggests that impaired DC maturation may contribute to local immune evasion in CRC. Our results demonstrate that DC and macrophages in the tumour environment likely play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in Lynch syndrome. Moreover, impaired DC maturation might contribute to local immune evasion in CRC.

  20. Interaction of Werner and Bloom syndrome genes with p53 in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtenberger, Michael; Frank, Bernd; Hemminki, Kari; Klaes, Rüdiger; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kiechle, Marion; Arnold, Norbert; Weber, Bernhard H F; Niederacher, Dieter; Bartram, Claus R; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2006-08-01

    Mutations of the human RecQ helicase genes WRN and BLM lead to rare autosomal recessive disorders, Werner and Bloom syndromes, which are associated with premature ageing and cancer predisposition. We tested the hypothesis whether three polymorphic, non-conservative amino acid exchanges in WRN and BLM act as low-penetrance familial breast cancer risk factors. Moreover, we examined the putative impact of p53 MspI 1798G>A, which is completely linked to p53PIN3, a 16 bp insertion/duplication that has been associated with reduced p53 expression, on familial breast cancer risk. Genotyping analyses, performed on 816 BRCA1/2 mutation-negative German familial breast cancer patients and 1012 German controls, revealed a significant association of the WRN Cys1367Arg polymorphism with familial breast cancer (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.54) and high-risk familial breast cancer (OR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.06-1.65). The analysis of p53 MspI 1798G>A, which is completely linked to p53PIN3, showed a significantly increased familial breast cancer risk for carriers of the 16 bp insertion/duplication, following a recessive mode (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.12-4.11). WRN Cys1367Arg, located in the C-terminus, the binding site of p53, is predicted to be damaging. The joint effect of WRN Cys1367Arg and p53 MspI resulted in an increased breast cancer risk compared to the single polymorphisms (OR = 3.39, 95% CI 1.19-9.71). In conclusion, our study indicates the importance of inherited variants in the WRN and p53 genes for familial breast cancer susceptibility.

  1. Mechanisms of Anorexia Cancer Cachexia Syndrome and Potential Benefits of Traditional Medicine and Natural Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Hua, Cong; Bao-Hua, Zou; Lei, Yu

    Anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome is prevalent in advanced cancer patients, which is featured by anorexia, decreased dietary intake, body weight loss (skeletal muscle mass loss), and is unable to be reversed by routine nutritional support therapy. Up to now, the main mechanisms involved in cancer cachexia include excessive systemic inflammation, which is represented by increased plasma levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, tumor-induced factors, such as PIF and LMF. These factors eventually act on orexigenic and anorexigenicneurons located in the hypothalamus or protein and lipid metabolism of peripheral tissues, which lead to anorexia, decreased dietary intake, enhanced basic metabolism rate and hypercatabolism. The treatment modality includes early nutritional intervention, physical activity and drug treatment. However, studies about drugs used to treat cachexia are always controversial or merely effective in stimulating appetite and increasing body weight, though not lean body mass. The main target of pharmaceutical treatment is to improve appetite, decrease systemic inflammation and promote anabolic metabolism. Nevertheless, the treatment effectiveness of chemical drugs are not reaching consensus by existing cachexia guidelines. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is recently known as a promising treatment to improve cachaxia status and quality of life of cancer patients. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural herbal medicines have been used in the treatment of cancer for thousands of years worldwide, particularly in China. More and more research show that traditional Hanfang (Chinese medicines) and some natural herbs with less side reactions, have the effects of antagonizing pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancing immune system, inhibiting protein catabolism, boosting the appetite and body weight, which maybe a promising treatment strategy and development tendency for anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome.

  2. [Feeding-related disorders in medicine, with special reference to cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Akio

    2006-10-01

    Cachexia is among the most debilitating and life-threatening aspects of cancer. Associated with anorexia, fat and muscle tissue wasting, psychological distress, and a lower quality of life, cachexia arises from a complex interaction between the cancer and the host. This process results from a failure of the adaptive feeding response seen in simple starvation and includes cytokine production, release of lipid-mobilizing and proteolysis-inducing factors, and alterations in intermediary metabolism. Cytokines play a pivotal role in long-term inhibition of feeding by mimicking the hypothalamic effect of excessive negative feedback signaling from leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, which is an integral component of the homeostatic loop of body weight regulation. The two major options for pharmacological therapy have been either progestational agents or corticosteroids. However, knowledge of the mechanisms of cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome continues to lead to effective therapeutic interventions for several aspects of the syndrome. These include antiserotonergic drugs, gastroprokinetic agents, branched-chain amino acids, eicosapentanoic acid, cannabinoids, melatonin, and thalidomide, all of which act on the feeding-regulatory circuitry to increase appetite and inhibit tumor-derived catabolic factors to antagonize tissue wasting and/or host cytokine release. The outcomes of drug studies in cancer cachexia should focus on the symptomatic and quality-of-life advantages rather than simply on nutritional end points, since the survival of cachexia cancer patients may be limited to weeks or months due to the incurable nature of the underlying malignancy. As weight loss shortens the survival time of cancer patients and decreases their performance status, effective therapy would extend patient survival and improve quality of life.

  3. Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased breast cancer risk: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Ruchi; Kelley, George A; Hartley, Tara A; Rockett, Ian R H

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although individual metabolic risk factors are reported to be associated with breast cancer risk, controversy surrounds risk of breast cancer from metabolic syndrome (MS). We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between MS and breast cancer risk in all adult females. Methods. Studies were retrieved by searching four electronic reference databases [PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Science, and ProQuest through June 30, 2012] and cross-referencing retrieved articles. Eligible for inclusion were longitudinal studies reporting associations between MS and breast cancer risk among females aged 18 years and older. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study and pooled using random-effects models. Publication bias was assessed quantitatively (Trim and Fill) and qualitatively (funnel plots). Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I (2) statistics. Results. Representing nine independent cohorts and 97,277 adult females, eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A modest, positive association was observed between MS and breast cancer risk (RR: 1.47, 95% CI, 1.15-1.87; z = 3.13; p = 0.002; Q = 26.28, p = 0.001; I (2) = 69.55%). No publication bias was observed. Conclusions. MS is associated with increased breast cancer risk in adult women.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Increased Breast Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

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    Ruchi Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although individual metabolic risk factors are reported to be associated with breast cancer risk, controversy surrounds risk of breast cancer from metabolic syndrome (MS. We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between MS and breast cancer risk in all adult females. Methods. Studies were retrieved by searching four electronic reference databases [PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Web of Science, and ProQuest through June 30, 2012] and cross-referencing retrieved articles. Eligible for inclusion were longitudinal studies reporting associations between MS and breast cancer risk among females aged 18 years and older. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study and pooled using random-effects models. Publication bias was assessed quantitatively (Trim and Fill and qualitatively (funnel plots. Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I2 statistics. Results. Representing nine independent cohorts and 97,277 adult females, eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A modest, positive association was observed between MS and breast cancer risk (RR: 1.47, 95% CI, 1.15–1.87; z=3.13; p=0.002; Q=26.28, p=0.001; I2=69.55%. No publication bias was observed. Conclusions. MS is associated with increased breast cancer risk in adult women.

  5. [Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome: phenotypic diversity and association to colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Matilde; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Capellá, Gabriel; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Blanco, Ignacio

    2013-07-21

    Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by hyperplastic polyps (HP) occasionally associated with serrated adenomas (SA) or mixed polyps (MP) and defined by clinical criteria (OMS/Cleveland). HPS is heterogeneous regarding the number and size of polyps, and it is associated with colorectal cáncer (CRC) and a family history. Its genetic basis is unknow. We describe individuals with HPS criteria from a series of families assessed in our Unit of Genetic Advice for colonic polyposis. Our objective is to identify the clinical characteristics of this syndrome. Retrospective study of 197 families with colonic polyposis (1998-2011), identifying patients with HPS criteria. To know the number of polyps, we took into account polypectomies and/or the histologic study of surgical samples. Polyps were classified into adenomas, serrated lesiones (HP and SA) and MP. Genetic studies revealed: microsatellite instability (MSI), MUTYH gene variants (p.Tyr165Cys, p.Gly382Asp and p.Glu396GlyfsX43) and APC gene. Eighteen individuals, with a median age of 51.1 years, had criteria of HPS (11M/7F). Number of HP varied between 14 and 100 coexisting with classical adenomas, SA and MP in 14 individuals (77.8%). Localization of polyps: ascending and descending colon in 13 individuals (72.2%) and only descending colon in 5 (27.8%). A CRC was detected in 10/18 (55.6%) patients, and 3 of them had a double CRC, a family history in 3 patients (16.7%) and a history of HPS in one. IMS was not detected in 8 CRC nor in 3 adenomas studied; we detected 2/13 heterozygous mutations in the MUTYH gene (p.Gly382Asp) and one variant with an unknown biological significance in the APC gene (p.Ser926Pro). The phenotypic variability of HPS difficults its identification, hence it is important to adhere to the clinical criteria established for its classification as well as to establish screening guidelines for CRC on the basis of its high incidence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Espa

  6. Out of Amazonia: the unexpected trans-Andean distribution of Cochranella resplendens (Lynch and Duellman, 1978) (Anura: Centrolenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Zuluaga, Claudia; Cano, Estefany; Restrepo, Adriana; Rada, Marco; Daza, Juan M

    2017-03-02

    The glassfrog genus Cochranella, with nine recognized species, is distributed in the lowlands and mid elevation of the Neotropical forests, from Nicaragua to Bolivia (Guayasamin et al. 2009; Twomey et al. 2014). Four species are trans-Andean-C. granulosa (Taylor 1949) occurs in the lowlands and mountains, at mid elevation, of Central America, C. litoralis (Ruiz-Carranza & Lynch 1996) and C. mache Guayasamin & Bonaccorso 2004 occur in the Pacific lowlands and the western cloud forests of Colombia and Ecuador, and C. euknemos (Savage & Starrett 1967) occurs both in Central America and South America (northwestern Colombia).-The other five species have cis-Andean distributions in the Amazonian slopes and lowlands, from Colombia to Bolivia: C. nola Harvey 1996, C. guayasamini Twomey, Delia & Castroviejo-Fisher 2014, C. resplendens (Lynch & Duellman 1973), C. erminea Torres-Gastello, Suárez-Segovia & Cisneros-Heredia 2007, and C. phryxa Aguayo-Vedia & Harvey 2006. In Colombia, C. resplendens is known from the foothills of the Amazon versant in Caquetá (Malambo et al. 2013) and Putumayo (Lynch & Duellman 1973; Ruiz-Carranza et al. 1996). The species is also known from Ecuador (Lynch & Duellman 1973) and Peru (Twomey et al. 2014). Here, we report two new records of Cochranella resplendens, extending the species distribution beyond the Amazonian lowlands into the northern Cordillera Central in Colombia.

  7. Myofascial pain syndrome after head and neck cancer treatment: Prevalence, risk factors, and influence on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Leticia Rodrigues; Rizzo, Cláudia Carvalho; de Oliveira, Cleyton Zanardo; dos Santos, Carlos Roberto; Carvalho, André Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer may develop myofascial pain syndrome as sequelae. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and quality of life (QOL) related to myofascial pain syndrome. This was a prospective study including patients with head and neck cancer with at least a 1-year disease-free interval. One hundred sixty-seven patients were analyzed, and myofascial pain syndrome was diagnosed in 20 (11.9%). In the multivariate analysis, hypopharyngeal tumors (odds ratio [OR] = 6.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58-25.56) and neck dissection (OR = 3.43; 95% CI = 1.16-10.17) were independent factors for myofascial pain syndrome. The pain (p myofascial pain syndrome. Myofascial pain syndrome was observed in 1 of 9 patients after head and neck cancer treatment and a worse QOL was observed among them. Tumor site and neck dissection were found to be risk factors for myofascial pain syndrome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A hypothesis-generating search for new genetic breast cancer syndromes - a national study in 803 Swedish families

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    von Wachenfeldt Anna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among Swedish families with an inherited predisposition for breast cancer, less than one third segregate mutations in genes known to be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in combination with other types of tumours. In a search for new putative familial breast cancer syndromes we studied Swedish families undergoing genetic counselling during 1992-2000. Four thousand families from counselling clinics in Sweden were eligible for study. Families with breast cancer only were excluded, as were families with mutations in genes already known to be associated with malignant diseases. We identified 803 families with two or more cases of breast cancer and at least one other type of cancer. The observed proportion of different types of non-breast cancer was compared with the percentage distribution of non-breast cancer tumours in Sweden in 1958 and 1999. We found tumours in the colon, ovary, endometrium, pancreas and liver, as well as leukaemia in a significantly larger proportion of the study population than in the general population in both years. These tumours were also seen among families where several members had one additional tumour, suggesting that malignancies at these sites, in combination with breast tumours, could constitute genetic syndromes. Endometrial carcinoma has not previously been described in the context of breast cancer syndromes and the excess of malignancies at this site could not be explained by secondary tumours. Thus, we suggest that endometrial carcinoma and breast cancer constitute a new breast cancer syndrome. Further investigation is warranted to categorize phenotypes of both breast and endometrial tumours in this subgroup.

  9. BREAST AND/OR OVARIAN CANCER AS PART OF FAMILY CANCER SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Lyubchenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems in the early diagnosis, primary and secondary prevention of family cancer of the breast and/or ovaries are successfully solved within medical genetic counseling at a cancer clinic. Its genetic diagnosis is confirmed, individual risks for breast and/or ovarian cancer are calculated, risk-modifying factors are studied, and treatment, family planning, and childbirth are discussed during clinicogenetic studies.

