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Sample records for cancer survival comparisons

  1. Comparison of survival of patients with metastases from known versus unknown primaries: survival in metastatic cancer

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    Riihimäki Matias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is considered an aggressive metastatic disease but whether the prognosis differs from metastatic cancers of known primary site is not known. Such data may give insight into the biology of CUP and the metastatic process in general. Methods 6,745 cancer patients, with primary metastatic cancer at diagnosis, were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry, and were compared with 2,881 patients with CUP. Patients were diagnosed and died between 2002 and 2008. The influence of the primary site, known or unknown, on survival in patients with metastases at specific locations was investigated. Hazard ratios (HRs of death were estimated for several sites of metastasis, where patients with known primary sites were compared with CUP patients. Results Overall, patients with metastatic cancers with known primary sites had decreased hazards of death compared to CUP patients (HR = 0.69 [95% CI = 0.66–0.72]. The exceptions were cancer of the pancreas (1.71 [1.54–1.90], liver (1.58 [1.36–1.85], and stomach (1.16 [1.02–1.31]. For individual metastatic sites, patients with liver or bone metastases of known origin had better survival than those with CUP of the liver and bone. Patients with liver metastases of pancreatic origin had an increased risk of death compared with patients with CUP of the liver (1.25 [1.06–1.46]. The median survival time of CUP patients was three months. Conclusions Patients with CUP have poorer survival than patients with known primaries, except those with brain and respiratory system metastases. Of CUP sites, liver metastases had the worst prognosis. Survival in CUP was comparable to that in metastatic lung cancer. The aggressive behavior of CUP may be due to initial immunosuppression and immunoediting which may allow accumulation of mutations. Upon escape from the suppressed state an unstoppable tumor spread ensues. These novel data on the epidemiology of the

  2. Comparison of breast cancer survival in two populations : Ardabil, Iran and British Columbia, Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadjadi, Alireza; Hislop, T. Gregory; Bajdik, Chris; Bashash, Morteza; Ghorbani, Anahita; Nouraie, Mehdi; Babaei, Masoud; Malekzadeh, Reza; Yavari, Parvin

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patterns in survival can provide information about the burden and severity of cancer, help uncover gaps in systemic policy and program delivery, and support the planning of enhanced cancer control systems. The aim of this paper is to describe the one-year survival rates for breast cancer

  3. Comparison of Elixhauser and Charlson Methods for Predicting Oral Cancer Survival.

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    Chang, Heng-Jui; Chen, Po-Chun; Yang, Ching-Chieh; Su, Yu-Chieh; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-02-01

    Cancer survival correlates not only with the features of primary malignancy but also with the degree of underlying comorbidities. Of the multiple methods used for evaluating the impact of comorbidities on survival, the Charlson and Elixhauser methods are most common. This study compared these 2 comorbidity measures for predicting survival in oral cancer patients. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data (2008-2011), we acquired data regarding patients' characteristics, comorbidities, and survival from 3583 oral cancer patients. Comorbidity was classified according to both the Charlson comorbidity and Elixhauser comorbidity based on the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision. The Elixhauser comorbidity score and Charlson comorbidity score were also calculated. The prediction of survival was determined using measures of discrimination, including the Akaike information criterion and Harrell C (C-statistic). The mean age of the study cohort was 52 ± 10 years, and 94.9% of the patients were male. The median follow-up time was 30.1 months, and the 3-year overall survival was 61.6%. Elixhauser comorbidity method added higher discrimination, compared with the Charlson comorbidity method (Harrell C, 0.677 vs 0.651). Furthermore, the Elixhauser comorbidity score outperformed the Charlson comorbidity score in continuous variable (Harrell C, 0.654 vs 0.646) and category (Harrell C, 0.658 vs 0.645). The Elixhauser method is a superior comorbidity risk-adjustment model for oral cancer survival prediction. Utilization of the Elixhauser comorbidity method may be encouraged for risk adjustment in oral cancer study.

  4. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  5. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer Survival rates are often used by doctors ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. Comparison of survival of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with or without a localized non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Gerner Hansen, Niels-Christian; Schytte, Tine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are often co-existing diseases with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare survival in COPD patients with localized NSCLC treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (NSCLC group) with COPD...

  7. Inter-country and ethnic variation in colorectal cancer survival: Comparisons between a Philippine population, Filipino-Americans and Caucasians

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    Gondos Adam

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous population-based studies showed differences in international and within country colorectal cancer survival estimates, but few investigated the role of prognostic factors. Using a "high resolution approach", we aimed to determine the effect of ethnicity and health care by comparing Filipino-Americans with Philippine residents, who have the same ethnicity, and with Caucasians living in the US, who have the same health care system. Methods Using databases from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries and the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, age-adjusted five-year absolute and relative survival estimates were computed and compared between Filipino-American colorectal cancer patients, cancer patients from the Philippines and Caucasian patients. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine factors affecting survival differences. Results Much lower 5-year relative survival estimates were obtained for Philippine residents (37% as compared to those in Filipino-Americans (60.3% and Caucasians (62.4%. Differences in age, stage and receipt of surgery explained a large proportion of the survival differences between Philippine residents and Filipino-Americans. However, strong excess risk of death for Philippine residents remained after controlling for these and other variables (relative risk, RR, 2.03, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.83-2.25. Conclusions Strong survival disadvantages of Philippine residents compared to Filipino-American patients were disclosed, which most likely reflect differences in access to and utilization of health care. Health education and advocacy, for both patients and health practitioners, should likewise be given priority.

  8. Prognostic value of DCE-MRI in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a comparison with traditional survival indicators

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    Pickles, Martin D.; Lowry, Martin; Turnbull, Lindsay W. [Hull York Medical School at University of Hull, Hull Royal Infirmary, Centre for Magnetic Resonance Investigations, Hull (United Kingdom); Manton, David J. [Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiation Physics Department, Hull (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    To determine associations between dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters and survival intervals in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), surgery, and adjuvant therapies. Further, to compare the prognostic value of DCE-MRI parameters against traditional survival indicators. DCE-MRI and MR tumour volume measures were obtained prior to treatment and post 2nd NAC cycle. To demonstrate which parameters were associated with survival, Cox's proportional hazards models (CPHM) were employed. To avoid over-parameterisation, only those MR parameters with at least a borderline significant result were entered into the final CPHM. When considering disease-free survival positive axillary nodal status (hazard ratio [HR] 6.79), younger age (HR 3.37), negative oestrogen receptor status (HR 3.24), pre-treatment Maximum Enhancement Index (MaxEI) (HR 6.51), and percentage change in MaxEI (HR 1.02) represented the retained CPHM covariates. Similarly, positive axillary nodal status (HR 11.47), negative progesterone receptor status (HR 4.37) and percentage change in AUC{sub 90} (HR 1.01) represented the retained predictive variables for overall survival. Multivariate survival analysis has demonstrated that DCE-MRI parameters obtained prior to NAC and/or post 2nd cycle can provide independent prognostic information that can complement traditional prognostic indicators available prior to treatment. (orig.)

  9. Survival benefit and additional value of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in resectable gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction cancer: a direct and adjusted indirect comparison meta-analysis.

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    Kumagai, K; Rouvelas, I; Tsai, J A; Mariosa, D; Lind, P A; Lindblad, M; Ye, W; Lundell, L; Schuhmacher, C; Mauer, M; Burmeister, B H; Thomas, J M; Stahl, M; Nilsson, M

    2015-03-01

    Several phase I/II studies of chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer have reported promising results, but the significance of preoperative radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy has not been proven. In this study, a systematic literature search was performed to capture survival and postoperative morbidity and mortality data in randomised clinical studies comparing preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy or chemotherapy versus surgery alone, or preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus chemotherapy for gastric and/or gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) cancer. Hazard ratios (HRs) for overall mortality were extracted from the original studies, individual patient data provided from the principal investigators of eligible studies or the earlier published meta-analysis. The incidences of postoperative morbidities and mortalities were also analysed. In total 18 studies were eligible and data were available from 14 of these. The meta-analysis on overall survival yielded HRs of 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.86, P < 0.001) for preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and 0.83 (95% CI 0.67-1.01, P = 0.065) for preoperative chemotherapy when compared to surgery alone. Direct comparison between preoperative chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy resulted in an HR of 0.71 (95% CI 0.45-1.12, P = 0.146). Combination of direct and adjusted indirect comparisons yielded an HR of 0.86 (95% CI 0.69-1.07, P = 0.171). No statistically significant differences were seen in the risk for postoperative morbidity or mortality between preoperative treatments and surgery alone, or preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy for gastric and GOJ cancer showed significant survival benefit over surgery alone. In comparisons between preoperative chemotherapy and (chemo)radiotherapy, there is a trend towards improved survival when adding radiotherapy, without increased postoperative morbidity or mortality.

  10. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

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    Folkesson, Joakim; Engholm, Gerda; Ehrnrooth, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries in Eur...... and detailed data in order to understand international survival differences, and cautions comparisons between large national samples and those of smaller areas........ Age standardized 5-year relative survival and multiplicative regression models for the relative excess mortality were calculated. 3888 patients were included in the survival study. Men in Denmark, Finland and Iceland had lower 5-year relative survival and poorer stage distribution compared to Norway...

  11. Comparison of Survival Rates, Tumor Stages, and Localization in between Obese and Nonobese Patients with Gastric Cancer

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    Hakan Kocoglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In this study we tried to determine the association between body-mass index (BMI, survival rate, and the stage of tumor at the time of diagnosis in patients with gastric cancer. Methods. A total of 270 gastric cancer patients’ hospital records were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were grouped according to their BMI at the time of tumor diagnosis. Tumor stages at admission were compared according to their BMI values. Results. There were no differences in OS among BMI subgroups (p=0.230. The percent of patients with stage III tumor was significantly higher in nonobese while the percent of stage IV tumor was surprisingly higher in obese patients (p was 0.011 and 0.004, resp.. Percent of patients who did not have any surgical intervention was significantly lower in overweight and obese patients than normal and/or underweight patients. Conclusions. At the time of diagnosis, obese patients had significantly higher percent of stage IV tumor than nonobese patients. Despite of that, there were no differences in survival rates among BMI subgroups. Our study results are consistent with “obesity paradox” in gastric cancer patients. We also did not find any relationship between BMI and localization of gastric tumor.

  12. Comparison of Survival Rates, Tumor Stages, and Localization in between Obese and Nonobese Patients with Gastric Cancer

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    Dogan, Hakan; Oguz, Basak; Ocak Serin, Sibel; Okuturlar, Yildiz; Gunaldi, Meral; Erismis, Betul; Ozdemir, Bahar; Tural, Deniz; Hursitoglu, Mehmet; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study we tried to determine the association between body-mass index (BMI), survival rate, and the stage of tumor at the time of diagnosis in patients with gastric cancer. Methods. A total of 270 gastric cancer patients' hospital records were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were grouped according to their BMI at the time of tumor diagnosis. Tumor stages at admission were compared according to their BMI values. Results. There were no differences in OS among BMI subgroups (p = 0.230). The percent of patients with stage III tumor was significantly higher in nonobese while the percent of stage IV tumor was surprisingly higher in obese patients (p was 0.011 and 0.004, resp.). Percent of patients who did not have any surgical intervention was significantly lower in overweight and obese patients than normal and/or underweight patients. Conclusions. At the time of diagnosis, obese patients had significantly higher percent of stage IV tumor than nonobese patients. Despite of that, there were no differences in survival rates among BMI subgroups. Our study results are consistent with “obesity paradox” in gastric cancer patients. We also did not find any relationship between BMI and localization of gastric tumor. PMID:27418926

  13. The comparison between two different methods of radiotherapy in palliation and survival of patients with esophageal cancer

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    Keshvary M

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in our country. Patients often seek medical advice in advanced and inoperable stages or with cervical esophageal cancer, in which operation is accompanied by sever morbidity. In this conditions many of them cannot tolerate chemo-radiation, or refuse it. Therefore radiotherapy is applied as a single modality in palliation of many patients with esophageal cancer. One of the palliative radio therapeutic methods is application of 5000 CGY in 20 fractions (Long Course; but considering the great number of our patients and limited capacity of radiotherapy centers, as well as emphasis of literature on palliation with 4000 CGY in 13 fractions (short course, we decided to compare these two methods (which are both used in our departments. In this retrospective analytic study, the files of 283 patients with esophageal cancer referred to cancer institute of Imam Khomeini Hospital from 1989-1999 were studied. Patients were between 27-97 years old (mean age=58.3 and most of them were male (53.7 percent. The mean length of lesion was 8.5 cm. The most common site of lesion was middle third at esophagus (48.1 percent and the most common pathology was squamous cell carcinoma (99.6 percent. Fifty-four percent of patients were hot tea drinkers habitually. From the mentioned variables, only length of lesion had significant relationship with overall survival (P=0.04. Thirty-eight of 283 patients were excluded from analytic study because of incomplete follow-up. The number of patients had been treated by long course (5000 CGY in 20 fractions was 137 and the remainder (108 patients by short course (4000 CGY in 13 fractions. No significant difference was seen statistically between these two groups in overall and dysphagia-free survival (Kaplan-Meyer test. Also total dosage of spinal cord is lower in the short course. Thus regarding to less required time in short course and comparable palliation and survival between

  14. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John;

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  15. Socioeconomic position and survival after cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, E H; Kjær, S K; Høgdall, C;

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could...... be explained by socioeconomic differences in cancer stage, comorbidity, lifestyle factors or treatment....

  16. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, J.; Engholm, G.; Ehrnrooth, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates four patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based oil cancer register data. differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries ill ...... for high quality and detailed data in order to understand international survival differences, and cautions comparisons between large national samples and those of smaller areas. (C) 2009 UICC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/11/15...... included. Age standardized 5-year relative survival and multiplicative regression models for the relative excess mortality were calculated. 3888 patients were included in the survival study. Men in Denmark, Finland and Iceland hall lower 5-year relative survival and poorer stage distribution compared...

  17. Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study

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    ... gov/news/fullstory_162498.html Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study Weak social ties linked to higher risk ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival, a new study suggests. In the years after ...

  18. A Comparison between Accelerated Failure-time and Cox Pro-portional Hazard Models in Analyzing the Survival of Gastric Cancer Patients

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    Ali ZARE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer is the one of the most prevalent reason of cancer-related death in the world. Survival of patients after surgery involves identifying risk factors. There are various models to detect the effect of risk factors on patients’ survival. The present study aims at evaluating these models.Methods: Data from 330 gastric cancer patients diagnosed at the Iran cancer institute during 1995-99 and followed up the end of 2011 were analyzed. The survival status of these patients in 2011 was determined by reopening the files as well as phone calls and the effect of various factors such as demographic, clinical, treatment, and post-surgical on pa-tients’ survival was studied. To compare various models of survival, Akaike Information Criterion and Cox-Snell Re-siduals were used. STATA 11 was used for data analyses.Results: Based on Cox-Snell Residuals and Akaike Information Criterion, the exponential (AIC=969.14 and Gom-pertz (AIC=970.70 models were more efficient than other accelerated failure-time models. Results of Cox propor-tional hazard model as well as the analysis of accelerated failure-time models showed that variables such as age (at di-agnosis, marital status, relapse, number of supplementary treatments, disease stage, and type of surgery were among factors affecting survival (P<0.05.Conclusion: Although most cancer researchers tend to use proportional hazard model, accelerated failure-time mod-els in analogous conditions — as they do not require proportional hazards assumption and consider a parametric sta-tistical distribution for survival time— will be credible alternatives to proportional hazard model.

  19. Cancer survival disparities by health insurance status.

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    Niu, Xiaoling; Roche, Lisa M; Pawlish, Karen S; Henry, Kevin A

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies found that uninsured and Medicaid insured cancer patients have poorer outcomes than cancer patients with private insurance. We examined the association between health insurance status and survival of New Jersey patients 18-64 diagnosed with seven common cancers during 1999-2004. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals for 5-year cause-specific survival were calculated from Cox proportional hazards regression models; health insurance status was the primary predictor with adjustment for other significant factors in univariate chi-square or Kaplan-Meier survival log-rank tests. Two diagnosis periods by health insurance status were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival log-rank tests. For breast, colorectal, lung, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and prostate cancer, uninsured and Medicaid insured patients had significantly higher risks of death than privately insured patients. For bladder cancer, uninsured patients had a significantly higher risk of death than privately insured patients. Survival improved between the two diagnosis periods for privately insured patients with breast, colorectal, or lung cancer and NHL, for Medicaid insured patients with NHL, and not at all for uninsured patients. Survival from cancer appears to be related to a complex set of demographic and clinical factors of which insurance status is a part. While ensuring that everyone has adequate health insurance is an important step, additional measures must be taken to address cancer survival disparities.

  20. Comparison between artificial neural network and Cox regression model in predicting the survival rate of gastric cancer patients.

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    Zhu, Lucheng; Luo, Wenhua; Su, Meng; Wei, Hangping; Wei, Juan; Zhang, Xuebang; Zou, Changlin

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic factors and their significance in gastric cancer (GC) patients, using the artificial neural network (ANN) and Cox regression hazard (CPH) models. A retrospective analysis was undertaken, including 289 patients with GC who had undergone gastrectomy between 2006 and 2007. According to the CPH analysis, disease stage, peritoneal dissemination, radical surgery and body mass index (BMI) were selected as the significant variables. According to the ANN model, disease stage, radical surgery, serum CA19-9 levels, peritoneal dissemination and BMI were selected as the significant variables. The true prediction of the ANN was 85.3% and of the CPH model 81.9%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the ANN model is a more powerful tool in determining the significant prognostic variables for GC patients, compared to the CPH model. Therefore, this model is recommended for determining the risk factors of such patients.

  1. Brain cancer survival in Kentucky: 1996-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Tim E; Freitas, Samantha J; Ling, Lan; McKinney, Paul

    2008-10-01

    This is a report of brain cancer survival patterns in certain Area Development Districts (ADDs) in Kentucky, the state, and the nation. Brain cancer is of national and regional concern as it is a disease of high case fatality rates and relatively short survival. Comparisons for survival were made between the U.S.A. and the state. Kentucky has higher brain cancer mortality rates than the U.S.A., but significantly better cause-specific survival (p Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant), the Green River ADD (the location of elevated brain cancer mortality rates), and the Kentucky River ADD (comprising counties that each have significantly more than the state average of persons living below the national poverty level). We found no evidence of lower survival for brain cancer among the poorer region of the state. The western districts were found to have lower cause-specific survival than the state (p < 0.05) and the U.S.A. Such a regional variation alerts population-based researchers to consider varying survival trends within the state's population.

  2. Improved survival after rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Harling, H; Iversen, L H

    2010-01-01

    treated from 1994 to 2006. Method The study was based on the National Rectal Cancer Registry and the National Colorectal Cancer Database, supplemented with data from the Central Population Registry. The analysis included actuarial overall and relative survival. Results A total of 10 632 patients were......Objective In 1995, an analysis showed an inferior prognosis after rectal cancer in Denmark compared with the other Scandinavian countries. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) was established with the aim of improving the prognosis, and in this study we present a survival analysis of patients...... operated on. The overall 5-year survival increased from 0.37 in 1994 to 0.51% in 2006; the improvement was greater in men (20% points) than in women (10% points), and greatest in stage III (20% points). The relative 5-year survival increased from 0.46 to 0.62, including an improvement of 23% points in men...

  3. Long-term survival and conditional survival of cancer patients in Japan using population-based cancer registry data

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yuri; Miyashiro, Isao; Ito, Hidemi; Hosono, Satoyo; Chihara, Dai; Nakata-Yamada, Kayo; Nakayama, Masashi; Matsuzaka, Masashi; Hattori, Masakazu; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Oze, Isao; Tanaka, Rina; Nomura, Etsuko; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    Although we usually report 5-year cancer survival using population-based cancer registry data, nowadays many cancer patients survive longer and need to be followed-up for more than 5 years. Long-term cancer survival figures are scarce in Japan. Here we report 10-year cancer survival and conditional survival using an established statistical approach. We received data on 1 387 489 cancer cases from six prefectural population-based cancer registries in Japan, diagnosed between 1993 and 2009 and ...

  4. Survival of women with breast cancer in Kaunas Region, Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanauskienė, Rugilė; Gedminaitė, Jurgita; Juozaitytė, Elona; Vanagas, Giedrius; Simoliūnienė, Renata; Padaiga, Zilvinas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The assessment of breast cancer survival rates and comparison with those of other countries may help to deepen knowledge among decision makers in the health care system and to improve the inequalities in accessibility to early detection and effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate breast cancer survival rates in Kaunas region, Lithuania, and to compare them with those in the selected European countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A retrospective study was carried out using medical records and data gathered from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry. A group of 240 patients with primary breast cancer diagnosed in 2008 in Kaunas region was analyzed. All causes of death were included in the analysis. The closing date of follow-up was September 30, 2010. Survival was determined using the life-table method and the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the effects of prognostic risk factors on survival. RESULTS. The median age of the patients was 63 years (range, 28-95). The 1-year and 2-year cumulative survival for breast cancer patients in Kaunas region, Lithuania, was 94.2% and 90.1%, respectively. As expected, the survival of patients with diagnosed advanced disease (stage III and IV) was significantly worse than that of patients with stage I (PLithuania was found to be similar to most European countries.

  5. A comparison between Kaplan-Meier and weighted Kaplan-Meier methods of five-year survival estimation of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Ali; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Mohammad, Kazem; Zeraati, Hojjat; Hosseini, Mostafa; Holakouie Naieni, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    The 5-year survival rate is a good prognostic indicator for patients with Gastric cancer that is usually estimated based on Kaplan-Meier. In situations where censored observations are too many, this method produces biased estimations. This study aimed to compare estimations of Kaplan-Meier and Weighted Kaplan-Meier as an alternative method to deal with the problem of heavy-censoring. Data from 330 patients with Gastric cancer who had undergone surgery at Iran Cancer Institute from 1995- 1999 were analyzed. The Survival Time of these patients was determined after surgery, and the 5-year survival rate for these patients was evaluated based on Kaplan-Meier and Weighted Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 239 (72.4%) patients passed away by the end of the study and 91(27.6%) patients were censored. The mean and median of survival time for these patients were 24.86±23.73 and 16.33 months, respectively. The one-year, two-year, three-year, four-year, and five-year survival rates of these patients with standard error estimation based on Kaplan-Meier were 0.66 (0.0264), 0.42 (0.0284), 0.31 (0.0274), 0.26 (0.0264) and 0.21 (0.0256) months, respectively. The estimations of Weighted Kaplan-Meier for these patients were 0.62 (0.0251), 0.35 (0.0237), 0.24 (0.0211), 0.17 (0.0172), and 0.10 (0.0125) months, consecutively. In cases where censoring assumption is not made, and the study has many censored observations, estimations obtained from the Kaplan-Meier are biased and are estimated higher than its real amount. But Weighted Kaplan-Meier decreases bias of survival probabilities by providing appropriate weights and presents more accurate understanding.

  6. A comparison between Kaplan-Meier and weighted Kaplan-Meier methods of five-year survival estimation of patients with gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zare

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The 5-year survival rate is a good prognostic indicator for patients with Gastric cancer that is usually estimated based on Kaplan-Meier. In situations where censored observations are too many, this method produces biased estimations. This study aimed to compare estimations of Kaplan-Meier and Weighted Kaplan-Meier as an alternative method to deal with the problem of heavy-censoring. Data from 330 patients with Gastric cancer who had undergone surgery at Iran Cancer Institute from 1995- 1999 were analyzed. The Survival Time of these patients was determined after surgery, and the 5-year survival rate for these patients was evaluated based on Kaplan-Meier and Weighted Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 239 (72.4% patients passed away by the end of the study and 91(27.6% patients were censored. The mean and median of survival time for these patients were 24.86±23.73 and 16.33 months, respectively. The one-year, two-year, three-year, four-year, and five-year survival rates of these patients with standard error estimation based on Kaplan-Meier were 0.66 (0.0264, 0.42 (0.0284, 0.31 (0.0274, 0.26 (0.0264 and 0.21 (0.0256 months, respectively. The estimations of Weighted Kaplan-Meier for these patients were 0.62 (0.0251, 0.35 (0.0237, 0.24 (0.0211, 0.17 (0.0172, and 0.10 (0.0125 months, consecutively. In cases where censoring assumption is not made, and the study has many censored observations, estimations obtained from the Kaplan-Meier are biased and are estimated higher than its real amount. But Weighted Kaplan-Meier decreases bias of survival probabilities by providing appropriate weights and presents more accurate understanding.

  7. Understanding Cancer: Survivability and Hope

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    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Survivability and Hope Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... cure or long-term survivorship." This message of hope is a hallmark of the latest advances in ...

  8. Cancer Patients’ Survival: Standard Calculation Methods And Some Considerations Regarding Their Interpretation

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    Zadnik Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients’ survival is an extremely important but complex indicator for assessing regional or global inequalities in diagnosis practices and clinical management of cancer patients. The population-based cancer survival comparisons are available through international projects (i.e. CONCORD, EUROCARE, OECD Health Reports and online systems (SEER, NORDCAN, SLORA. In our research we aimed to show that noticeable differences in cancer patients’ survival may not always reflect the real inequalities in cancer care, but can also appear due to variations in the applied methodology for relative survival calculation.

  9. Mental vulnerability and survival after cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakaya, Naoki; Bidstrup, Pernille E; Eplov, Lene F

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that personality traits affect survival after cancer, but studies have produced inconsistent results. This study examined the association between mental vulnerability and survival after cancer in Denmark in a prospective cohort study. METHODS: Between 1976...... and 2001, 12733 residents of Copenhagen completed a questionnaire eliciting information on a 12-item mental vulnerability scale, as well as various personal data. Follow-up in the Danish Cancer Registry until 2003 identified 884 incident cases of primary cancer, and follow-up for death from the date...... of cancer diagnosis until 2003 identified 382 deaths. Mental vulnerability scores were divided into 4 approximately equal-sized groups. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Multivariate HR for all-cause mortality for persons...

  10. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS OF CANCER CASES FROM QIDONG CANCER REGISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-guo; Sankaranarayanan R; SHEN Zhuo-cai; Black RJ; YAO Hong-yu; LI Wen-guang; Parkin DM

    1999-01-01

    Objective: 16,922 patients with cancers from 15 sites of Qidong population-based cancer registry in the period of 1982-1991 were analyzed for evaluation of cancer survival as well as different cancer control measures.Methods: Observed survival rate (OS) was computed by the Kaplan-Meier method using EGRET statistical software package. Relative survival (RS) which is the ratio of the OS to the expected rate was calculated by using Qidong life table with respect to sex, age and calendar period of observation. Results: The five-year OS for the 5 leading sites of cancers, liver, stomach, lung,oesophagus, and rectum were 1.8%, 11.6%, 3.0% 3.3%,and 19.9%, respectively. The five-year RS for the 5 sites were 1.9%, 14.0%, 3.6%, 4.2%, and 23.7%, respectively,in which, 1.7%, 14.8%, 3.4%, 4.2%, and 26.0% for males, and 2.7%, 12.7%, 4.1%, 4.0%, and 22.0% for females, respectively. Female patients with breast cancer and cervix cancer had 5-year RS of 54.6% and 33.0%.Conclusion: Cancer survival rates for all sites are poor,in which that of the liver is the lowest, while that of the breast, the highest. The survivals of cancers for all sites,especially for breast, cervix, and leukemia are seen to be lower than those of European countries except for oesophagus, pancreas and lung cancer which do not achieve improved survival both in developing and developed countries. There will be a long way to improve the total cancer survival, as well as the cancer treatment in the developing countries.

  11. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  12. Surviving testicular cancer : relationship aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinman, Marrit Annika

    2008-01-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common malignancy in young men and a highly curable disease. However, the illness and treatment can negatively affect physical, psychological and social functioning of patients. The same is true for their family, especially their spouses. Being in an intimate relationsh

  13. Assessment of performance of survival prediction models for cancer prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hung-Chia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer survival studies are commonly analyzed using survival-time prediction models for cancer prognosis. A number of different performance metrics are used to ascertain the concordance between the predicted risk score of each patient and the actual survival time, but these metrics can sometimes conflict. Alternatively, patients are sometimes divided into two classes according to a survival-time threshold, and binary classifiers are applied to predict each patient’s class. Although this approach has several drawbacks, it does provide natural performance metrics such as positive and negative predictive values to enable unambiguous assessments. Methods We compare the survival-time prediction and survival-time threshold approaches to analyzing cancer survival studies. We review and compare common performance metrics for the two approaches. We present new randomization tests and cross-validation methods to enable unambiguous statistical inferences for several performance metrics used with the survival-time prediction approach. We consider five survival prediction models consisting of one clinical model, two gene expression models, and two models from combinations of clinical and gene expression models. Results A public breast cancer dataset was used to compare several performance metrics using five prediction models. 1 For some prediction models, the hazard ratio from fitting a Cox proportional hazards model was significant, but the two-group comparison was insignificant, and vice versa. 2 The randomization test and cross-validation were generally consistent with the p-values obtained from the standard performance metrics. 3 Binary classifiers highly depended on how the risk groups were defined; a slight change of the survival threshold for assignment of classes led to very different prediction results. Conclusions 1 Different performance metrics for evaluation of a survival prediction model may give different conclusions in

  14. Physical activity and survival in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Søgaard, Karen; Karlsen, Randi V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knowledge about lifestyle factors possibly influencing survival after breast cancer (BC) is paramount. We examined associations between two types of postdiagnosis physical activity (PA) and overall survival after BC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used prospective data on 959 BC survivors from...... the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort, all enrolled before diagnosis. Self-reported PA was measured as time per activity, and estimated metabolic equivalent task (MET)-hours per week were summed for each activity. We constructed measures for household, exercise, and total PA. The association between...... from all causes during the study period. In adjusted analyses, exercise PA above eight MET h/week compared to lower levels of activity was significantly associated with improved overall survival (HR, 0.68; confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.99). When comparing participation in exercise to non...

  15. Lung Cancer Survival Improvement through Surgical Intervention in PUMCH Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Feng; ZHANG Zhiyong; CUI Yushang; LI Shanqing; LI Li; XU Xiaohui; GE Feng; GUO Huiqin; LI Zejian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and evaluate improvement of lung cancer survival after surgical intervention in PUMC hospital during the last 15 years. Methods: From January 1989 to December 2003, 1574 lung cancer cases underwent surgical treatment and followed up. All cases in this series were divided into two groups according to time period: group A (1999-2003) and group B (1989-1998). The difference in the survival rate between groups A and B was compared. Results: The morbidity and mortality in group A was decreased significantly in comparison to group B (11.2% vs. 19.2%, 1.06% vs. 1.93%, respectively).However, the 3-year and 5-year survival rate was increased from 42.35% to 56.07%, and from 28.46% to38.99%, respectively. A significant improvement in survival was observed in patients with stage Ⅰ, Ⅱ and ⅢA, but not in those with stage ⅢB and Ⅳ. Also, patients with lobectomy had more satisfactory results than those receiving exploratory thoracotomy, limited resection, pneumonectomy and sleeve resection. Conclusion: Lobectomy plus systematic mediastinal lymph nodes dissection has become the standard mode for resectable lung cancer. Combination of complete resection along with lymph nodal dissection, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy based on platinum/3rd generation chemotherapy medicine, has preliminarily been justified, proving an important approach for effective improvement in long-term survival of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

  16. Breast cancer survival and season of surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Dorthe; Bjerre, Karsten D; Tjønneland, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    outcome for early breast cancer patients operated at different seasons of the year. Design Open population-based cohort study. Setting Danish women operated 1978-2010. Cases 79 658 adjusted for age at surgery, period of surgery, tumour size, axillary lymph node status and hormone receptor status....... Statistical analysis The association between OS and season of surgery was analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression models, at survival periods 0-1, 0-2, 0-5 and 0-10 years after surgery. A two-sided p value......Background Vitamin D has been suggested to influence the incidence and prognosis of breast cancer, and studies have found better overall survival (OS) after diagnosis for breast cancer in summer-autumn, where the vitamin D level are expected to be highest. Objective To compare the prognostic...

  17. Metformin Use and Endometrial Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevadunsky, Nicole S.; Van Arsdale, Anne; Strickler, Howard D.; Moadel, Alyson; Kaur, Gurpreet; Frimer, Marina; Conroy, Erin; Goldberg, Gary L.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes are risk factors for the development of uterine cancer. Although greater progression free survival among diabetic patients with ovarian and breast cancer using metformin have been reported, no studies have assessed the association of metformin use with survival in women with endometrial cancer (EC). Methods We conducted a single-institution retrospective cohort study of all patients treated for uterine cancer from January 1999 through December 2009. Demographic, medical, social, and survival data were abstracted from medical records and the national death registry. Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox models were utilized for multivariate analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Of 985 patients, 114 (12%) had diabetes and were treated with metformin, 136 (14%) were diabetic but did not use metformin, and 735 (74%) had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Greater OS was observed in diabetics with non-endometrioid EC who used metformin than in diabetic cases not using metformin and non-endometrioid EC cases without diabetes (log rank test (p=0.02)). This association remained significant (hazard ratio = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.30–0.97, p<0.04) after adjusting for age, clinical stage, grade, chemotherapy treatment, radiation treatment and presence of hyperlipidemia in multivariate analysis. No association between metformin use and OS in diabetics with endometrioid histology was observed. Conclusion Diabetic EC patients with non-endometrioid tumors who used metformin had lower risk of death than women with EC who did not use metformin. These data suggest that metformin might be useful as adjuvant therapy for non-endometrioid EC. PMID:24189334

  18. Analysing population-based cancer survival – settling the controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Pohar Perme, M; Estève, J; Rachet, B

    2016-01-01

    Background The relative survival field has seen a lot of development in the last decade, resulting in many different and even opposing suggestions on how to approach the analysis. Methods We carefully define and explain the differences between the various measures of survival (overall survival, crude mortality, net survival and relative survival ratio) and study their differences using colon and prostate cancer data extracted from the national population-based cancer registry of Slovenia as w...

  19. Survival of ovarian cancer patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen McKinnon; Noer, Mette Calundann; Sperling, Cecilie Dyg;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate, especially in Denmark where mortality rates have been reported higher than in adjacent countries with similar demographics. This study therefore examined recent survival and mortality among Danish ovarian cancer patients over an 18-year study...... period. METHODS: This nationwide registry-based observational study used data from the Danish Gynecology Cancer Database, Danish Pathology Registry, and Danish National Patient Registry. All patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 were included in the study. The data sources were...... identified 9972 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the period 1995-2012. The absolute one-year mortality rate decreased from 42.8 (CI 40.3-45.6) in 1995-1999 to 28.3 (CI 25.9-30.9) in 2010-2012, and the five-year mortality rate decreased from 28.2 (CI 27.0-29.5) in 1995-1999 to 23.9 (CI 22...

  20. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E.; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J.; Joshi, Amit D.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I. Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of eviden

  1. Human papillomavirus serologic follow-up response and relationship to survival in head and neck cancer: a case-comparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamšíková Eva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus high risk (HPV-HR type 16 is a significant risk factor for head and neck cancers (HNC independent of tobacco and alcohol. The purpose of this study was to determine whether antibody levels to the HPV-16 oncoproteins E6 and E7 measured in sera collected at baseline (BL prior to treatment and at two post-treatment follow-up (FU visits were associated with HNC risk factors or prognosis. Methods Presence of antibodies to HPV-16 E6 and E7 was evaluated in 109 newly diagnosed HNC cases with BL and FU blood samples, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results HPV-16 E6 and/or E7 seropositive HNC cases were associated with higher risk in younger patients (≤ 55 years, more sexual partners (≥ 10, oropharyngeal cancer, worse stage at diagnosis, poorer grade, and nodal involvement. Between BL and FU (median = 8.3 months, there were decreased antibody levels for seropositive E6 (73% vs. 27%, p = 0.02 and seropositive E7 patients (65% vs. 35%, p = 0.09 with 5% of BL E6 and 35% of BL E7 seropositive patients converting to negative status at FU. Overall mortality (OM was significantly worse among BL E6 seronegative patients than among BL seropositive patients (40.2% vs.13.6%, p = 0.01. There were no disease specific (DS deaths among BL E6 seropositive vs. 24% in BL E6 seronegative patients (p = 0.01. BL E7 seronegative patients also had higher mortality than BL seropositive patients (OM: 38.2% vs. 20.0%, p = 0.04; DS: 22.5% vs. 5.6%, p = 0.07. Conclusion These findings are the first to follow post-treatment OD levels of HPV-16 E6 and E7 in HNC and suggest that these HPV antibodies may be potential prognostic markers of survival in HNC patients.

  2. Long-term survival in small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Osterlind, K; Hansen, M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) the characteristics of those who survive for > or = 5 years, to identify long-term prognostic factors, to analyze survival data of 5-year survivors, and to study 10-year survival in patients entered before 1981. PATIENTS......, especially tobacco-related cancers and other tobacco-related diseases....

  3. Full dates (day, month, year) should be used in population-based cancer survival studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Laura M; Rachet, Bernard; Ellis, Libby; Coleman, Michel P

    2012-10-01

    Accurate survival estimates are essential for monitoring cancer survival trends, for health care planning and for resource allocation. To obtain precise estimates of survival, full dates (day, month and year) rather than partial dates (month and year) are required. In some jurisdictions, however, cancer registries are constrained from providing full dates on the grounds of confidentiality. The bias resulting from the use of partial dates in the estimation and comparison of survival makes it impossible to determine precisely the differences in the risk of death from cancer between population groups or in successive calendar periods. Important operational arguments also exist against the use of incomplete dates for survival analysis, including increased workload for cancer registry staff and the introduction of avoidable complexity for quality control of survival data. Cancer survival is one of the most widely known outputs produced by population-based cancer registries, and it is a crucial metric for the comparative effectiveness of health services. The bodies that set data access guidelines must take a more balanced view of the risks and benefits of using full dates for the estimation of cancer survival.

  4. Attributing death to cancer: cause-specific survival estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survival estimation is an important part of assessing the overall strength of cancer care in a region. Generally, the death of a patient is taken as the end point in estimation of overall survival. When calculating the overall survival, the cause of death is not taken into account. With increasing demand for better survival of cancer patients it is important for clinicians and researchers to know about survival statistics due to disease of interest, i.e. net survival. It is also important to choose the best method for estimating net survival. Increase in the use of computer programmes has made it possible to carry out statistical analysis without guidance from a bio-statistician. This is of prime importance in third- world countries as there are a few trained bio-statisticians to guide clinicians and researchers. The present communication describes current methods used to estimate net survival such as cause-specific survival and relative survival. The limitation of estimation of cause-specific survival particularly in India and the usefulness of relative survival are discussed. The various sources for estimating cancer survival are also discussed. As survival-estimates are to be projected on to the population at large, it becomes important to measure the variation of the estimates, and thus confidence intervals are used. Rothman′s confidence interval gives the most satisfactory result for survival estimate.

  5. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  6. Predicting Mean Survival Time from Reported Median Survival Time for Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lousdal, Mette L; Kristiansen, Ivar S; Møller, Bjørn;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mean duration of survival following treatment is a prerequisite for cost-effectiveness analyses used for assessing new and costly life-extending therapies for cancer patients. Mean survival time is rarely reported due to censoring imposed by limited follow-up time, whereas the median...... survival time often is. The empirical relationship between mean and median survival time for cancer patients is not known. AIM: To derive the empirical associations between mean and median survival time across cancer types and to validate this empirical prediction approach and compare it with the standard...... approach of fitting a Weibull distribution. METHODS: We included all patients in Norway diagnosed from 1960 to 1999 with one of the 13 most common solid tumor cancers until emigration, death, or 31 December 2011, whichever came first. Observed median, restricted mean, and mean survival times were obtained...

  7. Could Grilled, Smoked Meats Lower Survival After Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163114.html Could Grilled, Smoked Meats Lower Survival After Breast Cancer? Study can't prove cause and effect, but ... study finds these cooking methods may also lower survival after a breast cancer diagnosis. The study involved more than 1,500 ...

  8. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Guo (Qi); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); S. Kar (Siddhartha); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); B. Holleczek (B.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); C.D. Berg (Christine); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-

  9. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta-analysis ...

  10. 5-Alpha reductase inhibitor use and prostate cancer survival in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtola, Teemu J; Karppa, Elina K; Taari, Kimmo; Talala, Kirsi; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-06-15

    Randomized clinical trials have shown that use of 5α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) lowers overall prostate cancer (PCa) risk compared to placebo, while the proportion of Gleason 8-10 tumors is elevated. It is unknown whether this affects PCa-specific survival. We studied disease-specific survival by 5-ARI usage in a cohort of 6,537 prostate cancer cases diagnosed in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial and linked to the national prescription database for information on medication use. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prostate cancer-specific deaths. For comparison, survival among alpha-blocker users was also evaluated. During the median follow-up of 7.5 years after diagnosis a total of 2,478 men died; 617 due to prostate cancer and 1,861 due to other causes. The risk of prostate cancer death did not differ between 5-ARI users and nonusers (multivariable adjusted HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.72-1.24 and HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.69-1.41 for usage before and after the diagnosis, respectively). Alpha-blocker usage both before and after diagnosis was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.08-1.54 and HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.30-1.86, respectively). The risk increase vanished in long-term alpha-blocker usage. Use of 5-ARIs does not appear to affect prostate cancer mortality when used in management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Increased risk associated with alpha-blocker usage should prompt further exploration on the prognostic role of lower urinary tract symptoms.

  11. Survival trends in gastric cancer patients of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaoZhang; Ling—LingSun; Yan—LiMeng; Guang-YuSong; ]ing-.1ingHu; PingLu; BinJl

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To describe survival trends in patients in Northeast China diagnosed as gastric cancer. METHODS: A review of all inpatient and outpatient records of gastric cancer patients was conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. All the gastric cancer patients who satisfied the inclusion criteria from January 1, 1980 through December 31, 2003 were included in the study. The main outcomes were based on median survival and 3-year and 5-year survival rates, by decade of diagnosis. RESULTS: From 1980 through 2003, the median survival for patients with gastric cancer (n = 1604) increased from 33 mo to 49 mo. The decade of diagnosis was not significantly associated with patient survival for gastric cancer (P = 0.084 for overall survival, and P = 0.150 for 5-year survival); however, the survival rate of the 2000s was remarkably higher than that of the 1980s (P = 0.019 for overall survival, and P = 0.027 for 5-year survival).CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference of survival among each period; however, the survival rate of the 2000s was remarkably higher than that of the 1980s.

  12. Cancer estimation of incidence and survival in Algeria 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Cherif M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the major public health problems in Algeria. In the last 25 years, a significant increase in the incidence of the major types of cancers has been observed in both sexes. Moreover, the 5-year survival rate is low for the severe tumors due to a difficulty in access to cancer care and an incomplete health care framework. Cancer Registry of Setif, Algeria, has been recording cancer incidence, mortality, and survival since 1986 in collaboration with International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC of Lyon. Cancer Registry of Setif is being a source of information for cancer planning and corresponding surveillance in the National Cancer Plan 2015-2019, starting in January 2015. Data is recorded by means of CanReg 5 software. This software is developed and provided by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC of Lyon. It is designed specifically for cancer registration, and standardized to capture, control, and process the data. Estimation of cancer incidence in Algeria and survival rates are very important for surveillance, control, and planning of care. In men the incidence of lung, colorectal, bladder, prostate, and laryngeal cancers has significantly and steadily increased in the last decade. In women, the incidence of breast, colorectal, thyroid, and lung cancers has also increased significantly in the same period. Five-year survival rates for cancer of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast, cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and childhood leukemia are relatively low compared with other countries. The aim of our study was to estimate incidence and survival by means of Setif cancer registry data.

  13. Propranolol and survival from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Pottegård, Anton; Vaes, Evelien

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated that propranolol inhibits several pathways involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated whether breast cancer patients who used propranolol, or other non-selective beta-blockers, had reduced breast cancer-specific or all......-cause mortality in eight European cohorts. METHODS: Incident breast cancer patients were identified from eight cancer registries and compiled through the European Cancer Pharmacoepidemiology Network. Propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use was ascertained for each patient. Breast cancer-specific and all......-analysis techniques. Dose-response analyses by number of prescriptions were also performed. Analyses were repeated investigating propranolol use before cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: The combined study population included 55,252 and 133,251 breast cancer patients in the analysis of breast cancer-specific and all...

  14. Survival after radical prostatectomy for clinically localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    hazard of all-cause and prostate cancer-specific mortality after 10 years was 15.4% (95% confide3nce interval [CI] 13.2-17.7) and 6.6% (95% CI 4.9-8.2) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We present the first survival analysis of a complete, nationwide cohort of men undergoing RP for localised prostate cancer......OBJECTIVES: To describe survival and cause of death in a nationwide cohort of Danish patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). To describe risk factors associated with prostate cancer mortality. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Observational study of 6489 men with localised prostate...... cancer treated with RP at six different hospitals in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. Survival was described using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Causes of death were obtained from the national registry and cross-checked with patient files. Cumulative incidence of death, any cause and prostate cancer...

  15. Prediction of breast cancer survival through knowledge discovery in databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfnezhad Afshar, Hadi; Ahmadi, Maryam; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-01-26

    The collection of large volumes of medical data has offered an opportunity to develop prediction models for survival by the medical research community. Medical researchers who seek to discover and extract hidden patterns and relationships among large number of variables use knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) to predict the outcome of a disease. The study was conducted to develop predictive models and discover relationships between certain predictor variables and survival in the context of breast cancer. This study is Cross sectional. After data preparation, data of 22,763 female patients, mean age 59.4 years, stored in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) breast cancer dataset were analyzed anonymously. IBM SPSS Statistics 16, Access 2003 and Excel 2003 were used in the data preparation and IBM SPSS Modeler 14.2 was used in the model design. Support Vector Machine (SVM) model outperformed other models in the prediction of breast cancer survival. Analysis showed SVM model detected ten important predictor variables contributing mostly to prediction of breast cancer survival. Among important variables, behavior of tumor as the most important variable and stage of malignancy as the least important variable were identified. In current study, applying of the knowledge discovery method in the breast cancer dataset predicted the survival condition of breast cancer patients with high confidence and identified the most important variables participating in breast cancer survival.

  16. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  17. Conditional Melanoma Cancer Survival in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray M. Merrill

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond relative survival, which indicates the likelihood that patients will not die from causes associated with their cancer, conditional relative survival probabilities provide further useful prognostic information to cancer patients, tailored to the time already survived from diagnosis. This study presents conditional relative survival for melanoma patients in the United States, diagnosed during 2000–2008 and followed through 2012. Analyses are based on 62,803 male and 50,261 female cases in population-based cancer registries in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of the National Cancer Institute. Five-year relative survival estimates are presented for melanoma patients who have already survived one, two, three, four, or five years after the initial diagnosis. Five- and ten-year relative survival decreases with age, stage at diagnosis, and is lower among males, Blacks, and Hispanics. Five-year conditional relative survival improves with each year already survived. The potential for improvement in five-year conditional relative survival is greatest for older age, males, Blacks, Hispanics, and in later staged cases. For local disease, five-year conditional relative survival was significantly lower in ages greater than 65 years and in Blacks. It was significantly higher in females, non-Hispanics, and married individuals. Age had a greater inverse relationship with five-year survival in later staged disease. A similar result occurred for females and married individuals. In contrast, non-Hispanics had better five-year survival if diagnosed with local or regional disease, but not distant disease.

  18. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer (Updated)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy and radiation before surgery survived, on average, nearly twice as long as patients treated with surgery alone, according to results of a randomized clinical trial published May 31, 2012, in NEJM.

  19. Eribulin Improves Survival of Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment with eribulin (Halaven™) improved overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer whose disease progressed despite multiple rounds of prior chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III clinical trial called EMBRACE.

  20. Breast thermography. A prognostic indicator for breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isard, H J; Sweitzer, C J; Edelstein, G R

    1988-08-01

    A prognostic classification for thermographic staging of breast cancer has been applied to a cohort of 70 patients from 5040 screenees enrolled in the Albert Einstein Medical Center (AEMC) Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP). A diagnosis of breast cancer was established in each case before December 31, 1980. None of the patients have been lost to follow-up which extended from a minimum of 6 to a maximum of 13 years. Survival rates for those with favorable, equivocal, and poor thermographic factors are compared with each other and with results in accordance with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. As of December 31, 1986, there have been 22 (31.4%) deaths, all attributed to breast cancer. The thermographic scoring system clearly shows shorter survival for patients with poor thermographic prognostic factors, 30% surviving at 5 years and only 20% at 10 years compared with overall survival of 80% at 5 years and 70% at 10 years.

  1. Propranolol and survival from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Pottegård, Anton; Vaes, Evelien;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated that propranolol inhibits several pathways involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated whether breast cancer patients who used propranolol, or other non-selective beta-blockers, had reduced breast cancer-specific or all......-cause mortality in eight European cohorts. METHODS: Incident breast cancer patients were identified from eight cancer registries and compiled through the European Cancer Pharmacoepidemiology Network. Propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use was ascertained for each patient. Breast cancer-specific and all......-cause mortality were available for five and eight cohorts, respectively. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cancer-specific and all-cause mortality by propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use. HRs were pooled across cohorts using meta...

  2. Childhood cancer survival in France, 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Brigitte; Goujon, Stéphanie; Guissou, Sandra; Guyot-Goubin, Aurélie; Desmée, Solène; Désandes, Emmanuel; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the latest survival data for French childhood cancer patients at the national level. Data from the two French National Registries of Childhood Cancer (Haematopoietic Malignancies and Solid Tumours) were used to describe survival outcomes for 15,479 children diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2008 in mainland France. The overall survival was 91.7% at 1 year, 86.9% at 2 years and 81.6% at 5 years. Relative survival did not differ from overall survival even for infants. Survival was lower among infants for lymphoblastic leukaemia and astrocytoma, but higher for neuroblastoma. For all cancers considered together, 5-year survival increased from 79.5% in the first (2000-2002) diagnostic period to 83.2% in the last (2006-2008) period. The improvement was significant for leukaemia, both myeloid and lymphoid, central nervous system tumours (ependymoma) and neuroblastoma. The results remained valid in the multivariate analysis, and, for all cancers combined, the risk of death decreased by 20% between 2000-2002 and 2006-2008. The figures are consistent with various international estimates and are the result of progress in treatment regimens and collaborative clinical trials. The challenge for the French registries is now to study the long-term follow-up of survivors to estimate the incidence of long-term morbidities and adverse effects of treatments.

  3. Comorbidity and survival after early breast cancer. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, Lotte Holm; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Jørgensen, Trine Lembrecht

    2011-01-01

    : A search in Pubmed with keywords, breast neoplasm, comorbidity, and survival, was performed. A total of 18 studies published between 2000 and August 2010 was included in this review. RESULTS: All 18 studies demonstrated that comorbidity had a significant impact on survival after breast cancer with poorer...

  4. Modeling survival in colon cancer: a methodological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holbert Don

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Cox proportional hazards model is the most widely used model for survival analysis because of its simplicity. The fundamental assumption in this model is the proportionality of the hazard function. When this condition is not met, other modifications or other models must be used for analysis of survival data. We illustrate in this review several methodological approaches to deal with the violation of the proportionality assumption, using survival in colon cancer as an illustrative example.

  5. Incidence and survival from lung cancer in Greenland is comparable to survival in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelvan, Allan; Risum, Signe; Langer, Seppo W

    2015-01-01

    referred to treatment at Queen Ingrid's Hospital. On 1 February 2014, treatment results, survival, and prognostic variables were analysed. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 63 years. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was diagnosed in 145 patients (84%); 56% had squamous cell carcinoma, 34% had......INTRODUCTION: Oncological treatment of lung cancer has been available in Greenland since 2004. We evaluated patient characteristics and survival rates for the first six years of local lung cancer treatment. METHODS: From September 2004 to August 2010, a total of 173 patients with lung cancer were...... of the 142 treated patients (86%). Of these, 36 patients (30%) received second-line chemotherapy.The median survival of patients undergoing primary lobectomy/pneumonectomy, palliative chemotherapy, and no treatment was 76.3 months, 11.8 months, and 2.0 months, respectively (p

  6. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  7. PREDICT : model for prediction of survival in localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkmeijer, Linda G W; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; van Oort, Inge M.; van der Poel, Henk G.; de Meerleer, Gert; van Vulpen, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current models for prediction of prostate cancer-specific survival do not incorporate all present-day interventions. In the present study, a pre-treatment prediction model for patients with localized prostate cancer was developed.Methods: From 1989 to 2008, 3383 patients were treated with I

  8. Survival in patients with breast cancer with bone metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cetin, Karynsa; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Sværke, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since population-based data on prognostic factors affecting survival in patients with breast cancer with bone metastasis (BM) are currently limited, we conducted this nationwide retrospective cohort study to examine the prognostic role of disease stage at breast cancer diagnosis...

  9. Dietary patterns and survival in German postmenopausal breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Buck, K.; Seibold, P.; Heinz, J.; Obi, N.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Chang-Claude, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research on the association between dietary patterns and breast cancer survival is very limited. METHODS: A prospective follow-up study was conducted in Germany, including 2522 postmenopausal breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2001-2005 with available food frequency questionnaire data.

  10. A superstatistical model of metastasis and cancer survival

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, L Leon

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a superstatistical model for the progression statistics of malignant cancer cells. The metastatic cascade is modeled as a complex nonequilibrium system with several macroscopic pathways and inverse-chi-square distributed parameters of the underlying Poisson processes. The predictions of the model are in excellent agreement with observed survival time probability distributions of breast cancer patients.

  11. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirie, Ailith; Guo, Qi; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer...

  12. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer in Taiwanese women: potential treatment delay and impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ling; Chan, K Arnold; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Chang, Li-Yun; Wang, Ming-Yang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of women diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) in Taiwan. PABC is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after obstetric delivery. Our sample of PABC patients (N = 26) included all patients diagnosed at a major medical center in northern Taiwan from 1984 through 2009. Among these patients, 15 were diagnosed during pregnancy and 11 were diagnosed within 1 year after delivery. The comparison group included 104 patients within the same age range as the PABC patients and diagnosed with breast cancer not associated with pregnancy from 2004 through 2009 at the same hospital. Patients' initiating treatment delayed, 5-year and 10-year overall survival were delineated by stratified Kaplan-Meier estimates. Patients' characteristics were associated with initiating treatment delayed was evaluated with multivariate proportional hazards modeling. Antepartum PABC patients were younger and had longer time between diagnosis and treatment initiation than postpartum PABC patients. The predictor of treatment delayed was including birth parity, cancer stage, and pregnancy. The PABC group had larger tumors, more advanced cancer stage, and tumors with less progesterone receptor than the comparison group. The antepartum PABC patients had higher mortality than postpartum PABC and comparison groups within 5 years after diagnosis. Based on these results, we confirmed that pregnant women with breast cancer were more likely to delay treatment. Therefore, we recommend that breast cancer screening should be integrated into the prenatal and postnatal routine visits for early detection of the women's breast problems.

  13. Smoking and prostate cancer survival and recurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto L Muller; Daniel M Moreira

    2011-01-01

    Smooking is associated with several major benign and malignant diseases,representing one of the most important modifiable risk factors.Among urothelial neoplasms,smoking is pivotal in tumor carcinogenesis,but its role in prostate cancer is still controversial.Many authors have failed to demonstrate an association between smoking and prostate cancer.1-3 However,large epidemiological studies have shown that smoking is associated with higher risk of developing and dying of prostate cancer.4 Thus,large sample sizes and long follow-ups are important when studying prostate cancer given that its natural history can be quite long.

  14. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival...... in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer...... in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer....