  10. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab Shafek Atta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner’s, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A.

  11. Preoperative metabolic syndrome and prognosis after radical resection for colorectal cancer: The Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Feng; Hu, Dan; Lin, Xiandong; Chen, Gang; Liang, Binying; Zhang, Hejun; Ji, Kaida; Huang, Jun; Lin, Jinxiu; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2016-12-15

    This prospective study sought to investigate the prediction of preoperative metabolic syndrome and its components for the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality by analyzing a subset of data from the ongoing Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study. In total, 1,318 CRC patients who received radical resection were consecutively enrolled between January 2000 and December 2008. The median follow-up time was 58.6 months, with 412 deaths from CRC. The CRC patients with metabolic syndrome had significantly shorter median survival time (MST) than those without (50.9 vs. 170.3 months, p < 0.001). Among four components of metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia was the strongest predictor and its presence was associated with shorter MST than its absence (44.4 vs. 170.3 months, p < 0.001). Moreover, the complication of metabolic syndrome in CRC patients was associated with a 2.98-fold increased risk of CRC mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.98, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.40-3.69, p < 0.001) after adjusting for confounding factors. The magnitude of this association was especially potentiated in CRC patients with tumor-node-metastasis stage I/II (HR = 3.94, 95% CI: 2.65-5.85, p < 0.001), invasion depth T1/T2 (HR = 5.41, 95% CI: 2.54-11.50, p < 0.001), regional lymph node metastasis N0 (HR = 4.06, 95% CI: 2.85-5.80, p < 0.001) and negative distant metastasis (HR = 3.23, 95% CI: 2.53-4.12, p < 0.001). Further survival tree analysis reinforced the prognostic capability of fasting blood glucose in CRC survival. Our findings convincingly demonstrated that preoperative metabolic syndrome, especially hyperglycemia, was a robust predictor for CRC mortality, and the protection was more obvious in patients with Stage I/II. © 2016 UICC.

  12. Preoperative Metabolic Syndrome Is Predictive of Significant Gastric Cancer Mortality after Gastrectomy: The Fujian Prospective Investigation of Cancer (FIESTA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Peng, Feng; Lin, Xiandong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Hejun; Liang, Binying; Ji, Kaida; Lin, Jinxiu; Chen, Lin-Feng; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. However, the impact of MetS on gastric cancer mortality remains largely unknown. Here, we prospectively examined the prediction of preoperative MetS for gastric cancer mortality by analyzing a subset of data from the ongoing Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study. This study was conducted among 3012 patients with gastric cancer who received radical gastrectomy between 2000 and 2010. The latest follow-up was completed in 2015. Blood/tissue specimens, demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics were collected at baseline. During 15-year follow-up, 1331 of 3012 patients died of gastric cancer. The median survival time (MST) of patients with MetS was 31.3months, which was significantly shorter than that of MetS-free patients (157.1months). The coexistence of MetS before surgery was associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk for gastric cancer mortality (P<0.001). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were increased with invasion depth T1/T2 (HR=2.78, P<0.001), regional lymph node metastasis N0 (HR=2.65, P<0.001), positive distant metastasis (HR=2.53, P<0.001), TNM stage I/II (HR=3.00, P<0.001), intestinal type (HR=2.96, P<0.001), negative tumor embolus (HR=2.34, P<0.001), and tumor size ≤4.5cm (HR=2.49, P<0.001). Further survival tree analysis confirmed the top splitting role of TNM stage, followed by MetS or hyperglycemia with remarkable discrimination ability. In this large cohort study, preoperative MetS, especially hyperglycemia, was predictive of significant gastric cancer mortality in patients with radical gastrectomy, especially for early stage of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. A high degree of LINE-1 hypomethylation is a unique feature of early-onset colorectal cancer.

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    Marina Antelo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC represents a clinically distinct form of CRC that is often associated with a poor prognosis. Methylation levels of genomic repeats such as LINE-1 elements have been recognized as independent factors for increased cancer-related mortality. The methylation status of LINE-1 elements in early-onset CRC has not been analyzed previously. DESIGN: We analyzed 343 CRC tissues and 32 normal colonic mucosa samples, including 2 independent cohorts of CRC diagnosed ≤ 50 years old (n=188, a group of sporadic CRC >50 years (MSS n=89; MSI n=46, and a group of Lynch syndrome CRCs (n=20. Tumor mismatch repair protein expression, microsatellite instability status, LINE-1 and MLH1 methylation, somatic BRAF V600E mutation, and germline MUTYH mutations were evaluated. RESULTS: Mean LINE-1 methylation levels (± SD in the five study groups were early-onset CRC, 56.6% (8.6; sporadic MSI, 67.1% (5.5; sporadic MSS, 65.1% (6.3; Lynch syndrome, 66.3% (4.5 and normal mucosa, 76.5% (1.5. Early-onset CRC had significantly lower LINE-1 methylation than any other group (p<0.0001. Compared to patients with <65% LINE-1 methylation in tumors, those with ≥ 65% LINE-1 methylation had significantly better overall survival (p=0.026, log rank test. CONCLUSIONS: LINE-1 hypomethylation constitutes a potentially important feature of early-onset CRC, and suggests a distinct molecular subtype. Further studies are needed to assess the potential of LINE-1 methylation status as a prognostic biomarker for young people with CRC.

  14. Therapy insight: Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome--when all you can eat is yourself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Meguid, Michael M; Inui, Akio; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo

    2005-03-01

    Tumor growth is associated with profound metabolic and neurochemical alterations, which can lead to the onset of anorexia-cachexia syndrome. Anorexia is defined as the loss of the desire to eat, while cachexia results from progressive wasting of skeletal muscle mass--and to a lesser extent adipose tissue--occurring even before weight loss becomes apparent. Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome is highly prevalent among cancer patients, has a large impact on morbidity and mortality, and impinges on patient quality of life. However, its clinical relevance is frequently overlooked, and treatments are usually only attempted during advanced stages of the disease. The pathogenic mechanisms of cachexia and anorexia are multifactorial, but cytokines and tumor-derived factors have a significant role, thereby representing a suitable therapeutic target. Energy expenditure in anorexia is frequently increased while energy intake is decreased, which further exacerbates the progressive deterioration of nutritional status. The optimal therapeutic approach to anorectic-cachectic cancer patients should be based on both changes in dietary habits, achieved via nutritional counseling; and drug therapy, aimed at interfering with cytokine expression or activity. Our improved understanding of the influence a tumor has on the host's metabolism is advancing new therapeutic approaches, which are likely to result in better preservation of nutritional status if started concurrently with specific antineoplastic treatment.

  15. Posterior fossa syndrome: Review of the behavioral and emotional aspects in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Jane C; Abrams, Annah N

    2017-02-15

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, occurs in the posterior fossa, the part of the intracranial cavity that contains the brainstem and the cerebellum. The cerebellum is involved in many complex aspects of human behavior and function, and when it is disrupted or insulted, this can lead to significant sequelae in children with posterior fossa tumors. A constellation of impairing and distressing symptoms, including mutism, ataxia/hypotonia, and emotional lability, develops in approximately 25% of children after the surgical resection of posterior fossa tumors. These symptoms may impede treatment and frequently require intervention in order for children to be able to participate in their care. The eventual recovery of speech occurs for most, but with slowly improving dysarthria over many months. Behavioral changes and emotional lability also occur. This phenomenon has been classified differently by different investigators over the past 35 years. For the purposes of this article, the term posterior fossa syndrome is used to refer to the neuropsychiatric and behavioral features that compose this condition. The current review summarizes the development of the clinical understanding of this phenomenon with a focus on near- and long-term psychosocial and psychiatric implications. Also, clinical examples of the presentation, management, and lasting implications of this syndrome are provided. This review is intended to be a resource for clinicians who treat affected children. Cancer 2017;123:551-559. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a patient with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Takeshi; Nabeya, Daijiro; Nakamura, Hideta; Haranaga, Shusaku; Hirata, Tetsuo; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Atsumi, Eriko; Fuchigami, Tatsuya; Aoki, Yoichi; Fujita, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman complained of diarrhea and vomiting after receiving chemotherapy for cervical cancer in association with high doses of corticosteroids. Two months later, the patient developed acute respiratory distress syndrome, and numerous Strongyloides stercoralis parasites were found in the intrabronchial discharge. Ivermectin was administered daily until nematodes were no longer detected in the sputum, and the patient's condition was successfully rescued. Antibodies for human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) were positive. HTLV-1 infection and the administration of corticosteroids are known risk factors for strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome. Therefore, physicians should consider this disease in the differential diagnosis of patients from endemic areas who present with gastrointestinal symptoms under these risk factors.

  17. Breast cancer presenting with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone after simple mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, H; Honda, T; Morimoto, H; Sasaki, T; Aibara, Y; Yamanaka, M

    2001-09-01

    A 71-year-old woman showed disorientation 7 days after simple mastectomy for right breast cancer. Computed tomography of the brain was normal. The level of serum sodium was very low (110 mEq/l), while the urine sodium level was normal. The osmolality of urine was higher (342 mosmol/kg) than that of serum (220 mosmol/kg). These data suggested a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. A fluid restriction, infusion of hypertonic saline and administration of diuretics gradually increased the level of serum sodium. Subsequently, disorientation disappeared. This is a rare case of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone caused by simple mastectomy, a relatively minor surgical procedure.

  18. The association between polycystic ovary syndrome and breast cancer: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobeiri, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective The results of epidemiological studies investigated the association between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the breast cancer are inconsistent. This meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the association between PCOS and the breast cancer risk. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus for observational studies until June 2015. Data were independently extracted and analyzed using 95% odds ratio, and confidence intervals (CIs) based on the random-effects models. Methods We identified 970 references and conducted eight studies with 45,470 participants and 243,064 person- year. Results The association between PCOS and the breast cancer risk in case-control studies 0.87 (95% CI, 0.44 to 1.31) and that of cohort studies was estimated 1.18 (95% CI, 0.93 to 1.43). Conclusion This meta-analysis demonstrated that PCOS no does increase the risk of breast cancer. Further prospective cohort studies are needed to provide convincing evidence in order to PCOS can increase or not effect on the risk of the breast cancer. PMID:27668199

  19. Depression and demoralization as distinct syndromes: Preliminary data from a cohort of advanced cancer patients

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    Jacobsen Juliet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The term demoralization has been used to describe existential distress and despair of patients with advanced disease. Aim: This study sought to determine whether a cluster of symptoms interpreted as demoralization could be identified and distinguished from a cluster of depressive symptoms. Materials and Methods: As part of the Coping with Cancer Study, a federally funded multi-site study of advanced cancer patients, 242 patients were interviewed on a broad range of mental health parameters related to depression, grief, quality of life, self-efficacy, coping and religiousness/spirituality. Results: A principal components analysis revealed separate depression and demoralization/despair factors. Seven symptoms constituted the demoralization/despair factor: loss of control, loss of hope, anger/bitterness, sense of failure, feeling life was a burden, loss of meaning and a belief that life′s meaning is dependent on health and were found to be internally consistent (Cronbach′s a = 0.78. Only 14.8% of subjects with "syndromal demoralization" met DSM-IV criteria for Major Depression (MDD; 7.4% for Minor Depression. Of those with MDD only 28.6% had syndromal level demoralization. Prior history of MDD predicted current MDD, but not syndromal demoralization. Demoralization, not MDD, was significantly associated with the patient′s reported level of inner peacefulness. When compared with MDD, syndromal demoralization was more strongly associated with wish to live and wish to die and equally predictive of mental health service use. Conclusion: The symptoms of demoralization are distinct from depressive symptoms and appear to be associated with the patient′s degree of inner peacefulness.

  20. Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Risk: A Case-Cohort Study Nested in a Multicentre Italian Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Claudia; Grioni, Sara; Sieri, Sabina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Tumino, Rosario; Frasca, Graziella; Pala, Valeria; Mattiello, Amalia; Chiodini, Paolo; Iacoviello, Licia; De Curtis, Amalia; Panico, Salvatore; Krogh, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (defined as at least three among abdominal obesity, high blood triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood glucose, and high blood pressure) is emerging as a risk factor for breast cancer; however few studies – most confined to postmenopausal women – have investigated associations between breast cancer risk and metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between metabolic syndrome and its components, and risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal and premenopausal women. Methods We performed a case-cohort study on 22,494 women recruited in 1993-1998 to four Italian centres (Turin, Varese, Naples, Ragusa) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and followed-up for up to 15 years. A random subcohort of 565 women was obtained and 593 breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by Prentice-weighted Cox proportional hazards models. Results Presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with significantly increased breast cancer risk in all women (HR 1.52, 95%CI 1.14-2.02). When the analyses were repeated separately for menopausal status, the association was limited to postmenopausal women (HR 1.80, 95%CI 1.22-2.65) and absent in premenopausal women (HR 0.71, 95%CI 0.43-1.16); P for interaction between metabolic syndrome and menopausal status was 0.001. Of metabolic syndrome components, only high blood glucose was significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk in all women (HR 1.47, 95%CI 1.13-1.91) and postmenopausal women (HR 1.89, 95%CI 1.29-2.77), but not premenopausal women (HR 0.80, 95%CI 0.52-1.22; P interaction=0.004). Conclusions These findings support previous data indicating that metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women, and suggest that prevention of

  1. Early-onset colorectal cancer: a sporadic or inherited disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigliano, Vittoria; Sanchez-Mete, Lupe; Martayan, Aline; Anti, Marcello

    2014-09-21

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed worldwide. Although epidemiology data show a marked variability around the world, its overall incidence rate shows a slow but steady decrease, mainly in developed countries. Conversely, early-onset colorectal cancer appears to display an opposite trend with an overall prevalence in United States and European Union ranging from 3.0% and 8.6%. Colorectal cancer has a substantial proportion of familial cases. In particular, early age at onset is especially suggestive of hereditary predisposition. The clinicopathological and molecular features of colorectal cancer cases show a marked heterogeneity not only between early- and late-onset cases but also within the early-onset group. Two distinct subtypes of early-onset colorectal cancers can be identified: a "sporadic" subtype, usually without family history, and an inherited subtype arising in the context of well defined hereditary syndromes. The pathogenesis of the early-onset disease is substantially well characterized in the inherited subtype, which is mainly associated to the Lynch syndrome and occasionally to other rare mendelian diseases, whereas in the "sporadic" subtype the origin of the disease may be attributed to the presence of various common/rare genetic variants, so far largely unidentified, displaying variable penetrance. These variants are thought to act cumulatively to increase the risk of colorectal cancer, and presumably to also anticipate its onset. Efforts are ongoing in the attempt to unravel the intricate genetic basis of this "sporadic" early-onset disease. A better knowledge of molecular entities and pathways may impact on family-tailored prevention and clinical management strategies.