  15. Cancer pathways are associated with improved long-term survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Højsgaard; Maina, Pierre Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The impact of cancer patient pathways (CPP) on long-term outcome after surgery for colorectal cancer has not been documented. This study aimed to investigate the effect of CPP on survival in patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort...... study performed in a single centre on prospectively collected data from a national database, the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group. In total, we reviewed 309 consecutive patients (145 females) with a median age of 70 years (range: 30-92 years), who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer between 2007...

  16. Smoking and survival in male breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padron-Monedero, Alicia; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Tannenbaum, Stacey L; Miao, Feng; Hansra, Damien; Lee, David J; Byrne, Margaret M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the article was to assess whether smoking affects survival in male breast cancer patients for the overall population and when stratified by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Data were obtained by linking the 1996-2007 Florida Cancer Data System, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, and the US Census. Inclusion criteria were males ≥18 years, diagnosed with breast cancer and residing in Florida (n = 1573). To analyze the association between smoking and survival, we performed sequential multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models with progressive adjustment for main confounders. Compared to never smokers, worse survival was found in current (hazard ratio = 1.63; 95 % CI = 1.23-2.16) but not in former smokers (1.26; 0.99-1.59). Those who smoked ≥1 packs/day had worse survival (2.48; 1.59-3.87) than never smokers with a significant dose-response (P for linear trend survival, which was worse by intensity of smoking. Also, any smoking history is associated with worse survival in White and non-Hispanic male breast cancer patients compared to never smokers. Thus, male breast cancer patients should be advised to quit smoking.

  17. Incidence and survival from lung cancer in Greenland is comparable to survival in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelvan, Allan; Risum, Signe; Langer, Seppo W

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oncological treatment of lung cancer has been available in Greenland since 2004. We evaluated patient characteristics and survival rates for the first six years of local lung cancer treatment. METHODS: From September 2004 to August 2010, a total of 173 patients with lung cancer were...... referred to treatment at Queen Ingrid's Hospital. On 1 February 2014, treatment results, survival, and prognostic variables were analysed. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 63 years. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was diagnosed in 145 patients (84%); 56% had squamous cell carcinoma, 34% had...... adenocarcinoma, 2% had large cell carcinoma and 8% had NSCLC not otherwise specified (NOS). In all, 28 (16%) had small cell lung cancer. A total of 142 patients (82%) received treatment; 20 underwent surgery (ten stage Ib, one stage IIa, five stage IIb, four stage IIIa); palliative chemotherapy was given to 122...

  18. Obesity and survival among women with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagle, C M; Dixon, S C; Jensen, A.

    2015-01-01

    analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-specific survival and overall survival (OS) among women with invasive ovarian cancer. METHODS: We used original data from 21 studies, which included 12 390......BACKGROUND: Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative...... women with ovarian carcinoma. We combined study-specific adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models to estimate pooled HRs (pHR). We further explored associations by histologic subtype. RESULTS: Overall, 6715 (54%) deaths occurred during follow-up. A significant OS disadvantage...

  19. Paradoxical Relationship between Chromosomal Instability and Survival Outcome in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Eklund, Aron Charles; Li, Qiyuan

    2011-01-01

    70 scores. These results suggest a nonmonotonic relationship between gene signature expression and HR for survival outcome, which may explain the difficulties encountered in the identification of prognostic expression signatures in ER- breast cancer. Furthermore, the data are consistent......Chromosomal instability (CIN) is associated with poor prognosis in human cancer. However, in certain animal tumor models elevated CIN negatively impacts upon organism fitness, and is poorly tolerated by cancer cells. To better understand this seemingly contradictory relationship between CIN...

  20. Socioeconomic disparities in childhood cancer survival in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Martin; Rueegg, Corina S; Schmidlin, Kurt; Spoerri, Adrian; Niggli, Felix; Grotzer, Michael; von der Weid, Nicolas X; Egger, Matthias; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Zwahlen, Marcel; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we investigated whether childhood cancer survival in Switzerland is influenced by socioeconomic status (SES), and if disparities vary by type of cancer and definition of SES (parental education, living condition, area-based SES). Using Cox proportional hazards models, we analyzed 5-year cumulative mortality in all patients registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry diagnosed 1991-2006 below 16 years. Information on SES was extracted from the Swiss census by probabilistic record linkage. The study included 1602 children (33% with leukemia, 20% with lymphoma, 22% with central nervous system (CNS) tumors); with an overall 5-year survival of 77% (95%CI 75-79%). Higher SES, particularly parents' education, was associated with a lower 5-year cumulative mortality. Results varied by type of cancer with no association for leukemia and particularly strong effects for CNS tumor patients, where mortality hazard ratios for the different SES indicators, comparing the highest with the lowest group, ranged from 0.48 (95%CI: 0.28-0.81) to 0.71 (95%CI: 0.44-1.15). We conclude that even in Switzerland with a high quality health care system and mandatory health insurance, socioeconomic differences in childhood cancer survival persist. Factors causing these survival differences have to be further explored, to facilitate universal access to optimal treatment and finally eliminate social inequalities in childhood cancer survival.

  1. Diet and colorectal cancer risk and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary and other lifestyle factors account for 20–45% of all colorectal cancer cases. Being overweight or obese, having a high intake of red and processed meat and alcohol increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while a high intake of dairy products, fruits and vegetables, foods containin

  2. Surviving testicular cancer : sexuality & other existential issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Grietje

    2003-01-01

    The thesis deals with the psychological aspects of ‘sexuality after testicular cancer’, where my collegue, the physician dr. Van Basten formerly predominantly described the physical-biological aspects of this subject. Testicular cancer is a type of male genital cancer, usually diagnosed between abou

  3. Feature selection and survival modeling in The Cancer Genome Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim H

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyunsoo Kim,1 Markus Bredel2 1Department of Pathology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, and Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Purpose: Personalized medicine is predicated on the concept of identifying subgroups of a common disease for better treatment. Identifying biomarkers that predict disease subtypes has been a major focus of biomedical science. In the era of genome-wide profiling, there is controversy as to the optimal number of genes as an input of a feature selection algorithm for survival modeling. Patients and methods: The expression profiles and outcomes of 544 patients were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We compared four different survival prediction methods: (1 1-nearest neighbor (1-NN survival prediction method; (2 random patient selection method and a Cox-based regression method with nested cross-validation; (3 least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO optimization using whole-genome gene expression profiles; or (4 gene expression profiles of cancer pathway genes. Results: The 1-NN method performed better than the random patient selection method in terms of survival predictions, although it does not include a feature selection step. The Cox-based regression method with LASSO optimization using whole-genome gene expression data demonstrated higher survival prediction power than the 1-NN method, but was outperformed by the same method when using gene expression profiles of cancer pathway genes alone. Conclusion: The 1-NN survival prediction method may require more patients for better performance, even when omitting censored data. Using preexisting biological knowledge for survival prediction is reasonable as a means to understand the biological system of a cancer, unless the analysis goal is to identify completely unknown genes relevant to cancer biology. Keywords: brain, feature selection

  4. Survival Analysis of Breast Cancer Subtypes in Spinal Metastases Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Miao; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Morgen, Soeren Smith

    2014-01-01

    growth factor receptor 2 subtypes had similar median survival duration and mortality risk. Patients with triple-negative breast cancer had a median survival duration of only 9.9 months. CONCLUSION: Patients with spinal metastases with ER/HR (-) status and triple-negative breast cancer could be downgraded...... from score "5" to "3" in Tokuhashi scoring system and from "slow growth" to "moderate growth" in Tomita scoring system. Spine surgeons should be critical before performing high-risk extensive surgery in patients with ER/HR (-) status, and especially, in those with triple-negative status. LEVEL...... hazards regression model unadjusted and adjusted by age were used. RESULTS: Patients with ER-negative (-) breast cancer had 11 months shorter median survival duration (10.6 vs. 21.5 mo) and 48% higher mortality risk (P=0.03) than those with ER-positive (+) breast cancer. Patients with PgR (-) status had...

  5. Changing Trends of Breast Cancer Survival in Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyam Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in women, with elevated incidence in developing countries. This retrospective study included all 122 patients diagnosed with breast cancer from January 2003 to December 2008 in the Sultanate of Oman. Age at presentation was 47.41 years (SD±12.88, with one-third of patients younger than 40 years. The majority of patients presented with stage III (41.2% and IV (18.2% breast cancer. T size (=.023, skin involvement (=.003, and stage at presentation (=.004 were significantly associated with overall survival. Skin involvement at presentation (=.003, T size (=.09, lymph node status (=.013, and stage (=.003 were strong predictors of relapse-free survival. Patients had a 5-year survival of 78%, compared to 64% of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1996 and 2002 identified in our previously published study. Thus, despite Omani breast cancer patients continuing to present with advanced breast cancer, survival rates have significantly improved.

  6. Incidental prostate cancer diagnosed at radical cystoprostatectomy for bladder cancer: disease-specific outcomes and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B. Kaelberer

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: For men undergoing RCP for bladder cancer, the present study suggests that incidentally discovered prostate cancers, irrespective of pathologic stage, Gleason score, or clinical significance, do not impact 5-year disease control or survival outcomes.

  7. Survival in Norwegian BRCA1 mutation carriers with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Anne

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies of survival in women with BRCA1 mutations have shown either reduced survival or no difference compared to controls. Programmes for early detection and treatment of inherited breast cancer, have failed to demonstrate a significant improvement in survival in BRCA1 mutation carriers. One hundred and sixty-seven women with disease-associated germline BRCA1 mutations and breast cancer from 1980 to 2001 were identified. Tumour characteristics, treatment given and survival were recorded. A control group comprising three hundred and four women matched for age, time of diagnosis and stage were used to compare survival. BRCA1 mutation carriers were found to have a poorer prognosis, which could be explained by neither the mode of surgical treatment nor the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. BRCA1 mutation carriers with node negative breast cancer had worse overall survival than controls. Our findings confirm the serious prognosis of BRCA1-associated breast cancer even when diagnosed at an early stage, and that type of treatment does not influence prognosis.

  8. Control of data quality for population-based cancer survival analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, R.; Abela, L; Moore, J.; Woods, LM; Nur, U; Rachet, B; Allemani, C; Coleman, MP

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based cancer survival is an important measure of the overall effectiveness of cancer care in a population. Population-based cancer registries collect data that enable the estimation of cancer survival. To ensure accurate, consistent and comparable survival estimates, strict control of data quality is required before the survival analyses are carried out. In this paper, we present a basis for data quality control for cancer survival. METHODS: We propose three distinct ph...

  9. Brain metastases free survival differs between breast cancer subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, A; Bago-Horvath, Z; De Vries, C; Dubsky, P; Pluschnig, U; Rudas, M; Rottenfusser, A; Knauer, M; Eiter, H; Fitzal, F; Dieckmann, K; Mader, R M; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer; in addition, an increasing incidence was reported for triple-negative tumours. We aimed to compare brain metastases free survival (BMFS) of breast cancer subtypes in patients treated between 1996 until 2010. Methods: Brain metastases free survival was measured as the interval from diagnosis of extracranial breast cancer metastases until diagnosis of BM. HER-2 status was analysed by immunohistochemistry and reanalysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation if a score of 2+ was gained. Oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PgR) status was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Brain metastases free survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Data of 213 patients (46 luminal/124 HER-2/43 triple-negative subtype) with BM from breast cancer were available for the analysis. Brain metastases free survival differed significantly between breast cancer subtypes. Median BMFS in triple-negative tumours was 14 months (95% CI: 11.34–16.66) compared with 18 months (95% CI: 14.46–21.54) in HER-2-positive tumours (P=0.001) and 34 months (95% CI: 23.71–44.29) in luminal tumours (P=0.001), respectively. In HER-2-positive patients, co-positivity for ER and HER-2 prolonged BMFS (26 vs 15 m; P=0.033); in luminal tumours, co-expression of ER and PgR was not significantly associated with BMFS. Brain metastases free survival in patients with lung metastases was significantly shorter (17 vs 21 months; P=0.014). Conclusion: Brain metastases free survival in triple-negative breast cancer, as well as in HER-2-positive/ER-negative, is significantly shorter compared with HER-2/ER co-positive or luminal tumours, mirroring the aggressiveness of these breast cancer subtypes. PMID:22233926

  10. Disparities in oral cancer survival among mentally ill patients.

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    Ting-Shou Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have reported excess cancer mortality in patients with mental illness. However, scant studies evaluated the differences in cancer treatment and its impact on survival rates among mentally ill patients. Oral cancer is one of the ten most common cancers in the world. We investigated differences in treatment type and survival rates between oral cancer patients with mental illness and without mental illness. METHODS: Using the National Health Insurance (NHI database, we compared the type of treatment and survival rates in 16687 oral cancer patients from 2002 to 2006. The utilization rate of surgery for oral cancer was compared between patients with mental illness and without mental illness using logistic regression. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for survival analysis. RESULTS: Oral cancer patients with mental disorder conferred a grave prognosis, compared with patients without mental illness (hazard ratios [HR] = 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.30-1.93; P<0.001. After adjusting for patients' characteristics and hospital characteristics, patients with mental illness were less likely to receive surgery with or without adjuvant therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.34-0.65; P<0.001. In multivariate analysis, oral cancer patients with mental illness carried a 1.58-times risk of death (95% CI = 1.30-1.93; P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Oral cancer patients with mental illness were less likely to undergo surgery with or without adjuvant therapy than those without mental illness. Patients with mental illness have a poor prognosis compared to those without mental illness. To reduce disparities in physical health, public health strategies and welfare policies must continue to focus on this vulnerable group.

  11. The impact of comorbidity on cancer survival: a review

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    Søgaard M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mette Søgaard,1 Reimar Wernich Thomsen,1 Kristine Skovgaard Bossen,2 Henrik Toft Sørensen,1 Mette Nørgaard1 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark Background: A number of studies have shown poorer survival among cancer patients with comorbidity. Several mechanisms may underlie this finding. In this review we summarize the current literature on the association between patient comorbidity and cancer prognosis. Prognostic factors examined include tumor biology, diagnosis, treatment, clinical quality, and adherence. Methods: All English-language articles published during 2002–2012 on the association between comorbidity and survival among patients with colon cancer, breast cancer, and lung cancer were identified from PubMed, MEDLINE and Embase. Titles and abstracts were reviewed to identify eligible studies and their main results were then extracted. Results: Our search yielded more than 2,500 articles related to comorbidity and cancer, but few investigated the prognostic impact of comorbidity as a primary aim. Most studies found that cancer patients with comorbidity had poorer survival than those without comorbidity, with 5-year mortality hazard ratios ranging from 1.1 to 5.8. Few studies examined the influence of specific chronic conditions. In general, comorbidity does not appear to be associated with more aggressive types of cancer or other differences in tumor biology. Presence of specific severe comorbidities or psychiatric disorders were found to be associated with delayed cancer diagnosis in some studies, while chronic diseases requiring regular medical visits were associated with earlier cancer detection in others. Another finding was that patients with comorbidity do not receive standard cancer treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy as often as patients without comorbidity, and their chance of

  12. Socioeconomic position and survival after lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, Susanne O; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Jakobsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    with stepwise inclusion of possible mediators. RESULTS: For both low- and high-stage lung cancer, adjusted ORs for first-line treatment were reduced in patients with short education and low income, although the OR for education did not reach statistical significance in men with high-stage disease. Patients...... by differences in stage, treatment and comorbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the Danish Lung Cancer Register, we identified 13 045 patients with lung cancer diagnosed in 2004-2010, with information on stage, histology, performance status and first-line treatment. We obtained age, gender, vital status, comorbid...... conditions and socioeconomic information (education, income and cohabitation status) from nationwide population-based registers. Associations between SEP and receipt of first-line treatment were analysed in multivariate logistic regression models and those with overall mortality in Cox regression models...

  13. The impact of the extent of surgical resection on survival of gastric cancer patients

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    Angelov KG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kostadin Georgiev Angelov, Mariela Borisova Vasileva, Konstantin Savov Grozdev, Svetoslav Yordanov Toshev, Manol Bonev Sokolov, Georgi Todorov Todorov Department of Surgery, Medical University of Sofia, Aleksandrovska University Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the significance of the extent of gastric resection on the postoperative and overall gastric cancer survival.Background: Resection with clean margins (4 cm or more is widely accepted as the standard­ized goal for radical treatment of gastric cancer according to current guidelines, while the type of resection (subtotal or total is still a matter of debate.Patients and methods: The study included 155 patients diagnosed and treated in the Department of Surgery, Aleksandrovska University Hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. In order to determine the significance of the resection volume, we excluded from the study 54 patients receiving palliative intervention or staging exploratory laparoscopy. The remaining 101 patients were divided into two groups based on the volume of the performed gastric resection (total and subtotal and compared based on overall survival and perioperative mortality. We also investigated the 3-year survival in the two groups as well as the overall survival only in the subgroup of patients with D2 lymphadenectomy.Results: We could not determine any statistically significant difference in overall survival and 3-year survival (P=0.990 based on the extent of surgical resection (P=0.824 or perioperative mortality. The statistical analysis on patients with D2 lymph node dissection only did not show significance for overall survival. Conclusion: Our study shows no difference in safety and long-term survival rate of patients with gastric carcinoma based on the volume of stomach resection. Comparison with other studies also shows no difference in survival based on volume of the resection. Keywords: gastric cancer

  14. [Survival after gastrectomy for cancer. 209 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Treut, Y P; Capobianco, C; Botti, G; Christophe, M; Lebreuil, G; Bricot, R

    1992-09-26

    The long-term results of 209 gastrectomies performed for adenocarcinoma, including 117 which were prospectively collected, are presented. Resection was curative in 154 cases (73.6 percent). The TNM distribution of the tumours was: stage I (TxNOMO) 75 cases, stage II (TxN1MO) 46 cases, stage III (TxN2MO) 33 cases and stage IV (TxNxM1) 55 cases. Lymph node involvement was more frequent in the prospective than in the retrospective study. With a more than 5 years' follow-up of 80 percent of the patients operated upon, the actuarial survival rate at 5 years (operative mortality included) was 38 percent for all lesions, 52 percent for curative resection and 2 percent for palliative resection. Following curative resection, the survival rates for tumours of the upper, middle and lower thirds of the stomach were 40, 60 and 55 percent respectively. These rates were 60 percent for stage I tumours, 54 percent for stage II tumours and 25 percent for stage III tumours. The results obtained in this series, where most of the curative gastrectomies included excision of N1 and N2 lymph nodes, show that lymph node involvement has no significant importance for the prognosis when it is proximal (N1) and is not incompatible with prolonged survival when it is pedicular (N2).

  15. LHRH and LHR genotypes and prostate cancer incidence and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Sue Ann; Liu, Stephen V; Pinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Despite their crucial role in initiating steroid-hormone synthesis, the hypothalamic and pituitary hormones (LH, LHRH) and their receptors have received scant attention in genetic studies of hormone-related diseases. This study included 1,170 men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PC) in Los Angeles County between 1999 and 2003. LHRH and LH receptor genotypes were examined for association with PC survival. Additionally, associations with PC incidence were examined by comparing PC cases to control men of similar age and race/ethnicity. The LHR 312 G allele was found to be associated with increased PC mortality (p=0.01). Ten years after diagnosis, 16% of men carrying two copies of the G allele (genotype GG) had died of PC, compared to 11% of those with genotype AG and 9% of those with AA. In a case-control comparison, this same allele was significantly associated with decreased PC risk: OR=0.68 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.93) for genotype GG vs. AA. These results suggest that androgens may play opposing roles in PC initiation and progression, and highlight the need to include these important but overlooked genes in future studies of PC etiology, prognosis, and treatment.

  16. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

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    Zain, Zakiyah, E-mail: zac@uum.edu.my; Ahmad, Yuhaniz, E-mail: yuhaniz@uum.edu.my [School of Quantitative Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok 06010, Kedah (Malaysia); Azwan, Zairul, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Raduan, Farhana, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Sagap, Ismail, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com [Surgery Department, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Bandar Tun Razak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Aziz, Nazrina, E-mail: nazrina@uum.edu.my

    2014-12-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  17. Use of Aspirin postdiagnosis improves survival for colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaannet, E; Sampieri, K; Dekkers, O M; de Craen, A J M; van Herk-Sukel, M P P; Lemmens, V; van den Broek, C B M; Coebergh, J W; Herings, R M C; van de Velde, C J H; Fodde, R; Liefers, G J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The preventive role of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, in particular, on colorectal cancer is well established. More recently, it has been suggested that aspirin may also have a therapeutic role. Aim of the present observational population-based study was to assess the therapeutic effect on overall survival of aspirin/NSAIDs as adjuvant treatment used after the diagnosis of colorectal cancer patients. Methods: Data concerning prescriptions were obtained from PHARMO record linkage systems and all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (1998–2007) were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry (population-based cancer registry). Aspirin/NSAID use was classified as none, prediagnosis and postdiagnosis and only postdiagnosis. Patients were defined as non-user of aspirin/NSAIDs from the date of diagnosis of the colorectal cancer to the date of first use of aspirin or NSAIDs and user from first use to the end of follow-up. Poisson regression was performed with user status as time-varying exposure. Results: In total, 1176 (26%) patients were non-users, 2086 (47%) were prediagnosis and postdiagnosis users and 1219 (27%) were only postdiagnosis users (total n=4481). Compared with non-users, a survival gain was observed for aspirin users; the adjusted rate ratio (RR) was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63–0.95; P=0.015). Stratified for colon and rectal, the survival gain was only present in colon cancer (adjusted RR 0.65 (95%CI 0.50–0.84; P=0.001)). For frequent users survival gain was larger (adjusted RR 0.61 (95%CI 0.46–0.81; P=0.001). In rectal cancer, aspirin use was not associated with survival (adjusted RR 1.10 (95%CI 0.79–1.54; P=0.6). The NSAIDs use was associated with decreased survival (adjusted RR 1.93 (95%CI 1.70–2.20; P<0.001). Conclusion: Aspirin use initiated or continued after diagnosis of colon cancer is associated with a lower risk of overall mortality. These findings strongly support initiation of

  18. Height and the survival of prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honglei; Miller, Barry A; Giovannucci, Edward; Hayes, Richard B

    2003-03-01

    We investigated the associations between height and other anthropometric factors and the survival of 584 prostate cancer patients, initially recruited for a population-based, case-control study. During a median of 6.6 years of follow-up, 129 prostate cancer deaths and 153 deaths because of other causes were identified. After adjusting for age, cancer stage, and grade, the relative risk and 95% confident intervals for prostate cancer death were 1.0 (reference), 0.9 (0.6-1.4), 0.5 (0.3-0.9), and 0.6 (0.3-1.0) for patients whose heights were or =1.85 m, respectively (P for trend = 0.01). Similar associations were found in subgroup analyses by cancer stage, cancer grade, age, race, and occupation-based socioeconomic status. However, height was not associated with death because of other causes. In addition, no significant associations were found between body mass index or weight and either prostate cancer death or death because of other causes. Our results suggest that greater height may be associated with better survival of prostate cancer patients.

  19. Time dependent ethnic convergence in colorectal cancer survival in hawaii

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    Hundahl Scott A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although colorectal cancer death rates have been declining, this trend is not consistent across all ethnic groups. Biological, environmental, behavioral and socioeconomic explanations exist, but the reason for this discrepancy remains inconclusive. We examined the hypothesis that improved cancer screening across all ethnic groups will reduce ethnic differences in colorectal cancer survival. Methods Through the Hawaii Tumor Registry 16,424 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were identified during the years 1960–2000. Cox regression analyses were performed for each of three cohorts stratified by ethnicity (Caucasian, Japanese, Hawaiian, Filipino, and Chinese. The models included stage of diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex as predictors of survival. Results Mortality rates improved significantly for all ethnic groups. Moreover, with the exception of Hawaiians, rates for all ethnic groups converged over time. Persistently lower survival for Hawaiians appeared linked with more cancer treatment. Conclusion Ethnic disparities in colorectal cancer mortality rates appear primarily the result of differential utilization of health care. If modern screening procedures can be provided equally to all ethnic groups, ethnic outcome differences can be virtually eliminated.

  20. Combining gene signatures improves prediction of breast cancer survival.

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    Xi Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several gene sets for prediction of breast cancer survival have been derived from whole-genome mRNA expression profiles. Here, we develop a statistical framework to explore whether combination of the information from such sets may improve prediction of recurrence and breast cancer specific death in early-stage breast cancers. Microarray data from two clinically similar cohorts of breast cancer patients are used as training (n = 123 and test set (n = 81, respectively. Gene sets from eleven previously published gene signatures are included in the study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the relationship between breast cancer survival and gene expression on a particular gene set, a Cox proportional hazards model is applied using partial likelihood regression with an L2 penalty to avoid overfitting and using cross-validation to determine the penalty weight. The fitted models are applied to an independent test set to obtain a predicted risk for each individual and each gene set. Hierarchical clustering of the test individuals on the basis of the vector of predicted risks results in two clusters with distinct clinical characteristics in terms of the distribution of molecular subtypes, ER, PR status, TP53 mutation status and histological grade category, and associated with significantly different survival probabilities (recurrence: p = 0.005; breast cancer death: p = 0.014. Finally, principal components analysis of the gene signatures is used to derive combined predictors used to fit a new Cox model. This model classifies test individuals into two risk groups with distinct survival characteristics (recurrence: p = 0.003; breast cancer death: p = 0.001. The latter classifier outperforms all the individual gene signatures, as well as Cox models based on traditional clinical parameters and the Adjuvant! Online for survival prediction. CONCLUSION: Combining the predictive strength of multiple gene signatures improves

  1. Interobserver variability in prostate cancer specific survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J Y; Lillis, P K; O'Rourke, T J; Jones, C; Higgins, B A; Thompson, I M

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the reliability of disease-specific survival (DSS) as an outcome measure in patients with carcinoma of the prostate (CaP). The records of 50 patients had a diagnosis of CaP and had expired were selected from the hospital tumor registry. Records were reviewed by six individuals and each individual was asked to specify cause of death as due to CaP or some other cause. DSS curves were generated based on the determinations of each reviewer. Although the DSS curves were generally parallel, a high degree of variability was seen at various intervals, leading us to conclude that DSS is dependent upon the individual reviewer. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. Treatment Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  3. Effect of cimetidine on survival after gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H; Knigge, U; Bülow, Steffen

    1988-01-01

    The effect of cimetidine on survival was investigated in 181 patients with gastric cancer. Immediately after operation or the decision not to operate, the patients were randomised in double-blind fashion to placebo or cimetidine 400 mg twice daily for two years or until death, with review every...

  4. Exemestane Following Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences and Prolongs Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postmenopausal women with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer had delayed disease recurrence and longer survival after taking 2-3 years of tamoxifen followed by exemestane for a total of 5 years compared to taking tamoxifen for 5 years.

  5. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pirie (Ailith); Q. Guo (Qi); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mats); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; C. van Ongeval (Chantal); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); J.E. Olsen (Janet E.); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Frederick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J.L. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); K. Butterbach (Katja); B. Holleczek (B.); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Siljie); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); C.J. Poole (Christopher J.); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); R. Yang (Rose); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A. Mannermaa (Arto); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Hall (Per); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); A. Cox (Angela); P.A. Fasching (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with brea

  6. Incidence of and survival after subsequent cancers in carriers of pathogenic MMR variants with previous cancer:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pål; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Today most patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) survive their first cancer. There is limited information on the incidences and outcome of subsequent cancers. The present study addresses three questions: (i) what is the cumulative incidence of a subsequent cancer; (ii) in which organs do s...

  7. Prognostic factors of overall survival in renal cancer patients – single oncological center study

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    Kajetan Juszczak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The clinical course of renal cancer remains difficult to predict. Attempts to appoint new independent prognostic factors (IPFs and comparisons of already identified ones among populations are inevitable to develop more effective prognostic instruments. The aim of this study was to evaluate IPFs of overall survival in a given population of patients with renal cancer.Materials and methods. Retrospective analysis of 148 patients with renal cancer treated at the Oncological Institute in Cracow from 2000 to 2007 was performed. Mean follow–up was 51 months. Using the log–rang test, a group of clinicopathological and biochemical features was analyzed in respect to their influence on overall survival. Results were presented as Kaplan–Meier curves. Final identification of IPFs was made by multivariate Cox regression analysis.Results. Overall survival rate at 1, 2, and 5–year follow–up was 58.8%, 38.2%, and 21.4%, respectively. The set of identified IPFs consisted of performance status, smoking history, hemoglobin concentration, anatomical staging, tumor grade, and the presence of microvascular invasion. It was confirmed that only nephrectomy increases significantly overall survival.Conclusions. Apart from smoking history, the role of all other IPFs identified in our study is well documented in the literature. Smoking history seems to be a new IPF with strong negative impact on survival in patients with RCC.

  8. Global and regional estimates of cancer mortality and incidence by site: I. Application of regional cancer survival model to estimate cancer mortality distribution by site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Alan D

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Global Burden of Disease 2000 (GBD 2000 study starts from an analysis of the overall mortality envelope in order to ensure that the cause-specific estimates add to the total all cause mortality by age and sex. For regions where information on the distribution of cancer deaths is not available, a site-specific survival model was developed to estimate the distribution of cancer deaths by site. Methods An age-period-cohort model of cancer survival was developed based on data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER. The model was further adjusted for the level of economic development in each region. Combined with the available incidence data, cancer death distributions were estimated and the model estimates were validated against vital registration data from regions other than the United States. Results Comparison with cancer mortality distribution from vital registration confirmed the validity of this approach. The model also yielded the cancer mortality distribution which is consistent with the estimates based on regional cancer registries. There was a significant variation in relative interval survival across regions, in particular for cancers of bladder, breast, melanoma of the skin, prostate and haematological malignancies. Moderate variations were observed among cancers of colon, rectum, and uterus. Cancers with very poor prognosis such as liver, lung, and pancreas cancers showed very small variations across the regions. Conclusions The survival model presented here offers a new approach to the calculation of the distribution of deaths for areas where mortality data are either scarce or unavailable.

  9. Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyapati, Sonia M; Shu, Xiao-ou; Ruan, Zhi Xian; Dai, Qi; Cai, Qiuyin; Gao, Yu-tang; Zheng, Wei

    2005-07-01

    Soy and its constituents have been shown in many in vivo and in vitro studies and in some epidemiological studies to have anti-cancer effects. Some soy constituents, however, also stimulate cell proliferation, which has raised concerns in promoting soy intake among breast cancer survivors. To investigate whether soy intake may be associated with breast cancer survival, we evaluated data from a cohort of 1459 breast cancer patients who participated in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study between 1996 and 1998. Usual soy food intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. The median follow-up time for this cohort of women was 5.2 years. We found that soy intake prior to cancer diagnosis was unrelated to disease-free breast cancer survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-1.33 for the highest tertile compared to the lowest tertile). The association between soy protein intake and breast cancer survival did not differ according to ER/PR status, tumor stage, age at diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR), or menopausal status. Additionally, the soy-survival association did not appear to vary according to XbaI or PvuII polymorphisms in ER-alpha, or C(14206)T, G(25652)A, or A(50766)G polymorphisms in ER-beta. These data suggest that soyfoods do not have an adverse effect on breast cancer survival.

  10. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer in Taiwanese women: potential treatment delay and impact on survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Yang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of women diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC in Taiwan. PABC is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after obstetric delivery. Our sample of PABC patients (N = 26 included all patients diagnosed at a major medical center in northern Taiwan from 1984 through 2009. Among these patients, 15 were diagnosed during pregnancy and 11 were diagnosed within 1 year after delivery. The comparison group included 104 patients within the same age range as the PABC patients and diagnosed with breast cancer not associated with pregnancy from 2004 through 2009 at the same hospital. Patients' initiating treatment delayed, 5-year and 10-year overall survival were delineated by stratified Kaplan-Meier estimates. Patients' characteristics were associated with initiating treatment delayed was evaluated with multivariate proportional hazards modeling. Antepartum PABC patients were younger and had longer time between diagnosis and treatment initiation than postpartum PABC patients. The predictor of treatment delayed was including birth parity, cancer stage, and pregnancy. The PABC group had larger tumors, more advanced cancer stage, and tumors with less progesterone receptor than the comparison group. The antepartum PABC patients had higher mortality than postpartum PABC and comparison groups within 5 years after diagnosis. Based on these results, we confirmed that pregnant women with breast cancer were more likely to delay treatment. Therefore, we recommend that breast cancer screening should be integrated into the prenatal and postnatal routine visits for early detection of the women's breast problems.

  11. Survival of patients with breast cancer attending Bristol Cancer Help Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, F S; Easton, D F; Harris, E; Chilvers, C E; McElwain, T J

    1990-09-08

    The Bristol Cancer Help Centre (BCHC) was set up in 1979 to offer various alternative therapies and treatments for patients with cancer. It attracted much public interest and a high demand for its services--and profound medical scepticism. In a study beginning in 1986 of 334 women with breast cancer attending the centre for the first time between June, 1986, and October, 1987, information about the diagnosis was obtained from case notes. Controls were a sample of 461 women with breast cancer attending a specialist cancer hospital or two district general hospitals. The same information was obtained for the control group as for the BCHC group. All patients have been followed up to June, 1988. 85% of patients with breast cancer attending the BCHC were aged under 55 at diagnosis. More than half had experienced recurrence of their disease before entry. For patients metastasis-free at entry, metastasis-free survival in the BCHC group was significantly poorer than in the controls (relapse rate ratio 2.85). Survival in relapsed cases was significantly inferior to that in the control group (hazard ratio 1.81). For cases metastasis-free at entry to the BCHC there was a significant difference in survival between cases and controls, confirming the difference in metastasis-free survival. There was no significant difference in survival or disease-free survival between the cancer hospital controls and other controls.

  12. Germline copy number variation and ovarian cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke L Fridley

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs have been implicated in many complex diseases. We examined whether inherited CNVs were associated with overall survival among women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Germline DNA from 1,056 cases (494 deceased, average of 3.7 years follow-up was interrogated with the Illumina 610quad genome-wide array containing, after quality control exclusions, 581,903 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 17,917 CNV probes. Comprehensive analysis capitalized upon the strengths of three complementary approaches to CNV classification. First, to identify small CNVs, single markers were evaluated and, where associated with survival, consecutive markers were combined. Two chromosomal regions were associated with survival using this approach (14q31.3 rs2274736 p=1.59x10-6, p=0.001; 22q13.31 rs2285164 p=4.01x10-5, p=0.009, but were not significant after multiple testing correction. Second, to identify large CNVs, genome-wide segmentation was conducted to characterize chromosomal gains and losses, and association with survival was evaluated by segment. Four regions were associated with survival (1q21.3 loss p=0.005, 5p14.1 loss p=0.004, 9p23 loss p=0.002, and 15q22.31 gain p=0.002; however, again, after correcting for multiple testing, no regions were statistically significant, and none were in common with the single-marker approach. Finally, to evaluate associations with general amounts of copy number changes across the genome, we estimated CNV burden based on genome-wide numbers of gains and losses; no associations with survival were observed (p>0.40. Although CNVs that were not well-covered by the Illumina 610quad array merit investigation, these data suggest no association between inherited CNVs and survival after ovarian cancer.

  13. 三阴乳腺癌与非三阴乳腺癌预后的比较分析%Comparison of survival in patients with breast cancer of triple-negative versus non-triple-negative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章克毅; 吴智勇; 张仕义

    2009-01-01

    目的 比较三阴乳腺癌与非三阴乳腺癌预后的不同及其影响因素.方法 回顾性分析1998年12月至2007年6月收治的684例临床可手术乳腺癌患者的临床资料,其中107例为三阴乳腺癌患者(三阴组),577例为非三阴乳腺癌患者(非三阴组).应用Kaplan-Meier法进行生存分析,组间比较用log-rank检验,多因素分析采用COX比例风险模型.结果 三阴组与非三阴组总的7年生存率分别为51.4%(55/107)及74.2%(428/577),差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).Her-2表达阳性患者总的7年生存率为53.1%(43/81),与三阴组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).单因素分析结果显示患者的年龄、月经状态、肿瘤大小、腋窝淋巴结状态及受体状况均为预后影响因素.多因素分析结果表明肿瘤大小、腋窝淋巴结状态及受体状况为预后的独立影响因素.结论 三阴乳腺癌和Her-2表达阳性的乳腺癌患者治疗效果均较差,三阴乳腺癌是一个独立的预后影响因素.%Objective To assess whether survival differed among patients who had triple-negative breast cancers compared with patients who had non-triple-negative breast cancers.Methods The clinicopathologic data of 684 patients with operable breast cancer,who were treated with multimodal therapy from December 1998 to June 2007 were analyzed.Of these patients,107 cases were confirmed to have triple-negative tumor histology(triple-negative group),577 cases were confirmed to have non-triple-negative tumor histology(non-triple-negative group).The 7 years cumulative survival and disease-free survival were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method and compared by Log-rank test.The prognosis Was analyzed by COX regression model.Results The 7 years overall survival rates for triple-negative group and non-triple-negative group were 51.4%(55/107),74.2%(428/577),respectively,there Was significant difference between the two groups(P<0.01).However,the 7 years overall survival rates of patients with

  14. Survival rate of colorectal cancer patients during 2005-2010 in Zhejiang province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗胜兰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the survival rate of colorectal cancer,using data from the population-based cancer registry during 2005—2010 in Zhejiang.Methods The last follow-up activites on 17 235 cases regarding the survival status was December 31,2012.Both cumulative observed survival rate(OS)and relative survival rate(RS)were calculated with

  15. Population-based monitoring of cancer patient survival in situations with imperfect completeness of cancer registration

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, H.; Hakulinen, T

    2005-01-01

    Selective underascertainment of cases may bias estimates of cancer patient survival. We show that the magnitude of potential bias strongly depends on the time periods affected by underascertainment and on the type of survival analysis (cohort analysis vs period analysis). We outline strategies on how to minimise or overcome potential biases.

  16. Palliative sedation in advanced cancer patients: Does it shorten survival time? - A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Barathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple refractory symptoms in the terminal phase of their life. Palliative sedation is one of the few ways to relieve this refractory suffering. Objectives: This systematic review investigated the effect of palliative sedation on survival time in terminally ill cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Six electronic databases were searched for both prospective and retrospective studies which evaluated the effect of palliative sedation on survival time. Only those studies which had a comparison group that did not receive palliative sedation were selected for the review. Abstracts of all retrieved studies were screened to include the most relevant studies and only studies which met inclusion criteria were selected. References of all retrieved studies were also screened for relevant studies. Selected studies were assessed for quality and data extraction was done using the structured data extraction form. Results: Eleven studies including four prospective and seven retrospective studies were identified. Mean survival time (MST was measured as the time from last admission until death. A careful analysis of the results of all the 11 studies indicated that MST of sedated and non-sedated group was not statistically different in any of the studies. Conclusion: This systematic review supports the fact that palliative sedation does not shorten survival in terminally ill cancer patients. However, this conclusion needs to be taken with consideration of the methodology, study design, and the population studied of the included studies in this review.

  17. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  18. Illicit survival of cancer cells during polyploidization and depolyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, I; Galluzzi, L; Senovilla, L; Criollo, A; Jemaà, M; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2011-09-01

    Tetraploidy and the depolyploidization of tetraploid cells may contribute to oncogenesis. Several mechanisms have evolved to avoid the generation, survival, proliferation and depolyploidization of tetraploids. Cells that illicitly survive these checkpoints are prone to chromosomal instability and aneuploidization. Along with their replication, tetraploids constantly undergo chromosomal rearrangements that eventually lead to pseudodiploidy by two non-exclusive mechanisms: (i) multipolar divisions and (ii) illicit bipolar divisions in the presence of improper microtubule-kinetochore attachments. Here, we describe the regulation and the molecular mechanisms that underlie such a 'polyploidization-depolyploidization' cascade, while focusing on the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in tetraploidy-driven tumorigenesis. We speculate that the identification of signaling/metabolic cascades that are required for the survival of tetraploid or aneuploid (but not diploid) cancer cells may pave the way for the development of novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents.

  19. Analysis of breath samples for lung cancer survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmekel, Birgitta [Division of of Clinical Physiology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping (Sweden); Clinical Physiology, Department of Medicine and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping (Sweden); Winquist, Fredrik, E-mail: frw@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 83 (Sweden); Vikström, Anders [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University hospital of Linköping, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-08-20

    Graphical abstract: Predictions of survival days for lung cancer patients. - Highlights: • Analyses of exhaled air offer a large diagnostic potential. • Patientswith diagnosed lung cancer were studied using an electronic nose. • Excellent predictions and stable models of survival day were obtained. • Consecutive measurements were very important. - Abstract: Analyses of exhaled air by means of electronic noses offer a large diagnostic potential. Such analyses are non-invasive; samples can also be easily obtained from severely ill patients and repeated within short intervals. Lung cancer is the most deadly malignant tumor worldwide, and monitoring of lung cancer progression is of great importance and may help to decide best therapy. In this report, twenty-two patients with diagnosed lung cancer and ten healthy volunteers were studied using breath samples collected several times at certain intervals and analysed by an electronic nose. The samples were divided into three sub-groups; group d for survivor less than one year, group s for survivor more than a year and group h for the healthy volunteers. Prediction models based on partial least square and artificial neural nets could not classify the collected groups d, s and h, but separated well group d from group h. Using artificial neural net, group d could be separated from group s. Excellent predictions and stable models of survival day for group d were obtained, both based on partial least square and artificial neural nets, with correlation coefficients 0.981 and 0.985, respectively. Finally, the importance of consecutive measurements was shown.

  20. The impact of oophorectomy on survival after breast cancer in BRCA1-positive breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzarski, T; Byrski, T; Gronwald, J; Cybulski, C; Oszurek, O; Szwiec, M; Gugała, K; Stawicka, M; Morawiec, Z; Mierzwa, T; Falco, M; Janiszewska, H; Kilar, E; Marczyk, E; Kozak-Klonowska, B; Siołek, M; Surdyka, D; Wiśniowski, R; Posmyk, M; Domagała, P; Sun, P; Lubiński, J; Narod, S A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study is to identify treatments which predict survival for women with a BRCA1 mutation, including oophorectomy and chemotherapy. 476 women with stage I to stage III breast cancer who carried a BRCA1 mutation were followed from diagnosis until April 2015. Information on treatment was obtained from chart review and patient questionnaires. Dates of death were obtained from the Poland vital statistics registry. Survival curves were compared for different subgroups according to treatment received. Predictors of overall survival were determined using the Cox proportional hazards model. The ten-year overall survival was 78.3 % (95 % CI 74.2-82.6 %) and the ten-year breast cancer-specific survival was 84.2 % (95 % CI 80.5-88.0 %). Sixty-two patients died of breast cancer, 14 patients died of ovarian cancer, and 2 patients died of peritoneal cancer. Oophorectomy was associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in the entire cohort (adjusted HR = 0.41; 95 % CI 0.24-0.69; p = 0.0008) and in breast cancer-specific mortality among ER-negative breast cancer patients (HR = 0.44; 95 % CI 0.22-0.89; p = 0.02). Among women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 mutation, survival is greatly improved by oophorectomy due to the prevention of deaths from both breast and ovarian cancer.

  1. p53 and survival in early onset breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentile, M; Bergman Jungeström, M; Olsen, K E;

    1999-01-01

    The p53 protein has proven to be central in tumorigenesis by its cell cycle regulatory properties and both gene mutations and protein accumulation have been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic significance of gene mutations......, p53 protein accumulation and of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TP53 locus in young (age breast cancer patients. In total, gene mutations were found in 21 of the 123 patients (17%), LOH in 20 of the 47 informative cases (43%) and protein accumulation in 47 of the 102 available cases...... in this as well as other studies, p53 protein accumulation is frequently found in young breast cancer patients, but this protein overexpression appears to be of minor significance for survival. Nevertheless, the present report also suggests that specific mutations contribute substantially to tumour aggressiveness....

  2. SurvExpress: an online biomarker validation tool and database for cancer gene expression data using survival analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Aguirre-Gamboa

    Full Text Available Validation of multi-gene biomarkers for clinical outcomes is one of the most important issues for cancer prognosis. An important source of information for virtual validation is the high number of available cancer datasets. Nevertheless, assessing the prognostic performance of a gene expression signature along datasets is a difficult task for Biologists and Physicians and also time-consuming for Statisticians and Bioinformaticians. Therefore, to facilitate performance comparisons and validations of survival biomarkers for cancer outcomes, we developed SurvExpress, a cancer-wide gene expression database with clinical outcomes and a web-based tool that provides survival analysis and risk assessment of cancer datasets. The main input of SurvExpress is only the biomarker gene list. We generated a cancer database collecting more than 20,000 samples and 130 datasets with censored clinical information covering tumors over 20 tissues. We implemented a web interface to perform biomarker validation and comparisons in this database, where a multivariate survival analysis can be accomplished in about one minute. We show the utility and simplicity of SurvExpress in two biomarker applications for breast and lung cancer. Compared to other tools, SurvExpress is the largest, most versatile, and quickest free tool available. SurvExpress web can be accessed in http://bioinformatica.mty.itesm.mx/SurvExpress (a tutorial is included. The website was implemented in JSP, JavaScript, MySQL, and R.

  3. Inferential Statistics from Black Hispanic Breast Cancer Survival Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz M. R. Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we test the statistical probability models for breast cancer survival data for race and ethnicity. Data was collected from breast cancer patients diagnosed in United States during the years 1973–2009. We selected a stratified random sample of Black Hispanic female patients from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database to derive the statistical probability models. We used three common model building criteria which include Akaike Information Criteria (AIC, Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC, and Deviance Information Criteria (DIC to measure the goodness of fit tests and it was found that Black Hispanic female patients survival data better fit the exponentiated exponential probability model. A novel Bayesian method was used to derive the posterior density function for the model parameters as well as to derive the predictive inference for future response. We specifically focused on Black Hispanic race. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method was used for obtaining the summary results of posterior parameters. Additionally, we reported predictive intervals for future survival times. These findings would be of great significance in treatment planning and healthcare resource allocation.

  4. Modelling p-value distributions to improve theme-driven survival analysis of cancer transcriptome datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brors Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theme-driven cancer survival studies address whether the expression signature of genes related to a biological process can predict patient survival time. Although this should ideally be achieved by testing two separate null hypotheses, current methods treat both hypotheses as one. The first test should assess whether a geneset, independent of its composition, is associated with prognosis (frequently done with a survival test. The second test then verifies whether the theme of the geneset is relevant (usually done with an empirical test that compares the geneset of interest with random genesets. Current methods do not test this second null hypothesis because it has been assumed that the distribution of p-values for random genesets (when tested against the first null hypothesis is uniform. Here we demonstrate that such an assumption is generally incorrect and consequently, such methods may erroneously associate the biology of a particular geneset with cancer prognosis. Results To assess the impact of non-uniform distributions for random genesets in such studies, an automated theme-driven method was developed. This method empirically approximates the p-value distribution of sets of unrelated genes based on a permutation approach, and tests whether predefined sets of biologically-related genes are associated with survival. The results from a comparison with a published theme-driven approach revealed non-uniform distributions, suggesting a significant problem exists with false positive rates in the original study. When applied to two public cancer datasets our technique revealed novel ontological categories with prognostic power, including significant correlations between "fatty acid metabolism" with overall survival in breast cancer, as well as "receptor mediated endocytosis", "brain development", "apical plasma membrane" and "MAPK signaling pathway" with overall survival in lung cancer. Conclusions Current methods of theme

  5. Breast cancer in young women: poor survival despite intensive treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Fredholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is uncommon in young women and correlates with a less favourable prognosis; still it is the most frequent cancer in women under 40, accounting for 30-40% of all incident female cancer. The aim of this study was to study prognosis in young women, quantifying how much stage at diagnosis and management on the one hand, and tumour biology on the other; each contribute to the worse prognosis seen in this age group. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a registry based cohort of women aged 20-69 (n = 22 017 with a primary diagnosis of invasive breast cancer (1992-2005, women aged 20-34 (n = 471, 35-39 (n = 858 and 40-49 (n = 4789 were compared with women aged 50-69 years (n = 15 899. The cumulative 5-year relative survival ratio and the relative excess mortality (RER were calculated. The cumulative 5-year relative survival ratio was lowest in women aged 20-34. The RER was 2.84 for women aged 20-34 and decreased with increasing age (RER 1.76 and 1.17 for women aged 35-39 and 40-49, respectively. The excess risk was, however, present only in disease stages I and II. For women aged 20-34 with stage I disease RER was 4.63, and 6.70 in the subgroup with tumour size 1-10 mm. The absolute difference in stage I between the youngest and the reference groups amounted to nearly 8%, with a 90% 5-year survival in women aged 20-34. In stages IIa and IIb, the relative excess risk was not as dramatic, but the absolute differences approached 15%. The youngest women with small tumours generally received more aggressive treatment than women in older age groups. CONCLUSIONS: After correction for stage, tumour characteristics and treatment, age remained an independent risk factor for breast cancer death in women <35 years of age. The excess risk for young women was only seen in early stages of disease and was most pronounced in women with small tumours. Young women affected by breast cancer have a high risk of dying compared to their middle

  6. Opioid growth factor improves clinical benefit and survival in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill P Smith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jill P Smith1, Sandra I Bingaman1, David T Mauger2, Harold H Harvey1, Laurence M Demers3, Ian S Zagon41Departments of Medicine, 2Public Health Sciences, 3Pathology, and 4Neurosciences and Anatomy, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USABackground: Advanced pancreatic cancer carries the poorest prognosis of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Once the tumor has spread beyond the margins of the pancreas, chemotherapy is the major treatment modality offered to patients; however, chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival.Objective: Opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met5]-enkephalin is a natural peptide that has been shown to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer in cell culture and in nude mice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of OGF biotherapy on subjects with advanced pancreatic cancer who failed chemotherapy.Methods: In a prospective phase II open-labeled clinical trial, 24 subjects who failed standard chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer were treated weekly with OGF 250 μg/kg intravenously. Outcomes measured included clinical benefit, tumor response by radiographic imaging, quality of life, and survival.Results: Clinical benefit response was experienced by 53% of OGF-treated patients compared to historical controls of 23.8% and 4.8% for gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, respectively. Of the subjects surviving more than eight weeks, 62% showed either a decrease or stabilization in tumor size by computed tomography. The median survival time for OGF-treated patients was three times that of untreated patients (65.5 versus 21 days, p < 0.001. No adverse effects on hematologic or chemistry parameters were noted, and quality of life surveys suggested improvement with OGF. Limitations: Measurements other than survival were not allowed in control patients, and clinical benefit comparisons were made to historical controls.Conclusion: OGF biotherapy improves the

  7. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  8. Alcohol Consumption and Survival after a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Alaa M G; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Bolla, Manjeet

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for an association of alcohol consumption with prognosis after a diagnosis of breast cancer has been inconsistent. We have reviewed and summarized the published evidence and evaluated the association using individual patient data from multiple case cohorts. METHODS: A MEDLINE...... published studies suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Moderate postdiagnosis alcohol consumption was not associated with overall survival [HR, 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.05], but there was some evidence of better survival associated with prediagnosis consumption (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.......73-0.88). Individual data on alcohol consumption for 29,239 cases with 4,839 deaths were available from the 11 case cohorts, all of which had data on estrogen receptor (ER) status. For women with ER-positive disease, there was little evidence that pre- or postdiagnosis alcohol consumption is associated with breast...

  9. Nuclear oxidative damage correlates with poor survival in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, J

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative DNA damage results from DNA adducts such as 8-oxo-7, 8 dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), which is a pro-mutagenic lesion. No known association between 8-oxo-dG, disease progression and survival exists in colorectal cancer (CRC). We examined levels of 8-oxo-dG in sporadic CRC to determine its relationship with pathological stage and outcome. A total of 143 CRC patients and 105 non-cancer patients were studied. Nuclear and cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Double immunofluorescence using 8-oxo-dG and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) antibodies localised cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG. Apoptosis was detected using TUNEL. Nuclear staining levels were similar in tumour tissue and matched normal mucosa in both epithelial (P=0.22) and stromal (P=0.85) cells. Epithelial cytoplasmic staining was greater in tumour tissue (P<0.001). Double immunofluorescence localised cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG to mitochondria. Epithelial and stromal nuclear 8-oxo-dG decreased with local disease spread, but highest levels were found in distant disease (P<0.01). Survival was related to epithelial nuclear and stromal staining in normal mucosa (P<0.001) and tumour (P<0.01) but was unrelated to cytoplasmic staining. Normal control cells in tissue from cancer patients with high levels of 8-oxo-dG failed to undergo cell death. 8-oxo-dG may be an important biomarker of disease risk, progression and survival for CRC patients.

  10. Conditional disease-free survival among patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hyun-June; Lee, Se Kyung; Ryu, Jai Min; Park, Sungmin; Kim, Isaac; Bae, Soo Youn; Yu, Jonghan; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin

    2017-01-01

    Conditional disease-free survival (CDFS) reflects changes over time. Because traditional disease-free survival (DFS) is estimated from the date of diagnosis, it is limited in the ability to predict risk of recurrence in patients who have been disease free. In this study, we determined CDFS of breast cancer patients and estimated the prognostic factors for DFS.We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 7587 consecutive patients who underwent curative surgery for breast cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 at Samsung Medical Center. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for DFS, which was computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. CDFS rates were based on cumulative DFS estimates.Median follow-up duration was 20.59 months. Three-year DFS was 93.46% at baseline. Three-year CDFS survival estimates for patients who had been disease free for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years after treatment were calculated as 92.84%, 92.37%, 93.03%, 89.41%, and 79.64%, respectively. Three-year CDFS increased continuously each year after 1 year of DFS in hormone receptor (HR)-negative patients but decreased each year in HR-positive patients.In HR-positive patients who are disease free after 3 years, continuous care including surveillance and metastases workup should be considered, although this is not recommended in the current guidelines. On the other hand, the social costs may be reduced in HR-negative patients by extending the surveillance interval. Further studies are needed to identify indicators of DFS prognosis in breast cancer patients.

  11. High risk bladder cancer: current management and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Leliveld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 412 patients with newly diagnosed high risk NMIBC. Clinical, demographic and follow-up data were obtained from the CCCN Cancer Registry and a detailed medical record review. Uni and multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors related to choice of treatment and 5 year recurrence and progression free survival. RESULTS: 74/412 (18% patients with high risk NMIBC underwent a transurethral resection (TUR as single treatment. Adjuvant treatment after TUR was performed in 90.7% of the patients treated in teaching hospitals versus 71.8 % in non-teaching hospitals (p 80 years OR 0.1 p = 0.001 and treatment in non-teaching hospitals (OR 0.25; p < 0.001 were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. Tumor recurrence occurred in 191/392 (49% and progression in 84 /392 (21.4% patients. The mean 5-years progression free survival was 71.6% (95% CI 65.5-76.8. CONCLUSION: In this pattern of care study in high risk NMIBC, 18% of the patients were treated with TUR as single treatment. Age and treatment in non-teaching hospitals were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. None of the variables sex, age, comorbidity, hospital type, stage and year of treatment was associated with 5 year recurrence or progression rates.