  2. Literature Analysis of TCM Syndrome Types of Gastric Cancer and Advanced Gastric Cancer%进展期胃癌中医证型的文献分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓妍; 曹志群; 相宏杰; 王慧娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Study of gastric cancer and advanced gastric cancer syndromes distribution was made to determine the main TCM syndrome types. Methods: The domestic public reports of gastric cancer and advanced gastric cancer syndrome differentiation of TCM in nearly 30 years were analyzed, in order to summarize and analyze the syndrome type of traditional Chinese medicine constitution ratio. Results: Common syndrome types of traditional Chinese medicine about gastric cancer are deficiency of the spleen and stomach type,stasis toxin resistance type,liver stomach disharmony,Qi and blood deficiency type,phlegm coagulation type,stomach yin deficiency type,Common syndrome types of traditional Chinese medicine about advanced gastric cancer are deficiency of the spleen and stomach type, stasis toxin resistance type, Qi and blood deficiency type, liver stomach disharmony, stomach yin deficiency type, Deficiency of the spleen and stomach is the most basic pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma. Conclusion: The statistical results of TCM syndrome type of gastric cancer and advanced gastric cancer have important guiding significance on the establishment of the clinical syndrome differentiation standard.%目的:运用循证医学方法,探讨进展期胃癌的证型分布规律,明确其主要证型.方法:统计近30余年国内公开报道的进展期胃癌辨证分型文献,总结、分析其中中医证型的构成比.结果:进展期胃癌常见中医证型是:脾胃虚损型、瘀毒内阻型、气血两亏型、肝胃不和型、胃热伤阴型.脾胃虚损是胃癌的最基本病机.结论:进展期胃癌证型统计结果对确立临床辨证分型标准具有重要指导意义.

  3. Prostate Cancer in a Male with Holt-Oram Syndrome: First Clinical Association of the TBX5 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Aherne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.

  4. Lynching Luther

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    police procedurals. The character of DCI John Luther is indicative of the series’ general approach: he is unmistakably constructed from stereotypes of US television, yet not in a straightforward way, as he combines elements of both the impulsive, physical maverick cop and the psychologically adept......, cerebral detective – two character-types traditionally rather juxtaposed as irreconcilable opposites. In this fashion, the overall story arc meshes together elements from Thomas Harris-style serial killer fiction and intuitive detection in the tradition of George Simenon’s Maigret. Similarly...... as the id to his superior Rose Teller’s super-ego and his former partner Ian Reed’s ego, a configuration his subconscious tries to overwrite by juxtaposing those two characters to sociopath Alice Morgan and sophomore detective Justin Ripley. The second season finds Luther at odds with several mother figures...

  5. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zeidan, Amer M; Yu, James B; Soulos, Pamela R; Davidoff, Amy J; Gore, Steven D; Huntington, Scott F; Gross, Cary P; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-04-01

    To understand the impact of radiotherapy on the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among elderly prostate cancer patients. We performed a retrospective cohort study of elderly prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1999-2011 by using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare linked database. Competing risk analyses adjusting for patient characteristics were conducted to assess the impact of radiotherapy on the development of subsequent MDS/AML, compared with surgery. Of 32,112 prostate cancer patients, 14,672 underwent radiotherapy, and 17,440 received surgery only. The median follow-up was 4.68 years. A total of 157 (0.47%) prostate cancer patients developed subsequent MDS or AML, and the median time to develop MDS/AML was 3.30 (range: 0.16-9.48) years. Compared with prostate cancer patients who received surgery only, patients who underwent radiotherapy had a significantly increased risk of developing MDS/AML (hazard ratio [HR] =1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-2.13). When radiotherapy was further categorized by modalities (brachytherapy, conventional conformal radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]), increased risk of second MDS/AML was only observed in the IMRT group (HR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.09-2.54). Our findings suggest that radiotherapy for prostate cancer increases the risk of MDS/AML, and the impact may differ by modality. Additional studies with longer follow-up are needed to further clarify the role of radiotherapy in the development of subsequent myeloid malignancies. A better understanding may help patients, physicians, and other stakeholders make more informed treatment decisions. Prostate 77:437-445, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer with Taxotere: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Raufi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Docetaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that has proven its efficacy in the treatment of patients with both castration sensitive and resistant metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel (Taxotere. ARDS is very rare but life threatening complication of docetaxel which requires aggressive supportive care and close monitoring. Better awareness and prompt diagnosis of this treatment related ARDS will improve the effectiveness and outcome of its management.

  8. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome in a Patient with Tongue Cancer: A Report of a Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Baba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but life-threatening complication of neuroleptic drugs, which are used widely in head and neck cancer (HANC patients who develop delirium. Methods and Results. Postoperative delirium in a 39-year-old man with tongue cancer was treated with haloperidol and chlorpromazine. Three days after the first administration of antipsychotics, the patient exhibited elevated body temperature, autonomic and extrapyramidal symptoms, and impaired consciousness. A definitive diagnosis was made using the research diagnostic criteria for NMS in the DSM-IV, and the antipsychotics were immediately discontinued. The patient was given dantrolene and bromocriptine to treat the NMS. The patient’s hyperthermia, elevated creatinin kinase (CK, and muscle rigidity improved gradually, with all symptoms of NMS resolving completely by 13 days after the diagnosis. Conclusions. HANC surgeons must be alert for early signs of NMS and use antipsychotics conservatively to avoid NMS and its potentially fatal outcome.

  9. Interpretation of chest radiographs in both cancer and other critical care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a clinical, pathophysiological and radiographic pattern that has signs of pulmonary edema occur without elevated pulmonary venous pressures. Clinical presentation and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome are followed by frequently ordered portable chest X-ray in critically ill patients. We evaluated chest radiographs of ten cancer and other six critical care pediatric patients. The parenchymal imaging of lung in patients with cancer was reported the same as that of other critically ill children despite underlying pathophysiological variations in our investigation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 270-273

  10. p53 mutations in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Debra G B; Travis, Lois B; Addya, Kathakali; Dores, Graca M; Holowaty, Eric J; Bergfeldt, Kjell; Malkin, David; Kohler, Betsy A; Lynch, Charles F; Wiklund, Tom; Stovall, Marilyn; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Slater, Diana J; Felix, Carolyn A

    2002-05-01

    Although p53 mutations occur in alkylating agent-related leukemias, their frequency and spectrum in leukemias after ovarian cancer have not been addressed. The purpose of this study was to examine p53 mutations in leukemias after ovarian cancer, for which treatment with platinum analogues was widely used. Adequate leukemic or dysplastic cells were available in 17 of 82 cases of leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that occurred in a multicenter, population-based cohort of 23,170 women with ovarian cancer. Eleven of the 17 received platinum compounds and other alkylating agents with or without DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors and/or radiation. Six received other alkylating agents, in one case, with radiation. Genomic DNA was extracted and p53 exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 were amplified by PCR. Mutations and loss of heterozygosity were analyzed on the WAVE instrument (Transgenomic) followed by selected analysis by sequencing. Eleven p53 mutations involving all four exons studied and one polymorphism were identified. Genomic DNA analyses were consistent with loss of heterozygosity for four of the mutations. The 11 mutations occurred in 9 cases, such that 6 of 11 leukemias after platinum-based regimens (55%) and 3 of 6 leukemias after other treatments (50%) contained p53 mutations. Two leukemias that occurred after treatment with platinum analogues contained two mutations. Among eight mutations in leukemias after treatment with platinum analogues, there were four G-to-A transitions and one G-to-C transversion. p53 mutations are common in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after multiagent therapy for ovarian cancer. The propensity for G-to-A transitions may reflect specific DNA damage in leukemias after treatment with platinum analogues.

  11. Pedigree and BRCA gene analysis in breast cancer patients to identify hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality of disease in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooei, Mina; Poornima, Subhadra; Salma, Bibi Umae; Iyer, Gayatri R; Pujar, Akhilesh N; Annapurna, Srirambhatla; Shah, Ashwin; Maddali, Srinivas; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2017-02-01

    Global burden of breast cancer is expected to increase to >2 million new cases every year by 2030 and 10% of these are likely to have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Identifying these individuals by pedigree and BRCA1/2 mutation analyses will enable us to offer targeted mutation testing and appropriate counseling. This study from a tertiary care hospital showed that of the 127 breast cancer patients on treatment during 2014-2015, 24 of them fulfilled the criteria of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome after detailed verbal autopsy and pedigree analysis, and BRCA1 and 2 next-generation sequencing done after pre-test counseling revealed mutations in 13 cases (54%), these included 9 BRCA1 mutations (69%) and 4 BRCA2 mutation (31%). Subsequent post-test counseling recommended targeted mutation analysis for 64 high-risk members in these 13 families with pathogenic mutations, which will help in surveillance for early detection, appropriate management, and prevention of the disease by decreasing the burden to both family and nation. Results from this preliminary study highlight the importance of genetic counseling, pedigree analysis, and genetic testing. It can be recommended that all oncology units should have a genetic counseling service for providing appropriate support to oncologists, patients, and families to prevent unnecessary testing; however, breast cancer screening program is incomplete without evaluating for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A New Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Davis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs are aggressive tumors with poor prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. The evidence linking TNBC with the metabolic syndrome, which consists of central obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, has emerged from clinical studies and experiments using cell lines and mouse models. Epidemiological studies have associated abdominal obesity with increased incidence of TNBC. Additionally, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer across all subtypes. The insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis has been implicated mechanistically in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Specifically, increased leptin and decreased adiponectin levels disrupt homeostatic signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, cell-cycle regulation, and angiogenesis. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR may mediate interactions between these two hormones. Further research will facilitate the development of targeted therapeutics and programs to modify lifestyle factors to modulate the insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis for TNBC.

  13. Identification of signaling pathways associated with cancer protection in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkina-Gendler, Lena; Rotem, Itai; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Gurwitz, David; Sarfstein, Rive; Laron, Zvi; Werner, Haim

    2016-05-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) pathway emerged in recent years as a critical player in cancer biology. Enhanced expression or activation of specific components of the GH-IGF1 axis, including the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), is consistently associated with a transformed phenotype. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that patients with Laron syndrome (LS), the best-characterized entity among the congenital IGF1 deficiencies, seem to be protected from cancer development. To identify IGF1-dependent genes and signaling pathways associated with cancer protection in LS, we conducted a genome-wide analysis using immortalized lymphoblastoid cells derived from LS patients and healthy controls of the same gender, age range, and ethnic origin. Our analyses identified a collection of genes that are either over- or under-represented in LS-derived lymphoblastoids. Gene differential expression occurs in several gene families, including cell cycle, metabolic control, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Jak-STAT signaling, and PI3K-AKT signaling. Major differences between LS and healthy controls were also noticed in pathways associated with cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and autophagy. Our results highlight the key role of the GH-IGF1 axis in the initiation and progression of cancer. Furthermore, data are consistent with the concept that homozygous congenital IGF1 deficiency may confer protection against future tumor development.

  14. Occam's Razor or Hickam's dictum: a paraneoplastic or coincidental occurrence of lung cancer and Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Kensuke; Oda, Akiko; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Hiroaki; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted due to weakness, coughing, shortness of breath and fever. He had decreased breath sounds in the left lung and muscle weakness in the lower and upper extremities. Chest imaging showed a mass in the left lung, and a biopsy revealed small cell lung cancer. The nerve conduction velocity was decreased, and anti-GM1 IgG antibodies were positive. The patient showed a temporary neurologic recovery following the administration of cancer chemotherapy, although he eventually died of progression of lung cancer. As a result of the almost simultaneous symptomatic development of lung cancer and Guillain-Barré syndrome, this case may be considered to involve a paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome.

  15. Leser-Trélat syndrome in patients affected by six multiple metachronous primitive cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannetti Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leser-Trélat syndrome is characterized by the eruptive appearance of multiple seborrheic keratoses in association with underlying malignant disease. Usually, the sign of Leser-Trélat is associated with adenocarcinoma, most frequently of the colon, breast, or stomach, but also of the lung, kidney, liver, and pancreas. Herein, we present a case that we believe is the first report of the sign of Leser-Trélat in association with occult gastric adenocarcinoma and the anamnestic oncologic history of five other multiple primitive cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR immunohistochemical expression analysis of multiple seborrheic keratoses revealed an intense membranous staining in the basal keratinocytes and in all the upper epidermal layers. Patients with the sign of Leser-Trélat should undergo a diagnostic screening programme for malignant disease along with patients with known Leser-Trélat syndrome who present with a recent acute and florid eruption of their seborrheic keratoses. We propose the importance of combining the molecular features of multiple seborrheic keratoses with EGFR immunohistochemistry analyses to determine the likelihood of Leser-Trélat syndrome and the consequent high risk of underlying multiple visceral malignancies.