  12. Different survival outcomes after curative R0-resection for Eastern Asian and European gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Woo; Joo, Jungnam; Yoon, Hong Man; Eom, Bang Wool; Ryu, Keun Won; Choi, Il Ju; Kook, Myeong Cherl; Schuhmacher, Christoph; Siewert, Joerg Ruediger; Reim, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several retrospective analyses on patients who underwent gastric cancer (GC) surgery revealed different survival outcomes between Eastern (Korean, Japanese) and Western (USA, Europe) countries due to potential ethnical and biological differences. This study investigates treatment outcomes between specialized institution for GC in Korea and Germany. The prospectively documented databases of the Gastric Cancer Center of the National Cancer Center, Korea (NCCK) and the Department of Surgery of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Germany were screened for patients who underwent primary surgical resection for GC between 2002 and 2008. Baseline characteristics were compared using χ2 testing, and 2 cohorts were matched using a propensity score matching (PSM) method. Patients’ survival was estimated using Kaplan–Meier method, and multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was used for comparison. Three thousand seven hundred ninety-five patients were included in the final analysis, 3542 from Korea and 253 from Germany. Baseline characteristics revealed statistically significant differences for age, tumor location, pT stage, grading, lymphatic vessel infiltration (LVI), comorbidities, number of dissected lymph nodes (LN), postoperative complications, lymph-node ratio stage, and application of adjuvant chemotherapy. After PSM, 171 patients in TUM were matched to NCCK patients, and baseline characteristics for both cohorts were well balanced. Patients in Korea had significantly longer survival than those in Germany both before and after PSM. When the analysis was performed for each UICC stage separately, same trend was found over all UICC stages before PSM. However, significant difference in survival was observed only for UICC I after PSM. This analysis demonstrates different survival outcomes after surgical treatment of GC on different continents in specialized centers after balancing of baseline characteristics by PSM. PMID:27428238

  13. Social comparison and coping with cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, K; Buunk, B; Sanderman, R; Botke, G; van den Bergh, F

    2000-01-01

    In the present study scales were developed as indicators of four social comparison processes of respectively identification with others who are either doing better or worse and contrasting one's situation against the situation of either upward or downward comparison others. In a sample of 112 cancer

  14. Occurrence and survival of synchronous pulmonary metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of synchronous colorectal cancer metastases (SCCM) confined to the lungs, risk factors for these metastases and their impact on survival. METHODS: In a nationwide cohort study of 26,200 patients data were prospectively entered into the Danish Colorectal...... Cancer Group's (DCCG's) database between May 2001 and December 2011. The recorded data were merged with data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the National Patient Registry. Multivariable logistic- and extended Cox regression analyses were used to adjust for confounding variables. RESULTS: In total...... this association (adjusted OR=1.81 (95% CI: 1.46-2.25, Psurvival compared with non-treated patients, especially when these therapeutic modalities were combined. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence...

  15. Stage-specific survival of epithelial cancers in North-Holland/Flevoland, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, O.; Leeuwen, van F.E.

    2005-01-01

    While stage is the most important factor for determining cancer survival, population-based survival data according to stage are rarely presented. We present such data for a large population diagnosed with cancer in the area covered by the Amsterdam Cancer Registry for the period 1989-2001 (n=108,251

  16. Prediction of survival in patients with Stage IV kidney cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Mirilenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of treatment was evaluated and the predictors of adjusted survival (AS were identified in patients with disseminated kidney cancer treated at the Republican Research and Practical Center for Oncology and Medical Radiology in 1999 to 2011 (A.E. Okeanov, P.I. Moiseev, L.F. Levin. Malignant tumors in Belarus, 2001–2012. Edited by O.G. Sukonko. Seven factors (regional lymph node metastases; distant bone metastases; a high-grade tumor; sarcomatous tumor differentiation; hemoglobin levels of < 125 g/l in women and < 150 g/l in men; an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 40 mm/h; palliative surgery were found to have an independent, unfavorable impact on AS. A multidimensional model was built to define what risk group low (no more than 2 poor factors, moderate (3–4 poor factors, and high (more than 4 poor factors the patients with Stage IV kidney cancer belonged to. In these groups, the median survival was 34.7, 17.2, and 4.0 months and 3-year AS rates were 48.6, 24.6, and 3.2 %, respectively. 

  17. Partitioning of excess mortality in population-based cancer patient survival studies using flexible parametric survival models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloranta Sandra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relative survival is commonly used for studying survival of cancer patients as it captures both the direct and indirect contribution of a cancer diagnosis on mortality by comparing the observed survival of the patients to the expected survival in a comparable cancer-free population. However, existing methods do not allow estimation of the impact of isolated conditions (e.g., excess cardiovascular mortality on the total excess mortality. For this purpose we extend flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which use restricted cubic splines for the baseline cumulative excess hazard and for any time-dependent effects. Methods In the extended model we partition the excess mortality associated with a diagnosis of cancer through estimating a separate baseline excess hazard function for the outcomes under investigation. This is done by incorporating mutually exclusive background mortality rates, stratified by the underlying causes of death reported in the Swedish population, and by introducing cause of death as a time-dependent effect in the extended model. This approach thereby enables modeling of temporal trends in e.g., excess cardiovascular mortality and remaining cancer excess mortality simultaneously. Furthermore, we illustrate how the results from the proposed model can be used to derive crude probabilities of death due to the component parts, i.e., probabilities estimated in the presence of competing causes of death. Results The method is illustrated with examples where the total excess mortality experienced by patients diagnosed with breast cancer is partitioned into excess cardiovascular mortality and remaining cancer excess mortality. Conclusions The proposed method can be used to simultaneously study disease patterns and temporal trends for various causes of cancer-consequent deaths. Such information should be of interest for patients and clinicians as one way of improving prognosis after cancer is

  18. Tumour characteristics and survival in patients with invasive interval breast cancer classified according to mammographic findings at the latest screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitak, B; Olsen, K E; Månson, J C;

    1999-01-01

    rate of patients with interval cancer and the interval between the latest screen and diagnosis, tumour characteristics and radiological category of the interval tumours. The study focused on comparison of patients with true interval and missed interval cancer. Women with mammographically occult tumours...... screen and diagnosis were not genuine predictors of the prognosis in patients with invasive interval breast cancer. No certain prognostic difference existed between true interval cancers and overlooked or misinterpreted interval breast cancers, despite higher proportions of grade-I tumours, ER positive......The aim of this study was to investigate whether different mammographic categories of interval cancer classified according to findings at the latest screening are associated with different distributions of prognostic factors or with different survival rates. The series consisted of all patients...

  19. A transcriptome analysis by lasso penalized Cox regression for pancreatic cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tong Tong; Gong, Haijun; Clarke, Edmund M

    2011-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States with five-year survival rates less than 5% due to rare detection in early stages. Identification of genes that are directly correlated to pancreatic cancer survival is crucial for pancreatic cancer diagnostics and treatment. However, no existing GWAS or transcriptome studies are available for addressing this problem. We apply lasso penalized Cox regression to a transcriptome study to identify genes that are directly related to pancreatic cancer survival. This method is capable of handling the right censoring effect of survival times and the ultrahigh dimensionality of genetic data. A cyclic coordinate descent algorithm is employed to rapidly select the most relevant genes and eliminate the irrelevant ones. Twelve genes have been identified and verified to be directly correlated to pancreatic cancer survival time and can be used for the prediction of future patient's survival.

  20. History of Recreational Physical Activity and Survival After Breast Cancer: The California Breast Cancer Survivorship Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yani; John, Esther M; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Vigen, Cheryl; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Kwan, Marilyn L; Caan, Bette J; Lee, Valerie S; Roh, Janise M; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Keegan, Theresa H M; Kurian, Allison W; Monroe, Kristine R; Cheng, Iona; Sposto, Richard; Wu, Anna H; Bernstein, Leslie

    2015-06-15

    Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that prediagnosis physical activity is associated with survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. However, few data exist for racial/ethnic groups other than non-Latina whites. To examine the association between prediagnosis recreational physical activity and mortality by race/ethnicity, we pooled data from the California Breast Cancer Survivorship Consortium for 3 population-based case-control studies of breast cancer patients (n=4,608) diagnosed from 1994 to 2002 and followed up through 2010. Cox proportional hazards models provided estimates of the relative hazard ratio for mortality from all causes, breast cancer, and causes other than breast cancer associated with recent recreational physical activity (i.e., in the 10 years before diagnosis). Among 1,347 ascertained deaths, 826 (61%) were from breast cancer. Compared with women with the lowest level of recent recreational physical activity, those with the highest level had a marginally decreased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio=0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 1.01) and a statistically significant decreased risk of mortality from causes other than breast cancer (hazard ratio=0.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 0.80), and particularly from cardiovascular disease. No association was observed for breast cancer-specific mortality. These risk patterns did not differ by race/ethnicity (non-Latina white, African American, Latina, and Asian American). Our findings suggest that physical activity is beneficial for overall survival regardless of race/ethnicity.

  1. Influence of low molecular weight heparin on cancer patients’ survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an evidence of interaction between the hemostasis system and tumor progression factors. It is known that in addition to the fibrin formation and platelets activation, thrombin can influence many cells function interacting with protease-activating receptors including tumor cells. These receptors are involved in the malignant cell phenotype formation (adhesion, proliferation, proteolysis. Thrombin can also affect angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells penetration through basal membrane and its migration with new vessels formation. Furthermore, it can cause the release of main neoangiogenesis promoter – vascular endothelial growth factor. All of the above and many other linkages of coagulation and tumor create a theoretical background of possible affecting tumor by regulation of the coagulation activity. Thepromise of this approach is controversial, but there is some clinical and experimental evidence of their effectiveness. The most used group ofdrugs for this purpose was heparins. Several retrospective studies have shown a benefit of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH over unfractionated heparin in cancer patient survival. The appearance of a new heparins group – ultra LMWH are of interest from this point ofview and their possible use in cancer patients. To date bemiparin and semuloparin are used in clinic. Both (bemiparin about 3600 kDa,semuloparin 3000 kDa have substancially reduced molecular weight as compared with the smallest of LMWH – enoxaparin (4600 kDa.Use of bemiparin in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy resulted in increased of 2-year survival rate compared to the control group (68.6 % vs. 29.4 %, p = 0.0042.

  2. Recent improvement in survival of breast cancer patients in Saarland, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, H; Stegmaier, C; Ziegler, H

    1998-09-01

    A new method for more timely monitoring of cancer patient survival was employed to assess progress in 5-year survival of breast cancer patients in Saarland, Germany, between 1980-84 and 1990-94. Five-year relative survival gradually increased from 68.8% to 73.5%. Improvements were most pronounced among age groups 50-59 and 60-69. The latter had the highest 5-year relative survival (77.1%) in 1990-94.

  3. Personality and cancer survival: the Miyagi cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, N; Tsubono, Y; Nishino, Y; Hosokawa, T; Fukudo, S; Shibuya, D; Akizuki, N; Yoshikawa, E; Kobayakawa, M; Fujimori, M; Saito-Nakaya, K; Uchitomi, Y; Tsuji, I

    2005-06-06

    We tested the hypothesis that personality plays a role in cancer outcome in a population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. In July 1990, 41 442 residents of Japan completed a short form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised and a questionnaire on various health habits, and between January 1993 and December 1997, 890 incident cases of cancer were identified among them. These 890 cases were followed up until March 2001, and a total of 356 deaths from all causes was identified among them. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death according to four score levels on each of four personality subscales (extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and lie), with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Multivariable HRs of deaths from all causes for individuals in the highest score level on each personality subscale compared with those at the lowest level were 1.0 for extraversion (95% CI=0.8-1.4; Trend P=0.73), 1.1 for neuroticism (0.8-1.6; Trend P=0.24), 1.2 for psychoticism (0.9-1.6; Trend P=0.29), and 1.0 for lie (0.7-1.5; Trend P=0.90). The data obtained in this population-based prospective cohort study in Japan do not support the hypothesis that personality is associated with cancer survival.

  4. Germ Cell Cancer and Multiple Relapses: Toxicity and Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria G.G.; Mortensen, Mette S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A small number of patients with germ cell cancer (GCC) receive more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate late toxicity and survival in an unselected cohort of patients who experienced relapse after receiving first-line treatment......, compared with patients treated with only orchiectomy, had an increased risk for a second cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 3.2; 95% CI, 1.9 to 5.5), major cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.3), pulmonary disease (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8), GI disease (HR, 7.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 14.8), renal...... for disseminated disease. Methods: From the Danish Testicular Cancer database, we identified all patients who received more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. Information about late toxicity and mortality was obtained by means of linkage to national registers. Prognostic factors for relapse...

  5. Winning the Race: Lance Armstrong Shares His Struggle To Survive Cancer... and Thrive!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Photo courtesy of Lance Armstrong Foundation Lance Armstrong Shares His Struggle To Survive Cancer... and Thrive! The world knows and celebrates Lance Armstrong for his remarkable defeat of life-threatening cancer ...

  6. Survival of patients with stomach cancer in Changle city of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Tian; Xiao-Dong Wang; Zhen-Chun Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The survival rate of patients with stomach cancer is used to evaluate the effects of treatments. The short- and mid-term survival of patients on the present level of treatments can be described by calculating 1- to 5-year survival rates.The aims of this study were to document patterns of survival after treatments for stomach cancer in Changle city and analyze whether the stage of cancer and the way of treatment impacted on survival of patients or not.METHODS: A total number of 745 patients with stomach cancer reported in the Changle Cancer Registry from 1993to 1998 were investigated with respect to the disease condition, the way of treatment and survival time. 1- to 5-year survival rates were estimated by using life-table method.RESULTS: The 1- to 5-year survival rates in the patients with stomach cancer in Changle city were 54.23%, 41.77%,37.95%, 33.98% and 30.47%, respectively. The 1- to 5-year survival rates in stageIor Ⅱ group were 3, 6.1, 7.4, 8.9and 9.8 times as high as those in stage Ⅲ or Ⅳ group,respectively. The 1- to 5-year survival rates in operation group were 3.5, 8.7, 11.2, 11.7 and 19 times as high as those in no operation group, respectively. For the patients with stage Ⅲ or Ⅳ stomach cancer the 1-year survival rate in operation group was 3 times as high as that in no operation group and 2-year survival rate in operation group was 11.9 times as high as that in no operation group. For the patients with stage Ⅲ or Ⅳstomach cancer, the differences of the survival rates average survival times between total gastrectomy and partial gastrectomy were not significant and the median survival times in these 2 groups were 8 mo and 9 mo, respectively.CONCLUSION: Mid-term survival rates of patients with stomach cancer in Changle city are low. Stage of cancer is an important factor influencing survival of patients with stomach cancer. Surgery is an effective treatment for the patients with stage Ⅳ cancer and can raise short- and mid

  7. Pretreatment serum albumin as a predictor of cancer survival: A systematic review of the epidemiological literature

    OpenAIRE

    Lis Christopher G; Gupta Digant

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background There are several methods of assessing nutritional status in cancer of which serum albumin is one of the most commonly used. In recent years, the role of malnutrition as a predictor of survival in cancer has received considerable attention. As a result, it is reasonable to investigate whether serum albumin has utility as a prognostic indicator of cancer survival in cancer. This review summarizes all available epidemiological literature on the association between pretreatme...

  8. Expected Survival Using Models of Life Table Compared with Survival of Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer Patients in North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zeraati

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Northern regions of Iran have been encountered to dominate malignancies of gastrointestinal (GI tract. We came to examine the total excess mortality due to the GI cancer in Mazandaran province.Methods: Socio-demographic and clinical data of 484 patients with GI cancer collected during the years 1990-1991were available from Babol Cancer Registry. Patients were followed up for 15 years by the year 2006. Using the West Coale-De­meny life table model, a number of five life tables for men and four for women, corresponding to each birth cohort, were constructed. Observed survival was obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the Expected survival cal­culated using the direct adjusted method represented by STEIN et al.Results: The sample of subjects encompassed 66.3% men and 33.7% women with mean age 58.26 ± 10.90, and endoscopy was the general method for cancer detection. Esophagus accounted for 74.2%, and stomach and colorectal accounted for 22.7% and 3.1% of GI cancers, respectively. Survival rate in 15 years following diagnosis was nearly 6%. Comparing pa­tient and expected survival curves showed a significantly reduced survival for patients of each GI cancer over the whole period and especially during the first two years after diagnosis.Conclusion: Patients experienced reduced survival associated with the development of GI cancers. Considering individuals in a population come from different cohorts, adjustment by constructing distinct life tables for different birth cohorts is rec­ommended. The West model is recommended as a first choice to represent mortality in countries whose registration systems are exposed to various errors.

  9. Terminal and progenitor lineage-survival oncogenes as cancer markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vias, Maria; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Mills, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Tumour classification has traditionally focused on differentiation and cellular morphology, and latterly on the application of genomic approaches. By combining chromatin immunoprecipitation with expression array, it has been possible to identify direct gene targets for transcription factors for nuclear hormone receptors. At the same time, there have been great strides in deriving stem and progenitor cells from tissues. It is therefore timely to propose that pairing the isolation of these cell subpopulations from tissues and tumours with these genomics approaches will reveal conserved gene targets for transcription factors. By focusing on transcription factors (lineage-survival oncogenes) with roles in both organogenesis and tumourigenesis at multiple organ sites, we suggest that this comparative genomics approach will enable developmental biology to be used more fully in relation to understanding tumour progression and will reveal new cancer markers. We focus here on neurogenesis and neuroendocrine differentiation in tumours.

  10. Venous thromboembolism in ovarian cancer: incidence, risk factors and impact on survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abu Saadeh, Feras

    2013-09-01

    Ovarian cancer has a higher incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other cancers. Clear cell cancers carry the highest risk at 11-27%. The aim of this study was to identify the predisposing factors for VTE in a population of ovarian cancer patients and to determine the influence of VTE on overall survival.

  11. Post diagnosis diet quality and colorectal cancer survival in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa T Fung

    Full Text Available Dietary factors are known to influence colorectal cancer (CRC risk, however, their association with CRC survival is unclear. Therefore, we prospectively examined the association between diet quality scores, dietary patterns and colorectal cancer (CRC survival.1201 women diagnosed with stage I-III CRC between 1986 and 2008, were followed through 2010. Diet was assessed via a food frequency questionnaire administered at least 6 months after diagnosis. We computed the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010, alternate Mediterranean Diet score (aMED and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score (DASH and derived two dietary patterns, Western (unhealthy and prudent (healthy, by principal component analysis for each woman.During follow-up, we documented 435 deaths, including 162 from CRC. After adjusting for potential confounders, only a higher AHEI-2010 score was significantly associated with lower overall mortality (HR comparing extreme quintiles = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52-0.98, p trend = 0.01 as well as borderline significantly with lower risk of CRC mortality by the trend test (HR Q5 vs Q1 = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.43-1.21, p trend = 0.07. When AHEI-2010 components were examined separately, inverse associations for overall mortality were primarily accounted for by moderate alcohol intake (HR comparing abstainers vs 5-15 g/d = 1.30, 95%CI = 1.05-1.61 and lower intake of sugar sweetened beverages and fruit juices combined (HR for each additional serving = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01-1.23. No other diet quality score or dietary pattern was associated with overall or CRC-specific mortality.Higher AHEI-2010 score may be associated with lower overall mortality, moderate alcohol consumption and lower consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and juices combined appeared to account for most of the observed associations.

  12. Family history of the cancer on the survival of the patients with gastrointestinal cancer in northern Iran, using frailty models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasouli Mahboobeh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal (GI tract cancer is one of the common causes of the mortality due to cancer in most developing countries such as Iran. The digestive tract is the major organ involved in the cancer. The northern part of the country, surrounded the Caspian Sea coast, is well known and the region with highest regional incidence of the GI tract cancer. In this paper our aim is to study the most common risk factors affecting the survival of the patients suffering from GI tract cancer using parametric models with frailty. Methods This research was a prospective study. Information of 484 cases with GI cancer was collected from Babol Cancer Registration Center during 1990-1991. The risk factors we studied are age, sex, family history of cancer, marital status, smoking status, occupation, race, medication status, education, residence (urban, rural, type of cancer, migration status (indigenous, non-native. The studied cases were followed up until 2006 for 15 years. Hazard ratio was used to interpret the death risk. The effect of the factors in the study on the patients survival are studied under a family of parametric models including Weibull, Exponential, Log-normal, and the Log-logistic model. The models are fitted using with and without frailty. The Akaike information criterion (AIC was considered to compare between competing models. Results Out of 484 patients in the study, 321 (66.3% were males and 163 (33.7% were females. The average age of the patient at the time of the diagnosis was 59 yr and 55 yr for the males and females respectively. Furthermore, 359 (74.2% patients suffered from esophageal, 110 (22.7% patients recognized with gastric, and 15 (3.1% patients with colon cancer. Survival rates after 1, 3, and 5 years of the diagnosis were 24%, 16%, and 15%, respectively. We found that the family history of the cancer is a significant factor on the death risk under all statistical models in the study. The comparison of AIC

  13. Epidemiology and Survival Analysis of Jordanian Female Breast Cancer Patients Diagnosed from 1997 to 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi Sharkas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Jordanian women, yet survival data are scarce. This study aims to assess the observed five-year survival rate of breast cancer in Jordan from 1997 to 2002 and to determine factors that may influence survival. Methods: Data were obtained from the Jordan Cancer Registry (JCR, which is a population-based registry. From 1997-2002, 2121 patients diagnosed with breast cancer were registered in JCR. Relevant data were collected from JCR files, hospital medical records and histopathology reports. Patient's status, whether alive or dead, wasascertained from the Department of Civil Status using patients’ national numbers (ID. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS (version 10. Survival probabilities by age, morphology, grade, stage and other relevant variables were obtained with the Kaplan Meier method. Results: The overall five-year survival for breast cancer in Jordan, regardless of the stage or grade was 64.2%, meanwhile it was 58% in the group aged less than 30 years. The best survival was in the age group 40-49 years (69.3%. The survival for adenocarcinoma was 57.4% and for medullary carcinoma, it was 82%. The survival rate approximated 73.8% for well-differentiated, 55.6% for anaplastic, and 58% for poorly differentiated cancers. The five-year survival rate was 82.7% for stage I, 72.2% for stage II, 58.7% for stage III, and 34.6% for stage IV cancers.Conclusion: According to univariate analysis, stage, grade, age and laterality of breast cancer significantly influenced cancer survival. Cox regression analysis revealed that stage, grade and age factors correlated with prognosis, while laterality showed no significant effect on survival. Results demonstrated that overall survival was relatively poor. We hypothesized that this was due to low levels of awareness and lack of screening programs.

  14. High SHIP2 Expression Indicates Poor Survival in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available SH2-containing inositol 5′-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2, which generally regulates insulin signaling, cytoskeleton remodeling, and receptor endocytosis, has been suggested to play a significant role in tumor development and progression. However, the associations between SHIP2 expression and the clinical features to evaluate its clinicopathologic significance in colorectal cancer (CRC have not been determined yet. In the present study, one-step quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR test and immunohistochemistry (IHC analysis with CRC tissue microarrays (TMA were employed to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression of SHIP2 in CRC. The results showed that SHIP2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels was significantly higher in CRC tissues than that in corresponding noncancerous tissues (both P<0.05. The expression of SHIP2 protein in CRC was related to lymph node metastasis (P=0.036, distant metastasis (P=0.001, and overall survival (P=0.009. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox multifactor analysis suggested that high SHIP2 protein level (P=0.040 and positive distant metastasis (P=0.048 were critically associated with the unfavorable survival of CRC patients. The findings suggested that SHIP2 may be identified as a useful prognostic marker in CRC and targeting CRC may provide novel strategy for CRC treatment.

  15. Cervical cancer: Renal complications and survival after percutaneous nephrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzira Carvalho Paula de Souza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: Obstructive nephropathy is a frequent complication in the course of advanced cervical cancer (CC, and ultrasonography-guided percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN is a well established technique for fast ureteral desobstruction. Objective: To identify possible factors related to the survival and quality of life of patients with advanced CC presenting acute urinary obstructive complications that after desobstruction by PCN recovered urinary flux and renal function. Method: This is an analytical, descriptive, cross-sectional study that included 45 patients with CC who underwent PCN and were divided into 2 groups: “death” (DG and “survival” (SG, in a public hospital that is reference for oncologic diseases in Northern Brazil. Results: The mean serum creatinine of the patients preceding PCN was >10 mg/dL, and after PCN 8.7g/dL and Ht >27% were associated to longer survival, and the presence of low blood pressure during follow-up was associated with progression to death.

  16. Non-small cell lung cancer cell survival crucially depends on functional insulin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Carolin Maria; Zimmermann, Katrin; Zilleßen, Pia; Pfeifer, Alexander; Racké, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Insulin plays an important role as a growth factor and its contribution to tumor proliferation is intensely discussed. It acts via the cognate insulin receptor (IR) but can also activate the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R). Apart from increasing proliferation, insulin might have additional effects in lung cancer. Therefore, we investigated insulin action and effects of IR knockdown (KD) in three (NCI-H292, NCI-H226 and NCI-H460) independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. All lung cancer lines studied were found to express IR, albeit with marked differences in the ratio of the two variants IR-A and IR-B. Insulin activated the classical signaling pathway with IR autophosphorylation and Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, activation of MAPK was observed in H292 cells, accompanied by enhanced proliferation. Lentiviral shRNA IR KD caused strong decrease in survival of all three lines, indicating that the effects of insulin in lung cancer go beyond enhancing proliferation. Unspecific effects were ruled out by employing further shRNAs and different insulin-responsive cells (human pre-adipocytes) for comparison. Caspase assays demonstrated that IR KD strongly induced apoptosis in these lung cancer cells, providing the physiological basis of the rapid cell loss. In search for the underlying mechanism, we analyzed alterations in the gene expression profile in response to IR KD. A strong induction of certain cytokines (e.g. IL20 and tumour necrosis factor) became obvious and it turned out that these cytokines trigger apoptosis in the NSCLC cells tested. This indicates a novel role of IR in tumor cell survival via suppression of pro-apoptotic cytokines.

  17. Comparison of Cox and Gray's survival models in severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasal, Jan; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Clermont, Gilles;

    2004-01-01

    Although survival is traditionally modeled using Cox proportional hazards modeling, this approach may be inappropriate in sepsis, in which the proportional hazards assumption does not hold. Newer, more flexible models, such as Gray's model, may be more appropriate....

  18. Disseminated tumor cells in pancreatic cancer-an independent prognosticator of disease progression and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effenberger, Katharina E.; Schroeder, Cornelia; Eulenburg, Christine; Reeh, Matthias; Tachezy, Michael; Riethdorf, Sabine; Vashist, Yogesh K.; Izbicki, Jakob R.; Pantel, Klaus; Bockhorn, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most devastating cancers with a 6-month median survival and a 5-year survival rate of 35%. Still important aspects of its aggressive biology remain elusive and advanced therapeutic regimens have not been substantially successful. We investigated the prognostic role of

  19. Oesophageal cancer in The Netherlands : Increasing incidence and mortality but improving survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crane, Lucia M. A.; Schaapveld, Michael; Visser, Otto; Louwmand, Marieke W. J.; Plukker, John T. M.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Oesophageal cancer is highly lethal with a 5-year relative survival of 10-15%. An increasing incidence has been reported for several parts bf the Western world. We studied time trends in incidence, mortality and survival for oesophageal cancer in the Netherlands during 1989-2003. Methods: Data

  20. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chien Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? OBJECTIVES: The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. PATIENTS: A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. RESULTS: Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. LIMITATIONS: The study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSION: This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  1. Pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and postmenopausal breast cancer survival: a prospective patient cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Buck, K.; Heinz, J.; Obi, N.; Benner, A.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Chang-Claude, J.

    2012-01-01

    Study results on the association of alcohol consumption with breast cancer survival are inconsistent, partly due to the use of different survival outcomes. We assessed the association of pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption with survival and recurrence in a prospective cohort study in Germany includin

  2. Breast cancer survival rate according to data of cancer registry and death registry systems in Bushehr province, 2001-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rampisheh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide. Survival rate of breast cancer, especially as an indicator of the successful implementation of screening, diagnosis and treatment programs, has been at the center of attention of public health experts Material and Methods: In a survival study, the records of breast cancer cases in cancer registry system of Bushehr Province were extracted during 2001, March to 2013, September. These records were linked and matched with records of death registry system. After determining patients, status regarding being alive or dead, survival analysis was done. Life table, Kaplan-Mayer analysis, log rank and Breslow tests were used for computing and comparing survival rates. Results: In 300 recorded breast cancer cases, mean and standard deviation of age was 51.26±13.87. Survival rates were 95, 88, 78, 73 and 68 percent since the first year through the fifth year, respectively. Mean survival was 87.20 months (95% CI= 81.28- 93.12. There was no significant difference in mean survival regarding age and different geographical areas. Conclusion: Although survival rates of registered breast cancer patients in Bushehr Province are similar to other provinces, they are far from those of developed countries. This situation demands more extensive efforts regarding public education and improving the process of diagnosis, treatment and care of patients especially during first two years after diagnosis.

  3. Breast Cancer Subtypes and Survival in Chinese Women with Operable Primary Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-sheng Li; Yun-tao Xie; Lu Yao; Yi-qiang Liu; Tao Ouyang; Jin-feng Li; Tian-feng Wang; Zhao-qing Fan; Tie Fan; Ben-yao Lin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the associations between the different breast cancer subtypes and survival in Chinese women with operable primary breast cancer. Methods: A total of 1538 Chinese women with operable primary breast cancer were analyzed in this study, the median follow-up was 77 months. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 status were available for these patients. Results: Luminal A (ER+ and/or PR+, HER2-) had a favorable disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS)compared with other subtypes in the entire cohort. Using the luminal A as a reference, among the patients with lymph node positive disease, HER2+ (ER-, PR-, HER2+) had the worst DFS (hazard ratio, HR=1.80, 95% Cl 1.11 to 2.91,P=0.017) and luminal B (ER+ and/or PR+, HER2+) had the worst OS (HR=2.27, 95% CI 1.50 to 3.45, P<0.001); among the patients with lymph node negative disease, triple-negative (ER-, PR-, HER2-) had the worst DFS (HR=2.21, 95% Cl 1.43 to 3.41, P<0.001), whereas no significant difference in DFS between HER2+ and luminal B or luminal A was observed. Conclusion: As compared with luminal A, luminal B and HER2+ have the worst survival in patients with lymph node positive disease, but this is not the case in patients with lymph node negative disease; triple-negative subtype has a worse survival in both lymph node positive and lymph node negative patients.

  4. Palliative Care Improves Survival, Quality of Life in Advanced Lung Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from the first randomized clinical trial of its kind have revealed a surprising and welcome benefit of early palliative care for patients with advanced lung cancer—longer median survival. Although several researchers said that the finding needs to be confirmed in other trials of patients with other cancer types, they were cautiously optimistic that the trial results could influence oncologists’ perceptions and use of palliative care. |

  5. Gompertz - A program for evaluation and comparison of survival curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemera, P; Doubal, S

    2000-07-01

    Principles, properties and use of a program for evaluation of survival curves are described. Parameters of Gompertzian mortality curves are computed from survival data of two populations by help of nonlinear regression. The differences in parameters of both curves are evaluated statistically. This method evaluates effectively even survival data of very small populations. The results are presented in numeric, verbal and graphic forms. Finally, reading of the results is offered to distinguish changes corresponding to altered aging rate from changes caused by influences not affecting the basic mechanism of aging. Program GOMPERTZ in the form of Microsoft Excel workbook equipped with Visual Basic procedures is offered free through e-mail (klemera@faf.cuni.cz).

  6. Lasso tree for cancer staging with survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunzhi; Wang, Sijian; Chappell, Richard J

    2013-04-01

    The tumor-node-metastasis staging system has been the lynchpin of cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for many years. For meaningful clinical use, an orderly grouping of the T and N categories into a staging system needs to be defined, usually with respect to a time-to-event outcome. This can be reframed as a model selection problem with respect to features arranged on a partially ordered two-way grid, and a penalized regression method is proposed for selecting the optimal grouping. Instead of penalizing the L1-norm of the coefficients like lasso, in order to enforce the stage grouping, we place L1 constraints on the differences between neighboring coefficients. The underlying mechanism is the sparsity-enforcing property of the L1 penalty, which forces some estimated coefficients to be the same and hence leads to stage grouping. Partial ordering constraints is also required as both the T and N categories are ordinal. A series of optimal groupings with different numbers of stages can be obtained by varying the tuning parameter, which gives a tree-like structure offering a visual aid on how the groupings are progressively made. We hence call the proposed method the lasso tree. We illustrate the utility of our method by applying it to the staging of colorectal cancer using survival outcomes. Simulation studies are carried out to examine the finite sample performance of the selection procedure. We demonstrate that the lasso tree is able to give the right grouping with moderate sample size, is stable with regard to changes in the data, and is not affected by random censoring.

  7. Cancer survival in Cali, Colombia: A population-based study, 1995-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Bravo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited information on population-based cancer survival data in Latin America.Objetive: To obtain estimates of survival for some cancers recognized as a public health priority in Colombia using data from the Cancer Registry of Cali for 1995-2004.Methods: All cancer cases for residents of Cali were included for the following sites: breast (3,984, cervix uteri (2,469, prostate (3,999, stomach (3,442 and lung (2,170.  Five-year relative survival estimates were calculated using the approach described by Estève.Results: Five-year relative survival was 79% in patients with prostate cancer and 68% and 60% in women with breast or cervix uteri cancer, respectively. The cure fraction was 6% in subjects with lung cancer and 15% in those with stomach cancer. The probability of dying from breast or prostate cancer in people in the lower socio-economic strata (SES was 1.8 and  2.6  times greater,  respectively,  when compared to  upper SES, p <0.001. Excess mortality associated with cancer was independent of age in prostate or breast cancer.  After adjusting for age, sex and SES, the risk of dying from breast, cervix uteri, prostate and lung cancer during the 2000-2004 period decreased 19%, 13%, 48% and 16%, respectively, when compared with the period of 1995-1999. There was no change in the prognosis for patients with stomach cancer.Conclusions: Survival for some kinds of cancer improved through the 1995-2004 period, however health care programs for cancer patients in Cali are inequitable. People from lower SES are the most vulnerable and the least likely to survive

  8. Do stage of disease, comorbidity or access to treatment explain socioeconomic differences in survival after ovarian cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, Else Helene; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Høgdall, Claus

    2015-01-01

    educated women. After adjustment for comorbid conditions, cancer stage, tumour histology, operation status and lifestyle factors, socioeconomic differences in survival persisted. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic disparities in survival after ovarian cancer were to some extent, but not fully explained...

  9. Explaining variation in cancer survival between 11 jurisdictions in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Peter W; Rubin, Greg; Perera-Salazar, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) is a collaboration between 6 countries and 12 jurisdictions with similar primary care-led health services. This study investigates primary care physician (PCP) behaviour and systems that may contribute to the timeliness of inves......OBJECTIVES: The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) is a collaboration between 6 countries and 12 jurisdictions with similar primary care-led health services. This study investigates primary care physician (PCP) behaviour and systems that may contribute to the timeliness...... relating to the diagnosis of lung, colorectal or ovarian cancer. PARTICIPANTS: 2795 PCPs in 11 jurisdictions: New South Wales and Victoria (Australia), British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario (Canada), England, Northern Ireland, Wales (UK), Denmark, Norway and Sweden. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES......: Analysis compared the cumulative proportion of PCPs in each jurisdiction opting to investigate or refer at each phase for each vignette with 1-year survival, and conditional 5-year survival rates for the relevant cancer and jurisdiction. Logistic regression was used to explore whether PCP characteristics...

  10. Ethnic Differences in Survival after Breast Cancer in South East Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng-Har; Saxena, Nakul; Taib, Nur Aishah; Lim, Siew-Eng; Iau, Philip; Adami, Hans-Olov; Bulgiba, Awang M.; Lee, Soo-Chin; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The burden of breast cancer in Asia is escalating. We evaluated the impact of ethnicity on survival after breast cancer in the multi-ethnic region of South East Asia. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry, we analyzed the assoc

  11. Estimating the loss in expectation of life due to cancer using flexible parametric survival models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Dickman, Paul W; Eloranta, Sandra; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2013-12-30

    A useful summary measure for survival data is the expectation of life, which is calculated by obtaining the area under a survival curve. The loss in expectation of life due to a certain type of cancer is the difference between the expectation of life in the general population and the expectation of life among the cancer patients. This measure is used little in practice as its estimation generally requires extrapolation of both the expected and observed survival. A parametric distribution can be used for extrapolation of the observed survival, but it is difficult to find a distribution that captures the underlying shape of the survival function after the end of follow-up. In this paper, we base our extrapolation on relative survival, because it is more stable and reliable. Relative survival is defined as the observed survival divided by the expected survival, and the mortality analogue is excess mortality. Approaches have been suggested for extrapolation of relative survival within life-table data, by assuming that the excess mortality has reached zero (statistical cure) or has stabilized to a constant. We propose the use of flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which enables estimating the loss in expectation of life on individual level data by making these assumptions or by extrapolating the estimated linear trend at the end of follow-up. We have evaluated the extrapolation from this model using data on four types of cancer, and the results agree well with observed data.

  12. Breast cancer survival in Germany: a population-based high resolution study from Saarland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleczek, Bernd; Jansen, Lina; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Population-based survival studies of breast cancer patients are commonly restricted to age- and stage-specific analyses. This study from Germany aimed at extending available population-based survival data on further prognostic cancer characteristics such as tumor grade, hormone receptor status and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2/neu) expression. Data from the population-based Saarland Cancer Registry including female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2000 and 2009 were included. Period analysis methodology and regression modelling were used to obtain estimates of 5-year relative survival and tumor related excess risks in 2005-2009. Overall age standardized 5-year relative survival was 83%. In addition to age and stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status were independent predictors of 5-year relative survival. Detailed analyses by age, stage, morphology, tumor grade, hormone receptor status and HER2/neu expression consistently revealed lower survival of patients with high grade, hormone receptor negative or HER2/neu positive cancers and patients aged 70 years or older. This high resolution study extends available population-based survival data of breast cancer patients. Particular efforts should be made to overcome the persisting large survival deficits, which were observed for elderly patients in all clinical subgroups.

  13. Comorbidity and survival of Danish ovarian cancer patients from 2000-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grann, Anne Fia; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Jacobsen, Jacob Bonde;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of comorbidity among patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer in the Central Denmark Region and to study the impact of comorbidity on cancer survival over time. METHODS: We included women recorded with a first-time diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer...... analyses to compute adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRRs) within different calendar time periods overall and by comorbidity level. RESULTS: We identified 1,540 patients. In 2000-2002, 25% of the newly diagnosed ovarian cancer patients had a comorbidity diagnosis compared with 35% in 2009-2011. Median age.......33-3.14) in 2000-2002 to 1.09 (95% CI: 0.69-1.71) in 2009-2011. CONCLUSION: Comorbidity increased among ovarian cancer patients over time and was associated with poor survival. One- and 5-year overall survivals changed only little and an expected decrease in survival, following increased prevalence of comorbidity...

  14. TFF3 and survivin expressions associate with a lower survival rate in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia-Rong; Tang, Hui-Zhong; Zhou, Kai-Zong; Shen, Wu-Hong; Guo, He-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) and survivin with functions of inhibiting apoptosis are involved in the gastric cancer by overexpression. The purpose of this study is to examine the expression of TFF3 and survivin in patients' tissue samples with gastric cancer and analyze the relationship between the protein expression and the different clinical records. By studying the expressions of TFF3 and survivin in gastric cancer through immunohistochemical staining and examining the survival rate via Kaplan-Meier analysis for gastric cancer patients, we found that the TFF3 and survivin positive expressions have a significant relationship with the lower survival rate comparing to that of negative expressions in the analyzed patients (P TFF3 and survivin expressions have the lowest survival rate. TFF3 or survivin positive expression correlates with the lymph node metastasis, metastasis, and TNM stages of gastric cancer. Survival analysis indicates that survival rate has a close relationship with the age, tumor histology, tumor differentiation, degree of infiltration, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stages (P TFF3 and survivin expressions play a vital role in gastric cancer development, and these two proteins are important markers for prognosis in gastric cancer. Patients with gastric cancer can increase the survival rate through an earlier diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  15. The Effect of Different Comorbidities on Survival of Non-small Cells Lung Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iachina, Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Møller, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    of each comorbid disease groups on survival. METHODS: The analysis is based on all patients with NSCLC who were registered in 2009-2011, in total 10,378 patients. To estimate the effect of each comorbidity group on the survival, we fitted a Cox regression model for each comorbidity group adjusting for age......PURPOSE: Primary lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancers. Comorbidity has been shown to be a negative prognostic factor in the overall lung cancer population. The significance of the individual comorbidities is less well known. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect...... have a significant impact on survival of NSCLC patients....

  16. Survival rate of breast cancer patients in Malaysia: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nor Aini; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Muhammad, Nor Asiah; Ali, Zainudin Mohamad; Ibrahim, Lailanor; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mustafa, Amal Nasir; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. Other than hospital-based results, there are no documented population-based survival rates of Malaysian women for breast cancers. This population- based retrospective cohort study was therefore conducted. Data were obtained from Health Informatics Centre, Ministry of Health Malaysia, National Cancer Registry and National Registration Department for the period from 1st Jan 2000 to 31st December 2005. Cases were captured by ICD-10 and linked to death certificates to identify the status. Only complete data were analysed. Survival time was calculated from the estimated date of diagnosis to the date of death or date of loss to follow-up. Observed survival rates were estimated by Kaplan- Meier method using SPSS Statistical Software version 17. A total of 10,230 complete data sets were analysed. The mean age at diagnosis was 50.6 years old. The overall 5-year survival rate was 49% with median survival time of 68.1 months. Indian women had a higher survival rate of 54% compared to Chinese women (49%) and Malays (45%). The overall 5-year survival rate of breast cancer patient among Malaysian women was still low for the cohort of 2000 to 2005 as compared to survival rates in developed nations. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the strategies for early detection and intervention.

  17. Elevated biomarkers of inflammation are associated with reduced survival among breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brandon L; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Bernstein, Leslie; Baumgartner, Richard N; Neuhouser, Marian L; Wener, Mark H; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Gilliland, Frank D; Sorensen, Bess E; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2009-07-20

    PURPOSE Chronic inflammation is believed to contribute to the development and progression of breast cancer. Systemic C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are measures of low-grade chronic inflammation and potential predictors of cancer survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS We evaluated the relationship between circulating markers of inflammation and breast cancer survival using data from the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) Study (a multiethnic prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with stage 0 to IIIA breast cancer). Circulating concentrations of CRP and SAA were measured approximately 31 months after diagnosis and tested for associations with disease-free survival (approximately 4.1 years of follow-up) and overall survival (approximately 6.9 years of follow-up) in 734 disease-free breast cancer survivors. Cox proportional hazards models were used with adjustment for potential confounding factors to generate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results Elevated SAA and CRP were associated with reduced overall survival, regardless of adjustment for age, tumor stage, race, and body mass index (SAA P trend history of cardiovascular events and censoring cardiovascular disease deaths. Elevated CRP and SAA were also associated with reduced disease-free survival, although these associations were of borderline significance (SAA P trend = .04; CRP P trend = .07). CONCLUSION Circulating SAA and CRP may be important prognostic markers for long-term survival in breast cancer patients, independent of race, tumor stage, and body mass index.

  18. Up-to-date and precise estimates of cancer patient survival: model-based period analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Hermann; Hakulinen, Timo

    2006-10-01

    Monitoring of progress in cancer patient survival by cancer registries should be as up-to-date as possible. Period analysis has been shown to provide more up-to-date survival estimates than do traditional methods of survival analysis. However, there is a trade-off between up-to-dateness and the precision of period estimates, in that increasing the up-to-dateness of survival estimates by restricting the analysis to a relatively short, recent time period, such as the most recent calendar year for which cancer registry data are available, goes along with a loss of precision. The authors propose a model-based approach to maximize the up-to-dateness of period estimates at minimal loss of precision. The approach is illustrated for monitoring of 5-year relative survival of patients diagnosed with one of 20 common forms of cancer in Finland between 1953 and 2002 by use of data from the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. It is shown that the model-based approach provides survival estimates that are as up-to-date as the most up-to-date conventional period estimates and at the same time much more precise than the latter. The modeling approach may further enhance the use of period analysis for deriving up-to-date cancer survival rates.

  19. Pretreatment serum albumin as a predictor of cancer survival: A systematic review of the epidemiological literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis Christopher G

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several methods of assessing nutritional status in cancer of which serum albumin is one of the most commonly used. In recent years, the role of malnutrition as a predictor of survival in cancer has received considerable attention. As a result, it is reasonable to investigate whether serum albumin has utility as a prognostic indicator of cancer survival in cancer. This review summarizes all available epidemiological literature on the association between pretreatment serum albumin levels and survival in different types of cancer. Methods A systematic search of the literature using the MEDLINE database (January 1995 through June 2010 to identify epidemiologic studies on the relationship between serum albumin and cancer survival. To be included in the review, a study must have: been published in English, reported on data collected in humans with any type of cancer, had serum albumin as one of the or only predicting factor, had survival as one of the outcome measures (primary or secondary and had any of the following study designs (case-control, cohort, cross-sectional, case-series prospective, retrospective, nested case-control, ecologic, clinical trial, meta-analysis. Results Of the 29 studies reviewed on cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, all except three found higher serum albumin levels to be associated with better survival in multivariate analysis. Of the 10 studies reviewed on lung cancer, all excepting one found higher serum albumin levels to be associated with better survival. In 6 studies reviewed on female cancers and multiple cancers each, lower levels of serum albumin were associated with poor survival. Finally, in all 8 studies reviewed on patients with other cancer sites, lower levels of serum albumin were associated with poor survival. Conclusions Pretreatment serum albumin levels provide useful prognostic significance in cancer. Accordingly, serum albumin level could be used in clinical trials to

  20. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R

    2011-01-01

    The dearth of reliable survival statistics from developing countries was very evident until the mid-1990s. This prompted the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to undertake a project that facilitated hands-on-training and thereby transfer of knowledge and technology on cancer survival analysis to a majority of researchers from the participating population-based cancer registries, which culminated in the publication of the first volume of the IARC scientific publication on Cancer Survival in Developing Countries in 1998. The present study is the second in the series with wider geographical coverage and is based on data from 27 registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. The calendar period of registration of incident cases for the present study ranges between 1990 and 2001. Data on 564 606 cases of 1-56 cancer sites from different registries are reported. Data from eleven registries were utilized for eliciting survival trend and seventeen registries for reporting survival by clinical extent of disease. Besides chapters on every registry and general chapters on methodology, database and overview, the availability of online comparative statistics on cancer survival data by participating registries or cancer site in the form of tables or graphs is an added feature (available online at http://survcan.iarc.fr).

  1. Increasing Disadvantages in Cancer Survival in New Zealand Compared to Australia, between 2000-05 and 2006-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, J Mark; Aye, Phyu Sin; Tin Tin, Sandar

    2016-01-01

    New Zealand has lower cancer survival compared to its neighbour Australia. If this were due to long established differences between the two patient populations, it might be expected to be either constant in time, or decreasing, as improving health services deals with inequities. In this study we compared trends in relative cancer survival ratios in New Zealand and Australia between 2000-05 and 2006-10, using data from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Australian Institute for Health and Welfare. Over this period, Australia showed significant improvements (6.0% in men, 3.0% in women) in overall 5-year cancer survival, with substantial increases in survival from major cancer sites such as lung, bowel, prostate, and breast cancers. New Zealand had only a 1.8% increase in cancer survival in men and 1.3% in women, with non-significant changes in survival from lung and bowel cancers, although there were increases in survival from prostate and breast cancers. For all cancers combined, and for lung and bowel cancer, the improvements in survival and the greater improvements in Australia were mainly in 1-year survival, suggesting factors related to diagnosis and presentation. For breast cancer, the improvements were similar in each country and seen in survival after the first year. The findings underscore the need to accelerate the efforts to improve early diagnosis and optimum treatment for New Zealand cancer patients to catch up with the progress in Australia.

  2. Increasing Disadvantages in Cancer Survival in New Zealand Compared to Australia, between 2000-05 and 2006-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mark Elwood

    Full Text Available New Zealand has lower cancer survival compared to its neighbour Australia. If this were due to long established differences between the two patient populations, it might be expected to be either constant in time, or decreasing, as improving health services deals with inequities. In this study we compared trends in relative cancer survival ratios in New Zealand and Australia between 2000-05 and 2006-10, using data from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Australian Institute for Health and Welfare. Over this period, Australia showed significant improvements (6.0% in men, 3.0% in women in overall 5-year cancer survival, with substantial increases in survival from major cancer sites such as lung, bowel, prostate, and breast cancers. New Zealand had only a 1.8% increase in cancer survival in men and 1.3% in women, with non-significant changes in survival from lung and bowel cancers, although there were increases in survival from prostate and breast cancers. For all cancers combined, and for lung and bowel cancer, the improvements in survival and the greater improvements in Australia were mainly in 1-year survival, suggesting factors related to diagnosis and presentation. For breast cancer, the improvements were similar in each country and seen in survival after the first year. The findings underscore the need to accelerate the efforts to improve early diagnosis and optimum treatment for New Zealand cancer patients to catch up with the progress in Australia.

  3. Transcription factor-microRNA-target gene networks associated with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Kristin R; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    The identification of reliable transcriptome biomarkers requires the simultaneous consideration of regulatory and target elements including microRNAs (miRNAs), transcription factors (TFs), and target genes. A novel approach that integrates multivariate survival analysis, feature selection, and regulatory network visualization was used to identify reliable biomarkers of ovarian cancer survival and recurrence. Expression profiles of 799 miRNAs, 17,814 TFs and target genes and cohort clinical records on 272 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer were simultaneously considered and results were validated on an independent group of 146 patients. Three miRNAs (hsa-miR-16, hsa-miR-22*, and ebv-miR-BHRF1-2*) were associated with both ovarian cancer survival and recurrence and 27 miRNAs were associated with either one hazard. Two miRNAs (hsa-miR-521 and hsa-miR-497) were cohort-dependent, while 28 were cohort-independent. This study confirmed 19 miRNAs previously associated with ovarian cancer and identified two miRNAs that have previously been associated with other cancer types. In total, the expression of 838 and 734 target genes and 12 and eight TFs were associated (FDR-adjusted P-value cancer survival and recurrence, respectively. Functional analysis highlighted the association between cellular and nucleotide metabolic processes and ovarian cancer. The more direct connections and higher centrality of the miRNAs, TFs and target genes in the survival network studied suggest that network-based approaches to prognosticate or predict ovarian cancer survival may be more effective than those for ovarian cancer recurrence. This study demonstrated the feasibility to infer reliable miRNA-TF-target gene networks associated with survival and recurrence of ovarian cancer based on the simultaneous analysis of co-expression profiles and consideration of the clinical characteristics of the patients.

  4. Transcription factor-microRNA-target gene networks associated with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin R Delfino

    Full Text Available The identification of reliable transcriptome biomarkers requires the simultaneous consideration of regulatory and target elements including microRNAs (miRNAs, transcription factors (TFs, and target genes. A novel approach that integrates multivariate survival analysis, feature selection, and regulatory network visualization was used to identify reliable biomarkers of ovarian cancer survival and recurrence. Expression profiles of 799 miRNAs, 17,814 TFs and target genes and cohort clinical records on 272 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer were simultaneously considered and results were validated on an independent group of 146 patients. Three miRNAs (hsa-miR-16, hsa-miR-22*, and ebv-miR-BHRF1-2* were associated with both ovarian cancer survival and recurrence and 27 miRNAs were associated with either one hazard. Two miRNAs (hsa-miR-521 and hsa-miR-497 were cohort-dependent, while 28 were cohort-independent. This study confirmed 19 miRNAs previously associated with ovarian cancer and identified two miRNAs that have previously been associated with other cancer types. In total, the expression of 838 and 734 target genes and 12 and eight TFs were associated (FDR-adjusted P-value <0.05 with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence, respectively. Functional analysis highlighted the association between cellular and nucleotide metabolic processes and ovarian cancer. The more direct connections and higher centrality of the miRNAs, TFs and target genes in the survival network studied suggest that network-based approaches to prognosticate or predict ovarian cancer survival may be more effective than those for ovarian cancer recurrence. This study demonstrated the feasibility to infer reliable miRNA-TF-target gene networks associated with survival and recurrence of ovarian cancer based on the simultaneous analysis of co-expression profiles and consideration of the clinical characteristics of the patients.

  5. Survival of breast cancer patients with synchronous or metachronous central nervous system metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, V.K.; Gijtenbeek, J.M.M.; Brandsma, D.; Beerepoot, L.V.; Sonke, G.S.; Loo, M. te

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases represent a devastating complication for advanced breast cancer patients. This observational study examines the influence of patient, tumour and treatment characteristics on overall survival after synchronous or metachronous CNS metastases. METHODS

  6. Sentinel Lymph Node Occult Metastases Have Minimal Survival Effect in Some Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detailed examination of sentinel lymph node tissue from breast cancer patients revealed previously unidentified metastases in about 16% of the samples, but the difference in 5-year survival between patients with and without these metastases was very small

  7. Trends in colorectal cancer survival in northern Denmark: 1985-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Nørgaard, Mette; Jepsen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The prognosis for colorectal cancer (CRC) is less favourable in Denmark than in neighbouring countries. To improve cancer treatment in Denmark, a National Cancer Plan was proposed in 2000. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in CRC survival and mortality...... in four Danish counties. METHOD: We used hospital discharge registry data for the period January 1985-March 2004 in the counties of north Jutland, Ringkjøbing, Viborg and Aarhus. We computed crude survival and used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusted...... for age and gender. A total of 19,515 CRC patients were identified and linked with the Central Office of Civil Registration to ascertain survival through January 2005. Results: From 1985 to 2004, 1-year and 5-year survival improved both for patients with colon and rectal cancer. From 1995-1999 to 2000...

  8. Quantifying the changes in survival inequality for Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baade, Peter D; Dasgupta, Paramita; Dickman, Paul W; Cramb, Susanna; Williamson, John D; Condon, John R; Garvey, Gail

    2016-08-01

    The survival inequality faced by Indigenous Australians after a cancer diagnosis is well documented; what is less understood is whether this inequality has changed over time and what this means in terms of the impact a cancer diagnosis has on Indigenous people. Survival information for all patients identified as either Indigenous (n=3168) or non-Indigenous (n=211,615) and diagnosed in Queensland between 1997 and 2012 were obtained from the Queensland Cancer Registry, with mortality followed up to 31st December, 2013. Flexible parametric survival models were used to quantify changes in the cause-specific survival inequalities and the number of lives that might be saved if these inequalities were removed. Among Indigenous cancer patients, the 5-year cause-specific survival (adjusted by age, sex and broad cancer type) increased from 52.9% in 1997-2006 to 58.6% in 2007-2012, while it improved from 61.0% to 64.9% among non-Indigenous patients. This meant that the adjusted 5-year comparative survival ratio (Indigenous: non-Indigenous) increased from 0.87 [0.83-0.88] to 0.89 [0.87-0.93], with similar improvements in the 1-year comparative survival. Using a simulated cohort corresponding to the number and age-distribution of Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer in Queensland each year (n=300), based on the 1997-2006 cohort mortality rates, 35 of the 170 deaths due to cancer (21%) expected within five years of diagnosis were due to the Indigenous: non-Indigenous survival inequality. This percentage was similar when applying 2007-2012 cohort mortality rates (19%; 27 out of 140 deaths). Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer still face a poorer survival outlook than their non-Indigenous counterparts, particularly in the first year after diagnosis. The improving survival outcomes among both Indigenous and non-Indigenous cancer patients, and the decreasing absolute impact of the Indigenous survival disadvantage, should provide increased motivation to continue and enhance

  9. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) and published in The Lancet on December 5, 2012—are likely to change ... Cancer Center London in an accompanying editorial in The Lancet . "No data are available to suggest that [the ...

  10. Microchimerism and survival after breast and colon cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported microchimerism to be oppositely associated with maternal breast and colon cancer. In women with a blood test positive for male microchimerism the risk of breast cancer development was reduced to one third, whereas the risk of colon cancer was elevated 4-fold. In this article...

  11. The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shugaa-Addin, Bassam; Al-Shamiri, Hashem M.; Al-Maweri, Sadeq A.; TARAKJI, BASSEL

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the current literature of the survival of dental implants in irradiated head and neck cancer patients considering the role of implant location, bone augmentation, dose of radiation and timing of implant placement. Study Design Pubmed search was conducted to identify articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 and presenting data of dental implant survival with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Studies on animal subjects and craniofacial implant...

  12. Mixed adenosquamous histology is associated with poorer survival of cervical cancer stage 1b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauszus, Finn; Tjessem, Ingvild; Al-Far, Hanine M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of histopathological factors for women with radical hysterectomy a.m. Okabayashi for cervical cancer in stage 1bwith similar pre- and postoperative treatment Methods: Data on 141 women with cervical cancer stage 1b were revised. The local patient registry, data charts......, while survival was found to be 89 % (83-95 %) and 86 % (79-93 %), respectively. The women’s age at diagnosis showed no association with histology type or survival....

  13. High procedure volume is strongly associated with improved survival after lung cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Riaz, Sharma P; Coupland, Victoria H

    2013-01-01

    Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect.......Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect....

  14. Application of Artificial Neural Network in Predicting the Survival Rate of Gastric Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Biglarian, A; E. Hajizadeh; Kazemnejad, A; Zali, MR

    2011-01-01

    "nBackground: The aim of this study was to predict the survival rate of Iranian gastric cancer patients using the Cox proportional hazard and artificial neural network models as well as comparing the ability of these approaches in predicting the survival of these patients."nMethods: In this historical cohort study, the data gathered from 436 registered gastric cancer patients who have had surgery between 2002 and 2007 at the Taleghani Hospital (a referral center for gastrointestinal...

  15. Improvements in breast cancer survival between 1995 and 2012 in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maj-Britt; Ejlertsen, Bent; Mouridsen, Henning T

    2016-01-01

    was extended considerable. Methods A population-based study of 68 842 breast cancer patients registered in the clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group in 1995-2012. Comprehensive data on prognostic factors, comorbidity and treatment together with complete follow-up for survival were....... The modified treatment strategies implemented by the use of nationwide guidelines seemed to have a major impact on the substantial survival improvements....

  16. Impact of Physical Activity on Cancer-Specific and Overall Survival of Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetan Des Guetz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical activity (PA reduces incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC. Its influence on cancer-specific (CSS and overall survival (OS is controversial. Methods. We performed a literature-based meta-analysis (MA of observational studies, using keywords “colorectal cancer, physical activity, and survival” in PubMed and EMBASE. No dedicated MA was found in the Cochrane Library. References were cross-checked. Pre- and postdiagnosis PA levels were assessed by MET. Usually, “high” PA was higher than 17 MET hour/week. Hazard ratios (HRs for OS and CSS were calculated, with their 95% confidence interval. We used more conservative adjusted HRs, since variables of adjustment were similar between studies. When higher PA was associated with improved survival, HRs for detrimental events were set to <1. We used EasyMA software and fixed effect model whenever possible. Results. Seven studies (8056 participants were included, representing 3762 men and 4256 women, 5210 colon and 1745 rectum cancers. Mean age was 67 years. HR CSS for postdiagnosis PA (higher PA versus lower was 0.61 (0.44–0.86. The corresponding HR OS was 0.62 (0.54–0.71. HR CSS for prediagnosis PA was 0.75 (0.62–0.91. The corresponding HR OS was 0.74 (0.62–0.89. Conclusion. Higher PA predicted a better CSS. Sustained PA should be advised for CRC. OS also improved (reduced cardiovascular risk.

  17. Second Primary Lung Cancers Demonstrate Better Survival with Surgery than Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taioli, Emanuela; Lee, Dong-Seok D; Kaufman, Andrew; Wolf, Andrea; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Gomez, Jorge; Flores, Raja M

    2016-01-01

    Patients who have had curative surgery for lung cancer are at the highest risk of developing a new lung cancer. Individual studies are usually underpowered to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes in second primary lung cancer (SPLC). The goal of this study is to determine which treatment is best associated with survival in patients who develop a new primary lung cancer. All pathologically proven stage I lung cancer cases that received cancer-directed surgery included in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database between 2004 and 2010 were selected. Cases that received radiation therapy were excluded. Cases that developed a SPLC 6 or more months after the diagnosis of the first cancer were analyzed. The original data set consisted of 9564 stage I lung cancer cases treated with surgery; 520 of them developed a second primary, and completed data were available for 494 of them. Stage I disease was diagnosed in 272 patients with SPLCs (58.5%); 45.8% of these underwent cancer surgery alone, and 31.6% received radiation alone. Surgery was performed more frequently in early stages and younger patients. Surgical patients had statistically significant longer survival than patients treated with radiation (log-rank P < 0.0001) or not treated with surgery or radiation (log-rank P < 0.0001). The incidence of SPLCs was 5.4%. Stage I second primaries had improved survival when compared with later stage disease, and surgery conferred an increased survival benefit as compared with radiation.

  18. Estimating Survival Rates in Gastric Cancer Based on Pathologic and Demographic Factors in Fars Cancer Registry (2001-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaeifard Abdolreza

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer remains as one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In patients with gastric cancer, the survival rate after diagnosis is relatively low. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of demographic factors in estimation of survival rate in patients with gastric cancer in order to develop updated documents in these patients. Materials and Methods: All gastric cancer patients registered in Fars cancer registry from 2001-2006 were entered in the study. Vital status of the patients was asked by telephone contact. Survival rates were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared by Log-rank test. All calculations were performed using STATA (v.8 software. The p value0.05. Conclusion: Our results showed that the survival rates of gastric cancer patients in our study were relatively low. Late diagnosis and delayed therapy are important reasons for low survival in these patients. Therefore, improving public education about primary symptoms of gastric cancer by media is recommended

  19. Colorectal cancers detected through screening are associated with lower stages and improved survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindebjerg, Jan; Osler, Merete; Bisgaard, Claus

    2014-01-01

    detected through screening were diagnosed at significantly lower stages than among screening non-responders. There were relatively fewer locally advanced rectal cancers among patients diagnosed through positive FOBT than among non-responders. Survival among screening cancer patients was superior...... to that of all other screening groups. No effect of lead time was detected. Neither stage nor survival among patients who had a negative FOBT was inferior to the unscreened Danish population. CONCLUSION: The positive effect on survival among screening cancer patients is neither outbalanced by more advanced......INTRODUCTION: Population screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) using faecal occult blood test (FOBT) will be introduced in Denmark in 2014. Prior to the implementation of the screening programme, a feasibility study was performed in 2005-2006. In this paper, occurrences of colorectal cancer...

  20. Colorectal cancers detected through screening are associated with lower stages and improved survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindebjerg, Jan; Osler, Merete; Bisgaard, Claus Hedebo

    2014-01-01

    in the distribution of colon cancer stages and rectal cancer groups between the various screening categories were analysed through χ(2)-tests. Survival analysis with respect to screening groups was done by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-Mantel hazard ratios, and survival was corrected for lead time. RESULTS: Colon cancers......INTRODUCTION: Population screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) using faecal occult blood test (FOBT) will be introduced in Denmark in 2014. Prior to the implementation of the screening programme, a feasibility study was performed in 2005-2006. In this paper, occurrences of colorectal cancer...... in the feasibility study cohort were reviewed with respect to the effect of screening participation on stages and survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All cases of CRC in a feasibility study cohort diagnosed from the beginning of the study until two years after the study ended were identified. Differences...

  1. Important prognostic factors for the long-term survival of lung cancer subjects in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Albert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study used a large-scale cancer database in determination of prognostic factors for the survival of lung cancer subjects in Taiwan. Methods Total of 24,910 subjects diagnosed with lung cancer was analysed. Survival estimates by Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional-hazards model estimated the death risk (hazard ratio (HR for various prognostic factors. Results The prognostic indicators associated with a higher risk of lung cancer deaths are male gender (males versus females; HR = 1.07, 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.03–1.11, males diagnosed in later periods (shown in 1991–1994 versus 1987–1990; HR = 1.13, older age at diagnosis, large cell carcinoma (LCC/small cell carcinoma (SCC, and supportive care therapy over chemotherapy. The overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer death was significantly poorer for males (21.3% than females (23.6%. Subjects with squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC and treatment by surgical resection alone had better prognosis. We find surgical resections to markedly increase 5-year survival rate from LCC, decreased risk of death from LCC, and no improved survival from SCC. Conclusion Gender and clinical characteristics (i.e. diagnostic period, diagnostic age, histological type and treatment modality play important roles in determining lung cancer survival.

  2. Loco-regional treatment in metastatic breast cancer patients: is there a survival benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Bevan H; Nguyen, Nam P; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Vlastos, Georges

    2010-02-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated a survival benefit in stage IV breast cancer patients following surgical resection of the primary tumor. Here, we investigate the relationship between loco-regional treatment and survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer and evaluate the impact of different loco-regional treatments. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using PubMed to analyze studies with the following criteria: Type of loco-regional treatment (surgery alone or combined with radiation, radiotherapy), overall survival, progression-free survival, selection factors for local treatment, and complication rates. Thirteen studies evaluated the effect of loco-regional treatment on overall survival with overall median survival increasing from a range of 12.6-28.3 months among patients without surgery to a range of 25-42 months among patients with surgery. In addition, six studies reported a 3-year survival benefit of 28-95% and 17-79% in women with and without locoregional therapy respectively. Two studies did not find any improvement in overall survival. One study found an improvement in 5-year breast cancer-specific survival of 27% with negative surgical margins versus 12% with no surgery. Three studies reported an advantage in progression-free survival in the treatment group compared with the non-treatment group. Loco-regional treatment for breast cancer patients with distant metastases at diagnosis is an important issue because of possible improvement of survival or disease-free survival. The possibility of surgery and/or radiotherapy following induction chemotherapy should be weighed and left to individual practice. Participation in randomized controlled trials should be encouraged.

  3. Survival Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Role of Androgen Receptor and Integrins in Regulating Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    negative regulator of PI3K signaling, is lost in ~30% of clinical prostate cancers and in ~60% of metastatic cancers, resulting in constitutive...AR1 cells treated with vehicle (Etoh), 10nM Casodex ( Caso ), or 10nM RU486 (RU). F) Viability of PC3-AR1 or AR2 cells treated with Casodex in the

  4. Socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer survival: relation to stage at diagnosis, treatment and race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xue

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have documented lower breast cancer survival among women with lower socioeconomic status (SES in the United States. In this study, I examined the extent to which socioeconomic disparity in breast cancer survival was explained by stage at diagnosis, treatment, race and rural/urban residence using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER data. Methods Women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1998-2002 in the 13 SEER cancer registry areas were followed-up to the end of 2005. The association between an area-based measure of SES and cause-specific five-year survival was estimated using Cox regression models. Six models were used to assess the extent to which SES differences in survival were explained by clinical and demographical factors. The base model estimated the hazard ratio (HR by SES only and then additional adjustments were made sequentially for: 1 age and year of diagnosis; 2 stage at diagnosis; 3 first course treatment; 4 race; and 5 rural/urban residence. Results An inverse association was found between SES and risk of dying from breast cancer (p Conclusion Stage at diagnosis, first course treatment and race explained most of the socioeconomic disparity in breast cancer survival. Targeted interventions to increase breast cancer screening and treatment coverage in patients with lower SES could reduce much of socioeconomic disparity.

  5. Alcohol consumption before and after breast cancer diagnosis: associations with survival from breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newcomb, P.A.; Kampman, E.; Trentham-Dietz, A.; Egan, K.M.; Titus, L.J.; Baron, J.A.; Hampton, J.M.; Passarelli, M.N.; Willett, W.C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Alcohol intake is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. In contrast, the relation between alcohol consumption and breast cancer survival is less clear. Patients and Methods We assessed pre- and postdiagnostic alcohol intake in a cohort of 22,890 women with incident invasive breast

  6. Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostenfeld EB

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Eva B Ostenfeld1, Rune Erichsen1, Lene H Iversen1,2, Per Gandrup3, Mette Nørgaard1, Jacob Jacobsen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 3Department of Surgery A, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkObjective: The prognosis for colon and rectal cancer has improved in Denmark over the past decades but is still poor compared with that in our neighboring countries. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in colon and rectal cancer survival in the central and northern regions of Denmark.Material and methods: Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, we identified 9412 patients with an incident diagnosis of colon cancer and 5685 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2009. We determined survival, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusting for age and gender. Among surgically treated patients, we computed 30-day mortality and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs.Results: The annual numbers of colon and rectal cancer increased from 1998 through 2009. For colon cancer, 1-year survival improved from 65% to 70%, and 5-year survival improved from 37% to 43%. For rectal cancer, 1-year survival improved from 73% to 78%, and 5-year survival improved from 39% to 47%. Men aged 80+ showed most pronounced improvements. The 1- and 5-year adjusted MRRs decreased: for colon cancer 0.83 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.76–0.92 and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.90 respectively; for rectal cancer 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68–0.91 and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73–0.89 respectively. The 30-day postoperative mortality after resection also declined over the study period. Compared with 1998–2000 the 30-day MRRs in 2007–2009 were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53–0.87 for colon cancer and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37–0.96 for rectal cancer.Conclusion: The survival after colon and rectal

  7. Increased proliferation activity measured by immunoreactive Ki67 is associated with survival improvement in rectal/recto sigmoid cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eeva Salminen; Salla Palmu; Tero Vahlberg; Peter J. Roberts; Karl-Owe S(o)derstr(o)m

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the expression of Ki67 as prognosticator in rectal/recto sigmoid cancer.METHODS: Samples from 146 patients with rectal and recto sigmoid cancer were studied for expression of Ki67 and its prognostic significance in comparison with clinicopathological predictors of survival. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 6 (4.1%) patients with T1, 26 (17.8%) with T2, 94 (64.4%) with T3, and 20 (13.7%) with T4 tumors were studied. Ki67 expression was determined immunohistochemically. Samples were divided according to mean value into high (>40%) and low (≤40%) expression. Areas of extensive proliferation (>50%) were defined as 'hot spot' areas. RESULTS: Hot spot areas were present in samples regardless of histopathological grade. Lower TNM and Dukes stage and higher expression of Ki67 and presence of Ki67 hot spot areas in histopathological samples were associated with better survival, whereas no association was observed with histopathological grade (P = 0.78). In Cox multivariate regression analysis, significant prognostic factors were Dukes stage (P<0.001), presence of lymph node metastases (P = 0.015), age (P = 0.035) andpresence of Ki67 hot spot areas (P = 0.044). CONCLUSION: Proliferative activity as measured by Ki67 in rectal cancer is associated with survival improvement compared with patients with low Ki67. Areas of prognostically significant increased proliferation were found independently of histopathological tumor grade.

  8. Effect of autoimmune diseases on risk and survival in histology-specific lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-12-01

    Patients with autoimmune diseases are at an increased risk of cancer due to underlying dysregulation of the immune system or treatment. Data on cancer incidence, mortality and survival after autoimmune diseases would provide further information on the clinical implications. We systematically analysed data on lung cancer in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent incident lung cancers or lung cancer deaths up to 2008 in patients hospitalised for autoimmune disease after 1964. Increased risks of lung cancer were recorded for SIRs after 12 autoimmune diseases, SMRs after 11 autoimmune diseases and HRs after two autoimmune diseases. The highest SIRs and SMRs, respectively, were seen after discoid lupus erythematosus (4.71 and 4.80), polymyosistis/dermatomyositis (4.20 and 4.17), systemic lupus erythematosus (2.47 and 2.69), rheumatic fever (2.07 and 2.07) and systemic sclerosis (2.19 and 1.98). Autoimmune disease did not influence survival overall but some autoimmune diseases appeared to impair survival in small cell carcinoma. All autoimmune diseases that had an SIR >2.0 are known to present with lung manifestations, suggesting that the autoimmune process contributes to lung cancer susceptibility. The data on survival are reassuring that autoimmune diseases do not influence prognosis in lung cancer.

  9. Oral cancer incidence and survival rates in the Republic of Ireland, 1994-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, Hala

    2016-12-20

    Oral cancer is a significant public health problem world-wide and exerts high economic, social, psychological, and physical burdens on patients, their families, and on their primary care providers. We set out to describe the changing trends in incidence and survival rates of oral cancer in Ireland between 1994 and 2009.

  10. Metformin use improves survival of diabetic liver cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Juan; Zheng, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Peng-Cheng; Xiao, Yan-Ni; Tan, Hong-Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Metformin has garnered considerable interest as a chemo-preventive and chemo-therapeutic agent given the increased risk of liver cancer among diabetic patients. This work was performed to illustrate the association between metformin use and survival of diabetic liver cancer patients. We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, BIOSIS Previews, Cochrane Library from inception to 12 May 2016. Meta-analyses were performed using Stata (version 12.0), with hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as effect measures. Eleven cohort studies involving 3452 liver cancer patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed that metformin use was associated with better survival (HR = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.42-0.83; p = 0.002) of liver cancer patients, and the beneficial effect persisted (HR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42-0.97; p = 0.035) when the population was restricted to diabetic liver cancer patients. After adjusting for age, etiology, index of tumor severity and treatment of liver cancer, the association between metformin use and better survival of liver cancer patients was stable, pooled HR ranged from 0.47 to 0.57. The results indicated that metformin use improved survival of diabetic liver cancer patients. However, the results should be interpreted with caution given the possibility of residual confounding. Further prospective studies are still needed to confirm the prognostic benefit of metformin use. PMID:27494848

  11. A RUNX2-Mediated Epigenetic Regulation of the Survival of p53 Defective Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hwa Shin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The inactivation of p53 creates a major challenge for inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. An attractive strategy is to identify and subsequently target the survival signals in p53 defective cancer cells. Here we uncover a RUNX2-mediated survival signal in p53 defective cancer cells. The inhibition of this signal induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not non-transformed cells. Using the CRISPR technology, we demonstrate that p53 loss enhances the apoptosis caused by RUNX2 knockdown. Mechanistically, RUNX2 provides the survival signal partially through inducing MYC transcription. Cancer cells have high levels of activating histone marks on the MYC locus and concomitant high MYC expression. RUNX2 knockdown decreases the levels of these histone modifications and the recruitment of the Menin/MLL1 (mixed lineage leukemia 1 complex to the MYC locus. Two inhibitors of the Menin/MLL1 complex induce apoptosis in p53 defective cancer cells. Together, we identify a RUNX2-mediated epigenetic mechanism of the survival of p53 defective cancer cells and provide a proof-of-principle that the inhibition of this epigenetic axis is a promising strategy to kill p53 defective cancer cells.

  12. Specialized care and survival of ovarian cancer patients in The Netherlands: Nationwide cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Vernooij (Flora); A.P.M. Heintz (Peter); P.O. Witteveen (Petronella); M. van der Heiden-Van der Loo (Margriet); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There is much debate on the necessity of regionalization of ovarian cancer care. We investigated the association between hospital type and survival of patients with ovarian cancer in The Netherlands. Methods: A retrospective, population-based cohort study was performed on all

  13. A RUNX2-Mediated Epigenetic Regulation of the Survival of p53 Defective Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Hwa; He, Yunlong; Marrogi, Eryney; Piperdi, Sajida; Ren, Ling; Khanna, Chand; Gorlick, Richard; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The inactivation of p53 creates a major challenge for inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. An attractive strategy is to identify and subsequently target the survival signals in p53 defective cancer cells. Here we uncover a RUNX2-mediated survival signal in p53 defective cancer cells. The inhibition of this signal induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not non-transformed cells. Using the CRISPR technology, we demonstrate that p53 loss enhances the apoptosis caused by RUNX2 knockdown. Mechanistically, RUNX2 provides the survival signal partially through inducing MYC transcription. Cancer cells have high levels of activating histone marks on the MYC locus and concomitant high MYC expression. RUNX2 knockdown decreases the levels of these histone modifications and the recruitment of the Menin/MLL1 (mixed lineage leukemia 1) complex to the MYC locus. Two inhibitors of the Menin/MLL1 complex induce apoptosis in p53 defective cancer cells. Together, we identify a RUNX2-mediated epigenetic mechanism of the survival of p53 defective cancer cells and provide a proof-of-principle that the inhibition of this epigenetic axis is a promising strategy to kill p53 defective cancer cells.

  14. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Catalase Is Strongly Associated with Ovarian Cancer Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotte, Jimmy; Fletcher, Nicole M; Saed, Mohammed G; Abusamaan, Mohammed S; Dyson, Gregory; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. Recent evidence demonstrates an association between enzymatic activity altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with human cancer susceptibility. We sought to evaluate the association of SNPs in key oxidant and antioxidant enzymes with increased risk and survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Individuals (n = 143) recruited were divided into controls, (n = 94): healthy volunteers, (n = 18), high-risk BRCA1/2 negative (n = 53), high-risk BRCA1/2 positive (n = 23) and ovarian cancer cases (n = 49). DNA was subjected to TaqMan SNP genotype analysis for selected oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. Of the seven selected SNP studied, no association with ovarian cancer risk (Pearson Chi-square) was found. However, a catalase SNP was identified as a predictor of ovarian cancer survival by the Cox regression model. The presence of this SNP was associated with a higher likelihood of death (hazard ratio (HR) of 3.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.149-11.836)) for ovarian cancer patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a significant median overall survival difference (108 versus 60 months, pcancer patients, and thus may serve as a prognosticator.

  15. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene modify survival of bladder cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacerdote, C.; Guarrera, S.; Ricceri, F.; Pardini, B.; Polidoro, S.; Allione, A.; Critelli, R.; Russo, A.; Andrew, A.S.; Ye, Y.; Wu, X.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Bosio, A.; Casetta, G.; Cucchiarale, G.; Destefanis, P.; Gontero, P.; Rolle, L.; Zitella, A.; Fontana, D.; Vineis, P.; Matullo, G.

    2013-01-01

    Survival of bladder cancer patients depends on several factors including disease stage and grade at diagnosis, age, health status of the patient and the applied treatment. Several studies investigated the role of DNA repair genetic variants in cancer susceptibility, but only few studies investigated

  16. Disparities in survival of stomach cancer among different socioeconomic groups in North-East Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemerink, Ester J. M.; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Survival differences in stomach cancer are depended on patient, tumour and treatment factors. Some populations are more prone to develop stomach cancer, such as people with low socioeconomic status (SES). The aim of this population based study was to assess whether differences in socioec

  17. Diverging breast and stomach cancer incidence and survival in migrants in The Netherlands, 1996–2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.; Aarts, M.J.; Siesling, S.; Aa, van der M.A.; Visser, O.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Migrant populations usually experience a health transition with respect to their cancer risk as a result from environmental changes and acculturation processes. We investigated potentially contrasting experiences with breast and stomach cancer risk and survival in migrants to the Netherl

  18. Cancer Incidence, Survival, and Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horm, John W.; Burhansstipanov, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Overall cancer incidence among southwestern American Indians is less than half that of U.S. whites; Alaska Native and white rates are similar. However, both native groups have elevated rates for specific cancers (stomach, liver, and gallbladder), and Indians have low five-year survival rates. Data tables outline incidence, mortality, and survival…

  19. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In stage III colonic cancer, time from surgery to start of adjuvant chemotherapy may influence survival. In this study, we evaluated the effect of timing of adjuvant therapy on survival. METHODS: Database study from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's national database....... RESULTS: The final population included 1,827 patients scheduled for adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy started within 4 and 8 weeks improved survival when compared to start later than 8 weeks (HR [95%CI]: 1.7 [1.1-2.6]; P = 0.024 and 1.4 [1.07-1.8]; P = 0.013, respectively), whereas...

  20. Comparison of survival of adolescents and young adults with hematologic malignancies in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata-Yamada, Kayo; Inoue, Masami; Ioka, Akiko; Ito, Yuri; Tabuchi, Takahiro; Miyashiro, Isao; Masaie, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Jun; Hino, Masayuki; Tsukuma, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    The survival gap between adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hematological malignancies persists in many countries. To determine to what extent it does in Japan, we investigated survival and treatment regimens in 211 Japanese AYAs (15-29 years) in the Osaka Cancer Registry diagnosed during 2001-2005 with hematological malignancies, and compared adolescents (15-19 years) with young adults (20-29 years). AYAs with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) had a poor 5-year survival (44%), particularly young adults (29% vs. 64% in adolescents, p = 0.01). Additional investigation for patients with ALL revealed that only 19% of young adults were treated with pediatric treatment regimens compared with 45% of adolescents (p = 0.05). Our data indicate that we need to focus on young adults with ALL and to consider establishing appropriate cancer care system and guidelines for them in Japan.

  1. Leukoplakia, Oral Cavity Cancer Risk, and Cancer Survival in the U.S. Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Katki, Hormuzd A; Silverberg, Michael J; Manos, M Michele; Engels, Eric A; Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2015-09-01

    Screening for oral leukoplakia, an oral cavity cancer (OCC) precursor, could lead to earlier detection of OCC. However, the progression rate from leukoplakia to OCC and the benefits of leukoplakia screening for improving OCC outcomes are currently unclear. We conducted a case-cohort study of U.S. adults ages ≥65 years in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linkage. We identified leukoplakia diagnoses through Medicare claims, and OCC diagnoses through SEER cancer registries. Weighted Cox regression was used to estimate leukoplakia associations with OCC incidence, and the absolute OCC risk following leukoplakia diagnosis was calculated. Among OCC cases, we compared OCC stage and OCC survival between cases with a prior leukoplakia diagnosis versus those without prior leukoplakia. Among 470,266 individuals in the SEER-Medicare subcohort, 1,526 (0.3%) had a leukoplakia diagnosis. Among people with leukoplakia, the cumulative OCC incidence was 0.7% at 3 months and 2.5% at 5 years. OCC risk was most increased leukoplakia diagnosis (HR, 115), likely representing the diagnosis of prevalent cancers. Nonetheless, risk remained substantially increased in subsequent follow-up [HR ≥ 3 months, 24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 22-27; HR ≥ 12 months, 22, 95% CI, 20-25]. Among OCC cases (N = 8,927), those with prior leukoplakia were less likely to be diagnosed at regional/distant stage (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.30-0.43), and had lower mortality (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.84) when compared with OCC cases without a prior leukoplakia. Individuals with leukoplakia have substantially elevated risk of OCC. Lower stage and better survival after OCC diagnosis suggest that leukoplakia identification can lead to earlier OCC detection and reduced mortality.

  2. Polymorphisms in MicroRNA Binding Sites Predict Colorectal Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Pi; Ting, Wen-Chien; Chen, Lu-Min; Lu, Te-Ling; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate negative regulation of target genes through base pairing, and aberrant miRNA expression has been described in cancers. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within miRNA target sites might influence clinical outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Sixteen common SNPs within miRNA target sites were identified, and the association between these SNPs and overall survival was assessed in colorectal cancer patients using Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. Results: Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the RPS6KB1 rs1051424 and ZNF839 rs11704 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival rates were 74.6%, 62.7%, and 57.1% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (P = 0.006). The genetic interaction profile remained significant even after adjusting for potential risk factors. Additional in silico analysis provided evidence that rs1051424 and rs11704 affect RPS6KB1 and ZNF839 expressions, which in turn is significantly correlated with prognosis in colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profiles among SNPs within miRNA target sites might be prognostic markers for colorectal cancer survival. PMID:28138309

  3. Survival benefit in patients after palliative resection vs non-resection colon cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Beham; M Rentsch; K Püllmann; L Mantouvalou; H Spatz; HJ Schlitt; A Obed

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate survival in patients undergoing palliative resection versus non-resection surgery for primary colorectal cancer in a retrospective analysis.METHODS: Demographics, TNM status, operating details and survival were reviewed for 67 patients undergoing surgery for incurable colorectal cancer. Palliative resection of the primary tumor was performed in 46 cases in contrast to 21 patients with non-resection of the primary tumor and bypass surgery. Risk factors for postoperative mortality and poor survival were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses.RESULTS: The two groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, preoperative presence of ileus and tumor stage. Multivariate analysis showed that median survival was significantly higher in patients with palliative resection surgery (544 vs 233 d). Differentiation of the tumor and tumor size were additional independent factors that were associated with a significantly poorer survival rate.CONCLUSION: Palliative resection surgery for primary colorectal cancer is associated with a higher median survival rate. Also, the presence of liver metastasis and tumor size are associated with poor survival. Therefore,resection of the primary tumor should be considered in patients with non-curable colon cancer.

  4. Age-specific cancer survival in Estonia: recent trends and data quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innos K

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaire Innos,1 Katrin Lang,2 Kersti Pärna,2 Tiiu Aareleid11Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia; 2Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, EstoniaBackground: A number of population-based studies have demonstrated lower cancer survival in elderly patients than among middle-aged or younger patients. Also, data quality in cancer registries has been shown to be associated with age. The objective of this study was to examine the recent age-specific cancer survival trends and age-specific quality of cancer data in Estonia.Methods: Using Estonian Cancer Registry data, we calculated relative survival ratios (RSRs for eight common cancers in Estonia in 1995–1999 (cohort method and 2005–2009 (period method for four major age groups (15–54, 55–64, 65–74, and 75–84 years at diagnosis. The main data quality indicators were calculated, and the age-specific effect of missing death certificate initiated (DCI cases on survival was estimated comparing 5-year RSRs computed from the complete data set with those from data set without DCI cases.Results: We observed overall rise in 5-year RSR for all eight cancers over the study period, with a considerable variation by age, with the lowest survival among the oldest patients. The widest age gradient in 5-year RSR was seen for bladder cancer (20% units in 2005–2009, followed by cancers of lung (16% units, kidney (15% units, breast and prostate (13% units, stomach and rectum (11% units, and colon (5% units. All data quality indicators, including proportion of cases with unknown stage showed a similar age-related pattern with the lowest quality in the oldest age group. The effect of missing DCI cases on survival estimates increased by age and was around 3% units for prostate and kidney cancers among the oldest patients.Conclusion: Young or middle-aged patients in Estonia experienced larger survival gain since the late 1990s

  5. Common genetic variability in ESR1 and EGF in relation to endometrial cancer risk and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Einarsdóttir, K; Darabi, H; Czene, K.; Li, Y; Low, Y.L.; Y. Q. Li; Bonnard, C.; Wedrén, S.; Liu, E. T.; Hall, P; Liu, J; Humphreys, K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated common genetic variation in the entire ESR1 and EGF genes in relation to endometrial cancer risk, myometrial invasion and endometrial cancer survival. We genotyped a dense set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both genes and selected haplotype tagging SNPs (tagSNPs). The tagSNPs were genotyped in 713 Swedish endometrial cancer cases and 1567 population controls and the results incorporated into logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. We found five a...

  6. Defining the Survival Benchmark for Breast Cancer Patients with Systemic Relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Zeichner, Simon B.; Tadeu Ambros; John Zaravinos; Montero, Alberto J.; Mahtani, Reshma L; Ahn, Eugene R; Aruna Mani; Markward, Nathan J; Vogel, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our original paper, published in 1992, reported a median overall survival after first relapse in breast cancer of 26 months. The current retrospective review concentrates more specifically on patients with first systemic relapse, recognizing that subsets of patients with local recurrence are potentially curable. METHODS Records of 5,168 patients from a largely breast-cancer-specific oncology practice were reviewed to identify breast cancer patients with their first relapse between ...

  7. Delay in Breast Cancer: Implications for Stage at Diagnosis and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee eCaplan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer continues to be a disease with tremendous public health significance. Primary prevention of breast cancer is still not available, so efforts to promote early detection continue to be the major focus in fighting breast cancer. Since early detection is associated with decreased mortality, one would think that it is important to minimize delays in detection and diagnosis. There are two major types of delay. Patient delay is delay in seeking medical attention after self-discovering a potential breast cancer symptom. System delay is delay within the health care system in getting appointments, scheduling diagnostic tests, receiving a definitive diagnosis, and initiating therapy. Earlier studies of the consequences of delay on prognosis tended to show that increased delay is associated with more advanced stage cancers at diagnosis, thus resulting in poorer chances for survival. More recent studies have had mixed results, with some studies showing increased survival with longer delays. One hypothesis is that diagnostic difficulties could perhaps account for this survival paradox. A rapidly growing lump may suggest cancer to both doctors and patients, while a slow growing lump or other symptom could be less obvious to them. If this is the case, then the shorter delays would be seen with the more aggressive tumors for which the prognosis is worse leading to reduced survival. It seems logical that a tumor that is more advanced at diagnosis would lead to shorter survival; but the several counter-intuitive studies in this review show that it is dangerous to make assumptions.

  8. Semiparametric Bayesian estimation of quantile function for breast cancer survival data with cured fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Cherry; Cobre, Juliana; Polpo, Adriano; Sinha, Debjayoti

    2016-09-01

    Existing cure-rate survival models are generally not convenient for modeling and estimating the survival quantiles of a patient with specified covariate values. This paper proposes a novel class of cure-rate model, the transform-both-sides cure-rate model (TBSCRM), that can be used to make inferences about both the cure-rate and the survival quantiles. We develop the Bayesian inference about the covariate effects on the cure-rate as well as on the survival quantiles via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) tools. We also show that the TBSCRM-based Bayesian method outperforms existing cure-rate models based methods in our simulation studies and in application to the breast cancer survival data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database.

  9. Dose surgical sub-specialization influence survival in patients with colorectal cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cameron Platell; Daniel Lim; Nazreen Tajudeen; Ji-Li Tan; Karen Wong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To perform a review of patients with colorectal cancer to a community hospital and to compare the risk-adjusted survival between patients managed in general surgical units versus a colorectal unit.METHODS: The study evaluated all patients with colorectal cancer referred to either general surgical units or a colorectal unit from 1/1996 to 6/2001.These results were compared to a historical control group treated within general surgical units at the same hospital from 1/1989 to 12/1994. A KaplanMeier survival analysis compared the overall survivals (allcause mortality) between the groups. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the influence of a number of independent variables on survival. These variables included age, ASA score, disease stage, emergency surgery,adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, disease location, and surgical unit.RESULTS: There were 974 patients involved in this study.There were no significant differences in the demographic details for the three groups. Patients in the colorectal group were more likely to have rectal cancer and Stage T cancers,and less likely to have Stage Ⅱ cancers. Patients treated in the colorectal group had a significantly higher overall 5-year survival when compared with the general surgical group and the historical control group (56 % versus 45 % and 40 % respectively, P<0.01). Survival regression analysis identified age, ASA score, disease stage, adjuvant chemotherapy, and treatment in a colorectal unit (Hazards ratio: 0.67; 95 % CI: 0.53 to 0.84, P =0.0005), as significant independent predictors of survival.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that there may be a survival advantage for patients with colon and rectal cancers being treated within a specialist colorectal surgical unit.

  10. [Childhood cancer: a comparative analysis of incidence, mortality, and survival in Goiania (Brazil) and other countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Patrícia Emília; Latorre Md, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Curado, Maria Paula

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of cancer incidence, mortality, and survival rates can yield geographic and temporal trends that are useful for planning and evaluating health interventions. This article reviews cancer incidence and mortality rates and respective trends around the world in children under 15 years old, as well as their 5-year survival rates in developed and developing countries. We conclude that even though increasing or stable childhood cancer incidence rates and decreasing mortality rates have been observed in developed countries, the trends remain unknown in developing countries. Data from the city of Goiania, Brazil, show stable childhood cancer incidence and mortality rates. Five-year survival rates (48%) in Goiania are similar to those seen in underdeveloped regions and lower than those reported in developed countries (64-70%).

  11. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here......, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox' regression models...... allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly...

  12. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes in relation to ovarian cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Vivo, Immaculata De; Titus, Linda J; Vitonis, Allison F; Wong, Jason Y Y; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive non-coding DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes that provide protection against chromosomal instability. Telomere length and stability are influenced by proteins, including telomerase which is partially encoded by the TERT gene. Genetic variation in the TERT gene is associated with ovarian cancer risk, and predicts survival in lung cancer and glioma. We investigated whether genetic variation in five telomere maintenance genes was associated with survival among 1480 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer in the population-based New England Case-Control Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall we observed no significant associations between SNPs in telomere maintenance genes and mortality using a significance threshold of p=0.001. However, we observed some suggestive associations in subgroup analyses. Future studies with larger populations may further our understanding of what role telomeres play in ovarian cancer survival.

  13. Unfavorable survival rates in Iranian patients with gastric cancers: a single center experience from Tehran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of potential interfering factors that play major roles in the outcome of our patients with stomach cancer. 100 consecutive patients diagnosed with gastric cancers were prospectively observed, treated and followed from November 2009 to January. Absence of Helicobacter pylori infection (P=0.027, absence of vascularisation (P<0.001, and undetermined histopathological type of adenocarcinoma (P=0.003 were factors significantly associated with higher grade of gastric lesions. Life tables were used to define survival of gastric cancers. Survival rates of these patients at 1st week, 1st month, 2nd month, 3rd month, and 6th month were 97%, 96%, 91%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. The only determinant of 6 months of survival was age over 68 (P=0.039. Our study confirms our previous knowledge that gastric cancers have unfavorable outcome in Iran.

  14. Survival after early-stage breast cancer of women previously treated for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis Frederik Palm; Johansen, Christoffer; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this nationwide, register-based cohort study was to determine whether women treated for depression before primary early-stage breast cancer are at increased risk for receiving treatment that is not in accordance with national guidelines and for poorer survival. Material...... and Methods We identified 45,325 women with early breast cancer diagnosed in Denmark from 1998 to 2011. Of these, 744 women (2%) had had a previous hospital contact (as an inpatient or outpatient) for depression and another 6,068 (13%) had been treated with antidepressants. Associations between previous...... treatment of depression and risk of receiving nonguideline treatment of breast cancer were assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. We compared the overall survival, breast cancer-specific survival, and risk of death by suicide of women who were and were not treated for depression before...

  15. Cancer incidence and survival among children and adolescents in Israel during the years 1998 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Ron; Barchana, Micha; Liphshiz, Irena; Futerman, Boris; Linn, Shai; Weyl-Ben-Arush, Myriam

    2012-08-01

    Our goal was to describe childhood cancer incidence and survival in Israel and to identify demographic and epidemiologic variations among children and adolescents with cancer. We used data from the Israel National Cancer Registry to examine the incidence and survival of pediatric cancer in Israeli children aged 0 to 19 years, diagnosed during the years 1998 to 2007. Cases were analyzed according to sex, age, ethnicity, and geographic region. Among the 4255 cases of childhood cancer, there was a total age-adjusted incidence rate of 172.4 per million for children aged 0 to 19 years and 153.4 per million for children aged 0 to 14 years. The incidence rate for boys was higher than for girls (192.5 and 153.3, respectively) and higher for Jewish children than for Arab children (177.6 and 156.8, respectively). The largest groups were leukemias (22%), lymphomas (20.2%), and central nervous system tumors (17.4%). The number of new cases increased each year, but the incidence rate remained steady. The survival probability updated to December 2008 was estimated and the 5-year survival was calculated for the new cases until the end of 2003. The overall survival at 5 years was 80.8%, with 72.8% for the Arabic population and 83.2% for the Jewish population, and depended on the diagnosis. Incidence and survival in childhood cancer in Israel is at the same medium level compared with other parts of the world. This study may set the basis for investigating the genetic and environmental factors that cause pediatric cancer in Israel, delineating the genetic basis for ethnic origin disparities in survival.

  16. The association of statin use after cancer diagnosis with survival in pancreatic cancer patients: a SEER-medicare analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Y Jeon

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has poor prognosis and existing interventions provide a modest benefit. Statin has anti-cancer properties that might enhance survival in pancreatic cancer patients. We sought to determine whether statin treatment after cancer diagnosis is associated with longer survival in those with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC.We analyzed data on 7813 elderly patients with PDAC using the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER - Medicare claims files. Information on the type, intensity and duration of statin use after cancer diagnosis was extracted from Medicare Part D. We treated statin as a time-dependent variable in a Cox regression model to determine the association with overall survival adjusting for follow-up, age, sex, race, neighborhood income, stage, grade, tumor size, pancreatectomy, chemotherapy, radiation, obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes, chronic pancreatitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Overall, statin use after cancer diagnosis was not significantly associated with survival when all PDAC patients were considered (HR = 0.94, 95%CI 0.89, 1.01. However, statin use after cancer diagnosis was associated with a 21% reduced hazard of death (Hazard ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.67, 0.93 in those with grade I or II PDAC and to a similar extent in those who had undergone a pancreatectomy, in those with chronic pancreatitis and in those who had not been treated with statin prior to cancer diagnosis.We found that statin treatment after cancer diagnosis is associated with enhanced survival in patients with low-grade, resectable PDAC.

  17. Prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and survival trends in the United States: 1981-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Aruna V; Schottenfeld, David

    2002-02-01

    The increased use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in screening for preclinical disease after 1985 is thought to be a major determinant of the changing patterns in prostate cancer incidence; however, the long-term effect of screening on future trends in mortality and survival is uncertain. This article reviews the temporal trends (1981-1998) for prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and survival, and projects prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates for 1999 to 2001. Autoregressive, quadratic, time-series models were used to describe prostate cancer mortality rates in the US population and prostate cancer incidence rates derived from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. These models were based on data collected from 1979 through 1998, with forecasts produced for 1999 to 2001. Prostate cancer incidence increased steadily from 1981 to 1989, with a steep increase in the early 1990s, followed by a decline. Incidence rates were forecasted to remain stable through the year 2001. Mortality rates decreased steadily and were forecasted to continue to decrease concurrently with increasing 5- and 10-year relative survival rates. The incidence, mortality, and survival trends were comparable in US blacks, who exhibited on average 2-fold higher mortality and 50% higher incidence than whites. Decreasing prostate cancer mortality and increasing relative survival trends in the United States were described after the introduction of PSA screening. However, the exaggerated rate of increase in the early 1990s in prostate cancer incidence was transient and likely a result of increased detection of preclinical disease that was prevalent in the general population.

  18. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Catalase Is Strongly Associated with Ovarian Cancer Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Belotte

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. Recent evidence demonstrates an association between enzymatic activity altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP with human cancer susceptibility. We sought to evaluate the association of SNPs in key oxidant and antioxidant enzymes with increased risk and survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Individuals (n = 143 recruited were divided into controls, (n = 94: healthy volunteers, (n = 18, high-risk BRCA1/2 negative (n = 53, high-risk BRCA1/2 positive (n = 23 and ovarian cancer cases (n = 49. DNA was subjected to TaqMan SNP genotype analysis for selected oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. Of the seven selected SNP studied, no association with ovarian cancer risk (Pearson Chi-square was found. However, a catalase SNP was identified as a predictor of ovarian cancer survival by the Cox regression model. The presence of this SNP was associated with a higher likelihood of death (hazard ratio (HR of 3.68 (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.149-11.836 for ovarian cancer patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a significant median overall survival difference (108 versus 60 months, p<0.05 for those without the catalase SNP as compared to those with the SNP. Additionally, age at diagnosis greater than the median was found to be a significant predictor of death (HR of 2.78 (95% CI: 1.022-7.578. This study indicates a strong association with the catalase SNP and survival of ovarian cancer patients, and thus may serve as a prognosticator.

  19. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  20. Hormone-receptor expression and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Köbel, Martin; Longacre, Teri A;

    2013-01-01

    Few biomarkers of ovarian cancer prognosis have been established, partly because subtype-specific associations might be obscured in studies combining all histopathological subtypes. We examined whether tumour expression of the progesterone receptor (PR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) was associated...

  1. Neuroticism and reactions to social comparison information among cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, K; Buunk, B; Sanderman, R

    1998-01-01

    In an experimental study neuroticism was examined as a moderator of breast cancer patients' affective reactions to social comparison information about a fellow patient. Fifty-seven women with breast cancer completed Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire and received social comparison information about

  2. Treatment-associated severe thrombocytopenia affects survival rate in esophageal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y M Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Esophageal cancer is commonly treated with surgery, concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT, or a combination of both. The correlation between the hematological parameters during CCRT and early survival of esophageal cancer has not been fully evaluated. Materials And Methods: We analyzed the records of 65 esophageal cancer patients treated by CCRT between 2007 and 2010 retrospectively. The association between CCRT-associated myelosuppression, demographic variables, and survival rates were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The univariate analysis showed that tumor extent of T3-4, a higher stage of tumor, a lower albumin level, grade 3 or higher anemia and thrombocytopenia, and interruptions in treatment affected survival rates. Further, the multivariate analysis revealed that stage IV (P = 0.030 is an independently negative prognostic factor for a one-year survival rate. Stage IV (P = 0.035, tumor extent of T3-4 (P = 0.002, and grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia (P = 0.015 are independently negative prognostic factors for a two-year survival rate. Conclusions: Severe decrease in platelet count during CCRT independently affects survival of esophageal cancer patients in addition to stage of the tumor.

  3. Socioeconomic disparity in survival after breast cancer in ireland: observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Walsh

    Full Text Available We evaluated the relationship between breast cancer survival and deprivation using data from the Irish National Cancer Registry. Cause-specific survival was compared between five area-based socioeconomic deprivation strata using Cox regression. Patient and tumour characteristics and treatment were compared using modified Poisson regression with robust variance estimation. Based on 21356 patients diagnosed 1999-2008, age-standardized five-year survival averaged 80% in the least deprived and 75% in the most deprived stratum. Age-adjusted mortality risk was 33% higher in the most deprived group (hazard ratio 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.45, P<0.001. The most deprived groups were more likely to present with advanced stage, high grade or hormone receptor-negative cancer, symptomatically, or with significant comorbidity, and to be smokers or unmarried, and less likely to have breast-conserving surgery. Cox modelling suggested that the available data on patient, tumour and treatment factors could account for only about half of the survival disparity (adjusted hazard ratio 1.18, 95% CI 0.97-1.43, P = 0.093. Survival disparity did not diminish over time, compared with the period 1994-1998. Persistent survival disparities among Irish breast cancer patients suggest unequal use of or access to services and highlight the need for further research to understand and remove the behavioural or other barriers involved.

  4. The optimal number of lymph nodes removed in maximizing the survival of breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lim Fong; Taib, Nur Aishah; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Daud, Noorizam

    2014-07-01

    The number of lymph nodes removed is one of the important predictors for survival in breast cancer study. Our aim is to determine the optimal number of lymph nodes to be removed for maximizing the survival of breast cancer patients. The study population consists of 873 patients with at least one of axillary nodes involved among 1890 patients from the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC) breast cancer registry. For this study, the Chi-square test of independence is performed to determine the significant association between prognostic factors and survival status, while Wilcoxon test is used to compare the estimates of the hazard functions of the two or more groups at each observed event time. Logistic regression analysis is then conducted to identify important predictors of survival. In particular, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) are calculated from the logistic regression model for all thresholds of node involved, as an alternative measure for the Wald statistic (χ2), in order to determine the optimal number of nodes that need to be removed to obtain the maximum differential in survival. The results from both measurements are compared. It is recommended that, for this particular group, the minimum of 10 nodes should be removed to maximize survival of breast cancer patients.

  5. Influence of Body Mass Index on Tumor Pathology and Survival in Uterine Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anne Bjerrum; Hare-Bruun, Helle; Høgdall, Claus Kim;

    2016-01-01

    for uterine cancer or atypical endometrial hyperplasia (International Classification of Diseases-10 codes D070, DC549) 2005 to 2012 (n = 6003). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Impact of BMI on type I and II endometrial cancer survival. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Danish Gynecological Cancer Database data on women with type......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of body mass index (BMI) on endometrial tumor pathology, stage and complication rate and to identify individual prognostic factors, such as BMI, in types I and II endometrial cancer. DESIGN: Register study included all Danish women who underwent surgery...... I and II endometrial cancer were retrieved. Kaplan-Meier plot was used to illustrate differences in survival in relation to BMI. Log-rank test was used to demonstrate difference between the curves. Cox regression hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of the effect of BMI on overall...

  6. Impact of anaesthetic technique on survival in colon cancer: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, F Jeroen; Lips, Daan J; van Dorsten, Frank R C; Lemmens, Valery E; Bosscha, Koop

    2016-02-01

    An oncological surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for potentially curable colon cancer. At the time of surgery, a large fraction of patients do harbour-although not visibly-minimal residual disease at the time of surgery. The immunosuppression that accompanies surgery may have an effect on disease recurrence and survival. Regional or neuraxial anaesthetic techniques like epidural anaesthesia may suppress immune function less than opioid analgesia, by reducing stress response and significantly reducing exposure to opioids. Consistent with this hypothesis, regional anaesthetic techniques have been associated with lower recurrence rates in breast cancer and prostate cancer. Results for colon cancer, however, are contradictory. In this review of the literature we describe all studies addressing the association of the use of epidural anaesthesia and survival in colon cancer surgery.

  7. Correlation between rest-activity rhythm and survival in cancer patients experiencing pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Pei; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of rest-activity rhythm on the survival of cancer patients. This study collected data related to cancer patients experiencing pain who had been hospitalized for treatment between August 2006 and October 2007. Data included the Karnofsky Performance Status Index as a representation of functional condition as well as the Brief Pain Inventory and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Actigraphic methods were used to record the dichotomy index (I rest-activity rhythms over periods of three consecutive days. Patients were closely followed until 31 July 2013. Results were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, log-rank testing and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to evaluate whether alterations in the rest-activity rhythm affected the survival rate of the patients. Of the 68 hospitalized cancer patients experiencing pain at the time of admission, 51 subsequently died within the study period. A significant difference was observed in the survival curves between the regular I rest-activity rhythm were negatively correlated with the survival of hospitalized cancer patients experiencing pain. Effects were particularly pronounced in cancer patients with poor performance status.

  8. Baseline Quality of Life Factors Predict Long Term Survival after Elective Resection for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhiram Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Studies have shown an association between baseline quality of life (Qol and survival in advanced cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate their predictive value in long term survival after elective colorectal cancer resection. Methods. A consecutive series of patients undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery for nonmetastatic disease were recruited in 2003/04. Patients completed standardized quality of life questionnaires (HADS, FACTC, MRS, and PANAS prior to and 6 weeks after surgery. Univariate (log-rank test and multivariate analyses (Cox proportional hazards were performed to predict long term survival. Results. Ninety-seven patients met the inclusion criteria. Sixty-five (67% were male and the median age of the group was 70 years. Forty-six (47.5% patients had died and the mean survival was 1,741 days (median 2159, range 9–2923 days. Preoperative mood rating scale and functional assessment of cancer therapy-colorectal FACT C emotional well-being and postoperative FACT C additional concerns were independent predictors of long term survival. Conclusion. Incorporating psychosocial measures in preoperative assessment of cancer patients could help to identify patients who require assessment with a view to implementing psychosocial interventions. These active interventions to maximize mood and well-being should form an integral part of multidisciplinary treatment in these patients.

  9. Pathological features and survival outcomes of young patients with operable colon cancer: are they homogeneous?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Li

    Full Text Available To compare the pathological features and survival outcomes at different age subgroups of young patients with colon cancer.Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER population-based data, we identified 2,861 young patients with colon cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2005 treated with surgery. Patients were divided into four groups: group 1 (below 25 years, group 2 (26-30 years, group 3 (31-35 years and group 4 (36-40 years. Five-year cancer specific survival data were obtained. Kaplan-Meier methods were adopted and multivariable Cox regression models were built for the analysis of long-term survival outcomes and risk factors.There were significant different among four groups in pathological grading, histological type, AJCC stage, current standard (≥12 lymph nodes retrieval, mean number of lymph nodes examined and positive lymph nodes (p<0.001. The 5-year cause specific survival was 71.0% in group 1, 75.1% in group 2, 80.6% in group 3 and 82.5% in group 4, which had significant difference in both univariate (P = 0.002 and multivariate analysis (P = 0.041.Young patients with colon cancer at age 18-40 years are essentially a heterogeneous group. Patients at age 31-35, 36-40 subgroups have more favorable clinicopathologic characteristics and better cancer specific survival than below 30 years.

  10. The effect of neuraxial anesthesia on cancer recurrence and survival after cancer surgery: an updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Meilin; Chen, Wankun; Hou, Wenting; Li, Lihong; Ding, Ming; Miao, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Several animal and observational studies have evaluated the effects of neuraxial anesthesia on the recurrence and survival of cancer surgery; studies reported benefit, whereas others did not. To provide further evidence that neuraxial anesthesia(combined with or without general anesthesia (GA))may be associated with reduced cancer recurrence and long-term survival after cancer surgery, we conducted this meta-analysis. A total of 21 studies were identified and analyzed, based on searches conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. After data abstraction, adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the impact of neuraxial anesthesia (combined with or without GA) and GA on oncological outcomes after cancer surgery. For overall survival (OS), a potential association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved OS (HR 0.853, CI 0.741-0.981, P = 0.026, the random-effects model) was observed compared with GA. Specifically, we found a positive association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved OS in colorectal cancer (HR 0.653, CI 0.430-0.991, P = 0.045, the random-effects model). For recurrence-free survival (RFS), a significant association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved RFS (HR 0.846, CI 0.718-0.998, P = 0.047, the random-effects model) was detected compared with GA. Our meta-analysis suggests that neuraxial anesthesia may be associated with improved OS in patients with cancer surgery, especially for those patients with colorectal cancer. It also supports a potential association between neuraxial anesthesia and a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. More prospective studies are needed to elucidate whether the association between neuraxial use and survival is causative. PMID:26918830

  11. Cancer survival among children and adolescents at a state referral hospital in southeastern Brazil

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    Glaucia Perini Zouain-Figueiredo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to analyze the patient characteristics and evaluate overall survival, survival according to demographic variables, the most common tumor groups and subgroups, the stages of disease, and risk factors after at least 5 years among children and adolescents with cancer who were admitted to a state referral hospital between 2000 and 2005. METHODS: the Kaplan-Meier method was employed to estimate survival. The survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. The Cox regression model was used to estimate the effect of independent variables. RESULTS: a total of 571 new cases were registered. The most frequent cancer groups were leukemia (34%, lymphoma (18%, and central nervous system (CNS tumors (15%.The overall survival rate was 59%. The risk factors associated with lower survival were an age of more than 4 years or less than 1 year, the presence of CNS tumors, and non-localized disease. CONCLUSION: although this was not a populationbased study, it provides important epidemiological information about a state where population data on childhood and adolescent cancer are scarce and where hospital-based data do not exist. The survival rate found here should serve as a framework for future improvements, helping to guide policymakers focused on pediatric oncology in the state.

  12. The ketogenic diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapy prolong survival in mice with systemic metastatic cancer.

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    Angela M Poff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Abnormal cancer metabolism creates a glycolytic-dependency which can be exploited by lowering glucose availability to the tumor. The ketogenic diet (KD is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet which decreases blood glucose and elevates blood ketones and has been shown to slow cancer progression in animals and humans. Abnormal tumor vasculature creates hypoxic pockets which promote cancer progression and further increase the glycolytic-dependency of cancers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO₂T saturates tumors with oxygen, reversing the cancer promoting effects of tumor hypoxia. Since these non-toxic therapies exploit overlapping metabolic deficiencies of cancer, we tested their combined effects on cancer progression in a natural model of metastatic disease. METHODS: We used the firefly luciferase-tagged VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer to compare tumor progression and survival in mice fed standard or KD ad libitum with or without HBO₂T (2.5 ATM absolute, 90 min, 3x/week. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. RESULTS: KD alone significantly decreased blood glucose, slowed tumor growth, and increased mean survival time by 56.7% in mice with systemic metastatic cancer. While HBO₂T alone did not influence cancer progression, combining the KD with HBO₂T elicited a significant decrease in blood glucose, tumor growth rate, and 77.9% increase in mean survival time compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: KD and HBO₂T produce significant anti-cancer effects when combined in a natural model of systemic metastatic cancer. Our evidence suggests that these therapies should be further investigated as potential non-toxic treatments or adjuvant therapies to standard care for patients with systemic metastatic disease.

  13. Aromatase expression increases the survival and malignancy of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells.