  16. Anorexia-cachexia syndrome in pancreatic cancer: recent advances and new pharmacological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronga, Ilaria; Gallucci, Fernando; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Uomo, Generoso

    2014-03-01

    About 80% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients suffer from a wasting syndrome referred to as the "cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome" (CACS) characterized by abnormally low weight, weakness and loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without loss of body fat, which directly impacts overall survival, quality of life, and physical activity. The aim of this review was to examine recent findings about CACS' pathophysiology and to describe the current pharmacological approaches. In recent years many efforts were made to improve our knowledge of CACS; currently we know that cachexia arises from a complex and multifactorial interaction between various mechanisms including inflammation, anorexia/malnutrition, alterations of protein and lipid metabolism; consequently its management requires multidisciplinary and multipharmacological approach that should address the different causes underlying this clinical event. On these premises, several drugs have been proposed starting from the first pharmacological treatment based on progestational agents or corticosteroids; most of them are in the preclinical phase, but some have already reached the clinical experimentation stage. In conclusion, to date, there is no standard effective treatment and further studies are needed to unravel the basic mechanisms underlying CACS and to develop newer therapeutic strategies with the hope to improve the quality of life of pancreatic cancer patients.

  17. Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal Version 1.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzale, Dawn; Gupta, Samir; Ahnen, Dennis J; Bray, Travis; Cannon, Jamie A; Cooper, Gregory; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Erwin, Deborah; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Grady, William; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Klapman, Jason B; Larson, David W; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Regenbogen, Scott E; Samadder, Niloy Jewel; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary; Darlow, Susan

    2016-08-01

    This is a focused update highlighting the most current NCCN Guidelines for diagnosis and management of Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer, usually resulting from a germline mutation in 1 of 4 DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2), or deletions in the EPCAM promoter. Patients with Lynch syndrome are at an increased lifetime risk, compared with the general population, for colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other cancers, including of the stomach and ovary. As of 2016, the panel recommends screening all patients with colorectal cancer for Lynch syndrome and provides recommendations for surveillance for early detection and prevention of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers.

  18. Transcriptomic and Protein Expression Analysis Reveals Clinicopathological Significance of Bloom Syndrome Helicase (BLM) in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Arvind; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Agarwal, Devika; Doherty, Rachel; Moseley, Paul M; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Ball, Graham; Alshareeda, Alaa T; Rakha, Emad A; Chan, Stephen Y T; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-04-01

    Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) has key roles in homologous recombination repair, telomere maintenance, and DNA replication. Germ-line mutations in the BLM gene causes Bloom syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by premature aging and predisposition to multiple cancers, including breast cancer. The clinicopathologic significance of BLM in sporadic breast cancers is unknown. We investigated BLM mRNA expression in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium cohort (n = 1,950) and validated in an external dataset of 2,413 tumors. BLM protein level was evaluated in the Nottingham Tenovus series comprising 1,650 breast tumors. BLM mRNA overexpression was significantly associated with high histologic grade, larger tumor size, estrogen receptor-negative (ER(-)), progesterone receptor-negative (PR(-)), and triple-negative phenotypes (ps < 0.0001). BLM mRNA overexpression was also linked to aggressive molecular phenotypes, including PAM50.Her2 (P < 0.0001), PAM50.Basal (P < 0.0001), and PAM50.LumB (P < 0.0001) and Genufu subtype (ER(+)/Her2(-)/high proliferation; P < 0.0001). PAM50.LumA tumors and Genufu subtype (ER(+)/Her2(-)/low proliferation) were more likely to express low levels of BLM mRNA (ps < 0.0001). Integrative molecular clusters (intClust) intClust.1 (P < 0.0001), intClust.5 (P < 0.0001), intClust.9 (P < 0.0001), and intClust.10 (P < 0.0001) were also more likely in tumors with high BLM mRNA expression. BLM mRNA overexpression was associated with poor breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS; ps < 0.000001). At the protein level, altered subcellular localization with high cytoplasmic BLM and low nuclear BLM was linked to aggressive phenotypes. In multivariate analysis, BLM mRNA and BLM protein levels independently influenced BCSS. This is the first and the largest study to provide evidence that BLM is a promising biomarker in breast cancer.

  19. BAP1 cancer syndrome: malignant mesothelioma, uveal and cutaneous melanoma, and MBAITs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone Michele

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRCA1–associated protein 1 (BAP1 is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p21. Germline BAP1 mutations have been recently associated with an increased risk of malignant mesothelioma, atypical melanocytic tumors and other neoplasms. To answer the question if different germline BAP1 mutations may predispose to a single syndrome with a wide phenotypic range or to distinct syndromes, we investigated the presence of melanocytic tumors in two unrelated families (L and W with germline BAP1 mutations and increased risk of malignant mesothelioma. Methods Suspicious cutaneous lesions were clinically and pathologically characterized and compared to those present in other families carrying BAP1 mutations. We then conducted a meta-analysis of all the studies reporting BAP1-mutated families to survey cancer risk related to the germline BAP1 mutation (means were compared using t-test and proportions were compared with Pearson χ2 test or two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. Results Melanocytic tumors: of the five members of the L family studied, four (80% carried a germline BAP1 mutation (p.Gln684* and also presented one or more atypical melanocytic tumors; of the seven members of W family studied, all carried a germline BAP1 mutation (p.Pro147fs*48 and four of them (57% presented one or more atypical melanocytic tumors, that we propose to call “melanocytic BAP1-mutated atypical intradermal tumors” (MBAITs. Meta-analysis: 118 individuals from seven unrelated families were selected and divided into a BAP1-mutated cohort and a BAP1-non-mutated cohort. Malignant mesothelioma, uveal melanoma, cutaneous melanoma, and MBAITs prevalence was significantly higher in the BAP1-mutated cohort (p ≤ 0.001. Conclusions Germline BAP1 mutations are associated with a novel cancer syndrome characterized by malignant mesothelioma, uveal melanoma, cutaneous melanoma and MBAITs, and possibly by other cancers. MBAITs provide physicians with a

  20. Identifying radiation-induced survivorship syndromes affecting bowel health in a cohort of gynecological cancer survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steineck, Gunnar; Skokic, Viktor; Bull, Cecilia; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Dunberger, Gail; Bergmark, Karin; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Oh, Jung Hun; Deasy, Joseph O.; Jörnsten, Rebecka

    2017-01-01

    Background During radiotherapy unwanted radiation to normal tissue surrounding the tumor triggers survivorship diseases; we lack a nosology for radiation-induced survivorship diseases that decrease bowel health and we do not know which symptoms are related to which diseases. Methods Gynecological-cancer survivors were followed-up two to 15 years after having undergone radiotherapy; they reported in a postal questionnaire the frequency of 28 different symptoms related to bowel health. Population-based controls gave the same information. With a modified factor analysis, we determined the optimal number of factors, factor loadings for each symptom, factor-specific factor-loading cutoffs and factor scores. Results Altogether data from 623 survivors and 344 population-based controls were analyzed. Six factors best explain the correlation structure of the symptoms; for five of these a statistically significant difference (P< 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test) was found between survivors and controls concerning factor score quantiles. Taken together these five factors explain 42 percent of the variance of the symptoms. We interpreted these five factors as radiation-induced syndromes that may reflect distinct survivorship diseases. We obtained the following frequencies, defined as survivors having a factor loading above the 95 percent percentile of the controls, urgency syndrome (190 of 623, 30 percent), leakage syndrome (164 of 623, 26 percent), excessive gas discharge (93 of 623, 15 percent), excessive mucus discharge (102 of 623, 16 percent) and blood discharge (63 of 623, 10 percent). Conclusion Late effects of radiotherapy include five syndromes affecting bowel health; studying them and identifying the underlying survivorship diseases, instead of the approximately 30 long-term symptoms they produce, will simplify the search for prevention, alleviation and elimination. PMID:28158314

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-10-14

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)-1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes.

  3. [Recent development in research and management of cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Akio

    2005-06-01

    Cachexia is among the most debilitating and life-threatening aspects of cancer, and is more common in children and elderly patients. Associated with anorexia, fat and muscle tissue wasting, psychological distress, and a lower quality of life, cachexia arises from a complex interaction between the cancer and the host. This process results from a failure of the adaptive feeding response seen in simple starvation and includes cytokine production, release of lipid-mobilizing and proteolysis-inducing factors, and alterations in intermediary metabolism. Cytokines play a pivotal role in long-term inhibition of feeding by mimicking the hypothalamic effect of excessive negative feedback signaling from leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, which is an integral component of the homeostatic loop of body weight regulation. This could be done by persistent inhibition of feeding-stimulatory circuitry including neuropeptide Y. Cachexia should be suspected in patients with cancer if an involuntary weight loss of greater than five percent of premorbid weight occurs within a 3-6-month period. The two major options for pharmacological therapy have been either progestational agents or corticosteroids. However, knowledge of the mechanisms of cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome has led to, and continues to lead to, effective therapeutic interventions for several aspects of the syndrome. These include antiserotonergic drugs, gastroprokinetic agents, branched-chain amino acids, eicosapentanoic acid, cannabinoids, melatonin, and thalidomide-all of which act on the feeding-regulatory circuitry to increase appetite and inhibit tumor-derived catabolic factors to antagonize tissue wasting and/or host cytokine release. The outcomes of drug studies in cancer cachexia should focus on the symptomatic and quality-of-life advantages rather than simply on nutritional end points, since the survival of cachexia cancer patients may be limited to weeks or months due to the incurable nature of the

  4. Unusual Horner's syndrome in recurrent breast cancer: Evaluating using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a widely used imaging modality in the initial diagnosis of cancer, treatment response evaluation and detection of recurrence. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old female who presented right ptosis on the follow-up of breast cancer after surgery. Clinicians suspected Horner's syndrome, and the patient underwent FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of recurrence that could cause Horner's syndrome. FDG PET/CT demonstrated a focal hypermetabolic lesion in the right cervicothoracic junction area, corresponding to the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk. A subsequent needle biopsy was done, and the lesion was confirmed as metastatic ductal carcinoma. In this case, we could detect the exact location of the recurring lesion that caused Horner's syndrome using FDG PET/CT.

  5. A Subgeneric Classification of the Genus Uranotaenia Lynch Arribalzaga, with a Historical Review and Notes on Other Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    first applied by Lynch Arribalzaga in 1891. It was derived from the Greek and Latin combinations of urano (heaven) and taenia (band or stripe) in...have been seen in the subgenus Urano taenia d Other secondary characters seen in Pseudoficalbia only are conspicuous setae at or near the apical...o o e ANNULATA SERIES Although a few of these characters are found in other Urano- taenia species, the peculiar larval head seta 1-C in the annulata

  6. BRCA1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase: the metabolic syndrome of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Joan; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Colomer, Ramon; Graña-Suarez, Begoña; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer-associated mutations affecting the highly-conserved C-terminal BRCT domains of the tumor suppressor gene breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) fully disrupt the ability of BRCA1 to interact with acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACCA), the rate-limiting enzyme catalyzing de novo fatty acid biogenesis. Specifically, BRCA1 interacts solely with the phosphorylated (inactive) form of ACCA (P-ACCA), and the formation of the BRCA1/P-ACCA complex interferes with ACCA activity by preventing P-ACCA dephosphorylation. One of the hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells is a high rate of energy-consuming anabolic processes driving the synthesis of lipids, proteins, and DNA (all of which are regulated by the energy status of the cell). The ability of BRCA1 to stabilize the phosphorylated/inactive form of ACCA strongly suggests that the tumor suppressive function of BRCA1 closely depends on its ability to mimic a cellular-low-energy status, which is known to block tumor cell anabolism and suppress the malignant phenotype. Interestingly, physical exercise and lack of obesity in adolescence have been associated with significantly delayed breast cancer onset for Ashkenazi Jewish women carrying BRCA1 gene mutations. Further clinical work may explore a chemopreventative role of "low-energy-mimickers" deactivating the ACCA-driven "lipogenic phenotype" in women with inherited mutations in BRCA1. This goal might be obtained with current therapeutic approaches useful in treating the metabolic syndrome and associated disorders in humans (e.g., type 2 diabetes and obesity), including metformin, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), calorie deprivation, and exercise. Alternatively, new forthcoming ACCA inhibitors may be relevant in the management of BRCA1-dependent breast cancer susceptibility and development. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Testicular parenchymal abnormalities in Klinefelter syndrome: a question of cancer? Examination of 40 consecutive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Accardo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (KS is a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism characterized by a 47, XXY karyotype. The risk of testicular cancer in KS is of interest in relation to theories about testicular cancer etiology generally; nevertheless it seems to be low. We evaluated the need for imaging and serum tumor markers for testicular cancer screening in KS. Participants were 40 consecutive KS patients, enrolled from December 2009 to January 2013. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, and beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin subunit (β-HCG serum levels assays and testicular ultrasound (US with color Doppler, were carried out at study entry, after 6 months and every year for 3 years. Abdominal magnetic resonance (MR was performed in KS when testicular US showed micro-calcifications, testicular nodules and cysts. Nearly 62% of the KS had regular testicular echotexture, 37.5% showed an irregular echotexture and 17.5% had micro-calcifications and cysts. Eighty seven percent of KS had a regular vascular pattern, 12.5% varicocele, 12.5% nodules 1 cm. MR ruled out the diagnosis of cancer in all KS with testicular micro calcifications, nodules and cysts. No significant variations in LDH, AFP, and β-HCG levels and in US pattern have been detected during follow-up. We compared serum tumor markers and US pattern between KS with and without cryptorchidism and no statistical differences were found. We did not find testicular cancer in KS, and testicular US, tumor markers and MR were, in selected cases, useful tools for correctly discriminating benign from malignant lesions.