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    Keya De Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available In postmenopausal women, local estrogen produced by adipose stromal cells in the breast is believed to support estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positive breast cancer cell survival and growth. This raises the question of how the ERα positive metastatic breast cancer cells survive after they enter blood and lymph circulation, where estrogen level is very low in postmenopausal women. In this study, we show that the aromatase expression increased when ERα positive breast cancer cells were cultured in suspension. Furthermore, treatment with the aromatase substrate, testosterone, inhibited suspension culture-induced apoptosis whereas an aromatase inhibitor attenuated the effect of testosterone suggesting that suspended circulating ERα positive breast cancer cells may up-regulate intracrine estrogen activity for survival. Consistent with this notion, a moderate level of ectopic aromatase expression rendered a non-tumorigenic ERα positive breast cancer cell line not only tumorigenic but also metastatic in female nude mice without exogenous estrogen supplementation. The increased malignant phenotype was confirmed to be due to aromatase expression as the growth of orthotopic tumors regressed with systemic administration of an aromatase inhibitor. Thus, our study provides experimental evidence that aromatase plays an important role in the survival of metastatic ERα breast cancer cells by suppressing anoikis.

  14. Stochastic modeling and experimental analysis of phenotypic switching and survival of cancer cells under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Kumar, Niraj; Sundaram, Bala; Celli, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Rahul

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is critical to their survival under stress. A significant contribution to heterogeneity of cancer calls derives from the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a conserved cellular program that is crucial for embryonic development. Several studies have investigated the role of EMT in growth of early stage tumors into invasive malignancies. Also, EMT has been closely associated with the acquisition of chemoresistance properties in cancer cells. Motivated by these studies, we analyze multi-phenotype stochastic models of the evolution of cancers cell populations under stress. We derive analytical results for time-dependent probability distributions that provide insights into the competing rates underlying phenotypic switching (e.g. during EMT) and the corresponding survival of cancer cells. Experimentally, we evaluate these model-based predictions by imaging human pancreatic cancer cell lines grown with and without cytotoxic agents and measure growth kinetics, survival, morphological changes and (terminal evaluation of) biomarkers with associated epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The results derived suggest approaches for distinguishing between adaptation and selection scenarios for survival in the presence of external stresses.

  15. Interaction between smoking history and gene expression levels impacts survival of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Sarah A; Bickett, Katie E; Alatoum, Mohammad A; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S; Brock, Guy N; Wittliff, James L

    2015-08-01

    In contrast to studies focused on cigarette smoking and risk of breast cancer occurrence, this study explored the influence of smoking on breast cancer recurrence and progression. The goal was to evaluate the interaction between smoking history and gene expression levels on recurrence and overall survival of breast cancer patients. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were fitted for 48 cigarette smokers, 50 non-smokers, and the total population separately to determine which gene expressions and gene expression/cigarette usage interaction terms were significant in predicting overall and disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. Using methods similar to Andres et al. (BMC Cancer 13:326, 2013a; Horm Cancer 4:208-221, 2013b), multivariable analyses revealed CENPN, CETN1, CYP1A1, IRF2, LECT2, and NCOA1 to be important predictors for both breast carcinoma recurrence and mortality among smokers. Additionally, COMT was important for recurrence, and NAT1 and RIPK1 were important for mortality. In contrast, only IRF2, CETN1, and CYP1A1 were significant for disease recurrence and mortality among non-smokers, with NAT2 additionally significant for survival. Analysis of interaction between smoking status and gene expression values using the combined samples revealed significant interactions between smoking status and CYP1A1, LECT2, and CETN1. Signatures consisting of 7-8 genes were highly predictive for breast cancer recurrence and overall survival among smokers, with median C-index values of 0.8 and 0.73 for overall survival and recurrence, respectively. In contrast, median C-index values for non-smokers was only 0.59. Hence, significant interactions between gene expression and smoking status can play a key role in predicting breast cancer patient outcomes.

  16. Analysis on Lung Cancer Survival from 2001 to 2007 in Qidong, China

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    Jian ZHU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is one of the most important malignancies in China. Survival rates of lung cancer on the population-based cancer registry for the years 2001-2007 in Qidong were analysed in order to provide the basis for the prognosis assessment and the control of this cancer. Methods Total 4,451 registered lung cancer cases was followed up to December 31st, 2009. Death certificates only (DCO cases were excluded, leaving 4,382 cases for survival analysis. Cumulative observed survival rate (OS and relative survival rate (RS were calculated using Hakulinen’s method performed by the SURV 3.01 software developed at the Finnish Cancer Registry. Results The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates were 23.73%, 11.89%, 10.01%, and the RS rates were 24.86%, 13.69%, 12.73%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year RS of males vs females were 23.70% vs 27.89%, 12.58% vs 16.53%, and 11.73% vs 15.21%, respectively, with statisitically significant differences (χ2=13.77, P=0.032. RS of age groups of 15-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74 and 75+ were 35.46%, 17.66%, 11.97%, 13.49%, 10.61%, 15.14%, respectively. Remarkable improvement could be seen for the 5-year RS in this setting if compared with that for the years 1972-2000. Conclusion The lung cancer survival outcomes in Qidong have been improved gradually for the past decades. Further measures on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer should be taken.

  17. Odds and Probabilities Estimation for the Survival of Breast Cancer Patients with Cancer Stages 2 & 3

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    Urrutia Jackie D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the Philippines. One out of four who are diagnosed with breast cancer die within the first five years, and no less than 40 percent die within 10 years and it has continous rise as time passes by. Therefore, it is very important to know the factors that can help for the survival rate of the patients. The purpose of this study is to identify the best possible treatment or combination of treatments. The researchers considered four independent variables namely: Completed Surgery, Completed Chemotherapy, Completed Hormonotherapy and Completed Radiotherapy. The researchers limit this study for only 160 patients with stage 2 and 135 with stage 3 for a total of 295 patients considering the data gathered from three hospitals from Metro Manila. The names of the hospitals were not declared due to confidentiality of data. In identifying the best treatment or combination of treatments, odds, probabilities and odds ratios of patients, Logistic Regression Analysis was used.

  18. Personality and cancer survival: the Miyagi cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that personality plays a role in cancer outcome in a population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. In July 1990, 41 442 residents of Japan completed a short form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised and a questionnaire on various health habits, and between January 1993 and December 1997, 890 incident cases of cancer were identified among them. These 890 cases were followed up until March 2001, and a total of 356 deaths from all causes was identified ...

  19. Metformin Increases Overall Survival in Patients with Diabetes Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransgaard, Tina; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    between diabetes and overall survival after resection for CRC. Furthermore, the association between antidiabetic medication and overall survival was examined. METHODS: Patients diagnosed with CRC between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 were identified through the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group......BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that metformin decreases the risk of developing colorectal cancer in patients with diabetes, but only few studies have examined potential survival benefits after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of the study was to examine the association......'s National Clinical Database (DCCG). The Danish National Patient Register (NPR) records all hospital contacts in Denmark, and the diagnosis of diabetes was identified by combining NPR data with use of antidiabetic drugs identified through the Danish National Prescription Registry and DCCG. The Kaplan...

  20. Multi-state relative survival modelling of colorectal cancer progression and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilard-Pioc, Séverine; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Mahboubi, Amel; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Dejardin, Olivier; Huszti, Ella; Binquet, Christine; Quantin, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Accurate identification of factors associated with progression of colorectal cancer remains a challenge. In particular, it is unclear which statistical methods are most suitable to separate the effects of putative prognostic factors on cancer progression vs cancer-specific and other cause mortality. To address these challenges, we analyzed 10 year follow-up data for patients who underwent curative surgery for colorectal cancer in 1985-2000. Separate analyses were performed in two French cancer registries. Results of three multivariable models were compared: Cox model with recurrence as a time-dependent variable, and two multi-state models, which separated prognostic factor effects on recurrence vs death, with or without recurrence. Conventional multi-state model analyzed all-cause mortality while new relative survival multi-state model focused on cancer-specific mortality. Among the 2517 and 2677 patients in the two registries, about 50% died without a recurrence, and 28% had a recurrence, of whom almost 90% died. In both multi-state models men had significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence in both registries (HR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.68-0.92 and HR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.71-0.96). However, the two multi-state models identified different prognostic factors for mortality without recurrence. In contrast to the conventional model, in the relative survival analyses gender had no independent association with cancer-specific mortality whereas patients diagnosed with stage III cancer had significantly higher risks in both registries (HR=1.67; 95% CI: 1.27-2.22 and HR=2.38; 95% CI: 1.29-3.27). In conclusion, relative survival multi-state model revealed that different factors may be associated with cancer recurrence vs cancer-specific mortality either after or without a recurrence.

  1. Coactivator SRC-2-dependent metabolic reprogramming mediates prostate cancer survival and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Putluri, Nagireddy; Long, Weiwen; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Jianghua; Kaushik, Akash K; Arnold, James M; Bhowmik, Salil K; Stashi, Erin; Brennan, Christine A; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Coarfa, Cristian; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Ittmann, Michael M; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Sreekumar, Arun; O'Malley, Bert W

    2015-03-02

    Metabolic pathway reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cell growth and survival and supports the anabolic and energetic demands of these rapidly dividing cells. The underlying regulators of the tumor metabolic program are not completely understood; however, these factors have potential as cancer therapy targets. Here, we determined that upregulation of the oncogenic transcriptional coregulator steroid receptor coactivator 2 (SRC-2), also known as NCOA2, drives glutamine-dependent de novo lipogenesis, which supports tumor cell survival and eventual metastasis. SRC-2 was highly elevated in a variety of tumors, especially in prostate cancer, in which SRC-2 was amplified and overexpressed in 37% of the metastatic tumors evaluated. In prostate cancer cells, SRC-2 stimulated reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate to generate citrate via retrograde TCA cycling, promoting lipogenesis and reprogramming of glutamine metabolism. Glutamine-mediated nutrient signaling activated SRC-2 via mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation, which then triggered downstream transcriptional responses by coactivating SREBP-1, which subsequently enhanced lipogenic enzyme expression. Metabolic profiling of human prostate tumors identified a massive increase in the SRC-2-driven metabolic signature in metastatic tumors compared with that seen in localized tumors, further implicating SRC-2 as a prominent metabolic coordinator of cancer metastasis. Moreover, SRC-2 inhibition in murine models severely attenuated the survival, growth, and metastasis of prostate cancer. Together, these results suggest that the SRC-2 pathway has potential as a therapeutic target for prostate cancer.

  2. Overexpression of centromere protein H is significantly associated with breast cancer progression and overall patient survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ting Liao; Yan Feng; Men-Lin Li; Guang-Lin Liu; Man-Zhi Li; Mu-Sheng Zeng; Li-Bing Song

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide.This study aimed to analyze the expression of centromere protein H (CENP-H) in breast cancer and to correlate it with clinicopathologic data,including patient survival.Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Westem blotting to detect the expression of CENP-H in normal mammary epithelial cells,immortalized mammary epithelial cell lines,and breast cancer cell lines,we observed that the mRNA and protein levels of CENP-H were higher in breast cancer cell lines and in immortalized mammary epithelial cells than in normal mammary epithelial cells.We next examined CENP-H expression in 307 paraffin-embedded archived samples of clinicopathologically characterized breast cancer using immunohistochemistry,and detected high CENP-H expression in 134 (43.6%) samples.Statistical analysis showed that CENP-H expression was related with clinical stage (P = 0.001),T classification (P = 0.032),N classification (P =0.018),and Ki-67 (P<0.001).Patients with high CENP-H expression had short overall survival.Multivariate analysis showed that CENP-H expression was an independent prognostic indicator for patient survival.Our results suggest that CENP-H protein is a valuable marker of breast cancer progression and prognosis.

  3. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Relation to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival

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    Yuliang Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the DNA repair genes are suspected to be related to the survival of lung cancer patients due to their possible influence on DNA repair capacity (DRC. However, the study results are inconsistent. Methods: A follow-up study of 610 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients was conducted to investigate genetic polymorphisms associated with the DNA repair genes in relation to NSCLC survival; 6 SNPs were genotyped, including XRCC1 (rs25487 G>A, hOGG1 (rs1052133 C>G, MUTYH (rs3219489 G>C, XPA (rs1800975 G>A, ERCC2 (rs1799793 G>A and XRCC3 (rs861539 C>T. Kaplan-Meier survival curve and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed. SNP-SNP interaction was also examined using the survival tree analysis. Results: Advanced disease stage and older age at diagnosis were associated with poor prognosis of NSCLC. Patients with the variant ‘G' allele of hOGG1 rs1052133 had poor overall survival compared with those with the homozygous wild ‘CC' genotype, especially in female patients, adenocarcinoma histology, early stage, light smokers and without family history of cancer. For never smoking female lung cancer patients, individuals carrying homozygous variant ‘AA' genotype of XPA had shorter survival time compared to those with wild ‘G' alleles. Furthermore, females carrying homozygous variant XPA and hOGG1 genotypes simultaneously had 2.78-fold increased risk for death. Among all 6 polymorphisms, the homozygous variant ‘AA' of XPA carriers had poor prognosis compared to the carriers of wild ‘G' alleles of XPA together with other base excision repair (BER polymorphisms. Conclusions: Besides disease stage and age, the study found DNA repair gene polymorphisms were associated with lung cancer survival.

  4. Elevated nuclear S100P expression is associated with poor survival in early breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejczyk, Adam; Łacko, Aleksandra; Ekiert, Marcin; Jagoda, Ewa; Wysocka, Teresa; Matkowski, Rafał; Hałoń, Agnieszka; Györffy, Balázs; Lage, Hermann; Surowiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    S100P - low molecular weight acidic protein has been shown to be involved in processes of proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, multidrug resistance and metastasis in various human malignancies. In breast cancer, S100P expression is associated with immortalization of neoplastic cells and aggressive tumour behaviour, indicating that this protein may have adverse prognostic value. We analyzed nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of S100P in 85 stage II breast cancer patients with a median follow up of 17 years. Immunohistochemical reactions were performed on paraffin sections of primary tumours, using monoclonal antibodies against S100P. We also studied prognostic value of S100P mRNA expression using the KM plotter which assessed the effect of 22,277 genes on survival in 2422 breast cancer patients. Moreover, the relationship was examined between expression of S100P in cells of four breast cancer cell lines and their sensitivity to the 11 most frequently applied cytotoxic drugs. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that higher expression of nuclear S100P (S100Pn) was typical for cases of a shorter overall survival and disease-free time. KM plotter analysis showed that elevated S100P expression was specific for cases of a relapse-free survival and distant metastases-free survival. No relationship could be documented between expression of S100P and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to cytostatic drugs. We demonstrated that a high S100Pn expression level was associated with poor survival in early stage breast cancer patients. Since preliminary data indicated that expression of S100P was up-regulated by activation of glucocorticoid receptor and several agents manifested potential to activate or inhibit S100P promoter activity, this protein might become a therapy target and warrants further studies with respect to its prognostic, predictive and potentially therapeutic value.

  5. Pancreatic cancer patient survival correlates with DNA methylation of pancreas development genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael J; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Dawson, David W; Donahue, Timothy R; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark associated with regulation of transcription and genome structure. These markers have been investigated in a variety of cancer settings for their utility in differentiating normal tissue from tumor tissue. Here, we examine the direct correlation between DNA methylation and patient survival. We find that changes in the DNA methylation of key pancreatic developmental genes are strongly associated with patient survival.

  6. Incidence and survival of prostate cancer since 1970

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.N. Post (Piet)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn NOlih America and many European countries, prostate cancer has become the second most common and in some countries even the most common cancel' among men during the past two decades. I Since the age-specific incidence increases steeply after the age of 50 years, a considerable proport

  7. Use of Aspirin postdiagnosis improves survival for colon cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Bastiaannet (Esther); K. Sampieri (K.); O.M. Dekkers (Olaf); A.J. de Craen (Anton); M.P.P. van Herk-Sukel (Myrthe); V.E.P.P. Lemmens (Valery); C.B.M. van den Broek (Colette); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); R.M.C. Herings (Ron); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); R. Fodde (Riccardo); G.-J. Liefers (Gerrit-Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The preventive role of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, in particular, on colorectal cancer is well established. More recently, it has been suggested that aspirin may also have a therapeutic role. Aim of the present observational population-based stud

  8. Cancer incidence and survival among adolescents and young adults in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Kyeong Moon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Korea, cancer is the third leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs. However, cancer incidence and survival trends among AYAs (15-29 years have never been studied in Korea. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the incidence and relative survival rates and their trends among AYAs in Korea. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cancer incidence data from 1999-2010 were obtained from the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR. Each cancer was classified into subgroups according to the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER AYA site recode. Percent distributions, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates per million, and annual percent changes (APCs were calculated for AYAs according to sex. Five-year relative survival rates were estimated for cases diagnosed between 1993 and 2010 and followed up to 2011. RESULTS: The age-standardized incidence rates of all cancers combined were 196.4 and 367.8 per million for males and females, respectively (male-to-female (M/F ratio: 0.5. The age-standardized incidence rates increased from 208.7 per million in 1999 to 396.4 per million in 2010, and the APC was 6.3% (P<0.001. The five most common cancers among AYAs were thyroid carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, stomach carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and acute myeloid leukemia. In males, the 5-year relative survival rate improved, from 46.5% in 1993-1995 to 75.9% in 2006-2010. In females, the 5-year relative survival rate also improved, from 66.7% in 1993-1995 to 89.1% in 2006-2010. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed increases in cancer incidence and improvements in the 5-year relative survival rate among Korean AYAs. This study also provides additional data regarding temporal and geographic trends in cancer that may enhance future efforts to identify factors affecting cancer incidence and responses to treatment among AYAs.

  9. Relationship of prediagnostic body mass index with survival after colorectal cancer: Stage-specific associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Chan, Andrew T; Slattery, Martha L; Potter, John D; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey; Phipps, Amanda; Nan, Hongmei; Harrison, Tabitha; Rohan, Thomas E; Qi, Lihong; Hou, Lifang; Caan, Bette; Kroenke, Candyce H; Strickler, Howard; Hayes, Richard B; Schoen, Robert E; Chong, Dawn Q; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike; Newcomb, Polly A

    2016-09-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), but is inconsistently associated with CRC survival. In 6 prospective studies participating in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), 2,249 non-Hispanic white CRC cases were followed for a median 4.5 years after diagnosis, during which 777 died, 554 from CRC-related causes. Associations between prediagnosis BMI and survival (overall and CRC-specific) were evaluated using Cox regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, study and smoking status (current/former/never). The association between BMI category and CRC survival varied by cancer stage at diagnosis (I-IV) for both all-cause (p-interaction = 0.03) and CRC-specific mortality (p-interaction = 0.04). Compared to normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) ), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stage I disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages II-IV disease. Similarly, obesity (BMI ≥30) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stages I-II disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages III-IV disease. These results suggest the relationship between BMI and survival after CRC diagnosis differs by stage at diagnosis, and may emphasize the importance of adequate metabolic reserves for colorectal cancer survival in patients with late-stage disease.

  10. Survival after stage IA endometrial cancer; can follow-up be altered?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Elnegaard, Sandra; Christensen, René D;

    2012-01-01

    IA (1988 classification) endometrial cancer patients prospectively included between 1986 and 1999. All patients had total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy without adjuvant therapy. Methods. The patient and the disease characteristics were drawn from the DEMCA database....... Of these recurrences, 15 of 23 (65%) were vaginal. Death from recurrence was observed in nine of 23 (39%) patients, and five of these nine had vaginal recurrences. Conclusions. Women with FIGO stage IA endometrial cancer have a very high disease-specific five year survival. Survival was related to histopathology...

  11. Factors influencing the survival of patients with cancer of the prostate.

    OpenAIRE

    Bako, G.; Dewar, R.; Hanson, J.; Hill, G.

    1982-01-01

    During the period 1969 through 1973, 777 new cases of cancer of the prostate in northern Alberta men were registered with the Alberta Cancer Registry. The overall survival rate after 5 years was 41.2%. As expected, the rates were higher for those aged less than 65 years than for those who were older at the time of diagnosis and higher for those without metastases than for those with metastases at that time. Urban residents had a higher survival rate than rural residents (45.3% v. 38.0%), and ...

  12. Cardiac Recurrence in a Patient with Long-Term Survival from Metastatic Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Butler

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic colorectal cancer represents a major health problem in the US and worldwide. Forty percent of patients undergoing resection of the primary tumor will experience relapse. In this brief review, we describe a case of a woman with metastatic disease and long-term survival culminating with an unusual myocardial recurrence. Over three decades, a multimodality approach has evolved to allow for long-term survival in selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. In this case report, the role of multiple aggressive surgical resections is emphasized.

  13. Pre-diagnostic cruciferous vegetables intake and lung cancer survival among Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi-Jun; Yang, Gong; Zheng, Wei; Li, Hong-Lan; Gao, Jing; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2015-05-19

    No study to date has prospectively evaluated the association between pre-diagnostic cruciferous vegetables intake and lung cancer survival among women. This analysis included 547 incident lung cancer cases identified from the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS) during the follow-up period of 1997-2011. Dietary intake was assessed for all SWHS participants at enrollment and reassessed 2-3 years later. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with adjustment for potential confounders. Of the 547 lung cancer patients, 412 patients died during the follow-up. A total of 393 (95.4%) deaths from lung cancer were documented with median survival time of 10.3 months (interquartile range, 3.6-21.1 months). High cruciferous vegetables intake was significantly associated with improved lung cancer-specific survival after adjusting for all nonclinical prognostic factors (n = 547, HR = 0.69; 95%CI = 0.49-0.95; P trend = 0.02) for the highest versus lowest quartile. A slightly stronger association of cruciferous vegetables intake with lung cancer-specific survival was observed in analyses restricted to patients with known clinical prognostic factors (n = 331, HR = 0.63; 95%CI = 0.41-0.97; P trend = 0.03) or never smokers (n = 308, HR = 0.58; 95%CI = 0.37-0.91; P trend = 0.02). In conclusion, pre-diagnostic cruciferous vegetables intake is associated with better survival of lung cancer in Chinese women.

  14. Impact of modern chemotherapy on the survival of women presenting with de novo metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Sumanta K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data that directly associate utilization of novel systemic therapies with survival trends in metastatic breast cancer (MBC are limited. In the setting of de novo MBC, large registry analyses cite positive temporal trends in survival, but the extent to which advances in systemic therapy have contributed to these gains is not clear. Methods The City of Hope Cancer Registry was used to identify a consecutive series of patients with de novo MBC who received their first line of therapy between 1985 and 2004. Comprehensive clinicopathologic and treatment-related data were collected for each patient. Univariate analyses were conducted via Cox regression to identify factors associated with improved survival. Multivariate analysis was also conducted via Cox regression and the stepwise procedure was used to identify independent predictors of survival. Results A total of 324 patients with de novo MBC were identified. After application of exclusion criteria, including the sole presence of supraclavicular node metastasis, 274 patients were retained in the analysis. The treatment-related characteristics associated with improved survival included: use of endocrine therapy (hazard ratio [HR] 0.60, 95%CI 0.47-0.77; P Conclusions The overall survival of women with de novo metastatic breast cancer has improved over the past 20 years. However, the contribution of conventional cytotoxic agents to this improvement is minimal.

  15. Does Metastatic Lymph Node SUVmax Predict Survival in Patients with Esophageal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Vatankulu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node in predicting survival in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with esophageal cancer between 2009 and 2011 who had FDG positronemission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT. All patients were followed-up to 2013. Clinical staging, SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node were evaluated. Results: One hundred seven patients were included in the study. All patients were followed-up between 2 and 49 months. The mean SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node were 19.3±8.8 and 10.4±9.1, respectively. Metastatic lymph node SUVmax had an effect in predicting survival whereas primary tumor SUVmax did not have an effect (p=0.014 and p=0.262, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that clinical stage of the disease was the only independent factor predicting survival (p=0.001. Conclusion: Among patients with esophageal cancer, the value of primary tumor SUVmax did not have an effect on survival. Clinical stage assessed with FDG PET/CT imaging was found to predict survival in esophageal carcinoma. Additionally, lymph node SUVmax was identified as a new parameter in predicting survival in the present study

  16. Mortality and survival of lung cancer in Denmark: Results from the Danish Lung Cancer Group 2000-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Green, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background In the 1990s outcomes in Danish lung cancer patients were poor compared with the other Nordic countries. The five-year survival was only about 5%, only 10% of patients were operated on and less than 60% received active surgical or oncologic treatment. This paper describes trends in mor...... on cancer-specific mortality relative to the total general population may be misleading when interpreted in the context of outcomes and quality of care....

  17. Pre-diagnostic polyphenol intake and breast cancer survival: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Scalbert, Augustin; Tjønneland, Anne; Dossus, Laure; Johansen, Christoffer; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Christensen, Jane; Ward, Heather; Aune, Dagfinn; Riboli, Elio; His, Mathilde; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Baglietto, Laura; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Floegel, Anna; Overvad, Kim; Lasheras, Cristina; Travier, Noémie; Sánchez, Maria-José; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Masala, Giovanna; Grioni, Sara; Berrino, Franco; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H; van Gils, Carla; Borgquist, Signe; Butt, Salma; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Sund, Malin; Hjartåker, Anette; Skeie, Guri; Olsen, Anja; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the association between pre-diagnostic intakes of polyphenol classes (flavonoids, lignans, phenolic acids, stilbenes, and other polyphenols) in relation to breast cancer survival (all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality). We used data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Pre-diagnostic usual diet was assessed using dietary questionnaires, and polyphenol intakes were estimated using the Phenol-Explorer database. We followed 11,782 breast cancer cases from time of diagnosis until death, end of follow-up or last day of contact. During a median of 6 years, 1482 women died (753 of breast cancer). We related polyphenol intake to all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality using Cox proportional hazard models with time since diagnosis as underlying time and strata for age and country. Among postmenopausal women, an intake of lignans in the highest versus lowest quartile was related to a 28 % lower risk of dying from breast (adjusted model: HR, quartile 4 vs. quartile 1, 0.72, 95 % CI 0.53; 0.98). In contrast, in premenopausal women, a positive association between lignan intake and all-cause mortality was found (adjusted model: HR, quartile 4 vs. quartile 1, 1.63, 95 % CI 1.03; 2.57). We found no association for other polyphenol classes. Intake of lignans before breast cancer diagnosis may be related to improved survival among postmenopausal women, but may on the contrary worsen the survival for premenopausal women. This suggests that the role of phytoestrogens in breast cancer survival is complex and may be dependent of menopausal status.

  18. Incidence and survival trends for childhood cancer in Osaka, Japan, 1973-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Sachiko; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Noda, Hiroyuki; Ajiki, Wakiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2010-03-01

    Mortality for childhood cancer has declined in Osaka, as well as all over Japan, since the 1970s, but whether this decline can be explained by trends of incidence or survival of childhood cancer has not been examined. A total of 5960 malignant tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2001 in children Japan. The time trends for childhood cancer were analyzed over 29 years for incidence and 20 years for survival. Leukemia was the most common among childhood cancer for both sexes and accounted for one-third of all cases. The age-standardized annual incidence rate of all tumors was highest in 1988-1992: 155.1 per million for males and 135.9 for females. Five-year survival for all tumors improved from 50.1% in 1978-1982 to 73.0% in 1993-1997 for males and from 52.3% to 76.3% for females. Thus, the constant decline in mortality in childhood cancer was primarily due to improved survival between the 1970s and 1980s and reduced incidence after the 1990s.

  19. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy improves survival outcome in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Sang Jun; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Byung Hoon [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate survival rates and prognostic factors related to treatment outcomes after bladder preserving therapy including transurethral resection of bladder tumor, radiotherapy (RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy in bladder cancer with a curative intent. We retrospectively studied 50 bladder cancer patients treated with bladder-preserving therapy at Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center from January 1999 to December 2010. Age ranged from 46 to 89 years (median, 71.5 years). Bladder cancer was the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage II, III, and IV in 9, 27, and 14 patients, respectively. Thirty patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and 20 patients with RT alone. Nine patients received chemotherapy prior to CCRT or RT alone. Radiation was delivered with a four-field box technique (median, 63 Gy; range, 48.6 to 70.2 Gy). The follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 169 months (median, 34 months). Thirty patients (60%) showed complete response and 13 (26%) a partial response. All patients could have their own bladder preserved. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate was 37.2%, and the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 30.2%. In multivariate analysis, tumor grade and CCRT were statistically significant in OS. Tumor grade was a significant prognostic factor related to OS. CCRT is also considered to improve survival outcomes. Further multi-institutional studies are needed to elucidate the impact of RT in bladder cancer.

  20. Cervical cancer survival prediction using hybrid of SMOTE, CART and smooth support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnami, S. W.; Khasanah, P. M.; Sumartini, S. H.; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    According to the WHO, every two minutes there is one patient who died from cervical cancer. The high mortality rate is due to the lack of awareness of women for early detection. There are several factors that supposedly influence the survival of cervical cancer patients, including age, anemia status, stage, type of treatment, complications and secondary disease. This study wants to classify/predict cervical cancer survival based on those factors. Various classifications methods: classification and regression tree (CART), smooth support vector machine (SSVM), three order spline SSVM (TSSVM) were used. Since the data of cervical cancer are imbalanced, synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) is used for handling imbalanced dataset. Performances of these methods are evaluated using accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Results of this study show that balancing data using SMOTE as preprocessing can improve performance of classification. The SMOTE-SSVM method provided better result than SMOTE-TSSVM and SMOTE-CART.

  1. Modular degradable dendrimers enable small RNAs to extend survival in an aggressive liver cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kejin; Nguyen, Liem H.; Miller, Jason B.; Yan, Yunfeng; Kos, Petra; Xiong, Hu; Li, Lin; Hao, Jing; Minnig, Jonathan T.; Siegwart, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-based cancer therapies are hindered by the lack of delivery vehicles that avoid cancer-induced organ dysfunction, which exacerbates carrier toxicity. We address this issue by reporting modular degradable dendrimers that achieve the required combination of high potency to tumors and low hepatotoxicity to provide a pronounced survival benefit in an aggressive genetic cancer model. More than 1,500 dendrimers were synthesized using sequential, orthogonal reactions where ester degradability was systematically integrated with chemically diversified cores, peripheries, and generations. A lead dendrimer, 5A2-SC8, provided a broad therapeutic window: identified as potent [EC50 75 mg/kg dendrimer repeated dosing). Delivery of let-7g microRNA (miRNA) mimic inhibited tumor growth and dramatically extended survival. Efficacy stemmed from a combination of a small RNA with the dendrimer’s own negligible toxicity, therefore illuminating an underappreciated complication in treating cancer with RNA-based drugs. PMID:26729861

  2. Statin use and breast cancer survival and risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi-Jun; Tu, Chao; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Jingjing; Qian, Ke-Qing; Li, Wen-Jing; Wu, Lang

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the associations between statin use and breast cancer survival and risk by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science up to August 2015 for identifying relevant prospective or case-control studies, or randomized clinical trials. Five prospective studies involving 60,911 patients reported the association between statin use and breast cancer mortality. Eleven prospective studies, 12 case-control studies and 9 randomized clinical trials involving 83,919 patients reported the association between statin use and breast cancer risk. After pooling estimates from all available studies, there was a significantly negative association between pre-diagnosis statin use and breast cancer mortality (for overall survival (OS): hazard ratio (HR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.84; for disease specific survival (DSS): HR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.53-0.99). There was also a significant inverse association between post-diagnosis statin use and breast cancer DSS (HR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.43-0.98), although the association with breast cancer OS did not reach statistical significance (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.48-1.07). Additionally, there was a non-linear relationship for the duration of post-diagnosis statin use with breast cancer specific mortality. On the other hand, with regards to the relationship between statin use and breast cancer risk, no significant association was detected. Our analyses suggest that although statin use may not influence breast cancer risk, the use of statin may be associated with decrease mortality of breast cancer patients. Further large-scale studies are warranted to validate our findings.

  3. Progression-free survival, post-progression survival, and tumor response as surrogate markers for overall survival in patients with extensive small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Imai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The effects of first-line chemotherapy on overall survival (OS might be confounded by subsequent therapies in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC. We examined whether progression-free survival (PFS, post-progression survival (PPS, and tumor response could be valid surrogate endpoints for OS after first-line chemotherapies for patients with extensive SCLC using individual-level data. Methods: Between September 2002 and November 2012, we analyzed 49 cases of patients with extensive SCLC who were treated with cisplatin and irinotecan as first-line chemotherapy. The relationships of PFS, PPS, and tumor response with OS were analyzed at the individual level. Results: Spearman rank correlation analysis and linear regression analysis showed that PPS was strongly correlated with OS (r = 0.97, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.94, PFS was moderately correlated with OS (r = 0.58, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.24, and tumor shrinkage was weakly correlated with OS (r = 0.37, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.13. The best response to second-line treatment, and the number of regimens employed after progression beyond first-line chemotherapy were both significantly associated with PPS ( p ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: PPS is a potential surrogate for OS in patients with extensive SCLC. Our findings also suggest that subsequent treatment after disease progression following first-line chemotherapy may greatly influence OS.

  4. Coactivator SRC-2–dependent metabolic reprogramming mediates prostate cancer survival and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Putluri, Nagireddy; Long, Weiwen; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Jianghua; Kaushik, Akash K.; Arnold, James M.; Bhowmik, Salil K.; Stashi, Erin; Brennan, Christine A; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Coarfa, Cristian; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Ittmann, Michael M.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic pathway reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cell growth and survival and supports the anabolic and energetic demands of these rapidly dividing cells. The underlying regulators of the tumor metabolic program are not completely understood; however, these factors have potential as cancer therapy targets. Here, we determined that upregulation of the oncogenic transcriptional coregulator steroid receptor coactivator 2 (SRC-2), also known as NCOA2, drives glutamine-dependent de novo lip...

  5. Pre-diagnostic cruciferous vegetables intake and lung cancer survival among Chinese women

    OpenAIRE

    Qi-Jun Wu; Gong Yang; Wei Zheng; Hong-Lan Li; Jing Gao; Jing Wang; Yu-Tang Gao; Xiao-Ou Shu; Yong-Bing Xiang

    2015-01-01

    No study to date has prospectively evaluated the association between pre-diagnostic cruciferous vegetables intake and lung cancer survival among women. This analysis included 547 incident lung cancer cases identified from the Shanghai Women’s Health Study (SWHS) during the follow-up period of 1997-2011. Dietary intake was assessed for all SWHS participants at enrollment and reassessed 2-3 years later. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence...

  6. Descriptive epidemiology of breast cancer in China: incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Brennan, Patrick C

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm diagnosed amongst women worldwide and is the leading cause of female cancer death. However, breast cancer in China is not comprehensively understood compared with Westernised countries, although the 5-year prevalence statistics indicate that approximately 11 % of worldwide breast cancer occurs in China and that the incidence has increased rapidly in recent decades. This paper reviews the descriptive epidemiology of Chinese breast cancer in terms of incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence, and explores relevant factors such as age of manifestation and geographic locations. The statistics are compared with data from the Westernised world with particular emphasis on the United States and Australia. Potential causal agents responsible for differences in breast cancer epidemiology between Chinese and other populations are also explored. The need to minimise variability and discrepancies in methods of data acquisition, analysis and presentation is highlighted.

  7. YAP enhances autophagic flux to promote breast cancer cell survival in response to nutrient deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Song

    Full Text Available The Yes-associated protein (YAP, a transcriptional coactivator inactivated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, functions as an oncoprotein in a variety of cancers. However, its contribution to breast cancer remains controversial. This study investigated the role of YAP in breast cancer cells under nutrient deprivation (ND. Here, we show that YAP knockdown sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to nutrient deprivation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, in response to ND, YAP increased the autolysosome degradation, thereby enhancing the cellular autophagic flux in breast cancer cells. Of note, autophagy is crucial for YAP to protect MCF7 cells from apoptosis under ND conditions. In addition, the TEA domain (TEAD family of growth-promoting transcription factors was indispensable for YAP-mediated regulation of autophagy. Collectively, our data reveal a role for YAP in promoting breast cancer cell survival upon ND stress and uncover an unappreciated function of YAP/TEAD in the regulation of autophagy.

  8. Targeting Metabolic Survival Pathways in Lung Cancer via Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis studies in LKB1 proficient or deficient NSCLC cells under nutrient complete or metabolic stress conditions (e.g. hypoxia... metabolic flux analysis . Subsequent studies in Year 2 of this grant will aim to design combinatorial treatments that simultaneously induce these...growth control in tumour suppression. Nat Rev Cancer, 2009. 9(8): p. 563-75. 4. Zamboni, N., (13)C metabolic flux analysis in complex systems. Curr

  9. Survival of patients with kidney cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelant T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Tau Pelant1,2, Erik Højkjær Larsen1,2, Lars Lund3, Michael Borre4, Rune Erichsen1, Mette Nørgaard1, Jacob Bonde Jacobsen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; 2Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 3Department of Urology, Viborg Hospital, Denmark; 4Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, DenmarkObjective: For decades, kidney cancer patients in Denmark have had lower survival than patients in the other Scandinavian countries. Our aim was to study possible changes in survival of patients with kidney cancer after implementation of two national Danish cancer plans.Study design and setting: From 1998 through 2009 we included all patients (N = 2659 with an incident diagnosis of kidney cancer in two Danish regions (population 1.8 million. Data were retrieved from the Danish National Registry of Patients. We computed survival after 1, 3, and 5 years, stratified by age, and estimated mortality rate ratios (MRRs using Cox regression to assess changes over time, controlling for age and gender. We lacked data on stage distribution. Among patients who had a nephrectomy we also computed 30-day mortality and 30-day MRRs.Results: During the study period, we identified 2659 patients with kidney cancer. The annual number of patients increased from 583 in the period 1998–2000 to 853 in the period 2007–2009. The median age at diagnosis was 69 years throughout the study period. The overall 1-year survival improved from 56% (1998–2000 to 63% (2007–2009, corresponding to an adjusted MRR of 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66–0.93. We predicted the 3-year survival to increase from 40% to 51% and the 5-year survival to increase from 33% to 42%, corresponding to predicted MRRs of 0.76 (95% CI 0.66–0.87 and 0.77 (95% CI 0.68–0.89, respectively. Survival increased in all age groups (15–59 years, 60–74 years, 75+ years and in both genders, except for men below 60

  10. Five-Year Survival Among Stage IIIA Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Two Different Treatment Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilfinger, Thomas; Keresztes, Roger; Albano, Denise; Nemesure, Barbara

    2016-07-21

    BACKGROUND Five-year survival rates among stage IIIA lung cancer patients range between 2% and 15%, and there is currently no consensus regarding optimal treatment approaches for these patients. The current investigation evaluated survival outcomes among stage IIIA lung cancer patients receiving 2 different treatment modalities, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection versus chemoradiation alone. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study is based on 127 patients attending the Lung Cancer Evaluation Center at Stony Brook Cancer Center between 2002 and 2014. Patients were treated either with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection or a regimen of chemoradiation alone. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare survival outcomes between groups and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate treatment effects on survival, while adjusting for possible confounders. RESULTS Approximately one-fourth (n=33) of patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery, whereas 94 patients received definitive chemoradiation. Patients in the surgical group were found to be significantly younger than those receiving chemoradiation alone (60.1 vs. 67.9 years, respectively; p=0.001). Five-year survival among patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy followed by resection was significantly higher than that among patients receiving chemoradiation alone (63% vs. 19%, respectively; p<0.001), whereas the hazard ratio (HR) was 3-4 times greater in the latter group (HR=3.77, 95% confidence interval=1.87, 7.61). CONCLUSIONS Findings from this study indicate that preoperative chemotherapy followed by resection can improve survival outcomes for stage IIIA lung cancer patients compared with chemoradiation alone. The results reflect a select surgical group of patients; thus, the data highlight the need to develop new therapies that may result in more patients being viable surgical candidates.

  11. Correlating transcriptional networks to breast cancer survival: a large-scale coexpression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Colin; Madden, Stephen F; Doolan, Padraig; Aherne, Sinead T; Joyce, Helena; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Gallagher, William M; Hennessy, Bryan T; Moriarty, Michael; Crown, John; Kennedy, Susan; Clynes, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) is a powerful 'guilt-by-association'-based method to extract coexpressed groups of genes from large heterogeneous messenger RNA expression data sets. We have utilized WGCNA to identify 11 coregulated gene clusters across 2342 breast cancer samples from 13 microarray-based gene expression studies. A number of these transcriptional modules were found to be correlated to clinicopathological variables (e.g. tumor grade), survival endpoints for breast cancer as a whole (disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival and overall survival) and also its molecular subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2+ and basal-like). Examples of findings arising from this work include the identification of a cluster of proliferation-related genes that when upregulated correlated to increased tumor grade and were associated with poor survival in general. The prognostic potential of novel genes, for example, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2S (UBE2S) within this group was confirmed in an independent data set. In addition, gene clusters were also associated with survival for breast cancer molecular subtypes including a cluster of genes that was found to correlate with prognosis exclusively for basal-like breast cancer. The upregulation of several single genes within this coexpression cluster, for example, the potassium channel, subfamily K, member 5 (KCNK5) was associated with poor outcome for the basal-like molecular subtype. We have developed an online database to allow user-friendly access to the coexpression patterns and the survival analysis outputs uncovered in this study (available at http://glados.ucd.ie/Coexpression/).

  12. Low socioeconomic status is associated with worse survival in children with cancer: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While low socioeconomic status (SES has been associated with inferior cancer outcome among adults, its impact in pediatric oncology is unclear. Our objective was therefore to conduct a systematic review to determine the impact of SES upon outcome in children with cancer. METHODS: We searched Ovid Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL from inception to December 2012. Studies for which survival-related outcomes were reported by socioeconomic subgroups were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed articles and extracted data. Given anticipated heterogeneity, no quantitative meta-analyses were planned a priori. RESULTS: Of 7,737 publications, 527 in ten languages met criteria for full review; 36 studies met final inclusion criteria. In low- and middle-income countries (LMIC, lower SES was uniformly associated with inferior survival, regardless of the measure chosen. The majority of associations were statistically significant. Of 52 associations between socioeconomic variables and outcome among high-income country (HIC children, 38 (73.1% found low SES to be associated with worse survival, 15 of which were statistically significant. Of the remaining 14 (no association or high SES associated with worse survival, only one was statistically significant. Both HIC studies examining the effect of insurance found uninsured status to be statistically associated with inferior survival. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic gradients in which low SES is associated with inferior childhood cancer survival are ubiquitous in LMIC and common in HIC. Future studies should elucidate mechanisms underlying these gradients, allowing the design of interventions mediating socioeconomic effects. Targeting the effect of low SES will allow for further improvements in childhood cancer survival.

  13. Curcumin targets FOLFOX-surviving colon cancer cells via inhibition of EGFRs and IGF-1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhaumik B; Gupta, Deepshika; Elliott, Althea A; Sengupta, Vivek; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2010-02-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), which has no discernible toxicity, inhibits initiation, promotion and progression of carcinogenesis. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) or 5-FU plus oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) remains the backbone of colorectal cancer chemotherapeutics, but produces an incomplete response resulting in survival of cells (chemo-surviving cells) that may lead to cancer recurrence. The present investigation was, therefore, undertaken to examine whether addition of curcumin to FOLFOX is a superior therapeutic strategy for chemo-surviving cells. Forty-eight-hour treatment of colon cancer HCT-116 and HT-29 cells with FOLFOX resulted in 60-70% survival, accompanied by a marked activation of insulin like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and minor to moderate increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), v-erb-b2 erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (HER-2) as well as v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cyclin-D1. However, inclusion of curcumin to continued FOLFOX treatment for another 48 h greatly reduced the survival of these cells, accompanied by a concomitant reduction in activation of EGFR, HER-2, IGF-1R and AKT, as well as expression of COX-2 and cyclin-D1. More importantly, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib or attenuation of IGF-1R expression by the corresponding si-RNA caused a 30-60% growth inhibition of chemo-surviving HCT-116 cells. However, curcumin alone was found to be more effective than both gefitinib and IGF-1R si-RNA mediated growth inhibition of chemo-surviving HCT-116 cells and addition of FOLFOX to curcumin did not increase the growth inhibitory effect of curcumin. Our data suggest that inclusion of curcumin in conventional chemotherapeutic regimens could be an effective strategy to prevent the emergence of chemoresistant colon cancer cells.

  14. Prognostic factors and survival of patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer who underwent craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, José Pablo; Lee, Adrian V; Brufsky, Adam M

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis (BM) in patients with breast cancer is a catastrophic event that results in poor prognosis. Identification of prognostic factors associated with breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) could help to identify patients at risk. The aim of this study was to assess clinical characteristics, prognostic factors, and survival of patients with BCBM who had craniotomy and resection in a series of patients treated with modern multimodality therapy. We analyzed 42 patients with BCBM who underwent resection. Patients were diagnosed with breast cancer between April 1994 and May 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was selected to describe factors associated with time to BM, survival from the date of first recurrence, and overall survival (OS). Median age was 51 years (range 24-74). Median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 0.6-18.5). The proportion of the biological subtypes of breast cancer was ER+/HER2- 25%, ER+/HER2+ 15%, ER-/HER2+ 30%, and ER-/HER2- 30%. Median OS from the date of primary diagnosis was 5.74 years. Median survival after diagnosis of BM was 1.33 years. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, stage was the only factor associated with shorter time to the development of BM (P = 0.033), whereas age was the only factor associated with survival from the date of recurrence (P = 0.027) and with OS (P = 0.037). Stage at primary diagnosis correlated with shorter time to the development of BM, while age at diagnosis was associated with shorter survival in BCBM. None of the other clinical factors had influence on survival.

  15. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on gastric cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chia Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Gastric cancer is a leading cause of death, particularly in the developing world. The literature reports individual socioeconomic status (SES or neighborhood SES as related to survival, but the effect of both has not been studied. This study investigated the effect of individual and neighborhood SES simultaneously on mortality in gastric cancer patients in Taiwan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A study was conducted of 3,396 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each patient was followed for five years or until death. Individual SES was defined by income-related insurance premium (low, moderate, and high. Neighborhood SES was based on household income dichotomized into advantaged and disadvantaged areas. Multilevel logistic regression model was used to compare survival rates by SES group after adjusting for possible confounding factors. RESULTS: In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were lowest for those with low individual SES. After adjusting for patient characteristics (age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, gastric cancer patients with high individual SES had 68% risk reduction of mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] of mortality, 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.61. Patients aged 65 and above had no statistically significant difference in mortality rates by individual SES group. Different neighborhood SES did not statistically differ in the survival rates. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer patients aged less than 65 years old with low individual SES have higher risk of mortality, even under an universal healthcare system. Public health strategies, education and welfare policies should seek to correct the inequality in gastric cancer survival, especially in those with lower individual SES.

  16. Ethnic differences in survival after breast cancer in South East Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Bhoo-Pathy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The burden of breast cancer in Asia is escalating. We evaluated the impact of ethnicity on survival after breast cancer in the multi-ethnic region of South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry, we analyzed the association between ethnicity and mortality following breast cancer in 5,264 patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2007 (Chinese: 71.6%, Malay: 18.4%, Indian: 10.0%. We compared survival rates between ethnic groups and calculated adjusted hazard ratios (HR to estimate the independent effect of ethnicity on survival. Malays (n = 968 presented at a significantly younger age, with larger tumors, and at later stages than the Chinese and Indians. Malays were also more likely to have axillary lymph node metastasis at similar tumor sizes and to have hormone receptor negative and poorly differentiated tumors. Five year overall survival was highest in the Chinese women (75.8%; 95%CI: 74.4%-77.3% followed by Indians (68.0%; 95%CI: 63.8%-72.2%, and Malays (58.5%; 95%CI: 55.2%-61.7%. Compared to the Chinese, Malay ethnicity was associated with significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR: 1.34; 95%CI: 1.19-1.51, independent of age, stage, tumor characteristics and treatment. Indian ethnicity was not significantly associated with risk of mortality after breast cancer compared to the Chinese (HR: 1.14; 95%CI: 0.98-1.34. CONCLUSION: In South East Asia, Malay ethnicity is independently associated with poorer survival after breast cancer. Research into underlying reasons, potentially including variations in tumor biology, psychosocial factors, treatment responsiveness and lifestyle after diagnosis, is warranted.

  17. Metformin therapy associated with survival benefit in lung cancer patients with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Guoxing; Yu, Xiongjie; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianhe; Pan, Dongfeng; Wang, Xuanbin; Li, Linjun; Cai, Xiaojun; Cao, Fengjun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize the currently available evidence regarding the concerned issue by performing a comprehensive meta-analysis. Relevant publications reporting the association of metformin use with survival of lung cancer patients with diabetes were electronically searched to identify eligible studies. The meta-analysis was performed with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) as effect measures for disease-free survival(DFS) and overall survival(OS) estimates. A total of 17 individual studies from 10 publications were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the results revealed a significant association of metformin use with a better survival of lung cancer patients with diabetes(for DFS: HR = 0.65, 95%CI = 0.52-0.83; for OS: HR = 0.78, 95%CI = 0.64-0.93). The subgroup analyses showed similar association in Asian region(for DFS:HR = 0.69, 95%CI = 0.59-0.80; for OS: HR = 0.55, 95%CI = 0.46-0.67) but not in Western region. Such association was also presented in small cell lung cancer (for DFS: HR = 0.54, 95%CI = 0.38-0.77; for OS: HR = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.39-0.69) and in non-small cell lung cancer(for DFS: HR = 0.70, 95%CI = 0.51-0.96; for OS: HR = 0.75, 95%CI = 0.58-0.97). Analyses stratified by treatment strategy showed a reduction in the risk of cancer-related mortality in patients receiving chemotherapy(for DFS: HR = 0.71, 95%CI = 0.64-0.83; for OS: HR = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.47-0.71) but not in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. The meta-analysis demonstrated that metformin use was significantly associated with a favorable survival outcome of lung cancer patients with diabetes. PMID:27105507

  18. Comparing two classifications of cancer cachexia and their association with survival in patients with unresected pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseltoft-Rao, Nima; Hjermstad, Marianne J; Ikdahl, Tone; Dajani, Olav; Ulven, Stine M; Iversen, Per Ole; Bye, Asta

    2015-01-01

    There is no universally accepted definition of cancer cachexia. Two classifications have been proposed; the 3-factor classification requiring ≥ 2 of 3 factors; weight loss ≥ 10%, food intake ≤ 1500 kcal/day, and C-reactive protein ≥ 10 mg/l, and the consensus classification requiring weight loss >5% the past 6 mo, or body mass index 2%. Precachexia is the initial stage of the cachexia trajectory, identified by weight loss ≤ 5%, anorexia and metabolic change. We examined the consistency between the 2 classifications, and their association with survival in a palliative cohort of 45 (25 men, median age of 72 yr, range 35-89) unresected pancreatic cancer patients. Computed tomography images were used to determine sarcopenia. Height/weight/C-reactive protein and survival were extracted from medical records. Food intake was self-reported. The agreement for cachexia and noncachexia was 78% across classifications. Survival was poorer in cachexia compared to noncachexia (3-factor classification, P = 0.0052; consensus classification, P = 0.056; when precachexia was included in the consensus classification, P = 0.027). Both classifications showed a trend toward lower median survival (P cachexia. In conclusion, the two classifications showed good overall agreement in defining cachectic pancreatic cancer patients, and cachexia was associated with poorer survival according to both.

  19. A survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Veninga, T. [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Stalpers, L.J.A. [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Hoskin, P.J. [Mount Vernon Center for Cancer Treatment, Northwood (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Oncology; Rudat, V. [Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Background: This study aimed to develop and validate a survival scoring system for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Of 436 patients, 218 patients were assigned to the test group and 218 patients to the validation group. Eight potential prognostic factors (age, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval from cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy of MSCC, time developing motor deficits) plus the fractionation regimen were retrospectively investigated for associations with survival. Factors significant in the multivariate analysis were included in the survival score. The score for each significant prognostic factor was determined by dividing the 6-month survival rate (%) by 10. The total score represented the sum of the scores for each factor. The prognostic groups of the test group were compared to the validation group. Results: In the multivariate analysis of the test group, performance status, ambulatory status, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, and interval from cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy were significantly associated with survival. Total scores including these factors were 20, 21, 22, 24, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 37, or 39 points. In the test group, the 6-month survival rates were 6.5% for 20-24 points, 44.6% for 26-33 points, and 95.8% for 35-39 points (p < 0.0001). In the validation group, the 6-month survival rates were 7.4%, 45.4%, and 94.7%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Because the survival rates of the validation group were almost identical to the test group, this score can be considered valid and reproducible. (orig.)

  20. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brachytherapy with iodine125-labeled seeds (125I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I125 seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Results: Twenty-three studies (824 patients’ data) were included in the meta-analysis. 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P < 0.00001) overall survival with 1-year survival of 25.7 ± 9.3% (mean ± standard deviation; SD) and 2-year survival was 17.9 ± 8.6% (mean ± SD). In stage IV pancreatic cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P < 0.00001). In patients treated with 125I-seeds implantation along with 1 or more therapies, overall survival was 11.75 [95% CI: 9.84, 13.65] months (P < 0.00001) with 1-year survival of 47.4 ± 22.75% (mean ± SD) and 2-year survival was 16.97 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD). 125I-seeds brachytherapy was associated with relief of pain in 79.7 ± 9.9% (mean ± SD) of the patients. Conclusions: Survival of pancreatic cancer patients after 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months

  1. Organochlorine insecticides DDT and chlordane in relation to survival following breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Humberto; Wolff, Mary S; Engel, Lawrence S; White, Alexandra J; Eng, Sybil M; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Khankari, Nikhil K; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Neugut, Alfred I; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-02-01

    Organochlorine insecticides have been studied extensively in relation to breast cancer incidence, and results from two meta-analyses have been null for late-life residues, possibly due to measurement error. Whether these compounds influence survival remains to be fully explored. We examined associations between organochlorine insecticides [p,p'-DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), its primary metabolite, p,p'-DDE, and chlordane] assessed shortly after diagnosis and survival among women with breast cancer. A population-based sample of women diagnosed with a first primary invasive or in situ breast cancer in 1996-1997 and with available organochlorine blood measures (n = 633) were followed for vital status through 2011. After follow-up of 5 and 15 years, we identified 55 and 189 deaths, of which 36 and 74, respectively, were breast cancer-related. Using Cox regression models, we estimated the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lipid-adjusted organochlorine concentrations with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. At 5 years after diagnosis, the highest tertile of DDT concentration was associated with all-cause (HR = 2.19; 95% CI: 1.02, 4.67) and breast cancer-specific (HR = 2.72; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.13) mortality. At 15 years, middle tertile concentrations of DDT (HR = 1.42; 95% CI 0.99, 2.06) and chlordane (HR = 1.42; 95% CI: 0.94, 2.12) were modestly associated with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. Third tertile DDE concentrations were inversely associated with 15-year all-cause mortality (HR = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.99). This is the first population-based study in the United States to show that DDT may adversely impact survival following breast cancer diagnosis. Further studies are warranted given the high breast cancer burden and the ubiquity of these chemicals.

  2. Personality and breast cancer risk and survival: the Miyagi cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yuko; Hosokawa, Toru; Nakaya, Naoki; Sugawara, Yumi; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Fukao, Akira; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    It has long been hypothesized that personality is associated with breast cancer risk and survival. The present population-based prospective cohort study in Japan tested this hypothesis. To investigate the association of personality with breast cancer risk, a total of 15,107 women aged 40-64 years who completed the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R) Short Form were followed from 1990 to 2007. To assess the association of personality with survival after breast cancer, 250 identified cases were further followed up from the date of diagnosis to 2008, and 45 all-cause deaths were documented. Study subjects were categorized into four groups based on the quartile points of scores ranging between 0 and 12 on each EPQ-R subscale (extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and lie), and the hazard ratio (HR) for each category was computed using the lowest category as reference. Multivariate analysis revealed no association between any of the four personality subscales and the risk of breast cancer. In the analysis on survival, no significant association was found between any of these subscales and the risk of death, although breast cancer cases with a higher score of extraversion tended to have a lower risk of death (P for trend = 0.07; HR for highest score level = 0.38). Exclusion of 32 cases diagnosed in the first 3 years of follow-up did not largely change the results with regard to either breast cancer risk or survival. The present findings suggest that personality does not impact significantly on the development and progression of breast cancer.

  3. LOXL2 expression is associated with invasiveness and negatively influences survival in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Gwe; Dong, Seung Myung; Oshima, Akira; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hak Min; Lee, Seung Ah; Kwon, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hae; Lee, Jae Myun; Jeong, Joon; Lee, Hy-De; Green, Jeffrey E

    2013-08-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is associated with invasiveness and metastasis in breast cancer. We analyzed the prognostic impact of LOXL2 for breast cancer patients and investigated the role of LOXL2 in breast cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical study of LOXL2 expression was done in samples from 309 patients. Survival analysis was performed using log-rank test and Cox regression hazard model. After identification of LOXL2 expression in breast cancer cell lines, we performed matrigel invasion and wound-healing assays with LOXL2-silenced cell lines. In the human study, LOXL2 was expressed in 16.2 % of patients. Comparing the LOXL2-positive versus negative groups, there was a significantly higher proportion of estrogen receptor-negative patients (54.0 vs. 37.0 %, respectively; p = 0.029) and triple-negative patients (34.0 vs. 18.0 %; p = 0.022) in the positive group. In multivariate analysis for overall survival and metastasis-free survival, positive LOXL2 was demonstrated as a poor prognostic factor (HR 2.27 and 2.10, respectively). In vitro study indicated that LOXL2 silencing induces a mesenchymal-epithelial transition-like process in basal cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and BT549) associated with decreased invasive and migratory properties. These clinical and preclinical data confirm that higher LOXL2 expression is associated with invasiveness of basal-like breast cancer cells and lower survival of breast cancer patients. Our results suggest the clinical value of LOXL2 as a therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  4. Surviving breast cancer: women's experiences with their changed bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M; Burke, Shaunna

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we explored women's experiences with their bodies following treatment for breast cancer. Eleven women who had been treated for the disease (M(time since treatment)=4.45 years) were interviewed. Data were collected and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith et al., 2009). Four main themes emerged from the data: changing visibly and invisibly; experiencing intense thoughts and emotions; meaning of the body: a vehicle of health, well-being, and social expression; and managing and dealing with physical changes. Overall, the women experienced various physical changes that shaped, mostly in a negative way, their perceptions, thoughts, attitudes, feelings, and beliefs about their bodies. The women described attempts to make positive lifestyle behavior choices (e.g., diet, participate in physical activity), and used other strategies (e.g., wigs, make-up, clothes) to manage their appearances and restore positive body-related experiences. Based on these findings, it is important to be cognizant of women's body image concerns following breast cancer given the poignant and lasting effects they can have on their psychosocial and emotional well-being.

  5. Abiraterone plus prednisone improves survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott T Tagawa; Himisha Beltran

    2011-01-01

    In essentially just 1 year's time,we have seen science translated into exciting new therapeutic agents for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),1 most recently with the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of abiraterone acetate in combination with prednisone.2 While prostate cancer has been known to be highly responsive to surgical or medical castration for well over half a century,3 what was once termed 'hormone refractory' prostate cancer inevitably developed,leading to cancerrelated death.Many consider the introduction of chemotherapy for CRPC initially for symptomatic benefit,then with improvements in survival,a substantial step forward.

  6. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  7. Investigation of Exomic Variants Associated with Overall Survival in Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winham, Stacey J; Pirie, Ailith; Chen, Yian Ann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While numerous susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have been identified, few associations have been reported with overall survival. In the absence of common prognostic genetic markers, we hypothesize that rare coding variants may be associated with overall EOC surv...

  8. Genome-wide association study of prostate cancer-specific survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szulkin, Robert; Karlsson, Robert; Whitington, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unnecessary intervention and overtreatment of indolent disease are common challenges in clinical management of prostate cancer. Improved tools to distinguish lethal from indolent disease are critical. METHODS: We performed a genome-wide survival analysis of cause-specific death in 24,...

  9. Educational inequalities in cancer survival: A role for comorbidities and health behaviours?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Aarts (Mieke); C.B.M. Kamphuis (Carlijn); M.W.J. Louwman (Marieke); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); F.J. van Lenthe (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAim: To describe educational inequalities in cancer survival and to what extent these can be explained by comorbidity and health behaviours (smoking, physical activity and alcohol consumption). Methods: The GLOBE study sent postal questionnaires to individuals in The Netherlands in 1991

  10. Does neoadjuvant chemotherapy impair long-term survival for ovarian cancer patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten Lindberg; Ottesen, Bent Smedegaard; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In Denmark, the proportion of women with ovarian cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has increased, and the use of NACT varies among center hospitals. We aimed to evaluate the impact of first-line treatment on surgical outcome and median overall survival (MOS). METHODS...

  11. Prostate cancer: trends in incidence, survival and mortality in the Netherlands, 1989-2006.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Houterman, S.; Verhoeven, R.H.; Schroder, F.H.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Kil, P.J.M.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer occurrence and stage distribution changed dramatically during the end of the 20th century. This study aimed to quantify and explain trends in incidence, stage distribution, survival and mortality in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2006. METHODS: Population-based data fro

  12. Centralized treatment of advanced stages of ovarian cancer improves survival: a nationwide Danish survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten L; Høgdall, Claus; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This retrospective, nationwide, observational study was designed to compare treatment in tertiary referral centers vs. regional hospitals on overall survival for patients with stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer. Material and methods. The study took place in all gynecological departments ...

  13. Variation in NF-κB Signaling Pathways and Survival in Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Block, Matthew S; Charbonneau, Bridget; Vierkant, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Survival in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is influenced by the host immune response, yet the key genetic determinants of inflammation and immunity that affect prognosis are not known. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor family plays an important role in many immune and inflammato...

  14. Modelling circulating tumour cells for personalised survival prediction in metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Ascolani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET. In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics.

  15. Proteomic biomarkers for overall and progression-free survival in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid; Fung, Eric T; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    To determine if the level of apolipoprotein A1, hepcidin, transferrin, inter-α trypsin IV internal fragment, transthyretin (TT), connective-tissue activating protein 3 (CTAP3), serum amyloid A1, β-2 microglobulin (B2M) might have impact on overall and progression-free survival for ovarian cancer ...

  16. Proteomic biomarkers for overall and progression-free survival in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid; Fung, Eric T; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    To determine if the level of apolipoprotein A1, hepcidin, transferrin, inter-a trypsin IV internal fragment, transthyretin (TT), connective-tissue activating protein 3 (CTAP3), serum amyloid A1, ß-2 microglobulin (B2M) might have impact on overall and progression-free survival for ovarian cancer ...

  17. Survival nomogram for curatively resected Korean gastric cancer patients: multicenter retrospective analysis with external validation.

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    Bang Wool Eom

    Full Text Available A small number of nomograms have been previously developed to predict the individual survival of patients who undergo curative resection for gastric cancer. However, all were derived from single high-volume centers. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a nomogram for gastric cancer patients using a multicenter database.We reviewed the clinicopathological and survival data of 2012 patients who underwent curative resection for gastric cancer between 2001 and 2006 at eight centers. Among these centers, six institutions were randomly assigned to the development set, and the other two centers were assigned to the validation set. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazard regression model was performed, and discrimination and calibration were evaluated by external validation.Multivariate analyses revealed that age, tumor size, lymphovascular invasion, depth of invasion, and metastatic lymph nodes were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. In the external validation, the concordance index was 0.831 (95% confidence interval, 0.784-0.878, and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistic was 3.92 (P = 0.917.We developed and validated a nomogram to predict 5-year overall survival after curative resection for gastric cancer based on a multicenter database. This nomogram can be broadly applied even in general hospitals and is useful for counseling patients, and scheduling follow-up.

  18. LONG-TERM SURVIVAL OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER PATIENTS AFTER CHEMOTHERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGAAST, A; POSTMUS, PE; BURGHOUTS, J; VANBOLHUIS, C; STAM, J; SPLINTER, TAW

    1993-01-01

    Eighty-one patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with a survival Of more than 2 years start of chemotherapy were studied. Twenty-six of the 28 patients who died of relapsed SCLC had in relapsed before two years and of the 55 who had not then only two (4%) relapsed subsequently. It is stressed

  19. Functional complementation studies identify candidate genes and common genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Ramus, Susan J;

    2009-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation and/or somatic alterations in tumours may be associated with survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The successful identification of genetic associations relies on a suitable strategy for identifying and testing candidate genes. We used microcell-mediat...

  20. Reduced CDX2 expression predicts poor overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kwang Dae; Lee, Dooseok; Lee, Youngseok; Lee, Sun Il; Moon, Hong Young

    2013-04-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor CDX2 directs development and maintenance of normal intestinal epithelium. However, the role of CDX2 in colorectal carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Hence, we investigated the CDX2 expression in patients with colorectal cancer and its relationship to tumor cell proliferation and differentiation and evaluated the role of this molecule as a biologic marker for the prediction of poor patient survival. We retrospectively reviewed 207 patients with colorectal cancer, with an available paraffin block, who underwent surgical resection between January 2002 and December 2004 at Korea University Guro Hospital. CDX2 expression was compared between tumor tissue and the adjacent normal mucosa using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical staining for CDX2, Ki-67, and CK20 was performed in each tumor tissue. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CDX2 protein is overexpressed by colorectal cancer compared with adjacent normal mucosa (P < 0.001). In the Western blot analysis, tumor tissue showed a trend toward overexpression of CDX2 protein compared with normal mucosa (P = 0.09). CDX2 expression showed a significant direct correlation with the expression of Ki-67 and CK20 in tumor tissue (P = 0.028 and P = 0.042, respectively). Survival analysis showed that reduced CDX2 expression was statistically and significantly related to poor overall survival. Reduced CDX2 expression is associated with poor overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer and may be clinically useful as a marker for poor prognosis.

  1. Endobronchial mucosa invasion predicts survival in patients with small cell lung cancer.

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    Pai-Chien Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current staging system for small cell lung cancer (SCLC categorizes patients into limited- or extensive-stage disease groups according to anatomical localizations. Even so, a wide-range of survival times has been observed among patients in the same staging system. This study aimed to identify whether endobronchial mucosa invasion is an independent predictor for poor survival in patients with SCLC, and to compare the survival time between patients with and without endobronchial mucosa invasion. METHODS: We studied 432 consecutive patients with SCLC based on histological examination of biopsy specimens or on fine-needle aspiration cytology, and received computed tomography and bone scan for staging. All the enrolled patients were assessed for endobronchial mucosa invasion by bronchoscopic and histological examination. Survival days were compared between patients with or without endobronchial mucosa invasion and the predictors of decreased survival days were investigated. RESULTS: 84% (364/432 of SCLC patients had endobronchial mucosal invasion by cancer cells at initial diagnosis. Endobronchial mucosal involvement (Hazard ratio [HR], 2.01; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.30-3.10, age (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03-1.06, and extensive stage (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.06-1.84 were independent contributing factors for shorter survival time, while received chemotherapy (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.25-0.42 was an independent contributing factor better outcome. The survival days of SCLC patients with endobronchial involvement were markedly decreased compared with patients without (median 145 vs. 290, p<0.0001. Among SCLC patients of either limited (median 180 vs. 460, p<0.0001 or extensive (median 125 vs. 207, p<0.0001 stages, the median survival duration for patients with endobronchial mucosal invasion was shorter than those with intact endobronchial mucosa, respectively. CONCLUSION: Endobronchial mucosal involvement is an independent prognostic factor for SCLC

  2. Neuroendocrine differentiation as a survival prognostic factor in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

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    Petrović Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Beckground/Aim. Neuroendrocine lung tumors are histologically heterogenous group of cancers with different clinical progression. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC neuroendocrine differentiation exists in 10-30% of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and influence of neuroendocrine differentiation on survival of treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods. A clinical trial included 158 patients (74% males and 26% females, with the diagnosis of NSCLC, determined by histological verification. The patients were treated by combined chemo - and X-ray therapy in stage III (without pleural effusion or chemotherapy only in stage III (with pleural effusion and stage IV. Chemotherapy was conducted until progression of the disease, but no more than six cycles. When the progression had been noted in stage III (without pleural effusion, the treatment was continued with X-ray therapy. Neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, as well as synapthophysin expression in tissue examples were determined by immunohistochemical analysis with monoclonal mouse anti-human-bodies. Survival was assessed within a year and two years follow-up examination. Results. A total of 53 patients (34% had NSCLC with neuroendocrine differentiation, confirmed rather in large cell lung cancer and lung adenocarcinoma (66.7% and 40%, respectively. Neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A and synapthophysin expression was noted in 45 (28.5%, 34 (21.5% and 33 (20.1% patients, respectively. The one year and two years follow-up survival periods were confirmed in 39% and 17% of patients respectively. The median survival time in the patients with the neuroendocrine expression as compared to those without the expression was 15.6 vs 10.8 months; one year survival time with the expression compared to those without the expression achieved in 62% vs 27% of the patients, (p < 0.001; a two - year survival time noted in 30% of the patients (p = 0

  3. Lung cancer associated hypercalcemia: An analysis of factors influencing survival and prognosis in 34 cases

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    Su-jie ZHANG

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives  To explore the factors influencing survival time in lung cancer associated hypercalcemia patients. Methods  Thirty-four patients with pathologically confirmed lung cancer complicated with hypercalcemia, who were treated at the Department of Oncology in General Hospital of PLA from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2010, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data analyzed included sex, age, pathological type of the malignancies, organ metastasis (bone, lung, liver, kidney, brain, number of distal metastatic site, mental status, interval between final diagnosis of lung cancer and of hypercalcemia, peak value of blood calcium during the disease course, treatment methods and so on. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox analysis with statistic software SPSS 18.0 to identify the potential prognostic factors. Results  The highest blood calcium level ranged from 2.77 to 4.87mmol/L, and the median value was 2.94mmol/L. The patients' survival time after diagnosis of hypercalcemia varied from 1 day to 1067 days, and the median survival time was 92 days. With the log-rank test, age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after diagnosis of cancer, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis were predictors for poor survival (P=0.048, P=0.001, P=0.000, P=0.003. In the COX proportional hazard model analysis, age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after cancer diagnosis, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis were significant prognostic factors for poor survival (HR=11.483, P=0.006; HR=4.371, P=0.002; HR=6.064, P=0.026; HR=8.502, P=0.011. Conclusions  Patients with lung cancer associated hypercalcemia have a shorter survival time and poor prognosis. Age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after cancer diagnosis, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis are significant factors of poor prognosis.

  4. Survival of prostate cancer patients in central and northern Denmark, 1998–2009

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    Borre M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Borre1,2, Rune Erichsen1, Lars Lund3, Erik Højkjær Larsen4, Mette Nørgaard1, Jacob Bonde Jacobsen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; 2Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark; 3Department of Urology, Region Hospital Viborg, Denmark; 4Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkObjective: Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among Danish men. During the last decade, use of prostate specific antigen (PSA testing has increased, and in clinically localized prostate cancer, curative intended treatment has gained a footing. Our aim was to examine possible changes in the short- and long-term survival of patients with prostate cancer during 1998–2009.Study design and setting: From two Danish regions (population, 1.8 million we included all patients (N = 10,547 with an incident diagnosis of prostate cancer retrieved from the Danish National Registry of Patients. We determined survival after 1, 3, and 5 years, stratified by age, and estimated mortality rate ratios (MRRs using Cox proportional hazard regression to assess changes over time, controlling for age.Results: During the study period, the annual number of incident prostate cancer patients more than doubled, and the median age at diagnosis decreased from 74 to 70 years. The survival improved over the study period, particularly in the last half of the period (2004–2009. Thus, 1-year survival increased from 80% (1998–2000 to 90% (2007–2009, corresponding to an age-adjusted MRR of 0.54 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.46–0.63. The expected increase in 3- and 5-year survival was even more pronounced: 47%–73% and 34%–60%, respectively. This corresponded to a 3-year age-adjusted MRR of 0.46 (95% CI: 0.42–0.51 and a 5-year MRR of 0.50 (95% CI: 0.46–0.54. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival increased in all age groups (<70 years, 70–79 years, ≥80 years

  5. Global assessment of cancer incidence and survival in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyer, Archie; Ferrari, Andrea; Whelan, Jeremy; Barr, Ronald D

    2017-02-28

    In high-income countries, cancer remains the commonest cause of disease-related death in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) despite survival improvements. With more than 1,000,000 new diagnoses of cancer in AYAs annually worldwide, and their number of life-years affected by cancer being greatest of all ages, the global burden of cancer in AYAs exceeds that in all other ages. In low- and middle-income countries, where the great majority of the world's 3 billion AYAs reside, the needs of those with cancer have been identified and demand attention. Unique to the age group but universal, the psychosocial challenges they face are the utmost across life's spectrum. This lead-off article of a new series in Pediatric Blood and Cancer on AYA oncology attempts to assess the global status of this emerging discipline. The review includes the changing incidence and survival of the common cancers in AYAs-there is no other age group with a similar array of malignancies-and the specific challenges to quality and quantity of life that compromise their lives.

  6. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Stephen P; Myeroff, Lois L; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K V; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-10-13

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target.

  7. Aggressive Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Increases Survival: A Scandinavian Single-Center Experience

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    Kristoffer Watten Brudvik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined overall and disease-free survivals in a cohort of patients subjected to resection of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRLM in a 10-year period when new treatment strategies were implemented. Methods. Data from 239 consecutive patients selected for liver resection of CRLM during the period from 2002 to 2011 at a single center were used to estimate overall and disease-free survival. The results were assessed against new treatment strategies and established risk factors. Results. The 5-year cumulative overall and disease-free survivals were 46 and 24%. The overall survival was the same after reresection, independently of the number of prior resections and irrespectively of the location of the recurrent disease. The time intervals between each recurrence were similar (11 ± 1 months. Patients with high tumor load given neoadjuvant chemotherapy had comparable survival to those with less extensive disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive resection margin or resectable extrahepatic disease did not affect overall survival. Conclusion. Our data support that one still, and perhaps to an even greater extent, should seek an aggressive therapeutic strategy to achieve resectable status for recurrent hepatic and extrahepatic metastases. The data should be viewed in the context of recent advances in the understanding of cancer biology and the metastatic process.

  8. Methodological issues in international comparison of interval breast cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulliard, Jean-Luc; Sasieni, Peter; Klabunde, Carrie; De Landtsheer, Jean-Pierre; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Fracheboud, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    International comparisons of interval cancers (IC) are important to better understand the relationship between programmes' performance and screening practices. In this respect, differences in (i) definition, (ii) identification and (iii) quantification of IC have received little attention. To examin

  9. Marital status and survival in pancreatic cancer patients: a SEER based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Baine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent findings suggest that marital status affects survival in patients with different types of cancer. However, its role in the survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether there was an association between marital status and overall survival (OS in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. METHODS: Adult patients diagnosed with PDAC between 1998 and 2003 with known marital statuses were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of the National Cancer Institute. OS for these patients was plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparative risks of mortality were evaluated by using univariate and multivariate-adjusted Cox regression models. RESULTS: Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, we found that the median overall survival of patients was 4 months and 3 months (p<0.001 for married and unmarried patients, respectively. Subgroup analysis on patients with cancer-directed surgery showed that the median survival was 16 months and 13 months (P<0.0005 for married and unmarried groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis adjusting for age, race, sex, stage, year of diagnosis, radiation therapy and cancer-directed surgery showed that patients who were married at the time of diagnosis had a significantly decreased risk of death at both 2 months (15% risk reduction and 3 years (13% risk reduction post diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Marital status is an independent prognostic factor of both perioperative and long-term survival in patients with PDAC. This observation may suggest a suboptimally met psychosocial need among PDAC patients that is partially fulfilled by the support system provided by marriage.

  10. Use of metformin and survival of diabetic women with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, Paul J H L; Bazelier, Marloes T; Vestergaard, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was set out to determine whether metformin use influences survival in breast cancer patients treated with antidiabetic drugs as compared to non-users. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We used data from the Danish national registries (1996-2008) to identify adult female patients...... diagnosed with breast cancer who were prescribed antidiabetic medication. We performed multivariate Coxproportional hazard regression to assess all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality risks associated with metformin exposure. In a secondary analysis, we stratified use of metformin according...... to the cumulative number of prescriptions. RESULTS: Of the 1058 breast cancer patients 349 died during follow-up, with breast cancer listed as the primary cause of death for 152 cases. Compared to non-use, current metformin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in overall mortality (adjusted HR 0...

  11. Disease-free survival after complete mesocolic excision compared with conventional colon cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus Anders; Neuenschwander, Anders Ulrich; Jansen, Jens Erik

    2015-01-01

    consisted of patients who underwent CME surgery in a centre validated to perform such surgery; the control group consisted of patients undergoing conventional colon resection in three other hospitals. Data were collected from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) database and medical charts. Patients......, irrespective of UICC stage, with 4-year disease-free survival of 85·8% (95% CI 81·4-90·1) after CME and 73·4% (66·2-80·6) after non-CME (log-rank p=0·0014). INTERPRETATION: Our data indicate that CME surgery is associated with better disease-free survival than is conventional colon cancer resection...... for patients with stage I-III colon adenocarcinoma. Implementation of CME surgery might improve outcomes for patients with colon cancer. FUNDING: Tvergaards Fund and Edgar and Hustru Gilberte Schnohrs Fund....

  12. Stress and survival after cancer: A prospective study of a Finnish population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saito-Nakaya, K.; Bidstrup, P. E.; Nakaya, N.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has been suggested to reduce survival after cancer, but the results of previous studies have been contradictory. We investigated the hypothesis in a national cohort of adults in Finland. Of those who completed the Stressful Life Events scale and the Stress of Daily Activities scale, 1470...... and 1882, respectively, later had cancer and were included in the analysis, covering 23 years of follow-up between 1982 and 2004. In Cox regression analysis, the multivariate hazard ratio (HR) was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96-1.01) for total number of life events and the HR for the life change...... score was 0.99 (95% CI, 0.95-1.03). Further, the HR was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.69-1.22) for severe daily stress. Overall, the results of the current study do not support the hypothesis that stress reduces cancer survival. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Intrathoracic Anastomotic Leakage after Gastroesophageal Cancer Resection Is Associated with Reduced Long-term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone Susanne;

    2014-01-01

    .19-1.90) and 1.41 (1.10-1.81). After exclusion of 8 weeks mortality the odds ratios were 1.38 (1.08-1.77) and 1.32 (1.02-1.71). CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide study confirms that patients experiencing anastomotic leakage after gastroesophageal cancer resection have a significantly lower long-term survival, even......BACKGROUND: Most likely because of low statistical power, no previous studies have shown any significant association between long-term survival and anastomotic leakage in patients who have undergone gastroesophageal cancer resection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present study included, prospectively...... and consecutively, nationwide collected patients who underwent gastroesophageal cancer resection between 2003 and 2011 in Denmark. The operation was carried out as an Ivor Lewis procedure. Only patients with intrathoracic anastomosis were included in the analysis. RESULTS: From 2003 to 2011, 1,296 patients...

  14. A mechanistic breast cancer survival modelling through the axillary lymph node chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobre, Juliana; Castro Perdoná, Gleici S; Peria, Fernanda M; Louzada, Francisco

    2013-04-30

    In this paper, we proposed a mechanistic breast cancer survival model based on the axillary lymph node chain structure, considering lymph nodes as a potential dissemination arrangement. We assume a naive breast cancer treatment protocol consisting of exposing patients first to a chemotherapy treatment on r intervals at k-cycles separated by equal time intervals, and then they proceed to surgery. Our model, different from former ones, accommodates a quantity of contaminated lymph nodes, which is observed during surgery. We assume a generalised negative binomial survival distribution for the unknown number of contaminated lymph nodes after surgery, which, during an unknown period, may potentially propagate the disease. Estimation is based on a maximum likelihood approach. A simulation study assesses the coverage probability of asymptotic confidence intervals when small or moderate samples are considered. A Brazilian breast cancer data illustrate the applicability of our modelling.

  15. Postoperative Survival Estimation of Gastric Cancer Patients in Cancer Institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital and Its Relative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kazemnejad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Gastric Cancer (GC is one of the most common causes of death in the world. The most important cause of high death rate related to GC is late diagnosis of the disease. The main treatment of gastric cancer in its primary stage of is surgery, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are supplementary treatments. There are some factors that affect survival after surgery. This study aimed to assess the survival of patients with GC under surgery and to determine the risk factors of this cancer. Materials & Methods: A total of 262 patients with GC under surgery were followed and included in the study from 21st of March 2003 to 21st of March 2007 in the cancer institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital, . The staging of the disease before the surgery was based on CT-Scan and endosonography and after the surgery was based on the pathologic reports. The survival of the patients was determined by their periodical referrals and our telephone contacts with their relatives. The survival times were considered as the time from the diagnosis up to the death or the end of the study. The effect of the various risk factors including gender, age at diagnosis, tumor site, pathologic stage of the disease, type of treatment, metastases and relapse were evaluated. Kaplan-Miere approach was used to estimate survival and Log-rank test and proportional Cox model to evaluate the related factors. Data were analyzed using Spss16 statistical software. Results: 75.2% of patients were men and 34.4% cases of patients experienced death. The mean follow-up time was 19.317.4. The mean age at diagnosis was 5811.5 and survival mean and median were 49 and 27 months respectively. The one, three and five year survival of the patients were 0.85, 0.41 and 0.3 respectively. Gender, pathologic stage, age at diagnosis and weight-loss were significantly related to the survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The diagnosis of the cancer in primary stages causes

  16. Surviving cells after treatment with gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil for the study of de novo resistance of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Chen-Yan; Yu, Dang-Hui; Bu, Hai-Ji; Chen, Ying; Ni, Can-Yong; Zhu, Ming-Hua

    2012-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of pancreatic cancer is its inherent insensitivity to chemotherapy. This study was undertaken to develop a cell model for the study of de novo resistance of pancreatic cancer. The surviving pancreatic cancer cells after a 3-day exposure to gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil followed by another 7-day recovery were potentially drug-resistant. They had similar morphology and comparable growth and tumorigenic potentials to their untreated parental cells. Repeated subculture affected the cell-cycle profile and growth characteristics of the surviving cells. Our data suggest that surviving pancreatic cancer cells after drug treatment are a useful model for exploring intrinsic resistance.

  17. Cancer incidence and survival in adolescents and young adults in France, 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Lacour, Brigitte; Belot, Aurélien; Molinie, Florence; Delafosse, Patricia; Tretarre, Brigitte; Velten, Michel; Sauleau, Erik-André; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Ganry, Olivier; Bara, Simona; Grosclaude, Pascale; Troussard, Xavier; Bouvier, Véronique; Brugieres, Laurence; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to describe cancer incidence (2000-2008) and survival (2000-2004) in France in adolescents and young adults (AYA). All cases of cancer diagnosed in 15-24 years, recorded by all French population-based registries (14% of the French population), over the 2000-2008 period, were included. Incidence change over time was described with the conventional annual percentage change (cAPC). The survival of cases diagnosed (2000-2004) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 1022 in adolescents and 1396 in young adults were diagnosed. Overall incidence rates were 219.4/10(6) in 15-19 year olds and 293.1/10(6) in 20-24 year olds. The most frequently diagnosed cancers in male AYA were malignant gonadal germ-cell tumors and Hodgkin's disease, and were melanoma, thyroid carcinoma, and Hodgkin's disease in females. The age-standardized rates appeared stable over time in AYA, with a cAPC of +2.0% (P = 0.68). The 5-year overall survival for all cancers was different between genders and age groups, with 78.8% (95%CI: 75.6-82.0) for males and 85.2% (95%CI: 82.2-88.1) for females (P = 0.01), and 78.5% (95%CI: 75.0-82.1) in 15-19 year olds and 84.3% (95% CI: 81.6-87.0) in 20-24 year olds (P = 0.02). Noteworthy, the frequency and the distribution of tumor types in AYA are unique and different from the observed at any other age group. Survival in French AYA has improved over time. Epidemiological data might reflect major trends in the risk factors and preventive interventions. Thus, further research into etiology of cancers affecting AYA should become key priorities for cancer control among AYA.

  18. Potentiation of ghrelin signaling attenuates cancer anorexia-cachexia and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitsuka, N; Asakawa, A; Uezono, Y; Minami, K; Yamaguchi, T; Niijima, A; Yada, T; Maejima, Y; Sedbazar, U; Sakai, T; Hattori, T; Kase, Y; Inui, A

    2011-07-26

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome is characterized by decreased food intake, weight loss, muscle tissue wasting and psychological distress, and this syndrome is a major source of increased morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. This study aimed to clarify the gut-brain peptides involved in the pathogenesis of the syndrome and determine effective treatment for cancer anorexia-cachexia. We show that both ghrelin insufficiency and resistance were observed in tumor-bearing rats. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) decreased the plasma level of acyl ghrelin, and its receptor antagonist, α-helical CRF, increased food intake of these rats. The serotonin 2c receptor (5-HT2cR) antagonist SB242084 decreased hypothalamic CRF level and improved anorexia, gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility and body weight loss. The ghrelin receptor antagonist (D-Lys3)-GHRP-6 worsened anorexia and hastened death in tumor-bearing rats. Ghrelin attenuated anorexia-cachexia in the short term, but failed to prolong survival, as did SB242084 administration. In addition, the herbal medicine rikkunshito improved anorexia, GI dysmotility, muscle wasting, and anxiety-related behavior and prolonged survival in animals and patients with cancer. The appetite-stimulating effect of rikkunshito was blocked by (D-Lys3)-GHRP-6. Active components of rikkunshito, hesperidin and atractylodin, potentiated ghrelin secretion and receptor signaling, respectively, and atractylodin prolonged survival in tumor-bearing rats. Our study demonstrates that the integrated mechanism underlying cancer anorexia-cachexia involves lowered ghrelin signaling due to excessive hypothalamic interactions of 5-HT with CRF through the 5-HT2cR. Potentiation of ghrelin receptor signaling may be an attractive treatment for anorexia, muscle wasting and prolong survival in patients with cancer anorexia-cachexia.

  19. Targeting proapoptotic protein BAD inhibits survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, K S R; Al-Muftah, M A; Li, Pu; Al-Kowari, M K; Wang, E; Ismail Chouchane, A; Kizhakayil, D; Kulik, G; Marincola, F M; Haoudi, A; Chouchane, L

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the resistance of cancer stem cells (CSC) to many conventional therapies is one of the major limiting factors of cancer therapy efficacy. Identification of mechanisms responsible for survival and self-renewal of CSC will help design new therapeutic strategies that target and eliminate both differentiated cancer cells and CSC. Here we demonstrated the potential role of proapoptotic protein BAD in the biology of CSC in melanoma, prostate and breast cancers. We enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells (CSC) by tumorosphere formation and purified this population by FACS. Both spheres and CSC exhibited increased potential for proliferation, migration, invasion, sphere formation, anchorage-independent growth, as well as upregulation of several stem cell-associated markers. We showed that the phosphorylation of BAD is essential for the survival of CSC. Conversely, ectopic expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant BAD induced apoptosis in CSC. This effect was enhanced by treatment with a BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Both pharmacological agents that inhibit survival kinases and growth factors that are involved in drug resistance delivered their respective cytotoxic and protective effects by modulating the BAD phosphorylation in CSC. Furthermore, the frequency and self-renewal capacity of CSC was significantly reduced by knocking down the BAD expression. Consistent with our in vitro results, significant phosphorylation of BAD was found in CD44(+) CSC of 83% breast tumor specimens. In addition, we also identified a positive correlation between BAD expression and disease stage in prostate cancer, suggesting a role of BAD in tumor advancement. Our studies unveil the role of BAD in the survival and self-renewal of CSC and propose BAD not only as an attractive target for cancer therapy but also as a marker of tumor progression.

  20. Cancer incidence and survival among infants in Israel, 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Ron; Barchana, Micha; Liphshiz, Irena; Linn, Shai; Futerman, Boris; Ben-Arush, Myriam Weyl

    2013-10-01

    Cancer during the first year of life is relatively rare and often has clinical and biological properties different from those of the same histologic type of cancer occurring in older children. The aim of this study was to find differences in epidemiology and survival between infants and older children and to compare the percentage of distribution of infant cancer types in Israel with that reported in the United States. We collected infant <1 year of age cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2007 as having cancer from the database of the Israel National Cancer Registry, a total of 309 cases with an incidence rate of 228.5 cases per million. The largest group was diagnosed with neuroblastoma (35%) with an incident rate of 80 per million, followed by leukemia (15.9%), with acute lymphoid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia accounting for most of this group and central nervous system malignancies comprised 10.7% of infant cancer. One hundred and fifty four new cases of infant girls was diagnosed compared to 155 infant boys with an incidence rates of 234 cases per million for girls and 224.7 for boys, not statistically significant (F:M rate ratio of 1.04). The 5-year survival rates seen in the different groups were leukemia: 55.3%, lymphoma: 71%, CNS tumors: 53.3%, neuroblastoma: 93.4%, retinoblastoma: 94.7% renal tumors: 90.9%, hepatic tumors: 63.3%, soft tissue sarcoma: 76.2%, germ cell neoplasms: 83.3%, and other epithelial neoplasms: 100%. Our study did not find survival differences with statistical significance upon comparing survival rates between different genders and ethnic groups.

  1. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cancer recurrence and survival in CALGB 89803 (Alliance.

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    Michael A Fuchs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In colon cancer patients, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and high dietary glycemic load have been associated with increased risk of cancer recurrence. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown. METHODS: We assessed the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on cancer recurrence and mortality in 1,011 stage III colon cancer patients who completed food frequency questionnaires as part of a U.S. National Cancer Institute-sponsored adjuvant chemotherapy trial. Hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated with Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Patients consuming ≥ 2 servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day experienced an adjusted HR for disease recurrence or mortality of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.04-2.68, compared with those consuming <2 servings per month (P(trend = 0.02. The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2 and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18 (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend = 0.0025. CONCLUSION: Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 level is increased in blood of lung cancer patients and associated with poor survival.

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    Chengcheng Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently showed that IGFBP2 is overexpressed in primary lung cancer tissues. This study aims to determine whether IGFBP2 is elevated in blood samples of lung cancer patients and whether its level is associated with clinical outcomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasma IGFBP2 levels were determined blindly by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 80 lung cancer patients and 80 case-matched healthy controls for comparison. We analyzed blood samples for IGFBP2 levels from an additional 84 patients with lung cancer and then tested for associations between blood IGFBP2 levels and clinical parameters in all 164 lung cancer patients. All statistical tests were two-sided and differences with p160.9 ng/ml is 15.1 months; whereas median survival time was 128.2 months for the patients whose blood IGFBP2 was ≤ 160.9 ng/ml (p =0.0002. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Blood IGFBP2 is significantly increased in lung cancer patients. A high circulating level of IGFBP2 is significantly associated with poor survival, suggesting that blood IGFBP2 levels could be a prognostic biomarker for lung cancer.

  3. Effect of angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab on survival in patients with cancer: a meta-analysis of the published literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuan; Yang, Wei-Bing; Li, Shi; Ye, Zhi-Jian; Shi, Huan-Zhong; Zhou, Qiong

    2012-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor which has been used in conjunction with other anti-cancer agents in the treatment of patients with many cancers. It remains controversial whether bevacizumab can prolong survival in cancer patients. This meta-analysis was therefore performed to evaluate effect of bevacizumab on survival in cancer patients. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched for English-language studies of randomized controlled trials comparing bevacizumab with control therapy published through February 8, 2012. Progression-free survival, overall survival, and one-year survival rate were analyzed using random- or fixed-effects model. Thirty one assessable randomized controlled trials were identified. A significant improvement in progression-free survival in cancer patients was attributable to bevacizumab compared with control therapy (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.68 to 0.76; psurvival was also significantly longer in patients were treated with bevacizumab (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 0.91; psurvival rate was further seen in cancer patients receiving bevacizumab (odds ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.20 to 1.41; psurvival and overall survival, and increase one-year survival rate in cancer patients as compared with control therapy.

  4. Social inequality and incidence of and survival from cancers of the oesophagus, stomach and pancreas in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Sørensen, Mette; Hansen, Johnni;

    2008-01-01

    with increasing social advantage; this was most pronounced for oesophageal cancer and least for pancreatic cancer. The effect of socioeconomic position on survival after these cancers was less clear, perhaps due to the poor relative survival from these cancers and the fact that all three cancers are relatively...

  5. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers.

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    Elena Pereira

    Full Text Available High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools.Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival.Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic dilemma and a potential

  6. Comparison of Uncinate Process Cancer and Non-Uncinate Process Pancreatic Head Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Gao, Hongqiao; Zhuang, Yan; Yang, Yinmo

    2016-01-01

    The special anatomical position accounts for unusual clinicopathological features of uncinate process cancer. This study aimed to compare clinicopathological features of patients with uncinate process cancer to patients with non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. Total 160 patients with pancreatic head cancer were enrolled and classified into two groups: uncinate process cancer and non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. We found that the ratio of vascular invasion was significantly higher in patients with uncinate process cancer than in patients with non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. In addition, the rate of R1 resection was significantly higher in patients with uncinate process cancer. Furthermore, the median disease-free survival (11 months vs. 15 months, p=0.043) and overall survival (15 months vs. 19 months, p=0.036) after R0 resection were lower for uncinate process cancer. Locoregional recurrence was more frequent (p=0.017) and earlier (12 months vs. 36 months; p=0.002) in patients with uncinate process cancer than in patients with non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. In conclusion, uncinate process cancer is more likely to invade blood vessel and has worse prognosis due to the earlier and more frequent locoregional recurrence.

  7. Predictive factors of the survival of women with invasive breast cancer in French Guiana: the burden of health inequalities

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    Roué, Tristan; Labbé, Sylvain; Belliardo, Sophie; Plenet, Juliette; Douine, Maylis; Nacher, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This study aimed to compare the relative survival of patients with invasive breast cancer between women from French Guiana (a French territory in South America) and metropolitan France. No study hadever compared survival of breast cancer on the basis of immigrant status in France. Our study underlined that access to care for migrants is challenging whichwgenerates health inequalities. Background The prognosis of breast cancer in French Guiana is worse than in France wi...

  8. Anticoagulant treatment and survival in cancer patients. The evidence from clinical studies.

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    Lecumberri, Ramón; Páramo, José A; Rocha, Eduardo

    2005-09-01

    The association between cancer and an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (Trousseau syndrome) is well characterized and recent studies have shown that the hemostatic system plays a key role at different stages in the process of tumorigenesis. Anticoagulant drugs therefore appear to be an attractive strategy in cancer therapy, with an effect that would surpass the benefit of preventing thrombosis. This hypothesis was initially supported by the post-hoc analysis of clinical trials not primarily designed to evaluate the effect of anticoagulants, mainly low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), on cancer survival. Other studies regarding the addition of unfractionated heparin or oral anticoagulants to standard cancer treatment offered controversial results. However, recent investigations among cancer patients without deep venous thrombosis, with cancer-related mortality as the primary end point, suggest that at least in some patients LMWH may exert an antineoplastic effect in vivo and alter the natural history of malignant disease by increasing the response rates and, therefore, improving survival. Additional research on this field is needed to clarify the biological mechanisms involved and to answer yet unsolved questions such as the types of tumor and stages of disease most suitable for this treatment as well as how to optimize treatment regimens.

  9. Cancer incidence and patient survival rates among the residents in the Pudong New Area of Shanghai between 2002 and 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Pan Li; Guang-Wen Cao; Qiao Sun; Chen Yang; Bei Yan; Mei-Yu Zhang; Yi-Fei Fu; Li-Ming Yang

    2013-01-01

    With the growing threat of malignancy to health, it is necessary to analyze cancer incidence and patient survival rates among the residents in Pudong New Area of Shanghai to formulate better cancer prevention strategies. A total of 43,613 cancer patients diagnosed between 2002 and 2006 were recruited from the Pudong New Area Cancer Registry. The incidence, observed survival rate, and relative survival rate of patients grouped by sex, age, geographic area, and TNM stage were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier, life table, and Ederer II methods, respectively. Between 2002 and 2006, cancer incidence in Pudong New Area was 349.99 per 100,000 person-years, and the 10 most frequently diseased sites were the lung, stomach, colon and rectum, liver, breast, esophagus, pancreas, brain and central nervous system, thyroid, and bladder. For patients with cancers of the colon and rectum, breast, thyroid, brain and central nervous system, and bladder, the 5-year relative survival rate was greater than 40%, whereas patients with cancers of the liver and pancreas had a 5-year relative survival rate of less than 10%. The 1-year to 5-year survival rates for patients grouped by sex, age, geographic area, and TNM stage differed significantly (al P<0.001). Our results indicate that cancer incidence and patient survival in Pudong New Area vary by tumor type, sex, age, geographic area, and TNM stage.

  10. Survival Analysis of 1,742 Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Hong PENG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective At present non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still the leading cause of death induced by cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors of advanced NSCLC. Methods Total 1,742 cases of stage IV NSCLC data from Jan 4, 2000 to Dec 25, 2008 in Shanghai Chest Hospital were collected, confirmed by pathological examinations. Analysis was made to observe the impact of treatment on prognosis in gender, age, smoking history, pathology, classification, clinical TNM stage. Survival rate, survival difference were evaluated by Kaplan-Meire method and Logrank test respectively. The prognosis were analyzed by Cox multivariate regression. Results The median survival time of 1,742 patients was 10.0 months (9.5 months-10.5 months. One, two, three, four, and five-year survival rates were 44%, 22%, 13%, 9%, 6% respectively. The median survivals of single or multiple metastasis were 11 months vs 7 months (P < 0.001. Survival time were different in metastasic organs, with the median survival time as follows: lung for about 12 months (11.0 months-12.9 months, bone for 9 months (8.3 months-9.6 months, brain for 8 months (6.8 months-9.1 months, liver, adrenal gland, distannt lymph node metastasis for 5 months (3.8 months-6.1 months, and subcutaneous for 3 months (1.7 months-4.3 months. The median survival times of adenocarcinoma (n=1,086, 62% and squamous cell carcinoma cases (n=305, 17.5% were 12 months vs 8 months (P < 0.001. The median survival time of chemotherapy and best supportive care were 11 months vs 6 months (P < 0.001; the median survival times of with and without radiotherapy were 11 months vs 9 months (P=0.017. Conclusion Gender, age, gross type, pathological type, clinical T stage, N stage, numbers of metastatic organ, smoking history, treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer were independent prognostic factors.

  11. Survival after Pneumonectomy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Sibu P. Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has a poor prognosis. Reports suggest that five-year survival after current treatment is between 14 to 24 percent. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity and mortality of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC and treated with pneumonectomy at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, KY. Methods: We reviewed the medical record and tumor registry follow-up data on 100 consecutive patients who underwent pneumonectomy for lung cancer at the University of Kentucky. Results: We identified thirty-six patients in stage III who underwent pneumonectomy. Ten patients had surgery only, eight patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, and eighteen patients received neoadjuvant therapy. There was one surgical death in this series. Mean follow-up was 2.9 years. One-, three-, and five-year survival was 66%, 38%, and 38%, respectively. Five-year survival for the group with adjuvant therapy was 60%. Conclusion: Most lung cancer patients present with advanced disease and the prognosis remains poor. Our experience indicates resection offers an above average chance of long-term survival when supplemented with neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy.

  12. Defining the Survival Benchmark for Breast Cancer Patients with Systemic Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, Simon B; Ambros, Tadeu; Zaravinos, John; Montero, Alberto J; Mahtani, Reshma L; Ahn, Eugene R; Mani, Aruna; Markward, Nathan J; Vogel, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our original paper, published in 1992, reported a median overall survival after first relapse in breast cancer of 26 months. The current retrospective review concentrates more specifically on patients with first systemic relapse, recognizing that subsets of patients with local recurrence are potentially curable. METHODS Records of 5,168 patients from a largely breast-cancer-specific oncology practice were reviewed to identify breast cancer patients with their first relapse between 1996 and 2006 after primary treatment. There were 189 patients diagnosed with metastatic disease within 2 months of being seen by our therapeutic team and 101 patients diagnosed with metastatic disease greater than 2 months. The patients were divided in order to account for lead-time bias than could potentially confound the analysis of the latter 101 patients. RESULTS Median survival for our primary study population of 189 patients was 33 months. As expected, the median survival from first systemic relapse (MSFSR) for the 101 patients excluded because of the potential for lead-time bias was better at 46 months. Factors influencing prognosis included estrogen receptor (ER) status, disease-free interval (DFI), and dominant site of metastasis. Compared with our original series, even with elimination of local-regional recurrences in our present series, the median survival from first relapse has improved by 7 months over the past two decades. CONCLUSION The new benchmark for MSFSR approaches 3 years. PMID:25922577

  13. Five year retrospective survival analysis of triple negative breast cancer in North-West India

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    B Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In our institute, about 10% of total cancer is female breast cancer. This analysis was performed to check triple negativity among these patients with their survival strength up to 5 years in relation to different age groups, stage and chemotherapy protocols. Materials and Methods: 208 immunohistochemistry proved triple negative breast cancer patients registered and treated until 2008 were retrospectively selected for the study. Overall survival up to 5 years was observed on the basis of stage, different age groups and chemotherapy regimens. All patients had undergone surgery, conventional external beam radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The majority of patients (41% were in the age group 21-30 years. Stage IV was seen in 18% of the patients at diagnosis and mainly in 21-40 years age group. Only 3% of females were >70 years age and were of Stage I and II. Overall 5 year survival in Stage I in Cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin/Epirubicin, 5-Flurouracil group was 37.5% as compared with Docetaxel/Paclitaxel, Epirubicin group 93% (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Triple negativity in North-West India is about 11.8%. We observed it in younger patients mainly with highly aggressive behaviors. Taxane based chemotherapy gives better result as compared with anthracycline based regimens in all stages.

  14. Statin use and breast cancer survival: a nationwide cohort study from Finland.

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    Teemu J Murtola

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that statins, an established drug group in the prevention of cardiovascular mortality, could delay or prevent breast cancer recurrence but the effect on disease-specific mortality remains unclear. We evaluated risk of breast cancer death among statin users in a population-based cohort of breast cancer patients. The study cohort included all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in Finland during 1995-2003 (31,236 cases, identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Information on statin use before and after the diagnosis was obtained from a national prescription database. We used the Cox proportional hazards regression method to estimate mortality among statin users with statin use as time-dependent variable. A total of 4,151 participants had used statins. During the median follow-up of 3.25 years after the diagnosis (range 0.08-9.0 years 6,011 participants died, of which 3,619 (60.2% was due to breast cancer. After adjustment for age, tumor characteristics, and treatment selection, both post-diagnostic and pre-diagnostic statin use were associated with lowered risk of breast cancer death (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.38-0.55 and HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.44-0.67, respectively. The risk decrease by post-diagnostic statin use was likely affected by healthy adherer bias; that is, the greater likelihood of dying cancer patients to discontinue statin use as the association was not clearly dose-dependent and observed already at low-dose/short-term use. The dose- and time-dependence of the survival benefit among pre-diagnostic statin users suggests a possible causal effect that should be evaluated further in a clinical trial testing statins' effect on survival in breast cancer patients.

  15. Incidence and survival of stomach cancer in a high-risk population of Chile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katy Heise; Enriqueta Bertran; Marcelo E Andia; Catterina Ferreccio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the incidence and survival rate of stomach cancer (SC) and its associated factors in a high risk population in Chile. METHODS: The population-based cancer registry of Valdivia, included in the International Agency for Research on Cancer system, covers 356 396 residents of Valdivia Province, Southern Chile. We studied all SC cases entered in this Registry during 1998-2002 (529 cases). Population data came from the Chilean census (2002). Standardized incidence rates per 100 000 inhabitants (SIR) using the world population, cumulative risk of developing cancer before age 75, and rate ratios by sex, age, ethnicity and social factors were estimated. Relative survival (Ederer Ⅱ method) and age-standardized estimates (Brenner method) were calculated. Specific survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were measured at 3 and 5 years and survival curves were analyzed with the Logrank and Breslow tests. Survival was studied in relation to demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory results and medical management of the cases. Those variables significantly associated with survival were later included in a Cox multivariate model. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2002, 529 primary gastric cancers occurred in Valdivia (crude incidence rate 29.2 per 100 000 inhabitants). Most cases were male (69.0%), residents of urban areas (57.5%) and Hispanic (83.2%), with a low education level (84.5% < 8 school years). SC SIR was higher in men than women (40.8 and 14.8 respectively, P < 0.001), risk factors were low education RR 4.4 (95% CI: 2.9-6.8) and 1.6, (95% CI: 1.1-2.1) for women and men respectively and Mapuche ethnicity only significant for women (RR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.7). Of all cases, 76.4% were histologically confirmed, 11.5% had a death certificate only (DCO), 56.1% were TNM stage Ⅳ; 445 cases (84.1%) were eligible for survival analysis, all completed five years follow-up; 42 remained alive, 392 died of SC and 11 died from other causes. Specific 5-year survival, excluding cases

  16. Cancer targeted gene therapy of BikDD inhibits orthotopic lung cancer growth and improves long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Y-P; Tzeng, T-F; Kan, S-F; Hsu, J; Xie, X; Han, Z; Lin, W-C; Li, L-Y; Hung, M-C

    2009-09-17

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death due to the high incidence of metastasis; therefore, novel and effective treatments are urgently needed. A current strategy is cancer-specific targeted gene therapy. Although many identified that cancer-specific promoters are highly specific, they tend to have low activity compared with the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, limiting their application. We developed a targeted gene therapy expression system for lung cancer that is highly specific with strong activity. Our expression vector uses the survivin promoter, highly expressed in many cancers but not normal adult tissues. We enhanced the survivin promoter activity comparable to the CMV promoter in lung cancer cell lines using an established platform technology, whereas the survivin promoter remained weak in normal cells. In mouse models, the transgene was specifically expressed in the lung tumor tissue, compared with the CMV promoter that was expressed in both normal and tumor tissues. In addition, the therapeutic gene BikDD, a mutant form of pro-apoptotic Bcl2 interacting killer, induced cell killing in vitro, and inhibited cell growth and prolonged mouse survival in vivo. Importantly, there was virtually no toxicity when BikDD was expressed with our expression system. Thus, the current report provides a therapeutic efficacy and safe strategy worthy of development in clinical trials treating lung cancer.

  17. The combined effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on cancer survival rates.

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    Chun-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This population-based study investigated the relationship between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES and mortality rates for major cancers in Taiwan. METHODS: A population-based follow-up study was conducted with 20,488 cancer patients diagnosed in 2002. Each patient was traced to death or for 5 years. The individual income-related insurance payment amount was used as a proxy measure of individual SES for patients. Neighborhood SES was defined by income, and neighborhoods were grouped as living in advantaged or disadvantaged areas. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the death-free survival rates between the different SES groups after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. RESULTS: After adjusting for patient characteristics (age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, urbanization, and area of residence, tumor extent, treatment modalities (operation and adjuvant therapy, and hospital characteristics (ownership and teaching level, colorectal cancer, and head and neck cancer patients under 65 years old with low individual SES in disadvantaged neighborhoods conferred a 1.5 to 2-fold higher risk of mortality, compared with patients with high individual SES in advantaged neighborhoods. A cross-level interaction effect was found in lung cancer and breast cancer. Lung cancer and breast cancer patients less than 65 years old with low SES in advantaged neighborhoods carried the highest risk of mortality. Prostate cancer patients aged 65 and above with low SES in disadvantaged neighborhoods incurred the highest risk of mortality. There was no association between SES and mortality for cervical cancer and pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that cancer patients with low individual SES have the highest risk of mortality even under a universal health-care system. Public health strategies and welfare policies must continue to focus on this vulnerable group.

  18. Survival Prognostic Factors of Male Breast Cancer in Southern Iran: a LASSO-Cox Regression Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Hadi Raeisi; Salehi, Alireza; Zare, Najaf

    2015-01-01

    We used to LASSO-Cox method for determining prognostic factors of male breast cancer survival and showed the superiority of this method compared to Cox proportional hazard model in low sample size setting. In order to identify and estimate exactly the relative hazard of the most important factors effective for the survival duration of male breast cancer, the LASSO-Cox method has been used. Our data includes the information of male breast cancer patients in Fars province, south of Iran, from 1989 to 2008. Cox proportional hazard and LASSO-Cox models were fitted for 20 classified variables. To reduce the impact of missing data, the multiple imputation method was used 20 times through the Markov chain Mont Carlo method and the results were combined with Rubin's rules. In 50 patients, the age at diagnosis was 59.6 (SD=12.8) years with a minimum of 34 and maximum of 84 years and the mean of survival time was 62 months. Three, 5 and 10 year survival were 92%, 77% and 26%, respectively. Using the LASSO-Cox method led to eliminating 8 low effect variables and also decreased the standard error by 2.5 to 7 times. The relative efficiency of LASSO-Cox method compared with the Cox proportional hazard method was calculated as 22.39. The19 years follow of male breast cancer patients show that the age, having a history of alcohol use, nipple discharge, laterality, histological grade and duration of symptoms were the most important variables that have played an effective role in the patient's survival. In such situations, estimating the coefficients by LASSO-Cox method will be more efficient than the Cox's proportional hazard method.

  19. Tumor subtype-specific associations of hormone-related reproductive factors on breast cancer survival.

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    Nan Song

    Full Text Available It is inconclusive whether reproductive factors, which are known as risk factors of breast cancer, also influence survival. We investigated overall and subtype-specific associations between reproductive factors and breast cancer survival.Among 3,430 incident breast cancer patients who enrolled in the Seoul Breast Cancer Study, 269 patients (7.8% died and 528 patients (15.4% recurred. The overall and subtype-specific associations of reproductive factors including age at menarche and menopause, duration of estrogen exposure, menstrual cycle, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy, number of children, age at last birth, time since the last birth, and duration of breastfeeding, on overall and disease-free survival (OS and DFS were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model.An older age at menarche (HR for OS=1.10, 95% CI=1.03-1.19, a greater number of children (≥ 4 vs. 2, HR for DFS=1.58, 95% CI=1.11-2.26, and a shorter time since last birth (<5 vs. ≥ 20 years, HR for DFS=1.67, 95% CI=1.07-2.62 were associated with worse survival while longer duration of estrogen exposure with better survival (HR for DFS=0.97, 95% CI=0.96-0.99. In the stratified analyses by subtypes, those associations were more pronounced among women with hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2 positive (HR+ HER2+ tumors.It is suggested that reproductive factors, specifically age at menarche, number of children, time since last birth, and duration of estrogen exposure, could influence breast tumor progression, especially in the HR+ HER2+ subtype.

  20. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Andrulis, Irene L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Guo, Qi; Rhenius, Valerie; Cornelissen, Sten; Rudolph, Anja; Knight, Julia A; Loehberg, Christian R; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Van Dyck, Laurien; Nevelsteen, Ines; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Simard, Jacques; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-11-10

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox' regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P=1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses.

  1. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.

    distribution models, and gamma response models was developed. This software can be used for direct numerical comparison between the models, submodels and their parameters and experimental data. In the present paper, we look at 10%-survival data from cell lines irradiated in vitro with carbon and proton beams......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion...... by Tsuruoka et al. [4] . Results and conclusion: Preliminary results show a good agreement of models predictions and the experimental data for clinical doses. When investigating the influence of radial dose distributions on inactivation cross section in the Katz model, we found that one of the most important...