  8. Testicular parenchymal abnormalities in Klinefelter syndrome: a question of cancer? Examination of 40 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Giacomo; Vallone, Gianfranco; Esposito, Daniela; Barbato, Filomena; Renzullo, Andrea; Conzo, Giovanni; Docimo, Giovanni; Esposito, Katherine; Pasquali, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism characterized by a 47, XXY karyotype. The risk of testicular cancer in KS is of interest in relation to theories about testicular cancer etiology generally; nevertheless it seems to be low. We evaluated the need for imaging and serum tumor markers for testicular cancer screening in KS. Participants were 40 consecutive KS patients, enrolled from December 2009 to January 2013. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), and beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin subunit (β-HCG) serum levels assays and testicular ultrasound (US) with color Doppler, were carried out at study entry, after 6 months and every year for 3 years. Abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) was performed in KS when testicular US showed micro-calcifications, testicular nodules and cysts. Nearly 62% of the KS had regular testicular echotexture, 37.5% showed an irregular echotexture and 17.5% had micro-calcifications and cysts. Eighty seven percent of KS had a regular vascular pattern, 12.5% varicocele, 12.5% nodules 1 cm. MR ruled out the diagnosis of cancer in all KS with testicular micro calcifications, nodules and cysts. No significant variations in LDH, AFP, and β-HCG levels and in US pattern have been detected during follow-up. We compared serum tumor markers and US pattern between KS with and without cryptorchidism and no statistical differences were found. We did not find testicular cancer in KS, and testicular US, tumor markers and MR were, in selected cases, useful tools for correctly discriminating benign from malignant lesions.

  9. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  10. Public Health Approaches and Barriers to Educating Providers about Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Trepanier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services implemented and evaluated two initiatives designed to enhance provider knowledge of patients appropriate for breast and/or ovarian cancer genetic risk assessment and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC syndrome testing. The first initiative targeted select providers who had diagnosed patients meeting HBOC risk criteria. Specifically, the initiative used 2008–2009 state cancer registry data to identify all providers who had diagnosed breast cancers in women ≤50 years of age, male breast cancers, and ovarian cancers in four health systems with newly established cancer genetics clinics. Using a method coined bidirectional reporting (BDR, reports highlighting how many of these cases each provider had seen were generated and mailed. Reports on 475 cancers (9.5% of the 5005 cases statewide meeting criteria were sent to 69 providers with information about how and why to refer such patients for genetic counseling. Providers who received a report were contacted to assess whether the reports increased awareness or resulted in action (genetic counseling/referral. Based on the few responses received, despite multiple attempts to contact, and attrition rate, it is not possible to ascertain the impact of this initiative on providers. However the project resulted in the MDHHS identifying which providers see the largest proportion of at-risk patients, creating an opportunity to target those providers with HBOC education efforts. The second initiative involved creating and broadly disseminating an online, interactive case-based educational module to increase awareness and referral decisions for HBOC using high- and low-risk patient scenarios. A total of 1835 unique users accessed the module in a one year. Collectively the users viewed topic pages 2724 times and the interactive case studies 1369 times. Point of care tools (fact sheets were viewed 1624 times and downloaded 764 times. Satisfaction

  11. Public Health Approaches and Barriers to Educating Providers about Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Angela M; Supplee, Laura; Blakely, Lindsey; McLosky, Jenna; Duquette, Debra

    2016-03-11

    The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services implemented and evaluated two initiatives designed to enhance provider knowledge of patients appropriate for breast and/or ovarian cancer genetic risk assessment and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome testing. The first initiative targeted select providers who had diagnosed patients meeting HBOC risk criteria. Specifically, the initiative used 2008-2009 state cancer registry data to identify all providers who had diagnosed breast cancers in women ≤50 years of age, male breast cancers, and ovarian cancers in four health systems with newly established cancer genetics clinics. Using a method coined bidirectional reporting (BDR), reports highlighting how many of these cases each provider had seen were generated and mailed. Reports on 475 cancers (9.5% of the 5005 cases statewide meeting criteria) were sent to 69 providers with information about how and why to refer such patients for genetic counseling. Providers who received a report were contacted to assess whether the reports increased awareness or resulted in action (genetic counseling/referral). Based on the few responses received, despite multiple attempts to contact, and attrition rate, it is not possible to ascertain the impact of this initiative on providers. However the project resulted in the MDHHS identifying which providers see the largest proportion of at-risk patients, creating an opportunity to target those providers with HBOC education efforts. The second initiative involved creating and broadly disseminating an online, interactive case-based educational module to increase awareness and referral decisions for HBOC using high- and low-risk patient scenarios. A total of 1835 unique users accessed the module in a one year. Collectively the users viewed topic pages 2724 times and the interactive case studies 1369 times. Point of care tools (fact sheets) were viewed 1624 times and downloaded 764 times. Satisfaction among the subset of

  12. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Houweling; L.M. Gijezen; M.A. Jonker; M.B.A. van Doorn; R.A. Oldenburg; K.Y. van Spaendonck-Zwarts; E.M. Leter; T.A. van Os; N.C.T. van Grieken; E.H. Jaspars; M.M. de Jong; E.M.H.F. Bongers; P.C. Johannesma; P.E. Postmus; R.J.A. van Moorselaar; J.H.T.M. van Waesberghe; T.M. Starink; M.A.M. van Steensel; J.J.P. Gille; F.H. Menko

    2011-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main focus of this st

  13. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome; An analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Houweling (Arjan); L.M. Gijezen (L.); M.A. Jonker (Marianne); M.B. van Doorn (Martijn); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); K.Y. van Spaendonck-Zwarts (Karin); E.M. Leter (Edward); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); N.C.T. Grieken (Nicole); J.J. Jaspars (Joris); M.M. de Jong (Mirjam); E. Bongers (Ernie); P.C. Johannesma (P.); D. Postmus (Douwe); R.J.A. van Moorselaar; J.-H. van Waesberghe (J.); T.M. Starink; M.A.M. van Steensel; J.J. Gille (Johan); F. Menko

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. T

  14. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, A. C.; Gijezen, L. M.; Jonker, M. A.; van Doorn, M. B. A.; Oldenburg, R. A.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Leter, E. M.; van Os, T. A.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Jaspars, E. H.; de Jong, M. M.; Johannesma, P. C.; Postmus, P. E.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; van Waesberghe, J-H T. M.; Starink, T. M.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Menko, F. H.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main focu

  15. Sequential fluctuating paraneoplastic ocular flutter-opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in small-cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Simister, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration may occur in association with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), but to our knowledge, the co-occurrence of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and LEMS has not been previously reported. A 67-year-old woman presented with a complex partial seizure and evolving ocular flutter, opsoclonus, myoclonus and \\'cerebellar\\' signs, all of which improved spontaneously within 6 weeks. Approximately 8 weeks after symptom onset, the patient became encephalopathic, she had a further complex partial seizure, and she became areflexic with potentiation of deep tendon reflexes. Radiological, bronchoscopic and histological investigations revealed small-cell lung cancer, and neurophysiological investigations confirmed a diagnosis of LEMS. High-titre anti-P\\/Q-type voltage-gated calcium-channel antibodies were identified in the serum, which increased as the signs of opsoclonus and myoclonus resolved. The encephalopathy and clinical features of LEMS responded dramatically to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Spontaneous improvement of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome may occur, and this syndrome may occur in association with LEMS. Antivoltage-gated calcium-channel antibodies are not implicated in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

  16. Nanocytology of rectal colonocytes to assess risk of colon cancer based on field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K; Subramanian, Hariharan; Weinberg, David S; Rex, Douglas K; Goldberg, Michael J; Muldoon, Joseph; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhu, Yuanjia; Bianchi, Laura K; Shah, Dhiren; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Borkar, Monica; Lynch, Henry; Backman, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Developing a minimally invasive and cost-effective prescreening strategy for colon cancer is critical because of the impossibility of conducting colonoscopy on the entire at-risk population. The concept of field carcinogenesis, in which normal-appearing tissue away from a tumor has molecular and, consequently, nano-architectural abnormalities, offers one attractive approach to identify high-risk patients. In this study, we investigated whether the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy could risk-stratify patients harboring precancerous lesions of the colon, using an optically measured biomarker (L(d)) obtained from microscopically normal but nanoscopically altered cells. Rectal epithelial cells were examined from 146 patients, including 72 control patients, 14 patients with diminutive adenomas, 20 patients with nondiminutive/nonadvanced adenomas, 15 patients with advanced adenomas/high-grade dysplasia, 12 patients with genetic mutation leading to Lynch syndrome, and 13 patients with cancer. We found that the L(d) obtained from rectal colonocytes was well correlated with colon tumorigenicity in our patient cohort and in an independent validation set of 39 additional patients. Therefore, our findings suggest that PWS-measured L(d) is an accurate marker of field carcinogenesis. This approach provides a potential prescreening strategy for risk stratification before colonoscopy.

  17. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Jaspers, Jan P C

    2016-06-01

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors that can predict which counselees are most likely to develop psychological problems after presymptomatic genetic testing. Counselees with a 50 % risk of BRCA1/2 or Lynch syndrome completed questionnaires at three time-points: after receiving a written invitation for a genetic counseling intake (T1), 2-3 days after receiving their DNA test result (T2), and 4-6 weeks later (T3). The psychological impact of the genetic test result was examined shortly and 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Subsequently, the influence of various potentially prognostic factors on psychological impact were examined in the whole group. Data from 165 counselees were analyzed. Counselees with an unfavorable outcome did not have more emotional distress, but showed significantly more cancer worries 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Prognostic factors for cancer worries after genetic testing were pre-existing cancer worries, being single, a high risk perception of getting cancer, and an unfavorable test result. Emotional distress was best predicted by pre-existing cancer worries and pre-existing emotional distress. The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result appears considerable if it is measured as "worries about cancer." Genetic counselors should provide additional guidance to counselees with many cancer worries, emotional distress, a high risk perception or a weak social network.

  18. Impact of 226C>T MSH2 gene mutation on cancer phenotypes in two HNPCC-associated highly-consanguineous families from Kuwait: emphasis on premarital genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafie, Makia J; Al-Awadi, Sadiqa; Al-Mosawi, Fatemah; Elshafey, Alaa; Al-Ali, Waleed; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2009-01-01

    Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is one of the commonest cancer susceptibility syndromes. It is characterized by early onset colon cancer and a variety of extracolonic tumours. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS1, and PMS2) are responsible for this disorder. Identifying an affected individual depends on the tumour histopathology, family history that fulfils the Amsterdam and/or Bethesda criteria, tumour immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability, and finally molecular analysis of an affected member. It is a laborious, time consuming and expensive procedure, which needs the effort of a multi-disciplinary team. However, once the diagnosis is established and germline defect is identified, other high risk pre-symptomatic carriers could be offered intensive surveillance and management as a preventive measure against cancer development. Here, we present two large highly consanguineous HNPCC-families from Kuwait in whom a founder MSH2 mutation was identified. The relationship between this mutation and cancer expressivity in two large consanguineous families harbouring other genetic defects is discussed. Moreover, we shed light on the challenges pertaining to diagnosis, screening, premarital counselling of couples and prenatal diagnosis of offspring with biallelic MSH2 gene mutation.

  19. Ectopic Cushing syndrome secondary to metastatic medullary thyroid cancer in a child with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2B: clues to early diagnosis of the paraneoplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Kanakadurga; Heiniger, Nicholas; Thomas, Inas; Worden, Francis P; Menon, Ram K; Chen, Ming

    2014-09-01

    We describe a 13-year-old male with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2B with medullary thyroid carcinoma who was diagnosed with ectopic adrenocorticotropin-dependent Cushing syndrome. This report highlights the importance of monitoring for paraneoplastic syndrome in MEN and clues to the diagnosis of this complication provided by growth patterns.

  20. Study on TCM Syndrome Differentiation of Primary Liver Cancer Based on the Analysis of Latent Structural Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary liver cancer (PLC is one of the most common malignant tumors because of its high incidence and high mortality. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM plays an active role in the treatment of PLC. As the most important part in the TCM system, syndrome differentiation based on the clinical manifestations from traditional four diagnostic methods has met great challenges and questions with the lack of statistical validation support. In this study, we provided evidences for TCM syndrome differentiation of PLC using the method of analysis of latent structural model from clinic data, thus providing basis for establishing TCM syndrome criteria. And also we obtain the common syndromes of PLC as well as their typical clinical manifestations, respectively.

  1. Rapid Mutation Scanning of Genes Associated with Familial Cancer Syndromes Using Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J. Marsh

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, or less frequently oncogenes, have been identified in up to 19 familial cancer syndromes including Li-Fraumeni syndrome, familial paraganglioma, familial adenomatous polyposis coli and breast and ovarian cancers. Multiple genes have been associated with some syndromes as approximately 26 genes have been linked to the development of these familial cancers. With this increased knowledge of the molecular determinants of familial cancer comes an equal expectation for efficient genetic screening programs. We have trialled denaturing highperformance liquid chromatography (dHPLC as a tool for rapid germline mutation scanning of genes implicated in three familial cancer syndromes - Cowden syndrome (PTEN mutation, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (RET mutation and von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL mutation. Thirty-two mutations, including 21 in PTEN, 9 in RET plus a polymorphism, and 2 in VHL, were analyzed using the WAVE DNA fragment analysis system with 100% detection efficiency. In the case of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN, mutations were scattered along most of the gene. However, mutations in the RET proto-oncogene associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 were limited to specific clusters or “hot spots”. The use of GC-clamped primers to scan for mutations scattered along PTEN exons was shown to greatly enhance the sensitivity of detection of mutant hetero- and homoduplex peaks at a single denaturation temperature compared to fragments generated using non-GC-clamped primers. Thus, when scanning tumor suppressor genes for germline mutation using dHPLC, the incorporation of appropriate GCclamped primers will likely increase the efficiency of mutation detection.

  2. Clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁瑛; 叶俊; 郑树

    2004-01-01

    Background Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPPC) is one of the most common genetic syndrome related with mutation of human mismatch repair genes. This study was to evaluate the clinical significance of suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (sHNPCC) criteria I and the clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-HNPCC (ICG-HNPCC) and sHNPCC families.Methods Twenty-nine ICG-HNPCC families fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria and 34 sHNPCC families fulfilling the sHNPCC criteria I were collected. PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing analysis were employed to screen the germline mutations of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes in these families.Results The ICG group had more colorectal cancer (CRC) patients per family than did the suspected group (P0.05), mutation type, and mutation distribution. Comparison of the families with and without mutation showed no significant difference in CRC patients per family, Lynch classification, and tumor spectrum.Conclusions ICG-HNPCC and sHNPCC families that have similar clinical manifestations and genetic basis indicate a similar nature for cancer development. The application of sHNPCC criteria I will facilitate clinical diagnosis and treatment of small families.

  3. Fish oil, lean tissue, and cancer: is there a role for eicosapentaenoic acid in treating the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Aminah

    2005-07-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid is an omega-3 fatty acid, a group of fatty acids characterized by a double bond that sits three carbons down from the n terminal of the molecule. Derived from dark, rich fish, eicosapentaenoic acid has received increasing attention as a therapy for the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome. Multiple studies, including laboratory and preliminary clinical studies suggest this fish oil derivative may benefit cancer patients. Recently, however, three large comparative studies suggest that eicosapentaenoic acid is relatively ineffective for treating this syndrome. In view of these recent results, the goals of this review are as follows: (1) to provide background on the mandate for further study of the cancer-associated anorexia/weight loss syndrome; (2) to review the preliminary data that have suggested that eicosapentaenoic acid is a promising agent for treating this syndrome; (3) to review the methodology and findings of the more recent, definitive clinical trials; (4) to discuss and speculate on why the earlier positive findings drew conclusions that are discrepant from the results of more recent comparative clinical studies.

  4. Learning about Cri du Chat Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learning About Prostate Cancer Learning About Cri du Chat Syndrome What is cri du chat syndrome? What ... cri du chat syndrome What is cri du chat syndrome? Cri du chat syndrome - also known as ...

  5. Breast cancer in patients with Li–Fraumeni syndrome – a case-series study and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandikolla, Amara G; Venugopal, Sangeetha; Anampa, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Background Li–Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is a rare disease with autosomal dominant inheritance linked to germline mutations of tumor suppressor gene TP53. These patients are predisposed to malignancies such as sarcoma, breast cancer, leukemia, and other malignancies. Breast cancer, the most common malignancy in adult patients with LFS, has an early-onset presentation and is usually treated as per the guidelines for the general population due to the limited literature about breast cancer in LFS. We aimed to describe our institutional experience treating patients with breast cancer and LFS to contribute to literature about this entity. Design Retrospective single-institution case-series study. We searched for cases with LFS and breast cancer from 01/01/2000 to 12/31/2015 with treatment received at our institution. Results We identified 4 cases (2 African Americans, 1 Indian, and 1 Hispanic) in 4 different families, who were diagnosed with LFS after presenting with breast cancer. Three cases were triple-negative disease and 1 case was ER+, HER2 positive disease. They were treated with mastectomy and a third-generation breast chemotherapy regimen and/or trastuzumab-containing regimen. Radiation therapy was used in 2 patients. Breast cancer recurrence was seen in 1 patient, while three other malignancies were identified after breast cancer treatment (1 breast sarcoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, and 1 myelodysplastic syndrome). A patient, who underwent surveillance with a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan, was found to have a stage I leiomyosarcoma and was treated with surgical resection, but then developed metastatic disease requiring cytotoxic chemotherapy. Conclusion Breast cancer among patients with LFS needs a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Surgical management follows the guidelines for the general population. Risk–benefit assessment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy needs to be performed carefully in a case-by-case approach. Patients should

  6. Engagement with Genetic Information and Uptake of Genetic Testing: the Role of Trust and Personal Cancer History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Megan C; Taber, Jennifer M; Klein, William M

    2017-01-20

    We used national survey data to (1) determine the extent to which individuals trust the sources from which they are most likely to receive information about cancer-related genetic tests (BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome), (2) examine how level of trust for sources of genetic information might be related to cancer-related genetic testing uptake, and (3) determine whether key factors, such as cancer history and numeracy, moderate the latter association. We used cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey. Our study sample included individuals who responded that they had heard or read about genetic tests (n = 1117). All analyses accounted for complex survey design. Although respondents trusted information from health professionals the most, they were significantly less likely to report hearing about genetic testing from such professionals than via television (p information source from which participants heard about genetic tests were associated with increased odds of genetic testing uptake, particularly among those with a personal cancer history. Numeracy was not associated with genetic testing uptake. Because health professionals were among the most trusted health information sources, they may serve as important brokers of genetic testing information for those with a personal cancer history.

  7. NUTRITION AND FITNESS (PART 1: OBESITY, THE METABOLIC SYNDROME, CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE, AND CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Nutrition and Fitness held in Athens, Greece, on June 91-2, 2004 are presented in the book as the first volume of the series. The objectives of the book are to review/discuss the latest information on nutrition and fitness by taking into consideration i genetic endowment, ii adaptation to the nutritional factors and the effect of various resources of energy on exercise and performance, iii the epidemiology of obesity, iv the relationship of nutrition and fitness to chronic diseases (cardiovascular diseases, syndrome X, obesity, osteoporosis, diabetes, cancer. The book also discusses the classification system of obesity in several countries and compares the diets used in several regions/countries. FEATURES A common, uniform strategy and evidence-based approach to organizing and interpreting the literature is used in all chapters. This textbook is composed of three parts with sub-sections in three of them. The topics of the parts are: i Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, ii Coronary Heart Disease and iii Cancer. In each specific chapter, an epidemiological picture has been systematically developed from the data available in prospective, retrospective, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. The tables and figures are numerous, helpful and very useful. AUDIENCE This book is almost a compulsory reading for anyone interested in cardiovascular system, nutrition, metabolism, social and preventive medicine, clinical nutrition, diabetics, genetics, obesity, public health, sports medicine and for those wishing to run comprehensive research in this and relevant areas. The fact that the contributors are leading international researchers in this field makes this book more welcome. ASSESSMENT This book is almost a compulsory reading for anyone interested in pediatric injuries and for those wishing to run comprehensive research in this and relevant areas. The fact that the contributors are leading

  8. Dissecting the association between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer risk: analysis of a large clinical cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhindi, Bimal; Locke, Jennifer; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Kulkarni, Girish S; Margel, David S; Hamilton, Robert J; Finelli, Antonio; Trachtenberg, John; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Toi, Ants; Hersey, Karen M; Evans, Andrew; van der Kwast, Theodorus H; Fleshner, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    A biologic rationale exists for the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate cancer (PCa). However, epidemiologic studies have been conflicting. To evaluate the association between MetS and the odds of PCa diagnosis in men referred for biopsy. Patients without prior PCa diagnosis undergoing prostate biopsy were identified from a large prostate biopsy cohort (in Toronto, Canada). The definition of MetS was based on the most recent interim joint consensus definition, requiring any three of five components (obesity, elevated blood pressure, diabetes or impaired fasting glucose, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia). Both the individual components of MetS and the cumulative number of MetS components were evaluated. The outcomes were PCa detection overall, clinically significant PCa (CSPC; defined as any Gleason pattern ≥ 4, >50% involvement of a single biopsy core, or more than one of three total number of cores involved), and intermediate- or high-grade PCa (I-HGPC; Gleason 7-10). Tests for trend and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Of 2235 patients, 494 (22.1%) had MetS. No individual MetS component was independently associated with PCa. However, increasing number of MetS components was associated with higher PCa grade (pcancer grade. Metabolic syndrome is a collection of metabolic abnormalities that increases one's risk for heart disease. Our study shows that an increasing degree of metabolic abnormality is also associated with an increased risk of diagnosis of overall and aggressive prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. From Molecular Classification to Targeted Therapeutics: The Changing Face of Systemic Therapy in Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1 or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician’s therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  10. From molecular classification to targeted therapeutics: the changing face of systemic therapy in metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  11. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  12. Molecular approach to genetic and epigenetic pathogenesisof early-onset colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancertype and the incidence of this disease is increasinggradually per year in individuals younger than 50 yearsold. The current knowledge is that early-onset CRC(EOCRC) cases are heterogeneous population thatincludes both hereditary and sporadic forms of theCRC. Although EOCRC cases have some distinguishingclinical and pathological features than elder age CRC,the molecular mechanism underlying the EOCRC ispoorly clarified. Given the significance of CRC in theworld of medicine, the present review will focus on therecent knowledge in the molecular basis of genetic andepigenetic mechanism of the hereditary forms of EOCRC,which includes Lynch syndrome, Familial CRC type X,Familial adenomatous polyposis, MutYH-associatedpolyposis, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-JeghersSyndrome and sporadic forms of EOCRC. Recent findingsabout molecular genetics and epigenetic basis of EOCRCgave rise to new alternative therapy protocols. Althoughexact diagnosis of these cases still remains complicated,the present review paves way for better predictions andcontributes to more accurate diagnostic and therapeuticstrategies into clinical approach.

  13. Breast cancer risk is not increased in individuals with TWIST1 mutation confirmed Saethre-Chotzen syndrome: an Australian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Paul A; Culling, Bronwyn; Mullan, Glenda; Jenkins, Mark; Elakis, George; Turner, Anne M; Mowat, David M; Wilson, Meredith; Anderson, Peter; Savarirayan, Ravi; Cliffe, Simon T; Caramins, Melody; Buckley, Michael F; Tucker, Kathy; Roscioli, Tony

    2009-07-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome involving craniosynostosis, craniofacial abnormalities, and syndactyly. A recent Scandinavian study reported an increased risk of breast cancer in individuals with a clinical diagnosis of SCS. Because of the potential importance of this finding, we organized a multicenter study enrolling people with TWIST1 mutation confirmed SCS to determine if an increased risk of cancer is present. This study did not identify any cases of breast or ovarian cancer in a cohort of equivalent power to that reported previously. These results provide clinical reassurance that at present there is no evidence for breast cancer screening above standard practice for individuals with SCS.

  14. Occult Breast Cancer due to Multiple Calcified Hamartomas in a Patient with Cowden Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Gómez García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome (CS is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by presence of multiple hamartomas, and other benign and malignant abnormalities of the breasts, skin, thyroid, endometrium, gastrointestinal tract, and central nervous system. Hamartomas are benign, developmentally disorganized tumors that can develop in any of the above mentioned organs. The presence of massive calcifications in the breasts in very young women is an indication to perform a breast MRI to exclude a neoplasm since, like in the current case report, presence of breast calcifications may obscure a neoplasm. Although fibrocystic disease and cooccurrence of fibrocystic disease and breast cancer are much more common than CS, the presence of massive calcifications in the breasts of very young women should elicit the possibility of an underlying genetic disease. Furthermore, breast cancer and macrocephaly are considered major criteria for the diagnosis of CS and the combination of both is enough to establish the clinical diagnosis of this entity. Fibrocystic disease of the breasts and multinodular goiter are minor criteria. Family history is also important for the diagnosis of (any hereditary disease.

  15. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria a

  16. Breast cancer risk is not increased in individuals with TWIST1 mutation confirmed Saethre-Chotzen syndrome: an Australian multicenter study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, P.A.; Culling, B.; Mullan, G.; Jenkins, M.; Elakis, G.; Turner, A.M.; Mowat, D.; Wilson, M.; Anderson, P.; Savarirayan, R.; Cliffe, S.T.; Caramins, M.; Buckley, M.F.; Tucker, K.; Roscioli, T.