  2. Impact of preoperative chemoradiotherapy on survival in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P(a)lvi Vento; Harri Mustonen; Timo Joensuu; P(a)ivi K(a)rkk(a)inen; Eero Kivilaakso; Tuula Kiviluoto

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether preoperative chemoradiation therapy improves survival of patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing resectional surgery.METHODS: Forty-seven patients with a malignant pancreatic tumor localized in the head or uncinate process of the pancreas underwent radical pancreaticoduodenectomy. Twenty-two received chemoradiation therapy (gemcitabine and radiation dose 50.4 Gy) before surgery (CRR) and 25 patients underwent surgery only (RO). The study was non-randomised. Patients were identified from a prospective database.RESULTS: The median survival time was 30.2 mo in the CRR group and 35.9 mo in the RO group. No statistically significant differences were found in subclasses according to lymph node involvement, TNM stages, tumor size, or perineural invasion. The one, three and five year survival rates were 81%, 33% and 33%, respectively, in the CRR group and 72%, 47% and 23%, respectively, in the RO group. In ductal adenocarcinoma, the median survival time was 27 mo in the CRR group and 20 mo in the RO group. No statistically significant differences were found in the above subclasses. The one, three and five year survival rates were 79%, 21% and 21%, respectively, in the CRR group and 64%, 50% and 14%, respectively,in the RO group. The overall hospital mortality rate was 2%. The morbidity rate was 45% in the CRR group and 32% (NS) in the RO group.CONCLUSION: Major multicenter randomized studies are needed to conclusively assess the impact of neoadjuvant treatment in the management of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Surviving with lung cancer: medication-taking and oral targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Karen E; Happ, Mary Beth; Bender, Catherine M; Engberg, Sandra J; Tarhini, Ahmad; Erlen, Judith A

    2014-01-01

    Oral epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, medication-taking implications are unknown. We used grounded theory to explore the process of medication-taking for NSCLC patients receiving oral EGFRIs. Thirty-two interviews were conducted for 13 participants purposively selected for gender, race/ethnicity, age, time in therapy, dose reductions, and therapy discontinuation and theoretically sampled for age and health insurance carrier. The study produced a grounded theory, Surviving with Lung Cancer, in which participants framed EGFRI therapy within recognition of NSCLC as a life-limiting illness without cure. Medication-taking was a "window" into participants' process of surviving with metastatic cancer that included deciding and preparing to take EGFRIs and treating lung cancer as a chronic condition. Our results contribute to understanding how NSCLC patients view themselves in the context of a life-limiting illness and support development of a theoretically-based intervention to improve medication-taking with EGFRIs.

  4. Do signal transduction cascades influence survival in triple-negative breast cancer? A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Jan-Niclas; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a rather aggressive form of breast cancer, comprised by early metastasis formation and reduced overall survival of the affected patients. Steroid hormone receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 are not overexpressed, limiting therapeutic options. Therefore, new treatment options have to be investigated. The aim of our preliminary study was to detect coherences between some molecules of intracellular signal transduction pathways and survival of patients with TNBC, in order to obtain some hints for new therapeutical solutions. Methods Thirty-one paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples, which were determined to be negative for steroid hormone receptors as well as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, were immunohistochemically stained for a number of signal transduction molecules from several signaling pathways. β-Catenin, HIF1α, MCL, Notch1, LRP6, XBP1, and FOXP3 were stained with specific antibodies, and their staining was correlated with patient survival by Kaplan–Meier analyses. Results Only two of the investigated molecules have shown correlation with overall survival. Cytoplasmic staining of HIF1α and centro-tumoral lymphocyte FOXP3 staining showed statistically significant correlations with survival. Conclusion The coherence of signal transduction molecules with survival of patients with TNBC is still controversially discussed in the literature. Our study comprises one more mosaic stone in the elucidation of these intracellular processes and their influences on patient outcome. Lots of research still has to be done in this field, but it would be worthwhile as it may offer new therapeutic targets for a group of patients with breast cancer, which is still hard to treat. PMID:27307757

  5. Influence of socioeconomic factors on survival after breast cancer-A nationwide cohort study of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 1983-1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Ross, Lone; During, M.;

    2007-01-01

    The reasons for social inequality in breast cancer survival are far from established. Our study aims to study the importance of a range of socioeconomic factors and comorbid disorders on survival after breast cancer surgery in Denmark where the health care system is tax-funded and uniform. All 25...... resulting in a 15% lower survival 10 year after primary surgery in poor women with low-risk breast cancer having comorbid conditions ( approximately 65%) compared to rich women with similar breast cancer prognosis and comorbid conditions ( approximately 80%) suggests that part of the explanation...

  6. Disease-specific survival for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer affected by statistical method of assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Fei

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, prognosis and impact of prognostic/predictive factors are assessed with Kaplan-Meier plots and/or the Cox proportional hazard model. There might be substantive differences from the results using these models for the same patients, if different statistical methods were used, for example, Boag log-normal (cure-rate model, or log-normal survival analysis. Methods Cohort of 244 limited-stage small-cell lung cancer patients, were accrued between 1981 and 1998, and followed to the end of 2005. The endpoint was death with or from lung cancer, for disease-specific survival (DSS. DSS at 1-, 3- and 5-years, with 95% confidence limits, are reported for all patients using the Boag, Kaplan-Meier, Cox, and log-normal survival analysis methods. Factors with significant effects on DSS were identified with step-wise forward multivariate Cox and log-normal survival analyses. Then, DSS was ascertained for patients with specific characteristics defined by these factors. Results The median follow-up of those alive was 9.5 years. The lack of events after 1966 days precluded comparison after 5 years. DSS assessed by the four methods in the full cohort differed by 0–2% at 1 year, 0–12% at 3 years, and 0–1% at 5 years. Log-normal survival analysis indicated DSS of 38% at 3 years, 10–12% higher than with other methods; univariate 95% confidence limits were non-overlapping. Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction significantly impacted DSS. DSS assessed by the Cox and log-normal survival analysis methods for four clinical risk groups differed by 1–6% at 1 year, 15–26% at 3 years, and 0–12% at 5 years; multivariate 95% confidence limits were overlapping in all instances. Conclusion Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction all significantly impacted DSS. Apparent DSS for patients was influenced by the

  7. 中国和加拿大两所医院乳腺癌病人术后生存分析比较%Comparison of survival among patients with breast cancer treate d at First Teaching Hospital,Changchun,China and at Saint-Sacrement Hospital,Q uebec,Canada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志民; 付彤; 辛志泳; 孙淑滨; 司序

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To explore th five year survivals and some prognostic factors for bres at cancer patients in the north areas of China,and the indentification or differ e nces on these variables among breast cancer patients between in China and in Can ada.Methods:All Data were collected from the hospital records of 1 002 breast cancer patients who were initially treated at the First Hospital of Jilin Uni versity (116 cases FTH,Changchun China) and the Sain t-Sacrement Hospital (886 cases in SSH,Quebec Canada) respectively by use of Historical Cohort survey,and the survival propotions were calculated and comp ared stradly by use of Kaplan-Meier method.Results:Age at diagnosis was substantially lower (average of age about 10 years less) among breast cancer patients seen at FTH compared to those treated at SSH (P<0.0001).Patients in the two hospitals differed in respect to tumor size at pathology (P=0.036).The proportion of women with lymph node involvement was greater at FTH (61.1%) than that at HSS(37.3%)(P<0.0001).Surgical treat ment of breats cancer was varied considerably:the radical mastectomy was frequen tly performed for andy stage of breast cancer patients in Changchun,but the part ial mastectomy was mainly used for patients with stage Ⅰ or Ⅱ in Quebec.The fi ve year survival was 74.2% among breast cacer patients seen at FTH compared to 7 6.3% among women treated at HSS,and there was no singnificant differrence (P =0.302). Conclusion:Five year survival of breast cancer patients treated surgically in C hangchun,China,was similar to that of patients treated surgically in Quebec,Can ada except for differences in age at diagnosis,tumor size and lymph node involve ment%目的:探讨我国北方地区乳腺癌病人的5年生存率、主要预后因素及其与加拿大类似气候地 区的异同。方法:收集吉林大学第一医院(中国长春,简称FTH)和拉瓦尔大学圣萨可门医 院(加拿大魁北克,简称SSH)1 002例乳腺癌病人的资料

  8. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roses, Robert E., E-mail: Robert.Roses@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mamtani, Ronac [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Datta, Jashodeep [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  9. Reduced Popdc3 expression correlates with high risk and poor survival in patients with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Luo; Ming-Liang Lu; Gong-Fang Zhao; Hua Huang; Meng-Yao Zheng; Jiang Chang; Lin Lv

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the expression of Popeye domain containing 3 (Popdc3) and its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognosis of gastric cancer.METHODS:The method of immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of Popdc3 in 306 cases of human gastric cancer and 84 noncancerous gastric tissues.Simultaneously,the relationship between Popdc3 expression and the survival of the patients was retrospectively analyzed.RESULTS:Popdc3 was detected in 72 (85.71%) of 84 human nontumor mucosa.High expression of Popdc3 protein was detected in 78 (25.49%) of 306 human gastric cancer cases,and low expression was detected in 228 (74.51%).Low expression of Popdc3 correlated with depth of invasion (P < 0.0001),regional lymph nodes (P < 0.0001) and distant metastasis (P =0.02),and tumor,nodes,metastasis (TNM) stages (P< 0.0001).On multivariate analysis,only the patient's gender,regional lymph node metastasis,distant metastasis,TNM stages,and the expression of Popdc3 were independent prognostic factors in patients with gastric cancer.The Kaplan-Meier plot showed that low Popdc3 expression had a much more significant effect on the survival of those patients with early-stage tumors (x2 =104.741,P < 0.0001),with a > 51.9% reduction in the three-year survival compared with high Popdc3 expression.In late stages,the difference was also significant (x2 =5.930,P =0.015),with a 32.6% reduction in the three-year survival.CONCLUSION:Reduced expression of Popdc3 may play a significant role in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.Popdc3 may be an independent prognostic factor.

  10. An overview of cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America: the case for investment in cancer health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Swaminathan, R; Jayant, K; Brenner, H

    2011-01-01

    Population-based cancer survival data, a key indicator for monitoring progress against cancer, are reported from 27 population-based cancer registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. In China, Singapore, the Republic of Korea, and Turkey, the 5-year age-standardized relative survival ranged from 76-82% for breast, 63-79% for cervical, 71-78% for bladder, and 44-60% for large-bowel cancer. Survival did not exceed 22% for any cancer site in The Gambia, or 13% for any cancer site except breast (46%) in Uganda. For localized cancers of the breast, large bowel, larynx, ovary, urinary bladder and for regional diseases at all sites, higher survival rates were observed in countries with more rather than less developed health services. Inter- and intra-country variations in survival imply that the levels of development of health services and their efficiency to provide early diagnosis, treatment and clinical follow-up care have a profound impact on survival from cancer. These are reliable baseline summary estimates to evaluate improvements in cancer control and emphasise the need for urgent investment to improve awareness, population-based cancer registration, early detection programmes, health-services infrastructure, and human resources in these countries in the future.

  11. Short telomere length, cancer survival, and cancer risk in 47102 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Cawthon, Richard M;

    2013-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses have suggested that short telomere length was associated with increased risk of cancer. We therefore tested the hypotheses that short telomere length was associated with increased risk of cancer and with increased risk of early death after cancer.......Recent meta-analyses have suggested that short telomere length was associated with increased risk of cancer. We therefore tested the hypotheses that short telomere length was associated with increased risk of cancer and with increased risk of early death after cancer....

  12. HPV16 variant lineage, clinical stage, and survival in women with invasive cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuna Rosemary E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV16 variants are associated with different risks for development of CIN3 and invasive cancer, although all are carcinogenic. The relationship of HPV 16 variants to cancer survival has not been studied. Methods 155 HPV16-positive cervical cancers were categorized according to European and non-European variant patterns by DNA sequencing of the E6 open reading frame. Clinico-pathologic parameters and clinical outcome were collected by chart review and death registry data. Results Of the 155 women (mean age 44.7 years; median follow-up 26.7 months, 85.2% harbored European variants while 14.8% had non-European sequences. HPV16 variants differed by histologic cell type (p = 0.03 and stage (1 vs. 2+; p = 0.03. Overall, 107 women (68.0% were alive with no evidence of cancer, 42 (27.1% died from cervical cancer, 2 (1.3% were alive with cervical cancer, and 4 (2.6% died of other causes. Death due to cervical cancer was associated with European variant status (p Conclusions Overall, invasive cervical cancers with non-European variants showed a less aggressive behavior than those with European variants. These findings should be replicated in a population with more non-European cases.

  13. Common genetic polymorphisms of microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hyuna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the role of microRNA’s (miRNA’s biogenesis pathway genes in cancer development and progression has been well established, the association between genetic variants of this pathway genes and breast cancer survival is still unknown. Methods We used genotype data available from a previously conducted case–control study to investigate association between common genetic variations in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival. We investigated the possible associations between 41 germ-line single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and both disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS among 488 breast cancer patients. During the median follow-up of 6.24 years, 90 cases developed disease progression and 48 cases died. Results Seven SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer survival. Two SNPs in AGO2 (rs11786030 and rs2292779 and DICER1 rs1057035 were associated with both DFS and OS. Two SNPs in HIWI (rs4759659 and rs11060845 and DGCR8 rs9606250 were associated with DFS, while DROSHA rs874332 and GEMIN4 rs4968104 were associated with only OS. The most significant association was observed in variant allele of AGO2 rs11786030 with 2.62-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.41-4.88 and in minor allele homozygote of AGO2 rs2292779 with 2.94-fold increased risk of death (95% CI, 1.52-5.69. We also found cumulative effects of SNPs on DFS and OS. Compared to the subjects carrying 0 to 2 high-risk genotypes, those carrying 3 or 4–6 high-risk genotypes had an increased risk of disease progression with a hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% CI, 1.18- 3.93 and 4.47 (95% CI, 2.45- 8.14, respectively (P for trend, 6.11E-07. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variants in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes may be associated with breast cancer survival. Further studies in larger sample size and functional characterizations are warranted to validate these results.

  14. Role of comorbidity on survival after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for nonsurgically treated lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemgaard, Anders; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Iachina, Maria

    2015-01-01

    , sex, lung function, and comorbidity were all associated with survival. Apart from excess mortality among patients with unspecified histological subtypes (hazard ratio), there was no clear difference between the specified subtypes. When adjusting for the other factors, particularly age, sex......, performance status, and stage proved to be robust while risk estimates for comorbidity were attenuated somewhat. When grouped by the three types of cancer treatment or no treatment, there was no influence of comorbidity on radiation therapy and modest influence on survival after chemotherapy...

  15. Endometrial cancer survival after breast cancer in relation to tamoxifen treatment : Pooled results from three countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Michael E.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hoogendoorn, Wilhelmina E.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Hollema, Harry; van Boven, Hester; Press, Michael F.; Bernstein, Leslie; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Tamoxifen is an effective treatment for breast cancer but an undesirable side-effect is an increased risk of endometrial cancer, particularly rare tumor types associated with poor prognosis. We investigated whether tamoxifen therapy increases mortality among breast cancer patients subs

  16. Roles of TRPM8 Ion Channels in Cancer: Proliferation, Survival, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to provide a critical review of the transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 8 (TRPM8 in cancers, with an emphasis on its roles in cellular proliferation, survival, and invasion. The TRPM8 ion channels regulate Ca²⁺ homeostasis and function as a cellular sensor and transducer of cold temperature. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that TRPM8 is aberrantly expressed in a variety of malignant solid tumors. Clinicopathological analysis has shown that over-expression of TRPM8 correlates with tumor progression. Experimental data have revealed important roles of TRPM8 channels in cancer cells proliferation, survival, and invasion, which appear to be dependent on the cancer type. Recent reports have begun to reveal the signaling mechanisms that mediate the biological roles of TRPM8 in tumor growth and metastasis. Determining the mechanistic roles of TRPM8 in cancer is expected to elucidate the impact of thermal and chemical stimuli on the formation and progression of neoplasms. Translational research and clinical investigation of TRPM8 in malignant diseases will help exploit these ion channels as molecular biomarkers and therapeutic targets for developing precision cancer medicine.

  17. Improved survival of mice bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells treated with a combination of radioimmunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Bai, Jingming; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Biotracer Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Koshida, Kiyoshi [Department of Integrative Cancer Therapy and Urology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro [Radioisotope Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Watanabe, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama (Japan); Shuke, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    We attempted to determine whether the combined regimen of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and antiangiogenic therapy would favorably affect the survival of animals bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells. Daily antiangiogenic therapy with 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), 75 mg/kg, was initiated at 3 days following intrasplenic cell inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells. RIT with 7 MBq of {sup 131}I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, or {sup 131}I-HPMS-1, an irrelevant IgG1, was conducted at 7 days. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by LS180 cells was assessed in vitro. All nontreated mice died by 31 days following cell inoculation (n=5). Monotherapy comprising 2-ME treatment resulted in slightly better survival of mice (n=8) (P<0.05). {sup 131}I-A7 RIT displayed a marked therapeutic effect (n=8) (P<0.001); however, all animals eventually died due to metastases by 99 days. The combined regimen of {sup 131}I-A7 RIT and antiangiogenic therapy demonstrated a superior therapeutic effect in comparison to monotherapy consisting of either RIT or antiangiogenic therapy (n=10) (P<0.05); three mice survived the entire 160-day observation period. The combination of antiangiogenic therapy and {sup 131}I-HPMS-1 RIT failed to provide an appreciable benefit (n=5). Treatment with 2-ME decreased VEGF production by LS180 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, a combination regimen comprising RIT and antiangiogenic therapy initiated at the early stage of metastasis would be of great benefit in terms of improvement of the therapeutic efficacy with respect to liver metastases. (orig.)

  18. SNHG5 promotes colorectal cancer cell survival by counteracting STAU1-mediated mRNA destabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damas, Nkerorema Djodji; Marcatti, Michela; Côme, Christophe;

    2016-01-01

    We currently have limited knowledge of the involvement of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in normal cellular processes and pathologies. Here, we identify and characterize SNHG5 as a stable cytoplasmic lncRNA with up-regulated expression in colorectal cancer. Depletion of SNHG5 induces cell cycle...... characterize SNHG5 as a lncRNA promoting tumour cell survival in colorectal cancer and delineate a novel mechanism in which a cytoplasmic lncRNA functions through blocking the action of STAU1....

  19. Infinite mixture-of-experts model for sparse survival regression with application to breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahl Edgar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an infinite mixture-of-experts model to find an unknown number of sub-groups within a given patient cohort based on survival analysis. The effect of patient features on survival is modeled using the Cox’s proportionality hazards model which yields a non-standard regression component. The model is able to find key explanatory factors (chosen from main effects and higher-order interactions for each sub-group by enforcing sparsity on the regression coefficients via the Bayesian Group-Lasso. Results Simulated examples justify the need of such an elaborate framework for identifying sub-groups along with their key characteristics versus other simpler models. When applied to a breast-cancer dataset consisting of survival times and protein expression levels of patients, it results in identifying two distinct sub-groups with different survival patterns (low-risk and high-risk along with the respective sets of compound markers. Conclusions The unified framework presented here, combining elements of cluster and feature detection for survival analysis, is clearly a powerful tool for analyzing survival patterns within a patient group. The model also demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing complex interactions which can contribute to definition of novel prognostic compound markers.

  20. Survival after liver resection in metastatic colorectal cancer: review and meta-analysis of prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanas GP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gena P Kanas,1 Aliki Taylor,2 John N Primrose,3 Wendy J Langeberg,4 Michael A Kelsh,4 Fionna S Mowat,1 Dominik D Alexander,5 Michael A Choti,6 Graeme Poston71Health Sciences, Exponent, Menlo Park, CA, USA; 2Centre for Observational Research, Amgen, Uxbridge, UK; 3Department of Surgery, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK; 4Center for Observational Research, Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 5Health Sciences, Exponent, Chicago, IL, USA; 6Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; 7Department of Surgery, Aintree University Hospitals NHS, Liverpool, UKBackground: Hepatic metastases develop in approximately 50% of colorectal cancer (CRC cases. We performed a review and meta-analysis to evaluate survival after resection of CRC liver metastases (CLMs and estimated the summary effect for seven prognostic factors.Methods: Studies published between 1999 and 2010, indexed on Medline, that reported survival after resection of CLMs, were reviewed. Meta-relative risks for survival by prognostic factor were calculated, stratified by study size and annual clinic volume. Cumulative meta-analysis results by annual clinic volume were plotted.Results: Five- and 10-year survival ranged from 16% to 74% (median 38% and 9% to 69% (median 26%, respectively, based on 60 studies. The overall summary median survival time was 3.6 (range: 1.7–7.3 years. Meta-relative risks (95% confidence intervals by prognostic factor were: node positive primary, 1.6 (1.5–1.7; carcinoembryonic antigen level, 1.9 (1.1–3.2; extrahepatic disease, 1.9 (1.5–2.4; poor tumor grade, 1.9 (1.3–2.7; positive margin, 2.0 (1.7–2.5; >1 liver metastases, 1.6 (1.4–1.8; and >3 cm tumor diameter, 1.5 (1.3–1.8. Cumulative meta-analyses by annual clinic volume suggested improved survival with increasing volume.Conclusion: The overall median survival following CLM liver resection was 3.6 years. All seven investigated prognostic factors showed a modest but significant predictive

  1. Survival benefit of early androgen receptor inhibitor therapy in locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib J

    2015-01-01

    -metastatic PCa. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate overall survival (OS) and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was performed to analyse time-to-event (death). FINDINGS: A total of 1218 patients were included into the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group (SPCG)-6 study of which 607 were randomised......BACKGROUND: The optimal timing of endocrine therapy in non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is still an issue of debate. METHODS: A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trial comparing bicalutamide 150mg once daily with placebo in addition to standard care in patients with hormone-naïve, non...... disease (HR=1.19 (95% CI: 1.00-1.43), p=0.056). However, a survival gain from bicalutamide therapy was present in patients with localised disease and a baseline PSA greater than 28ng/mL at randomisation. In multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, only including patients managed on watchful waiting...

  2. Genetic variants in ABCG1 are associated with survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanru; Liu, Hongliang; Ready, Neal E; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Christiani, David C; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-06-01

    Cell membrane transporters and metabolic enzymes play a crucial role in the transportation of a wide variety of substrates that maintain homeostasis in biological processes. We explored associations between genetic variants in these genes and survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by reanalyzing two datasets from published genome-wide association studies (GWASs). In the discovery by using the GWAS dataset of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, we evaluated associations of 1,245 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of four transporter families and two metabolic enzyme families with survival of 1,185 NSCLC patients. We then performed a replication analysis in the Harvard University Lung Cancer study (LCS) with 984 NSCLC patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression and false discovery rate (FDR) corrections were performed to evaluate the associations. We identified that 21 genotyped SNPs in eight gene regions were significantly associated with survival with FDR ≤ 0.1 in the discovery dataset. Subsequently, we confirmed six SNPs, which were putative functional, in ABCG1 of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family in the replication dataset. In the pooled analysis, two tagging (at r(2)  > 0.8 for linkage disequilibrium with other replicated SNPs)/functional SNPs were independently associated with survival: rs225388 G > A [adjusted hazards ratio (HR) = 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-1.20, Ptrend  = 4.6 × 10(-3)] and rs225390 A > G (adjusted HR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, Ptrend  = 3.8 × 10(-4) ). Our results indicated that genetic variants of ABCG1 may be predictors of survival of NSCLC patients.

  3. Survival Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Patients Aged 70 and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankun SUN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective With a trend of worldwide increasing incidence of elderly population, more and more people pay close attention to diseases in the elderly. Lung cancer is a typical disease of the elderly patients. Around one-third of all patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC are over the age of 70. Many authors use the age 70 to define the elderly patients in lung cancer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the survival of patients older than 70 with NSCLC and explore the independent prognostic factors in this group of patients. Methods 148 elderly patients with NSCLC were reviewed. All the potential prognostic factors, including sex, age, smoke, symptoms, pathological types, clinical stage, ECOG performance status, complication, focus resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were analyzed by COX regression in SPSS 13.0 software. Results After 5-168 months follow-up, 119 patients died, the overall survival rate was 19.6%. 1,2,3,5-year survival rates were 43.2%, 19.0%, 9.0% and 5.4% respectively. Median survival time (MST was 9.29 moths. COX regression showed clinical stage (P=0.002, ECOG performance status (P=0.000, focus resection (P=0.012 and radiotherapy of primary site (P=0.012 were the independent prognostic factors. Conclusion The elderly patients with NSCLC in early stage and good performance status tend to have longer life expectance, whereas resection and radiotherapy of primary site can prolong the survival time (P<0.05.

  4. Repetitive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of liver metastases from gastric cancer: Local control and survival results

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    Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: T.Vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Eichler, Katrin [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Trojan, Jörg [Department of Internal Medicine I, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Zangos, Stephan [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Naguib, Nagy N.N. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the local tumor control and survival data after transarterial chemoembolization with different drug combinations in the palliative treatment of patients with liver metastases of gastric cancer. Materials and methods: The study was retrospectively performed. 56 patients (mean age, 52.4) with unresectable liver metastases of gastric cancer who did not respond to systemic chemotherapy were repeatedly treated with TACE in 4-week intervals. In total, 310 chemoembolization procedures were performed (mean, 5.5 sessions per patient). The local chemotherapy protocol consisted of mitomycin alone (30.4%), mitomycin and gemcitabine (33.9%), or mitomycin, gemcitabine and cisplatin (35.7%). Embolization was performed with lipiodol and starch microspheres. Local tumor response was evaluated by MRI according to RECIST. Survival data from first chemoembolization were calculated according to the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: The local tumor control was: complete response in 1.8% (n = 1), partial response in 1.8% (n = 1), stable disease in 51.8% (n = 29) and progressive disease in 44.6% (n = 25) of patients. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rate from the start of chemoembolization were 58%, 38%, and 23% respectively. The median and mean survival times were 13 and 27.1 months. A Statistically significant difference between patients treated with different chemotherapy protocols was noted (ρ = 0.045) with the best survival time in the mitomycin, gemcitabine and cisplatin group. Conclusion: Transarterial chemoembolization is a minimally invasive therapy option for palliative treatment of liver metastases in patients with gastric cancer.

  5. Oral contraceptives and survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivers, Katrina F; Gammon, Marilie D; Abrahamson, Page E; Lund, Mary Jo; Flagg, Elaine W; Moorman, Patricia G; Kaufman, Jay S; Cai, Jianwen; Porter, Peggy L; Brinton, Louise A; Eley, J William; Coates, Ralph J

    2007-09-01

    Recent oral contraceptive (OC) use is associated with modestly higher breast cancer incidence among younger women, but its impact on survival is unclear. This study examined the relationship between OC use before breast cancer diagnosis and survival. A population-based sample of 1,264 women aged 20 to 54 years with a first primary invasive breast cancer during 1990 to 1992 were followed up for 8 to 10 years. OC and covariate data were obtained by interviews conducted shortly after diagnosis and from medial records. All-cause mortality was ascertained through the National Death Index (n = 292 deaths). Age- and income-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by Cox regression methods. All-cause mortality was not associated with ever use of OCs or duration of use. Compared with nonusers, mortality estimates were elevated among women who were using OCs at diagnosis or stopped use in the previous year (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.95-2.61). The HR for use of high-dose estrogen pills within 5 years before diagnosis was double that of nonusers (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.29-4.41) or, if the most recent pill included the progestin levonorgestrel, compared with nonusers (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.03-3.91). Because subgroup estimates were based on small numbers of OC users, these results should be cautiously interpreted. Overall, most aspects of OC use did not seem to influence survival, although there is limited evidence that OC use just before diagnosis, particularly use of some pill types, may negatively impact survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

  6. Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival

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    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Munck, Linda de [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Visser, Otto [Comprehensive Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willemse, Pax H.B. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Siesling, Sabine [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Health Technology and Services Research, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Maduro, John H., E-mail: j.h.maduro@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

  7. Polymorphism at 19q13.41 predicts breast cancer survival specifically after endocrine therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sofia; Fagerholm, Rainer; Rafiq, Sajjad; Tapper, William; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although most estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients benefit from endocrine therapies, a significant proportion do not. Our aim was to identify inherited genetic variations that might predict survival among patients receiving adjuvant endocrine therapies. Experimental Design We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide studies; Helsinki Breast Cancer Study, 805 patients, with 240 receiving endocrine therapy and Prospective study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer, 536 patients, with 155 endocrine therapy-patients, evaluating 486,478 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The top four associations from the endocrine treatment subgroup were further investigated in two independent datasets totalling 5011 patients, with 3485 receiving endocrine therapy. Results A meta-analysis identified a common SNP rs8113308, mapped to 19q13.41, associating with reduced survival among endocrine treated patients (hazard ratio (HR) 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.07, P = 6.34 ×10−7) and improved survival among ER-negative patients, with a similar trend in ER-positive cases not receiving endocrine therapy. In a multivariate analysis adjusted for conventional prognostic factors, we found a significant interaction between the rs8113308 and endocrine treatment indicating a predictive, treatment-specific effect of the SNP rs8113308 on breast cancer survival, with the per-allele HR for interaction 2.16 (95% CI 1.30 – 3.60, Pinteraction = 0.003) and HR=7.77 (95% CI 0.93 – 64.71) for the homozygous genotype carriers. A biological rationale is suggested by in silico functional analyses. Conclusions Our findings suggest carrying the rs8113308 rare allele may identify patients who will not benefit from adjuvant endocrine treatment. PMID:25964295

  8. Systematic review: does endocrine therapy prolong survival in patients with prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, John Thomas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Lippert, Solvej;

    2016-01-01

    trials have challenged this dogma. The aim of this study was to evaluate how endocrine therapy (ET) affects survival in different clinical settings of PCa. Materials and methods A review of published phase II, III and IV studies evaluating the effect of ET on survival was performed. Results In localized......Objective Primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the gold standard in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). ADT relieves symptoms and reduces tumor burden, but it has never been demonstrated to increase either PCa-specific or overall survival per se. Several...... + disease, the timing of ET is under debate, although data suggest that early ET is associated with decreased PCa-specific and overall mortality. In M + disease, no proper randomized trials have been performed in patients with newly diagnosed M1 disease. In metastatic castration-resistant PCa, two novel...

  9. Metformin use and survival after colorectal cancer: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Menamin, Úna C; Murray, Liam J; Hughes, Carmel M; Cardwell, Chris R

    2016-01-15

    Preclinical evidence suggests that metformin could delay cancer progression. Previous epidemiological studies however have been limited by small sample sizes and certain time-related biases. This study aimed to investigate whether colorectal cancer patients with type 2 diabetes who were exposed to metformin had reduced cancer-specific mortality. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1,197 colorectal cancer patients newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2009 (identified from English cancer registries) with type 2 diabetes (based upon Clinical Practice Research Datalink, CPRD, prescription and diagnosis records). In this cohort 382 colorectal cancer-specific deaths occurred up to 2012 from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) mortality data. Metformin use was identified from CPRD prescription records. Using time-dependent Cox regression models, unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CIs were calculated for the association between post-diagnostic exposure to metformin and colorectal cancer-specific mortality. Overall, there was no evidence of an association between metformin use and cancer-specific death before or after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.80, 1.40). In addition, after adjustment for confounders, there was also no evidence of associations between other diabetic medications and cancer-specific mortality including sulfonylureas (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.86, 1.51), insulin use (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.95, 1.93) or other anti-diabetic medications including thiazolidinediones (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.46, 1.14). Similar associations were observed by duration of use and for all-cause mortality. This population-based study, the largest to date, does not support a protective association between metformin and survival in colorectal cancer patients.

  10. Prognostic factors and survival of colorectal cancer in Kurdistan province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Mohammad Aziz; Moradi, Ghobad; Roshani, Daem; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ghaytasi, Bahman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) survival varies at individual and geographically level. This population-based study aimed to evaluating various factors affecting the survival rate of CRC patients in Kurdistan province. In a retrospective cohort study, patients diagnosed as CRC were collected through a population-based study from March 1, 2009 to 2014. The data were collected from Kurdistan's Cancer Registry database. Additional information and missing data were collected reference to patients’ homes, medical records, and pathology reports. The CRC survival was calculated from the date of diagnosis to the date of cancer-specific death or the end of follow-up (cutoff date: October 2015). Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test were used for the univariate analysis of survival in various subgroups. The proportional-hazard model Cox was also used in order to consider the effects of different factors on survival including age at diagnosis, place of residence, marital status, occupation, level of education, smoking, economic status, comorbidity, tumor stage, and tumor grade. A total number of 335 patients affected by CRC were assessed and the results showed that 1- and 5-year survival rate were 87% and 33%, respectively. According to the results of Cox's multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly related to CRC survival: age at diagnosis (≥65 years old) (HR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.17–3.71), single patients (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10–2.40), job (worker) (HR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.22–3.58), educational level: diploma or below (HR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.39–0.92), wealthy economic status (HR 0.51, 95% CI: 0.31–0.82), tumor grade in poorly differentiated (HR 2.25, 95% CI: 1.37–3.69), and undifferentiated/anaplastic grade (HR 2.90, 95% CI: 1.67–4.98). We found that factors such as low education, inappropriate socioeconomic status, and high tumor grade at the time of disease diagnosis were effective in the poor survival of CRC patients in Kurdistan province; this

  11. Diverging trends in recent population-based survival rates in oesophageal and gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Lagergren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survival trends in oesophageal and gastric cancer need to be updated. A nationwide Swedish population-based study in 1961-2009 was based on registry data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Relative survival rate, i.e. the ratio of the observed to the expected survival, adjusted for age, sex, and calendar period, and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI, was the main outcome measure. The expected survival was calculated using the corresponding Swedish general population with no exclusions. The relative survival rates in oesophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma have improved since the 1990s (p for trend <0.001, but not in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma or gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma. The relative 5-year survival rates during the two recent periods 1990-1999 and 2000-2008 were 12.5% (95%CI 10.1%-14.9% and 10.3% (95%CI 8.5-12.0% for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 12.5% (95%CI 10.1%-14.9% and 14.6% (95%CI 12.6-16.6% for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, 11.1% (95%CI 9.6%-12.6% and 14.3% (95%CI 12.3-16.3% for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and 20.2% (95%CI 19.2%-21.1% and 19.0% (95%CI 17.7-20.2% for gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma. The 3-year survival in tumour stage III in 2004-2008 was about 25% for all four tumour types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The survival in oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma is increasing, but the lack of such increase in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma is a concern.

  12. Correlation of pretreatment drug induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells with patient survival and clinical response

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    Salom Emery

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to determine if a chemotherapy-induced apoptosis assay (MiCK could predict the best therapy for patients with ovarian cancer. Methods A prospective, multi-institutional and blinded trial of the assay was conducted in 104 evaluable ovarian cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. The MiCK assay was performed prior to therapy, but treating physicians were not told of the results and selected treatment only on clinical criteria. Outcomes (response, time to relapse, and survival were compared to the drug-induced apoptosis observed in the assay. Results Overall survival in primary therapy, chemotherapy naïve patients with Stage III or IV disease was longer if patients received a chemotherapy which was best in the MiCK assay, compared to shorter survival in patients who received a chemotherapy that was not the best. (p  Conclusion The MiCK assay can predict the chemotherapy associated with better outcomes in ovarian cancer patients. This study quantifies outcome benefits on which a prospective randomized trial can be developed.

  13. Clinical and pathological characteristics, and prognostic factors for gastric cancer survival in 155 patients in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, Kostadin Georgiev; Vasileva, Mariela Borisova; Grozdev, Konstantin Savov; Sokolov, Manol Bonev; Todorov, Georgi

    2014-01-01

    Almost one million new cases of gastric cancer were estimated to have occurred in 2012, making it the fifth most common malignancy in the world. It is also the third leading cause of cancer death of people of both genders worldwide. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance of some prognostic factors for gastric cancer survival in 155 patients treated at Aleksandrovska University Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria. This retrospective study includes patients diagnosed and treated at Department of Surgery of Aleksandrovska University Hospital for the 9-years period of time between January 2005 and December 2013. We classified the prognostic factors as patient-related (age at diagnosis specification, gender, and blood type), tumor-related (N-stage, tumor differentiation, process localization), and treatment related (patients who had radical surgery and adjuvant therapy). We found that blood type is the only statistically significant prognostic factor for overall survival from the patients-related group of factors (p = 0.030). The only prognostic factor from the ones in the tumor related group remains the N-stage according to the TNM classification (p = 0.003). Adjuvant could not prove its value for overall survival (p = 0.675).

  14. Bladder cancer survival in a former industrial area in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Emanuel; Selinski, Silvia; Schikowsky, Christian; Seidel, Thilo; Volkert, Frank; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Long-term follow-ups on bladder cancer patients from highly industrialized areas are rare. Therefore, we present a follow-up of bladder cancer patients from the greater area Lutherstadt Wittenberg, a center of the chemical industry of the former German Democratic Republic. Relapse-free survival times of 213 confirmed bladder cancer cases from the greater area Lutherstadt Wittenberg were collected between 2008 and 2009. Data on lifestyle and occupational exposure to potential carcinogens was recorded by questionnaire. Genotypes of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1), rs710521, and rs9642880 were determined by standard methods. Cox models were used to evaluate differences in relapse-free survival. Clear differences in relapse-free survival could be observed for the number of relapses, multilocular tumor growth, and relapses with higher staging or grading than the primary tumor, as well as GSTT1. None of the other investigated polymorphisms showed significant impact on prognosis. This is the first study on two recently detected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing that these polymorphisms may also contribute to shorter relapse-free times.

  15. XRCC3 Gene Polymorphism Is Associated with Survival in Japanese Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Kido

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We focused on OGG1 Ser326Cys, MUTYH Gln324His, APEX1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC3 Thr241Met and examined the relationship between the different genotypes and survival of Japanese lung cancer patients. A total of 99 Japanese lung cancer patients were recruited into our study. Clinical data were collected, and genotypes of the target genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Survival analysis to verify the impact of these gene polymorphisms on the clinical outcome of lung cancer showed that lung squamous cell carcinoma patients with the Thr/Met genotype at XRCC3 had a significantly shorter survival time than those with the Thr/Thr genotype (13 months versus 48 months; log-rank test, p < 0.0001. Cox regression analysis showed that the carriers of XRCC3 genotypes were at a significantly higher risk [adjusted hazard ratio (HR = 9.35, 95% confidence interval (CI = 2.52–34.68, p = 0.001; adjusted HR = 9.05, 95% CI = 1.89–44.39, p = 0.006]. Our results suggest that XRCC3 Thr241Met may act as a favorable prognostic indicator for lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. 

  16. Effects of social isolation stress on immune response and survival time of mouse with liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Zhun Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of isolation stress on mouse with liver cancer and possible associated mechanisms.METHODS: Transplantable murine hepatoma22 (H22) model was used to evaluate the effects of social isolation stress on murine liver cancer. Mice were immunized with sheep red blood cell (SRBC) and intraperitoneally inoculated with H22 cell, then divided into two groups, one reared individually as group (Ⅰ) and the other reared in groups as group (G). Titer of antibody to SRBC and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in serum was monitored. The survival time of mouse with liver cancer was observed.RESULTS: The titer of antibody to SRBC in group (G) was 1:24.5 and that in group (Ⅰ) was 1:11.2. There was a significant difference between these two groups (t = 2.60,P = 0.02). A significant difference in IL-2 concentration was observed between group (G) (39.6 ng/L) and group (Ⅰ) (47.1 ng/L, t= 2.14, P = 0.046). The survival time in group (G) (16.5 d) was markedly longer than that in group (Ⅰ) (13.2 d, t = 3.46, P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that survival time of the mouse bearing H22 tumor is affected by the social isolation stress and the associated mechanism may be the immunological changes under the social isolation stress.

  17. Polysialic acid sustains cancer cell survival and migratory capacity in a hypoxic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkashef, Sara M.; Allison, Simon J.; Sadiq, Maria; Basheer, Haneen A.; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Pors, Klaus; Falconer, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique carbohydrate polymer expressed on the surface of NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule) in a number of cancers where it modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis and is strongly associated with poor clinical prognosis. We have carried out the first investigation into the effect of polySia expression on the behaviour of cancer cells in hypoxia, a key source of chemoresistance in tumours. The role of polysialylation and associated tumour cell migration and cell adhesion were studied in hypoxia, along with effects on cell survival and the potential role of HIF-1. Our findings provide the first evidence that polySia expression sustains migratory capacity and is associated with tumour cell survival in hypoxia. Initial mechanistic studies indicate a potential role for HIF-1 in sustaining polySia-mediated migratory capacity, but not cell survival. These data add to the growing body of evidence pointing to a crucial role for the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) in neuroendocrine tumour progression and provide the first evidence to suggest that polySia is associated with an aggressive phenotype in tumour hypoxia. These results have significant potential implications for polyST inhibition as an anti-metastatic therapeutic strategy and for targeting hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:27611649

  18. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America: database and attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, R; Lucas, E; Sankaranarayanan, R

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-one registries in 17 countries submitted data for systematic and centralized scrutiny. Data on 564 606 cases of different cancers ranging 1-56 sites/types from 27 registries in 14 low-/medium-resource countries in Eastern and Western Africa, the Caribbean, Central America and four regions of Asia, registered during 1990-2001 (period varying for individual registries) were reported. The database for this survival study comprised data that were classified as mandatory and optional. Mandatory variables provided by all registries included case-ID, age at diagnosis, sex, incidence date, most valid basis of diagnosis, cancer site/type (ICD-10 codes C00-96), vital status at follow-up and corresponding date. Clinical extent of disease was prominent among the optional variables provided by 17 registries and analysed. The grouping of cancer sites for analysis was based on standard norms, and only categories with at least 25 cases were reported. Cases registered based on a death certificate only, cases lacking any follow-up after initial registration, or cases rejected based on validation checks were excluded from the survival analysis. An easy guide to contents in subsequent chapters, especially tables and graphs describing data quality indices, survival statistics and online dynamic functions, is provided.

  19. Survival rates of breast cancer: a hospital-based study from northeast of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poum, Amornsak; Kamsa-ard, Supot; Promthet, Supannee

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was carried out with 340 female breast cancer at a teaching university in northeast of Thailand recruited and followed-up until the end of 2006. Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. 161 cases were alive after five years and 58 patients were lost to follow-up. The overall observed survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 83.3%, 59.9% and 42.9%, respectively. When analysis was conducted for stage combined into 2 groups, early (stage I, II and unknown) and late (stage III and IV), the 5-year survival rate for early stage (60%; 95%CI: 0.51-0.67), was higher than for late stage (27%; 95%CI: 0.19-0.34) with high statistical significance (p<0.001). The hazard ratio of patients with stage IV was 11.6 times greater than for stage I (p=0.03). The findings indicate that the different stages of breast cancer markedly effect the overall survival rate.

  20. Kaiso depletion attenuates the growth and survival of triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassey-Archibong, Blessing I; Rayner, Lyndsay G A; Hercules, Shawn M; Aarts, Craig W; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Bramson, Jonathan L; Hassell, John A; Daniel, Juliet M

    2017-03-23

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) are highly aggressive and lack specific targeted therapies. Recent studies have reported high expression of the transcription factor Kaiso in triple negative tumors, and this correlates with their increased aggressiveness. However, little is known about the clinical relevance of Kaiso in the growth and survival of TNBCs. Herein, we report that Kaiso depletion attenuates TNBC cell proliferation, and delays tumor onset in mice xenografted with the aggressive MDA-231 breast tumor cells. We further demonstrate that Kaiso depletion attenuates the survival of TNBC cells and increases their propensity for apoptotic-mediated cell death. Notably, Kaiso depletion downregulates BRCA1 expression in TNBC cells expressing mutant-p53 and we found that high Kaiso and BRCA1 expression correlates with a poor overall survival in breast cancer patients. Collectively, our findings reveal a role for Kaiso in the proliferation and survival of TNBC cells, and suggest a relevant role for Kaiso in the prognosis and treatment of TNBCs.

  1. Methodology to predict long-term cancer survival from short-term data using Tobacco Cancer Risk and Absolute Cancer Cure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, R. F.; Lederman, M.; Tai, P.; Wong, J. K. M.

    2002-11-01

    Three parametric statistical models have been fully validated for cancer of the larynx for the prediction of long-term 15, 20 and 25 year cancer-specific survival fractions when short-term follow-up data was available for just 1-2 years after the end of treatment of the last patient. In all groups of cases the treatment period was only 5 years. Three disease stage groups were studied, T1N0, T2N0 and T3N0. The models are the Standard Lognormal (SLN) first proposed by Boag (1949 J. R. Stat. Soc. Series B 11 15-53) but only ever fully validated for cancer of the cervix, Mould and Boag (1975 Br. J. Cancer 32 529-50), and two new models which have been termed Tobacco Cancer Risk (TCR) and Absolute Cancer Cure (ACC). In each, the frequency distribution of survival times of defined groups of cancer deaths is lognormally distributed: larynx only (SLN), larynx and lung (TCR) and all cancers (ACC). All models each have three unknown parameters but it was possible to estimate a value for the lognormal parameter S a priori. By reduction to two unknown parameters the model stability has been improved. The material used to validate the methodology consisted of case histories of 965 patients, all treated during the period 1944-1968 by Dr Manuel Lederman of the Royal Marsden Hospital, London, with follow-up to 1988. This provided a follow-up range of 20- 44 years and enabled predicted long-term survival fractions to be compared with the actual survival fractions, calculated by the Kaplan and Meier (1958 J. Am. Stat. Assoc. 53 457-82) method. The TCR and ACC models are better than the SLN model and for a maximum short-term follow-up of 6 years, the 20 and 25 year survival fractions could be predicted. Therefore the numbers of follow-up years saved are respectively 14 years and 19 years. Clinical trial results using the TCR and ACC models can thus be analysed much earlier than currently possible. Absolute cure from cancer was also studied, using not only the prediction models which

  2. Study of integrated heterogeneous data reveals prognostic power of gene expression for breast cancer survival.

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    Richard E Neapolitan

    Full Text Available Studies show that thousands of genes are associated with prognosis of breast cancer. Towards utilizing available genetic data, efforts have been made to predict outcomes using gene expression data, and a number of commercial products have been developed. These products have the following shortcomings: 1 They use the Cox model for prediction. However, the RSF model has been shown to significantly outperform the Cox model. 2 Testing was not done to see if a complete set of clinical predictors could predict as well as the gene expression signatures.We address these shortcomings. The METABRIC data set concerns 1981 breast cancer tumors. Features include 21 clinical features, expression levels for 16,384 genes, and survival. We compare the survival prediction performance of the Cox model and the RSF model using the clinical data and the gene expression data to their performance using only the clinical data. We obtain significantly better results when we used both clinical data and gene expression data for 5 year, 10 year, and 15 year survival prediction. When we replace the gene expression data by PAM50 subtype, our results are significant only for 5 year and 15 year prediction. We obtain significantly better results using the RSF model over the Cox model. Finally, our results indicate that gene expression data alone may predict long-term survival.Our results indicate that we can obtain improved survival prediction using clinical data and gene expression data compared to prediction using only clinical data. We further conclude that we can obtain improved survival prediction using the RSF model instead of the Cox model. These results are significant because by incorporating more gene expression data with clinical features and using the RSF model, we could develop decision support systems that better utilize heterogeneous information to improve outcome prediction and decision making.

  3. Addressing the expected survival benefit for clinical trial design in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Sensitivity analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Pilotto, Sara; Maines, Francesca; Bracarda, Sergio; Sperduti, Isabella; Giannarelli, Diana; Carlini, Paolo; Santini, Daniele; Tortora, Giampaolo; Porta, Camillo; Bria, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    We performed a sensitivity analysis, cumulating all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) received systemic therapy, to evaluate if the comparison of RCTs may drive to biased survival estimations. An overall survival (OS) significant difference according to therapeutic strategy was more likely be determined in RCTs evaluating hormonal drugs versus those studies testing immunotherapy, chemotherapy or other strategies. With regard to control arm, an OS significant effect was found for placebo-controlled trials versus studies comparing experimental treatment with active therapies. Finally, regarding to docetaxel (DOC) timing, the OS benefit was more likely to be proved in Post-DOC setting in comparison with DOC and Pre-DOC. These data suggest that clinical trial design should take into account new benchmarks such as the type of treatment strategy, the choice of the comparator and the phase of the disease in relation to the administration of standard chemotherapy.

  4. HER3 over-expression and overall survival in gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yadong; Yang, Haiyan; Duan, Guangcai

    2015-12-15

    Published studies on the association between human epidermal factor receptor 3 (HER3) expression and overall survival (OS) in gastrointestinal cancers have yielded conflicting results. The aim of this study was to explore the association of HER3 over-expression with OS in gastrointestinal cancers. A systematic search was performed through Medline/PubMed, Embase, Science Direct and Elsevier. The summary odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated to estimate the strength of the association. Overall, we observed that HER3 over-expression was associated with worse OS at five years (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.04-1.82); however, HER3 over-expression was not associated with worse OS at three years (OR = 1.33, 95% CI: 0.97-1.84). The cumulative meta-analysis showed similar results. In subgroup analyses by tumor type, HER3 over-expression in gastric cancers was associated with worse OS at both three years (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.28-2.25) and five years (OR = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.26-2.41). In conclusion, our results suggest that HER3 over-expression may be associated with worse overall survival in gastric cancers. Well-designed studies with a large sample size are required to further confirm our findings.

  5. Thyroid cancer in Egypt: histopathological criteria, correlation with survival and oestrogen receptor protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rehab Allah; Aboelnaga, Engy M

    2015-07-01

    Thyroid cancer represents approximately 1% of new cancer and oestrogen may play a role in the pathogenesis of thyroid neoplasm. We aimed to study the clinicopathological criteria and ER expression of thyroid cancer in Mansoura University (Egypt), and to correlate the survival to these clinicopathological data and ER expression. This retrospective study reviewed 644 patients with histologically proven thyroid carcinoma during the period from 2003 to 2011. 152 cases during the period between 2008 and 2011 were retrieved from the archive and examined by immunohistochemistry for oestrogen receptor-α (ER) expression. ER-α expression is significantly associated with the female sex, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, extrathyroid extension, multifocality disease and recurrence and in the whole series (p gender of the patient. Tumour type, extrathyroid extension and ER expression were the independent prognostic factors of DFS, while in PTC, only ER expression was the independent one. The histological type was the only independent prognostic factor for OAS in the series were studied for ER expression, while extrathyroid extension was the only one that affected OAS of PTC. There was significant positive correlation with lymph node metastasis and ER expression in whole patient and PTC cases. No difference in survival between the low and high ranges of positive oestrogen expression. The prognosis of thyroid carcinoma in Egypt is similar to that occurs worldwide. ER-α expression was a significant prognostic marker for DFS in thyroid cancer and can be used as a predictive factor of lymph node metastasis.

  6. A signature inferred from Drosophila mitotic genes predicts survival of breast cancer patients.

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    Christian Damasco

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The classification of breast cancer patients into risk groups provides a powerful tool for the identification of patients who will benefit from aggressive systemic therapy. The analysis of microarray data has generated several gene expression signatures that improve diagnosis and allow risk assessment. There is also evidence that cell proliferation-related genes have a high predictive power within these signatures. METHODS: We thus constructed a gene expression signature (the DM signature using the human orthologues of 108 Drosophila melanogaster genes required for either the maintenance of chromosome integrity (36 genes or mitotic division (72 genes. RESULTS: The DM signature has minimal overlap with the extant signatures and is highly predictive of survival in 5 large breast cancer datasets. In addition, we show that the DM signature outperforms many widely used breast cancer signatures in predictive power, and performs comparably to other proliferation-based signatures. For most genes of the DM signature, an increased expression is negatively correlated with patient survival. The genes that provide the highest contribution to the predictive power of the DM signature are those involved in cytokinesis. CONCLUSION: This finding highlights cytokinesis as an important marker in breast cancer prognosis and as a possible target for antimitotic therapies.

  7. Qingyihuaji Formula Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer and Prolongs Survival by Downregulating Hes-1 and Hey-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dire prognosis of pancreatic cancer has not markedly improved during past decades. The present study was carried out to explore the effect of Qingyihuaji formula (QYHJ on inhibiting pancreatic cancer and prolonging survival in related Notch signaling pathway. Proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells (SW1990 and PANC-1 was detected by MTT assay at 24, 48, and 72 h with exposure to various concentrations (0.08–50 mg/mL of QYHJ water extract. Pancreatic tumor models of nude mice were divided into three groups randomly (control, QYHJ, and gemcitabine. mRNA and protein expression of Notch target genes (Hes-1, Hey-1, Hey-2, and Hey-L in dissected tumor tissue were detected. Results showed that proliferation of SW1990 cells and PANC-1 cells was inhibited by QYHJ water extract in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. QYHJ effectively inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival time in nude mice. Expression of both Hes-1 and Hey-1 was decreased significantly in QYHJ group, suggesting that Hes-1 and Hey-1 in Notch signaling pathway might be potential targets for QYHJ treatment. This research could help explain the clinical effectiveness of QYHJ and may provide advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a new therapeutic option.

  8. DNA methylation modifies the association between obesity and survival after breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Lauren E; Chen, Jia; Cho, Yoon Hee; Khankari, Nikhil K; Bradshaw, Patrick T; White, Alexandra J; Garbowski, Gail; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-02-01

    Mechanisms underlying the poor breast cancer prognosis among obese women are unresolved. DNA methylation levels are linked to obesity and to breast cancer survival. We hypothesized that obesity may work in conjunction with the epigenome to alter prognosis. Using a population-based sample of women diagnosed with first primary breast cancer, we examined modification of the obesity-mortality association by DNA methylation. In-person interviews were conducted approximately 3 months after diagnosis. Weight and height were assessed [to estimate body mass index (BMI)], and blood samples collected. Promoter methylation of 13 breast cancer-related genes was assessed in archived tumor by methylation-specific PCR and Methyl Light. Global methylation in white blood cell DNA was assessed by analysis of long interspersed elements-1 (LINE-1) and with the luminometric methylation assay (LUMA). Vital status among 1308 patients (with any methylation biomarker and complete BMI assessment) was determined after approximately 15 years of follow-up (N = 194/441 deaths due to breast cancer-specific/all-cause mortality). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) using two-sided p values of 0.05. Breast cancer-specific mortality was higher among obese (BMI ≥ 30) patients with promoter methylation in APC (HR = 2.47; 95 % CI = 1.43-4.27) and TWIST1 (HR = 4.25; 95 % CI = 1.43-12.70) in breast cancer tissue. Estimates were similar, but less pronounced, for all-cause mortality. Increased all-cause (HR = 1.81; 95 % CI = 1.19-2.74) and breast cancer-specific (HR = 2.61; 95 % CI = 1.45-4.69) mortality was observed among obese patients with the lowest LUMA levels. The poor breast cancer prognosis associated with obesity may depend on methylation profiles, which warrants further investigation.