    2009-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome involving craniosynostosis, craniofacial abnormalities, and syndactyly. A recent Scandinavian study reported an increased risk of breast cancer in individuals with a clinical diagnosis of SCS. Because of the potential importance of

  17. Effects of total-body digital photography on cancer worry in patients with atypical mole syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Molly S; King, Sallyann M C; Rice, Zakiya P; DeLong, Laura K; Seidler, Anne M; Veledar, Emir; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Chen, Suephy C

    2015-02-01

    Cancer worry about developing melanoma in at-risk patients may affect one's quality of life and adherence to screening. Little is known about melanoma-related worry in patients with atypical mole syndrome (AMS). To quantify levels and elucidate predictors of worry related to developing melanoma in patients with AMS and to determine whether total-body digital photography (TBDP) in pigmented lesion clinics (PLCs) reduces worry. In this pretest-posttest study, patients with AMS from PLCs at 2 academic medical centers were recruited from June 1, 2005, through October 31, 2008, to answer questions about cancer worry before and after undergoing TBDP. Questionnaires used included the new melanoma and recurrent melanoma Revised Impact of Event Scale (RIES), the Melanoma Worry Scale (MWS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Life Orientation Test. All patients underwent TBDP. Changes in the MWS and new melanoma RIES scores. A total of 138 patients completed baseline questionnaires; 108 patients (78.3%) completed questionnaires after TBDP. Baseline levels of worry were low and reduced further after TBDP. In patients with a personal history of melanoma, worry was reduced on all scales. In patients without a personal history of melanoma, only the new melanoma RIES score was significantly decreased. Predictors of baseline MWS scores include female sex, personal history of melanoma, and higher Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, adjusted for demographics, family history of melanoma, and Life Orientation Test scores. Adjusted predictors of the baseline new melanoma RIES score were similar but also included lower educational level and did not include sex. Patients with AMS have low levels of melanoma-related worry, which is similar to data from other populations at high risk of cancers. We found that TBDP is a clinically useful tool that can be used in PLCs to help decrease worry about developing melanoma in at-risk patients.

  18. Case Report of Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome: Germline Mutations of FLCN Detected in Patients With Renal Cancer and Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Gao, Ming; Hao, Wei-Jing; Zheng, Xiang-Qian; Li, Yi-Gong; Li, Xiao-Long; Yu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome that is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas and/or trichodiscomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal tumors. Here, the 2 patients we reported with renal cell carcinomas and dermatological features were suspected to be suffering from BHD syndrome. Blood samples of these patients were sent for whole exon sequencing performed by Sanger sequencing. Eight mutations, including 5 mutations, which were mapped in noncoding region, 1 synonymous mutation, and 2 missense mutations, were detected in the FLCN gene in both patients. The 2 missense mutations, predicted to be disease-causing mutation or affecting protein function by MutationTaster and SIFT, confirmed the diagnosis. In addition, the 2 patients were also affected with papillary thyroid cancer. Total thyroidectomy and prophylactic bilateral central lymph node dissection were performed for them and the BHD-2 also received lateral lymph node dissection. Pathology reports showed that the patients had lymph node metastasis in spite of small size of thyroid lesions.The 2 missense mutations, not reported previously, expand the mutation spectrum of FLCN gene associated with BHD syndrome. For the thyroid cancer patients with BHD syndrome, total thyroidectomy and prophylactic bilateral central lymph node dissection may be suitable and the neck ultrasound may benefit BHD patients and their family members.

  19. The reflectance confocal microscopy features of sebaceous adenoma in a case of Muir Torre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma İnan Yüksel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the occurrence of sebaceous gland neoplasms and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. It is considered as a subtype of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome. Characteristic sebaceous gland neoplasms include sebaceous adenoma, sebaceous carcinoma, sebaceoma, and keratoacanthoma with sebaceous differentiation. The most common visceral malignancies are colorectal and genitourinary tumors. CASE: A 47year-old male patient admitted to our clinic complaining of two lesions on the nose. Dermatological examination revealed a plaque in 1 cm diameter consisting of bright yellowish-white coloured papules with slightly umblicated appearance and telangiectasias on the left site of the nose and had a dome shaped papule in 3 mm diameter with hyperkeratotic plug on the tip of the nose. He had personal history of partial colon resection because of colon cancer and familial Lynch 2 syndrome. On dermoscopic examination of sebaceous adenoma, a few yellow comedo-like globules and branching arborizing vessels were detected. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM revealed a good histopathologic correlation. Sebaceous lobules were composed by clusters of ovoid cells with hyporefractile dark nuclei and bright, hyperrefractile glistening cytoplasm. Numerous roundish to ovoid dark spaces corresponding to sebaceous ducts were detected. The diagnosis of MTS was established based on the personal and family history, dermoscopic, RCM and histopathologic findings. CONCLUSIONS: MTS evaluation is required in patients with biopsy-proven sebaceous adenoma. Early diagnosis may be lifesaving in patients with MTS. A better characterization of RCM features of sebaceous tumors will allow early diagnosis of the patients with MTS.

  20. Competing interests in a lung cancer with metastasis to the pituitary gland: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion versus diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsin, Gaurav Singh; Jacobs, Madeleine Louisa Bryson; Gohil, Shailesh; Thomas, Adam; Levy, Miles

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the pituitary gland are rare; cancers that most commonly metastasize to the pituitary are breast and lung cancers. No specific computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging features reliably distinguish primary pituitary masses from metastases. A combination of a detailed clinical assessment together with specialist endocrine and neuroradiology support is essential to make the rare diagnosis of a pituitary metastasis. We present the case of a man with metastatic lung cancer, initially presenting as hypopituitarism. Subtle features in the history, together with neuroimaging findings atypical for pituitary adenomas, provided clues that the diagnosis was one of the pituitary metastases. Treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI) with replacement antidiuretic hormone (ADH) was complicated by extreme difficulties in achieving a satisfactory sodium and water balance. This was the result of coexistent DI and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion perpetuated by the patient's primary lung cancer, a phenomenon not previously described in the literature.

  1. [Standardization of syndrome differentiation based on stages for breast cancer: a significant and updating topic on mastology of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Chen, Qian-Jun; Liu, Peng-Xi

    2006-09-01

    The incidence of breast cancer increased rapidly in recent years. Breast cancer has become the most frequent malignant tumor of female especially in the developed regions. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is effective in treating breast cancer, but its theories appear hysteretic, restricting the progress in clinical practice, teaching and research of TCM in the treatment of breast cancer. This article described the significance and urgency to work out the standardization of syndrome differentiation based on stages for breast cancer and put it into practice. It also analyzed the foundations, ideas and approaches of the research of standardization of syndrome differentiation based on stages for breast cancer in light of the changes of spectrum of diseases, the weaknesses of modern medicine in treating breast cancer, and the existed problems in the update clinical practice.

  2. Fatal posterior revesible leukoencephalopathy syndrome associated coma induced by bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryılmaz, Melek Karakurt; Mutlu, Hasan; Salim, Derya Kıvrak; Musri, Fatma Yalçın; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol

    2016-12-01

    Posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a syndrome characterized by headache, hypertension, confusion, visual disturbance, and seizures accompanied by subcortical vasogenic edema, predominantly involving the parietal and occipital lobes. The syndrome is usually described in malignant hypertension, eclampsia, renal failure, immunosuppressive, and cytotoxic chemotherapies. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been linked to PRES. We carried out review of reports documenting the occurrence of PRES in patients receiving bevacizumab. This literature review was conducted by utilizing PubMed Database. If early diagnosed, PRES is reversible. We present a case of fatal PRES-associated coma induced by bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Brady-tachycardia syndrome after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Assessment by computed tomography and carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Michihata, Tetsuo; Katagiri, Takashi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Okazaki, Osamu; Izumo, Kazuhide; Harumi, Kenichi

    1999-09-01

    A 74-year-old male who had received radiotherapy (total 54 Gy) for right lung cancer 7 months earlier developed a symptomatic brady-tachycardia syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. Chest CT showed a pulmonary tumor of 2-cm diameter in the right lower lobe with direct extension into the surrounding tissue, suggesting the possibility of cardiac invasion. Carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography (PET) indicated the absence of visible invasion of the heart with lung cancer. The brady-tachycardia syndrome, therefore, was considered to be associated with sinus node injury due to radiation. Carbon-11 methionine PET metabolic imaging might play an important role in evaluating noninvasively the cause of the arrhythmia in this patient. (author)

  4. The Relationship between Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Colorectal Cancer: The Future Challenges and Outcomes of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said O. Muhidin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is closely related to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidaemia. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with an increased cancer risk, and recent evidence demonstrated an association between NAFLD and colorectal cancer (CRC. The mechanism of how NAFLD can be associated with increased risk of CRC is not fully understood; however, NAFLD represents a condition of profound insulin resistance and a proinflammatory state. Insulin and insulin-like growth factors may promote the development of CRC through their proliferative and antiapoptotic effects. Patients with NAFLD have reduced expression of adiponectin, an adipokine with anti-inflammatory effects. Importantly, hypoadiponectinemia is associated with an increased risk of CRC. Decreased levels of adiponectin lead to increased insulin levels due to marked insulin resistance and in turn increased insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1. Insulin binds to IGF-1 receptors and plays an important role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and increased production of vascular endothelial growth factor, an angiogenic factor that supports cancer growth. Further studies are needed to establish (i the pathophysiology of NAFLD with colorectal cancer, (ii the benefit of early screening of CRC in NAFLD patients, and (iii the impact of treatment of NAFLD in the modulation of the risk of colorectal cancer.

  5. [A case of hemolytic uremic syndrome after adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine in a patient with pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wato, Masaki; Inaba, Tomoki; Ishikawa, Hisashi; Ishikawa, Shigenao; Baba, Nobuyuki; Miyoshi, Masatsugu; Senoh, Tomonori; Nagano, Takuya; Takaguchi, Koichi; Watanabe, Seishiro; Kawai, Kozo

    2010-10-01

    A 63-year-old man with Stage IVa pancreas tail cancer was admitted for a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy; adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine was also administered. The chemotherapy was terminated after 16 courses due to hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. Plasma exchange was performed; however the patient's renal function was diminished, requiring chronic hemodialysis. Physicians should be cautious of hemolytic uremic syndrome as a possible adverse reaction to gemcitabine and be aware that tests are needed for its early detection.

  6. Iconografía, música y narración en Wild at Heart, de David Lynch

    OpenAIRE

    García Escrivá, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    El análisis del texto fílmico Corazón Salvaje (Wild at Heart, David Lynch, EEUU, 1990) permite localizar toda una serie de rasgos característicos de la narrativa y la estética cinematográfica posmoderna. Por un lado, el film presenta una notable descomposición narrativa, lo que se traduce en una sucesión de escenas un tanto inconexas, a modo de cuadros intensos pero poco trabados. Asimismo, en la película se produce una suerte de hibridación de géneros, aglutinados por un tono general de paro...

  7. Lower limb compartment syndrome by reperfusion injury after treatment of arterial thrombosis post-laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jihee; Jung, Ye Won; Yang, Shin Seok; Kang, Byung Hun; Lee, Mina; Ko, Young Bok; Yang, Jung Bo; Lee, Ki Hwan; Yoo, Heon Jong

    2017-03-01

    Compartment syndrome is a clinical condition associated with decreased blood circulation that can lead to swelling of tissue in limited space. Several factors including lithotomy position, prolonged surgery, intermittent pneumatic compressor, and reperfusion after treatment of arterial thrombosis may contribute to compartment syndrome. However, compartment syndrome rarely occurs after gynecologic surgery. In this case, the patient was diagnosed as compartment syndrome due to reperfusion injury after treatment of arterial thrombosis, which occurred after laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection for cervical cancer. Despite its rarity, prevention and identifying the risk factors of complication should be performed perioperatively; furthermore, gynecologist should be aware of the possibility of complications.

  8. Lower limb compartment syndrome by reperfusion injury after treatment of arterial thrombosis post-laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jihee; Jung, Ye Won; Yang, Shin Seok; Kang, Byung Hun; Lee, Mina; Ko, Young Bok; Yang, Jung Bo; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a clinical condition associated with decreased blood circulation that can lead to swelling of tissue in limited space. Several factors including lithotomy position, prolonged surgery, intermittent pneumatic compressor, and reperfusion after treatment of arterial thrombosis may contribute to compartment syndrome. However, compartment syndrome rarely occurs after gynecologic surgery. In this case, the patient was diagnosed as compartment syndrome due to reperfusion injury after treatment of arterial thrombosis, which occurred after laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection for cervical cancer. Despite its rarity, prevention and identifying the risk factors of complication should be performed perioperatively; furthermore, gynecologist should be aware of the possibility of complications. PMID:28344966

  9. Hypogonadism in testicular cancer patients is associated with risk factors of cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogefors, C; Isaksson, S; Bobjer, J; Kitlinski, M; Leijonhufvud, I; Link, K; Giwercman, A

    2017-07-01

    More than 95% of testicular cancer are cured but they are at increased long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. The risk of cardiovascular disease and treatment intensity was reported, but it is unknown whether this effect of cancer therapy is direct or indirect, mediated through androgen deficiency. Our aim was, therefore, to evaluate whether testicular cancer patients have increased the prevalence of risk factors of cardiovascular disease and if these risk factors are associated with hypogonadism and/or the cancer treatment given. In 92 testicular cancer patients (mean 9.2 years follow-up) and age-matched controls, blood samples were analysed for lipids, total testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), glucose and insulin. An estimate of insulin resistance, HOMAir was calculated. Hypogonadism was defined as total testosterone  10 IU/L and/or androgen replacement. In testicular cancer men with hypogonadism, compared with eugonadal patients, higher insulin (mean difference: 3.10 mIU/L; p = 0.002) and HOMAir (mean difference: 0.792; p = 0.007) were detected. Hypogonadism group presented with increased risk (OR = 4.4; p = 0.01) of metabolic syndrome. Most associations between the treatment given and the metabolic parameters became statistically non-significant after adjustment for hypogonadism. In conclusion, testicular cancer patients with signs of hypogonadism presented with significantly increased risk of metabolic syndrome and investigation of endocrine and metabolic parameters is warranted in these patients. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  10. Metabolic syndrome and risk of incident diabetes: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Hans-Georg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several aspects concerning the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes are incompletely understood including the magnitude of the risk estimate, potential gender differences in the associations between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes, the associations between the components of the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes, and whether the metabolic syndrome provides additional prediction beyond its components. To shed light on these issues, we examined the prospective association between the metabolic syndrome defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP and International Diabetes Federation (IDF and diabetes. Methods We used data for 2796 men and women aged 35–65 years from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study followed for an average of 6.9 years. This analysis employed a case-cohort design that included 697 participants who developed diabetes and 2099 participants who did not. Incident diabetes was identified on the basis of self-reports and verified by contacting the patient's attending physician. Results The adjusted hazard ratio for the NCEP definition was 4.62 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.90–5.48 and that for the IDF definition was 4.59 (95% CI: 3.84–5.50. The adjusted hazard ratios for the NCEP but not IDF definition were higher for women than men. When participants who had no cardiometabolic abnormalities were used as the reference group for the NCEP definition, the adjusted hazard ratio for having 3 or more abnormalities increased to 22.50 (95% CI: 11.21–45.19. Of the five components, abdominal obesity and hyperglycemia were most strongly associated with incident diabetes. Conclusion In this study population, both definitions of the metabolic syndrome provided similar estimates of relative risk for incident diabetes. The increase in risk for participants with the metabolic syndrome according to the NCEP

  11. MODERN POSSIBILITIES OF IMPORT SUBSTITUTION IN THE TREATMENT OF PAIN SYNDROME IN CANCER P ATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Abuzarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of prosidol in cheek tablets in the treatment of chronic pain syndrome in cancer patients.Material and methods. The study was conducted at 152 cancer patients with chronic pain syndrome caused by  malignant neoplasms. The objectification of pain intensity was conducted on a 5 — point verbal scale assessments (SVA, assessed the state of physical activity of patients on a 5‑point scale ECOG, objectified the mental status and a night’s sleep: 0‑no pain; 1 — slight pain; 2 — moderate pain; 3 — severe pain; 4 points unbearable pain. We registered the duration of analgesic effect of prosidol, calculated single and daily doses of analgesic in the dynamics on the stages of therapy and its side effects. The results of the study were assessed on stages: 1 — initial, before treatment, 2 — first day of therapy, 3 — completion of the selection of doses of analgesic (3–4 days, 4 — a week after the start of treatment, 5–2 weeks after the start of treatment, 6 — at the end of the 3rd week of treatment.Results. Initial single dose of buccal prosidol (20 mg caused effective analgesia after 10 to 45 (21,3+8,9 minutes after the first dose and lasted from 1 to 8 (6,0+1,8 hours: 21.8% of patients complete elimination of pain (more than 50% from baseline; in 63.6% of the pain was reduced by 30–50%; reduction of pain less than 30% — in 14.6% of patients. In General, a significant decrease in the intensity of pain with 2,47+0.37 to 0.5 to+0.30 VAS score (p<0.05. The failures of the drug were observed. All patients continued prosidol therapy after a 3‑week study period. The initial average daily dose of prosidol was 82.2 + 9,7 mg; 1 week of therapy — 112,3+16 mg, by the end of the 3rd week increased to 148,2+57 mg/day mg Tolerability was judged as good. Side effects: drowsiness and nausea most noted for 1–3 days of therapy was expressed moderately or

  12. Management of a patient with colon cancer and rotor syndrome: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARSLAN, DENIZ; AVCI, FATMA; MERDIN, ALPARSLAN; GUNDUZ, SEYDA; COSKUN, HASAN SENOL

    2014-01-01

    Rotor Syndrome (RS) is a rare disease that is autosomal recessive and characterized by asymptomatic jaundice, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and coproporphyria. RS occurs as a result of a complete lack or partial defect of organic anion transporter polypeptides (OATPs) on the basolateral surface of hepatocytes. OATPs facilitate the excretion of bilirubin and organic anions from the liver to the bile. To the best of our knowledge, there is no information in the literature relating to the treatment of a patient with colon cancer and RS. The present study aimed to discuss the systematic chemotherapy that is used and the effects on a 45-year-old patient who had RS with asymptomatic jaundice and was diagnosed with colon adenocarcinoma following surgery. The patient was administered oxaliplatin in combination with capecitabine. The patient’s biluribin level increased after one week. Capecitabine treatment was interrupted and the patient was administered oxaliplatin monotherapy. No significant toxicity was observed during that period. At the latest follow-up the patient did not exhibit any progression. PMID:24520296

  13. Bloom syndrome, genomic instability and cancer: the SOS-like hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2006-05-08

    Bloom syndrome (BS) displays one of the strongest known correlations between chromosomal instability and an increased risk of malignancy at an early age. The prevention of genomic instability and cancer depends on a complex network of pathways induced in response to DNA damage and stalled replication forks, including cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Several studies have demonstrated that BLM is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and stalled replication forks. BLM interacts physically and functionally with several proteins involved in the maintenance of genome integrity and BLM is redistributed and/or phosphorylated in response to several genotoxic stresses. The data concerning the relationship between BLM and these cellular pathways are summarized and the role of BLM in the rescue of arrested replication forks is discussed. Moreover, I speculate that BLM deficiency is lethal, and that BLM-deficient cells escaping apoptotic death do so by constitutively inducing a bacterial SOS-like response including the induction of alternative replication pathway(s) dependent on recombination, contributing to the mutator and hyper-Rec phenotypes characteristic of BS cells. This mechanism may be dependent on the RAD51 gene family, and involved in carcinogenesis in the general population.

  14. Metabolic syndrome in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Caffo, Orazio; Derosa, Lisa; Veccia, Antonello; Petracci, Elisabetta; Chiuri, Vincenzo Emanuele; Santoni, Matteo; Santini, Daniele; Fratino, Lucia; Maines, Francesca; Testoni, Sara; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) has not yet been studied in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) men treated with novel hormonal therapies. The study aims to assess the impact of MS on outcome from time starting abiraterone. We retrospectively evaluated a consecutive series of metastatic CRPC patients treated with abiraterone after docetaxel failure. MS, as defined by modified Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III criteria, was assessed at the time of initiation of abiraterone, during treatment and follow-up. Sixty-seven of 178 patients evaluated (37.6%) met MS criteria at baseline, before abiraterone initiation, whereas for 11 (9.9%) without MS before treatment with abiraterone this occurred during treatment. Median PFS was equal to 4.7 months for patients with MS versus 9 months for those without MS. Patients with MS had an increased risk of 71% of progression or death for all causes than patients without MS (HR = 1.7, 95% CI [1.2-2.4], P = 0.03). Median OS was 14.7 months and 22.3 months in patients with and without MS, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, MS resulted not significantly associated to OS (HR = 1.42, 95% CI [0.91-2.22], P = 0.073). The presence of MS is a significant risk factor for shorter PFS in CRPC patients treated with abiraterone, even if it does not show a significant impact on OS. A prospective evaluation is warranted. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A case of lung cancer associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome after thoracic radiotherapy

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    Enoki, Masafumi; Tojima, Hirokazu [Tokyo Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    A 73-year-old man presented with dyspnea, cough, fever, appetite loss and stridor due to bronchial stenosis. Fiber-optic bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial lesion in the right main bronchus and biopsy specimens showed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical stage of lung cancer was IIIB (T4N2M0). The patient received 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 43 days to a field including the right hilum and mediastinum. The tumor decreased in size and stenosis of the bronchus disappeared. A week after completion of radiation the patient began to have high grade fever and dyspnea, and progressive hypoxia developed. A chest radiograph showed diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates. Despite mechanical ventilation with PEEP and the administration of steroids, he died of respiratory failure three weeks after completion of radiation. Necropsy specimens obtained from the left lung revealed massive deposition of fibrin in the alveolar airspaces associated with hyaline membranes and hyperplasia of type II cells indicating diffuse alveolar damage. The patient had mild pulmonary fibrosis on a CT scan taken before the start of radiotherapy. We conclude that care should be taken if the case has pulmonary fibrosis because radiation therapy can precipitate severe radiation pneumonitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in such cases. (author)

  16. Tolvaptan Treatment in Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH Secretion due to Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Mucahit Gur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experience of ADH receptor antagonist (-vaptanes treatment in hyponatremia in malign patient is very limited. 68 years old male patient admitted to our department with a complain of nause, vomitting and epigastric pain. He has advanced stage of small cell lung cancer. He had treated with cisplatin and etoposide regimen 10 days ago as a first cure. We diagnosed inapropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone syndrome (SIADH with low sodium level (118 meq/dl. Although the treatment with water restriction and 3% NaCl infusion, sodium level was not in normal. So we ordered 30 mg tolvaptan tablet. And then sodium levels were reached normal. After one month of discharge from hospital, he has hospitilized with same symptom and diagnosis. And again we ordered same treatment procedure and tolvaptane treatment. He had normal sodium (136 mEq/dl level during his follow up. This case demostrate that tolvaptane treatment is suitable aproaches in hyponatremia due to SIADH in oncologic patient.

  17. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated cancers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J O

    2001-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is considered home to more than 60% of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected cases, with an estimated adult prevalence of 8.0%. It is stated that this region has contributed more than 90% of childhood deaths related to HIV infection and about 93% of childhood acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related deaths. Although no country in Africa is spared of the infection, the bulk is seen in East and South Africa, with the highest recorded rates of 20% to 50% in Zimbabwe. On the other hand, West Africa is less affected, while countries in Central Africa have relatively stable infection rates. Although infections, especially tuberculosis, have emerged as the most important HIV/AIDS-associated killers in recent times, AIDS-associated malignancies are increasingly identified in the late stages. As a result of incomplete data from African countries, it is unclear whether the epidemiology and risks of these cancers are the same as observed in the developed countries. Since the advent of AIDS, epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) has become more common in both sexes in Africa, with a dramatic lowering of the male to female ratio from 19:1 to 1.7:1, especially in East Africa. Although there has been a rising trend of AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) worldwide, there is an apparently lower risk in Africa compared with that in the developing world. At present, there is no strong evidence linking increased incidence of invasive cervical cancer to the HIV epidemic; however, some studies have demonstrated an association between HIV and the increased prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). On the other hand, HIV infection is now established as a risk factor for the development of squamous cell neoplasia of the conjunctiva based on studies from Rwanda, Malawi, and Uganda. Despite the problems and limitations of information from sub-Saharan Africa, interesting trends of HIV/AIDS-related cancers

  18. Meat and milk intake in the rice-based Korean diet: impact on cancer and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Shinyoung; Ha, Kyungho; Chung, Sangwon; Joung, Hyojee

    2016-08-01

    Over a few decades, Korean diet has changed from traditional diet, mainly composed of rice and vegetables, to Westernised diet rich, in meat and milk, along with the economic development and globalisation. Increasing prevalence of diet-related chronic diseases such as cancer and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is becoming a heavy burden to society and requires further attention. In this review, the association of meat and milk consumption with cancer and MetS among Koreans was discussed. Previous meta-analyses showed that meat intake was positively associated with increased risk of cancers, especially colon, as well as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and that the intake of milk and dairy products was negatively associated with colorectal cancer, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, based on studies conducted mostly in Western countries. In Korea and other Asian countries, the association of meat and milk intake with cancers were inconclusive and varied by types of cancers. Conversely, milk intake was negatively associated with MetS risk as reported in Western countries. The difference in results between Korea and Western countries might come from the differences in dietary patterns and study designs. Most Koreans still maintain traditional dietary pattern, although rapid change towards Westernised diet is underway among the younger age group. Randomised clinical trials or prospective cohort studies with consideration of combined effects of various dietary factors in Korea and other Asian countries are needed to elucidate the impact of meat and milk or related dietary patterns in their diet.

  19. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of phenotypic heterogeneity and anticipation in Li-Fraumeni cancer predisposition syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Hany; Hainaut, Pierre; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Choong, Soo Sin; Chan, Adelyne Sue Li; Tolkunov, Denis; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Kang, Wenfeng; Lim, Leon Li Wen; Krishnan, Shekhar; Chen, Kok-Siong; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Karsa, Mawar; Shamsani, Jannah; Levine, Arnold J; Chan, Chang S

    2014-10-28

    The Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) and its variant form (LFL) is a familial predisposition to multiple forms of childhood, adolescent, and adult cancers associated with germ-line mutation in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene. Individual disparities in tumor patterns are compounded by acceleration of cancer onset with successive generations. It has been suggested that this apparent anticipation pattern may result from germ-line genomic instability in TP53 mutation carriers, causing increased DNA copy-number variations (CNVs) with successive generations. To address the genetic basis of phenotypic disparities of LFS/LFL, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 13 subjects from two generations of an LFS kindred. Neither de novo CNV nor significant difference in total CNV was detected in relation with successive generations or with age at cancer onset. These observations were consistent with an experimental mouse model system showing that trp53 deficiency in the germ line of father or mother did not increase CNV occurrence in the offspring. On the other hand, individual records on 1,771 TP53 mutation carriers from 294 pedigrees were compiled to assess genetic anticipation patterns (International Agency for Research on Cancer TP53 database). No strictly defined anticipation pattern was observed. Rather, in multigeneration families, cancer onset was delayed in older compared with recent generations. These observations support an alternative model for apparent anticipation in which rare variants from noncarrier parents may attenuate constitutive resistance to tumorigenesis in the offspring of TP53 mutation carriers with late cancer onset.

  20. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they are diagnosed is about 60. Smoking and alcohol use Some, but not all, studies have found ... is discussed more in Colorectal Cancer . Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) Another name for HNPCC is Lynch syndrome . ...