  9. Association ofperioperative blood pressure withlong-term survival inrectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiChuanYu; YanXinLuo; HuiPeng; XiaoLinWang; ZiHuanYang; MeiJinHuang; LiangKang; LeiWang; JianPingWang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Several studies suggested that hypertension is positively related to cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we investigated the association between perioperative blood pressure (BP) and long‑term survival out‑comes in patients with rectal cancer. Methods:This study included a cohort of 358 patients with stages I–III rectal cancer who underwent a curative resection between June 2007 and June 2011. Both pre‑ and postoperative BPs were measured, by which patients were grouped (low BP: <120/80mmHg; high BP:≥120/80mmHg). The survival outcomes were compared between these two groups. The primary endpoints were disease‑free survival (DFS) and cancer‑speciifc survival (CSS). Results:Univariate analysis showed that patients with high preoperative systolic BP had lower 3‑year DFS (67.2% vs. 82.1%,P=0.041) and CSS rates (81.9% vs. 94.8%,P=0.003) than patients with low preoperative systolic BP, and the associations remained signiifcant in the Cox multivariate analysis, with the adjusted hazard ratios equal to 1.97 [95%conifdence interval (CI)=1.08–3.60,P=0.028] and 2.85 (95% CI=1.00–8.25,P=0.050), respectively. Similarly, in postoperative evaluation, patients with high systolic BP had signiifcantly lower 3‑year CSS rates than those with low systolic BP (78.3% vs. 88.9%,P=0.032) in univariate analysis. Moreover, high pre‑ and/or postoperative systolic BP presented as risk factors for CSS in the subgroups of patients who did not have a history of hypertension, with and/or without perioperative administration of antihypertensive drugs. Conclusions:High preoperative systolic BP was an independent risk factor for both CSS and DFS rates, and high postoperative systolic BP was signiifcantly associated with a low CSS rate in rectal cancer patients. Additionally, our results suggest that rectal cancer patients may get survival beneift from BP control in perioperative care. However, further studies should be conducted to determine the

  10. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  11. Effect of mucin production on survival in colorectal cancer:A case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirna H Farhat; Kassem A Barada; Ayman N Tawil; Doha H Itani; Hassan A Hatoum; Ali I Shamseddine

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of mucin production on prognosis in colorectal cancer, in terms of overall survival (OS) and time to disease progression (TTP) in patients with mucinous compared to those with nonmucinous colorectal cancer (NMCRC), matched for age,gender, and tumor stage.METHODS: Thirty five patients with mucinous colorectal cancer (MCRC) were matched for age, gender, and tumor stage with 35 controls having NMCRC. OS and TTP were compared among 4 groups divided according to mucin content: group A (500-75% mucin), group B (75%-100% mucin), group C or controls ( 75% of tumor volume. However, it tends to be more poorly differentiated. A larger study matching for stage and grade is needed.

  12. Do changes in lymph node status distribution explain trends in survival of breast cancer patients in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Klaus; Vaeth, Michael; Rootzén, Helle;

    2006-01-01

    We studied the impact on survival of changes in breast cancer patients' distribution by lymph node status at the time of diagnosis. Our study included breast cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 1994 in Denmark, where the treatment schemes for breast cancer patients were fairly stable, and wher...... distribution explained half of the improvement in 5-year relative survival, and seem to be the single most important cause behind the improved survival of breast cancer patients in Denmark.......We studied the impact on survival of changes in breast cancer patients' distribution by lymph node status at the time of diagnosis. Our study included breast cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 1994 in Denmark, where the treatment schemes for breast cancer patients were fairly stable, and where...... mammography screening was limited. We measured lymph node status by the proportion of positive lymph nodes of all excised lymph nodes, as assessed by a pathologist. This measure was available for two-thirds of the breast cancer patients. The outcome was 5-year relative survival. Changes in lymph node status...

  13. An essential role for DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B in cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Normand; Morin, Steves; Chute, Ian C; Robert, Marie-France; Nguyen, Hannah; MacLeod, A Robert

    2002-08-02

    Abnormal methylation and associated silencing of tumor suppressor genes is a common feature of many types of cancers. The observation of persistent methylation in human cancer cells lacking the maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 suggests the involvement of other DNA methyltransferases in gene silencing in cancer. To test this hypothesis, we have evaluated methylation and gene expression in cancer cells specifically depleted of DNMT3A or DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferases that are expressed in adult tissues. Here we have shown that depletion of DNMT3B, but not DNMT3A, induced apoptosis of human cancer cells but not normal cells. DNMT3B depletion reactivated methylation-silenced gene expression but did not induce global or juxtacentromeric satellite demethylation as did specific depletion of DNMT1. Furthermore, the effect of DNMT3B depletion was rescued by exogenous expression of either of the splice variants DNMT3B2 or DNMT3B3 but not DNMT1. These results indicate that DNMT3B has significant site selectivity that is distinct from DNMT1, regulates aberrant gene silencing, and is essential for cancer cell survival.

  14. Long-Time Survival of a Patient with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: A Case Report

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    Željko Soldić

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. It does not cause any symptoms in the early stage, and later symptoms are nonspecific, thus the disease is usually diagnosed when already advanced. In 2008, pancreatic cancer ranked eighth on the list of the 10 most common cancers among men in Croatia and tenth on the list of the most common cancers among Croatian women. Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, with a survival time of only 6–8 months for metastatic disease. Gemcitabine is the standard chemotherapeutic option. Other chemotherapeutic agents include5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. In this paper, we present a case of a patient diagnosed with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer, who is still alive and currently receives his fourth line of chemotherapy 5 years after the diagnosis. Following disease progression on gemcitabine chemotherapy, he was treated with chemoradiotherapy which, however, had no effect. We then applied cisplatin monochemotherapy which offered excellent disease control, was well tolerated by the patient and, although somewhat obsolete in this form, showed to be a valuable chemotherapeutic option.

  15. Incidence and survival differences of differentiated thyroid cancer among younger women

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    Boltz MM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Melissa M Boltz,1 Laura M Enomoto,1,2 Rollyn M Ornstein,3 Brian D Saunders,1,4 Christopher S Hollenbeak1,2,51Department of Surgery, 2Division of Outcomes Research and Quality, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine and Eating Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey Children’s Hospital, 4Division of General Surgery Specialties and Surgical Oncology, 5Department of Public Health Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USAAbstract: Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, with an estimated 60,220 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2013. For reasons that are unclear, differentiated thyroid cancer is three times more common in females than in males. However, among adolescent and young adult females between ages 15–39 years, differentiated thyroid cancer remains under-recognized. The disparity in cancer incidence and outcomes in this population may be secondary to the tumor's biology, and risk factors unique to women. This review summarizes the incidence and survival rates of thyroid cancer in women younger than 45 years of age, as well as the pathophysiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and current and emerging treatment options for this patient population.Keywords: differentiated thyroid cancer, young adult women, adolescents, incidence, risk factors, treatment

  16. Multivariable model development and internal validation for prostate cancer specific survival and overall survival after whole-gland salvage Iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Max; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem R N; Moerland, Marinus A; Hoekstra, Carel J; van de Pol, Sandrine; Westendorp, Hendrik; Maenhout, Metha; Kattevilder, Rob; Verkooijen, Helena M; van Rossum, Peter S N; Ahmed, Hashim U; Shah, Taimur T; Emberton, Mark; van Vulpen, Marco

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whole-gland salvage Iodine-125-brachytherapy is a potentially curative treatment strategy for localised prostate cancer (PCa) recurrences after radiotherapy. Prognostic factors influencing PCa-specific and overall survival (PCaSS & OS) are not known. The objective of this study was to de

  17. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

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    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  18. Can subjective global assessment of nutritional status predict survival in ovarian cancer?

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    Gupta Digant

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is a significant problem in patients with ovarian cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA in patients with ovarian cancer treated in an integrative cancer treatment setting. Methods We evaluated a case series of 132 ovarian cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® from Jan 2001 to May 2006. SGA was used to assess nutritional status at baseline. Using SGA, patients were classified as well nourished (SGA A, moderately malnourished (SGA B or severely malnourished (SGA C. Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of SGA independent of other factors. Results Of 132 patients, 24 were newly diagnosed while 108 had received prior treatment. 15 had stage I disease at diagnosis, 8 stage II, 85 stage III and 17 stage IV. The median age at presentation was 54.4 years (range 25.5 – 82.5 years. 66 patients were well-nourished (SGA A, 35 moderately malnourished (SGA B and 31 severely malnourished (SGA C. Well nourished patients had a median survival of 19.3 months (95% CI: 14.1 to 24.5, moderately malnourished 15.5 months (95% CI: 5.8 to 25.1, and severely malnourished 6.7 months (95% CI: 4.1 to 9.3; the difference being statistically significant (p = 0.0003. Multivariate Cox modeling, after adjusting for stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history found that moderately malnourished and severely malnourished status were associated with a relative risk of 2.1 (95% CI: 1.2 to 3.6, p = 0.008 and 3.4 (95% CI: 1.9 to 5.8, p Conclusion Univariate and multivariate survival analyses found that low SGA scores (i.e. well-nourished status are associated with better survival outcomes. This study lends support to the role of aggressive nutritional intervention in improving patient outcomes in cancer care.

  19. Survival analysis of gastric cancer patients using Cox model: a five year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biglarian A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer and known as the second cause of death due to cancers worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is the most fatal cancer in Iran and a patient with this kind of cancer, has a lower lifetime than others. In this research, the survival of patients with gastric carcinoma who were registered at Taleghani Hospital, were studied."n"nMethods: 291 patients with Gastric carcinoma who had received care, chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, at Taleghani Hospital in Tehran from 2002 to 2007 were studied as a historical cohort. Their survival rates and its relationship with 12 risk factors were assessed."n"nResults: Of the 291 patients with Gastric carcinoma, 70.1 percent were men and others (29.9% were women. The mean age of men was 62.26 years and of women was 59.32 years at the time of diagnosis. Most of patients (93.91% were advanced stage and metastasis. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that age at diagnosis, tumor stage and histology type with survival time had significant relationships (p=0.039, p=0.042 and p=0.032 respectively."n"n Conclusion: The five-year survival rate and median lifetime of gastric cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy are very

  20. Early detection of breast cancer through population-based mammographic screening in Asian women: a comparison study between screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuwa, Esther W L; Yeo, Allen W Y; Koong, Heng Nung; Wong, Chow Yin; Yong, Wei Sean; Tan, Puay Hoon; Ho, Juliana T S; Wong, Jill S L; Ho, Gay Hui

    2009-01-01

    The first nation-wide mammographic screening program in Asia, BreastScreen Singapore (BSS), was launched in Singapore in January 2002. This study compared the presentation and results of screen-detected breast cancers with symptomatic breast cancers in two affiliated high-volume institutions, one of which was an assessment centre for BSS. The medical records of patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer at the Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital and the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore, during the period January 2002 to December 2003 were reviewed. Clinical and pathological comparisons were made between screen-detected lesions and symptomatic lesions. Of a total of 767 cases, 640 (83.4%) were invasive carcinomas and 127 (16.6%) were ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) lesions. Only 13.4% of them were screen-detected. Compared to symptomatic cancers, screen-detected lesions were of smaller size (median size 18 versus 23 mm), a lower stage (stages 0-2, 95 versus 83.2%) and histologic grade (grade 1-2, 71 versus 60%), with a higher incidence of DCIS (31.0 versus 14.3%) and had higher rates of breast conservation (45.6 versus 28.2%) (all p-values 20 mm, nodal involvement, cerbB2 overexpression, and advanced disease stage were independent poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival, whereas nodal involvement, advanced disease, and recurrence predicted poor cancer-specific survival. However, there was no statistically significant difference in disease-free survival or cancer-specific survival between the two groups at a median follow-up of 38 months. Screening mammography has allowed the detection of smaller and hence oncologically more favorable lesions in Asian women. Although no significant survival benefit was demonstrated in our study, a longer period of follow-up is essential before the benefit of mortality reduction, as a result of mammography screening becomes evident in our population.

  1. Survival after adjuvant 5-FU treatment for stage III colon cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappel, WHDN; Meulenbeld, HJ; Kleibeuker, JH; Nagengast, FM; Menko, FH; Griffioen, G; Cats, A; Morreau, H; Gelderblom, H; Vasen, HFA

    2004-01-01

    In vitro studies suggest that a deficient mismatch repair (MMR) system-reduces 5-Fluorouracil cytotoxicity. Colon cancer (CC) in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is due to a dysfunctioning MMR gene that leads to microsatellite instability (MSI). Clinical studies on the efficacy of 5

  2. Survival after adjuvant 5-FU treatment for stage III colon cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos tot Nederveen Cappel, W.H. de; Meulenbeld, H.J.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Menko, F.H.; Griffioen, G.; Cats, A.; Morreau, H.; Gelderblom, H.; Vasen, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    In vitro studies suggest that a deficient mismatch repair (MMR) system reduces 5-Fluorouracil cytotoxicity. Colon cancer (CC) in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is due to a dysfunctioning MMR gene that leads to microsatellite instability (MSI). Clinical studies on the efficacy of 5

  3. Body composition, symptoms, and survival in advanced cancer patients referred to a phase I service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique A Parsons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Body weight and body composition are relevant to the outcomes of cancer and antineoplastic therapy. However, their role in Phase I clinical trial patients is unknown. METHODS: We reviewed symptom burden, body composition, and survival in 104 patients with advanced cancer referred to a Phase I oncology service. Symptom burden was analyzed using the MD Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory(MDASI; body composition was evaluated utilizing computerized tomography(CT images. A body mass index (BMI≥25 kg/m² was considered overweight. Sarcopenia, severe muscle depletion, was assessed using CT-based criteria. RESULTS: Most patients were overweight (n = 65, 63%; 53 patients were sarcopenic (51%, including 79% of patients with a BMI<25 kg/m² and 34% of those with BMI≥25 kg/m². Sarcopenic patients were older and less frequently African-American. Symptom burden did not differ among patients classified according to BMI and presence of sarcopenia. Median (95% confidence interval survival (days varied according to body composition: 215 (71-358 (BMI<25 kg/m²; sarcopenic, 271 (99-443 (BMI<25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic, 484 (286-681 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; sarcopenic; 501 d (309-693 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic. Higher muscle index and gastrointestinal cancer diagnosis predicted longer survival in multivariate analysis after controlling for age, gender, performance status, and fat index. CONCLUSIONS: Patients referred to a Phase I clinic had a high frequency of sarcopenia and a BMI≥25 kg/m², independent of symptom burden. Body composition variables were predictive of clinically relevant survival differences, which is potentially important in developing Phase I studies.

  4. Analysis of the Survival Rate with Cervical Cancer Using 137Cs and 192Ir Aftedoading Brachytherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuixioZhou; GuoxiongChen; DemeiMa; JianpingSun; LinMa

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze and compare the survival rate for stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ cervical cancer treated by external irradiation plus 137Cs or 192Ir. METHODS The patients with cervical cancer were treated by external irradiation plus 137Cs (group A, 427 patients) or plus 192Ir (group B, 156 patients). There were 170 stage Ⅱ cases and 413 stage Ⅲ cases. The number of cancer types were as follows: squamous cell carcinoma, 524; adenocarcinoma, 34; and adenosquamous cell carcinoma, 25. The two groups received the same external irradiation using 8 or 10 MV of X-ray. After the whole pelvis received 25-35 Gy, the focus was given a total of 45-55 Gy by four divided fields. Intracavitary irradiation was performed with one fraction of 6-7 Gy in reference dose at A point every week and a total dose of 40-60 Gy with 6-8 fractions for group A; every fraction of 5-6 Gy in reference dose of A point and total dose of 30-42 Gy with 5-7 fractions for group B.RESULTS The 5-year survival rate of stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ, and total were 82.9%, 62.2%, and 67.2% for group A respectively and 85.1%, 61.5% and 69.2% for group B respectively. There were significant differences between stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ in each group (P 0.05). The late complications of the therapy were rectitis and urocystitis and with an incidence rate of 7.3% and 6.3% for group A and 9.6% and 9.0% for group B (P> 0.05). CONCLUSION The long-term survival rate and complications of stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ cervical cancer are similar when treated with external irradiation plus 137Cs or plus 192Ir.

  5. TPD52 represents a survival factor in ERBB2-amplified breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, Nuruliza; Bièche, Ivan; Bright, Robert K; Lidereau, Rosette; Chen, Yuyan; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    TPD52 and ERBB2 co-expression has been persistently reported in human breast cancer and animal models of this disease, but the significance of this is unknown. We identified significant positive associations between relative TPD52 and ERBB2 transcript levels in human diagnostic breast cancer samples, and maximal TPD52 expression in the hormone receptor (HR)- and ERBB2-positive sub-group. High-level TPD52 expression was associated with significantly reduced metastasis-free survival, within the overall cohort (log rank test, P = 8.6 × 10(-4), n = 375) where this was an independent predictor of metastasis-free survival (hazard ratio, 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.59-4.54, P = 2.2 × 10(-4), n = 359), and the HR- and ERBB2-positive sub-group (log rank test, P = 0.035, n = 47). Transient TPD52 knock-down in the ERBB2-amplified breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 and BT-474 produced significant apoptosis, both singly and in combination with transient ERBB2 knock-down. Unlike ERBB2 knock-down, transient TPD52 knock-down produced no reduction in pAKT levels in SK-BR-3 or BT-474 cells. We then derived multiple SK-BR-3 cell lines in which TPD52 levels were stably reduced, and measured significant inverse correlations between pERBB2 and TPD52 levels in viable TPD52-depleted and control cell lines, all of which showed similar proliferative capacities. Our results therefore identify TPD52 as a survival factor in ERBB2-amplified breast cancer cells, and suggest complementary cellular functions for TPD52 and ERBB2.

  6. Colon cancer: association of histopathological parameters and patients' survival with clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiusdottir, Kristin K; Snaebjornsson, Petur; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Jonasson, Larus; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Björnsson, Einar Stefan; Möller, Pall Helgi; Jonasson, Jon G

    2013-10-01

    Available data correlating symptoms of colon cancer patients with the severity of the disease are very limited. In a population-based setting, we correlated information on symptoms of colon cancer patients with several pathological tumor parameters and survival. Information on all patients diagnosed with colon cancer in Iceland in 1995-2004 for this retrospective, population-based study was obtained from the Icelandic Cancer Registry. Information on symptoms of patients and blood hemoglobin was collected from patients' files. Pathological parameters were obtained from a previously performed standardized tumor review. A total of 768 patients entered this study; the median age was 73 years. Tumors in patients presenting at diagnosis with visible blood in stools were significantly more likely to be of lower grade, having pushing border, conspicuous peritumoral lymphocytic infiltration, and lower frequency of vessel invasion. Patients with abdominal pain and anemia were significantly more likely to have vessel invasion. Logistic regression showed that visible blood in stools was significantly associated with protecting pathological factors (OR range 0.38-0.83, p < 0.05). Tumors in patients presenting with abdominal pain were strongly associated with infiltrative margin and scarce peritumoral lymphocytic infiltration (OR = 1.95; 2.18 respectively, p < 0.05). Changes in bowel habits were strongly associated with vessel invasion (OR = 2.03, p < 0.05). Cox regression showed that blood in stools predicted survival (HR = 0.54). In conclusion, visible blood in stools correlates significantly with all the beneficial pathological parameters analyzed and with better survival of patients. Anemia, general symptoms, changes in bowel habits, acute symptoms, and abdominal pain correlate with more aggressive tumor characteristics and adverse outcome for patients.

  7. Social comparison processes, narrative mapping and their shaping of the cancer experience: a case study of an elite athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Andrew C; Pérez-Samaniego, Víctor; Smith, Brett

    2012-09-01

    Drawing on data generated by life history interviews and fieldwork observations we illuminate the ways in which a young elite athlete named David (a pseudonym) gave meaning to his experiences of cancer that eventually led to his death. Central to this process were the ways in which David utilized both social comparisons and a narrative map provided by the published autobiography of Lance Armstrong (2000). Our analysis reveals the selective manner in which social comparison processes operated around the following key dimensions: mental attitude to treatment; the sporting body; the ageing body; and physical appearance. The manner in which different comparison targets were chosen, the ways in which these were framed by Armstrong's autobiography, and the work that the restitution narrative as an actor did in this process are also examined. Some reflections are offered regarding the experiential consequences of the social comparison processes utilized by David when these are shaped by specific forms of embodiment and selective narrative maps of cancer survival.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) autocrine enhance breast cancer cells survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong, Kai Hung; Tan, Boon Shing; Choo, Heng Lungh; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Hii, Ling-Wei; Tan, Si Hoey; Khor, Nelson Tze Woei; Wong, Shew Fung; See, Sze-Jia; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Rosli, Rozita; Cheong, Soon-Keng; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-09-06

    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive tumor subtype with poor prognosis. The discovery of underlying mechanisms mediating tumor cell survival, and the development of novel agents to target these pathways, is a priority for patients with basal-like breast cancer. From a functional screen to identify key drivers of basal-like breast cancer cell growth, we identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) as a potential mediator of cell survival. We found that FGFR4 mediates cancer cell survival predominantly via activation of PI3K/AKT. Importantly, a subset of basal-like breast cancer cells also secrete fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), a canonical ligand specific for FGFR4. siRNA-mediated silencing of FGF19 or neutralization of extracellular FGF19 by anti-FGF19 antibody (1A6) decreases AKT phosphorylation, suppresses cancer cell growth and enhances doxorubicin sensitivity only in the FGFR4+/FGF19+ breast cancer cells. Consistently, FGFR4/FGF19 co-expression was also observed in 82 out of 287 (28.6%) primary breast tumors, and their expression is strongly associated with AKT phosphorylation, Ki-67 staining, higher tumor stage and basal-like phenotype. In summary, our results demonstrated the presence of an FGFR4/FGF19 autocrine signaling that mediates the survival of a subset of basal-like breast cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of this autocrine loop may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for future treatment of breast cancers.

  9. The impact of pregnancy on breast cancer survival in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter; Neuhausen, Susan L; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Singer, Christian F; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Saal, Howard; Lyonnet, Dominique Stoppa; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zakalik, Dana; Armel, Susan; Senter, Leigha; Eng, Charis; Grunfeld, Eva; Chiarelli, Anna M; Poll, Aletta; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    Physicians are often approached by young women with a BRCA mutation and a recent history of breast cancer who wish to have a baby. They wish to know if pregnancy impacts upon their future risks of cancer recurrence and survival. To date, there is little information on the survival experience of women who carry a mutation in one of the BRCA genes and who become pregnant. From an international multi-center cohort study of 12,084 women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, we identified 128 case subjects who were diagnosed with breast cancer while pregnant or who became pregnant after a diagnosis of breast cancer. These women were age-matched to 269 mutation carriers with breast cancer who did not become pregnant (controls). Subjects were followed from the date of breast cancer diagnosis until the date of last follow-up or death from breast cancer. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 15-year survival rates. The hazard ratio for survival associated with pregnancy was calculated using a left-truncated Cox proportional hazard model, adjusting for other prognostic factors. Among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer when pregnant or who became pregnant thereafter, the 15-year survival rate was 91.5 %, compared to a survival of 88.6 % for women who did not become pregnant (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.76; 95 % CI 0.31-1.91; p = 0.56). Pregnancy concurrent with or after a diagnosis of breast cancer does not appear to adversely affect survival among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  10. Individual and Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Healthcare Resources in Relation to Black-White Breast Cancer Survival Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi F. Akinyemiju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast cancer survival has improved significantly in the US in the past 10–15 years. However, disparities exist in breast cancer survival between black and white women. Purpose. To investigate the effect of county healthcare resources and SES as well as individual SES status on breast cancer survival disparities between black and white women. Methods. Data from 1,796 breast cancer cases were obtained from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study dataset. Cox Proportional Hazards models were constructed accounting for clustering within counties. Three sequential Cox models were fit for each outcome including demographic variables; demographic and clinical variables; and finally demographic, clinical, and county-level variables. Results. In unadjusted analysis, black women had a 53% higher likelihood of dying of breast cancer and 32% higher likelihood of dying of any cause (P<0.05 compared with white women. Adjusting for demographic variables explained away the effect of race on breast cancer survival (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.99–1.97, but not on all-cause mortality. The racial difference in all-cause survival disappeared only after adjusting for county-level variables (HR, 1.27; CI, 0.95–1.71. Conclusions. Improving equitable access to healthcare for all women in the US may help eliminate survival disparities between racial and socioeconomic groups.

  11. Trend analysis and survival of primary gallbladder cancer in the United States: a 1973-2009 population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rubayat; Simoes, Eduardo J; Schmaltz, Chester; Jackson, Christian S; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2017-03-20

    Primary gallbladder cancer is an aggressive and uncommon cancer with poor outcomes. Our study examines epidemiology, trend, and survival of gallbladder cancer in the United States from 1973 to 2009. We utilized the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database (SEER). Frequency and rate analyses on demographics, stage, and survival were compared among non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African American, and Asian/Pacific Islanders. A total of 18,124 cases were reported in SEER from 1973 to 2009 comprising 1.4% of all reported gastrointestinal cancers. Gallbladder cancer was more common in females than males (71 vs. 29%, respectively). The age-adjusted incidence rate was 1.4 per 100,000, significantly higher in females than males (1.7 vs. 1.0). Trend analysis showed that the incidence rate has been decreasing over the last three decades for males. However, among females, the incidence rate had decreased from 1973 to mid-90s but has remained stable since then. Trend analysis for stage at diagnosis showed that the proportion of late-stage cases has been increasing significantly since 2001 after a decreasing pattern since 1973. Survival has improved considerably over time, and survival is better in females than males and in Asian/Pacific Islanders than other racial groups. The highest survival was in patients who received both surgery and radiation. Trend analysis revealed a recent increase of the incidence of late-stage gallbladder cancer. Highest survival was associated with receiving both surgery and radiation.

  12. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Helen H.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chou, Cheng-Yang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Guo, How-Ran [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Wen-Ying, E-mail: 7707@so-net.net.tw [Department of Pathology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China) and Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Wu-Chou, E-mail: sunnysu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  13. Analysis of the Indicence and Survival of Female Breast Cancer Patients in Beijing Over a 20-Year Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qijun Wang; Weixing Zhu; Xiumei Xing; Chenxu Qu

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide evidence for breast cancer prevention and control through epidemiological analysis of the incidence, mortality and survival rate of female breast cancer patients in Beijing.METHODS The female registration data in the Beijing urban area from 1982 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, mortality and survival rate of female breast cancer patients were analyzed using routine and life-table statistical methods.RESULTS During the period of 1982 to 2001, there was a trend of an average annual increase of female breast cancer incidence of 4.6% in urban Beijing, and of 4.9% in the world-population standardized incidence.The epidemiological features of urban Beijing female breast cancer showed:(1)The incidence distribution of different age groups from 25 to 80 years elevated with two peaks at ages of 45~ and 70~ years; (2)There was an elevation in each age group over the last 20 years; (3)The incidence rate at ages of 35 to 64 reached 95.3/105, causing breast cancer to become the number one cancer in females. The changes in the survival rate showed the following: the 5-year observed survival rate (OSR)increased from 62.0% in 1982~1983 to 68.7% in 1987~1988, and the relative-survival rate (RSR) increased from 66.3% to 74.2%. The 10-year OSR and RSR in 1987~1988 were 60.3% and 65.1%, and at 15 years 57.5% and 61.3%, respectively. The mortality rate of breast cancer patients fluctuated from 8 to 10 per 105 population over the 20 years of study.CONCLUSION There is a trend of an annual increase in female breast cancer in Beijing. The 5-year survival is being improved gradually while the mortality remains stable. The results demonstrate that the principles of "early prevention, diagnosis and treatment" for breast cancer are effective in Beijing.

  14. Double-blind comparison of survival analysis models using a bespoke web system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taktak, A F G; Setzkorn, C; Damato, B E

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a comparison of different linear and non-linear models from different centres on a common dataset in a double-blind manner to eliminate bias. The dataset was shared over the Internet using a secure bespoke environment called geoconda. Models evaluated included: (1) Cox model, (2) Log Normal model, (3) Partial Logistic Spline, (4) Partial Logistic Artificial Neural Network and (5) Radial Basis Function Networks. Graphical analysis of the various models with the Kaplan-Meier values were carried out in 3 survival groups in the test set classified according to the TNM staging system. The discrimination value for each model was determined using the area under the ROC curve. Results showed that the Cox model tended towards optimism whereas the partial logistic Neural Networks showed slight pessimism.

  15. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Postmus, Douwe [Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  16. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression.

  17. Improving breast cancer survival analysis through competition-based multidimensional modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Bilal

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and is responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths annually. As with most cancers, it is a heterogeneous disease and different breast cancer subtypes are treated differently. Understanding the difference in prognosis for breast cancer based on its molecular and phenotypic features is one avenue for improving treatment by matching the proper treatment with molecular subtypes of the disease. In this work, we employed a competition-based approach to modeling breast cancer prognosis using large datasets containing genomic and clinical information and an online real-time leaderboard program used to speed feedback to the modeling team and to encourage each modeler to work towards achieving a higher ranked submission. We find that machine learning methods combined with molecular features selected based on expert prior knowledge can improve survival predictions compared to current best-in-class methodologies and that ensemble models trained across multiple user submissions systematically outperform individual models within the ensemble. We also find that model scores are highly consistent across multiple independent evaluations. This study serves as the pilot phase of a much larger competition open to the whole research community, with the goal of understanding general strategies for model optimization using clinical and molecular profiling data and providing an objective, transparent system for assessing prognostic models.

  18. Disease-free survival in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Wolp Diniz

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: Breast cancer is the second most common malignancy in the world and the one with highest incidence in the female population; it is also a major cause of death from cancer among women. Objective: To analyze the disease-free survival (DFS at 5 years and prognostic factors in women with non-metastatic invasive breast cancer treated at a referral center for cancer care located in a medium-sized city in the Southeast of Brazil. Method: Patients diagnosed with the disease between 2003 and 2005 and identified through the institution’s cancer hospital records were analyzed. The follow-up of cases was carried out through hospital records, and complemented by search in the database of the Mortality Information System (SIM as well as telephone contact. The variables analyzed were distributed in the following blocks: socio-demographic data, tumor-related characteristics, and treatment-related characteristics. Survival functions were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the prognostic factors were analyzed based on Cox proportional hazard model. Results: The study showed a DFS at 5 years of 72% (95CI 67.6-75.9. The main variables independently associated with DFS were lymph node involvement, use of hormone therapy, and education level. Conclusion: This study reinforces the importance of early diagnosis for DFS, pointing to the role of social aspects in this regard. The relevance of this research in the country is also highlighted, given the scarcity of studies on DFS in the Brazilian population.

  19. Striving to survive: families' lived experiences when a child is diagnosed with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Maria; Wiebe, Thomas; Hallström, Inger

    2005-01-01

    When a child is ill with cancer, this affects the whole family for long periods. The aim of this study was to elucidate the family's lived experience when a child in the family was diagnosed with cancer. A descriptive inductive design with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach including interviews with 17 families (parents, children, and siblings) was chosen. The families' lived experience was described as a 2-fold essential theme comprising "a broken life world" and an immediate "striving to survive." The families' secure everyday life disappeared and was replaced by fear, chaos, and loneliness. When striving to make the child and the family survive, family members strove to feel hope and have a positive focus, to gain control, and to feel close to other people. Phenomenological human science research can deepen the understanding of the meaning of being a family with a child who is ill with cancer and can help pediatric oncology staff become increasingly thoughtful, and thus better prepared to take action to diminish the chaos occurring in the family.

  20. The Prognostic Nutritional Index Predicts Survival and Identifies Aggressiveness of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Wan Kyu; Chang, Hye Jung; Suh, Jungho; Ahn, Jin; Shin, Jeong; Hur, Joon-Young; Kim, Gou Young; Lee, Sookyung; Park, Sora; Lee, Sanghun

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional status has been associated with long-term outcomes in cancer patients. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is calculated by serum albumin concentration and absolute lymphocyte count, and it may be a surrogate biomarker for nutritional status and possibly predicts overall survival (OS) of gastric cancer. We evaluated the value of the PNI as a predictor for disease-free survival (DFS) in addition to OS in a cohort of 314 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgical resection. There were 77 patients in PNI-low group (PNI ≤ 47.3) and 237 patients in PNI-high group (PNI > 47.3). With a median follow-up of 36.5 mo, 5-yr DFS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 83.6% and 5-yr OS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 88.4%, respectively (DFS, P < 0.0001; OS, P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, the only predictors for DFS were PNI, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, and perineural invasion, whereas the only predictors for OS were PNI, age, TNM stage, and perineural invasion. In addition, the PNI was independent of various inflammatory markers. In conclusion, the PNI is an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS, and provides additional prognostic information beyond pathologic parameters.

  1. Impact of Diabetes and Hyperglycemia on Survival in Advanced Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Villarreal-Garza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We examined the impact of diabetes and hyperglycemia on cancer-specific survival of patients with metastatic or recurrent breast cancer (BC. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of 265 patients with advanced BC receiving palliative chemotherapy. BC-specific mortality was compared for diabetic and nondiabetic patients as well as for patients that presented hyperglycemia during treatment. Results. No difference was observed between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients in terms of overall survival (OS. A difference in OS was observed between nondiabetic patients and diabetic patients who had hyperglycemia. The OS was greater in diabetic patients with proper metabolic control than diabetic patients with hyperglycemia. The risk of death was higher in patients with mean glucose levels >130 mg/dL during treatment. Several factors were associated with poor OS: tumor stage, hormone-receptor-negative tumors, HER2 negative disease, multiple metastatic sites, presence of visceral metastases, and mean glucose >130 mg/dL. Conclusion. Elevated glucose levels are associated with a poor outcome in diabetic and nondiabetic patients in contrast to patients with normoglycemic levels, conferring an elevated risk of death. According to these results, clinicians should monitor glucose levels during treatment for advanced breast cancer disease and take action to maintain normal glucose levels.

  2. FOXM1 targets XIAP and Survivin to modulate breast cancer survival and chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestal de Moraes, Gabriela; Delbue, Deborah; Silva, Karina L; Robaina, Marcela Cristina; Khongkow, Pasarat; Gomes, Ana R; Zona, Stefania; Crocamo, Susanne; Mencalha, André Luiz; Magalhães, Lídia M; Lam, Eric W-F; Maia, Raquel C

    2015-12-01

    Drug resistance is a major hurdle for successful treatment of breast cancer, the leading cause of deaths in women throughout the world. The FOXM1 transcription factor is a potent oncogene that transcriptionally regulates a wide range of target genes involved in DNA repair, metastasis, cell invasion, and migration. However, little is known about the role of FOXM1 in cell survival and the gene targets involved. Here, we show that FOXM1-overexpressing breast cancer cells display an apoptosis-resistant phenotype, which associates with the upregulation of expression of XIAP and Survivin antiapoptotic genes. Conversely, FOXM1 knockdown results in XIAP and Survivin downregulation as well as decreased binding of FOXM1 to the promoter regions of XIAP and Survivin. Consistently, FOXM1, XIAP, and Survivin expression levels were higher in taxane and anthracycline-resistant cell lines when compared to their sensitive counterparts and could not be downregulated in response to drug treatment. In agreement with our in vitro findings, we found that FOXM1 expression is significantly associated with Survivin and XIAP expression in samples from patients with IIIa stage breast invasive ductal carcinoma. Importantly, patients co-expressing FOXM1, Survivin, and nuclear XIAP had significantly worst overall survival, further confirming the physiological relevance of the regulation of Survivin and XIAP by FOXM1. Together, these findings suggest that the overexpression of FOXM1, XIAP, and Survivin contributes to the development of drug-resistance and is associated with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

  3. Therapeutic Delay and Survival After Surgery for Cancer of the Pancreatic Head With or Without Preoperative Biliary Drainage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Eshuis; N.A. van der Gaag; E.A.J. Rauws; C.H.J. van Eijck; M.J. Bruno; E.J. Kuipers; P.P. Coene; F.J.G.M. Kubben; J.J.G.M. Gerritsen; J.W. Greve; M.F. Gerhards; I.H.J.T. de Hingh; J.H. Klinkenbijl; C.Y. Nio; S.M.M. de Castro; O.R.C. Busch; T.M. van Gulik; P.M.M. Bossuyt; D.J. Gouma

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relation between delay in surgery because of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) and survival in patients scheduled for surgery for pancreatic head cancer. Background: Patients with obstructive jaundice due to pancreatic head cancer can undergo PBD. The associated delay of

  4. The influence of BRAF and KRAS mutation status on the association between aspirin use and survival after colon cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Frouws (Martine); B. Reimers (Bernhard); M. Swets (Marloes); E. Bastiaannet (Esther); Prinse, B. (Bianca); R. van Eijk (Ronald); V.E.P.P. Lemmens (Valery); M.P.P. van Herk-Sukel (Myrthe); T. van Wezel (Tom); P.J.K. Kuppen (P. J K); H. Morreau (Hans); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); G.-J. Liefers (Gerrit-Jan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Use of aspirin after diagnosis of colon cancer has been associated with improved survival. Identification of cancer subtypes that respond to aspirin treatment may help develop personalized treatment regimens. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of BRAF and

  5. Cancer survival in the elderly: Effects of socio-economic factors and health care system features (ELDCARE project)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Vercelli (Marina); R. Lillini (Roberto); R. Capocaccia (Riccardo); A. Micheli; J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); M.J. Quinn (M.); C. Martinez-Garcia (Carmen); A. Quaglia (Alberto); W. Oberaigner; J. Ajmová (J.); T. Aareleid (T.); J. Palo (Jukka); T. Hakulinen (Timo); P. Grosclaude (P.); H. Ziegler (H.); L. Tryggvadottir (Laufey); F. Langmark (F.); A. Andersen; M. Bielska-Lasota (Magdalena); M.A. Pinheiro (Magda Avelar); I. Pleško (I.); V. Pompe-Kirn (V.); P. Ecimovic (P.); T. Möller (Thomas); J.-M. Lutz (J.)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the ELDCARE project is to study differences in cancer survival for elderly patients by country, taking into account the socio-economic conditions and the characteristics of health care systems at the ecological level. Fifty-three European cancer registries, from 19 countri

  6. Smoking and survival of colorectal cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, V; Jansen, L; Hoffmeister, M; Brenner, H

    2014-08-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality. However, little is known on smoking and its association with survival after CRC diagnosis. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize current evidence. A systematic literature search was carried out in MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science. We included studies that analyzed recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, all-cause, and CRC-specific mortality according to smoking status. Data were extracted in duplicate. Standard methods of meta-analysis were applied. Sixteen studies from 11 countries were identified, comprising a total sample size of 62 278 CRC patients. Overall, in the 16 included studies, current smoking and, to a lesser extent, former smoking were rather consistently associated with a poorer prognosis compared with never smokers. Meta-analyses yielded random-effects hazard ratio estimates (95% confidence intervals) for all-cause mortality of 1.26 (1.15-1.37) and 1.11 (0.93-1.33) for current and former smokers, compared with never smokers, respectively. In particular, 30-day mortality was found to be increased by between 49% and 100% among current compared with never smokers. Our results support the existence of detrimental effects of smoking on survival also after CRC diagnosis. Perspectives for enhancing prognosis of CRC patients by smoking abstinence deserve increased attention in further research and clinical practice.

  7. Nomogram including pretherapeutic parameters for prediction of survival after SIRT of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendler, Wolfgang Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Munich (Germany); Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Paprottka, Philipp M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Jakobs, Tobias F. [Hospital Barmherzige Brueder, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Internal Medicine III, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter; Haug, Alexander R. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Khalaf, Feras [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Vienna General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    Pre-therapeutic prediction of outcome is important for clinicians and patients in determining whether selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is indicated for hepatic metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC). Pre-therapeutic characteristics of 100 patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) treated by radioembolization were analyzed to develop a nomogram for predicting survival. Prognostic factors were selected by univariate Cox regression analysis and subsequent tested by multivariate analysis for predicting patient survival. The nomogram was validated with reference to an external patient cohort (n = 25) from the Bonn University Department of Nuclear Medicine. Of the 13 parameters tested, four were independently associated with reduced patient survival in multivariate analysis. These parameters included no liver surgery before SIRT (HR:1.81, p = 0.014), CEA serum level ≥ 150 ng/ml (HR:2.08, p = 0.001), transaminase toxicity level ≥2.5 x upper limit of normal (HR:2.82, p = 0.001), and summed computed tomography (CT) size of the largest two liver lesions ≥10 cm (HR:2.31, p < 0.001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for our prediction model was 0.83 for the external patient cohort, indicating superior performance of our multivariate model compared to a model ignoring covariates. The nomogram developed in our study entailing four pre-therapeutic parameters gives good prediction of patient survival post SIRT. (orig.)

  8. Survival Benefit of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer following Gastrectomy and Extended Lymphadenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Snyder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Although randomized trials suggest a survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy (XRT for gastric adenocarcinoma, its use in patients who undergo an extended lymphadenectomy is less clear. The purpose of this study was to determine if a survival benefit exists in gastric cancer patients who receive adjuvant XRT following resection with extended lymphadenectomy. Methods. The SEER registry was queried for records of patients with resected gastric adenocarcinoma from 1988 to 2007. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to assess independent prognostic factors affecting overall survival (OS and disease-specific survival (DSS. Results. Of 15,060 patients identified, 3,208 (21% received adjuvant XRT. Adjuvant XRT was independently associated with improved OS (HR 0.67, CI 0.64–0.71 and DSS (HR 0.69, CI 0.65–0.73 in stages IB through IV (M0. This OS and DSS benefit persisted regardless of the extent of lymphadenectomy. Furthermore, lymphadenectomy with >25 LN resected was associated with improved OS and DSS compared with 25 LNs results in improved OS and DSS compared with patients who have fewer LNs resected.

  9. Neuroticism and responses to social comparison among cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Brakel, Thecla M.; Bennenbroek, Femke T. C.; Stiegelis, Heidi E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined how the effects of three audiotapes containig different types of social comparison information on the mood of cancer patients depended on the level of neuroticism. On the procedural tape, a man and woman discussed the process of radiation therapy, on the emotion tape, they

  10. High serum YKL-40 levels in patients with primary breast cancer is related to short recurrence free survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Julia S; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Riisbro, Rikke;

    2003-01-01

    YKL-40 is a growth factor for connective tissue cells and stimulates migration of endothelial cells. YKL-40 is secreted by cancer cells, and elevated serum YKL-40 in patients with metastatic breast cancer and colorectal cancer is associated with a poorer prognosis as compared to patients...... with normal serum YKL-40. In the present study we evaluated the associations of preoperative serum YKL-40 in 271 patients with primary breast cancer in relation to relapse-free survival and overall survival. The median follow-up time was 5.9 years. There were 77 relapses and 69 patients died. The median serum...... YKL-40 in patients with primary breast cancer at time of operation is only elevated in a small group of patients, but these patients have a shorter recurrence free interval. Further studies are required to determine the biological function of YKL-40 in breast cancer....

  11. Exosomes Derived from Squamous Head and Neck Cancer Promote Cell Survival after Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschelknaus, Lisa; Peters, Carsten; Winkler, Klaudia; Yentrapalli, Ramesh; Heider, Theresa; Atkinson, Michael John; Moertl, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized extracellular vesicles that are believed to function as intercellular communicators. Here, we report that exosomes are able to modify the radiation response of the head and neck cancer cell lines BHY and FaDu. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of irradiated as well as non-irradiated head and neck cancer cells by serial centrifugation. Quantification using NanoSight technology indicated an increased exosome release from irradiated compared to non-irradiated cells 24 hours after treatment. To test whether the released exosomes influence the radiation response of other cells the exosomes were transferred to non-irradiated and irradiated recipient cells. We found an enhanced uptake of exosomes isolated from both irradiated and non-irradiated cells by irradiated recipient cells compared to non-irradiated recipient cells. Functional analyses by exosome transfer indicated that all exosomes (from non-irradiated and irradiated donor cells) increase the proliferation of non-irradiated recipient cells and the survival of irradiated recipient cells. The survival-promoting effects are more pronounced when exosomes isolated from irradiated compared to non-irradiated donor cells are transferred. A possible mechanism for the increased survival after irradiation could be the increase in DNA double-strand break repair monitored at 6, 8 and 10 h after the transfer of exosomes isolated from irradiated cells. This is abrogated by the destabilization of the exosomes. Our results demonstrate that radiation influences both the abundance and action of exosomes on recipient cells. Exosomes transmit prosurvival effects by promoting the proliferation and radioresistance of head and neck cancer cells. Taken together, this study indicates a functional role of exosomes in the response of tumor cells to radiation exposure within a therapeutic dose range and encourages that exosomes are useful objects of study for a better understanding of tumor

  12. Reduced retinoids and retinoid receptors' expression in pancreatic cancer: A link to patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleul, Tim; Rühl, Ralph; Bulashevska, Svetlana; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents one of the deadliest cancers in the world. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A, regulating expression of many genes. Disturbances of vitamin A metabolism are prevalent in some cancer cells. The main aim of this work was to investigate deeply the components of retinoid signaling in PDAC compared to in the normal pancreas and to prove the clinical importance of retinoid receptor expression. For the study, human tumor tissues obtained from PDAC patients and murine tumors from the orthotopic Panc02 model were used for the analysis of retinoids, using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and real-time RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Survival probabilities in univariate analysis were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. In this work, we showed for the first time that the ATRA and all-trans retinol concentration is reduced in PDAC tissue compared to their normal counterparts. The expression of RARα and β as well as RXRα and β are down-regulated in PDAC tissue. This reduced expression of retinoid receptors correlates with the expression of some markers of differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as of cancer stem cell markers. Importantly, the expression of RARα and RXRβ is associated with better overall survival of PDAC patients. Thus, reduction of retinoids and their receptors is an important feature of PDAC and is associated with worse patient survival outcomes.

  13. Colorectal cancer incidence, mortality and survival in Cali, Colombia, 1962-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Cortés

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the colorectal cancer (CRC behavior in Cali, Colombia, during the 1963-2012 period using data from the Population-based Cancer Registry of Cali and the Municipal Health Secretariat of Cali. Materials and methods. An ecological time series analysis to study the CRC incidence (1962-2007 and mortality (1984-2012 rate trends; and a survival analysis of CRC cases registered in Cali between 1995 and 2004 were conducted. The age-standardized temporal trend of incidence (I-ASR and mortality (M-ASR rates were studied using an annual percent change (APC. The 5-year relative survival was estimated and a multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results. During the 1962-2007 period, CRC TTIR increased in men and women living in Cali [APC= 2.6 (95% CI 2.2-3.0 and APC= 2.2% (95% CI 1.8-2.7, respectively]. In the 1984-2012 period, the TTMR remained stable in women but increased in men in all age groups [APC= 1.8 (95% CI 0.8-2.8]. The 5-year relative survival was independent of sex and increased from 29.7% in 1995-1999 to 39.8% in 2000- 2004. The risk of dying from CRC was higher in people of lower socio-economic status (SES vs higher SES [HR= 2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.6], among people older than 70 years of age vs younger than 50 years [HR= 2.4 (95% CI: 1.9-2.9], and for the 1995-1999 period vs 2000-2004 period [HR= 1.5(95% CI 1.3-1.7]. Conclusion. CRC is beginning to take a prominent place among the most important cancers in Cali, Colombia.

  14. Chinese female breast cancer patients show a better overall survival than their male counterparts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Liang-ping; ZHOU Fei-fei; GUO Gui-fang; WANG Fang; WANG Xi; YUAN Zhong-yu; ZHANG Bei

    2010-01-01

    Backgroud It is not clear if there is a difference in prognosis between male breast cancer (MBC) and female breast cancer (FBC) patients. The aim of this study was to compare the prognosis of MBC and FBC patients in China and the prognosis of MBC and their corresponding postmenopausal FBC patients.Methods Thirty-five MBC patients who were treated at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between 1969 and 2004 were enrolled in the study. Seventy FBC patients who were matched with the MBC patients for TNM stage, year of diagnosis, and age at diagnosis were simultaneously enrolled in the study. A second group comprising 18 MBC patients and their corresponding 36 matched postmenopausal FBC patients were also enrolled. The whole group and the postmenopausal groups were compared for five- and ten-year survivals. Results All the factors that could potentially affect prognosis were comparable among the groups except more FBC than MBC patients underwent endocrine therapy and a modified radical mastectomy. The 5- and 10-year survivals in the whole group were 81.6% and 60.3% for men and 90.7% and 73.5% for women (P=0.02). The 5- and 10-year survival in the postmenopausal group was 82.5% and 100% for men and 66.0% and 85.9% for women (P=0.159).Conclusions Chinese FBC patients had a better prognosis than Chinese MBC patients. However, MBC patients and their corresponding postmenopausal FBC patients had a similar prognosis.

  15. Recent trends of cancer in Europe: A combined approach of incidence, survival and mortality for 17 cancer sites since the 1990s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; Vries, de Esther; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Lemmens, Valery; Siesling, Sabine; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We present a comprehensive overview of most recent European trends in population-based incidence of, mortality from and relative survival for patients with cancer since the mid 1990s. Methods Data on incidence, mortality and 5-year relative survival from the mid 1990s to early 2000 for

  16. Usefulness of tumor volumetry as a prognostic factor of survival in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Klinikum Offenbach (Germany); Kalogera-Fountzila, A.; Fountzilas, G. [AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, School of Medicine, Thessaloniki, Macedonia (Greece); Muskalla, K. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Heinrich Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Dafni, U. [Dept. of Public Health, School of Nursing, Univ. of Athens (Greece); Schnabel, T. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Clinic for Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Kober, B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Klinikum Darmstadt (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Background: The TNM classification system of tumor stage does not always reflect the actual tumor mass present at diagnosis. This study aimed at evaluating the prognostic value of volumetric data regarding survival in head and neck cancer patients being treated with either cisplatin or carboplatin administered concomitantly with radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 patients suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in a Greek-German cooperational study (see Table 1). All patients were treated by radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy. 65 patients received chemotherapy with carboplatin and 42 with cisplatin. More than 6,200 CT scans were analyzed by digitalization of contours which subsequently led to the computation of the tumor volume (primary and macroscopic lymph node metastases). Results: Median follow-up was 43 months and median survival 30 months. Median initial tumor volume was 32.5 ml (range 2.1-220.1 ml) in the carboplatin and 44.4 ml (range 3.2-202.5 ml) in the cisplatin group (see Figure 1). After treatment, tumor volumes did not differ significantly (median of 3.1 ml [range 0.0-167.1 ml] and 3.5 ml [range 0.0-166.0 ml], respectively). 41 patients (63.1%) died in the carboplatin group and 22 patients (52.4%) in the cisplatin group (see Figure 2). Pretherapeutic tumor volume was prognostic with respect to survival while TNM classification and age were not. Pretherapeutic tumor volume was negatively and percent decrease in tumor volume positively associated with survival (see Tables 2 and 3). Conclusion: Knowledge of the initial tumor volume adds valuable information in terms of prognosis. Initial tumor volume should be included in all future clinical trials regarding head and neck cancer patients. (orig.)

  17. Elevated BUBR1 expression is associated with poor survival in early breast cancer patients: 15-year follow-up analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejczyk, Adam; Szelachowska, Jolanta; Czapiga, Bogdan; Matkowski, Rafał; Hałoń, Agnieszka; Györffy, Balázs; Surowiak, Paweł

    2013-05-01

    BUBR1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazole-related 1) represents the component of a controlling complex in mitosis. Defects in mitotic control complex result in chromosomal instability and, as a result, disturb the mitotic process. This study was aimed at examining the prognostic value linked to the expression of BUBR1 in a group of patients with breast cancer. We analyzed the expression of BUBR1 in 98 stage II breast cancer patients with a median follow-up of 15 years. Immunohistochemical reactions were performed using monoclonal antibodies against BUBR1. We also studied the prognostic value of BUBR1 mRNA expression using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) plotter, which assessed the effect of 22,277 genes on survival in 2422 breast cancer patients. A background database was established using gene expression data and survival information on 2422 patients downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO; Affymetrix HGU133A and HGU133+2 microarrays). The median relapse-free survival was 6.43 years. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that higher expression of BUBR1 was typical for cases of shorter overall survival, disease-free time, and disease-specific survival. KM plotter analysis showed that elevated BUBR1 mRNA expression had a negative impact on patients' relapse-free, distant metastases-free, and overall survival. Elevated BUBR1 expression was associated with poor survival in early stage breast cancer patients.

  18. Survival in women with ovarian cancer before and after the introduction of adjuvant paclitaxel; a 25-year, single institution review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shireen, R

    2012-02-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy regime for ovarian cancer patients remains to be a contentious issue. The aim of this study was to compare the overall and progression-free survival of women with ovarian cancer before and after introduction of paclitaxel in our unit in 1992. A sample of 112 women who received adjuvant therapy following surgery for ovarian cancer was collected, 68 (61%) received platinum+alkylating agent before 1992 and later 44 (39%) received platinum+paclitaxel. Five-year survival was same in both treatment groups when there was no macroscopic disease after surgery (78% versus 70%) and when residual disease was <2 cm (50% versus 40%). Survival was greater in women with residual disease >2 cm in the platinum+paclitaxel group (50% versus 24%), (p = 0.04). However, progression-free survival was similar in both groups irrespective of stage or residual volume of disease. Therefore consideration to selective use of paclitaxel could reduce patient morbidity and costs significantly.

  19. Tumor regression grade of urothelial bladder cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a novel and successful strategy to predict survival.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischmann, Achim; Thalmann, George; Perren, Aurel; Seiler,Roland

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic tumor regression grades (TRGs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predict survival in different cancers. In bladder cancer, corresponding studies have not been conducted. Fifty-six patients with advanced invasive urothelial bladder cancer received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before cystectomy and lymphadenectomy. TRGs were defined as follows: TRG1: complete tumor regression; TRG2: >50% tumor regression; TRG3: 50% or less tumor regression. Separate TRGs were assigned for primary tumor...

  20. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α) signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/) to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patie...

  1. Application of Parametric Models of Survival Analysis in Determining the Cancer Influencing Factors in Patients with Thyroid Nodules

    OpenAIRE

    J.Yazdani Charati; O. Akha; AR Baghestani; F. Khosravi; Y Kavyani Charati

    2015-01-01

    Background & aim: One of the most common clinical problems among individuals is thyroid nodule diseases which are characterized by one or more nodules in the thyroid and are usually benign. It can be said that thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer worldwide. This study aimed to determine the risk factors for cancer in patients with thyroid nodule in Mazandaran province,Iran, using parametric survival analysis. Methods: In the present historical cohort study, 26,730 patients w...

  2. Do patient characteristics, disease, or treatment explain social inequality in survival from colorectal cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Osler, Merete; Harling, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the association between individually measured socioeconomic status (SES) and all-cause survival in colorectal cancer patients, and explores whether factors related to the patient, the disease, or the surgical treatment mediate the observed social gradient. The data were...... on comorbidity from previous hospitalizations and use of medication. Only patients with colorectal cancer as their first primary tumour and those born after 1920 were included. A total of 8763 patients were included in the study. Cox proportional hazard regression models revealed a positive social gradient...... derived from a nationwide clinical database of all adenocarcinomas of the colon or rectum diagnosed in Denmark between 2001 and 2004 (inclusive). These data were linked to those from several central registries providing information on income, education, and housing status, as well as to data...

  3. Modifiable risk factors and survival in women diagnosed with primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, Sophie Sell; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the impact of smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption, hormone replacement therapy, and physical activity on all-cause mortality among 528 Danish women diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Participants were women enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Prospective...... self-reported exposure information was collected from four points of follow-up in 1976-1978, 1981-1983, 1991-1994, and 2001-2003. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed adjusting for age, disease stage, adjuvant treatment, menopausal status, parity, alcohol...... intake, smoking, physical activity, body mass index, and hormone replacement therapy. The study shows that smoking for total mortality [hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.29] and obesity for both total mortality (1.61; 1.12-2.33) and breast cancer-specific mortality (1.82; 1...

  4. An Integrative Pathway-based Clinical-genomic Model for Cancer Survival Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Lily; Ishwaran, Hemant

    2010-09-01

    Prediction models that use gene expression levels are now being proposed for personalized treatment of cancer, but building accurate models that are easy to interpret remains a challenge. In this paper, we describe an integrative clinical-genomic approach that combines both genomic pathway and clinical information. First, we summarize information from genes in each pathway using Supervised Principal Components (SPCA) to obtain pathway-based genomic predictors. Next, we build a prediction model based on clinical variables and pathway-based genomic predictors using Random Survival Forests (RSF). Our rationale for this two-stage procedure is that the underlying disease process may be influenced by environmental exposure (measured by clinical variables) and perturbations in different pathways (measured by pathway-based genomic variables), as well as their interactions. Using two cancer microarray datasets, we show that the pathway-based clinical-genomic model outperforms gene-based clinical-genomic models, with improved prediction accuracy and interpretability.

  5. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder