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Sample records for cancer stage iii

  1. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Improving Well-Being in Patients With Stage III-IV Cancer and Their Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-21

    Malignant Female Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Hepatobiliary Neoplasm; Partner; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  3. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  4. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material...... were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...

  5. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Chandrakumar; Hines, Robert B; Jhala, Nirag C; Katkoori, Venkat R; Zhang, Bin; Posey, James A; Bumpers, Harvey L; Grizzle, William E; Eltoum, Isam E; Siegal, Gene P; Manne, Upender

    2011-05-28

    Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs) is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91), but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64), examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87) and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26) decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p < 0.0001). For Stage II and III colon cancers, there was improved survival and a decreased risk of recurrence with an increased number of LNs examined, regardless of the cutoff-points. Examination of ≥7 or ≥12 LNs had similar outcomes, but there were significant outcome benefits at the ≥20 cutoff-point only for Stage II patients. For Stage III patients, examination of 6 additional LNs detected one additional positive LN. Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  6. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Estrogen Receptor Status; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Status; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  9. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  10. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  11. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. The relation between lymph node status and survival in Stage I-III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J.; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study involved a large nationwide Danish cohort to evaluate the hypothesis that a high lymph node harvest has a positive effect on survival in curative resected Stage I-III colon cancer and a low lymph node ratio has a positive effect on survival in Stage III colon cancer. Method......: Analysis of overall survival was conducted using a nationwide Danish cohort of patients treated with curative resection of Stage I-III colon cancer. All 8901 patients in Denmark diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and treated with curative resection in the period 2003-2008 were identified from...... independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High lymph node count was associated with improved overall survival in colon cancer. Lymph node ratio was superior to N-stage in differentiating overall survival in Stage III colon cancer. Stage migration was observed....

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  15. Characteristics and treatment modalities for African American women diagnosed with stage III breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Monica; Lund, Mary Jo; Mosunjac, Marina; Bumpers, Harvey; Holmes, Leslie; O'Regan, Ruth; Brawley, Otis W; Gabram, Sheryl

    2009-07-01

    Stage III breast cancers account for about 6% to 7% of all invasive breast cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. In African American (AA) women, the incidence of stage III breast cancers is almost double that in Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to correlate age, receptor status, nuclear grade, and differences in treatment modalities for stage III breast cancer in an inner-city hospital serving a large AA population. A retrospective review was performed for all stage III primary breast cancers diagnosed and or treated from 2000 to 2006. : Of 840 primary invasive breast cancers, the authors identified 107 as stage III, 40.2% IIIA, 32.7% IIIB, 16.8% T4D, and 10.3% IIIC. The majority of the patients were AA (n = 93, 86.9%). Stage IIIC patients were younger (P < .05). Triple negative tumors (TNT) accounted for 29.0%. TNT were more likely among the inflammatory breast cancers (50.0%) compared with the other 3 groups (P < .05). Twenty-two patients (20.5%) refused chemotherapy, and 24 of the 91 patients (26.3%) who should have received chest wall radiation refused. There was no difference in race, marital status, religion, or age in the patients that refused chemotherapy or radiation therapy versus the majority of patients in this series who received standard care. Stage III breast cancers in AA women have distinct clinical characteristics. A high number of these patients refused chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Reasons for refusal need to be better defined so strategies can be implemented to improve compliance for these advanced stage patients.

  16. Factors Affecting Adjuvant Therapy in Stage III Pancreatic Cancer—Analysis of the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Krishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adjuvant therapy after curative resection is associated with survival benefit in stage III pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the factors affecting the outcome of adjuvant therapy in stage III pancreatic cancer and compared overall survival with different modalities of adjuvant treatment. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with stage III pancreatic cancer listed in the National Cancer Database (NCDB who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. Patients were stratified based on adjuvant therapy they received. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: We analyzed a cohort included 1731 patients who were recipients of adjuvant therapy for stage III pancreatic cancer within the limits of our database. Patients who received adjuvant chemoradiation had the longest postdiagnosis survival time, followed by patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, and finally patients who received no adjuvant therapy. On multivariate analysis, advancing age and patients with Medicaid had worse survival, whereas Spanish origin and lower Charlson comorbidity score had better survival. Conclusions: Our study is the largest trial using the NCDB addressing the effects of adjuvant therapy specifically in stage III pancreatic cancer. Within the limits of our study, survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was more apparent with longer duration from date of diagnosis.

  17. Association of family history with cancer recurrence and survival among patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B; Mayer, Robert J; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M; Warren, Robert S; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S

    2008-06-04

    A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Prospective observational study of 1087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up, 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in tumor specimens. Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Among 1087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57 of 195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343 of 892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared with patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) among those with 1 or more affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival, and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival. This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared with participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1 affected relative had a multivariate HR of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.57-1.04) for disease

  18. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  19. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...... in pre-operative staging, surgery, and pathological examination. The aim is to review the current risk of recurrence in stage II and III patients and second, to estimate the relative importance of routinely assessed clinico-pathological variables. Methods. The PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases...... were systematically searched for randomized controlled studies and observational studies published after 1 January 2005 with patients included after January 1995 on prognosis in surgically treated stage II and III CC patients. Results. Of 2596 studies identified, 37 met the inclusion criteria and 25...

  20. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  1. Disentangling the prognostic heterogeneity of stage III colorectal cancer through histologic stromal categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Sekine, Shigeki; Oshiro, Taihei; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shida, Dai; Takashima, Atsuo; Ishiguro, Megumi; Ito, Eisaku; Hashiguchi, Yojiro; Kondo, Fukuo; Shimazaki, Hideyuki; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Kajiwara, Yoshiki; Shinto, Eiji; Yamamoto, Junji; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2017-11-18

    Growing evidence suggests the importance of stroma in determining cancer biology and recent studies have identified that genes closely associated with poor prognosis subtypes of colorectal cancer are expressed by the stroma rather than epithelial cancer cells. We aimed to clarify the prognostic value of the novel histologic classification of desmoplastic reaction in stage III colorectal cancer. A pathologic review was conducted for 466 stage III colorectal cancer patients in a single Japanese institution (1999-2006). Desmoplastic reaction was classified as mature, intermediate, or immature according to existence of hyalinized collagen bundles and myxoid stroma, both appear exclusively at the desmoplastic front. An additional 432 patients treated at four independent institutions (2007-2008) were examined as a second cohort to validate the results. According to desmoplastic reaction, 164, 133, and 169 patients were classified as mature, intermediate, and immature, respectively. Five-year relapse-free survival rates were highest in the mature group (86.0%), followed by the intermediate (73.7%) and immature (50.9%) groups. An adverse prognostic impact of desmoplastic reaction was invariably observed in stage IIIB, which contained 71% of stage III cases. Harrell's concordance index for relapse-free survival was greater in desmoplastic reaction (0.66) than any conventional tumor-associated prognostic factors including tumor node metastasis substage (0.62) and tumor grade (0.53). Similar results were observed in the second cohort, wherein desmoplastic reaction categorization was the most influential prognostic factor. Histologic desmoplastic reaction categorization could be a key to solve the issue of prognostic heterogeneity in stage III colorectal cancer, thereby enhancing the value of tumor node metastasis stage. (Surgery 2017;160:XXX-XXX.). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; WT1 Positive

  3. Diabetes alone should not be a reason for withholding adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waalwijk, Maren A; van de Schans, Saskia A M; Haak, Harm R; Extermann, Martine; Dercksen, Wouter M W; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L G

    2011-01-01

    With increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and colon cancer, the number of patients suffering from both diseases is growing, and physicians are being faced with complicated treatment decisions. To investigate the association between diabetes and treatment/course of stage III colon cancer and the association between colon cancer and course of diabetes. Additional information was collected from the medical records of all patients with both stage III colon cancer and diabetes ( n =201) and a random sample of stage III colon cancer patients without diabetes ( n =206) in the area of the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry (1998-2007). Colon cancer patients without diabetes were more likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy compared with diabetic colon cancer patients (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.7). After adjustment for age, this difference was borderline significant (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0-2.6). Diabetic patients did not have: significantly more side-effects from surgery or adjuvant chemotherapy; more recurrence from colon cancer; significantly shorter time interval until recurrence; or a poorer disease-free survival or overall survival. Age and withholding of adjuvant chemotherapy were most predictive of all-cause mortality. After colon cancer diagnosis, the dose of antiglycaemic medications was increased in 22% of diabetic patients, resulting in significantly lower glycaemic indexes than before colon cancer diagnosis. Since diabetic patients did not have more side-effects of adjuvant chemotherapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy had a positive effect on survival for both patients with and without diabetes, diabetes alone should not be a reason for withholding adjuvant chemotherapy. Journal of Comorbidity 2011;1:19-27.

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessing Affect Reactivity and Regulation in Patients With Stage 0-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Healthy Subject; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. ColoGuidePro: a prognostic 7-gene expression signature for stage III colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Anita; Ågesen, Trude H; Nesbakken, Arild; Meling, Gunn Iren; Rognum, Torleiv O; Liestøl, Knut; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2012-11-01

    Improved prognostic stratification of patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer is warranted for postoperative clinical decision making. This study was conducted to develop a clinically feasible and robust prognostic classifier for these patients independent of adjuvant treatment. Global gene expression profiles from altogether 387 stage II and III colorectal cancer tissue samples from three independent patient series were included in the study. ColoGuidePro, a seven-gene prognostic classifier, was developed from a selected Norwegian learning series (n = 95; no adjuvant treatment) using lasso-penalized multivariate survival modeling with cross-validation. The expression signature significantly stratified patients in a consecutive Norwegian test series, in which patients were treated according to current standards [HR, 2.9 (1.1-7.5); P = 0.03; n = 77] and an external validation series [HR, 3.7 (2.0-6.8); P < 0.001; n = 215] according to survival. ColoGuidePro was also an independent predictor of prognosis in multivariate models including tumor stage in both series (HR, ≥ 3.1; P ≤ 0.03). In the validation series, which consisted of patients from other populations (United States and Australia), 5-year relapse-free survival was significantly predicted for stage III patients only (P < 0.001; n = 107). Here, prognostic stratification was independent of adjuvant treatment (P = 0.001). We present ColoGuidePro, a prognostic classifier developed for patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer. The test is suitable for transfer to clinical use and has best prognostic prediction potential for stage III patients. ©2012 AACR.

  6. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  7. A proteomics panel for predicting optimal primary cytoreduction in stage III/IV ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Signe; Høgdall, Estrid; Engelholm, Svend A

    2009-01-01

    for CA-125. In addition, serum was analyzed for 7 biomarkers using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These biomarkers were combined into a single-valued ovarian-cancer-risk index (OvaRI). CA-125 and OvaRI were evaluated as predictors of cytoreduction in 75......The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate CA-125 and a 7-marker panel as predictors of incomplete primary cytoreduction in patients with stage III/IV ovarian cancer (OC). From September 2004 to January 2008, serum from 201 patients referred to surgery for a pelvic tumor was analyzed...... stage III/IV patients using receiver operating characteristic curves. Complete primary cytoreduction (no macroscopic residual disease) was achieved in 31% (23/75) of the patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.66 for CA-125 and 0.75 for OvaRI. The sensitivity...

  8. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Stoddard, Greg [Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  9. Coffee Intake, Recurrence, and Mortality in Stage III Colon Cancer: Results From CALGB 89803 (Alliance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercio, Brendan J.; Sato, Kaori; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Ye, Xing; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Mowat, Rex B.; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al; Atienza, Daniel; Messino, Michael; Kindler, Hedy; Venook, Alan; Hu, Frank B.; Ogino, Shuji; Wu, Kana; Willett, Walter C.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Observational studies have demonstrated increased colon cancer recurrence in states of relative hyperinsulinemia, including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and increased dietary glycemic load. Greater coffee consumption has been associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes and increased insulin sensitivity. The effect of coffee on colon cancer recurrence and survival is unknown. Patients and Methods During and 6 months after adjuvant chemotherapy, 953 patients with stage III colon cancer prospectively reported dietary intake of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and nonherbal tea, as well as 128 other items. We examined the influence of coffee, nonherbal tea, and caffeine on cancer recurrence and mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Patients consuming 4 cups/d or more of total coffee experienced an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for colon cancer recurrence or mortality of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.34 to 0.99), compared with never drinkers (Ptrend = .002). Patients consuming 4 cups/d or more of caffeinated coffee experienced significantly reduced cancer recurrence or mortality risk compared with abstainers (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.91; Ptrend = .002), and increasing caffeine intake also conferred a significant reduction in cancer recurrence or mortality (HR, 0.66 across extreme quintiles; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.93; Ptrend = .006). Nonherbal tea and decaffeinated coffee were not associated with patient outcome. The association of total coffee intake with improved outcomes seemed consistent across other predictors of cancer recurrence and mortality. Conclusion Higher coffee intake may be associated with significantly reduced cancer recurrence and death in patients with stage III colon cancer. PMID:26282659

  10. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    . RESULTS: The final population included 1,827 patients scheduled for adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy started within 4 and 8 weeks improved survival when compared to start later than 8 weeks (HR [95%CI]: 1.7 [1.1-2.6]; P = 0.024 and 1.4 [1.07-1.8]; P = 0.013, respectively), whereas......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In stage III colonic cancer, time from surgery to start of adjuvant chemotherapy may influence survival. In this study, we evaluated the effect of timing of adjuvant therapy on survival. METHODS: Database study from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's national database...

  11. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  12. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  16. FOLFOX and FLOX regimens for the adjuvant treatment of resected stage II and III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Saima; O'Connell, Michael J; Yothers, Greg; Lopa, Samia; Wolmark, Norman

    2008-11-01

    The MOSAIC trial showed that the use of adjuvant oxaliplatin and an infusional regimen of 5-FU/LV in the treatment of stage II/III colon cancer improved disease-free survival (DFS). The NSABP's C-07 trial evaluated the addition of oxaliplatin to a weekly Roswell Park regimen of bolus 5-FU/LV and found a similar improvement in DFS. The benefit of oxaliplatin appears to be independent of the 5-FU/LV regimen used. This paper reviews the efficacy and toxicities of these two regimens and is meant to serve as a guide for clinical practice.

  17. Treatment-related lymphopenia in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, Jian L; Ye, Xiaobu; Brock, Malcolm; Grossman, Stuart A

    2013-03-01

    This study sought to estimate the severity, etiology, and clinical importance of treatment-related lymphopenia in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Serial lymphocyte counts and survival were analyzed retrospectively in 47 patients accounting for known prognostic factors. Total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) were normal before therapy and did not change following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Following radiation, TLC fell by 67% (median 500 cells/mm(3), p <.00001). Multivariate analysis revealed an association between severe TLC and survival (HR 1.70, 95% CI: 0.8-3.6). Rapid and severe lymphopenia occurred in 50% of patients following radiation which was associated with reduced survival.

  18. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  19. Impact of smoking on patients with stage III colon cancer: results from Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, Nadine Jackson; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al; Goldberg, Richard; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2010-02-15

    Cigarette smoking has been shown to increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer, particularly smoking early in life. Little is known about the impact of tobacco use on colon cancer recurrence among colon cancer survivors. The authors prospectively collected lifetime smoking history from stage III colon cancer patients enrolled in a phase 3 trial via self-report questionnaires during and 6 months after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Smoking status was defined as never, current, or past. Lifetime pack-years were defined as number of lifetime packs of cigarettes. Patients were followed for recurrence or death. Data on smoking history were captured on 1045 patients with stage III colon cancer receiving adjuvant therapy (46% never smokers; 44% past; 10% current). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for disease-free survival (DFS) was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-1.41), 1.17 (95% CI 0.89-1.55), and 1.22 (95% CI 0.92-1.61) for lifetime pack-years 0-10, 10-20, and 20+, respectively, compared with never smoking (P = .16). In a preplanned exploratory analysis of smoking intensity early in life, the adjusted HR for 12+ pack-years before age 30 years for DFS was 1.37 (95% CI, 1.02-1.84) compared with never smoking (P = .04). The adjusted HR for DFS was 1.18 (95% CI, 0.92-1.50) for past smokers and 1.10 (95% CI, 0.73-1.64) for current smokers, compared with never smokers. Total tobacco usage early in life may be an important, independent prognostic factor of cancer recurrences and mortality in patients with stage III colon cancer.

  20. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p cancer group and between palladium and cobalt (r = 0.945) in the healthy individuals. Our results show that there are distinct patterns of heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  2. Loss of KCNQ1 expression in stage II and stage III colon cancer is a strong prognostic factor for disease recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Uil, Sjoerd H; Coupé, Veerle M H; Linnekamp, Janneke F; van den Broek, Evert; Goos, Jeroen A C M; Delis-van Diemen, Pien M; Belt, Eric J Th; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Scott, Patricia M; Vermeulen, Louis; Medema, Jan Paul; Bril, Herman; Stockmann, Hein B A C; Cormier, Robert T; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A

    2016-12-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. Accurately identifying stage II CRC patients at risk for recurrence is an unmet clinical need. KCNQ1 was previously identified as a tumour suppressor gene and loss of expression was associated with poor survival in patients with CRC liver metastases. In this study the prognostic value of KCNQ1 in stage II and stage III colon cancer patients was examined. KCNQ1 mRNA expression was assessed in 90 stage II colon cancer patients (AMC-AJCCII-90) using microarray gene expression data. Subsequently, KCNQ1 protein expression was evaluated in an independent cohort of 386 stage II and stage III colon cancer patients by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. Low KCNQ1 mRNA expression in stage II microsatellite stable (MSS) colon cancers was associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.025). Loss of KCNQ1 protein expression from epithelial cells was strongly associated with poor DFS in stage II MSS (PKCNQ1 seemed an independent prognostic value in addition to other high-risk parameters like angio-invasion, nodal stage and microsatellite instability-status. We conclude that KCNQ1 is a promising biomarker for prediction of disease recurrence and may aid stratification of patients with stage II MSS colon cancer for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  5. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and its relation to survival among patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, A C R K; van Erning, F N; van Gestel, Y R B M; Creemers, G J M; Punt, C J A; van Oijen, M G H; Lemmens, V E P P

    2015-11-01

    Currently available data suggest that delaying the start of adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer patients has a detrimental effect on survival. We analysed which factors impact on the timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and evaluated the influence on overall survival (OS). Stage III colon cancer patients who underwent resection and received adjuvant chemotherapy between 2008 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy was subdivided into: ⩽ 4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-16 weeks post-surgery. Multivariable regressions were performed to assess the influence of several factors on the probability of starting treatment within 8 weeks post-surgery and to evaluate the association of timing of adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-year OS. 6620 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, 14% commenced after 8 weeks. Factors associated with starting treatment after 8 weeks were older age (Odds ratio (OR) 65-74 versus colon cancer patients within 8 weeks post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SU-E-J-269: Tracking of Tumor Regression for Stage III Lung Cancer Using CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Biswas, T; Podder, T [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to evaluate the tumor regression over the course of EBRT treatment and to determine the difference of tumor reduction for stage III lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma using CBCT. Methods: Twenty three stage III lung cancer patients treated in our clinic who had daily cone beam CT (CBCT) were selected for this study (16 adenocarcinoma and 7 SCC cases). Patients received prescription dose in the range of 50Gy–71.4Gy (mean =60.3Gy, median =50Gy) at 1.8Gy or 2Gy per fraction. Treatments spanned over a minimum of five weeks. Initial mean volume of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 123cc (range = 14.7cc–353.3cc). For this study, we choose six sets of CBCTs at an interval of one week, starting from the first fraction of treatment. Daily CBCTs from treatment linac computer were transferred to MIM Software version 6.0. An experienced physician contoured the primary GTV on each slices of the CBCT for these patients. Results: A consistent regression of the GTVs was observed in all patients, except in one patient (adeno case) where GTV did not change. Weekly volumetric reduction was in the range of 11.2%–16.6%. Maximum reductions were noticed in the first two weeks of the treatment cycle; mean overall (for adeno+SCC) reductions were 16.6%, 14.2% in week-1 and week-2, respectively. Mean reduction over five weeks of treatment was 49.8% (range = 0.1%–75.5%). Higher reduction was observed in SCC patients as compare to adenocarcinoma cases (54.9% vs. 47.6%); however, the difference was not statistically significant (p-value > 0.05). Conclusion: Large regression of tumors over the course of EBRT for stage III lung cancer patients was observed. Both SCC and adenocarcinoma responded well; overall reduction for SCC cases was higher. A future study is warranted for determining the co-relation between tumor volume reduction and treatment outcome.

  7. Radiotherapy for stage II and stage III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after preoperative chemotherapy and mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A; de la Lande, Brigitte; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  9. Cancer stem cell gene profile as predictor of relapse in high risk stage II and stage III, radically resected colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Scartozzi, Mario; Loretelli, Cristian; Piva, Francesco; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Lezoche, Giovanni; Del Prete, Michela; Bittoni, Alessandro; Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Cecchini, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario; Bearzi, Italo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data indicate that prognostic stratification of radically resected colorectal cancer based on disease stage only may not be always be adequate. Preclinical findings suggest that cancer stem cells may influence the biological behaviour of colorectal cancer independently from stage: objective of the study was to assess whether a panel of stemness markers were correlated with clinical outcome in resected stage II and III colon cancer patients. A panel of 66 markers of stemness were analysed and thus patients were divided into two groups (A and B) with most patients clustering in a manner consistent with different time to relapse by using a statistical algorithm. A total of 62 patients were analysed. Thirty-six (58%) relapsed during the follow-up period (range 1.63-86.5 months). Twelve (19%) and 50 (81%) patients were allocated into group A and B, respectively. A significantly different median relapse-free survival was observed between the 2 groups (22.18 vs 42.85 months, p=0.0296). Among of all genes tested, those with the higher "weight" in determining different prognosis were CD44, ALCAM, DTX2, HSPA9, CCNA2, PDX1, MYST1, COL1A1 and ABCG2. This analysis supports the idea that, other than stage, biological variables, such as expression levels of colon cancer stem cell genes, may be relevant in determining an increased risk of relapse in resected colorectal cancer patients.

  10. Cancer stem cell gene profile as predictor of relapse in high risk stage II and stage III, radically resected colon cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Giampieri

    Full Text Available Clinical data indicate that prognostic stratification of radically resected colorectal cancer based on disease stage only may not be always be adequate. Preclinical findings suggest that cancer stem cells may influence the biological behaviour of colorectal cancer independently from stage: objective of the study was to assess whether a panel of stemness markers were correlated with clinical outcome in resected stage II and III colon cancer patients. A panel of 66 markers of stemness were analysed and thus patients were divided into two groups (A and B with most patients clustering in a manner consistent with different time to relapse by using a statistical algorithm. A total of 62 patients were analysed. Thirty-six (58% relapsed during the follow-up period (range 1.63-86.5 months. Twelve (19% and 50 (81% patients were allocated into group A and B, respectively. A significantly different median relapse-free survival was observed between the 2 groups (22.18 vs 42.85 months, p=0.0296. Among of all genes tested, those with the higher "weight" in determining different prognosis were CD44, ALCAM, DTX2, HSPA9, CCNA2, PDX1, MYST1, COL1A1 and ABCG2. This analysis supports the idea that, other than stage, biological variables, such as expression levels of colon cancer stem cell genes, may be relevant in determining an increased risk of relapse in resected colorectal cancer patients.

  11. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus cystectomy in management of stages II, and III urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Osman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This phase III trial was de - signed to compare the survival benefit, surgical respectability, and toxicities among patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy (arm A, with those treated by radical cystectomy (arm B in the management of stage II, III urinary bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: For inclusion, patients should have pathologically proven urothelial carcinoma in urinary bladder, clinical stages from T2N0M0 to T4aN0M0, patient age less than 65 years, and performance state ≤ 2. Additionally, patients should have adequate hematological, renal, and liver functions. Arm A patients underwent 3 cycles of neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine followed by radical cystectomy, while arm B patients underwent radical cystectomy directly. Results: Thirty patients had been enrolled in each arm between September 2009 and April 2014 in 3 educational institutes in Egypt. The 3 year OS (overall survival for arm A, and B were 60% and 50% respectively. The median OS for arm A was 36+ months and that for arm B was 32.5 months. The 3 year progression-free survival (PFS for arm A, and B were 57% and 43% respectively. The median PFS for arm A was 36+ months and for arm B was 28 months. A subgroup analysis was performed to correlate between 3 year OS and predetermined prognostic factors including age, tumor size, pathological stage, and the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The later was performed only in arm A. Both treatment arms were tolerated well with mild toxicities profiles. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy achieved better survival, surgical respectability, with nearly equivalent toxicities when compared with radical cystectomy.

  12. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  13. Macrophage markers in serum and tumor have prognostic impact in American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I/II melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.O.; Schmidt, H.; Moller, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages, and it is s......PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages......, and it is shed from their surface. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Serum samples from 227 patients with stage I/II melanoma obtained before definitive surgery (baseline) and during 5 years of follow-up were analyzed for sCD163 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Excised formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary...

  14. Management of stage III colon cancer in the elderly: Practice patterns and outcomes in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Shaila J; Nanji, Sulaiman; Brennan, Kelly; Karim, Safiya; Patel, Sunil V; Biagi, James J; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-08-01

    Clinical trials have established surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) as the standard management for stage III colon cancer; however, the extent to which these results apply to elderly patients in routine practice is unclear. This article describes the management and outcomes of elderly patients with stage III colon cancer. All cases of surgically resected colon cancer from 2002 to 2008 were identified with the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry. Pathology reports were obtained for a random sample (25% of all cases); those with stage III disease constituted the study population. The utilization of ACT, cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) in elderly patients (≥70 years) and nonelderly patients (elderly. The 30- and 90-day mortality rates increased with advanced age: elderly patients and to 81% of younger patients (P elderly were a younger age (P elderly patients, ACT was associated with improved CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.88) and OS (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60-0.83); however, the magnitude of the benefit was smaller for elderly patients than younger patients (HR for CSS, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.42-0.67; HR for OS 0.56; 95% CI, 0.45-0.69). Half of elderly patients with stage III colon cancer do not receive ACT. Although the effect size is smaller than that in younger patients, ACT is associated with improved long-term survival. Cancer 2017;123:2840-49. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. TS Gene Polymorphisms Are Not Good Markers of Response to 5-FU Therapy in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fariña-Sarasqueta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Although the predictive and prognostic value of thymidylate synthase (TS expression and gene polymorphism in colon cancer has been widely studied, the results are inconclusive probably because of methodological differences. With this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of TS gene polymorphisms genotyping in therapy response in stage III colon carcinoma patients treated with 5-FU adjuvant chemotherapy.

  16. A phase I study of gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy in stage III, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, JWG; Price, A; van der Leest, AHD; Gregor, A; Little, FA; Groen, HJM

    Purpose: Our goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of gemcitabine administered concurrently with thoracic radiotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC and a radiation planning volume less than 2000 cm(3) were included.

  17. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1) gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Top1) is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III CRC...

  18. Treatment of base of tongue cancer, stage III and stage IV with primary surgery: survival and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Khaled; Rieger, Jen; Harris, Jeffery R; Mlynarek, Alex; Williams, David; Islam, Tahera; Seikaly, Hadi

    2015-08-01

    This study examines functional outcome (speech and swallowing), survival, and disease control in patients receiving an intensified treatment regimen with primary aggressive surgery, and postoperative radiotherapy or postoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy, for previously untreated, resectable, stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue base. Sixty-six consecutive patients treated from June 1997 to June 2006 were followed prospectively through the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Surgery Reconstruction Clinic. Speech and swallowing data were gathered at four evaluation times during the first year. Speech assessment was conducted by PERCI, Nasometer, and C-AIDS and swallowing assessment by Modified barium swallow, Diet survey and G-tube. Also, the overall survival, disease-specific survival and loco regional control were measured. The average age of the patients was 56.8, 85 % male and 15 % female. All patients had primary surgical resection and 83 % received postoperative radiotherapy and 17 % chemoradiation therapy. Overall survival at 3 years was 80.3 % and 5 years 52.2 %. Disease-specific survival at 3 years was 86.7 % and 5 years was 77.5 %. Local control was 94 %. Distal metastasis and second primary were found to be 7.5 % each. Primary surgical treatment of advanced BOT cancer offers excellent functional outcome, local control and disease-specific survival.

  19. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Waxweiller, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Koo, Phillip [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Rusthoven, Chad; Gaspar, Laurie; Kavanagh, Brian; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assess each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional

  20. Dose-Response Relationship between Radiation Dose and Loco-regional Control in Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal Cancer Treated with Definitive Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Cho, Byung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.

  1. Compromised margins following mastectomy for stage I-III invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jennifer; Al Mushawah, Fatema; Taylor, Marie E; Cyr, Amy E; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca L; Eberlein, Timothy J; Gao, Feng; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2012-09-01

    We investigated factors associated with positive margins following mastectomy and the impact on outcomes. We identified 240 patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer who underwent mastectomy from 1999 to 2009. Data included patient and tumor characteristics, pathologic margin assessment, and outcomes. Margin positivity was defined as the presence of in situ or invasive malignancy at any margin. Descriptive statistics were used for data summary and were compared using χ(2). Of the 240 patients, 132 (55%) had a simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy and 108 (45%) had a modified radical mastectomy. Overall, 21 patients (9%) had positive margins, including 12 (57%) with one positive margin, 3 (14%) with two positive margins, and 6 (29%) with three or more positive margins. The most commonly affected margin was the deep margin (48% of patients). Eight of the 21 patients (38%) received adjuvant chest wall irradiation. There were no differences between patients who had a positive margin and those who did not with respect to patient age, race, percentage of in situ component, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, or immunostain profile (P > 0.05 for all). None of the patients with positive margins experienced a local recurrence. Positive margins following mastectomy occurred in nearly 10% of our patients. No specific patient or tumor characteristics predicted a risk for having a positive margin. Despite the finding that only approximately 40% of patients received adjuvant radiation in the setting of a positive margin, no local recurrences have been observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Number of Lymph Node Metastases May Indicate the Regimen for Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients with Stage III Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Kasagi, Yuta; Tsuda, Yasuo; Zaitsu, Yoko; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Imamura, Y U; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) may prevent recurrence in patients with stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). However, only 10% of patients benefit from ACT and no effective indicators exist to predict which patients are likely to benefit. The present study validated metastatic lymph node (MLN) number as a new indicator for ACT. We retrospectively reviewed 173 patients with stage III CRC, who were classified by Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) stage or N category, and analyzed their overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) according to stage, number of MLNs and ACT use. Among 173 patients, we found 65 with only one MLN (N1a). For N1a patients treated with ACT, the 5-year OS rate was 100%; the 3-year DFS rate was 92.7% for those treated with oral ACT. The number of MLNs is a simple indicator for ACT in patients with stage III CRC. For patients with only one MLN, oral chemotherapy is a good option. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Establishment of a biomarker model for predicting bone metastasis in resected stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to establish a biomarker risk model for predicting bone metastasis in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods The model consists of 105 cases of stage III NSCLC, who were treated and followed up. The patients were divided into bone metastasis group (n = 45 and non-bone metastasis group (other visceral metastasis and those without recurrence (n = 60. Tissue microarrays were constructed for immunohistochemical study of 10 molecular markers associated with bone metastasis, based on which a model was established via logistic regression analysis for predicting the risk of bone metastases. The model was prospectively validated in another 40 patients with stage III NSCLC. Results The molecular model for predicting bone metastasis was logit (P = − 2.538 + 2.808 CXCR4 +1.629 BSP +0.846 OPN-2.939 BMP4. ROC test showed that when P ≥ 0.408, the sensitivity was up to 71% and specificity of 70%. Model validation in the 40 cases in clinical trial (NCT 01124253 demonstrated that the prediction sensitivity of the model was 85.7%, specificity 66.7%, Kappa: 0.618, with a high degree of consistency. Conclusion The molecular model combining CXCR4, BSP, OPN and BMP4 could help predict the risk of bone metastasis in stage IIIa and IIIb resected NSCLC.

  4. Efficacy of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil Therapy for Patients with EMAST-Positive Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Hamaya

    Full Text Available Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST is a genetic signature found in up to 60% of colorectal cancers (CRCs that is caused by somatic dysfunction of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR protein hMSH3. We have previously shown in vitro that recognition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU within DNA and subsequent cytotoxicity was most effective when both hMutSα (hMSH2-hMSH6 heterodimer and hMutSβ (hMSH2-hMSH3 heterodimer MMR complexes were present, compared to hMutSα > hMutSβ alone. We tested if patients with EMAST CRCs (hMutSβ defective had diminished response to adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, paralleling in vitro findings. We analyzed 230 patients with stage II/III sporadic colorectal cancers for which we had 5-FU treatment and survival data. Archival DNA was analyzed for EMAST (>2 of 5 markers mutated among UT5037, D8S321, D9S242, D20S82, D20S85 tetranucleotide loci. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and multivariate analysis was used to determine contribution to risk. We identified 102 (44% EMAST cancers. Ninety-four patients (41% received adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, and median follow-up for all patients was 51 months. Patients with EMAST CRCs demonstrated improved survival with adjuvant 5FU to the same extent as patients with non-EMAST CRCs (P<0.05. We observed no difference in survival between patients with stage II/III EMAST and non-EMAST cancers (P = 0.36. There is improved survival for stage II/III CRC patients after adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy regardless of EMAST status. The loss of contribution of hMSH3 for 5-FU cytotoxicity may not adversely affect patient outcome, contrasting patients whose tumors completely lack DNA MMR function (MSI-H.

  5. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  6. Outcome of transoral robotic surgery for stage I-II oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, J W L; Smeele, L E; Hilgers, F J M; van den Brekel, M W M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally T1-2N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma is treated with a single treatment modality, being either radiotherapy or surgery. Currently, minimally invasive surgery, such as transoral robotic surgery (TORS), is gaining popularity. The aim of this study is to assess whether T1-2N0 oropharyngeal cancer can be safely and effectively resected with TORS, and to determine the oncologic and functional outcomes. In addition, the long-term quality-of-life outcomes are reported. Between 2007 and 2012, 18 patients with early stage oropharyngeal cancers underwent transoral resection with the da Vinci robot system in the Netherlands Cancer Institute. All surviving patients filled out the self-report assessments of quality-of-life questionnaires. Median robot-assisted operating time was 115 min (range 43-186 min), while median estimated blood loss was 5 ml (range 0-125 ml). In three cases the exposure was insufficient to obtain clear tumor margins because of tumor extension and local anatomy. Fourteen patients had clear surgical margins. Four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Nine patients underwent an elective unilateral neck dissection. The oropharyngeal cancer recurred in two patients. Regarding the quality of life, patients who needed postoperative radiotherapy had a worse outcome and patients treated with transoral resection only did quite well. TORS seems to be an oncologically safe surgical treatment for early stage T1-2N0 oropharyngeal cancer based on this relatively small group of patients. Selecting patients in whom sufficient surgical exposure can be obtained, should be performed with the greatest care to avoid the need for adjuvant radiotherapy. Comparing radiotherapy and TORS or CO2 laser should be the next step in finding the optimal treatment for patients with T1-2N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma.

  7. DYPD genotyping to predict toxicity in patients with stage III colon cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in the PETACC-8 phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boige, Valérie; Vincent, Marc; Alexandre, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    stages of the disease. We here propose a randomized trial in order to demonstrate that resection of the primary tumour improves overall survival. METHODS/DESIGN: The CAIRO4 study is a multicentre, randomized, phase III study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG). Patients with synchronous...... unresectable metastases of CRC and few or absent symptoms of the primary tumour are randomized 1:1 between systemic therapy only, and resection of the primary tumour followed by systemic therapy. Systemic therapy will consist of fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy in combination with bevacizumab. The primary...

  8. Comparing survival and recurrence in curative stage I to III colorectal cancer in transfused and nontransfused patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Yumna; Stillwell, Andrew P; Siu, Simon K; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of the association between blood transfusions and its impact on prognostic outcomes in patients who undergo curative resection of colorectal cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to determine whether receiving peri-operative blood transfusions during curative colorectal cancer resection affected overall survival, cancer-related survival, and cancer recurrence. This retrospective study was undertaken at The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Australia, between 1984 and 2004. The outcomes of 1370 patients undergoing curative colorectal cancer resection for TNM stage I to III were analyzed. Four hundred twenty three patients (30.9%) required transfusion and 947 patients (69.1%) did not. Peri-operative transfusion was associated with higher rates of cancer recurrence on multivariate analysis (P = 0.024, RR, 1.257, 95% CI, 1.03-1.53); however, it was not independently associated with poorer overall or cancer-related survival. Where the aim is curative resection, this study contributes to a body of evidence that blood transfusions may be associated with poorer outcomes.

  9. De Novo Post-Diagnosis Aspirin Use and Mortality in Women with Stage I-III Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Thomas I; Murphy, Laura M; Brown, Chris; Bennett, Kathleen; Visvanathan, Kala; Sharp, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Aspirin use has been associated with significant reductions in breast cancer-related mortality in some observational studies. However, these studies included women who initiated aspirin use before breast cancer diagnosis. It is unclear whether initiating aspirin use after diagnosis is associated with similar reductions in mortality. This study investigates associations between de novo post-diagnostic aspirin use and all cause, breast cancer-specific mortality. Women, ages 50 to 80, with a diagnosis of stage I-III breast cancer were identified from Ireland's National Cancer Registry (N = 4,540). Initiation of de novo post-diagnostic aspirin use was identified from linked national prescription refill data (N = 764). Adjusted HRs were estimated for associations between de novo aspirin use and all-cause, breast cancer-specific mortality. The median time from diagnosis to aspirin initiation was 1.8 years. The mean number of days' supply of aspirin received was 631, and 95% of users were taking less than 150 mg/d. We found no association between de novo aspirin use and breast cancer-specific mortality [HR, 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.74-1.30]. Similar null associations were found in women taking aspirin at high-intensity (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.72-1.47) and women initiating use in the 1.5 years after diagnosis (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.77-1.40). There was no effect modification by estrogen (Pinteraction = 0.81) or progesterone (Pinteraction = 0.41) receptor status. Initiating aspirin use after a breast cancer diagnosis was not associated with a reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that a clearer understanding of aspirin's mechanism of action is needed to help inform the design of future studies in breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Clinical significance of IGF1R gene expression in patients with Stage II/III gastric cancer who receive curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Koji; Oshima, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshihara, Kazue; Aoyama, Toru; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takanobu; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Akaike, Makoto; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-02-01

    Curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for Stage II/III gastric cancer, and S-1 is widely used for adjuvant chemotherapy. The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) is involved in cell proliferation and prevention of apoptosis in many tumors. We evaluated the relative expression of the IGF1R gene to determine whether such expression correlates with outcomes in patients with Stage II/III gastric cancer. We measured the expression levels of the IGF1R gene in specimens of cancer and adjacent normal mucosa obtained from 134 patients with Stage II/III gastric cancer who received curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. We then evaluated whether the IGF1R gene expression levels correlate with clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes. IGF1R mRNA expression levels tended to be higher in cancer tissue than in the normal adjacent mucosa (P = 0.078). Multivariate analysis showed that high IGF1R gene expression was a significant independent predictor of poor survival in Stage II/III gastric cancer after curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 (HR 3.681, P = 0.007). The overall survival rate was significantly lower in patients with high IGF1R gene expression than in those with low expression (P = 0.012). IGF1R overexpression is considered a useful independent predictor of outcomes in Stage II/III gastric cancer after curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  11. Better Late than Never? Adherence to Adjuvant Therapy Guidelines for Stage III Colon Cancer in an Underserved Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Whitney; Wise, Amy; Lim, Garrett; Dong, Lei; Wan, Jim; Deneve, Jeremiah; Glazer, Evan; Dickson, Paxton; Daugherty, R Scott; Fleming, Martin; Shibata, David

    2018-01-01

    In 2008, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC) issued a quality guideline for stage III colon cancer (CC) recommending adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) within 120 days of diagnosis. We examined adherence in a healthcare system serving a region with disparities in CC outcomes. In a retrospective analysis of patients (2005-2014) with stage III CC in a multi-hospital healthcare system, the associations between adherence, clinicopathologic, demographic, geographic, and socioeconomic data and overall survival (OS) were examined. Of 1171 CC patients, 438 (37.4%) had stage III disease with 63% (n = 276) receiving AC and 37% (n = 162) not. AC conferred a 5-year OS advantage (62.4 vs. 42.5%, p < 0.0001). Younger age independently predicted AC receipt (OR = 0.95, p < 0.0001). Of 252 AC patients < 80 years, 75.8% were CoC guideline compliant (GC) whereas 24.2% were not (nGC). Although there was no OS difference between GC and nGC, both had superior survival (p < 0.0001) compared to non-AC patients. Surgical complications trended towards independent association with non-compliance (p = 0.07) CONCLUSION: Guideline compliance in our system (63%) is lower than the CoC Estimated Performance Rate (72.4%). Age influenced absolute receipt of AC while surgical complications may impact guideline compliance. Even when administered beyond 120 days, AC was associated with a survival benefit.

  12. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowble, Barbara L., E-mail: bfowble@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Einck, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, Danny N. [Athena Breast Health Network, Program Management Office, San Francisco, CA (United States); McCloskey, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chen, Steven L. [Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Hwang, E. Shelley [Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  13. MGL ligand expression is correlated to BRAF mutation and associated with poor survival of stage III colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenos, Kristiaan; Goos, Jeroen A.C.M.; Vuist, Ilona M.; den Uil, Sjoerd H.; Delis-van Diemen, Pien M.; Belt, Eric J.Th.; Stockmann, Hein B.A.C.; Bril, Herman; de Wit, Meike; Carvalho, Beatriz; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Fijneman, Remond J.A.; van Vliet, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer type worldwide with a mortality rate of approximately 50%. Elevated cell-surface expression of truncated carbohydrate structures such as Tn antigen (GalNAcα-Ser/Thr) is frequently observed during tumor progression. We have previously demonstrated that the C-type lectin macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), expressed by human antigen presenting cells, can distinguish healthy tissue from CRC through its specific recognition of Tn antigen. Both MGL binding and oncogenic BRAF mutations have been implicated in establishing an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Here we aimed to evaluate whether MGL ligand expression has prognostic value and whether this was correlated to BRAFV600E mutation status. Using a cohort of 386 colon cancer patients we demonstrate that high MGL binding to stage III tumors is associated with poor disease-free survival, independent of microsatellite instability or adjuvant chemotherapy. In vitro studies using CRC cell lines showed an association between MGL ligand expression and the presence of BRAFV600E. Administration of specific BRAFV600E inhibitors resulted in decreased expression of MGL-binding glycans. Moreover, a positive correlation between induction of BRAFV600E and MGL binding to epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract was found in vivo using an inducible BRAFV600E mouse model. We conclude that the BRAFV600E mutation induces MGL ligand expression, thereby providing a direct link between oncogenic transformation and aberrant expression of immunosuppressive glycans. The strong prognostic value of MGL ligands in stage III colon cancer patients, i.e. when tumor cells disseminate to lymph nodes, further supports the putative immune evasive role of MGL ligands in metastatic disease. PMID:26172302

  14. A phase I study of dasatinib with concurrent chemoradiation for stage III non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard eSafran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Src family kinases (SFKs are expressed in NSCLC and may be involved in tumor growth and metastases. Inhibition of SFK may also enhance radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if a maximum dose of 100 mg of dasatinib could be safely administered with concurrent chemoradiation and then continued as maintenance for patients with newly diagnosed stage III NSCLC.Methods: Patients with stage III locally advanced NSCLC received paclitaxel, 50mg/m2/week, with carboplatin area under the curve (AUC = 2, weekly for 7 weeks, and concurrent radiotherapy, 64.8 Gy. Three dose levels of dasatinib 50, 70 and 100mg/day were planned.Results: Eleven patients with locally advanced NSCLC were entered. At the 70 mg dose level 1 patient had grade 5 pneumonitis not responsive to therapy, and 1 patient had reversible grade 3 pneumonitis and grade 3 pericardial effusion. Due to these toxicities the Brown University Oncology Group Data Safety Monitoring Board terminated the study. Conclusion: Dasatinib could not be safely combined with concurrent chemoradiation for stage 3 lung cancer due to pneumonitis.

  15. Adherence to treatment guidelines and survival for older patients with stage II or III colon cancer in Texas from 2001 through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Ning; Ho, Vivian; Ding, Minming; He, Weiguo; Niu, Jiangong; Yang, Ming; Du, Xianglin L; Zorzi, Daria; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-11-15

    Treatment guidelines for colon cancer recommend colectomy with lymphadenectomy of at least 12 lymph nodes for patients with stage I to stage III disease as surgery adherence (SA) and adjuvant chemotherapy for individuals with stage III disease. Herein, the authors evaluated adherence to these guidelines among older patients in Texas with colon cancer and the associated survival outcomes. Using Texas Cancer Registry data linked with Medicare data, the authors included patients with AJCC stage II and III colon cancer who were aged ≥66 years and diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. SA and adjuvant chemotherapy adherence rates to treatment guidelines were estimated. The chi-square test, general linear regression, survival probability, and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with adherence and survival. The rate of SA increased from 47.2% to 84% among 6029 patients with stage II or stage III disease from 2001 to 2011, and the rate of adjuvant chemotherapy increased from 48.9% to 53.1% for patients with stage III disease during the same time period. SA was associated with marital status, tumor size, surgeon specialty, and year of diagnosis. Patient age, sex, marital status, Medicare state buy-in status, comorbidity status, and year of diagnosis were found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year survival probability for patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment was the highest at 87% for patients with stage II disease and was 73% for those with stage III disease. After adjusting for demographic and tumor characteristics, improved cancer cause-specific survival was associated with the receipt of stage-specific, guideline-concordant treatment for patients with stage II or stage III disease. The adherence to guideline-concordant treatment among older patients with colon cancer residing in Texas improved over time, and was associated with better survival outcomes. Future studies should be focused on identifying interventions to

  16. FDG PET evaluation of early axillary lymph node response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Caroline [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Nantes University, INSERM UMR 892, Cancer Research Center CRCNA, Nantes (France); Centre Rene Gauducheau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint Herblain Cedex (France); Devillers, Anne [Eugene Marquis Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rennes (France); Campone, Mario [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Medical Oncology Department, Saint Herblain (France); Campion, Loic [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Statistic Department, Saint Herblain (France); Ferrer, Ludovic [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Medical Physics Department, Saint Herblain (France); Sagan, Christine [University Hospital, Pathology Department, Nantes (France); Ricaud, Myriam [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Radiology Department, Saint Herblain (France); Bridji, Boumediene [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Nantes University, INSERM UMR 892, Cancer Research Center CRCNA, Nantes (France)

    2011-06-15

    Regional axillary lymph node status has remained the single most independent variable to predict prognosis both in terms of disease recurrence and survival. This study aimed to prospectively assess sequential [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) findings as early predictors of axillary lymph node response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer patients. Images were acquired with a PET/CT scanner in 52 patients after administration of FDG (5 MBq/kg) at baseline and after the first, second, third and sixth course of chemotherapy before surgery. Clinical examination and ultrasound (US) were used to assess the size of axillary nodes. Decrease in the standardized uptake value (SUV) with PET corrected or not for partial volume effects was compared to the pathological response. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of axillary node staging was higher with PET (75, 87 and 80%) than with US (50, 83 and 65%), and even more so when PET images were corrected for partial volume effects (86, 83 and 84%). While FDG uptake did not vary much in non-responders, as confirmed by histopathological analysis, it markedly decreased to baseline levels in responders (p < 10{sup -5}). Fifty per cent of baseline SUV was considered the best cutoff value to distinguish responders from non-responders. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy of FDG PET after one course of chemotherapy were, respectively, 96, 75, 95 and 84%. The pathological status of regional axillary lymph nodes in stage II and III breast cancer patients could be accurately predicted after one course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on FDG PET images. (orig.)

  17. Diversity in treatment modalities of Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan: sub-analysis of the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koie, Takuya; Ohyama, Chikara; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Jun; Hinotsu, Shiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Sakura, Mizuaki; Inokuchi, Junichi; Hara, Tomohiko; Ohyama, Chikara; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masato; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Eto, Masatoshi; Hara, Isao; Matsubara, Akio; Nonomura, Norio; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Koie, Takuya; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Miki, Tsuneharu; Fukumori, Tomoharu; Naito, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to survey treatment modalities for the patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan. We used the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association from 348 Japanese institutions, in which a total of 3707 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and 1538 with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were registered in 2008 and 2011, respectively. Primary treatment was classified as surgery alone, surgery with chemotherapy, surgery with radiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, combination of radiation and chemotherapy and observation. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival in the subgroups was analyzed using the log-rank test. In Stage II/III bladder cancer patients, 49.7% of those were treated with radical operation and 22.3% received observation only. A total 97.2% of Stage II/III upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients treated with radical surgery. A total 30.4% of Stage II/III bladder cancer patients received chemotherapy. Majority of the patients received cisplatin-based regimen, however, regimens of chemotherapy was rich in variety up to 13 regimens. Chemotherapy regimens for the patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were also various up to eight regimens. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were statistically significantly stratified according to the clinical stage. The upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients diagnosed with clinical stage T3 had significantly poor prognosis compared with those diagnosed with clinical stage T2. This study demonstrated the variety of treatments used for Japanese patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer. Treatment standardization for these entities may be necessary. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. [Effect of an intensive nutritional treatment in nutritional status of head and neck cancer patients in stages III and IV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, V; Barbosa, V; Mendoza, J; Vargas, A; Amancio, O; Hernández-Cuéllar, A; Arana-Rivera, E

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition and accelerated weight loss are frequent secondary diagnosis in patients with cancer. Head and neck cancer (H & N Cancer) affects nutritional status because of the tumor type and localization. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of an intensive nutritional treatment (INT) on nutritional status of H & N cancer patients, stages III and IV and to compare that with a historical control whose nutritional treatment was conventional (CT). All patients were nutritionally assessed before oncological treatment started (anthropometrical, biochemical, and dietetically). A nutritional feeding plan according to their nutritional personal need was calculated. In case it was impossible to cover all the nutritional requirements orally, a feeding tube was placed. Nutritional follow up was performed each 21 days, during their oncological treatment in four occasions. The results obtained were compared with those obtained from the patients who received the CT that consisted only in nutritional counseling by the attending physician; the statistical test used was Mann Whitney U test. The INT was associated with maintenance of the nutritional status along their oncological treatment. The statistical significant parameters were: weight 55 to 47 kg in the CT group vs 59 a 58 kg in the INT group (p nutrition parameters in patients the INT group, while in the CT group, they showed a persistent decrease. We concluded that patients who received the INT as part of their oncological treatment deteriorated less their nutritional status than those who received a CT.

  19. Prognostic impact of clinicopathologic parameters in stage II/III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel and doxorubicin chemotherapy: paradoxical features of the triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Wan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy differ from those of early breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical significance of potential predictive and prognostic factors in breast cancer patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods A total of 145 stage II and III breast cancer patients received neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. We examined the clinical and biological factors (ER, PR, p53, c-erbB2, bcl-2, and Ki-67 by immunohistochemistry. We analyzed clinical outcome and their correlation with clinicopathologic parameters. Results Among the clinicopathologic parameters investigated, none of the marker was correlated with response rate (RR except triple negative phenotype. Patients with triple negative phenotype showed higher RR (83.0% in triple negative vs. 62.2% in non-triple negative, p = 0.012 and pathologic complete RR (17.0% in triple negative vs. 3.1% in non-triple negative, p = 0.005. However, relapse free survival (RFS and overall survival (OS were significantly shorter in triple negative breast cancer patients (p p = 0.021, respectively. Low histologic grade, positive hormone receptors, positive bcl-2 and low level of Ki-67 were associated with prolonged RFS. In addition, positive ER and positive bcl-2 were associated with prolonged OS. In our homogeneous patient population, initial clinical stage reflects RFS and OS more precisely than pathologic stage. In multivariate analysis, initial clinical stage was the only significant independent prognostic factor to impact on OS (hazard ratio 3.597, p = 0.044. Conclusion Several molecular markers provided useful predictive and prognostic information in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy. Triple negative phenotype was associated with shorter survival, even though it was associated

  20. TOP1 gene copy number and TOP1/CEN-20 ratio in stage III colorectal cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    AIM OF STUDY To investigate if TOP1 gene copy number and/or the TOP1/CEN-20 ratio in colorectal cancer (CRC) areassociated with prognosis. BACKGROUND TOP1, localized on chromosome 20, encodes topoisomerase I (TOP1), which is the sole molecular target of irinotecan. TOP1 immunoreactivity in formalin...... analyses on 50 FFPE primary CRC tissues. When compared with results from normal colorectal mucosa, 80 % of the tumors showed increased TOP1 gene copy number and 2/3 had increased TOP1/CEN-20 ratio. MATERIALS AND METHODS FFPE samples from 154 stage III CRC patients not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were...... included. For each patient TOP1 gene copy number and CEN-20 reference number were determined in 60 nuclei from the malignant tumor by FISH using a TOP1/CEN-20 probe mix. Similarly, the TOP1 gene copy number and and CEN-20 reference number were dertermined in the normal colorectal mucosa in 105 of the 154...

  1. Prognostic value of KRAS mutations in stage III colon cancer: post hoc analysis of the PETACC8 phase III trial dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blons, H; Emile, J F; Le Malicot, K; Julié, C; Zaanan, A; Tabernero, J; Mini, E; Folprecht, G; Van Laethem, J L; Thaler, J; Bridgewater, J; Nørgård-Petersen, L; Van Cutsem, E; Lepage, C; Zawadi, M A; Salazar, R; Laurent-Puig, P; Taieb, J

    2014-12-01

    The prognostic value of KRAS mutations in colon adenocarcinoma is controversial. We examined this question as an ancillary study of the PETACC8 phase III trial. We analyzed the prognostic impact of KRAS exon 2 mutations in stage III colon cancer patients (n = 1657) receiving adjuvant FOLFOX ± cetuximab therapy included in the PETACC8 trial. Patients with BRAF-mutated cancers were excluded and, as no difference was found for time to recurrence (TTR) and disease-free survival (DFS) between treatment arms, both were pooled for analysis. Associations with TTR and DFS were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model. KRAS mutations were found in 638 of 1657 tumors and linked to shorter TTR (P < 0.001). However, when specific mutations were compared with wild-type, codon 12 mutations [hazard ratio (HR) 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-2.04; P < 0.001] but not codon 13 (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.85-1.79; P = 0.26) were significantly associated with shorter TTR, independently of other covariates. The interaction test showed that, regarding tumor location (distal versus proximal), KRAS genotype affects differently on recurrence (P = 0.02) and DFS (P = 0.042). Subgroup analysis showed that KRAS only affected TTR and DFS in distal tumors (n = 1043; 692 wild type; 351 mutated), with an increased risk of relapse (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.51-2.56; P < 0.0001) for KRAS codon 12 mutations and a borderline significance for codon 13 mutations (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.00-2.56; P = 0.051). KRAS exon 2 mutations are independent predictors of shorter TTR in patients with resected stage III distal colon cancers receiving adjuvant therapy. Future clinical trials in the adjuvant setting should consider both the tumor location and KRAS mutations as important stratification factors. This is an ancillary study of the PETACC8 trial: EUDRACT 2005-003463-23. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For

  2. Intravital Microscopy in Evaluating Patients With Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, or Stage IA-IV Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-28

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  3. Survival of patients with Stage III colon cancer is improved in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer compared with sporadic cases. A Danish registry based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixen, L M; Bernstein, I T; Bülow, S; Ehrnrooth, E

    2013-07-01

    Patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) seem to have a better prognosis than those with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim was to compare survival after Stage III CC in patients with HNPCC with those having sporadic CC. A total of 230 patients with hereditary cancer from the Danish HNPCC Register and 3557 patients with sporadic CC from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Database, diagnosed during May 2001-December 2008, were included. HNPCC patients were classified according to mismatch repair mutation status and family pedigree. Sporadic cases had no known family history of cancer. Patient characteristics, geographical differences and survival data were analysed. The overall survival (OS) was better in HNPCC patients compared with sporadic CC after stratification for sex and age (P = 0.02; CI 1.04-1.7). The 5-year survival was 70% in HNPCC patients compared with 56% in sporadic CC (P < 0.001). No survival difference was found between HNPCC subgroups but a tendency to better OS was seen in patients with Lynch syndrome. No geographical differences in OS were found. The median follow-up was 3.9 (0-9.5) years for HNPCC vs 3.2 (0-9.6) years for sporadic CC. HNPCC patients with Stage III CC have a better OS compared with sporadic CC. No significant difference in OS was found within HNPCC subgroups. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Phase III trial of maintenance gefitinib or placebo after concurrent chemoradiotherapy and docetaxel consolidation in inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: SWOG S0023.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Karen; Chansky, Kari; Gaspar, Laurie E; Albain, Kathy S; Jett, James; Ung, Yee C; Lau, Derick H M; Crowley, John J; Gandara, David R

    2008-05-20

    Early clinical studies with gefitinib showed promising efficacy and mild toxicity in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thus, gefitinib was an ideal agent to evaluate in a maintenance setting in stage III disease. Untreated patients with stage III NSCLC, a performance score of 0 to 1, and adequate organ function were eligible. All patients received cisplatin 50 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 plus etoposide 50 mg/m(2) on days 1 to 5, every 28 days for two cycles with concurrent thoracic radiation (1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day; total dose, 61 Gy) followed by three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m(2). Patients whose disease did not progress were randomly assigned to gefitinib 250 mg/d or placebo until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or the end of 5 years. The planned sample size was 672 patients to confer power of 0.89 to detect a 33% increase over the expected median survival time of 21 months (one-sided P = .025, log-rank test). Random assignment was stratified by stage, histology, and measurable versus nonmeasurable disease. Enrollment began in July 2001. An unplanned interim analysis conducted in April 2005 rejected the alternative hypothesis of improved survival at the P = .0015 level for 243 randomly assigned patients. The study closed, and preliminary results were reported. Now, with a median follow-up time of 27 months, median survival time was 23 months for gefitinib (n = 118) and 35 months for placebo (n = 125; two-sided P = .013). The toxic death rate was 2% with gefitinib compared with 0% for placebo. In this unselected population, gefitinib did not improve survival. Decreased survival was a result of tumor progression and not gefitinib toxicity.

  5. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1 gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hersi Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topoisomerase I (Top1 is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC. The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III CRC and how these can be detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. METHODS: Nine CRC cell line metaphase spreads were analyzed by FISH with a TOP1 probe in combination with a reference probe covering either the centromeric region of chromosome 20 (CEN-20 or chromosome 2 (CEN-2. Tissue sections from 154 chemonaive stage III CRC patients, previously studied with TOP1/CEN-20, were analyzed with TOP1/CEN-2. Relationships between biomarker status and overall survival (OS, time to recurrence (TTR in CRC and time to local recurrence (LR; rectal cancer only were determined. RESULTS: TOP1 aberrations were observed in four cell line metaphases. In all cell lines CEN-2 was found to reflect chromosomal ploidy levels and therefore the TOP1/CEN-2 probe combination was selected to identify TOP1 gene gains (TOP1/CEN-2≥1.5. One hundred and three patients (68.2% had TOP1 gain, of which 15 patients (14.6% harbored an amplification (TOP1/CEN-20≥2.0. TOP1 gene gain did not have any association with clinical endpoints, whereas TOP1 amplification showed a non-significant trend towards longer TTR (multivariate HR: 0.50, p = 0.08. Once amplified cases were segregated from other cases of gene gain, non-amplified gene increases (TOP1/CEN-2≥1.5 and TOP1/CEN-20<2.0 showed a trend towards shorter TTR (univariate HR: 1.57, p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: TOP1 gene copy number increase occurs frequently in stage III CRC in a mechanism that often includes CEN-20. Using CEN-2 as a measurement for tumor ploidy levels, we were able to discriminate between different mechanisms of gene gain, which appeared to differ in prognostic impact. TOP1 FISH guidelines have

  6. Anticipating the clinical use of prognostic gene expression-based tests for colon cancer stage II and III: is Godot finally arriving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Anita; Nesbakken, Arild; Ågesen, Trude H; Guren, Marianne G; Tveit, Kjell M; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2013-12-15

    According to current recommendations for adjuvant treatment, patients with colon cancer stage II are not routinely offered chemotherapy, unless considered to have a high risk of relapse based on specific clinicopathological parameters. Following these criteria, it is challenging to identify the subgroup of patients that will benefit the most from adjuvant treatment. Contrarily, patients with colon cancer stage III are routinely offered chemotherapy, but due to expected adverse effects and frailty, elderly patients are often excluded from standard protocols. Colon cancer is a disease of the elderly and accordingly, there is a large subgroup of patients for which guidelines for adjuvant treatment remain less clear. In these two clinical settings, improved risk stratification has great potential impact on patient care, anticipating that high-risk patients will benefit from chemotherapy. However, microsatellite instability is the only molecular prognostic marker recommended for clinical use. In this perspective, we provide an updated view on the status and clinical potential of the many proposed prognostic gene expression-based tests for colon cancer stage II and III. The main limitation for clinical implementation is lack of prospective validation. For patients with stage II, highly promising tests have been identified and clinical trials are ongoing. For elderly patients with stage III, the value of such tests has received less focus, but promising early results have been shown. Although awaiting results from prospective trials, improved risk assessment for patients with stage II and III is likely to be achieved in the foreseeable future. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Clinical studies in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer stage III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman-Maas, K.W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary lung cancer was first recognized as a distinct disease in 1761, long before the advent of cigarette smoking.1 Although it was a rare disease at the start of the 20th century,2,3,4,5 at the end, lung cancer had become one of the leading causes of preventable death. Since the 1930s, lung

  8. Survival and safety associated with aggressive surgery for stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: A single institution observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Shinichi; Kato, Kazuyoshi; Nishikimi, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Ayumu; Shozu, Makio

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of aggressive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer at a non-high-volume center. We evaluated consecutive patients with stage III/IV ovarian, fallopian, and peritoneal cancer undergoing elective aggressive surgery from January 2008 to December 2012, which encompassed the first 5years after implementing an aggressive surgery protocol. After receiving appropriate training for 9months, a gynecological surgical team began performing multi-visceral resections. Primary debulking surgery was chosen when the team considered that optimal surgery was achievable on the initial laparotomy, otherwise interval debulking surgery was chosen (the protocol treatments). Analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat basis (full-set analysis), and outcomes were compared to those of patients who underwent standard surgery between 2000 and 2007. Of 106 consecutive patients studied, 87 (82%) underwent aggressive surgery per protocol and 19 were excluded. Serous carcinoma was the most common disease (78%), followed by clear cell carcinoma (7%), and 32% of the patients had stage IV disease. The respective median progression-free and overall survival rates increased from 14.6 and 38.1months before implementation, respectively, to 25.0 and 68.5months after implementation, respectively. Complete resection was achieved in 83 of the 106 patients (78%), and the surgical complexity score was high (>8) in 61 patients (58%); although there was no mortality within 12weeks of surgery, major complications occurred in 8 patients. We confirmed that outcomes improved after implementing aggressive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer, without causing a significant increase in mortality. Factors enhancing survival outcomes are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathologic Factors Associated with Prognosis after Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II/III Microsatellite-Unstable Colorectal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are controversies regarding the benefit of fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with microsatellite instability–high (MSI-H colorectal cancer (CRC, the pathologic features affecting postchemotherapeutic prognosis in these patients have not been fully identified yet. Methods: A total of 26 histopathologic and immunohistochemical factors were comprehensively evaluated in 125 stage II or III MSI-H CRC patients who underwent curative resection followed by fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy. We statistically analyzed the associations of these factors with disease-free survival (DFS. Results: Using a Kaplan- Meier analysis with log-rank test, we determined that ulceroinfiltrative gross type (p=.003, pT4 (p<.001, pN2 (p=.002, perineural invasion (p=.001, absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (p=.041, signet ring cell component (p=.006, and cribriform comedo component (p=.004 were significantly associated with worse DFS in patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy (n=45. By contrast, pT4 (p<.001 and tumor budding-positivity (p=.032 were significant predictors of poor survival in patients receiving non-oxaliplatin–based adjuvant chemotherapy (n=80. In Cox proportional hazards regression model-based univariate and multivariate analyses, pT category (pT1-3 vs pT4 was the only significant prognostic factor in patients receiving non-oxaliplatin–based adjuvant chemotherapy, whereas pT category, signet ring cell histology and cribriform comedo histology remained independent prognostic factors in patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: pT4 status is the most significant pathologic determinant of poor outcome after fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II/III MSI-H CRC.

  10. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute⊕ Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruijt Hans FM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC. In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0 will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs and/or micrometastases (MMs at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+ and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+ are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS. Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265

  11. Family history of colorectal cancer and its impact on survival in patients with resected stage III colon cancer: results from NCCTG Trial N0147 (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson-Knodell, Claire L; Foster, Nathan R; Sargent, Daniel J; Limburg, Paul J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Smyrk, Thomas C; Sinicrope, Frank A; Jahagirdar, Balkrishna; Goldberg, Richard M; Alberts, Steven R

    2017-02-01

    Family history of colon cancer often portends increased risk of disease development; however, the prognostic significance of family history related to disease and survival outcomes is unclear. To investigate the relationship between family history of colorectal cancer and survival outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients, a prospective cohort of 1,935 patients with resected stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (N0147), comparing the standard of care FOLFOX to FOLFOX with cetuximab, was studied. Patients completed a baseline questionnaire on family history and were followed every 6 months until death or 5 years after randomization. We examined the endpoints of disease-free survival (DFS), time to recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS), comparing patients with a positive versus negative family history of colorectal cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for patients with a positive family history were 0.95 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.78-1.16] for DFS, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.76-1.16) for TTR, and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.74-1.15) for OS (all adjusted P>0.47). A non-significant trend toward improved DFS (P=0.17; adjusted P=0.34) was observed when 2 or more relatives were affected as compared to 0 relatives (multivariate HR: 0.72; 95% CI, 0.45-1.15), whereas subjects with histories of 0 or 1 affected relatives had similar DFS (multivariate HR for 1 vs. 0: 1.00; 95% CI, 0.81-1.24). Interactions of the molecular factors KRAS, BRAF, and MMR with family history were also explored. The only significant interaction was for deficient MMR (dMMR) and first-degree relatives with a family history of colorectal cancer (0 vs. 1 vs. 2+ relatives) for a benefit on OS (univariate P=0.001), which remained significant after adjusting for other factors (P=0.029). Among patients with stage III resected colon cancer treated with adjuvant FOLFOX, a family history of colorectal cancer did not significantly impact DFS, TTR, or OS outcomes, with the exception of

  12. Family history of colorectal cancer and its impact on survival in patients with resected stage III colon cancer: results from NCCTG Trial N0147 (Alliance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson-Knodell, Claire L.; Foster, Nathan R.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Limburg, Paul J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Sinicrope, Frank A.; Jahagirdar, Balkrishna; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Family history of colon cancer often portends increased risk of disease development; however, the prognostic significance of family history related to disease and survival outcomes is unclear. Methods To investigate the relationship between family history of colorectal cancer and survival outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients, a prospective cohort of 1,935 patients with resected stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (N0147), comparing the standard of care FOLFOX to FOLFOX with cetuximab, was studied. Patients completed a baseline questionnaire on family history and were followed every 6 months until death or 5 years after randomization. Results We examined the endpoints of disease-free survival (DFS), time to recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS), comparing patients with a positive versus negative family history of colorectal cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for patients with a positive family history were 0.95 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.78–1.16] for DFS, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.76–1.16) for TTR, and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.74–1.15) for OS (all adjusted P>0.47). A non-significant trend toward improved DFS (P=0.17; adjusted P=0.34) was observed when 2 or more relatives were affected as compared to 0 relatives (multivariate HR: 0.72; 95% CI, 0.45–1.15), whereas subjects with histories of 0 or 1 affected relatives had similar DFS (multivariate HR for 1 vs. 0: 1.00; 95% CI, 0.81–1.24). Interactions of the molecular factors KRAS, BRAF, and MMR with family history were also explored. The only significant interaction was for deficient MMR (dMMR) and first-degree relatives with a family history of colorectal cancer (0 vs. 1 vs. 2+ relatives) for a benefit on OS (univariate P=0.001), which remained significant after adjusting for other factors (P=0.029). Conclusions Among patients with stage III resected colon cancer treated with adjuvant FOLFOX, a family history of colorectal cancer did not significantly impact DFS

  13. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans

  14. Cancer Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this post. All comments must follow our comment policy . National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp Online Chat MORE INFORMATION About This Website Cancer.gov ...

  15. Treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramnath, Nithya; Dilling, Thomas J; Harris, Loren J; Kim, Anthony W; Michaud, Gaetane C; Balekian, Alex A; Diekemper, Rebecca; Detterbeck, Frank C; Arenberg, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) describes a heterogeneous population with disease presentation ranging from apparently resectable tumors with occult microscopic nodal metastases to unresectable, bulky nodal disease...

  16. Prognostic Value of BRAF and KRAS Mutations in MSI and MSS Stage III Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Julien; Le Malicot, Karine; Shi, Qian; Penault Lorca, Frédérique; Bouché, Olivier; Tabernero, Josep; Mini, Enrico; Goldberg, Richard M; Folprecht, Gunnar; Luc Van Laethem, Jean; Sargent, Daniel J; Alberts, Steven R; Emile, Jean Francois; Laurent Puig, Pierre; Sinicrope, Frank A

    2017-05-01

    The prognostic value of BRAF and KRAS mutations within microsatellite-unstable (MSI) and microsatellite-stable (MSS) subgroups of resected colon carcinoma patients remains controversial. We examined this question in prospectively collected biospecimens from stage III colon cancer with separate analysis of MSI and MSS tumors from patients receiving adjuvant FOLFOX +/- cetuximab in two adjuvant therapy trials. Three groups were defined: BRAF Mutant, KRAS Mutant, and double wild-type. The analytic strategy involved estimation of study-specific effects, assessment of homogeneity of results, and then analysis of pooled data as no differences in patient outcome were found between treatment arms in both trials. Associations of mutations with patient outcome were analyzed, and multivariable models were adjusted for treatment and relevant factors. Four thousand four hundred eleven tumors were evaluable for BRAF and KRAS mutations and mismatch repair status; 3934 were MSS and 477 were MSI. In MSS patients, all BRAF V600E mutations (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.92, P < .001), KRAS codon 12 alterations, and p.G13D mutations (HR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.40 to 1.83, P < .001) were associated with shorter time to recurrence (TTR) and shorter survival after relapse (SAR; HR = 3.02 , 95% CI = 2.32 to 3.93, P < .001, and HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.44, P = .04, respectively). Overall survival (OS) in MSS patients was poorer for BRAF-mutant patients (HR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.56 to 2.57, P < .001) and KRAS-mutant patients (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.38 to 1.91, P < .001) vs wild-type. No prognostic role of KRAS or BRAF mutations was seen in MSI patients. Furthermore, no interaction was found between treatment arm (with or without cetuximab) and KRAS and BRAF mutations for TTR or OS in MSS patients. In a pooled analysis of resected stage III colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant FOLFOX, BRAF or KRAS mutations are

  17. Association of Prognostic Value of Primary Tumor Location in Stage III Colon Cancer With RAS and BRAF Mutational Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Julien; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Emile, Jean-François; Le Malicot, Karine; Balogoun, Ralyath; Tabernero, Josep; Mini, Enrico; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Mulot, Claire; Bouché, Olivier; Aparicio, Thomas; Michel, Pierre; Thaler, Josef; Bridgewater, John; Van Cutsem, Eric; Perkins, Géraldine; Lepage, Come; Salazar, Ramon; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2017-11-22

    We know of no data on the prognostic value of primary tumor location (PTL) according to BRAF, RAS, and microsatellite instability (MSI) status in patients who have undergone resection for colon cancer (CC) and have been treated with current standard adjuvant chemotherapy. To determine the prognostic and predictive value of PTL according to BRAF, RAS, and MSI status in patients with stage III CC receiving adjuvant treatment with FOLFOX (folinic acid [leucovorin calcium], fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin) with or without cetuximab. This post hoc analysis included patients with available tumor blocks of resected stage III colon adenocarcinoma who participated in the Pan-European Trials in Alimentary Tract Cancer (PETACC)-8 phase 3 randomized trial. Among the 2559 patients who underwent randomization, 1900 were screened by next-generation sequencing, which showed that 1869 had full information concerning PTL. We categorized primary tumor site as located proximal (right) or distal (left) to the splenic flexure. The associations between PTL (right- vs left-sided) and disease-free survival (DFS), survival after relapse (SAR), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Cox models and adjusted for clinical and pathological features, treatment, and MSI, BRAF, and RAS status. Among the 1869 patients (1056 [57%] male; mean [SD] age, 59.4 [9.5] years) with full molecular data analyzed, 755 (40%) had a right-sided tumor, 164 (10%) had MSI, 942 (50%) had RAS mutations, and 212 (11%) had BRAF mutations. Right-sided tumor location was not prognostic for DFS in the whole population but was associated with a shorter SAR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% CI, 1.23-1.93; P = .001) and OS (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02-1.54; P = .03). When looking at DFS in the different molecular subgroups, we found similar results for microsatellite-stable tumors and tumors with MSI; a better DFS in right-sided vs left-sided tumors in patients with RAS mutations (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-1.00; P = .046

  18. Predictive Value of the Number of Harvested Lymph Nodes and Cut-Off for Lymph Node Ratio in the Prognosis of Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Barchitta, Martina; Pesce, Antonio; Latteri, Saverio; Bosco, Dorotea; Di Cataldo, Antonio; Agodi, Antonella; Puleo, Stefano

    2017-10-03

    Purpose/aim: The appropriate staging of colorectal cancer requires at least 12 lymph nodes to be sampled. We evaluated whether lymph node sampling (LNS) and lymph node ratio (LNR) can predict the prognosis of stage II-III patients. This is a retrospective study on 432 patients classified in LNS ≥12 and LNS test, p < 0.001). In the patients with LNS ≥ 12, the cut-off of 0.257 could predict recurrence (specificity 86%). Stage II patients with LNS < 12 tend to have shorter DFS than stage II patients with LNS ≥ 12. In stage III patients, an appropriate LNR cut-off is a better prognostic predictor than LNR quartile, especially in patients with LNS ≥ 12.

  19. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  20. Prospective validation of a lymphocyte infiltration prognostic test in stage III colon cancer patients treated with adjuvant FOLFOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Jean-François; Julié, Catherine; Le Malicot, Karine; Lepage, Come; Tabernero, Josep; Mini, Enrico; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Dimet, Stéphanie; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille; Allard, Marc-Antoine; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bennouna, Jaafar; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Taieb, Julien

    2017-09-01

    The prognostic value of lymphocyte infiltration (LI) of colorectal carcinoma (CC) has been demonstrated by several groups. However, no validated test is currently available for clinical practice. We previously described an automated and reproducible method for testing LI and aimed to validate it for clinical use. According to National Institutes of Health criteria, we designed a prospective validation of this biomarker in patients included in the PETACC8 phase III study. Primary objective was to compare percentage of patients alive and without recurrence at 2 years in patients with high versus low LI (#NCT02364024). Associations of LI with patient recurrence and survival were analysed, and multivariable models were adjusted for treatment and relevant factors. Automated testing of LI was performed on virtual slides without access to clinical data. Among the 1220 CC patients enrolled, LI was high, low and not evaluable in 241 (19.8%), 790 (64.8%) and 189 (15.5%), respectively. Primary objective was met with a 2-year recurrence rate of 14.4% versus 21.1% in patients with high and low LI, respectively (p = 0.02). Patients with high LI also had better disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Tumour stage, grade, RAS status and BRAF status were with LI the only prognostic markers in multivariable analysis for OS. Subgroup analyses revealed that high LI had better DFS and OS in mismatch repair (MMR) proficient patients, and in patients without RAS mutation, but not in MMR deficient and RAS mutated patients. Although this is the first validation with high level of evidence (IIB) of the prognostic value of a LI test in colon cancers, it still needs to be confirmed in independent series of colon cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting Individualized Postoperative Survival for Stage II/III Colon Cancer Using a Mobile Application Derived from the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Emmanuel; Attwood, Kristopher; Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Al-Sukhni, Eisar; Boland, Patrick; Nurkin, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Prediction calculators estimate postoperative survival and assist the decision-making process for adjuvant treatment. The objective of this study was to create a postoperative overall survival (OS) calculator for patients with stage II/III colon cancer. Factors that influence OS, including comorbidity and postoperative variables, were included. The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with stage II/III colon cancer, diagnosed between 2004 and 2006, who had surgical resection. Patients were randomly divided to a testing (nt) cohort comprising 80% of the dataset and a validation (nv) cohort comprising 20%. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression of nt was performed to identify factors associated with 5-year OS. These were used to build a prediction model. The performance was assessed using the nv cohort and translated into mobile software. A total of 129,040 patients had surgery. After exclusion of patients with carcinoma in situ, nonadenocarcinoma histology, more than 1 malignancy, stage I or IV disease, or missing data, 34,176 patients were used in the development of the calculator. Independent predictors of OS included patient-specific characteristics, pathologic factors, and treatment options, including type of surgery and adjuvant therapy. Length of postoperative stay and unplanned readmission rates were also incorporated as surrogates for postoperative complications (1-day increase in postoperative stay, hazard ratio [HR] 1.019, 95% CI 1.018 to 1.021, p data, culminating in a highly comprehensive, clinically useful tool. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Why adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer was not given: Reasons for non-recommendation by clinicians or patient refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbar, Peter; Lee, Andrew; Pokharel, Khageshwor

    2017-03-01

    Aim The aim of our study was to evaluate stage III colon cancer patients discussed at a multidisciplinary team meeting to identify reasons for clinicians not recommending adjuvant chemotherapy and reasons for patients declining recommended chemotherapy. Methods A retrospective, single institution Australian study was conducted on all surgically managed stage III colon cancer patients diagnosed at the regional cancer centre at Toowoomba Hospital between July 2010 and December 2014. Reasons why adjuvant chemotherapy was not recommended by the multidisciplinary team or following referral to a medical oncologist and patients' reasons for refusing chemotherapy despite medical oncology recommendation were determined. Results One hundred and nine patients were suitable for evaluation. Overall, 72 (66.1%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was not recommended in 25 (23.4%) of patients, with the majority (68%) having more than one cited reason. Multiple comorbidities and advanced age were the most common reasons for non-recommendation ( p refusal were not detailed in the majority of patient charts (63.6%). Travel distance was not a factor in accepting or refusing chemotherapy. Conclusion Discussion at a multidisciplinary team meeting facilitates the identification of patients unsuitable for adjuvant treatment. The reasons for declining offered chemotherapy need to be assessed fully to ensure that patients' treatment preferences are balanced against the proven benefits of chemotherapy. Attendance at a regional cancer centre provides the opportunity for high standard care in the management of stage III colon cancer.

  3. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, David V. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Division of Quantitative Sciences, Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E., E-mail: LECourt@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  4. Prediagnostic aspirin use and mortality in women with stage I to III breast cancer: A cohort study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marie C; Black, Amanda; Freedman, Andrew N; Barron, Thomas I

    2016-07-01

    There is a body of evidence indicating that aspirin may reduce the risk of cancer mortality. However, to the authors' knowledge, the optimal exposure timing and mechanism of action remain unclear. In the current study, the authors investigated associations between prediagnostic aspirin use and breast cancer-specific mortality in a US population. Postmenopausal women diagnosed with stage I to III breast cancer (1993-2009) were identified (2925 women with a total of 18,073 person-years) from the National Cancer Institute's Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Prediagnostic aspirin use (1274 women) was identified from study questionnaires. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for associations between aspirin use and breast cancer-specific mortality. Effect modification by lymph node status was evaluated. Prediagnostic aspirin use was not found to be associated with lower breast cancer-specific mortality (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.68-1.31 [P = .74]). In analyses stratified by lymph node status, aspirin use was found to be associated with lower breast cancer-specific mortality among women with lymph node-negative tumors (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.32-0.93 [P = 0.02]), but not those with lymph node-positive tumors (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.92-2.16 [P = 0.11]). Tests for interaction were found to be statistically significant (P for interaction =.006). No association was noted between aspirin use and lymph node status. Prediagnostic aspirin use was not found to be associated with a reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality overall. However, effect modification by lymph node status was observed and mortality was found to be reduced by approximately one-half among aspirin users with lymph node-negative disease. This represents a clinically significant reduction in breast cancer mortality. These findings contribute to the understanding of aspirin's mechanism of action in

  5. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  6. Validation of the American Joint Commission on Cancer (8th edition) changes for patients with stage III gastric cancer: survival analysis of a large series from a Specialized Eastern Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Cao, Long-Long; Ling, Shao-Wei; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Chen, Qi-Yue; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2017-10-01

    The 8th edition of the TNM was released in 2016 and included major revisions, especially for stage III. We aimed to compare the prognostic value of the 7th and 8th editions of the AJCC TNM classification for stage III gastric cancer. Clinical data from 1557 patients operated on for stage III gastric cancer according to the 7th edition between 2007 and 2014 were analyzed and compared using the 7th and 8th TNM classifications. A proposed staging system was established, and the three systems were compared in terms of prognostic performance. The stage shifted for 669 (42.96%) patients. It shifted from IIIA to IIIB (one patient, 0.06%), IIIB to IIIA (230 patients, 14.8%), IIIB to IIIC (94 patients, 6.0%), and IIIC to IIIB (344 patients, 22.1%). However, the new AJCC subgroupings did not prove distinctive for survival levels between T3N3aM0 (stage IIIB) and T3N3bM0 (stage IIIC) or between T4aN3aM0 (stage IIIB) and T4aN3bM0 (stage IIIC) when <30 lymph nodes (LNs) were resected. The performance of the 8th edition (c-index, 0.614; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.596-0.633) revealed no relevant improvement compared to the 7th edition (c-index, 0.624; 95% CI, 0.605-0.643). The proposed staging system generated the best prognostic stratification. The 8th TNM edition may not provide better accuracy in predicting the prognosis of stage III gastric cancer. The proposed staging system, comprised of a combination of the number of LNs harvested and the 7th and 8th AJCC classifications, may improve predictive capacities for stage III gastric cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Can we eliminate neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in favor of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy for select stage II/III rectal adenocarcinomas: Analysis of the National Cancer Data base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Richard J; Liu, Yuan; Patel, Kirtesh; Zhong, Jim; Steuer, Conor E; Kooby, David A; Russell, Maria C; Gillespie, Theresa W; Landry, Jerome C

    2017-03-01

    Stage II and III rectal cancers have been effectively treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) followed by definitive resection. Advancements in surgical technique and systemic therapy have prompted investigation of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy (NMAC) regimens with the elimination of radiation (RT). The objective of the current study was to investigate factors that predict for the use of NCRT versus NMAC and compare outcomes using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) for select stage II and III rectal cancers. In the NCDB, 21,707 patients from 2004 through 2012 with clinical T2N1 (cT2N1), cT3N0, or cT3N1 rectal cancers were identified who had received NCRT or NMAC followed by low anterior resection. Kaplan-Meier analyses, log-rank tests, and Cox-proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted along with propensity score matching analysis to reduce treatment selection bias. The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS) rate was 75% for patients who received NCRT versus 67.2% for those who received NMAC (P Cancer 2017;123:783-93. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  8. The survival of patients with Stage III Colon Cancer is improved in HNPCC compared with sporadic cases. A Danish registry based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Line Merrild; Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Bülow, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) seem to have a better prognosis than those with sporadic colon cancer (CC)s. The aim was to compare survival after stage III CC in patients with HNPCC with those having sporadic CC. METHOD: 230 patients with hereditary cancer...... history of cancer. Patient characteristics, geographic differences and survival data were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall survival (OS) was better in HNPCC patients compared to sporadic CC after stratification for sex and age (p=0.02; CI 1.04-1.7). The 5-year survival was 70% in HNPCC patients compared...... from The Danish HNPCC-Register and 3557 patients with sporadic CC from The Danish Colorectal Cancer Database, diagnosed during May 2001-December 2008 were included. HNPCC patients were classified according to Mismatch Repair mutation status and family pedigree. Sporadic cases had no known family...

  9. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1200 View Download Large: 2400x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  11. Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine, Palonosetron Hydrochloride, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Cisplatin in Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Nausea and Vomiting; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  12. Final results of a randomised phase III study on adjuvant chemotherapy with 5 FU and levamisol in colon and rectum cancer stage II and III by the Norwegian Gastrointestinal Cancer Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Olav; Fluge, Øystein; Carlsen, Erik; Wiig, Johan N; Myrvold, Helge E; Vonen, Barthold; Podhorny, Nina; Bjerkeset, Ottar; Eide, Tor Jack; Halvorsen, Tore B; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2009-01-01

    The recommendation of adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer with lymph node metastases, based on two studies from USA, was reluctantly accepted by Norwegian medical doctors. It was therefore decided to assess the role of adjuvant therapy with 5fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with levamisole (Lev) in a confirmatory randomised study. Four hundred and twenty five patients with operable colon and rectum cancer, Stage II and III (Dukes' stage B and C), were from January 1993 to October 1996, included in a randomised multicentre trial in Norway. The age limits were 18-75 years. Therapy started with a loading course of bolus i.v. 5-FU (450 mg/m(2)) daily for 5 days and p.o. doses of Lev (50 mg x 3) for 3 days. From day 28 a weekly i.v. 5-FU dose (450 mg/m(2)) were administered for 48 weeks. From day 28 also p.o. doses of Lev (50 mg x 3) for 3 days were given every 14 days. In total 214 patients were randomised to 5FU/Lev and 211 were included in the control group with surgery alone. Some did not comply with the inclusion and exclusion criteria, thus leaving 206 evaluable patients in each group. There was no significant survival difference between the two groups at 5 years: Disease-free survival (DFS) was 73% after chemotherapy, 68% (p=0.24) in the control group, and corresponding cancer specific survival (CSS) 75% and 71%, respectively (p=0.69). There was no difference between the two groups when analysed for colon and rectum separately. However, the subgroup of colon cancer with stage III exhibited a statistically significant difference both for DFS, 58% vs. 37% (p=0.012) and CSS, 65% vs. 47% (p=0.032) in favour of adjuvant chemotherapy. The benefit was further statistically significant for women but not for men. Toxicity was generally mild and acceptable with no drug related fatalities. Colon cancer patients with lymph node metastases benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-FU/Lev with acceptable toxicity. In a subgroup analysis females did better than males. Rectal

  13. Dose to heart substructures is associated with non-cancer death after SBRT in stage I-II NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Barbara; Peulen, Heike; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mantel, Frederick; Hope, Andrew; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Belderbos, Jose; Grills, Inga; O'Connell, Nicolette; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2017-06-01

    To investigate potential associations between dose to heart (sub)structures and non-cancer death, in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 803 patients with early stage NSCLC received SBRT with predominant schedules of 3×18Gy (59%) or 4×12Gy (19%). All patients were registered to an average anatomy, their planned dose deformed accordingly, and dosimetric parameters for heart substructures were obtained. Multivariate Cox regression and a sensitivity analysis were used to identify doses to heart substructures or heart region with a significant association with non-cancer death respectively. Median follow-up was 34.8months. Two year Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate was 67%. Of the deceased patients, 26.8% died of cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that the maximum dose on the left atrium (median 6.5Gy EQD2, range=0.009-197, HR=1.005, p-value=0.035), and the dose to 90% of the superior vena cava (median 0.59Gy EQD2, range=0.003-70, HR=1.025, p-value=0.008) were significantly associated with non-cancer death. Sensitivity analysis identified the upper region of the heart (atria+vessels) to be significantly associated with non-cancer death. Doses to mainly the upper region of the heart were significantly associated with non-cancer death. Consequently, dose sparing in particular of the upper region of the heart could potentially improve outcome, and should be further studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The relationship between positive peritoneal cytology and the prognosis of patients with FIGO stage I/II uterine cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kuji, Shiho; Hirashima, Yasuyuki; Komeda, Satomi; Tanaka, Aki; Abe, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Takekuma, Munetaka

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess whether peritoneal cytology has prognostic significance in uterine cervical cancer. Methods Peritoneal cytology was obtained in 228 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stages IB1-IIB) between October 2002 and August 2010. All patients were negative for intraperitoneal disease at the time of their radical hysterectomy. The pathological features and clinical prognosis of cas...

  15. Study protocol of the SACURA trial: a randomized phase III trial of efficacy and safety of UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishiguro Megumi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy, but the usefulness of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer remains controversial. The major Western guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for “high-risk stage II” cancer, but this is not clearly defined and the efficacy has not been confirmed. Methods/design SACURA trial is a multicenter randomized phase III study which aims to evaluate the superiority of 1-year adjuvant treatment with UFT to observation without any adjuvant treatment after surgery for stage II colon cancer in a large population, and to identify “high-risk factors of recurrence/death” in stage II colon cancer and predictors of efficacy and adverse events of the chemotherapy. Patients aged between 20 and 80 years with curatively resected stage II colon cancer are randomly assigned to a observation group or UFT adjuvant therapy group (UFT at 500–600 mg/day as tegafur in 2 divided doses after meals for 5 days, followed by 2-day rest. This 1-week treatment cycle is repeated for 1 year. The patients are followed up for 5 years until recurrence or death. Treatment delivery and adverse events are entered into a web-based case report form system every 3 months. The target sample size is 2,000 patients. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival, and the secondary endpoints are overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and incidence and severity of adverse events. In an additional translational study, the mRNA expression of 5-FU-related enzymes, microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability, and histopathological factors including tumor budding are assessed to evaluate correlation with recurrences, survivals and adverse events. Discussion A total of 2,024 patients were enrolled from October 2006 to July 2010. The results of this study will provide important information that help to improve the

  16. Detection of internal mammary lymph node metastasis with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with stage III breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Min Jung; Lee, Jong Jin; Kim, Hye Ok; Chae, Sun-Young; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seol Hoon [Ulsan University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sei Hyun; Lee, Jong Won; Son, Byung Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Gyung-Yub [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The present study assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the detection of internal mammary node (IMN) metastasis in patients with clinical stage III breast cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with clinical stage III breast cancer and underwent pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were prospectively reviewed by two board-certified nuclear medicine physicians in a blinded manner. The intensities of IMNs were graded into four categories (no activity and lower, similar, and higher activities than that of the mediastinal blood pool). IMNs were measured from the combined CT (largest diameter of the short axis). Histologic data of the IMNs were obtained by ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy or surgical excision. The PPV was calculated for pathologically confirmed IMNs. Visual grade, maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}), and sizes were analyzed according to the pathology results. There were 249 clinical stage III breast cancer patients (age 48.0 ± 10.1 years, range 26-79 years) who had undergone initial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment. Excluding 33 cases of stage IV breast cancer, 62 of 216 patients had visible IMNs on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and histologic confirmation was obtained in 31 patients. There were 27 metastatic and four nonmetastatic nodes (PPV 87.1 %). Metastatic nodes mostly presented with visual grade 3 (83.9 %), and SUV{sub max} and size were 3.5 ± 4.3 and 5.6 ± 2.0 mm, respectively. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has a high PPV for IMN metastasis in clinical stage III breast cancer, indicating the possibility of metastasis in IMNs with FDG uptake similar to/lower than that of the blood pool or small-sized nodes. (orig.)

  17. Predictive value of PET-CT for pathological response in stages II and III breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García-Esquinas, Marta A; Arrazola García, Juan; García-Sáenz, José A; Furió-Bacete, V; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel E; Ortega Candil, Aída; Cabrera Martín, María N; Carreras Delgado, José L

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively study the value of PET-CT with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response of locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients. A written informed consent and approval were obtained from the Ethics Committee. PET-CT accuracy in the prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC was studied in primary tumors and lymph node metastasis in 43 women (mean age: 50 years: range: 27-71 years) with histologically proven breast cancer between December 2009 and January 2011. PET-CT was performed at baseline and after NAC. SUV(max) percentage changes (ΔSUV(max)) were compared with pathology findings at surgery. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to discriminate between locoregional pCR and non-pCR. In patients not achieving pCR, it was investigated if ΔSUV(max) could accurately identify the residual cancer burden (RCB) classes: RCB-I (minimal residual disease (MRD)), RCB-II (moderate RD), and RCB-III (extensive RD). pCR was obtained in 11 patients (25.6%). Residual disease was found in 32 patients (74.4%): 16 (37.2%) RCB-I, 15 (35.6%) RCB-II and 2 (4.7%) RCB-III. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 90.9%, 90.6%, and 90.7%, respectively. Specificity was 94.1% in the identification of a subset of patients who had either pCR or MRD. Accuracy of ΔSUV(max) in the locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients after NAC is high for the identification of pCR cases. Its specificity is potentially sufficient to identify a subgroup of patients who could be managed with conservative surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. A preliminary result of radioactivity ¹²⁵I seed implants with micropuncture technique combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of stage III and IV lung cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fu, Gaifa; Lei, Guangyan; Bai, Xinkuan; Zhao, Zhulian; Song, Yangrong; Zhao, Xuewu

    2005-01-01

    .... The aim of this study is to investigate the value and effect of using radioactivity ¹²⁵I seed permanent implants combined with chemotherapy in the management of stage III or IV lung cancer...

  19. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.oberije@maastro.nl [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, KU Leuven (Belgium); Houben, Ruud [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deasy, Joseph O. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  20. Treatment Variation of Sequential versus Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, I; Damhuis, R A; Ten Berge, M G; Rosskamp, M; van Eycken, L; de Ruysscher, D; Belderbos, J S A

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the standard treatment regimen in non-surgical locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) is recommended in patients who are unfit to receive CCRT or when the treatment volume is considered too large. In this study, we investigated the proportion of CCRT/SCRT in the Netherlands and Belgium. Furthermore, patient and disease characteristics associated with SCRT were assessed. An observational study was carried out with data from three independent national registries: the Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Dutch Lung Cancer Audit-Radiotherapy (DLCA-R). Differences in patient and disease characteristics between CCRT and SCRT were tested with unpaired t-tests (for continuous variables) and with chi-square tests (for categorical variables). A prognostic model was constructed to determine patient and disease parameters predictive for the choice of SCRT. This study included 350 patients from the BCR, 780 patients from the NCR and 428 patients from the DLCA-R. More than half of the stage III NSCLC patients in the Netherlands (55%) and in Belgium more than a third (35%) were treated with CCRT. In both the Dutch and Belgian population, higher age and more advanced N-stage were significantly associated with SCRT. Performance score, pulmonary function, comorbidities and tumour volume were not associated with SCRT. In this observational population-based study, a large treatment variation in non-surgical stage III NSCLC patients was observed between and within the Netherlands and Belgium. Higher age and N-stage were significantly associated with the choice for SCRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. HALO-109-301: a Phase III trial of PEGPH20 (with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel) in hyaluronic acid-high stage IV pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gary J; Tempero, Margaret; Corrie, Pippa G

    2018-01-01

    The outlook for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer remains poor, despite significant advances in our understanding of pancreatic tumor biology. One emerging theme highlights the distinct composition of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Hyaluronic acid is a hydrophilic glycosaminoglycan whose production within the tumor leads to increased interstitial tumor pressure, thereby limiting the access of potentially effective circulating anticancer drugs via reduced tumor perfusion. PEGylated rHuPH20 is a multiply PEGylated recombinant human hyaluronidase that has shown promising efficacy in preclinical models and early phase clinical trials in pancreatic cancer patients. Here, we discuss these findings, and the rationale for the ongoing randomized Phase III trial (HALO-109-301), which seeks to definitively define the efficacy of PEGylated rHuPH20 alongside gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel in previously untreated, hyaluronic acid-high, stage IV pancreatic cancer.

  2. Total Gross Tumor Volume Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients Treated With Selective Nodal Irradiation for Stage I to III Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymen, Bart, E-mail: bart.reymen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Loon, Judith; Baardwijk, Angela van; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Lunde, Ragnar [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Leuven/ KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In non-small cell lung cancer, gross tumor volume (GTV) influences survival more than other risk factors. This could also apply to small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Analysis of our prospective database with stage I to III SCLC patients referred for concurrent chemo radiation therapy. Standard treatment was 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions twice daily concurrently with carboplatin-etoposide, followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in case of non-progression. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-positive or pathologically proven nodal sites were included in the target volume. Total GTV consisted of post chemotherapy tumor volume and pre chemotherapy nodal volume. Survival was calculated from diagnosis (Kaplan-Meier ). Results: A total of 119 patients were included between May 2004 and June 2009. Median total GTV was 93 ± 152 cc (7.5-895 cc). Isolated elective nodal failure occurred in 2 patients (1.7%). Median follow-up was 38 months, median overall survival 20 months (95% confidence interval = 17.8-22.1 months), and 2-year survival 38.4%. In multivariate analysis, only total GTV (P=.026) and performance status (P=.016) significantly influenced survival. Conclusions: In this series of stage I to III small cell lung cancer patients treated with FDG-PET-based selective nodal irradiation total GTV is an independent risk factor for survival.

  3. Demographics and Outcomes of Stage I-II Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared with Wide Local Excision in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Truong, Minh Tam; Sahni, Debjani

    2018-02-03

    The optimal surgical approach (wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs micrographic surgery (MOHS)) for treating Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is yet to be determined. To compare survival outcomes in patients with early stage MCC treated with MOHS versus WLE. A retrospective review of all cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of MCC of clinical Stage I-II MCC treated with WLE or MOHS was performed. 1,795 cases of Stage I-II MCC were identified who underwent WLE (N=1,685) or MOHS (N=110). There was no difference in residual tumor on surgical margins between the two treatment groups (p=0.588). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in overall survival between the treatment modalities (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.72-1.45, p=0.897). There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups on propensity score matched analysis. Disease specific survival was not reported as this data in not available in the NCDB. MOHS appears to be as effective as WLE in treating early stage MCC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Factors affecting number of lymph nodes harvested and the impact of examining a minimum of 12 lymph nodes in stage I-III colorectal cancer patients: a retrospective single institution cohort study of 1167 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Chen, Chao-Wen; Lu, Chien-Yu; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yang, I-Ping; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-04-14

    To identify factors affecting the harvest of lymph nodes (LNs) and to investigate the association between examining a minimum of 12 LNs and clinical outcomes in stage I-III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The clinicopathologic features and the number of examined LNs for 1167 stage I-III CRC patients were analyzed to identify factors affecting the number of LNs harvested and the correlations between clinical outcomes and high harvests (≧12 LNs) and low harvests (cancer and that tumor size (P = 0.015) was the only independent factor in rectal cancer. Patients with low harvests had poorer overall survival with stage II and stage III CRC (stage II: P number of examined LNs (≧12) is associated with a survival benefit. Removal of at least 12 LNs will determine the lymph node status reliably.

  5. Could semiquantitative FDG analysis add information to the prognosis in patients with stage II/III breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy); Ghiotto, Cristina; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Medical Oncology 2 Unit, Padua (Italy); Saibene, Tania; Michieletto, Silvia; Fernando, Bozza [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Breast Unit, Padua (Italy); Orvieto, Enrico [University Hospital of Padua, Department of Pathology, Padua (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We investigated whether maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and whole-body (WB) SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could improve prognostic stratification in patients with stage II/III breast cancer (BC). We prospectively enrolled 99 consecutive women (median age 50 years, range 27 - 77 years) with pathologically proven stage II/III BC who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were measured in all malignant lesions. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to test for relationships among WB SUVmax, WB MTV, WB TLG, and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), after adjustment for age, and histopathological and immunohistochemical features (oestrogen/progesterone and HER2 expression, proliferation index and grade). The median values of WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were 16.2 (range 1.5 - 33.1), 14 cm{sup 3} (range 0.03 - 708.6 cm{sup 3}) and 62.5 (0.06 - 3869.4), respectively. All WB semiquantitative values were higher in patients with higher TNM stage, although not significantly (all p > 0.05). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 30 months, with a range of 13 - 45 months. Both PFS and OS of patients with low WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were longer than that of patients with high WB values for progression, although not statistically significant. However, stratifying the patients in accordance with the stage of disease, both PFS and OS were significantly lower in patients with high WB TLG and stage III than in patients with stage II (p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, WB MTV and WB TLG were independent prognostic factors for PFS (hazard ratio 1.004, 95 % confidence interval 1.002 - 1.006, p < 0.001, and hazard ratio 1.001, 95 % confidence interval 1.000 - 1.001, p = 0.011, respectively). The addition of WB TLG to clinical data may provide a more detailed

  6. Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the elderly: Patient characteristics predictive for tolerance and survival of chemoradiation in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Elisabeth J M; Bootsma, Gerbern P; Hendriks, Lizza E L; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W P J; Bogaarts, Brigitte A H A; van Loon, Judith G M; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L G

    2016-10-01

    In unselected elderly with stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), evidence is scarce regarding motives and effects of treatment modalities. Hospital-based multicenter retrospective study including unresectable stage III NSCLC patients aged ⩾70 and diagnosed between 2009 and 2013 (N=216). Treatment motives and tolerance (no unplanned hospitalizations and completion of treatment), and survival were derived from medical records and the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Patients received concurrent chemoradiation (cCHRT, 33%), sequential chemoradiation (sCHRT, 24%), radical radiotherapy (RT, 16%) or no curative treatment (27%). Comorbidity, performance status (58%) and patient refusal (15%) were the most common motives for omitting cCHRT. Treatment tolerance for cCHRT and sCHRT was worse in case of severe comorbidity (OR 6.2 (95%CI 1.6-24) and OR 6.4 (95%CI 1.8-22), respectively). One-year survival was 57%, 50%, 49% and 26% for cCHRT, sCHRT, RT and no curative treatment, respectively. Compared to cCHRT, survival was worse for no curative treatment (P=0.000), but not significantly worse for sCHRT and RT (P=0.38). Although relatively fit elderly were assigned to cCHRT, treatment tolerance was worse, especially for those with severe comorbidity. Survival seemed not significantly better as compared to sCHRT or RT. Prospective studies in this vital and understudied area are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  8. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Sanoff, Hanna K; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Baron, John A; Lund, Jennifer L; Sandler, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  9. An explorative analysis of ERCC1-19q13 copy number aberrations in a chemonaive stage III colorectal cancer cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    line panel and in tumor sections from 152 stage III CRC chemonaive patients. Relationships between biomarker status and clinical endpoints (overall survival, time to recurrence, and local recurrence in rectal cancer) were analyzed by survival statistics. Results: ERCC1-19q13 copy number alterations...... investigation is to determine the presence, frequency and prognostic impact of ERCC1 or ERCC4 gene copy number alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Fluorescent in situ hybridization probes directed at ERCC1 and ERCC4 with relevant reference probes were constructed. Probes were tested in a CRC cell...... were observed in a single cell line metaphase (HT29). In patient material, ERCC1-19q13 copy number gains (ERCC1-19q13/CEN-2 ≥ 1.5) were detected in 27.0% of specimens, whereas ERCC1-19q13 deletions (ERCC1-19q13/CEN-2

  10. The effects of inpatient exercise therapy on the length of hospital stay in stages I-III colon cancer patients: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki-Yong; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Min, Jihee; Jeong, Duck Hyoun; Chu, Sang Hui; Lee, Ji Won; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Jones, Lee W; Jeon, Justin Y; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of a postsurgical, inpatient exercise program on postoperative recovery in operable colon cancer patients We conducted the randomized controlled trial with two arms: postoperative exercise vs. usual care. Patients with stages I-III colon cancer who underwent colectomy between January and December 2011 from the Colorectal Cancer Clinic, were recruited for the study. Subjects in the intervention group participated in the postoperative inpatient exercise program consisted of twice daily exercise, including stretching, core, balance, and low-intensity resistance exercises. The usual care group was not prescribed a structured exercise program. The primary endpoint was the length of hospital stay. Secondary endpoints were time to flatus, time to first liquid diet, anthropometric measurements, and physical function measurements. A total of 31 (86.1 %) patients completed the trial, with adherence to exercise interventions at 84.5 %. The mean length of hospital stay was 7.82 ± 1.07 days in the exercise group compared with 9.86 ± 2.66 days in usual care (mean difference, 2.03 days; 95 % confidence interval (CI), -3.47 to -0.60 days; p = 0.005) in per-protocol analysis. The mean time to flatus was 52.18 ± 21.55 h in the exercise group compared with 71.86 ± 29.2 h in the usual care group (mean difference, 19.69 h; 95 % CI, -38.33 to -1.04 h; p = 0.036). Low-to-moderate-intensity postsurgical exercise reduces length of hospital stay and improves bowel motility after colectomy procedure in patients with stages I-III colon cancer.

  11. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allal, A.S. [Geneva Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Monney, M.; Rosset, A.; Ozsahin, M. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Radiographie; Guillemin, C. [Cantonal Radiotherapy Department Sion (Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Wirksamkeit der akzelerierten Bestrahlung in bezug auf die Bewaeltigung der Tumorzellrepopulation waehrend einer Radiotherapie ist vor kurzem nachgewiesen worden. Das Verhaeltnis zwischen therapeutischem Effekt und Toxizitaet duerfte fuer fuenfwoechige Schemen

  12. LINE-1 Methylation Status Correlates Significantly to Post-Therapeutic Recurrence in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients Receiving FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yun-Ting; Chen, Chao-Wen; Fan, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, I-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Methylation levels of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) are representative of genome-wide methylation status and crucial in maintaining genomic stability and expression. Their prognostic impact on colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy has not been well established. We evaluated the association between LINE-1 methylation status and clinicopathologic features and postoperative oncological outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients. 129 UICC stage III colon cancer patients who had received radical resection and FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Global methylation was estimated by analyzing tumor LINE-1 methylation status using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. Demographics, clinicopathological data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded by trained abstractors. Outcome measurements included postoperative recurrence and disease-free survival. Univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses were conducted to identify prognostic factors of oncological outcomes. The LINE-1 methylation of all 129 patients was measured on a 0-100 scale (mean 63.3; median 63.7, standard deviation 7.1), LINE-1 hypomethylation was more common in patients aged 65 years and above (61.7%±7.6% vs. 64.6±6.4, p=0.019) and those with post-therapeutic recurrence (61.7±7.4 vs 64.3±6.7, p=0.041). Considering risk adjustment, LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be an independent risk factor of post-therapeutic recurrence (Adjusted OR=14.1, p=0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients in the low methylation group had shorter period of disease free survival (p=0.01). In a stratified analysis that included 48 patients with post-therapeutic recurrence, it was found that those who experienced shorter period of disease free survival (≦6 months) appeared to have lower LINE-1 methylation levels than patients who reported of recurrence after 6 months (56.68±15.75 vs. 63.55±7.57, p=0.041). There was a significantly

  13. Volume-based assessment by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT predicts survival in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Seung Hyup; Choi, Joon Young [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hee Kyung [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hojoong [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jhingook; Shim, Young Mog [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    We evaluated the prognostic impact of volume-based assessment by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We reviewed 194 consecutive patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with surgical resection (surgical group) and 115 patients treated with nonsurgical therapy (nonsurgical group: 50 stage IIIA, 65 stage IIIB). Metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of primary tumours were measured using pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Overall survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic significance of PET parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. To evaluate and compare the predictive performance of PET parameters, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used. In the Cox proportional hazards models, MTV (HR = 1.27 for a doubling of MTV, P = 0.008) and TLG (HR = 1.22 for a doubling of TLG, P = 0.035) were significantly associated with an increased risk of death after adjusting for age, gender, histological cell type, T stage, N stage, and treatment variables in the surgical group. SUVmax was not a significant prognostic factor in either the surgical or nonsurgical group. In the time-dependent ROC curve analysis, volume-based PET parameters predicted survival better than SUVmax. The volume-based PET parameters (MTV and TLG) are significant prognostic factors for survival independent of tumour stage and better prognostic imaging biomarkers than SUVmax in patients with stage IIIA NSCLC after surgical resection. (orig.)

  14. The twenty-first century role of Piver-Rutledge type III radical hysterectomy and FIGO stage IA, IB1, and IB2 cervical cancer in the era of robotic surgery: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piver, M Steven; Ghomi, Ali

    2010-12-30

    Type III radical hysterectomy reported in 1974 by Piver, Rutledge, and Smith is considered worldwide by many as the standard surgical therapy for invasive cervical carcinoma stage IB and IIA. With the increasing number of robotic surgeries being performed for early stage cervical cancer worldwide, the purpose of the paper is to present our personal perspective of the 21st century role of Piver-Rutledge type III radical hysterectomy for stage IB cervical cancer in the era of robotic surgery using the da Vinci robot.

  15. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT to monitor early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Bin; Chen, Bin; Wang, Ting; Chen, Minglong; Ji, Tiefeng; Gao, Shi; Ma, Qingjie [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changchun (China); Song, Yan [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Breast Surgery, Changchun (China); Wang, Xueju [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Pathology, Changchun (China)

    2015-08-15

    Monitoring of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is important for optimal management of patients with breast cancer. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT is a newly developed imaging modality for evaluating tumor vascular status. In this study, we investigated the application of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT in evaluating therapy response to NCT in patients with stage II or III breast cancer. Thirty-three patients were scheduled to undergo {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT at baseline, after the first and second cycle of NCT. Four patients had extremely low {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, and were not included in the subsequent studies. Changes in tumor to nontumor (T/N) ratio were compared with pathological tumor responses classified using the residual cancer burden system. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to compare the power to identify responders between the end of the first and the end of the second cycle of NCT. The impact of breast cancer subtype on {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake was evaluated. The correlation between {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake and pathological tumor response was also evaluated in each breast cancer subtype. Surgery was performed after four cycles of NCT and pathological analysis revealed 18 responders and 15 nonresponders. In patients with clearly visible {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT were 86.7 %, 85.7 % and 86.7 % after the first cycle of NCT, and 92.9 %, 93.3 % and 93.3 % after the second cycle, respectively. Among these patients, the HER-2-positive group demonstrated both higher T/N ratios and a greater change in T/N ratio than patients with other breast cancer subtypes (P < 0.05). A strong correlation was found between changes in T/N ratio and pathological tumor response in the HER-2-positive group (P < 0.03). {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT seems to be useful for determining the pathological

  16. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage II–III resectable rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jin Ho [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Uk [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Um, Jun Won [University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is better than postoperative CRT in oncologic outcome and toxicity is contentious in prospective randomized clinical trials. We systematically analyze and compare the treatment result, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate between preoperative CRT and postoperative CRT in stage II–III rectal cancer. We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from 1990 to 2014 for relevant trials. Only phase III randomized studies performing CRT and curative surgery were selected and the data were extracted. Meta-analysis was used to pool oncologic outcome and toxicity data across studies. Three randomized phase III trials were finally identified. The meta-analysis results showed significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence rate in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.84; p = 0.004). The 5-year distant recurrence rate (p = 0.55), relapse-free survival (p = 0.14), and overall survival (p = 0.22) showed no significant difference between two groups. Acute toxicity was significantly lower in the preoperativeCRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between two groups in perioperative and chronic complications (p = 0.53). The sphincter-saving rate was not significantly different between two groups (p = 0.24). The conversion rate from abdominoperineal resection to low anterior resection in low rectal cancer was significantly higher in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). As compared to postoperative CRT, preoperative CRT improves only locoregional control, not distant control and survival, with similar chronic toxicity and sphincter preservation rate in rectal cancer patients.

  17. Consolidation chemotherapy improves progression-free survival in stage III small-cell lung cancer following concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XR

    2016-09-01

    for PFS. Multivariate analysis for OS also showed that having undergone PCI (P<0.001 and having received CCT (P=0.006 were independent significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: CCT can improve PFS for patients with stage IIIA and IIIB SCLC following CCRT without significantly increasing treatment-related toxicities. Keywords: stage III, small-cell lung cancer, consolidation chemotherapy, survival analysis, prognosis, toxicities 

  18. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  19. Treatment using oxaliplatin and S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy for pathological stage III gastric cancer: a multicenter phase II study (TOSA trial) protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Maeda, Hiromichi; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Oba, Koji; Tsuji, Akihito; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2018-02-13

    Recent studies demonstrated the efficacy of S-1-based adjuvant chemotherapy administered for six months after curative surgery for stage III gastric cancer; however, it is unproven whether this type of combination chemotherapy is more effective than the standard adjuvant chemotherapy of S-1 for one year. This multicenter phase II study evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 plus oxaliplatin followed by S-1 for up to one year for curatively resected stage III gastric cancer in patients aged over 20 years. Treatment initially comprises oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 (80 mg/m 2 ) administered twice daily for the first 2 weeks of a 3-week cycle. On day 1 of a second 3-week cycle, patients will receive 100 mg/m 2 of intravenous oxaliplatin followed by 80 mg/m 2 of S-1 (maximum 8 cycles). Then, the patients will receive 80 mg/m 2 of S-1 daily for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of no chemotherapy. This 6-week cycle will be repeated during the first year after surgery. The primary endpoint is relapse-free survival for 3 years and secondary endpoints are safety, including the incidence of adverse events, and grading of neuropathy with each treatment cycle. The planned sample size of 75 patients is appropriate for this trial. The data will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis, assuming a two-sided test with a 5% level of significance. In contrast to previous trials, the current study involves administration of S-1 until one year after surgery in addition to prior S-1 plus oxaliplatin, and is the first study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of S-1 plus oxaliplatin followed by S-1 for up to one year in patients with curatively resected stage III gastric cancer. This trial is registered in the University Hospital Medical Information Network's Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) registration number, R000029656  ( https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr_e/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000029656 ). Registered January 24, 2017.

  20. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stages III/IV breast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stages III/IV breast cancer disease surgical experience at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Radiotherapy was given to any patient in either group where suspicion of residual tumor was present. Patients' data were entered in an SPSS window 11.5 program ...

  1. Understanding cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manual and Handbook . 2nd ed. New York, NY: Springer; 2012. National Cancer Institute. Staging. Updated March 9, ... medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- ...

  2. Early stage colon cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-01-01

    .... After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced...

  3. Stages of Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  4. Stages of Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  5. Human papillomavirus genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic factors for patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Carcinomas of the anal canal are strongly associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Expression of p16 is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection. In a retrospective study, we evaluated HPV genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic markers of overall survival (OS) and disease......-specific survival (DSS) in patients diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. PATIENTS AND METHODS: HPV genotyping polymerase chain reaction (high-risk subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) and immunohistochemical expression of p16 were analyzed...... by using paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies from 143 anal carcinomas. The patients were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. RESULTS: HPV16 was detected in 81.0% of the tumors, followed by HPV33 (5.1%), HPV18 (2.2%), and HPV58 (0.7%). p16 positivity was found in 92.9% of the tumors...

  6. Intratumoral Metabolic Heterogeneity for Prediction of Disease Progression After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Saeryung; Song, Hochun; Byun, Byung Hyun and others

    2014-03-15

    We evaluated the value of variable {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters for the prediction of disease progression after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One hundred sixteen pretreatment FDG PET/CT scans of inoperable stage III NSCLC were retrospectively reviewed (stage IIIA: 51; stage IIIB: 65). The volume of interest was automatically drawn for each primary lung tumor, and PET parameters were assessed as follows: maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using the boundaries presenting SUV intensity exceeding 3.0, and the area under the curve of the cumulative SUV-volume histograms (AUC-CSH), which is known to reflect the tumor heterogeneity. Progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were compared with each PET and clinical parameters by univariate and multivariate survival analysis.In the ROC analysis, the optimal cutoff values of SUV{sub max}, MTV (cm{sup 3}), and AUC-CSH for prediction of PFS were determined as 21.5, 27.7, and 4,800, respectively. In univariate analysis, PFS was statistically significantly reduced in those with AUC-CSH<4,800 (p =0.004). In multivariate analysis, AUC-CSH and SUV{sub max} were statistically significant independent prognostic factors (HR 3.35, 95 % CI 1.79.6.28, p <0.001; HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09.0.70, p =0.008, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that AUC-CSH was the most significant independent prognostic factor for LRFS and DMFS (HR 3.27, 95 % CI 1.54.6.94, p =0.002; HR 2.79, 95 % CI 1.42.5.50, p =0.003). Intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity of primary lung tumor in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT can predict disease progression after CCRT in inoperable stage III NSCLC.

  7. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1 as A Biomarker for Diagnosis 
and Prognosis of Stage I-II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning LIU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increased macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1, member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, was found in patients serum with epithelial tumors. Therefore, our aim was to delineate the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum MIC-1 in patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A total of 152 consecutive patients with stage I–II NSCLC were prospectively enrolled and underwent follow up after total resection of tumor. Serum MIC-1 level was detected in lung cancer patients by ELISA, 48 benign pulmonary disease patients and 105 healthy controls, and was correlated with clinical features and prognosis of patients. Results The level of MIC-1 of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that of controls (P<0.001 and benign pulmonary disease patients (P<0.001. A threshold of 1,000 pg/mL could be used to diagnose early-stage NSCLC with 70.4% sensitivity and 99.0% specificity. The level of MIC-1 was associated with elder age (P=0.001, female (P=0.03 and T2 (P=0.022. A threshold of 1,465 pg/mL could identify patients with early poor outcome with 72.2% sensitivity and 66.1% specificity. The overall 3-year survival rate in patients with high level of MIC-1 (≥1,465 pg/mL was significantly lower than that of patients with low MIC-1 level (77.6% vs 94.8%. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that a high level of MIC-1 was an independent risk factor for compromised overall survival (HR=3.37, 95%CI: 1.09-10.42, P=0.035. Conclusion High level of serum MIC-1 could be served as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and poorer outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  8. Appropriate customization of radiation therapy for stage II and III rectal cancer: Executive summary of an ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Karyn A; Patton, Caroline E; Fisher, George A; Hoffe, Sarah E; Haddock, Michael G; Parikh, Parag J; Kim, John; Baxter, Nancy N; Czito, Brian G; Hong, Theodore S; Herman, Joseph M; Crane, Christopher H; Hoffman, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    To summarize results of a Clinical Practice Statement on radiation therapy for stage II-III rectal cancer, which addressed appropriate customization of (neo)adjuvant radiation therapy and use of non-surgical therapy for patients who are inoperable or refuse abdominoperineal resection. The RAND/University of California, Los Angeles, Appropriateness Method was applied to combine current evidence with multidisciplinary expert opinion. A systematic literature review was conducted and used by the expert panel to rate appropriateness of radiation therapy options for different clinical scenarios. Treatments were categorized by median rating as Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate. In the neoadjuvant setting, chemoradiation was rated Appropriate and the ratings indicated short-course radiation therapy, chemotherapy alone, and no neoadjuvant therapy are potential options in selected patients. However, neoadjuvant endorectal brachytherapy was rated Rarely Appropriate. For adjuvant therapy, chemoradiation (plus ≥4 months of chemotherapy) was rated Appropriate and chemotherapy alone May Be Appropriate for most scenarios. For medically inoperable patients, definitive external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy alone were rated May Be Appropriate, whereas endorectal brachytherapy and chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy were possible approaches for some scenarios. The last option, definitive chemoradiation, was rated Appropriate to May Be Appropriate based on performance status. Finally, for patients with low-lying tumors refusing abdominoperineal resection, definitive chemoradiation alone, chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy, and chemoradiation plus external beam radiation therapy were all rated Appropriate. This Clinical Practice Statement demonstrated the central role of radiation therapy in stage II-III rectal cancer management and evaluated ways to better individualize its use in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and definitive settings

  9. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-22

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and leucovorin with or without cetuximab in patients with resected stage III colon cancer (PETACC-8): an open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Julien; Tabernero, Josep; Mini, Enrico; Subtil, Fabien; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Thaler, Josef; Bridgewater, John; Petersen, Lone Nørgård; Blons, Hélène; Collette, Laurence; Van Cutsem, Eric; Rougier, Philippe; Salazar, Ramon; Bedenne, Laurent; Emile, Jean-François; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lepage, Come

    2014-07-01

    Since the 1990s, fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy has significantly reduced the risk of tumour recurrence in patients with stage III colon cancer. We aimed to assess whether the addition of cetuximab to standard adjuvant oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and leucovorin chemotherapy (FOLFOX4) in patients with stage III colon cancer improved disease-free survival (DFS). For this open-label, randomised phase 3 study done in nine European countries, we enrolled patients through an interactive voice response system to the central randomisation centre, with a central stratified permuted block randomisation procedure. We randomly assigned patients with resected (R0) stage III disease (1:1) to receive 12 cycles of FOLFOX4 twice a week with or without cetuximab. Patients were stratified by N-status (N1 vs N2), T-status (T1-3 vs T4), and obstruction or perforation status (no obstruction and no perforation vs obstruction or perforation or both). A protocol amendment (applied in June, 2008, after 2096 patients had been randomly assigned to treatment-restricted enrolment to patients with tumours wild-type at codons 12 and 13 in exon 2 of the KRAS gene (KRAS exon 2 wild-type). The primary endpoint was DFS. Analysis was intention to treat in all patients with KRAS exon 2 wild-type tumours. The study is registered at EudraCT, number 2005-003463-23. Between Dec 22, 2005, and Nov 5, 2009, 2559 patients from 340 sites in Europe were randomly assigned. Of these patients, 1602 had KRAS exon 2 wild-type tumours (intention-to-treat population), 791 in the FOLFOX4 plus cetuximab group and 811 in the FOLFOX4 group. Median follow-up was 3·3 years (IQR 3·2-3·4). In the experimental and control groups, DFS was similar in the intention-to-treat population (hazard ratio [HR] 1·05; 95% CI 0·85-1·29; p=0·66), and in patients with KRAS exon 2/BRAF wild-type (n=984, HR 0·99; 95% CI 0·76-1·28) or KRAS exon 2-mutated tumours (n=742, HR 1·06; 95% CI 0·82-1·37). We noted heterogeneous

  11. Prognostic significance of bcl-2 expression in stage III breast cancer patients who had received doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel as adjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Wan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bcl-2 is positively regulated by hormonal receptor pathways in breast cancer. A study was conducted to assess the prognostic significances of clinico-pathologic variables and of ER, PR, p53, c-erbB2, bcl-2, or Ki-67 as markers of relapse in breast cancer patients who had received the identical adjuvant therapy at a single institution. Methods A cohort of 151 curatively resected stage III breast cancer patients (M:F = 3:148, median age 46 years who had 4 or more positive lymph nodes and received doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel (AC/T as adjuvant chemotherapy was analyzed for clinico-pathologic characteristics including disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS. Patients with positive ER and/or PR expression received 5 years of tamoxifen following AC/T. The protein expressions of biomarkers were assessed immunohistochemically. Results The median follow-up duration was 36 months, and 37 patients (24.5% experienced a recurrence. Univariate analyses indicated that the tumor size (P = 0.038 and the number of involved lymph nodes (P P = 0.013, bcl-2 positivity (P = 0.002 and low p53 expression (P = 0.032 were found to be significantly associated with a prolonged DFS. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified 10 or more involved lymph nodes (HR 7.366; P P = 0.030, and c-erbB2 over-expression (HR 3.535; P = 0.001 as independent indicators of poorer DFS. In addition, bcl-2 expression was found to be significantly correlated with the expressions of ER and PR, and inversely correlated with the expressions of p53, c-erbB2 and Ki-67. Patients with bcl-2 expression had a significantly longer DFS than those without, even in the ER (+ subgroup. Moreover, OS was significantly affected by ER, bcl-2 and c-erbB2. Conclusion Bcl-2 is an independent prognostic factor of DFS in curatively resected stage III breast cancer patients and appears to be a useful prognostic factor in combination with c-erbB2 and the

  12. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Prevention Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient ...

  13. Burden of spousal caregivers of stage II and III esophageal cancer survivors 3 years after treatment with curative intent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haj Mohammad, N; Walter, A W; van Oijen, M G H; Hulshof, M C C M; Bergman, J J G H M; Anderegg, M C J; van Berge Henegouwen, M I; Henselmans, I; Sprangers, M A G; van Laarhoven, H W M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to examine caregiver burden of spousal caregivers of patients with esophageal cancer after curative treatment with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by resection and to assess factors associated with caregiver burden. METHODS: In this exploratory,

  14. Quality of Sleep and Related Factors During Chemotherapy in Patients with Stage I/II Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Hsuan Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: The study showed poor sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in patients with breast cancer during the active phase of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy may bring symptom distress to patients and adversely influence sleep quality.

  15. Phase II study of bevacizumab and chemoradiation in the preoperative or adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Bendell, Johanna C; McCleod, Michael; Shipley, Dianna L; Arrowsmith, Edward; Barnes, E Kirk; Infante, Jeffrey R; Burris, Howard A; Greco, F Anthony; Hainsworth, John D

    2012-03-01

    We wanted to evaluate the efficacy, defined as 2-year disease-free survival (DFS), and safety of bevacizumab/chemoradiation in preoperative and adjuvant settings for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer. Eligible patients had stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) 0-1, and adequate organ function, and received preoperative (cohort A) or adjuvant (cohort B) treatment at physician discretion. Patients received 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as an intravenous infusion (IVCI) 225 mg/m(2)/d on days 1-42, bevacizumab 5 mg/kg intravenously (I.V.) on days 1 and 15 (cohort A), or every 2 weeks (cohort B), with radiation therapy to 50.4 Gy. After surgery (cohort A) or chemoradiation (cohort B), FOLFOX6 (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin) and bevacizumab were administered for 4 months and then bevacizumab was given alone for up to 1 year. Sixty-six patients (cohort A = 35; cohort B = 31) were enrolled from August 2006-April 2009: median age was 57 years; male patients, 62%; ECOG PS 0, 75%; stage II/III, 31%/69%. In cohort A, the complete pathologic response (pCR) rate was 29% (11% microscopic residual disease, 49% gross disease). Four patients did not undergo surgery (toxicity, 2 patients; progressive disease, 1 patient; patient decision, 1 patient). One- and 2-year DFS for cohorts A/B were 85%/not reached and 97%/89%, respectively (median survival not reached for either cohort). Frequent grade 3/4 toxicity included diarrhea (A cohort, 14%; B cohort, 29%), neutropenia (A cohort, 14%, B cohort, 23%), mucositis (A cohort, 23%, B cohort, 0%), and fatigue (A cohort, 6%, B cohort, 10%). Other serious toxicity included bowel perforation and pelvic infection (cohort A, 1 patient each), bowel perforation (2 patients), anal wound dehiscence (1 patient), perianal infection (2 patients), and rectovaginal fistula (1 patient) (cohort B), without treatment-related death in either cohort. Bevacizumab can be added to standard

  16. Concurrent Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced (Stage III) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Single Institution Experience With 600 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav, E-mail: nebareje@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia); Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Our institutional experience with the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (RT-CHT) in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer was reviewed. Methods and Materials: Three phase III and two phase II studies included a total of 600 patients. Hyperfractionated RT alone was given to 127 patients, and hyperfractionated RT-CHT was given to 473 patients. RT doses were 64.8 Gy and 69.6 Gy (using 1.2 Gy twice daily) and 67.6 Gy (using 1.3 Gy twice daily). CHT consisted of concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide to 409 patients and concurrent administration of carboplatin and paclitaxel to 64 patients. Results: The median survival times were 19 months, 21 months, and 12 months for all, RT-CHT, and RT-only patients, respectively. The survival difference between the RT-CHT and RT group was significant (p < 0.0001). Four-year rates of local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 29% and 35%, respectively, for the entire group. The RT-CHT group had significantly better LPFS rates than the RT group (31% for the RT-CHT group vs. 16% for the RT group; p = 0.0015) but not DMFS rates (36% for the RT-CHT group vs. 36% for the RT group, p = 0.0571). Acute high-grade esophagitis, pneumonitis, and hematological toxicities were seen most frequently and in 11%, 9%, and 12% of patients, respectively. Late high-grade esophageal and bronchopulmonary toxicity were each seen in 6% of patients. Conclusions: Compared to the majority of existing phase II and III studies, this study reconfirmed the excellent results achieved with concurrent RT-CHT, including low toxicity. Concurrent RT-CHT results in survival benefit primarily by increasing LPFS, not DMFS.

  17. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D2 - D98, where D2 and D98 are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to 98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects have limited impact on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and organ-at-risk dose parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Aspirin/antiplatelet agent use improves disease-free survival and reduces the risk of distant metastases in Stage II and III triple-negative breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, J; Thomas, K M; Rahimi, A S; Rao, R; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Xian-Jin; DaSilva, M; Spangler, A; Leitch, M; Wooldridge, R; Rivers, A; Farr, D; Haley, B; Kim, D W Nathan

    2017-02-01

    The objective is to define the therapeutic role of antiplatelet agents in a triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) population. We performed retrospective analysis using the UTSW TNBC registry containing data from 222 Stage II-III TNBC patients treated between 1998 and 2016. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to identify factors associated with disease-free survival (DFS), distant metastases rate (DMR), and overall survival outcomes. Antiplatelet drug use was determined by review of electronic medical records. A total of 65 patients used antiplatelet (AP) agents, and 157 patients did not use AP agents. Median follow-up for AP and non-AP groups was 41.3 and 40.9 months, respectively. There was an improvement in the AP group compared with the control group in 5-year DFS (80.4% at 5 years compared with 62.3% in the control group, p = 0.04) and 5-year DMR (8.8 vs. 31.9%, p = 0.007). In multivariate analysis, AP use was found to be significantly associated with improvements in DFS and DMR. We illustrate that antiplatelet agent use improves DMR and DFS among a stage II and III TNBC population despite our short follow-up evaluation. Longer follow-up evaluation will be required to determine additional outcome advantage for antiplatelet agent use. Our findings support consideration of investigation of antiplatelet therapy as an adjunctive therapy for TNBC at high risk for disease recurrence.

  19. Expression of Ribonucleotide Reductase Subunit-2 and Thymidylate Synthase Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Resected Stages I–III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Grossi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers can help to identify patients with early-stages or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC who have high risk of relapse and poor prognosis. To correlate the expression of seven biomarkers involved in DNA synthesis and repair and in cell division with clinical outcome, we consecutively collected 82 tumour tissues from radically resected NSCLC patients. The following biomarkers were investigated using IHC and qRT-PCR: excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1, breast cancer 1 (BRCA1, ribonucleotide reductase subunits M1 and M2 (RRM1 and RRM2, subunit p53R2, thymidylate synthase (TS, and class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3. Gene expression levels were also validated in an available NSCLC microarray dataset. Multivariate analysis identified the protein overexpression of RRM2 and TS as independent prognostic factors of shorter overall survival (OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a trend in shorter OS for patients with RRM2, TS, and ERCC1, BRCA1 overexpressed tumours. For all of the biomarkers except TUBB3, the OS trends relative to the gene expression levels were in agreement with those relative to the protein expression levels. The NSCLC microarray dataset showed RRM2 and TS as biomarkers significantly associated with OS. This study suggests that high expression levels of RRM2 and TS might be negative prognostic factors for resected NSCLC patients.

  20. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin C. Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in younger (age < 50 populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute’s Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n=6,862. Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age < 50 and older (age 50–69, age ≥ 70 CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13% and Hispanic (15% than patients aged 50–69 years (11% and 10%, resp. and ≥70 years (7% each. A larger proportion of young white (41% and Hispanic (33% patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%. The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%. Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  1. Topoisomerase 1(TOP1) gene copy number in stage III colorectal cancer patients and its relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    A Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) poison is frequently included in the treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, no predictive biomarkers for Top1 poisons are available. We here report a study on the TOP1 gene copy number in CRC patients and its association with patient prognosis...

  2. Tumor deposit is a poor prognostic indicator for patients who have stage II and III colorectal cancer with fewer than 4 lymph node metastases but not for those with 4 or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Kinuko; Ueki, Takashi; Nishioka, Yasunobu; Manabe, Tatsuya; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Hirahashi, Minako; Oda, Yoshinao; Tanaka, Masao

    2014-04-01

    Extranodal tumor deposits are involved in TNM classification. However, it is uncertain whether a tumor deposit is a regular lymph node metastasis, and its prognostic significance in patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer remains to be established. This study aimed to determine the prognostic significance of tumor deposits for stage II and III colorectal cancer. This study is a retrospective review of clinicopathological data. This study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital/referral center in Japan. We reviewed the clinical course of 171 stage II and 173 stage III consecutive patients between January 1999 and December 2006. We examined the clinicopathological features of colorectal cancers with tumor deposits and calculated overall survival and recurrence-free survival of the patients according to the status of tumor deposits. The primary outcome was the impact of tumor deposits on patient survival. Thirty-five (10.2%) patients with colorectal cancers had tumor deposits in the pericolic and/or mesocolic region. Survival rates among the patients with tumor deposits were significantly lower than those without (5-year overall survival: 58.4% vs 81.0%, p deposit was an independent prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer in multivariate analysis (overall survival: HR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.26-4.04; p = 0.04; recurrence-free survival: HR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.04-4.90; p = 0.04). Tumor deposit was an independent prognostic factor in N0 and N1 colorectal cancer, whereas N2 cancer had poor survival outcome regardless of tumor deposit. Our study was a single-institution retrospective study, and the numbers of patients were relatively small to draw firm conclusions. Tumor deposit may be an independent adverse prognostic factor for stage II and III N1 colorectal cancer.

  3. The principles of cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, James; Gospodarowicz, Mary; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic disease extent or tumour stage of a cancer at diagnosis as a determinant of prognosis is discussed. The importance of cancer stage in individual patient prognosis and determination of treatment is reviewed as well as its value in research and cancer control activities. The conflict between the need for stability of cancer stage definitions over time and the need to evolve with advances in medicine are examined. The e cancer elearning modules on Cancer Stage are introduced.

  4. Self-Advocacy Serious Game in Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-09

    Ovarian Cancer Stage III; Ovarian Cancer Stage IV; Breast Cancer Stage IV; Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB; Cervical Cancer Stage IVA; Cervical Cancer Stage IVB; Endometrial Cancer Stage III; Endometrial Cancer Stage IV; Vulvar Cancer, Stage III; Vulvar Cancer, Stage IV; Vaginal Cancer Stage III; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVA; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVB

  5. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schneeweiss, Andreas [University of Heidelberg, Nationales Centrum fuer Tumorerkrankungen (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Sohn, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynecology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Es wurden Akut- und Langzeittoxizitaet sowie Ueberlebensdaten der konsolidierenden intensitaetsmodulierten Ganzabdomenbestrahlung (&apos

  6. Acute toxicity profile and compliance to accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Geert O; Terhaard, Chris H; Doornaert, Patricia A; Bijl, Hendrik P; van den Ende, Piet; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A; Kaanders, Johannes H

    2012-02-01

    To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Doornaert, Patricia A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bijl, Hendrik P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Ende, Piet van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Chin, Alim [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  8. Long Term Survival Results of Surgery Alone versus Surgery plus 5-Fluorouracil and Leucovorin for Stage II and Stage III Colon Cancer: Pooled Analysis of NSABP C-01 through C-05 Baseline from Which to Compare Modern Adjuvant Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Neal W.; Yothers, Greg; Lopa, Samia; Costantino, Joseph P.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to conduct a pooled analysis of National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) colon trials involving surgery and surgery plus 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5-FU/LV) to compare survival and establish a baseline from which to evaluate future studies. Methods All patients enrolled in NSABP adjuvant trials C-01 through C-05 with stage II and III disease who were treated with surgery or with surgery plus 5-FU/LV were examined for overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and recurrence free interval (RFI). Time-to-event by treatment group was examined using adjusted Kaplan-Meier estimates and multivariable Cox regression analysis. Results There were 2,966 eligible patients: 693 (23%) surgery and 2,273 (77%) surgery plus 5-FU/LV; 1,255 (42%) stage II and 1,711 (58%) stage III. Age ≥ 60 years {hazard ratio (HR)=1.36, P<0.000], male gender (HR=1.20, P=0.0012), and more nodes positive or fewer nodes examined (P< 0.0001) were associated with worse survival. At 5 years, the adjusted OS was 0.62 [confidence interval (CI)= 0.60-0.63] in the surgery group and 0.76 (CI= 0.74- 0.78) in the surgery plus 5-FU/LV group. Treatment with 5-FU/LV was associated with improved outcome compared with surgery: OS (HR=0.62, P<0.0001), DFS (HR=0.66, P<0.0001) and RFI (HR=0.64, P<0.0001). Improved OS with adjuvant treatment was seen in both stage II (HR=0.58, 95% CI=0.48-0.71) and stage III disease (HR=0.65, 95% CI=0.55-0.75). Conclusions This analysis demonstrates that treatment of colon cancer patients with 5-FU/LV following surgery provides benefit over surgery alone and can provide anticipated survival outcomes from which to compare modern adjuvant trials. PMID:20082144

  9. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Oberije, Cary [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Wiersma, Terry [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gy eonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); DeRuyck, Kim [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Warner, Andrew [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palma, David A. [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  11. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Versmessen Harijati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. Methods A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS or mastectomy (MA were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. Results On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms, nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better

  12. Gemcitabine, cisplatin and vinorelbine as induction chemotherapy followed by radical therapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicentre study of galician-lung-cancer-group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Luis; Cueva-Banuelos, Juan F; Huidobro, G; Fírvida, J L; Amenedo, M; Lázaro, M; Romero, C; Estévez, S V; Barón, F J; Grande, C; García Mata, J; González, A; Castellanos, J; Gómez, A; Caeiro, M; Rodríguez, M R; Casal, J

    2003-05-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a gemcitabine-cisplatin-vinorelbine combination in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients (n=46) with stage III NSCLC and naive of therapy were recruited into the trial to receive gemcitabine (G, 1000 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 8, cisplatin (C, 100 mg/m(2)) on day 1 and vinorelbine (V, 25 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 8 every 21 days for three cycles. Two patients achieved complete response (CR) and 23 partial response (PR), overall response 52%. Subsequent radical surgery included nine patients of whom four were non-resectable and five were resected and with 1 CR. Radiotherapy was administered to 31 patients, and two achieved CR. The median time to progression and overall survival were 37 and 50 weeks, respectively. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 35% of cycles, with two toxic deaths. Severe non-haematological toxicity was uncommon. This GCV combination is effective in patients with stage III NSCLC, and with an acceptable toxicity.

  13. Clinicopathologic Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy versus Conventional Chemoradiotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting for Resectable Stages II and III Low Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess for differences in clinical, radiologic, and pathologic outcomes between patients with stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma treated neoadjuvantly with conventional external beam radiotherapy (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (EBT. Methods. Patients undergoing neoadjuvant EBT received 4 consecutive daily 6.5 Gy fractions without chemotherapy, while those undergoing 3DRT or IMRT received 28 daily 1.8 Gy fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Data was collected prospectively for 7 EBT patients and retrospectively for 25 historical 3DRT/IMRT controls. Results. Time to surgery was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P<0.001. There was a trend towards higher rate of pathologic CR for EBT (P=0.06. Rates of margin and lymph node positivity at resection were similar for all groups. Acute toxicity was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P=0.025. Overall and progression-free survival were noninferior for EBT. On MRI, EBT achieved similar complete response rate and reduction in tumor volume as 3DRT and IMRT. Histopathologic comparison showed that EBT resulted in more localized treatment effects and fewer serosal adhesions. Conclusions. EBT offers several practical benefits over conventional radiotherapy techniques and appears to be at least as effective against low rectal cancer as measured by short-term outcomes.

  14. DNA Topoisomerase I Gene Copy Number and mRNA Expression Assessed as Predictive Biomarkers for Adjuvant Irinotecan in Stage II/III Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Vainer, Ben; Nielsen, Signe L

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Prospective-retrospective assessment of the TOP1 gene copy number and TOP1 mRNA expression as predictive biomarkers for adjuvant irinotecan in stage II/III colon cancer (CC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays were obtained from an adjuvant CC trial...... (PETACC3) where patients were randomized to 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid with or without additional irinotecan. TOP1 copy number status was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a TOP1/CEN20 dual-probe combination. TOP1 mRNA data were available from previous analyses. RESULTS: TOP1...... FISH and follow-up data were obtained from 534 patients. TOP1 gain was identified in 27 % using a single-probe enumeration strategy (≥ 4 TOP1 signals per cell), and in 31 % when defined by a TOP1/CEN20 ratio ≥ 1.5. The effect of additional irinotecan was not dependent on TOP1 FISH status. TOP1 m...

  15. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  16. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tatsuya [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Takegawa, Hideki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Anneyuko I. [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Korevaar, Erik W., E-mail: e.w.korevaar@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D{sub 2} − D{sub 98}, where D{sub 2} and D{sub 98} are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to <98% (clinical threshold) in 3 of 10 patients for robust 5-mm evaluations. However, the TC remained >98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  19. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Childhood Treatment Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening Age, diet, and stomach disease can affect the ... Cancer Home Page Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Lasers in Cancer ...

  20. The issues regarding postoperative adjuvant therapy and prognostic risk factors for patients with stage I-II cervical cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekuma, Munetaka; Kasamatsu, Yuka; Kado, Nobuhiro; Kuji, Shiho; Tanaka, Aki; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Abe, Masakazu; Hirashima, Yasuyuki

    2017-04-01

    The treatment for most patients with early-stage cervical cancer involves radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, and indications for postoperative adjuvant therapy have been determined by evaluating the prognostic risk factors for recurrence in each case. The aim of this review is to raise and discuss the various issues that have not yet been resolved regarding the prognostic risk factors and postoperative adjuvant therapy. Several clinicopathological factors, such as tumor size, lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, parametrial involvement and lymph node metastasis, have been identified to have prognostic significance in early-stage cervical cancer. However, this remains controversial because there is suggested to be substantial heterogeneity among patients after radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy and it would be difficult to define the risk groups clearly. This indicates the need to develop more convenient and accurate criteria to define risk groups. According to the currently available evidence, patients in the high-risk group should receive adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) and fluolouracil. However, CCRT with CDDP administered weekly (CCRT-P) has instead been applied in a clinical context worldwide. Whether CCRT-P has a survival benefit compared with radiotherapy (RT) alone is unknown because no randomized phase III trials have been performed for patients in the high-risk group after radical surgery. Patients with high-risk factors have a high incidence of distant metastasis, for whom systemic chemotherapy might be a key to improving overall survival. The pivotal study that investigated the role of RT alone for patients with intermediate-risk factors after hysterectomy is the GOG092 trial. This trial showed a 47% reduction in the risk of recurrence after RT compared with no further treatment (NFT). However, the improvement in overall survival with RT did not reach statistical

  1. ERCC2 2251A>C genetic polymorphism was highly correlated with early relapse in high-risk stage II and stage III colorectal cancer patients: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Chen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early relapse in colorectal cancer (CRC patients is attributed mainly to the higher malignant entity (such as an unfavorable genotype, deeper tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis and advance cancer stage and poor response to chemotherapy. Several investigations have demonstrated that genetic polymorphisms in drug-targeted genes, metabolizing enzymes, and DNA-repairing enzymes are all strongly correlated with inter-individual differences in the efficacy and toxicity of many treatment regimens. This preliminary study attempts to identify the correlation between genetic polymorphisms and clinicopathological features of CRC, and evaluates the relationship between genetic polymorphisms and chemotherapeutic susceptibility of Taiwanese CRC patients. To our knowledge, this study discusses, for the first time, early cancer relapse and its indication by multiple genes. Methods Six gene polymorphisms functional in drug-metabolism – GSTP1 Ile105Val, ABCB1 Ile1145Ile, MTHFR Ala222Val, TYMS double (2R or triple (3R tandem repeat – and DNA-repair genes – ERCC2 Lys751Gln and XRCC1 Arg399Gln – were assessed in 201 CRC patients using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique and DNA sequencing. Patients were diagnosed as either high-risk stage II (T2 and 3 N0 M0 or III (any T N1 and 2 M0 and were administered adjuvant chemotherapy regimens that included 5-fluorouracil (5FU and leucovorin (LV. The correlations between genetic polymorphisms and patient clinicopathological features and relapses were investigated. Results In this study, the distributions of GSTP1 (P = 0.003, ABCB1 (P = 0.001, TYMS (P ERCC2 (P XRCC1 (P = 0.006 genotypes in the Asian population, with the exception of MTHFR (P = 0.081, differed significantly from their distributions in a Caucasian population. However, the unfavorable genotype ERCC2 2251A>C (P = 0.006, tumor invasion depth (P = 0.025, lymph node metastasis (P = 0

  2. ACUTE TOXICITY PROFILE AND COMPLIANCE TO ACCELERATED RADIOTHERAPY PLUS CARBOGEN AND NICOTINAMIDE FOR CLINICAL STAGE T2-4 LARYNGEAL CANCER : RESULTS OF A PHASE III RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; van den Ende, Piet; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with

  3. Acute toxicity profile and compliance to accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, G.O.R.J.; Terhaard, C.H.J.; Doornaert, P.A.; Bijl, H.P.; Ende, P. van den; Chin, A.; Pop, L.A.M.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with

  4. Electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I-II breast cancer. First results of the randomized Budapest boost trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Fodor, J. [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Orosz, Z. [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Experimental and Human Tumor Pathology Budapest (HU)] [and others

    2002-11-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate the effect of electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost on local tumor control (LTC), side effects and cosmesis after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in a prospective randomized study. Patients and Methods: 207 women with stage I-II breast cancer who underwent BCS were treated by 50 Gy irradiation to the whole breast and then randomly assigned to receive either a boost to the tumor bed (n=104) or no further radiotherapy (n=103). Boost treatments consisted of either 16 Gy electron irradiation (n=52) or 12-14.25 Gy HDR BT (n=52). Breast cancer-related events, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the crude rate of local recurrence was 6.7% (7/104) with and 15.5% (16/103) without boost. The 5-year probability of LTC, relapse-free survival (RFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 92.7% vs 84.9% (p=0.049), 76.6% vs 66.2% (p=0.044), and 90.4% vs. 82.1% (p=0.053), respectively. There was no significant difference in LTC between patients treated with electron or HDR BT boost (94.2% vs 91.4%; p=0.74). On multivariate analysis, patient age <40 years (RR: 4.53), positive margin status (RR: 4.17), and high mitotic activity index (RR: 3.60) were found to be significant risk factors for local recurrence. The incidence of grade 2-3 side effects was higher in the boost arm (17.3% vs 7.8%; p=0.03). However, the rate of excellent/good cosmetic results was similar for the two arms (85.6% vs 91.3%; p=0.14). Cosmesis was rated as excellent/good in 88.5% of patients treated with HDR BT and 82.7% of patients with electron boost (p=0.29). Conclusions: Boost dose significantly improves LTC and RFS in patients treated with BCS and radiotherapy. In spite of the higher incidence of late side effects in the boost arm, boost dose is strongly recommended for patients at high risk for local recurrence. Positive or close margin status, high mitotic activity index, and young patient age

  5. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m2 on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m2 on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Stages of Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head and Neck Cancer Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Health Professional Hypopharyngeal Cancer ... Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ...

  7. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-08

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  8. Safety of zoledronic acid and incidence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) during adjuvant therapy in a randomised phase III trial (AZURE: BIG 01-04) for women with stage II/III breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R; Woodward, E; Brown, J; Cameron, D; Bell, R; Dodwell, D; Keane, M; Gil, M; Davies, C; Burkinshaw, R; Houston, S J; Grieve, R J; Barrett-Lee, P J; Thorpe, H

    2011-06-01

    The AZURE trial is an ongoing phase III, academic, multi-centre, randomised trial designed to evaluate the role of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in the adjuvant therapy of women with stage II/III breast cancer. Here, we report the safety and tolerability profile of ZOL in this setting. Eligible patients received (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy and were randomised to receive neither additional treatment nor intravenous ZOL 4 mg. ZOL was administered after each chemotherapy cycle to exploit potential sequence-dependent synergy. ZOL was continued for 60 months post-randomisation (six doses in the first 6 months, eight doses in the following 24 months and five doses in the final 30 months). Serious (SAE) and non-serious adverse event (AE) data generated during the first 36 months on study were analysed for the safety population. 3,360 patients were recruited to the AZURE trial. The safety population comprised 3,340 patients (ZOL 1,665; control 1,675). The addition of ZOL to standard treatment did not significantly impact on chemotherapy delivery. SAE were similar in both treatment arms. No significant safety differences were seen apart from the occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in the ZOL group (11 confirmed cases; 0.7%; 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.1%). ZOL in the adjuvant setting is well tolerated, and can be safely administered in addition to adjuvant therapy including chemotherapy. The adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of ZOL, with a low incidence of ONJ.

  9. Stages of Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professional Anal Cancer Treatment Anal Cancer Prevention Research Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Anal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  10. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Hanna, Gerard G; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; Harrow, Stephen; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil; Faivre-Finn, Corinne

    2016-04-15

    The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of 'isotoxic' radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West-Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. NCT01836692; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  11. A Comparative Pharmacokinetic Study of 2 Pemetrexed Formulations in Indian Adult Chemonaive Patients With Adenocarcinoma Stage III/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavathiya, Krunal; Gurjar, Murari; Patil, Anand; Naik, Madhura; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Gota, Vikram; Prabhash, Kumar

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to compare the pharmacokinetics of 2 pemetrexed formulations (Pemgem, Dr. Reddy's Laboratories w.r.t; Alimta, Eli Lilly) in adult chemonaive subjects with adenocarcinoma stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer. All patients received 500 mg/m2 pemetrexed (Alimta or Pemgem) as a 10-minute infusion on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Plasma pemetrexed concentrations were determined on day 1 of cycle 1. Area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-inf ) and the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) were estimated using noncompartment analysis and compared between the 2 arms. Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study, 24 in each arm. Patient demographics were comparable in both arms. Mean AUC0-inf for the generic and innovator formulations was 218.2 ± 19.18 and 223.6 ± 34.24 μg·h/mL, respectively, and mean Cmax was 119 ± 13.44 and 113 ± 7.26 μg/mL, respectively. Volume of distribution of pemetrexed was 17.5 and 27.6 L, clearance was 4.2 versus 4.72 L/h, and half-life was 4.3 and 4.83 h in the 2 arms respectively. Both formulations showed comparable response rates (objective response of 45% versus 50% in the Pemgem and Alimta arms, respectively) and similar safety profiles. To conclude, Pemgem showed pharmacokinetic and safety profiles similar to Alimta. Substitution of Alimta with Pemgem will be cost-effective and likely to yield comparable efficacy. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  12. Knowledge of Cancer Stage among Women with Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, Jenna; Goldberg, Jessica; Linsky, Sarah; Linsky, Rebecca; Jeon, Sangchoon; Schulman-Green, Dena

    2016-03-01

    Discrepancies may exist between what oncologists communicate and what patients understand about their cancer stage and its implications. We explored patients' ability to identify their stage of breast cancer. As part of a study testing a cancer self-management intervention we asked women to identify their stage of disease and compared responses to the electronic medical record (EMR) for validation. The sample included women with recently diagnosed nonmetastatic (stage I-III) disease. We calculated descriptive statistics and used logistic regression to examine relationships between knowledge of stage, demographic and clinical variables, and study outcomes. Measurement instruments were the Control Preferences Scale (CPS), Knowledge of Care Options Test (KOCO), Measurement of Transitions Scale (MOT), Medical Communication Competence Scale (MCCS), Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE), Uncertainty in Illness Scale (MUIS-C), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Participants (n = 98) had a mean age of 52.3 years (range 27-72). Per the EMR, 19 participants (19.4%) had stage I breast cancer, 56 (57.1%) had stage II, and 23 (23.5%) had stage III. Of the 28 participants (28.6%) unable to identify their stage of cancer correctly, 11 (39.3%) provided vague responses, 11 (39.3%) reported an incorrect stage, and 6 (21.4%) did not know their stage. Younger age (p = 0.0412) and earlier cancer stage (p = 0.0136) were predictive of correctly identifying stage. Participants who at baseline had a greater knowledge of care options (curative, palliative, and hospice care) were more likely to correctly identify their stage (KOCO, p = 0.0345). Clinicians should revisit conversations about cancer stage and care options to ensure patients' understanding and support self-management.

  13. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  14. Radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy in lung cancer. A retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, D. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano (Milan) (Italy); De Rose, F.; Navarria, P.; Clerici, E.; Franzese, C.; Comito, T.; Tozzi, A.; Iftode, C.; D' Agostino, G. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Cozzi, L.; Sorsetti, M. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Milan (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    This study aimed to analyse the feasibility and acute toxicity of radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy (RT) for elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We conducted a retrospective evaluation of treatment with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of elderly patients affected by stage III inoperable NSCLC. The dose prescription was 56 Gy in 20 fractions, 55 Gy in 22 fractions, or 50 Gy in 20 fractions. Target volume included only the primary lesion and the infiltrated lymph nodes. The primary end point was acute and late toxicity, while secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In all, 41 patients were included in this analysis. The mean age of the patients was 78.6 years, and 22 patients had staged IIIA while 19 patients had stage IIIB disease. All but one patient had pathological nodal involvement; 15 patients received chemotherapy before RT. Acute grade 1-2 toxicity was recorded in 25 (61%) patients. Late toxicity was recorded in 13 (32%) patients. No cases of G3 or G4 toxicity were recorded. Complete response was obtained in two (5%) patients, 26 (63%) showed a partial response, and two (5%) experience disease progression. At a mean follow-up of 9.9 months (range, 1.1-25.4), 17 patients had died from disease progression, one died from other causes, and 23 were alive. Median OS was 13.7 ± 1.5 months (95% CI: 10.7-16.7), OS at 12 and 18 months was 51.3 ± 9.5% and 35.1 ± 10.1%, respectively. Median PFS was 13.7 ± 2.3 months (95% CI: 9.1-18.2), and PFS at 12 and 18 months was 50.1 ± 9.9% and 38.9 ± 10.4%, respectively. Radical hypo-fractionated VMAT is a promising treatment for locally advanced NSCLC in the elderly. The use of hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for lung cancer in older patients can be considered a valuable approach, particularly for patients with poor performance status or refusing other treatment approaches. (orig.) [German] Durchfuehrbarkeit und Nebenwirkungen der radikalen

  15. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  16. QUALITY ASSURANCE OF 4D-CT SCAN TECHNIQUES IN MULTICENTER PHASE III TRIAL OF SURGERY VERSUS STEREOTACTIC RADIOTHERAPY (RADIOSURGERY OR SURGERY FOR OPERABLE EARLY STAGE (STAGE 1A) NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CANCER [ROSEL] STUDY)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; van Lieshout, Maarten; Schuring, Danny; van Heumen, Marielle J. T.; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Widder, Joachim; van der Heide, Uulke A.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scanning techniques in institutions participating in a Phase III trial of surgery vs. stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All 9 centers performed a 4D-CT scan of a motion phantom

  17. Relationship Between Metformin Use and Recurrence and Survival in Patients With Resected Stage III Colon Cancer Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy: Results From North Central Cancer Treatment Group N0147 (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Preet Paul; Shi, Qian; Foster, Nathan R; Grothey, Axel; Nair, Suresh G; Chan, Emily; Shields, Anthony F; Goldberg, Richard M; Gill, Sharlene; Kahlenberg, Morton S; Sinicrope, Frank A; Sargent, Daniel J; Alberts, Steven R

    2016-12-01

    Preclinical and epidemiological data suggest that metformin might have antineoplastic properties against colon cancer (CC). However, the effect of metformin use on patient survival in stage III CC after curative resection is unknown. The survival outcomes were comparable regardless of the duration of metformin use. Before randomization to FOLFOX (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) with or without cetuximab, 1,958 patients with stage III CC enrolled in the N0147 study completed a questionnaire with information on diabetes mellitus (DM) and metformin use. Cox models were used to assess the association between metformin use and disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and the time to recurrence (TTR), adjusting for clinical and/or pathological factors. Of the 1,958 patients, 1,691 (86%) reported no history of DM, 115 reported DM with metformin use (6%), and 152 reported DM without metformin use (8%). The adjuvant treatment arms were pooled, because metformin use showed homogeneous effects on outcomes across the two arms. Among the patients with DM (n = 267), DFS (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-1.35; p = .60), OS (aHR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.65-1.49; p = .95), and TTR (aHR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.35; p = .53) were not different for the metformin users compared with the nonusers after adjusting for tumor and patient factors. The survival outcomes were comparable regardless of the duration of metformin use (colon cancer receiving adjuvant FOLFOX (folinic acid, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin)-based chemotherapy. This relationship was not modified by KRAS or BRAF mutation or DNA mismatch repair status. Metformin use did not increase or decrease the likelihood of chemotherapy-related grade 3 or higher adverse events. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Stages of Laryngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Need To Know About™ Cancer of the Larynx Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Lasers in Cancer Treatment Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help with quitting) For general cancer information ...

  19. GILT - A randomised phase III study of oral vinorelbine and cisplatin with concomitant radiotherapy followed by either consolidation therapy with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin or best supportive care alone in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Wuerzburg (Germany); Huber, Rudolf M. [University Hospital Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL CPC-M), Munich (Germany); Engel-Riedel, Walburga [University Hospital Merheim, Dept. of Pneumonology, Cologne (Germany); Andreas, Stefan [Dept. of Pneumonology, Immenhausen (Germany); Kollmeier, Jens [Helios Emil-von-Behring Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Staar, Susanne [Municipal Hospital Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Dickgreber, Nicolas [University Hospital Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Vaissiere, Nathalie; Almeida, Cecilia de [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Boulogne (France); Edlich, Birgit [Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is considered standard for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consolidation chemotherapy (CC) following CRT is intended to further improve outcomes, yet studies have shown discordant results. This phase III study assessed CRT followed by best supportive care (BSC) or consolidation with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin. Patients received two cycles of oral vinorelbine (50 mg/m{sup 2} days 1, 8 and 15) + cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} days 1-4) q4w + radiotherapy (RT; 66 Gy). Patients with at least stable disease (SD) were randomised to either two cycles oral vinorelbine (60-80 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 and 8) + cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} day 1) q3w + BSC or BSC alone. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 279 patients were enrolled for CRT and 201 patients were randomised to CC or BSC. Both CRT and CC were well tolerated, with limited radiation-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC/BSC: oesophagitis-related events 12.9 %/3.1 %/0 %; grade 3 pneumonitis 0 %/0 %/2 %) and chemotherapy-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC: neutropenia 11.2 %/22.1 %; leukopenia 18.3 %/26.7 %; grade 3 nausea 5.0 %/2.3 %, grade 3 vomiting 3.2 %/3.5 %). Median PFS from randomisation was 6.4 (5.0-8.7) and 5.5 (3.8-7.4) months in the CC and BSC arms (hazard ratio, HR = 0.93 [0.69-1.26]; p = 0.63), respectively; median overall survival (OS) 20.8 (13.5-25.3) and 18.5 (13.6-24.7) months, respectively. Consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent CRT did not prolong PFS or OS. Concurrent RT with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin demonstrated a favourable safety profile and represents a suitable treatment regimen for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Simultane Radiochemotherapie (CRT) wird als Standardtherapie beim inoperablen Stadium III des nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) angesehen. Konsolidierende Chemotherapie (CC) nach der CRT zielt darauf ab, das Therapieergebnis zu verbessern, allerdings zeigen Studien

  20. Surgical staging in endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, MJ; Aalders, JG; Slager, E; Fauser, B; VanGeijn, H; Brolmann, H; Vervest, H

    2005-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most prevalent cancer of the female genital tract. No randomised study exists to prove that pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy increases survival, either by dissecting micrometastases or by altering the adjuvant treatment in all early stage (stage I grade I and 2)

  1. Development of symptomatic brain metastases after chemoradiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Does the type of chemotherapy regimen matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Lizza E L; Brouns, Anita J W M; Amini, Mohammad; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Wijsman, Robin; Bussink, Jan; Biesma, Bonne; Oei, S Bing; Stigt, Jos A; Bootsma, Gerben P; Belderbos, José S A; De Ruysscher, Dirk K M; Van den Heuvel, Michel M; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C

    2016-11-01

    Symptomatic brain metastases (BM) occur frequently after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Aim of the current study was to determine whether the specific chemotherapy used in a CRT regimen influences BM development. Retrospective multicenter study including all consecutive stage III NSCLC who completed CRT. Primary endpoints: symptomatic BM development, whether this was the only site of first relapse. Differences between regimens were assessed with a logistic regression model including known BM risk factors and the specific chemotherapy: concurrent versus sequential (cCRT/sCRT), within cCRT: daily low dose cisplatin (LDC)-cyclic dose polychemotherapy; LDC-(non-)taxane cyclic dose; LDC-polychemotherapy subgroups of ≥50 patients. Between January 2006 and June 2014, 838 patients were eligible (737 cCRT, 101 sCRT). 18.2% developed symptomatic BM, 8.0% had BM as only site of first relapse. BM patients were significantly younger, female, had more advanced N-stage and had adenocarcinoma histology. In both cCRT and sCRT BM were found in 18% (p=0.904). In cyclic dose cCRT (N=346) and LDC (N=391) BM were found in 18.8% and 17.9%, respectively (p=0.757). In 7.2% and 8.7%, respectively, BM were the only site of first relapse (p=0.463). The chemotherapy used (cCRT versus sCRT) had no influence on BM development, not for all brain relapses nor as only site of first relapse (OR 0.88 (p=0.669), OR 0.93 (p=0.855), respectively). LDC versus cyclic dose cCRT was not significantly different: neither for all brain relapses nor as only site of first relapse (OR 0.96 (p=0.819), OR 1.21 (p=0.498), respectively). Comparable results were found for LDC versus cyclic dose non-taxane (N=277) and cyclic dose taxane regimens (N=69) and for cCRT regimens with ≥50 patients (LDC versus cisplatin/etoposide (N=188), cisplatin/vinorelbin (N=65), weekly cisplatin/docetaxel (N=60)). approximately 18% developed symptomatic BM after stage III diagnosis, not dependent on type of chemotherapy

  2. Stages of Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the vagina. The vagina is the canal leading from the cervix (the opening of uterus ) to ... Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer Coping with Cancer Questions to Ask Your Doctor about ...

  3. Stages of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI ...

  4. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from hard- ...

  5. Initial safety report of NSABP C-08: A randomized phase III study of modified FOLFOX6 with or without bevacizumab for the adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II or III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Carmen J; Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J; Sharif, Saima; Colangelo, Linda H; Lopa, Samia H; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Goldberg, Richard M; Atkins, James N; Seay, Thomas E; Fehrenbacher, Louis; O'Reilly, Seamus; Chu, Luis; Azar, Catherine A; Wolmark, Norman

    2009-07-10

    The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-08 trial was designed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of adding bevacizumab to modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen for the adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II or III colon cancer. We present safety information in advance of the planned analysis of efficacy. Among 2,710 randomly assigned patients, demographic factors were balanced. Patients received modified FOLFOX6 every 2 weeks x 12 or modified FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks x 26, experimental group). Overall rates of grade 4 or 5 toxicities were nearly identical in the FOLFOX6 and FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab arms (15.2% and 15.0%, respectively). Six-month mortality rates were 0.96% and 0.90% for the control and experimental groups, respectively. Grade 3+ toxicities that occurred more often in the experimental arm versus control arm included hypertension (12% v 1.8%, respectively), wound complications (abdominal incisional hernia or infusion port dehiscence/inflammation; 1.7% v 0.3%, respectively), pain (11.1% v 6.3%, respectively), and proteinuria (2.7% v 0.8%, respectively). Grade 2+ neuropathy was increased in the experimental arm versus the control arm (grade 2, 33% v 29%, respectively; grade 3, 16% v 14%, respectively; and grade 4, < 1% each). In the experimental arm versus control arm, significantly less thrombocytopenia (1.4% v 3.4%, respectively) and fewer allergic reactions (3.1% v 4.7%, respectively) were observed. Advanced age was associated with a significantly greater rate of grade 4 and 5 toxicities regardless of treatment. Bevacizumab with modified FOLFOX6 is well tolerated in the surgical adjuvant setting in these patients. No significant increase in GI perforation, hemorrhage, arterial or venous thrombotic events, or death with the addition of bevacizumab to modified FOLFOX6 has been observed. Follow-up for potential delayed adverse effects and efficacy is

  6. Serial Assessment of Therapeutic Response to a New Radiosensitization Treatment, Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II, in Patients with Stage I/II Breast Cancer Using Breast Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yaogawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have developed a new radiosensitization treatment called Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II. Using KORTUC II, we performed breast-conserving treatment (BCT without any surgical procedure for elderly patients with breast cancer in stages I/II or patients refusing surgery. Since surgery was not performed, histological confirmation of the primary tumor region following KORTUC II treatment was not possible. Therefore, to precisely evaluate the response to this new therapy, a detailed diagnostic procedure is needed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic response to KORTUC II treatment in patients with stage I/II breast cancer using annual breast contrast-enhanced (CE magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Methods: Twenty-one patients with stage I/II breast cancer who were elderly and/or refused surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent MRI prior to and at 3 to 6 months after KORTUC II, and then approximately biannually thereafter. Findings from MRI were compared with those from other diagnostic modalities performed during the same time period. Results: KORTUC II was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects. All of 21 patients showed a clinically complete response (cCR on CE MRI. The mean period taken to confirm cCR on the breast CE MRI was approximately 14 months. The mean follow-up period for the patients was 61.9 months at the end of October 2014. Conclusions: The therapeutic effect of BCT using KORTUC II without surgery could be evaluated by biannual CE MRI evaluations. Approximately 14 months were required to achieve cCR in response to this therapy.

  7. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of stage III C and IV epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forde GK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gareth K Forde,1 Jenny Chang,2 Argyrios Ziogas,21Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Irvine Medical Center, University of California, Orange, CA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA Objectives: To examine the cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery (PDS when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data linked to Medicare claims (SEER-Medicare. Methods: Using a Markov model, the cost-effectiveness of PDS was compared to that of NACT. We modeled cost and survival inputs using data from women in the SEER-Medicare database with ovarian cancer treated by either PDS or NACT between 1992 and 2009. Direct and indirect costs were discounted by an annual rate of 3%. Utility weights were obtained from published data. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of PDS compared to NACT was calculated. Results: In our model, women with stage IIIC EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost for PDS when compared to NACT ($31,945 vs $30,016 but yielded greater quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs (1.79 vs 1.69. The ICER was $19,359/QALY gained. Women with stage IV EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost following PDS when compared to NACT ($31,869 vs $27,338 but yielded greater QALYs (1.69 vs 1.66. The ICER was $130,083/QALY gained. A sensitivity analysis showed that for both PDS and NACT the ICER was sensitive to incremental changes in the utility weight. Conclusion: PDS is significantly more cost-effective for women with stage IIIC when compared to NACT. In women with stage IV EOC, PDS is also more cost-effective though the QALYs gained are much more costly and exceed a $50,000 willingness to pay. Keywords: Markov model, gynecologic cancer, chemotherapy, up front surgery

  9. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include the following: Taking estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after menopause . Taking tamoxifen to prevent or treat breast cancer . ... and You: Support for People With Cancer Radiation Therapy and You: Support for ... and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The ...

  10. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  11. Bevacizumab in stage II-III colon cancer: 5-year update of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-08 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Carmen J; Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J; Sharif, Saima; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Lopa, Samia H; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-01-20

    The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial C-08 was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of adding bevacizumab to fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX6) for the adjuvant treatment of patients with stage 2-3 colon cancer. Our report summarizes the primary and secondary end points of disease-free and overall survival, respectively, with 5 years median follow-up time. Patients received modified FOLFOX6 once every 2 weeks for a 6-month period (control group) or modified FOLFOX6 for 6 months plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) once every 2 weeks for a 12-month period (experimental group). The primary end point of the study was disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was a secondary end point. Of 2,673 analyzed patients, demographic factors were well-balanced by treatment. With a median follow-up of 5 years, the addition of bevacizumab to mFOLFOX6 did not result in an overall significant increase in DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.08; P = .35). Exploratory analyses found that the effect of bevacizumab on DFS was different before and after a 1.25-year landmark (time-by-treatment interaction P value <.0001). The secondary end point of OS was no different between the two study arms for all patients (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.13; P = .56) and for those with stage 3 disease (HR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.21; P = .99). Bevacizumab for 1 year with modified FOLFOX6 does not significantly prolong DFS or OS in stage 2-3 colon cancer. We observed no evidence of a detrimental effect of exposure to bevacizumab. A transient effect on disease-free survival was observed during bevacizumab exposure in the study's experimental arm.

  12. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi, E-mail: junsaito@sannet.ne.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi [Division of Respiratory Disease, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shibuya, Kei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  13. Stage III Melanoma : Time is relative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.C. Oude Ophuis (Charlotte)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis, we show that now is the time of emerging minimally invasive and potentially even non-invasive nodal staging procedures; to reconsider which patients may actually benefit from nodal staging; to continue shared decision making for surgery as timing of surgery does not

  14. Five-year lung cancer survival: which advanced stage nonsmall cell lung cancer patients attain long-term survival?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Tina; Nelson, Rebecca A; Bogardus, Alicia; Grannis, Jr, Frederic W

    2010-01-01

    .... In the absence of screening, most symptomatic lung cancer is discovered at advanced stages, with the goal of long-term survival entirely dependent on effective treatment of stage III and IV lung cancer...

  15. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... near the tumor. has spread into the diaphragm , pleura ( tissue that covers the lungs and lines the ... Cancer has spread into the (a) diaphragm, (b) pleura (tissue that covers the lungs and lines the ...

  16. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a nozzle is used to spray liquid nitrogen or liquid carbon dioxide to freeze and destroy ... or small particles to rub away skin cells. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that ...

  17. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment for information about childhood thyroid cancer. Age, gender, and being exposed to radiation can affect the ... is made by the pituitary gland in the brain. It stimulates the release of thyroid hormone and ...

  18. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under a microscope ). Having inherited changes in certain genes that increase the risk of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). Having a personal history of chronic ulcerative colitis ...

  19. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under a microscope ). Having inherited changes in certain genes that increase the risk of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). Having a personal history of chronic ulcerative colitis ...

  20. Fertility preservation with ovarian stimulation and time to treatment in women with stage II-III breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, A Jo; Chambers, Julia; Mcauley, Fiona; Kaplan, Tessa; Letourneau, Joseph; Hwang, Jimmy; Kim, Mi-Ok; Melisko, Michelle E; Rugo, Hope S; Esserman, Laura J; Rosen, Mitchell P

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether fertility preservation with ovarian stimulation (OS) results in treatment delay in breast cancer (BC) patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy (NAT). This is a retrospective study of women screened for the prospective neoadjuvant ISPY2 trial at the University of California San Francisco. All patients were fertility consultation was 16.3 days. With median follow-up of 79 months, 16 (19.5%) patients have recurred or died from BC. Rates of pCR, recurrence, and death were similar in both groups. Six of 34 STIM patients have undergone embryo transfer, resulting in one patient with two live births. Fertility preservation with OS can be performed in the neoadjuvant setting without delay in initiation of systemic therapy and should be discussed with all early-stage BC patients of reproductive age.

  1. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Su Jung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eulji General Hospital, College of Medicine, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won, E-mail: wonro.park@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nam Kwon [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Medical Center, Korea University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun Soo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bundang CHA Hospital, School of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Sik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dong-A University Hospital, Dong-A University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (≤40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (≤40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  2. [A preliminary result of radioactivity ¹²⁵I seed implants with micropuncture technique combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of stage III and IV lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gaifa; Lei, Guangyan; Bai, Xinkuan; Zhao, Zhulian; Song, Yangrong; Zhao, Xuewu

    2005-12-20

    Brachytherapy offers an innovative method of delivering conformal high-dose radiation to a defining target tumor. The aim of this study is to investigate the value and effect of using radioactivity ¹²⁵I seed permanent implants combined with chemotherapy in the management of stage III or IV lung cancer. Forty-two lung cancer patients in stage III and IV (15 center lung cancer) who couldn't be relieved by routine methods were treated with ¹²⁵I seed permanent micropuncture implant brachytherapy and chemotherapy. The dose and distribution of seeds was decided by treatment planning system, and CT was used during ¹²⁵I seed permanent implant treatment. Distribution of seeds and complication was reviewed by CT scan after treatment. Chemotherapy was performed in 3 to 7 days after implanting. The effect was observed by X-ray, CT and MRI every 3 or 4 weeks. The satisfaction rate of seed distribution was 83.3% (35/42). The response rate of treatment was 85.7% (36/42), including complete response rate 26.2% (11/42), partial response rate 59.5% (25/42), no change rate 14.3% (6/42). Effective rate of pain relief was 83.3% (15/18). Thirteen patients (31.0%) had complication of mild hemothorax, 8 (19.0%) with bleeding in lung and 5 (11.9%) with hemoptysis. Three patients (7.1%) had mild pneumothorax and 1 patient (2.4%) had a malposition seed. Leucopenia and radiation pneumonia didn't occurred. ¹²⁵I seed micropuncture implant has less trauma and complication, and is a safe and effective method. This method might be helpful in the treatment of lung cancer and can be selectively used in clinic.

  3. A phase II trial of erlotinib as maintenance treatment after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Rubio, J; Fírvida-Pérez, J L; Lázaro-Quintela, M; Barón-Duarte, F J; Alonso-Jáudenes, G; Santomé, L; Afonso-Afonso, F J; Amenedo, M; Huidobro, G; Campos-Balea, B; López-Vázquez, M D; Vázquez, S

    2014-03-01

    This single arm, phase II study aims to evaluate the role of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib as maintenance therapy following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cCRT) in unresectable locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with unresectable stage IIIA o dry IIIB NSCLC with no evidence of tumor progression after receiving a standard cCRT regimen with curative intent were included. Oral erlotinib 150 mg/day was administered within 4-6 weeks after the end of the cCRT for a maximum of 6 months if no disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Primary end point was the progression-free rate (PFR) at 6 months. Secondary end points included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Sixty-six patients were enrolled and received maintenance treatment with erlotinib [average: 4.5 months (95 % CI 4.0-5.0)]. PFR at 6 months was 63.5 % (41/66). With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (95 % CI 13.5-37.1), the median TTP was 9.9 months (95 % CI 6.2-12.1), and the median OS was 24.0 months (95 % CI 17.3-48.6). Most common adverse events (AEs) related to erlotinib were rash (78.8 %; 16.7 % grade 3), diarrhea (28.8 %; 1.5 % grade 3), fatigue (15.2 %; 1.5 % grade 3), anorexia (7.6 %; 1.5 % grade 3) and vomiting (4.6 %; none grade 3). Five patients (7.6 %) were withdrawn due to AEs. Erlotinib as maintenance therapy is an active treatment after cCRT in unselected patients with stage III NSCLC, reaching a 6-month PFR of 63.5 % and a median OS of 24 months. The safety profile of maintenance erlotinib was as expected and manageable.

  4. Stages of Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that slides through the CT scanner, which takes x-ray pictures of the inside of the head and neck. PET scan (positron emission tomography scan) : ... is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of ... External-beam radiation therapy of the head and neck. A machine is used to aim ...

  5. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram . This picture can be printed to be looked at later. Chest x-ray : ... use this content on your website or other digital platform? Our syndication services page shows you how. National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US ... ...

  6. The impact of disease distribution on survival in patients with stage III epithelial ovarian cancer cytoreduced to microscopic residual: A gynecologic oncology group study ☆,☆☆,★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Chad A.; Miller, Austin; Miller, Caela; Krivak, Thomas C.; Farley, John H.; Chernofsky, Mildred R.; Stany, Michael P.; Rose, G. Scott; Markman, Maurie; Ozols, Robert F.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the survival impact of initial disease distribution on patients with stage III epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cytoreduced to microscopic residual. Methods We reviewed data from 417 stage III EOC patients cytoreduced to microscopic disease and given adjuvant intravenous platinum/paclitaxel on one of three randomized Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) trials. We subdivided patients into three groups based on preoperative disease burden: (1) minimal disease (MD) defined by pelvic tumor and retroperitoneal metastasis (2) abdominal peritoneal disease (APD) with disease limited to the pelvis, retroperitoneum, lower abdomen and omentum; and (3) upper abdominal disease (UAD) with disease affecting the diaphragm, spleen, liver or pancreas. We assessed the survival impact of potential prognostic factors, focusing on initial disease distribution using a proportional hazards model and estimated Kaplan–Meier survival curves. Results The study groups had similar clinicopathologic characteristics. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached in MD patients compared to 80 and 56 months in the APD and UAD groups (P < 0.05). The five-year survival percentages for MD, APD, and UAD were 67%, 63%, and 45%. In multivariate analysis, the UAD group had a significantly worse prognosis than MD and APD both individually and combined (Progression Free Survival (PFS) Hazards Ratio (HR) 1.44; P = 0.008 and OS HR 1.77; P = 0.0004 compared to MD + APD). Conclusion Stage III EOC patients with initial disease in the upper abdomen have a worse prognosis despite cytoreductive surgery to microscopic residual implying that factors beyond cytoreductive effort are important in predicting survival. PMID:21683993

  7. Impact on Loco-regional Control of Radiochemotherapeutic Sequence and Time to Initiation of Adjuvant Treatment in Stage II/III Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Postoperative Concurrent Radiochemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haeyoung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Kyubo; Park, Won; Yoon, Won Sup; Huh, Seung Jae; Ha, Sung W

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the impact of radiochemotherapeutic sequence and time to initiation of adjuvant treatment on loco-regional control for resected stage II and III rectal cancer. Treatment outcomes for rectal cancer patients from two hospitals with different sequencing strategies regarding adjuvant concurrent radiochemotherapy (CRCT) were compared retrospectively. Pelvic radiotherapy was administered concurrently on the first (early CRCT, n=180) or the third cycle of chemotherapy (late CRCT, n=180). During radiotherapy, two cycles of fluorouracil were provided to patients in both groups. In the early CRCT group, median six cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin were prescribed during the post-CRCT period. In the late CRCT group, two cycles of fluorouracil were administered in the pre- and post-CRCT periods. No significant differences in the 5-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) (92.5% vs. 95.6%, p=0.43) or overall survival and disease-free survival were observed between groups. Patients who began receiving adjuvant treatment later than five weeks after surgery had lower LRRFS than patients who received adjuvant treatment within five weeks following surgery (79% vs. 91%, ploco-regional recurrence increased as the time to initiation of adjuvant treatment was delayed. In the current study, treatment outcomes were not significantly influenced by the sequence of adjuvant treatment but by the delay of adjuvant treatment for more than five weeks. Timely administration of adjuvant treatment is deemed important in achieving loco-regional tumor control for stage II/III rectal cancer patients.

  8. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  9. A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant MK-2206, an AKT Inhibitor, with Anastrozole in Clinical Stage II or III PIK3CA-Mutant ER-Positive and HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cynthia X; Suman, Vera; Goetz, Matthew P; Northfelt, Donald; Burkard, Mark E; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Naughton, Michael; Margenthaler, Julie; Aft, Rebecca; Gray, Richard; Tevaarwerk, Amye; Wilke, Lee; Haddad, Tufia; Moynihan, Timothy; Loprinzi, Charles; Hieken, Tina; Barnell, Erica K; Skidmore, Zachary L; Feng, Yan-Yang; Krysiak, Kilannin; Hoog, Jeremy; Guo, Zhanfang; Nehring, Leslie; Wisinski, Kari B; Mardis, Elaine; Hagemann, Ian S; Vij, Kiran; Sanati, Souzan; Al-Kateb, Hussam; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Doyle, Laurence; Erlichman, Charles; Ellis, Matthew J

    2017-09-05

    Purpose: Hyperactivation of AKT is common and associated with endocrine resistance in estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. The allosteric pan-AKT inhibitor MK-2206 induced apoptosis in PIK3CA-mutant ER(+) breast cancer under estrogen-deprived condition in preclinical studies. This neoadjuvant phase II trial was therefore conducted to test the hypothesis that adding MK-2206 to anastrozole induces pathologic complete response (pCR) in PIK3CA mutant ER(+) breast cancer.Experimental Design: Potential eligible patients with clinical stage II/III ER(+)/HER2(-) breast cancer were preregistered and received anastrozole (goserelin if premenopausal) for 28 days in cycle 0 pending tumor PIK3CA sequencing. Patients positive for PIK3CA mutation in the tumor were eligible to start MK-2206 (150 mg orally weekly, with prophylactic prednisone) on cycle 1 day 2 (C1D2) and to receive a maximum of four 28-day cycles of combination therapy before surgery. Serial biopsies were collected at preregistration, C1D1 and C1D17.Results: Fifty-one patients preregistered and 16 of 22 with PIK3CA-mutant tumors received study drug. Three patients went off study due to C1D17 Ki67 >10% (n = 2) and toxicity (n = 1). Thirteen patients completed neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery. No pCRs were observed. Rash was common. MK-2206 did not further suppress cell proliferation and did not induce apoptosis on C1D17 biopsies. Although AKT phosphorylation was reduced, PRAS40 phosphorylation at C1D17 after MK-2206 persisted. One patient acquired an ESR1 mutation at surgery.Conclusions: MK-2206 is unlikely to add to the efficacy of anastrozole alone in PIK3CA-mutant ER(+) breast cancer and should not be studied further in the target patient population. Clin Cancer Res; 1-10. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Predictors of cervical cancer being at an advanced stage at diagnosis in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sudan, with more than two-thirds of all women with invasive cervical cancer being diagnosed at an advanced stage (stages III and IV). The lack of a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan may contribute to the late presentation...... diagnosis) of cervical cancer in Sudan....

  11. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  12. Breast conserving therapy versus mastectomy for stage I-II breast cancer: 20 year follow-up of the EORTC 10801 phase 3 randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litière, Saskia; Werutsky, Gustavo; Fentiman, Ian S; Rutgers, Emiel; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Van Limbergen, Erik; Baaijens, Margreet H A; Bogaerts, Jan; Bartelink, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The EORTC 10801 trial compared breast-conserving therapy (BCT) with modified radical mastectomy (MRM) in patients with tumours 5 cm or smaller and axillary node negative or positive disease. Compared with BCT, MRM resulted in better local control, but did not affect overall survival or time to distant metastases. We report 20-year follow-up results. The EORTC 10801 trial was open for accrual between 1980 and 1986 in eight centres in the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, and South Africa. 448 patients were randomised to BCT and 420 to MRM. Randomisation was done centrally, stratifying patients by institute, carcinoma stage (I or II), and menopausal status. BCT comprised of lumpectomy and complete axillary clearance, followed by breast radiotherapy and a tumour-bed boost. The primary endpoint was time to distant metastasis. This analysis was done on all eligible patients, as they were randomised. After a median follow-up of 22·1 years (IQR 18·5-23·8), 175 patients (42%) had distant metastases in the MRM group versus 207 (46%) in the BCT group. Furthermore, 506 patients (58%) died (232 [55%] in the MRM group and 274 [61%] in the BCT group). No significant difference was observed between BCT and MRM for time to distant metastases (hazard ratio 1·13, 95% CI 0·92-1·38; p=0·23) or for time to death (1·11, 0·94-1·33; 0·23). Cumulative incidence of distant metastases at 20 years was 42·6% (95% CI 37·8-47·5) in the MRM group and 46·9% (42·2-51·6) in the BCT group. 20-year overall survival was estimated to be 44·5% (95% CI 39·3-49·5) in the MRM group and 39·1% (34·4-43·9) in the BCT group. There was no difference between the groups in time to distant metastases or overall survival by age (time to distant metastases: breast cancer seems to be justified, since long-term follow-up in this trial showed similar survival to that after mastectomy. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. Results of paclitaxel (day 1 and 8 and carboplatin given on every three weeks in advanced (stage III-IV non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salepci Taflan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both paclitaxel (P and carboplatin (C have significant activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The weekly administration of P is active, dose intense, and has a favorable toxicity profile. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 51 consecutive patients receiving C and day 1 and 8 P chemotherapy (CT regimen in advanced stage NSCLC to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity. Methods Patients treated in our institutions having pathologically proven NSCLC, no CNS metastases, adequate organ function and performance status (PS ECOG 0–2 were given P 112.5 mg/m2 intravenously (IV over 1 hour on day 1 and 8, followed by C AUC 5 IV over 1 hour, repeated in every three weeks. PC was given for maximum of 6 cycles. Results Median age was 58 (age range 39–77 and 41 patients (80% were male. PS was 0/1/2 in 29/17/5 patients and stage was IIIA/IIIB/IV in 3/14/34 patients respectively. The median number of cycles administered was 3 (1–6. Seven patients (14% did not complete the first 3 cycles either due to death, progression, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to P or lost to follow up. Best evaluable response was partial response (PR in 45% and stable disease (SD in 18%. Twelve patients (24% received local RT. Thirteen patients (25% received 2nd line CT at progression. At a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 1–20, 25 (49% patients died and 35 patients (69% progressed. Median overall survival (OS was 11 ± 2 months (95% CI; 6 to 16, 1-year OS ratio was 44%. Median time to progression (TTP was 6 ± 1 months (95% CI; 4 to 8, 1-year progression free survival (PFS ratio was 20%. We observed following grade 3 toxicities: asthenia (10%, neuropathy (4%, anorexia (4%, anemia (4%, hypersensitivity to P (2%, nausea/vomiting (2%, diarrhea (2% and neutropenia (2%. Two patients (4% died of febrile neutropenia. Doses of CT were reduced or delayed in 12 patients (24%. Conclusions P on day 1 and 8 and C every three weeks is practical and fairly

  14. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  15. Colorectal cancer stages transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyao Huo

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression differences in different stages of CRC. Gene expression data on 433 CRC patient samples were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Gene expression differences were evaluated across CRC stages using linear regression. Genes with p≤0.001 in expression differences were evaluated further in principal component analysis and genes with p≤0.0001 were evaluated further in gene set enrichment analysis. A total of 377 patients with gene expression data in 20,532 genes were included in the final analysis. The numbers of patients in stage I through IV were 59, 147, 116 and 55, respectively. NEK4 gene, which encodes for NIMA related kinase 4, was differentially expressed across the four stages of CRC. The stage I patients had the highest expression of NEK4 genes, while the stage IV patients had the lowest expressions (p = 9*10-6. Ten other genes (RNF34, HIST3H2BB, NUDT6, LRCh4, GLB1L, HIST2H4A, TMEM79, AMIGO2, C20orf135 and SPSB3 had p value of 0.0001 in the differential expression analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that the patients from the 4 clinical stages do not appear to have distinct gene expression pattern. Network-based and pathway-based gene set enrichment analyses showed that these 11 genes map to multiple pathways such as meiotic synapsis and packaging of telomere ends, etc. Ten of these 11 genes were linked to Gene Ontology terms such as nucleosome, DNA packaging complex and protein-DNA interactions. The protein complex-based gene set analysis showed that four genes were involved in H2AX complex II. This study identified a small number of genes that might be associated with clinical stages of CRC. Our analysis was not able to find a molecular basis for the current clinical staging for CRC based on the gene expression patterns.

  16. Mindfulness significantly reduces self-reported levels of anxiety and depression: results of a randomised controlled trial among 336 Danish women treated for stage I-III breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtzen, Hanne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Elsass, Peter; Sumbundu, Antonia D; Steding-Jensen, Marianne; Karlsen, Randi Valbjørn; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Flyger, Henrik L; Pedersen, Anne E; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-04-01

    As the incidence of and survival from breast cancer continue to raise, interventions to reduce anxiety and depression before, during and after treatment are needed. Previous studies have reported positive effects of a structured 8-week group mindfulness-based stress reduction program (MBSR) among patients with cancer and other conditions. To test the effect of such a programme on anxiety and depression among women with breast cancer in a population-based randomised controlled study. A total of 336 women who had been operated on for breast cancer (stage I-III) were randomised to usual care or MBSR+usual care. Questionnaires including the Symptom Checklist-90r anxiety and depression subscales and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale were administered before randomisation and immediately, 6 and 12 months after the intervention. Intention-to-treat analyses showed differences between groups in levels of anxiety (p=0.0002) and depression (SCL-90r, p<0.0001; CES-D, p=0.0367) after 12 months. Graphical comparisons of participants with higher levels of anxiety and depression at baseline showed a significantly greater decrease in the intervention group throughout follow-up and no differences among least affected participants. Medium-to-large effects were found for all outcomes in the intervention group in analyses of change scores after 12 months' follow-up. The 8-week group based MBSR intervention had clinically meaningful, statistically significant effects on depression and anxiety after 12 months' follow-up, and medium-to-large effect sizes. Our findings support the dissemination of MBSR among women with breast cancer. (Clintrials.gov No.: NCT00990977). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prognostic Effect of BRAF and KRAS Mutations in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer Treated With Leucovorin, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Post Hoc Analysis of the PETACC-8 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Julien; Zaanan, Aziz; Le Malicot, Karine; Julié, Catherine; Blons, Hélène; Mineur, Laurent; Bennouna, Jaafar; Tabernero, Josep; Mini, Enrico; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Laethem, Jean Luc; Lepage, Come; Emile, Jean-François; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2016-01-14

    The prognostic value of BRAF and KRAS mutations in patients who have undergone resection for colon cancer and have been treated with combination leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX)-based adjuvant chemotherapy is controversial, possibly owing to a lack of stratification on mismatch repair status. To examine the prognostic effect of BRAF and KRAS mutations in patients with stage III colon cancer treated with adjuvant FOLFOX with or without cetuximab. This study included patients with available tumor blocks of resected stage III colon adenocarcinoma who participated between December 2005 and November 2009 in the PETACC-8 phase III randomized trial.Mismatch repair, BRAF V600E, and KRAS exon 2 mutational status were determined on prospectively collected tumor blocks from 2559 patients enrolled in the PETACC-8 trial. The data were analyzed in April 2015. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 6 months of FOLFOX4 or FOLFOX4 plus cetuximab after surgical resection for stage III colon cancer. Associations between these biomarkers and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed with Cox proportional hazards models. Multivariate models were adjusted for covariates (age, sex, tumor grade, T/N stage, tumor location, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status). Among the 2559 patients enrolled in the PETACC-8 trial (42.9% female; median [range] age, 60.0 [19.0-75.0] years), microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype, KRAS, and BRAF V600E mutations were detected in, respectively, 9.9% (177 of 1791), 33.1% (588 of 1776), and 9.0% (148 of 1643) of cases. In multivariate analysis, MSI (hazard ratio [HR] for DFS: 1.10 [95% CI, 0.73-1.64], P = .67; HR for OS: 1.02 [95% CI, 0.61-1.69], P = .94) and BRAF V600E mutation (HR for DFS: 1.22 [95% CI, 0.81-1.85], P = .34; HR for OS: 1.13 [95% CI, 0.64-2.00], P = .66) were not prognostic, whereas KRAS mutation was significantly associated with shorter DFS (HR, 1.55 [95% CI

  18. A Phase 2 Trial of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results and Reflections Following Early Closure of a Single-Institution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Pham, Dat; Cury, James D.; Bajwa, Abubakr [Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); D' Agostino, Harry [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McCook, Barry [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Nichols, Romaine C. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has been shown to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) and could be used to safely escalate the radiation dose. We analyzed outcomes in a group of phase 2 study patients treated with dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From 2009 through 2013, LU02, a phase 2 trial of proton therapy delivering 74 to 80 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 NSCLC, was opened to accrual at our institution. Due to slow accrual and competing trials, the study was closed after just 14 patients (stage IIIA, 9 patients; stage IIIB, 5 patients) were accrued over 4 years. During that same time period, 55 additional stage III patients were treated with high-dose proton therapy, including 7 in multi-institutional proton clinical trials, 4 not enrolled due to physician preference, and 44 who were ineligible based on strict entry criteria. An unknown number of patients were ineligible for enrollment due to insurance coverage issues and thus were treated with photon radiation. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 52 months. Results: Two-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 57% and 25%, respectively. Median lengths of overall survival and progression-free survival were 33 months and 14 months, respectively. There were no acute grade 3 toxicities related to proton therapy. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and pulmonary toxicity each occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy was well tolerated with encouraging results among a small cohort of patients. Unfortunately, single-institution proton studies may be difficult to accrue and consideration for pragmatic and/or multicenter trial design should be considered when developing future proton clinical trials.

  19. MRE11-deficiency associated with improved long-term disease free survival and overall survival in a subset of stage III colon cancer patients in randomized CALGB 89803 trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pavelitz

    Full Text Available Colon cancers deficient in mismatch repair (MMR may exhibit diminished expression of the DNA repair gene, MRE11, as a consequence of contraction of a T11 mononucleotide tract. This study investigated MRE11 status and its association with prognosis, survival and drug response in patients with stage III colon cancer.Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 (Alliance randomly assigned 1,264 patients with stage III colon cancer to postoperative weekly adjuvant bolus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FU/LV or irinotecan+FU/LV (IFL, with 8 year follow-up. Tumors from these patients were analyzed to determine stability of a T11 tract in the MRE11 gene. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS, and a secondary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS. Non-proportional hazards were addressed using time-dependent covariates in Cox analyses.Of 625 tumor cases examined, 70 (11.2% exhibited contraction at the T11 tract in one or both MRE11 alleles and were thus predicted to be deficient in MRE11 (dMRE11. In pooled treatment analyses, dMRE11 patients showed initially reduced DFS and OS but improved long-term DFS and OS compared with patients with an intact MRE11 T11 tract. In the subgroup of dMRE11 patients treated with IFL, an unexplained early increase in mortality but better long-term DFS than IFL-treated pMRE11 patients was observed.Analysis of this relatively small number of patients and events showed that the dMRE11 marker predicts better prognosis independent of treatment in the long-term. In subgroup analyses, dMRE11 patients treated with irinotecan exhibited unexplained short-term mortality. MRE11 status is readily assayed and may therefore prove to be a useful prognostic marker, provided that the results reported here for a relatively small number of patients can be generalized in independent analyses of larger numbers of samples.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00003835.

  20. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok, E-mail: cosuh317@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  1. Impact of Lymph Node Ratio on Oncologic Outcomes in ypStage III Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Total Mesorectal Excision, and Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Taeryool; Song, Changhoon; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Kim, Tae-You

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic impact of the lymph node ratio (LNR) in ypStage III rectal cancer patients who were treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). We retrospectively reviewed the data of 638 consecutive patients who underwent NCRT followed by total mesorectal excision, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer from 2004 to 2011. Of these, 125 patients were positive for lymph node (LN) metastasis and were analyzed in this study. The median numbers of examined and metastatic LNs were 17 and 2, respectively, and the median LNR was 0.143 (range, 0.02-1). Median follow-up time was 55 months. In multivariate analyses, LNR was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 2.17, p = 0.041), disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 2.28, p = 0.005), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (HR 2.30, p = 0.010). When ypN1 patients were divided into low (low LNR ypN1 group) and high LNR (high LNR ypN1 group) according to a cut-off value of 0.152, the high LNR ypN1 group had poorer OS (p = 0.043) and DFS (p = 0.056) compared with the low LNR ypN1 group. And there were no differences between the high LNR ypN1 group and the ypN2 group in terms of the OS (p = 0.703) and DFS (p = 0.831). For ypN-positive rectal cancer patients, the LNR was a more effective prognostic marker than the ypN stage, circumferential resection margin, or tumor regression grade after NCRT, and could be used to discern the high-risk group among ypN1 patients.

  2. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  3. Stage-specific cancer incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chefo, Solomon; Tsodikov, Alex

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Early detection of prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen test led to a sharp spike in the incidence of the disease accompanied by an equally sharp improvement in patient prognoses as evaluated at the point of advanced diagnosis. Observed outcomes represent age at diagnosis and stage, a categorical prognostic variable combining the actual stage and the grade of tumor. The picture is summarized by the stage-specific cancer incidence that represents a joint survival-multinomial response regressed on factors affecting the unobserved history of the disease before diagnosis (mixture). Fitting the complex joint mixed model to large population data is a challenge. We develop a stable and structured MLE approach to the problem allowing for the estimates to be obtained iteratively. Factorization of the likelihood achieved by our method allows us to work with only a fraction of the model dimension at a time. The approach is based on generalized self-consistency and the quasi-EM algorithm used to handle the mixed multinomial part of the response through Poisson likelihood. The model provides a causal link between the screening policy in the population and the stage-specific incidence. PMID:19452568

  4. Phase III study comparing cisplatin plus gemcitabine with cisplatin plus pemetrexed in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, G.V.; Parikh, P.; Pawel, J. von

    2008-01-01

    , in patients with squamous cell histology, there was a significant improvement in survival with cisplatin/ gemcitabine versus cisplatin/pemetrexed (n = 473; 10.8 v 9.4 months, respectively). For cisplatin/pemetrexed, rates of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia (P .../gemcitabine. This is the first prospective phase III study in NSCLC to show survival differences based on histologic type Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7/20...

  5. The effect of radical treatment and rehabilitation on muscle mass and strength: a randomized trial in stages I-III lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, B; Huysse, W; Van Maele, G; Surmont, V F; Derom, E; van Meerbeeck, J P

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of an oncological treatment on muscle mass and strength in patients with lung cancer and the impact of a subsequent rehabilitation program. This study investigates the effect of radical treatment and post-treatment pulmonary rehabilitation on muscle mass and strength in patients with lung cancer and the relationship between muscle mass and strength. Lung cancer patients, candidate for radical treatment, were randomly (2:1) allocated after radical treatment to either standard follow up (CON) or a 12-week rehabilitation training program (RT). Muscle mass was estimated by bioelectric impedance and CT-scan. Muscle strength was estimated by measuring quadriceps force (QF) with a hand held dynamometer. All variables were measured before (M1) and after radical treatment (M2), and at the earliest 12 weeks after randomization (M3). Data are presented as means with standard deviation. 45 lung cancer patients (age: 65 years (9)) participated in the study. At M2, both muscle cross sectional area (MCSA) and QF were significantly decreased (pMuscle mass and strength: (1) are decreased at presentation in a substantial part of lung cancer patients; (2) are significantly negatively affected by radical treatment and (3) completely recover after a 12 week structured rehabilitation program, whereas a further decline was observed in CON-patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Practicability of a Novel Prognostic Index (PI) Model and Comparison with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) in Stage I-III Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jiahuai; Ye, Feng; Li, Shuaijie; Huang, Xiaojia; Yang, Lu; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated the prognostic value of various laboratory parameters in cancer patients. This study was to establish a prognostic index (PI) model for breast cancer patients based on the potential prognostic factors. A retrospective study of 1661 breast cancer patients who underwent surgical treatment between January 2002 and December 2008 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center was conducted. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression model) was performed to determine the independent prognostic factors and a prognostic index (PI) model was devised based on these factors. Survival analyses were used to estimate the prognostic value of PI, and the discriminatory ability of PI was compared with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) by evaluating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC). The mean survival time of all participants was 123.6 months. The preoperative globulin >30.0g/L, triglyceride >1.10mmol/L and fibrinogen >2.83g/L were identified as risk factors for shorter cancer-specific survival. The novel prognostic index model was established and enrolled patients were classified as low- (1168 patients, 70.3%), moderate- (410 patients, 24.7%) and high-risk groups (83 patients, 5.0%), respectively. Compared with the low-risk group, higher risks of poor clinical outcome were indicated in the moderate-risk group [Hazard ratio (HR): 1.513, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.169-1.959, p = 0.002] and high-risk group (HR: 2.481, 95%CI: 1.653-3.724, p< 0.001). The prognostic index based on three laboratory parameters was a novel and practicable prognostic tool. It may serve as complement to help predict postoperative survival in breast cancer patients.

  7. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Ikuo, E-mail: isekine@ncc.go.jp [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito, E-mail: hhorinou@ncc.go.jp [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Furuta, Koh [Department of Clinical Laboratories, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuta, Koji [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC.

  9. Is elective nodal irradiation beneficial in patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery for clinical stage II-III breast cancer? A multicentre retrospective study (KROG 12-05).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J M; Park, W; Suh, C-O; Keum, K C; Kim, Y B; Shin, K H; Kim, K; Chie, E K; Ha, S W; Kim, S S; Ahn, S D; Shin, H S; Kim, J H; Lee, H-S; Lee, N K; Huh, S J; Choi, D H

    2014-03-18

    To evaluate the effects of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes (LNs) (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively analysed 260 patients with ypN0 who received NAC followed by BCS and RT. Elective nodal irradiation was delivered to 136 (52.3%) patients. The effects of ENI on survival outcomes were evaluated. After a median follow-up period of 66.2 months (range, 15.6-127.4 months), 26 patients (10.0%) developed disease recurrence. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients were 95.5% and 90.5%, respectively. Pathologic T classification (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) and the number of LNs sampled (ENI. Elective nodal irradiation also did not affect survival outcomes in any of the subgroups according to pathologic T classification or the number of LNs sampled. ENI may be omitted in patients with ypN0 breast cancer after NAC and BCS. But until the results of the randomised trials are available, patients should be put on these trials.

  10. Is elective nodal irradiation beneficial in patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery for clinical stage II–III breast cancer? A multicentre retrospective study (KROG 12-05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J M; Park, W; Suh, C-O; Keum, K C; Kim, Y B; Shin, K H; Kim, K; Chie, E K; Ha, S W; Kim, S S; Ahn, S D; Shin, H S; Kim, J H; Lee, H-S; Lee, N K; Huh, S J; Choi, D H

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effects of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in clinical stage II–III breast cancer patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes (LNs) (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT). Methods: We retrospectively analysed 260 patients with ypN0 who received NAC followed by BCS and RT. Elective nodal irradiation was delivered to 136 (52.3%) patients. The effects of ENI on survival outcomes were evaluated. Results: After a median follow-up period of 66.2 months (range, 15.6–127.4 months), 26 patients (10.0%) developed disease recurrence. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients were 95.5% and 90.5%, respectively. Pathologic T classification (0−is vs 1 vs 2–4) and the number of LNs sampled (ENI. Elective nodal irradiation also did not affect survival outcomes in any of the subgroups according to pathologic T classification or the number of LNs sampled. Conclusions: ENI may be omitted in patients with ypN0 breast cancer after NAC and BCS. But until the results of the randomised trials are available, patients should be put on these trials. PMID:24481403

  11. Molecular staging in stage II and III melanoma patients and its effect on long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Christiane; Kron, Martina; Rademaker, Juergen; Schwürzer-Voit, Markus; Sterry, Wolfram; Weber, Lutz; Ozdemir, Cueneyt; Proebstle, Thomas; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2005-02-20

    To assess the prognostic value of serial reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) -based measurements of tyrosinase mRNA in peripheral blood of stage II and III melanoma patients. During routine follow-up of American Joint Committee on Cancer stage II and III melanoma patients, serial testing for tyrosinase transcripts in peripheral blood was performed by RT-PCR. The PCR results were compared with the clinical data collected during the follow-up. Over a period of 3 years, 111 patients (78 stage II and 33 stage III patients) were enrolled, and tyrosinase determinations were carried out. The 6-year disease-specific survival probability was 97% for patients always showing negative RT-PCR results and 67% for patients who tested positive at least once. In a Cox proportional hazards model, the prognostic value of sex, age, site of primary tumor, histologic subtype, stage, Breslow's tumor thickness, Clark level, and the time-dependent variable PCR result was assessed. Patients with a positive RT-PCR test had a distinctly higher risk of dying from melanoma, with a hazard ratio of 12.6 (95% CI, 3.4 to 46.3; P melanoma as the detection of micrometastatic disease in the sentinel lymph node. Whether a combination of these two factors leads to a better definition of the prognosis of melanoma patients is under investigation in current studies.

  12. Evaluation of a Hanging-Breast PET System for Primary Tumor Visualization in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer: Comparison With Standard PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Suzana C; Rebolleda, José Ferrér; Koolen, Bas B; Wesseling, Jelle; Jurado, Raúl Sánchez; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Del Puig Cózar Santiago, María; van der Noort, Vincent; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the performance of a mammography with molecular imaging PET (MAMMI-PET) system for breast imaging in the hanging-breast position for the visualization of primary breast cancer lesions and to compare this method with whole-body PET/CT. Between March 2011 and March 2014, a prospective evaluation included women with one or more histologically confirmed primary breast cancer lesions (index lesions). After injection of 180-240 MBq of (18)F-FDG, whole-body PET/CT and MAMMI-PET acquisitions were performed, index lesions were scored 0, 1, or 2 for FDG uptake relative to background. Detection and FDG uptake were compared by breast length, maximal tumor diameter, affected breast quadrants, tumor grade, and histologic and immunologic sub-types. Finally, the two PET modalities were compared for detection of index lesions. For 234 index lesions (diameter, 5-170 mm), the overall sensitivity was 88.9% for MAMMI-PET and 91% for PET/CT (p = 0.61). Twenty-three (9.8%) index lesions located too close to the pectoral muscle were missed with MAMMI-PET, and 20 index lesions were missed with PET/CT. Lesion visibility on MAMMI-PET images was influenced by tumor grade (p = 0.034) but not by cancer subtype (p = 0.65). Although in an overall evaluation MAMMI-PET was not superior to PET/CT, MAMMI-PET does have higher sensitivity for primary breast cancer lesions within the scanning range of the device. Optimization of the positioning device may increase visualization of the most dorsal lesions.

  13. Stages of Salivary Gland Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head and Neck Cancer Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Health Professional Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ...

  14. Comparison of Concurrent Use of Thoracic Radiation With Either Carboplatin-Paclitaxel or Cisplatin-Etoposide for Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Conor E; Behera, Madhusmita; Ernani, Vinicius; Higgins, Kristin A; Saba, Nabil F; Shin, Dong M; Pakkala, Suchita; Pillai, Rathi N; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Curran, Walter J; Belani, Chandra P; Khuri, Fadlo R; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2017-08-01

    The 2 most common chemotherapy regimens used concurrently with thoracic radiation for patients with unresectable IIIA and IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are carboplatin-paclitaxel and cisplatin-etoposide. There are no prospective comparisons of these 2 regimens in this setting. To conduct a systematic review of published trials to compare outcomes and toxic effects between cisplatin-etoposide and carboplatin-paclitaxel in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer receiving thoracic radiation. Studies that enrolled patients with stage III disease receiving radiotherapy (RT) with carboplatin-paclitaxel or cisplatin-etoposide were identified using electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane library) and meeting abstracts. Trials were excluded if they were phase 1, enrolled less than 10 patients, or included surgical resection. A systematic analysis of extracted data was performed with software using random and fixed effect models. Clinical outcomes were compared using point estimates for weighted values of median overall survival, progression-free survival, response rate, and toxic effects. A 2-tailed t test with a significance level of .05 was used for all comparisons. Overall, 3090 patients were included from 31 studies in the cisplatin-etoposide groups (median age, 61 years; 65% male; 40% squamous histology; median radiation dose, 63.0 Gy), and 3728 patients from 48 studies in carboplatin-paclitaxel groups (median age, 63 years; 65% male; 40% squamous histology; median radiation dose, 64.6 Gy). There was no significant difference in response rates between cisplatin-etoposide and carboplatin-paclitaxel (58% vs 56%; P = .26), respectively. For cisplatin-etoposide vs carboplatin-paclitaxel, there was no significant difference in median progression free survival (12 months vs 9.3 months; P = .20), overall survival (19.6 months vs 18.4 months; P = .40), or 3-year survival rate (31% vs 25%; P = .50). Cisplatin-etoposide was associated with

  15. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  16. Talimogene Laherparepvec and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7

  17. Adding Erlotinib to Chemoradiation Improves Overall Survival but Not Progression-Free Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blumenschein, George R. [Department of Thoracic Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tang, Ximing [Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, J. Jack [Department of Biostatatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wistuba, Ignacio I. [Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Diane D. [Department of Biostatatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hong, Waun Ki [Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To test, in a single-arm, prospective, phase 2 trial, whether adding the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib to concurrent chemoradiotherapy for previously untreated, locally advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer would improve survival and disease control without increasing toxicity. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer received intensity modulated radiation therapy (63 Gy/35 fractions) on Monday through Friday, with chemotherapy (paclitaxel 45 mg/m², carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] = 2) on Mondays, for 7 weeks. All patients also received the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg orally 1/d) on Tuesday-Sunday for 7 weeks, followed by consolidation paclitaxel–carboplatin. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), toxicity, response, and disease control and whether any endpoint differed by EGFR mutation status. Results: Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 40 were former or never-smokers, and 41 were evaluable for EGFR mutations (37 wild-type [WT] and 4 mutated [all adenocarcinoma]). Median time to progression was 14.0 months and did not differ by EGFR status. Toxicity was acceptable (no grade 5, 1 grade 4, 11 grade 3). Twelve patients (26%) had complete responses (10 WT, 2 mutated), 27 (59%) partial (21 WT, 2 mutated, 4 unknown), and 7 (15%) none (6 WT, 2 mutated, 1 unknown) (P=.610). At 37.0 months' follow-up (range, 3.6-76.5 months) for all patients, median OS time was 36.5 months, and 1-, 2-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 67.4%, and 35.9%, respectively; none differed by mutation status. Twelve patients had no progression, and 34 had local and/or distant failure. Eleven of 27 distant failures were in the brain (7 WT, 3 mutated, 1 unknown). Conclusions: Toxicity and OS were promising, but time to progression did not meet expectations. The prevalence of

  18. Intermittent hemodialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Melchert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD is a form of renal replacement that is used in veterinary medicine for cases involving drug removal, electrolyte imbalance, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the present study was to verify the efficacy of IHD in dogs with CKD staged at grade III and to evaluate the effect of IHD on quality of life. Twelve dogs with CKD at stage III met the inclusion criteria and were divided equally into two groups. The control group (n=6 received only clinical treatment and intravenous fluid therapy, and the hemodialysis group (n=6 received clinical and IHD treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after treatments in both groups. We evaluated complications and clinical parameters of IHD every 30 minutes. Hemodialysis decreased serum urea, creatinine, and phosphorus. Despite the evident removal of nitrogen compounds, dialysis treatment did not increase survival time in these patients. The results of this study do not support the early use of dialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III.

  19. Phase II Study of Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel Plus Cisplatin and Intravenous Paclitaxel Plus Bevacizumab As Adjuvant Treatment of Optimal Stage II/III Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konner, Jason A.; Grabon, Diana M.; Gerst, Scott R.; Iasonos, Alexia; Thaler, Howard; Pezzulli, Sandra D.; Sabbatini, Paul J.; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine M.; Tew, William P.; Hensley, Martee L.; Spriggs, David R.; Aghajanian, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intraperitoneal (IP) cisplatin and intravenous (IV) or IP paclitaxel constitute a standard therapy for optimally debulked ovarian cancer. Bevacizumab prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) when included in first-line IV chemotherapy. In this study, the safety and feasibility of adding bevacizumab to a first-line IP regimen were assessed. Patients and Methods Treatment was as follows: paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 IV over 3 hours day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 IP day 2, and paclitaxel 60 mg/m2 IP day 8. Bevacizumab 15 mg/kg IV was given after paclitaxel on day 1 beginning in cycle 2. After six cycles of chemotherapy, bevacizumab was given every 3 weeks for 17 additional treatments. The primary end point was safety and tolerability determined by whether 60% of patients completed six cycles of IV/IP chemotherapy. Results Of 41 treated patients, 30 (73%) received six cycles of IV/IP chemotherapy and 35 (85%) received at least four cycles. Three (27%) of those who discontinued chemotherapy did so because of complications related to bevacizumab (hypertension, n = 2; perforation, n = 1). Grades 3 to 4 toxicities included neutropenia (34%), vasovagal syncope (10%), hypertension (7%), nausea/vomiting (7%), hypomagnesemia (7%), and abdominal pain (7%). There were three grade 3 small bowel obstructions (7%) during cycles 3, 9, and 15. One patient died following rectosigmoid anastomotic dehiscence during cycle 4. Estimated median PFS is 28.6 months (95% CI, 19.1 to 38.9 months). Three patients (7%) had IP port malfunction. Conclusion The addition of bevacizumab to this IP regimen is feasible; however, bevacizumab may increase the risk of bowel obstruction/perforation. The observed median PFS is similar to that seen with IP/IV chemotherapy alone. PMID:22067389

  20. Phase III trial assessing bevacizumab in stages II and III carcinoma of the colon: results of NSABP protocol C-08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Carmen J; Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J; Sharif, Saima; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Colangelo, Linda H; Atkins, James N; Seay, Thomas E; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Goldberg, Richard M; O'Reilly, Seamus; Chu, Luis; Azar, Catherine A; Lopa, Samia; Wolmark, Norman

    2011-01-01

    The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-08 trial was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of adding bevacizumab to modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6; ie, infusional/bolus fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) for the adjuvant treatment of patients with stages II to III colon cancer. Patients received mFOLFOX6 every 2 weeks for 26 weeks alone or modified as FOLFOX6 + bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 52 weeks [ie, experimental group]). The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). Among 2,672 analyzed patients, demographic factors were well balanced by treatment. With a median follow-up of 35.6 months, the addition of bevacizumab to mFOLFOX6 did not result in an overall significant increase in DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.04; P = .15). The point estimates for 3-year DFS for the overall population were 77.4% and 75.5% for the experimental and control arms, respectively. For patients with stages II and III diseases, these same estimates were 87.4% and 84.7%, respectively, for stage II and 74.2% and 72.4%, respectively, for stage III. Exploratory analyses found that the effect of bevacizumab on DFS was different before and after a 15-month landmark (time-by-treatment interaction P value < .0001). Bevacizumab had a strong effect before the landmark (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.78; P < .001) but no significant effect after (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.52; P = .076). Bevacizumab for 1 year with mFOLFOX6 does not significantly prolong DFS in stages II and III colon cancer. However, a significant but transient effect during bevacizumab exposure was observed in the experimental arm. We postulate that this observation reflects a biologic effect during bevacizumab exposure. Given the lack of improvement in DFS, the use of bevacizumab cannot be recommended for use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with colon cancer.

  1. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  2. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David; Martineau, Antoine; Merlet, Pascal [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM, UMR 1101 LaTIM, Brest (France); Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [Miletrie Hospital, DACTIM, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Poitiers (France); Espie, Marc [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Roquancourt, Anne de [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and {sup 18}F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}. Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUV{sub max} values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUV{sub max} and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean} and TLG significantly differed among the three

  3. Comparison of the impact on life quality of boosts in iodine-125 and high rate iridium-192 curie-therapy associated with a conformational radiotherapy in prostate cancers of stage II or III according to Amico; Comparaison de l'impact sur la qualite de vie des boosts par curietherapie par iode-125 et par iridium-192 de haut debit associee a une radiotherapie conformationnelle dans les cancers de la prostate de stade II ou III selon d'Amico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerif, S.; Chung, C.; Lavigne, B.; Boissonnade, O.; Lavigne, B.; Godon, J.B.; Bolan, G.; Fontaine, G.; Bensadoun, R.J. [Pole regional de cancerologie, Poitiers (France)

    2011-10-15

    As there is no consensus about the curie-therapy boost modality to be chosen in the case of prostate cancers of stage II or III according to Amico, and as two modalities are available (iodine-125 curie-therapy, and high dose rate curie-therapy), the authors report a comparison between these two modalities in terms of impact on life quality during the first year. They indicate the treatment procedures and discuss the results obtained in terms of urinary toxicity, an the influence of dose escalation. Life quality has also been assessed by questionnaires. Short communication

  4. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage 0-IIB Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-05

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  5. Quality assurance of EORTC trial 22922/10925 investigating the role of internal mammary--medial supraclavicular irradiation in stage I-III breast cancer: the individual case review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortmans, P.; Kouloulias, V. E.; Venselaar, J. L.; Struikmans, H.; Davis, J. B.; Huyskens, D.; van Tienhoven, G.; Hurkmans, C.; Mijnheer, B.; van den Bogaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    To assess consistency among participants in an European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III trial randomising between irradiation and no irradiation of the internal mammary and medial supraclavicular (IM-MS) lymph nodes, all participating institutes were invited to

  6. Oncological outcomes from trimodality therapy receiving definitive doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (≥60 Gy and factors influencing consideration for surgery in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A.L. Vyfhuis, MD PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Trimodality treatment significantly improves survival and FFR in patients with LA-NSCLC when definitive doses of radiation with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are employed. We identified important demographic features that predict the use of surgical intervention in patients with stage III NSCLC.

  7. Neoadjuvant FOLFOX 4 versus FOLFOX 4 with Cetuximab versus immediate surgery for high-risk stage II and III colon cancers: a multicentre randomised controlled phase II trial--the PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Rullier, Anne; Luciani, Alain; Bonnetain, Franck; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Sarran, Antony; Monges, Geneviève; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Malicot, Karine; Leroy, Karen; Sobhani, Iradj; Bardier, Armelle; Moreau, Marie; Brindel, Isabelle; Seitz, Jean François; Taieb, Julien

    2015-07-10

    In patients with high risk stage II and stage III colon cancer (CC), curative surgery followed by adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy has become the standard of care. However, for 20 to 30% of these patients, the current curative treatment strategy of surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy fails either to clear locoregional spread or to eradicate distant micrometastases, leading to disease recurrence. Preoperative chemotherapy is an attractive concept for these CCs and has the potential to impact upon both of these causes of failure. Optimum systemic therapy at the earliest possible opportunity may be more effective at eradicating distant metastases than the same treatment given after the delay and immunological stress of surgery. Added to this, shrinking the primary tumor before surgery may reduce the risk of incomplete surgical excision, and the risk of tumor cell shedding during surgery. PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE is a multicenter randomized phase II trial designed to evaluate efficacy and feasibility of two chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX-4 alone and FOLFOX-4 + Cetuximab) in a peri-operative strategy in patients with bulky CCs. Patients with CC deemed as high risk T3, T4 and/or N2 on initial abdominopelvic CT scan are randomized to either colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy (control arm), or 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX-4 (for RAS mutated patients). In RAS wild-type patients a third arm testing FOLFOX+ cetuximab has been added prior to colectomy. Patients in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms will receive postoperative treatment for 4 months (8 cycles) to complete their therapeutic schedule. The primary endpoint of the study is the histological Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) as defined by Ryan. The secondary endpoints are: treatment strategy safety (toxicity, primary tumor related complications under chemotherapy, peri-operative morbidity), disease-free and recurrence free survivals at 3 years, quality of life, carcinologic quality and

  8. Long-term survival results of surgery alone versus surgery plus 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for stage II and stage III colon cancer: pooled analysis of NSABP C-01 through C-05. A baseline from which to compare modern adjuvant trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Neal W; Yothers, Greg; Lopa, Samia; Costantino, Joseph P; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct a pooled analysis of National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) colon trials involving surgery and surgery plus 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5-FU/LV) to compare survival and establish a baseline from which to evaluate future studies. All patients enrolled in NSABP adjuvant trials C-01 through C-05 with stage II and III disease who were treated with surgery or with surgery plus 5-FU/LV were examined for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and recurrence-free interval (RFI). Time-to-event by treatment group was examined using adjusted Kaplan-Meier estimates and multivariable Cox regression analysis. There were 2,966 eligible patients: 693 (23%) surgery and 2,273 (77%) surgery plus 5-FU/LV; 1,255 (42%) stage II and 1,711 (58%) stage III. Age > or =60 years [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36, P < 0.0001], male gender (HR = 1.20, P = 0.0012), and more nodes positive or fewer nodes examined (P < 0.0001) were associated with worse survival. At 5 years, the adjusted OS was 0.62 [confidence interval (CI) = 0.60-0.63] in the surgery group and 0.76 (CI = 0.74-0.78) in the surgery plus 5-FU/LV group. Treatment with 5-FU/LV was associated with improved outcome compared with surgery: OS (HR = 0.62, P < 0.0001), DFS (HR = 0.66, P < 0.0001) and RFI (HR = 0.64, P < 0.0001). Improved OS with adjuvant treatment was seen in both stage II (HR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.48-0.71) and stage III disease (HR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.55-0.75). This analysis demonstrates that treatment of colon cancer patients with 5-FU/LV following surgery provides benefit over surgery alone and can provide anticipated survival outcomes with which to compare modern adjuvant trials.

  9. Transesophageal ultrasonography for lung cancer staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  10. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  11. Genetic Analysis-Guided Dosing of FOLFIRABRAX in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Cholangiocarcinoma; Gallbladder Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Gastrointestinal Neoplasm; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ampulla of Vater Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ampulla of Vater Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Perioperative BRAF inhibitors in locally advanced stage III melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Douglas; Markel, Gal; Shapira-Frommer, Roni; Ben-Betzalel, Guy; Goitein, David; Ben-Ami, Eytan; Nissan, Aviram; Schachter, Jacob; Schneebaum, Schlomo

    2017-12-01

    Stage III malignant melanoma is a heterogeneous disease where those cases deemed marginally resectable or irresecatble are frequently incurable by surgery alone. Targeted therapy takes advantage of the high incidence of BRAF mutations in melanomas, most notably the V600E mutation. These agents have rarely been used in a neoadjuvant setting prior to surgery. Thirteen consecutive patients with confirmed BRAFV600E regionally advanced melanoma deemed marginally resectable or irrresectable, were treated with BRAF inhibiting agents, prior to undergoing surgery. The primary outcome measures were a successful resection and pathological response. Disease-free survival was a secondary outcome measure. Overall, 12/13 patients showed a marked clinical responsiveness to medical treatment, enabling a macroscopically successful resection in all cases. Four patients had a complete pathological response with no viable tumor evident in the resected specimens and eight patients showed evidence of minimally residual tumor with extensive tumoral necrosis and fibrosis. One patient progressed and died before surgery. At a median follow up of 20 months, 10 patients remain free of disease. Perioperative treatment with BRAF inhibiting agents in BRAFV600E mutated Stage III melanoma patients facilitates surgical resection and affords satisfactory disease free survival. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  14. Prospective Cohort Study Depending on the Use of Palliative Care for Advanced Stage of Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Liver Cancer; Malignant Hematologic Neoplasm; Biliary Cancer Metastatic; Pediatric Leukemia; Pediatric Lymphoma; Pediatric Brain Tumor; Pediatric Solid Tumor

  15. Upgrading a Stage III A engine for Stage IV; Ertuechtigung eines Stufe-III-A-Motors fuer Stufe IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrewe, Klaus; Lamotte, Dominik; Zirka, Ingo [HJS Emission Technology GmbH und Co. KG, Menden (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    In the field of construction and agricultural machinery proven simple technique is estimated especially in countries with lower development standards as in Central Europe. A 4.4 l, 65 to 95 kW diesel engine that is certified in line with Stage III A, equipped with a fully mechanical injection system and open loop-controlled exhaust-gas recirculation system has now been upgraded from HJS through a low-maintenance and fully autarkic exhaust aftertreatment system that complies with the Stage IV standard. The reduction of nitrogen oxides by selective catalytic reduction is carried out with a NO{sub x} reduction greater than 90 %. The particulate emissions are reduced by a maintenance-free bypass filter with a particle reduction rate exceeds by more than 60 %. (orig.)

  16. Melanoma staging: Evidence-based changes in the American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition cancer staging manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Scolyer, Richard A; Hess, Kenneth R; Sondak, Vernon K; Long, Georgina V; Ross, Merrick I; Lazar, Alexander J; Faries, Mark B; Kirkwood, John M; McArthur, Grant A; Haydu, Lauren E; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Flaherty, Keith T; Balch, Charles M; Thompson, John F

    2017-11-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE To update the melanoma staging system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) a large database was assembled comprising >46,000 patients from 10 centers worldwide with stages I, II, and III melanoma diagnosed since 1998. Based on analyses of this new database, the existing seventh edition AJCC stage IV database, and contemporary clinical trial data, the AJCC Melanoma Expert Panel introduced several important changes to the Tumor, Nodes, Metastasis (TNM) classification and stage grouping criteria. Key changes in the eighth edition AJCC Cancer Staging Manual include: 1) tumor thickness measurements to be recorded to the nearest 0.1 mm, not 0.01 mm; 2) definitions of T1a and T1b are revised (T1a, melanoma staging system will guide patient treatment, provide better prognostic estimates, and refine stratification of patients entering clinical trials. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:472-492. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. Prognosis of women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer and synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Machida, Hiroko; Frimer, Marina; Marcus, Jenna Z; Pejovic, Tanja; Roman, Lynda D; Wright, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    Synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancer with endometrioid histology at two cancer sites typically presents with early-stage disease and is thought to have a good prognosis. We examined the survival of women with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer who had synchronous early-stage endometrioid ovarian cancer. This is a retrospective case-control study examining the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result Program between 1973 and 2013. Survival of women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer with stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer (n=839) were compared to women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer without synchronous ovarian cancer (n=123,692) after propensity score matching. Women with synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer were more likely to be diagnosed recently, be younger, have stage IA disease, grade 1 tumors, to have undergone lymphadenectomy, and were less likely to receive radiotherapy compared to those without synchronous ovarian cancer (all, Pendometrial cancer-specific survival (10-year rates 96.0% versus 95.3%, P=0.97) or overall survival (85.6% versus 87.2%, P=0.10). Among tumors with concordant grades at the two cancer sites, survival was similar regardless of presence of synchronous ovarian tumors (grade 1 tumors, 10-year rate for overall survival, 88.2% versus 89.1%, P=0.40; and grade 2 tumors, 84.0% versus 85.8%, P=0.78). Women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer with synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer have a survival outcome similar to those with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer without synchronous ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Incorporating Tumor Characteristics to the American Joint Committee on Cancer Breast Cancer Staging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Clarke, Christina A; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y; Hunt, Kelly K; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-11-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) breast cancer staging system provides important prognostic information. The recently published eighth edition incorporates biological markers and recommends the use of a complex "prognostic stage." In this study, we assessed the relationship between stage, breast cancer subtype, grade, and outcome in a large population-based cohort and evaluated a risk score system incorporating tumor characteristic to the AJCC anatomic staging system. Patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer stage I-IV between 2005-2008 were identified in the California Cancer Registry. For patients with stage I-III disease, pathologic stage was recorded. For patients with stage IV disease, clinical stage was utilized. Five-year breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) rates were determined for each potential tumor size-node involvement-metastases (TNM) combination according to breast cancer subtype. A risk score point-based system using grade, estrogen receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status was designed to complement the anatomic AJCC staging system. Survival probabilities between groups were compared using log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models were used. Among 43,938 patients, we observed differences in 5-year BCSS and OS for each TNM combination according to breast cancer subtype. The most favorable outcomes were seen for hormone receptor-positive tumors followed closely by HER2-positive tumors, with the worst outcomes observed for triple negative breast cancer. Our risk score system separated patients into four risk groups within each stage category (all p  system incorporates biological factors into the AJCC anatomic staging system, providing accurate prognostic information. This study demonstrates that stage, but also breast cancer subtype and grade, define prognosis in a large population of breast cancer patients. It shows that a point-based risk score system that incorporates

  19. Mediastinal staging of lung cancer: novel concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tournoy, Kurt G.; Keller, Steven M.; Annema, Jouke T.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical TNM staging is the standard method used to decide treatment for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Although integrated fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET CT increases the accuracy of staging, it only guides direct tissue sampling. Histological assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes has

  20. Interactive Tailored Website to Promote Sun Protection and Skin Self-Check Behaviors in Patients With Stage 0-III Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage 0 Skin Melanoma; Stage I Skin Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage II Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma

  1. Stages of Childhood Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram . The picture can be printed to be looked at later. In childhood liver ... use this content on your website or other digital platform? Our syndication services page shows you how. National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US ... ...

  2. Efficacy of computed tomography features in predicting stage III thymic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yan; Ye, Jianding; Fang, Wentao; Zhang, Yu; Ye, Xiaodan; Ma, Yonghong; Chen, Libo; Li, Minghua

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the invasion of intrathoracic structures by stage III thymic tumors assists their appropriate management. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) features for the prediction of stage III thymoma invasion. The pre-operative CT images of 66 patients with confirmed stage III thymic tumors were reviewed retrospectively. The CT features of invasion into the mediastinal pleura, lungs, pericardium and great vessels were analyzed, and their ...

  3. Early diagnosis of early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Debeljak

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the detection of premalignant changes of bronchial mucosa and early stages of lung cancer frequent chest X-ray, spiral low dose computed tomography, fluorescence bronchoscopy, sputum cytology (also with automated systems with genetic and molecular changes in the sputum cells and bronchial mucosa were used. These screening methods of the high-risk groups for lung cancer achieved: earlier diagnosis of lung cancer in lower stage, higher operability, longer 5-year survival, but without mortality reduction.Conclusions: In the clinical practice we can examine higher risk groups for lung cancer in randomised control trials with multimodality approach: frequent chest low-dose fast spiral computed tomography, sputum cytology with genetic and molecular examinations and fluorescence bronchoscopy. Smoking cessation remains the best means to achieve mortality reduction from lung cancer.

  4. Prognostic and predictive value of YKL-40 in stage IIB-III melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Merete; Christensen, Ib; Bouwhuis, Marna

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the prognostic and predictive value of YKL-40 in stage IIB-III melanoma patients who were randomized to adjuvant interferon α-2b (IFN) or observation. Serum YKL-40 was determined postoperatively in patients from the Nordic IFN Trial (n=602), EORTC 18952 (n=246), and EORTC...... 18991 (n=386) (EORTC, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer). YKL-40 protein expression was determined in 300 tissue sections of primary melanoma or lymph node metastases from 204 Danish patients from the Nordic IFN Trial. Multivariate Cox analysis (including sex, age, stage......% CI 0.76-1.25; P=0.83; 2-years IFN: HR=1.06; 95% CI 0.83-1.34; P=0.64). During follow-up, increases in YKL-40 were significantly associated with shorter OS, but not with recurrence-free survival in univariate analysis. YKL-40 expression was stronger in tumor-associated macrophages than melanoma cells...

  5. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests.

  6. Clinical outcome and prognostic factors of patients with early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Li, Ning; Sun, Yangchun; Li, Bin; Xu, Lily; Wu, Lingying

    2017-04-04

    Some subsets of early stage ovarian cancer patients experience more recurrences than others. Studies on prognostics factors gave conflicting results. We investigated consecutive 221 patients with stage I/II ovarian cancer at our institution from 1999 to 2010. Univariate and multivariate analysis of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were performed. After a median follow-up of 79 months, the 5-year/10-year PFS and 5-year/10-year OS were 78% /76% and 90% /87% respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that stage as the most prominent independent prognostic factor in terms of PFS (stage I vs stage IIA vs stage IIB, Hazard Ratio (HR): 1 vs 4 vs 6.1, P stage I vs stage II, HR: 1 vs 2.1, P early-stage ovarian cancer had a favorable outcome, stage was the most powerful prognostic factor.

  7. Exercise Intervention in Targeting Adiposity and Inflammation With Movement to Improve Prognosis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-18

    Cancer Survivor; Central Obesity; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-02

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  9. [Virchow and the cancer of Frederick III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlander, N B

    2001-01-01

    Friedrich Wilhelm, born 1831, was the eldest son of Wilhelm I, king of Prussia 1861 and the first German emperor 1871. He was educated in European culture and decided liberal in his political way of thinking and came in opposition to his father, the soldier-king and to the "iron-chancellor" Bismarck, who had the dominant influence over his father and over German politics. One of Friedrich Wilhelms political sympathizer was Rudolf Virchow, the great pathologist, who was also a liberal member of parliament in Prussia and later in Germany. He opposed Bismarcks war-policy, argued in favour of a peaceful unifying of Germany and fought for parliamentary influence on politics and the responsibility of ministers to parliament. Friedrich Wilhelm was doomed to remain crown prince without influence for most of his life, since his father lived unto 91 years of age. The year before he succeeded his father as emperor Friedrich III, he became hoarse and the doctors i.e., the English laryngologist Mackenzie inspected his vocal cords and took a biopsy, which Virchow diagnosed as a benignant inflammatory reaction. Later on it became apparent that the crown prince suffered from cancer. He declined a radical operation as too risky but was soon compelled to have a tracheotomy performed, when he was on the point of being choked by the cancer. During his 99 days as emperor he could only communicate by writing, and he had not power enough left to fulfill his intention to dismiss Bismarck and initiate a liberal policy, including friendship with England - his beloved wife was the eldest daughter of queen Victoria. After his death his son, emperor Wilhelm II, took a quite different course, that led to World War I. If Friedrich III had been a less intensive smoker and not developed cancer, world history might have taken a different course.

  10. Stage-to-Stage Comparison of Preoperative and Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy for T3 Mid or Distal Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Choi, Hyo Seong; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Sohn, Dae Kyung [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a comparative analysis, the prognostic implications of postchemoradiotherapy (post-CRT) pathologic stage (ypStage) vs. postoperative pathologic stage (pStage) in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2006, 487 patients with T3 mid or distal rectal cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Concurrent CRT was administered preoperatively (n = 364, 74.7%) or postoperatively (n = 123, 25.3%). The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. All patients underwent a total mesorectal excision and received adjuvant chemotherapy. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in DFS, stratified by ypStage and pStage, were compared using the log-rank test. Results: For surviving patients, the median follow-up period was 68 months (range, 12-105 months). The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was not different, at 95.3% and 92.1% in preoperative and postoperative CRT groups, respectively (p = 0.402), but the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was significantly different, at 81.6% (preoperative CRT) vs. 65.4% (postoperative CRT; p = 0.001). The 5-year DFS rate of 78.8% in the preoperative CRT group was significantly better than the 63.0% rate in the postoperative CRT group (p = 0.002). Post-CRT pathologic Stage 0-I occurred in 42.6% (155 of 364) of the patients with preoperative CRT. The 5-year DFS rates were 90.2% (ypStage 0-I), 83.5% (ypStage II), 77.3% (pStage II), 58.6% (ypStage III), and 54.7% (pStage III). The DFS rate of ypStage 0-I was significantly better than that of ypStage II or pStage II. Post-CRT pathologic Stage II and III had similar DFS, compared with pStage II and III, respectively. Conclusions: Disease-free survival predicted by each ypStage was similar to that predicted by the respective pStage. Improved DFS with preoperative vs. postoperative CRT was associated with the ypStage 0-I group that showed a similarly favorable outcome to pStage I rectal

  11. A level III sentinel lymph node in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghesani Nasrin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For accurate nodal staging, all blue and radioactive lymph nodes should be sampled during the sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer. We report a case of anomalous drainage in which one of the sentinel lymph nodes was unexpectedly found in the level III axillary space. Case presentation A 40-year-old female underwent mastectomy for extensive high-grade ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS with micro-invasion. The index lesion was located in the right upper inner quadrant. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed on the morning of surgery. Two sentinel lymph nodes were identified. At operation, 5 mls of isosulfan blue dye was injected at the same site of the radio-colloid injection. The first sentinel lymph node was found at level I and was blue and radioactive. The second sentinel node was detected in an unexpected anomalous location at level III, medial to the pectoralis minor. Both sentinel nodes were negative. Conclusion Sentinel node staging can lead to unexpected patterns of lymphatic drainage. For accurate staging, it is important to survey all potential sites of nodal metastasis either with preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and/or rigorous examination of regional nodal basins with the intra-operative gamma probe.

  12. Cabazitaxel Plus Prednisone With Octreotide For Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Previously Treated With Docetaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-21

    Diarrhea; Hormone-resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  13. Surveillance for Stage I Nonseminoma Testicular Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Gundgaard, Maria Gry; Mortensen, Mette Saksø

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe treatment results in a large cohort with stage I nonseminoma germ cell cancer (NSGCC) treated in a surveillance program. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1, 1984, to December 31, 2007, 1,226 patients with stage I NSGCC, including high-risk patients with vascular invasion....... Relapses after 5 years were seen in 0.5% of the whole cohort or in 1.6% of relapsing patients. The majority of relapses (94.4%) belonged to the good prognostic group according to the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group classification. The disease-specific survival at 15 years was 99...

  14. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Hitre, Erika [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Chemotherapy and Clinical Pharmacology, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, Ferenc [Bacs-Kiskun County Hospital, Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Head and Neck Surgery, Kecskemet (Hungary); Goedeny, Maria [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-08-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this phase II randomized study, the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT was compared with those after standard CRT alone in patients with locally advanced, unresectable head and neck cancer. Between January 2007 and June 2009, 66 patients with advanced (stage III or IV) unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) were randomly assigned to two groups: one receiving two cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil ICT followed by CRT with three cycles of cisplatin and one treated by CRT alone. Response rate, local tumor control (LTC), locoregional tumor control (LRTC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity results were assessed. Three patients from the ICT + CRT group did not appear at the first treatment, so a total of 63 patients were evaluated in the study (30 ICT + CRT group and 33 CRT group). Three patients died of febrile neutropenia after ICT. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 63 months (range 53-82 months). The rate of radiologic complete response was 63 % following ICT + CRT, whereas 70 % after CRT alone. There were no significant differences in the 3-year rates of LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %), and PFS (41 vs. 50 %) in the ICT + CRT group and in the CRT group, respectively. The rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly higher in the ICT + CRT group than in the CRT group (37 and 12 %; p = 0.024). Late toxicity (grade 2 or 3 xerostomia) developed in 59 and 42 % in the ICT + CRT and CRT groups, respectively. The addition of ICT to CRT did not show any advantage in our phase II trial, while the incidence of adverse events increased. The three deaths as a consequence of ICT call attention to the importance of

  15. Olfactory Training in Improving Sense of Smell After Radiation Therapy in Patients With Paranasal Sinus or Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage I Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage I Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage II Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IIA Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IIB Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage III Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVB Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVC Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVC Paranasal Sinus Cancer

  16. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging.

  17. Iyengar-Yoga Compared to Exercise as a Therapeutic Intervention during (Neoadjuvant Therapy in Women with Stage I–III Breast Cancer: Health-Related Quality of Life, Mindfulness, Spirituality, Life Satisfaction, and Cancer-Related Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désirée Lötzke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to test the effects of yoga on health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, cancer-related fatigue, mindfulness, and spirituality compared to conventional therapeutic exercises during (neoadjuvant cytotoxic and endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer. In a randomized controlled trial 92 women with breast cancer undergoing oncological treatment were randomly enrolled for a yoga intervention (YI (n=45 or for a physical exercise intervention (PEI (n=47. Measurements were obtained before (t0 and after the intervention (t1 as well as 3 months after finishing intervention (t2 using standardized questionnaires. Life satisfaction and fatigue improved under PEI (p<0.05 but not under YI (t0 to t2. Regarding quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 a direct effect (t0 to t1; p<0.001 of YI was found on role and emotional functioning, while under PEI only emotional functioning improved. Significant improvements (p<0.001 were observed at both t1 and t2 also for symptom scales in both groups: dyspnea, appetite loss, constipation, and diarrhea. There was no significant difference between therapies for none of the analyzed variables neither for t1 nor for t2. During chemotherapy, yoga was not seen as more helpful than conventional therapeutic exercises. This does not argue against its use in the recovery phase.

  18. Prognosis of stage III colorectal carcinomas with FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy can be predicted by molecular subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yujin; Park, Minhee; Jang, Mi; Yun, Seongju; Kim, Won Kyu; Kim, Sora; Paik, Soonmyung; Lee, Hyun Jung; Hong, Sungpil; Kim, Tae Il; Min, Byungsoh; Kim, Hoguen

    2017-06-13

    Individualizing adjuvant chemotherapy is important in patients with advanced colorectal cancers (CRCs), and the ability to identify molecular subtypes predictive of good prognosis for stage III CRCs after adjuvant chemotherapy could be highly beneficial. We performed microarray-based gene expression analysis on 101 fresh-frozen primary samples from patients with stage III CRCs treated with FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy and 35 matched non-neoplastic mucosal tissues. CRC samples were classified into four molecular subtypes using nonnegative matrix factorization, and for comparison, we also grouped CRC samples using the proposed consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs). Of the 101 cases, 80 were classified into a CMS group, which shows a 79% correlation between the CMS classification and our four molecular subtypes. We found that two of our subtypes showed significantly higher disease-free survival and overall survival than the others. Group 2, in particular, which showed no disease recurrence or death, was characterized by high microsatellite instability (MSI-H, 6/21), abundant mucin production (12/21), and right-sided location (12/21); this group strongly correlated with CMS1 (microsatellite instability immune type). We further identified the molecular characteristics of each group and selected 10 potential biomarker genes from each. When these were compared to the previously reported molecular classifier genes, we found that 31 out of 40 selected genes were matched with those previously reported. Our findings indicate that molecular classification can reveal specific molecular subtypes correlating with clinicopathologic features of CRCs and can have predictive value for the prognosis for stage III CRCs with FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy.

  19. Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease stage III with special reference to tumour burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Nissen, N.I.

    1988-01-01

    143 patients with Hodgkin's disease stage III (65 PS III, 78 CS III) were treated with radiotherapy alone (33 patients), combination chemotherapy alone (56 patients), or radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy (54 patients). They were followed till death or from 7 to 191 months. Prognostic fac...... regarding early stage disease to the effect that tumour burden is the single most important prognostic factor in Hodgkin's disease....

  20. [Application of the 2007 lung cancer staging system by International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Nan; Zheng, Qing-feng; Feng, Yuan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue

    2009-08-18

    To compare the prognoses of non-small cell lung cancer patients based respectively on the 6th-Edition Staging System for NSCLC (the 6th-Edition Staging System) and the new staging system by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) (new staging system). Data were collected from 136 operated NSCLC patients from Sep. 2003 through Oct. 2007. Those data were staged based respectively on the 6th-Edition Staging System and the new staging system. The 2-year no-recurrence survival rate was calculated, and life span was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method of SPSS 13.0 software. (1) In this series, using the 6th-Edition Staging System, there were 56, 23, 53 and 4 patients in stage I, stage II, stage III and stage IV respectively; using the new staging system, there were 50, 31, 54 and 1 patients in stage I, stage II, stage III and stage IV respectively. There were 6 patients in stage I according to the 6th-Edition Staging System who had become 6 patients in stage II according to the new staging system, 1 patient in stage II 1 in stage III, 3 patients in stage III 3 in stage II, 1 patient in stage III 1 in stage IV, and 4 patients in stage IV 4 in stage III. (2) According to the 6th-Edition Staging System, the 2-year no-recurrence survival rates for Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb,IIIa, IIIb and IV were 95.0%, 83.3%, 100.0%, 63.6%, 52.1%, 80.0% and 50.0% respectively, and according to the new staging system, the 2-year cumulative survival rates for I a, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb and IV were 95.5%, 89.3%, 68.4%, 63.6%, 52.8%, 50.0% and 0.0% respectively. After Chi square analysis, there was no distinguished difference between the 2 staging systems for the 2-year cumulative survival rate. (3) According to the 6th-Edition Staging System, the difference between the no-recurrence rate of stage I and stage II was not statistically significant (P = 0.232), and the difference between the no-recurrence rates of stage II and III was statistically significant(P = 0

  1. Role of Surgical Versus Clinical Staging in Chemoradiated FIGO Stage IIB-IVA Cervical Cancer Patients-Acute Toxicity and Treatment Quality of the Uterus-11 Multicenter Phase III Intergroup Trial of the German Radiation Oncology Group and the Gynecologic Cancer Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnitz, Simone; Martus, Peter; Köhler, Christhardt; Stromberger, Carmen; Asse, Elke; Mallmann, Peter; Schmidberger, Heinz; Affonso Júnior, Renato José; Nunes, João Soares; Sehouli, Jalid; Budach, Volker

    2016-02-01

    The Uterus-11 trial was designed to evaluate the role of surgical staging in patients with cervical cancer before primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The present report provides the toxicity data stratified by the treatment arm and technique. A total of 255 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA) were randomized to either surgical staging followed by CRT (arm A) or clinical staging followed by CRT (arm B). Patients with para-aortic metastases underwent extended field radiation therapy (RT). Brachytherapy was mandatory. The present report presents the acute therapy-related toxicities stratified by treatment arm and radiation technique. A total of 240 patients were eligible (n=121 in arm A; n=119 in arm B). Of the 240 patients, 236 (98.3%) underwent external beam RT with a median total dose of 50.4 Gy. The mean treatment duration was 53 days. Of the patients, 60% underwent intensity modulated RT (IMRT). A total of 234 patients (97.5%) underwent chemotherapy, and 231 (96.3%) underwent brachytherapy, with a median single dose of 6 Gy covering the tumor to a median nominal total dose of 28 Gy. Treatment was well tolerated, with 0% grade ≥3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity, 6% grade 3 nausea, 3% grade 3 vomiting, and <2% grade 3 diarrhea. More patients after surgical staging experienced grade 2 anemia (54.3% in arm A vs 45.3% in arm B; P=.074) and grade 2 leukocytopenia (41.4% vs 31.6%; P=.56). Of the patients who received IMRT versus a 3-dimensional technique, 65.3% versus 33.7% presented with grade 2 anemia. Grade 3 gastrointestinal and grade 2 bladder toxicity were significantly reduced with the use of IMRT. The incidence and severity of acute therapy-related toxicity compared favorably with those from other randomized trials. Excellent adherence to treatment and treatment quality was achieved compared with patterns of care analyses. Surgical staging led to a doubled number of

  2. Role of Surgical Versus Clinical Staging in Chemoradiated FIGO Stage IIB-IVA Cervical Cancer Patients—Acute Toxicity and Treatment Quality of the Uterus-11 Multicenter Phase III Intergroup Trial of the German Radiation Oncology Group and the Gynecologic Cancer Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone, E-mail: simone.marnitz-schulze@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne Medical Faculty, Cologne (Germany); Martus, Peter [Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Advanced Operative and Oncologic Gynecology, Asklepios Clinics, Hamburg (Germany); Stromberger, Carmen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne Medical Faculty, Cologne (Germany); Asse, Elke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Mallmann, Peter [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Affonso Júnior, Renato José [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de Cãncer de Barretos, Barretos (Brazil); Nunes, João Soares [Department of Clinical Oncology, Hospital de Cãncer de Barretos, Barretos (Brazil); Sehouli, Jalid [Department of Gynecology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Budach, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne Medical Faculty, Cologne (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: The Uterus-11 trial was designed to evaluate the role of surgical staging in patients with cervical cancer before primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The present report provides the toxicity data stratified by the treatment arm and technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 255 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA) were randomized to either surgical staging followed by CRT (arm A) or clinical staging followed by CRT (arm B). Patients with para-aortic metastases underwent extended field radiation therapy (RT). Brachytherapy was mandatory. The present report presents the acute therapy-related toxicities stratified by treatment arm and radiation technique. Results: A total of 240 patients were eligible (n=121 in arm A; n=119 in arm B). Of the 240 patients, 236 (98.3%) underwent external beam RT with a median total dose of 50.4 Gy. The mean treatment duration was 53 days. Of the patients, 60% underwent intensity modulated RT (IMRT). A total of 234 patients (97.5%) underwent chemotherapy, and 231 (96.3%) underwent brachytherapy, with a median single dose of 6 Gy covering the tumor to a median nominal total dose of 28 Gy. Treatment was well tolerated, with 0% grade ≥3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity, 6% grade 3 nausea, 3% grade 3 vomiting, and <2% grade 3 diarrhea. More patients after surgical staging experienced grade 2 anemia (54.3% in arm A vs 45.3% in arm B; P=.074) and grade 2 leukocytopenia (41.4% vs 31.6%; P=.56). Of the patients who received IMRT versus a 3-dimensional technique, 65.3% versus 33.7% presented with grade 2 anemia. Grade 3 gastrointestinal and grade 2 bladder toxicity were significantly reduced with the use of IMRT. Conclusions: The incidence and severity of acute therapy-related toxicity compared favorably with those from other randomized trials. Excellent adherence to treatment and treatment quality was achieved compared with patterns of

  3. Risk of metachronous ovarian cancer after ovarian conservation in young women with stage I cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Machida, Hiroko; Horowitz, Max P; Shahzad, Mian M K; Guntupalli, Saketh R; Roman, Lynda D; Wright, Jason D

    2017-11-01

    While there is an increasing trend of ovarian conservation at the time of surgical treatment for young women with stage I cervical cancer, the risk for subsequent ovarian cancer after ovarian conservation has not been well studied. We sought to examine the incidence of and risk factors for metachronous ovarian cancer among young women with stage I cervical cancer who had ovarian conservation at the time of hysterectomy. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program was used to identify women aged ovarian conservation for stage I cervical cancer from 1983 through 2013 (n = 4365). Time-dependent analysis was performed for ovarian cancer risk after cervical cancer diagnosis. Mean age at cervical cancer diagnosis was 37 years, and the majority of patients had stage IA disease (68.2%) and squamous histology (72.9%). Median follow-up time was 10.8 years, and there were 13 women who developed metachronous ovarian cancer. The 10- and 20-year cumulative incidences of metachronous ovarian cancer were 0.2% (95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.4) and 0.5% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-0.8), respectively. Mean age at the time of diagnosis of metachronous ovarian cancer was 47.5 years, and stage III-IV disease was seen in 55.6%. Age (≥45 vs cancer histology (adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous vs squamous, hazard ratio, 3.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-10.5; P = .028), and adjuvant radiotherapy use (yes vs no, hazard ratio, 3.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-13.4; P = .034) were significantly associated with metachronous ovarian cancer risk. The presence of multiple risk factors was associated with a significantly increased risk of metachronous ovarian cancer compared to the no risk factor group: 1 risk factor (hazard ratio range, 2.96-8.43), 2 risk factors (hazard ratio range, 16.6-31.0), and 3-4 risk factors (hazard ratio range, 62.3-109), respectively. Metachronous ovarian cancer risk after ovarian conservation for women with stage I cervical cancer is ovarian

  4. Potential predictive markers of chemotherapy resistance in stage III ovarian serous carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Björn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy resistance remains a major obstacle in the treatment of women with ovarian cancer. Establishing predictive markers of chemoresponse would help to individualize therapy and improve survival of ovarian cancer patients. Chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer has been studied thoroughly and several non-overlapping single genes, gene profiles and copy number alterations have been suggested as potential markers. The objective of this study was to explore genetic alterations behind chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer with the ultimate aim to find potential predictive markers. Methods To create the best opportunities for identifying genetic alterations of importance for resistance, we selected a homogenous tumor material concerning histology, stage and chemotherapy. Using high-resolution whole genome array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, we analyzed the tumor genomes of 40 fresh-frozen stage III ovarian serous carcinomas, all uniformly treated with combination therapy paclitaxel/carboplatin. Fisher's exact test was used to identify significant differences. Subsequently, we examined four genes in the significant regions (EVI1, MDS1, SH3GL2, SH3KBP1 plus the ABCB1 gene with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR to evaluate the impact of DNA alterations on the transcriptional level. Results We identified gain in 3q26.2, and losses in 6q11.2-12, 9p22.3, 9p22.2-22.1, 9p22.1-21.3, Xp22.2-22.12, Xp22.11-11.3, and Xp11.23-11.1 to be significantly associated with chemotherapy resistance. In the gene expression analysis, EVI1 expression differed between samples with gain versus without gain, exhibiting higher expression in the gain group. Conclusion In conclusion, we detected specific genetic alterations associated with resistance, of which some might be potential predictive markers of chemotherapy resistance in advanced ovarian serous carcinomas. Thus, further studies are required to validate

  5. Carevive Survivor Care Planning System in Improving Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Cervical Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. Electronic Monitoring Device of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Function in Improving Patient-Centered Care in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Stage I Adult Liver Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Liver Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Liver Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  7. Multivariate Analysis of Prognostic Factors Among 2,313 Patients With Stage III Melanoma: Comparison of Nodal Micrometastases Versus Macrometastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Charles M.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Soong, Seng-jaw; Thompson, John F.; Ding, Shouluan; Byrd, David R.; Cascinelli, Natale; Cochran, Alistair J.; Coit, Daniel G.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Johnson, Timothy; Kirkwood, John M.; Leong, Stanley P.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Mihm, Martin C.; Morton, Donald L.; Ross, Merrick I.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the survival rates and independent predictors of survival using a contemporary international cohort of patients with stage III melanoma. Patients and Methods Complete clinicopathologic and follow-up data were available for 2,313 patients with stage III disease in an updated and expanded American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) melanoma staging database. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate survival analyses were performed. Results Among all 2,313 patients with stage III disease, 81% had micrometastases, and 19% had clinically detectable macrometastases. The 5-year overall survival was 63%; it was 67% for patients with nodal micrometastases, and it was 43% for those with nodal macrometastases (P < .001). Tremendous heterogeneity in survival was observed, particularly in the microscopically detected nodal metastasis subset (from 23% to 87% for 5-year survival). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that in patients with nodal micrometastases, number of tumor-containing lymph nodes, primary tumor thickness, patient age, ulceration, and anatomic site of the primary independently predicted survival (all P < .01). When added to the model, primary tumor mitotic rate was the second-most powerful predictor of survival after the number of tumor-containing nodes. In contrast, for patients with nodal macrometastases, the number of tumor-containing nodes, primary ulceration, and patient age independently predicted survival (P < .01). Conclusion In this multi-institutional analysis, we demonstrated remarkable heterogeneity of prognosis among patients with stage III melanoma, especially among those with nodal micrometastases. These results should be incorporated into the design and interpretation of future clinical trials involving patients with stage III melanoma. PMID:20368546

  8. Prevalence of epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells correlates with recurrence in early-stage ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Alvero, Ayesha B; Yang, Yingkui

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells (EOC stem cells) have been associated with recurrence and chemoresistance. CD44 and CK18 are highly expressed in cancer stem cells and function as tools for their identification and characterization. We investigated the association between the number of CD44......+ EOC stem cells in ovarian cancer tumors and progression-free survival. EOC stem cells exist as clusters located close to the stroma forming the cancer stem cell "niche". 17.1% of the samples reveled high number of CD44+ EOC stem cells (>20% positive cells). In addition, the number of CD44+ EOC stem...... cells was significantly higher in patients with early-stage ovarian cancer (FIGO I/II), and it was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = 0.026). This study suggests that quantification of the number of EOC stem cells in the tumor can be used as a predictor of disease and could...

  9. Bicalutamide monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The current evidence is considered to support 150 mg of the nonsteroidal antiandrogen bicalutamide for early stage prostate cancer.......The current evidence is considered to support 150 mg of the nonsteroidal antiandrogen bicalutamide for early stage prostate cancer....

  10. Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel vs Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  11. Abridged republication of FIGO's staging classification for cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancers have a similar clinical presentation and are treated similarly, and current evidence supports staging all 3 cancers in a single system. The primary site (i.e. ovary, fallopian tube, or peritoneum) should be designated where possible. The histologic type should be recorded. Intraoperative rupture ("surgical spill") is IC1; capsule ruptured before surgery or tumor on ovarian or fallopian tube surface is IC2; and positive peritoneal cytology with or without rupture is IC3. The new staging includes a revision of stage III patients; assignment to stage IIIA1 is based on spread to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes without intraperitoneal dissemination. Extension of tumor from omentum to spleen or liver (stage IIIC) should be differentiated from isolated parenchymal metastases (stage IVB). © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  12. [FDG-PET/CT in staging of breast carcinoma: use in tumour stage III and locoregional recurrent breast carcinoma].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulten, B.F.; Haas, M.J. de; Rodenburg, C.J.; Ooijen, B. van; Baas, I.O.; Klerk, J.M. de

    2014-01-01

    In stage III breast carcinoma, metastasized disease needs to be determined. In the past, conventional imaging by liver ultrasound, chest X-ray and bone scintigraphy was the work-up of choice. Recently, FDG-PET/CT was found to have additional value, but clinicians are hesitant to introduce this

  13. Survival Advantage Associated with Decrease in Stage at Detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to document the survival advantage of lowering stage at detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. Treatment outcomes and survival were evaluated in patients with Stage IIIA and Stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer treated from 2000 to 2009 at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center (UKMCC and SEER institutions. Results. Cytoreduction to no visible disease (P<0.0001 and complete response to platinum-based chemotherapy (P<0.025 occurred more frequently in Stage IIIA than in Stage IIIC cases. Time to progression was shorter in patients with Stage IIIC ovarian cancer (17±1 months than in those with Stage II1A disease (36±8 months. Five-year overall survival (OS improved from 41% in Stage IIIC patients to 60% in Stage IIIA patients treated at UKMCC and from 37% to 56% in patients treated at SEER institutions for a survival advantage of 19% in both data sets. 53% of Stage IIIA and 14% of Stage IIIC patients had NED at last followup. Conclusions. Decreasing stage at detection from Stage IIIC to stage IIIA epithelial ovarian cancer is associated with a 5-year survival advantage of nearly 20% in patients treated by surgical tumor cytoreduction and platinum-based chemotherapy.

  14. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head and Neck Cancer Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Health Professional Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ...

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Hypopharyngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head and Neck Cancer Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Health Professional Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck ...

  16. S-100B Concentrations Predict Disease-Free Survival in Stage III Melanoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, S.; Bastiaannet, E.; Kobold, A. C. Muller; van Ginkel, R. J.; Suurmeijer, A. J. H.; Hoekstra, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Elevation of the tumor marker S-100B in melanoma patients is a highly specific indicator of recurrence. The role of S-100B in disease-free survival (DFS) was evaluated in stage III melanoma patients (staged with fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET] and computed tomography [CT])

  17. Staging Lung Cancer: Current Controversies and Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyad Karmy-Jones

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A consistent approach to staging is required for the rational management of lung cancer. This paper was prepared at the request of the Standards Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society, and reviews and discusses the relative merits of the available methods of staging. Whichever methods are chosen by a particular institution, the following points must be stressed. No patient can be considered automatically "unresectable" when chest radiography and/ or computed tomography demonstrate adenopathy or only suggest local invasion. Clinical and/or radiographical evidence suggesting extensive local or metastatic disease should be evaluated as completely as possible before subjecting the patient to a possible "nontherapeutic" thoracotomy. Finally, in some cases thoracotomy is required to decide whether the lesion is "completely" resectable.

  18. Gastric cancer: staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    OpenAIRE

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the TNM classification has been a standard in classifying the anatomic extent of disease.8 In order to maintain the staging system relevant, the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) and the America...

  19. Renal cell cancer stage migration: analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Christopher J; Mallin, Katherine; Ritchey, Jamie; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Carroll, Peter R

    2008-07-01

    Evidence exists to suggest a pattern of increasing early diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of the study was to analyze patterns of disease presentation and outcome of RCC by AJCC stage using data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) over a 12-year period. The NCDB was queried for adults diagnosed between 1993 and 2004 presenting with ICD-O-2 of 3 renal cell tumors arising in the kidney. Cases were classified by demographics, 2002 AJCC stage (6th edition), and histology. The Cochran-Armitage Test for Trend was used to determine statistical significance of trends over time. Cox regression multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the impact of stage and histology on relative survival. SPSS 14.0 was used for analyses. Between 1993 and 2004 a total of 205,963 patients from the NCDB fit our case definition of RCC. Comparisons between 1993 and 2004 data show an increase in stage I disease and decrease in stage II, III, and IV disease (P < or = .001). The size of stage I tumors also decreased from a mean of 4.1 cm in 1993 to 3.6 cm in 2003. In multivariate analysis, stage, but not histology, predicted relative survival. A 3.3% increase in survival was found for patients diagnosed in 1998 compared with patients diagnosed in 1993. A greater proportion of newly diagnosed patients with RCC currently present with stage I disease compared with earlier years. Stage predicts relative survival for patients with kidney cancer. More recently diagnosed patients have improved relative survival. (Copyright) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  20. [Surgical management for early stage gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K; Möller, D; Bernhardt, J

    2017-10-26

    In the last decade the implementation of the new technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and the rapid progression of laparoscopic gastric cancer (LAG) resection with an adequate lymphadenectomy (LAD) have played an increasing role in the treatment of patients with early stage gastric cancer (EGC). A systematic review of the currently available data in the literature was carried out to evaluate the contemporary surgical management for treatment of EGC. Endoscopic resection (ER) of mucosal T1 gastric cancer (T1m) in accordance with the German guidelines on resection criteria is a widely accepted treatment option, if a definitive R0 resection can be achieved. Excellent en bloc and R0 results in more than 90% of these cases have been shown particularly for ESD. In contrast to T1m gastric carcinomas with a low risk of lymph node metastases (approximately 3%), nodal involvement reaches more than 20% for submucosal infiltrated EGC (T1sm). For this reason, a surgical resection with adequate LAD is further recommended in all cases of non-curative ER or any T1sm gastric cancer. In seven randomized controlled trials and a series of meta-analyses including high-quality non-randomized trials, significant benefits in short-term postoperative outcome have been demonstrated for LAG in comparison to open gastrectomy (OG) in the treatment of EGC. The general morbidity was also significantly lower in LAG than in OG. The 30-day mortality and long-term survival outcome were comparable between the two groups. The use of ESD should be the standard treatment for T1m EGC within the guidelines criteria. For non-curative ESD and T1sm gastric cancer, surgical resection with LAD is recommended. The LAG is a technically safe, feasible, and favorable approach in terms of faster recovery compared to OG. The long-term survival outcome is comparable between LAG and OG for EGC.

  1. Spatial variation in stage distribution in colorectal cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferink, M A G; Pukkala, E; Klaase, J M; Siesling, S

    2012-05-01

    In the Netherlands the incidence of colorectal cancer has increased, mainly in the eastern part of the country. Patient delay due to unawareness or ignorance of symptoms and differences in use of diagnostic tools could have influence on the stage distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate geographical differences in stage-specific incidence rates of colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands. Age-adjusted incidence rates for cancers of the colon and rectum diagnosed in 2001-2005 and registered in the Netherlands Cancer Registry were calculated for each municipality and stage. The incidence for each 500m by 500m grid was estimated as a weighted average of the incidence rates of the neighbouring municipalities. The incidence rates and the stage distribution are both presented as maps. Geographic variation in stage-specific incidence was evaluated using spatial scan statistic. In both colon and rectal cancer, significant spatial variation in stage-specific incidences was found, except for colon cancer of stages III and IV. The regions with a higher stage-specific incidence were almost all in the south eastern part of the Netherlands, however, these differences were not seen in the stage distribution. There were no differences in stage distribution between large cities and the rest of the country. These maps give insight into differences in stage-specific incidences of colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands. Educational interventions to increase the awareness of symptoms of colorectal cancer may be especially useful for the population in regions with high incidence of advanced stages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Socioeconomic position and stage at diagnosis of head and neck cancer - a nationwide study from DAHANCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Maja Halgren; Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl; Kjær, Trille Kristina

    2015-01-01

    of advanced stage (TNM III-IV) HNSCC in multivariate logistic regression models by site (glottic, non-glottic larynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx and oral cancer), with adjustment for age, gender, period of diagnosis, education, income, cohabitation status, degree of urbanisation and comorbidity in accordance...

  3. Prevalence of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells Correlates with Recurrence in Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Dahl Steffensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells (EOC stem cells have been associated with recurrence and chemoresistance. CD44 and CK18 are highly expressed in cancer stem cells and function as tools for their identification and characterization. We investigated the association between the number of CD44+ EOC stem cells in ovarian cancer tumors and progression-free survival. EOC stem cells exist as clusters located close to the stroma forming the cancer stem cell “niche”. 17.1% of the samples reveled high number of CD44+ EOC stem cells (>20% positive cells. In addition, the number of CD44+ EOC stem cells was significantly higher in patients with early-stage ovarian cancer (FIGO I/II, and it was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P=0.026. This study suggests that quantification of the number of EOC stem cells in the tumor can be used as a predictor of disease and could be applied for treatment selection in early-stage ovarian cancer.

  4. Quality of life after Sentinal Lymph Node Biopsy or Axillary Node Dissection in Stage I/II Breast Patients: A Prospective Longitunal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, Jan; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E.H.M.; Rietman, Johan Swanik; de Vries, Jaap; Baas, Peter; Geertzen, Jan H.B.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer patients’ quality of life (QoL) after surgery has been reported to improve significantly over time. Little is known about QoL recovery after sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Methods: 175 of 195 stage I/II breast

  5. Phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant bevacizumab plus pemetrexed and carboplatin in patients with unresectable stage III lung adenocarcinoma (GASTO 1001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Wei; Li, Ning; Wang, Si-Yu; Li, Jian; Liu, Qian-Wen; Huang, Qun-Ai; Wang, Bao-Xiao

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this phase 2 trial was to assess the efficacy and safety of induction bevacizumab plus chemotherapy followed by surgery in patients with unresectable stage III lung adenocarcinoma. The authors investigated induction bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg) plus pemetrexed (500 mg/m(2) and carboplatin (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 5) followed by surgery for patients with unresectable stage III lung adenocarcinoma ages 18 to 65 years. The patients received neoadjuvant therapy every 3 weeks for 4 cycles. Surgery was scheduled 3 to 4 weeks after the last neoadjuvant therapy; then, the medical team assessed each patient's resectability status. The primary endpoint was the resectability rate. From April 2012 to April 2014, 42 patients were enrolled and received bevacizumab plus pemetrexed and carboplatin. Grade 3 or 4 induction-related AEs included fatigue in 5 patients, neutropenia in 4 patients, hypertension in 1 patient, anemia in 1 patient, and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient. One patient achieved a complete response, 22 achieved a partial response, 17 had stable disease, and 2 had progressive disease. After neoadjuvant therapy, 31 patients (73.8%) underwent surgery, including 11 who underwent pneumonectomy. Complete (R0) resection was achieved in 22 patients (52.4%). Reoperation was required in 1 patient because of a bleeding intercostal artery. No perioperative thromboembolic events or wound-healing problems were observed. The median event-free survival was 15.4 months, and the 1-year event-free survival rate was 56.1%. Treatment with neoadjuvant bevacizumab in combination with pemetrexed and carboplatin followed by surgery appears to be feasible and safe in patients with unresectable stage III lung adenocarcinoma. Cancer 2016;122:740-747. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  6. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Gastric cancer : staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the

  8. Recording of family history is associated with colorectal cancer stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Koen; de Groot, Nicolette L; Fidder, Herma H; Timmer, Robin; Stolk, Mark F J; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Siersema, Peter D

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) associated with Lynch syndrome usually presents at a relatively young age. The Revised Bethesda Guidelines advise screening for Lynch syndrome in patients diagnosed with CRC and a positive family history (FH) of CRC and other Lynch-related cancers. To evaluate recording of the FH and identify factors associated with recording in young patients with CRC. In one academic and two nonacademic hospitals, of all patients diagnosed with CRC at the age of 60 years or younger between 1999 and 2007, electronic medical records were evaluated for a recorded FH of CRC and other Lynch-related cancers. Patient and tumor characteristics were retrieved from the Dutch Comprehensive Cancer Centre and the Dutch Pathological Archive. A total of 676 patients were identified. FH was recorded in 395/676 (58%) patients. From 1999 to 2007, recording improved with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.17] per year. Stage III CRC (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.07-2.75) and administration of chemotherapy (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.17-2.89) were associated with recording in multivariate analysis. Other factors, including age at diagnosis, sex, surgery, radiotherapy, proximal tumor localization, poor differentiation, and mucinous histology, were not associated with recording. A FH of CRC and other Lynch-related cancers was not recorded in ∼40% of young CRC patients and recording improved only slightly over the years. As a first step in the identification of Lynch-related cancer families, physicians should be trained to record a detailed FH in the work-up of all newly diagnosed CRC patients.

  9. Vitamin D (25-0H D3) status and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II/III breast cancer: Data from the NEOZOTAC trial (BOOG 10-01)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charehbili, A.; Hamdy, N. A. T.; Smit, V. T. H. B. M.; Kessels, L.; van Bochove, A.; van Laarhoven, H. W.; Putter, H.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; van Leeuwen-Stok, A. E.; van der Hoeven, J. J. M.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Nortier, J. W. R.; Kroep, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of 25-OH vitamin D3 (vitamin D) have been shown to be prognostic for disease-free survival in patients with breast cancer. We investigated the predictive value of these levels for pathological response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer taking part in the

  10. Vitamin D (25-0H D3) status and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II/III breast cancer: Data from the NEOZOTAC trial (BOOG 10-01)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charehbili, A.; Hamdy, N.A.; Smit, V.T.; Kessels, L; Bochove, A. van; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Putter, H.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Leeuwen-Stok, A.E. van; Hoeven, J.J.M. van der; Velde, C.J. van de; Nortier, J.W.; Kroep, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum levels of 25-OH vitamin D3 (vitamin D) have been shown to be prognostic for disease-free survival in patients with breast cancer. We investigated the predictive value of these levels for pathological response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer taking part

  11. Association Between Prognosis and Tumor Laterality in Early-Stage Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Safiya; Brennan, Kelly; Nanji, Sulaiman; Berry, Scott R; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-10-01

    Recent data have suggested that disease biology and outcome of colon cancer may differ between right-sided and left-sided tumors. However, the literature on the prognostic value of tumor laterality is conflicting. To explore differences in laterality based on disease characteristics and outcomes in a population-based cohort of early-stage colon cancer. This investigation was a population-based retrospective cohort study of patients with early-stage colon cancer from the province of Ontario, Canada. Electronic records of treatment were linked to the Ontario Cancer Registry to identify all patients with colon cancer who underwent resection between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2008. The date of the final analysis was October 20, 2016. The study population included a 25% random sample of all patients with resected stage I to III disease. Right-sided colon cancer was defined as any tumor arising in the cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, or transverse colon. Left-sided colon cancer was defined as any tumor arising in the splenic flexure, descending colon, sigmoid colon, or rectosigmoid colon. Overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) measured from the time of resection. This study identified 6365 patients with early-stage colon cancer (48.7% [3098 of 6365] female). Their median age was 72 years, and 51.7% (3291 of 6365) had right-sided disease. Stage distribution was 18.3% (1163 of 6365) stage I, 38.4% (2446 of 6365) stage II, and 43.3% (2756 of 6365) stage III. Patients with right-sided colon cancer were more likely to be older (median age, 73 vs 70 years; P stage III disease: the hazard ratios were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.93-1.14) for OS and 1.10 (95% CI, 0.97-1.24) for CSS. In this population-based cohort of early-stage resected colon cancer, disease laterality was not associated with long-term OS or CSS.

  12. Stage of breast cancer at diagnosis in New Zealand: impacts of socio-demographic factors, breast cancer screening and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Sanjeewa; Lawrenson, Ross; Harvey, Vernon; Ramsaroop, Reena; Elwood, Mark; Scott, Nina; Sarfati, Diana; Campbell, Ian

    2016-02-19

    Examination of factors associated with late stage diagnosis of breast cancer is useful to identify areas which are amenable to intervention. This study analyses trends in cancer stage at diagnosis and impact of socio-demographic, cancer biological and screening characteristics on cancer stage in a population-based series of women with invasive breast cancer in New Zealand. All women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2000 and 2013 were identified from two regional breast cancer registries. Factors associated with advanced (stages III and IV) and metastatic (stage IV) cancer at diagnosis were analysed in univariate and multivariate models adjusting for covariates. Of the 12390 women included in this study 2448 (19.7%) were advanced and 575 (4.6%) were metastatic at diagnosis. Māori (OR = 1.86, 1.39-2.49) and Pacific (OR = 2.81, 2.03-3.87) compared with NZ European ethnicity, other urban (OR = 2.00, 1.37-2.92) compared with main urban residency and non-screen (OR = 6.03, 4.41-8.24) compared with screen detection were significantly associated with metastatic cancer at diagnosis in multivariate analysis. A steady increase in the rate of metastatic cancer was seen which has increased from 3.8% during 2000-2003 to 5.0% during 2010-2013 period (p = 0.042). Providing equitable high quality primary care and increasing mammographic screening coverage needs to be looked at as possible avenues to reduce late-stage cancer at diagnosis and to reduce ethnic, socioeconomic and geographical disparities in stage of breast cancer at diagnosis in New Zealand.

  13. A multi-institutional study of outcomes in stage I-III uterine carcinosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Elizabeth L; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Gehrig, Paola A; Pierce, Stuart; Havrilesky, Laura; Secord, Angeles Alvarez; Dottino, Joseph; Fader, Amanda N; Ricci, Stephanie; Geller, Melissa A

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the use of adjuvant therapy after primary surgery for stage I-III uterine carcinosarcoma (CS). A multi-institutional retrospective study of women with stage I-III CS was conducted. Analyses were stratified by stage (I/II and III). Patients were categorized according to adjuvant therapy: observation (OBS), radiation (RT), chemotherapy (CT) or multimodal therapy (CT+RT). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards models. 303 patients were identified across four institutions: 195 with stage I/II and 108 with stage III disease. In stage I/II disease, 75 (39.9%) received OBS, 33 (17.6%) CT, 37 (19.7%) RT, and 43 (22.9%) CT+RT. OBS was associated with a fourfold increased risk of death compared to CT (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=4.48, p=0.003). Patients receiving CT+RT had significantly improved PFS compared to those receiving CT alone (aHR=0.43, p=0.04), but no difference in OS. In the stage III cohort, 16 (15.0%) received OBS, 34 (31.8%) CT, 20 (18.7%) RT, and 37 (34.6%) CT+RT. OBS was associated with worse OS and PFS compared to CT (OS: aHR=2.46, p=0.04; PFS: aHR=2.39, p=0.03, respectively). A potential improvement in PFS was seen for those treated with CT+RT compared to CT alone, however it was not statistically significant (aHR=0.53, p=0.09). Observation after surgery was associated with poor outcomes in uterine CS compared to CT and RT alone. Multimodality therapy for women with stage I/II disease was associated with improved PFS compared to chemotherapy alone. Novel treatment options are needed to improve outcomes in this aggressive disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A multi-institutional study of outcomes in stage I–III uterine carcinosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Gehrig, Paola A.; Pierce, Stuart; Havrilesky, Laura; Secord, Angeles Alvarez; Dottino, Joseph; Fader, Amanda N.; Ricci, Stephanie; Geller, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of adjuvant therapy after primary surgery for stage I–III uterine carcinosarcoma (CS). Methods A multi-institutional retrospective study of women with stage I–III CS was conducted. Analyses were stratified by stage (I/II and III). Patients were categorized according to adjuvant therapy: observation (OBS), radiation (RT), chemotherapy (CT) or multimodal therapy (CT + RT). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards models. Results 303 patients were identified across four institutions: 195 with stage I/II and 108 with stage III disease. In stage I/II disease, 75 (39.9%) received OBS, 33 (17.6%) CT, 37 (19.7%) RT, and 43 (22.9%) CT + RT. OBS was associated with a fourfold increased risk of death compared to CT (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 4.48, p = 0.003). Patients receiving CT + RT had significantly improved PFS compared to those receiving CT alone (aHR = 0.43, p = 0.04), but no difference in OS. In the stage III cohort, 16 (15.0%) received OBS, 34 (31.8%) CT, 20 (18.7%) RT, and 37 (34.6%) CT + RT. OBS was associated with worse OS and PFS compared to CT (OS: aHR = 2.46, p = 0.04; PFS: aHR = 2.39, p = 0.03, respectively). A potential improvement in PFS was seen for those treated with CT + RT compared to CT alone, however it was not statistically significant (aHR = 0.53, p = 0.09). Conclusions Observation after surgery was associated with poor outcomes in uterine CS compared to CT and RT alone. Multimodality therapy for women with stage I/II disease was associated with improved PFS compared to chemotherapy alone. Novel treatment options are needed to improve outcomes in this aggressive disease. PMID:26348313

  15. Melatonin and cortisol serum levels in lung cancer patients at different stages of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Carughi, Stefano; De Cata, Angelo; La Viola, Marco; Vendemiale, Gianluigi

    2005-06-01

    Numerous interactions exist among the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, mediated by neurotransmitters, hormones, and cytokines. Melatonin may modulate the integrated functions of a unique neuro-immune-endocrine system. Neoplastic diseases may be linked to progressive loss of integration among these systems. We investigated whether there are differences among healthy elderly people and elderly people suffering from lung cancer at different stages of disease in 24-hour melatonin and cortisol secretory profiles. In seventeen healthy subjects (mean age +/-S.E.: 68.8+/-1.92 years), seventeen patients with stage I and II lung cancer (mean age: 67.2+/-0.80), seventeen patients with stage III and IV lung cancer (mean age: 69.5+/-2.26), melatonin and cortisol serum levels were measured in blood samples collected every four hours for 24 hours. The area under the curve (AUC) and the presence of circadian rhythmicity were evaluated. The circadian rhythm of melatonin was present in all the groups, but serum levels were decreased in the subjects suffering from lung cancer (Pcortisol serum levels were increased (not in a significant way), with a loss of the circadian rhythm of secretion. The melatonin/cortisol ratio was decreased in stage III and IV cancer patients (Pmelatonin secretion and altered cortisol secretion pattern with advancing stage of neoplastic disease may be an expression of a gradual alteration of the integrated function of the neuro-endocrine system in lung cancer patients.

  16. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. Objectives To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRTor VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. Main results We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBTwith no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes. EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2

  17. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic ...

  19. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Stage at presentation of breast cancer in Luanda, Angola - a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lygia Vieira; Miguel, Fernando; Freitas, Helga; Tavares, António; Pangui, Salvador; Castro, Clara; Lacerda, Gonçalo Forjaz; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Santos, Lúcio Lara

    2015-10-15

    It is expected that, by 2020, 15 million new cases of cancer will occur every year in the world, one million of them in Africa. Knowledge of cancer trends in African countries is far from adequate, and improvements in cancer prevention efforts are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to characterize breast cancer clinically and pathologically at presentation in Luanda, Angola; we additionally provide quality information that will be useful for breast cancer care planning in the country. Data on breast cancer cases were retrieved from the Angolan Institute of Cancer Control, from 2006 to 2014. For women diagnosed in 2009 (5-years of follow-up), demographic, clinical and pathological information, at presentation, was collected, namely age at diagnosis, parity, methods used for pathological diagnoses, tumor pathological characteristics, stage of disease and treatment. Descriptive statistics were performed. The median age of women diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 was 47 years old (range 25-89). The most frequent clinical presentation was breast swelling with axillary lymph nodes metastasis (44.9 %), followed by a mass larger than 5 cm (14.2 %) and lump (12.9 %). Invasive ductal carcinoma was the main histologic type (81.8 %). Only 10.1 % of cancer cases had a well differentiated histological grade. Cancers were diagnosed mostly at advanced stages (66.7 % in stage III and 11.1 % in stage IV). In this study, breast cancer was diagnosed at a very advanced stage. Although it reports data from a single cancer center in Luanda, Angola it reinforces the need for early diagnosis and increasing awareness. According to the main challenges related to breast cancer diagnosis and treatment herein presented, we propose a realistic framework that would allow for the implementation of a breast cancer care program, built under a strong network based on cooperation, teaching, audit, good practices and the organization of health services. Angola needs urgently a program for

  1. A Retrospective Survival Analysis of Anatomic and Prognostic Stage Group Based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th Edition Cancer Staging Manual in Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Li, Jiang-Hong; Ye, Jing-Ming; Duan, Xue-Ning; Cheng, Yuan-Jia; Xin, Ling; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Yin-Hua

    2017-08-20

    Current understanding of tumor biology suggests that breast cancer is a group of diseases with different intrinsic molecular subtypes. Anatomic staging system alone is insufficient to provide future outcome information. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) expert panel updated the 8th edition of the staging manual with prognostic stage groups by incorporating biomarkers into the anatomic stage groups. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the data from our center in China using the anatomic and prognostic staging system based on the AJCC 8th edition staging manual. We reviewed the data from January 2008 to December 2014 for cases with Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer in our center. All cases were restaged using the AJCC 8th edition anatomic and prognostic staging system. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to compare the survival differences between different subgroups. SPSS software version 19.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA) was used for the statistical analyses. This study consisted of 796 patients with Luminal B HER-negative breast cancer. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) of 769 Stage I-III patients was 89.7%, and the 5-year overall survival (OS) of all 796 patients was 91.7%. Both 5-year DFS and 5-year OS were significantly different in the different anatomic and prognostic stage groups. There were 372 cases (46.7%) assigned to a different group. The prognostic Stage II and III patients restaged from anatomic Stage III had significant differences in 5-year DFS (χ2 = 11.319, P= 0.001) and 5-year OS (χ2 = 5.225, P= 0.022). In addition, cases restaged as prognostic Stage I, II, or III from the anatomic Stage II group had statistically significant differences in 5-year DFS (χ2 = 6.510, P= 0.039) but no significant differences in 5-year OS (χ2 = 5.087, P= 0.079). However, the restaged prognostic Stage I and II cases from anatomic Stage I had no statistically significant

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Esophageal Cancer Screening Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  6. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  8. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  9. Stages of Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This type of liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. This summary ... Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer Coping with Cancer Questions to Ask Your Doctor about ...

  10. Antibody profiling with protein antigen microarrays in early stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brian C-S; Dijohnson, Daniel A; O'Rourke, Dennis J

    2012-05-01

    Proteins not present in normal cells, that is, cancer cells, may elicit a host immune response that leads to the generation of antibodies that might react with these tumor-associated proteins. In recent years, a growing number of reports have showed that autoantibody profiling may provide an alternative approach for the detection of cancer. However, most studies of antigen-autoantibody reactivity have relied on recombinant proteins. Recombinant proteins lack the proper post-translational modifications present in native proteins. Because of this limitation, native or natural protein antigen microarrays are gaining popularity for profiling antibody responses. i) To illustrate some examples of autoantibodies as signatures for early stage cancer; ii) to briefly outline the various protein antigen microarray platforms; iii) to illustrate the use of native or natural protein microarrays in the discovery of potential biomarkers and iv) to discuss the advantages of native protein antigen microarrays over other approaches. The nature of protein microarray platforms is conducive to multiplexing, which amplifies the potential for uncovering effective biomarkers for many significant diseases. However, the major challenge will be in integrating microarray platforms into multiplexed clinical diagnostic tools, as the main drawback is the reproducibility and coefficient of variation of the results from array to array, and the transportability of the array platform to a more automatable platform.

  11. Quantification of functional abilities in Rett syndrome: a comparison between stages III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro CBM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carlos BM Monteiro,1 Geert JP Savelsbergh,2 Ana RP Smorenburg,3 Zodja Graciani,4 Camila Torriani-Pasin,5 Luiz Carlos de Abreu,6 Vitor E Valenti,7 Fernando Kok41School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Burke-Cornell Medical Research Institute, White Plains, NY, USA; 4Department of Neurology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Motor Behavior Laboratory, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Laboratory of Scientific Writing, Department of Morphology and Physiology, School of Medicine of ABC, Santo Andre, Brazil; 7Department of Speech Language and Hearing Therapy, Faculty of Philosophy and Sciences, UNESP, Marilia, BrazilAbstract: We aimed to evaluate the functional abilities of persons with Rett syndrome (RTT in stages III and IV. The group consisted of 60 females who had been diagnosed with RTT: 38 in stage III, mean age (years of 9.14, with a standard deviation of 5.84 (minimum 2.2/maximum 26.4; and 22 in stage IV, mean age of 12.45, with a standard deviation of 6.17 (minimum 5.3/maximum 26.9. The evaluation was made using the Pediatric ­Evaluation of Disability Inventory, which has 197 items in the areas of self-care, mobility, and social function. The results showed that in the area of self-care, stage III and stage IV RTT persons had a level of 24.12 and 18.36 (P=0.002, respectively. In the area of mobility, stage III had 37.22 and stage IV had 14.64 (P<0.001, while in the area of social function, stage III had 17.72 and stage IV had 12.14 (P=0.016. In conclusion, although persons with stage III RTT have better functional abilities when compared with stage IV, the areas of mobility, self-care, and social function are quite affected, which shows a great functional dependency and need for help in basic activities of daily life.Keywords: Rett syndrome, disability

  12. Long-term results of the randomized phase III trial EORTC 18991 of adjuvant therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b versus observation in resected stage III melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); S. Suciu (Stefan); A. Testori (Alessandro); M. Santinami (Mario); W.H.J. Kruit (Wim); J. Marsden (Jeremy); C.J.A. Punt (Cornelis); F. Salès (François); R. Dummer (Reinhard); C. Robert (Caroline); D. Schadendorf (Dirk); P. Patel (Poulam); G. de Schaetzen (Gaetan); A. Spatz (Alan); U. Keilholz (Ulrich)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Adjuvant pegylated interferon alfa-2b (PEG-IFN-α-2b) was approved for treatment of resected stage III melanoma in 2011. Here, we present long-term follow-up results of this pivotal trial. Patients and Methods: In all, 1,256 patients with resected stage III melanoma were randomly

  13. Interleukin-12 and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Cancer That Has High Levels of HER2/Neu

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Skin Metastases; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Anal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Anal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  14. Preoperative PET/CT in early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernsdorf, M; Berthelsen, A K; Wielenga, V T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer.......The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer....

  15. Socio-demographic inequalities in stage of cancer diagnosis: evidence from patients with female breast, lung, colon, rectal, prostate, renal, bladder, melanoma, ovarian and endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyratzopoulos, G; Abel, G A; Brown, C H; Rous, B A; Vernon, S A; Roland, M; Greenberg, D C

    2013-03-01

    Understanding socio-demographic inequalities in stage at diagnosis can inform priorities for cancer control. We analysed data on the stage at diagnosis of East of England patients diagnosed with any of 10 common cancers, 2006-2010. Stage information was available on 88 657 of 98 942 tumours (89.6%). Substantial socio-demographic inequalities in advanced stage at diagnosis (i.e. stage III/IV) existed for seven cancers, but their magnitude and direction varied greatly by cancer: advanced stage at diagnosis was more likely for older patients with melanoma but less likely for older patients with lung cancer [odds ratios for 75-79 versus 65-69 1.60 (1.38-1.86) and 0.83 (0.77-0.89), respectively]. Deprived patients were more likely to be diagnosed in advanced stage for melanoma, prostate, endometrial and (female) breast cancer: odds ratios (most versus least deprived quintile) from 2.24 (1.66-3.03) for melanoma to 1.31 (1.15-1.49) for breast cancer. In England, elimination of socio-demographic inequalities in stage at diagnosis could decrease the number of patients with cancer diagnosed in advanced stage by ∼5600 annually. There are substantial socio-demographic inequalities in stage at diagnosis for most cancers. Earlier detection interventions and policies can be targeted on patients at higher risk of advanced stage diagnosis.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of 18f-Fdg Pet/Ct for Screening Distant Metastasis in Stage Ii/Iii Breast Cancer Patients of the UK, the United States and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel-Cases, A.; Da Silva Teixeira, Sandra; Retel, Valesca; Retel, V.P.; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Valdes Olmos, R.; Rutgers, E.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: 18F-FDG-PET/CT is accurate in detecting distant metastases (DM) in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. If DMs are screen-detected in an early phase, morbidity and mortality may be reduced. Because 18F-FDG-PET/CT comes at a significant cost, we compared its

  17. Addition of zoledronic acid to neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not enhance tumor response in patients with HER2-negative stage II/III breast cancer: the NEOZOTAC trial (BOOG 2010-01)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charehbili, A.; Ven, S. van de; Smit, V.T.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Hamdy, N.A.; Putter, H.; Heijns, J.B.; Warmerdam, L.J. van; Kessels, L.; Dercksen, M.; Pepels, M.J.; Maartense, E.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Vriens, B.; Wasser, M.N.; Leeuwen-Stok, A.E. van; Liefers, G.J.; Velde, C.J. van de; Nortier, J.W.; Kroep, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of zoledronic acid (ZA) when added to the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer (BC) in enhancing the clinical and pathological response of tumors is unclear. The effect of ZA on the antitumor effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy has not prospectively been studied before.

  18. Addition of zoledronic acid to neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not enhance tumor response in patients with HER2-negative stage II/III breast cancer: the NEOZOTAC trial (BOOG 2010-01)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charehbili, A.; van de Ven, S.; Smit, V. T. H. B. M.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Hamdy, N. A. T.; Putter, H.; Heijns, J. B.; van Warmerdam, L. J. C.; Kessels, L.; Dercksen, M.; Pepels, M. J.; Maartense, E.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Vriens, B.; Wasser, M. N.; van Leeuwen-Stok, A. E.; Liefers, G. J.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Nortier, J. W. R.; Kroep, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The role of zoledronic acid (ZA) when added to the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer (BC) in enhancing the clinical and pathological response of tumors is unclear. The effect of ZA on the antitumor effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy has not prospectively been studied before. NEOZOTAC is a

  19. Prognostic classification of Hodgkin disease in pathologic stage III, based on anatomic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desser, R.K.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.; Ferguson, D.J.; Moran, E.M.; Griem, M.L.; Vardiman, J.; Miller, B.; Oetzel, N.; Sweet, D.

    1977-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with pathologic stage III Hodgkin's disease were studied in an effort to determine whether location of involved abdominal nodes influenced survival. Treatment consisted of total nodal radiotherapy with or without subsequent combination chemotherapy. The initial radiation field was the ''extended mantle,'' which included supradiaphragmatic nodes, the splenic hilar area, and paraaortic nodes to the level of L2-L4. Subsequently, lower paraaortic and iliac regions were treated (''lower inverted Y''). Patients with disease limited to the spleen and/or splenic, celiac, or portal nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 1/) had a more favorable 5-yr survival than did patients with involvement of paraaortic, iliac, or mesenteric nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 2/) : 93% versus 57%, respectively (p < 0.05). The addition of combination chemotherapy to total nodal irradiation was associated with improved survival of patients in stage III/sub 2/, but not of those in stage III/sub 1/.

  20. Utility of chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound for stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbauch, M. T. W.; Holm, J.; Rødgaard, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current Danish Melanoma Guidelines suggest that stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma receive chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound to exclude lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of chest X-ray and...

  1. Phase II study of ipilimumab in adolescents with unresectable stage III or IV malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geoerger, Birgit; Bergeron, Christophe; Gore, Lia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ipilimumab is approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma in adults; however, little information on the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in younger patients is available. METHODS: Patients aged 12 to <18 years with previously treated or untreated, unresectable stage III or IV mal...

  2. Efficacy of computed tomography features in predicting stage III thymic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Ye, Jianding; Fang, Wentao; Zhang, Yu; Ye, Xiaodan; Ma, Yonghong; Chen, Libo; Li, Minghua

    2017-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the invasion of intrathoracic structures by stage III thymic tumors assists their appropriate management. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) features for the prediction of stage III thymoma invasion. The pre-operative CT images of 66 patients with confirmed stage III thymic tumors were reviewed retrospectively. The CT features of invasion into the mediastinal pleura, lungs, pericardium and great vessels were analyzed, and their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated. For mediastinal pleural and pericardial invasion, an absence of space between the tumor and the mediastinal pleura/pericardium with mediastinal pleural/pericardial thickening and pleural/pericardial effusion exhibited a specificity and PPV of 100%, respectively. For lung invasion, a multi-lobular tumor convex to the lung with adjacent lung abnormalities exhibited a specificity and PPV of 91.2 and 81.3%, respectively. For vessel invasion, the specificity and PPV were each 100% for tumors abutting ≥50% of the vessel circumference, and for tumor oppression, deformation and occlusion of the vessel. In conclusion, recognition of the appropriate CT features can serve as a guide to invasion by stage III thymic tumors, and can facilitate the selection of appropriate pre-operative treatment. PMID:28123518

  3. AJCC-7TH Edition Staging Criteria for Colon Cancer: Do the Complex Modifications Improve Prognostic Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Danielle M; Leung, Anna M; Lee, Ji-Hey; Sim, Myung-Shin; Vuong, Brooke; Chiu, Connie G; Bilchik, Anton J

    2015-01-01

    Background The seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (AJCC-7) includes significant changes for colon cancer (CC), which are particularly complex in patients with stage II and III disease. We used a national cancer database to determine if these changes improved prediction of survival. Study Design The database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program was queried to identify patients with pathologically confirmed stage I-III CC diagnosed between 1988 and 2008. CC was staged by sixth edition AJCC criteria (AJCC-6) and then restaged by AJCC-7. Five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared. Results After all exclusion criteria were applied, AJCC-6 and AJCC-7 staging was possible in 157,588 patients (68.9%). Bowker's test of symmetry showed that the number of patients per substage was different for AJCC-6 and AJCC-7 (p 12 lymph nodes examined did not affect this observation. Conclusion AJCC-7 staging of CC does not address all survival discrepancies, regardless of the number of lymph nodes examined. Consideration of other prognostic factors is critical for decisions regarding therapy, particularly for patients with stage II CC. PMID:23768788

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Vulvar Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professional Vulvar Cancer Treatment Research Vulvar Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Vulvar Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  5. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  6. Recent decline in prostate cancer incidence in the United States, by age, stage, and Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget, Kimberly A; Patel, Darshan P; Hanson, Heidi A; Sweeney, Carol; Lowrance, William T

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer incidence is sensitive to screening practices, however the impact of recent screening recommendations from the United States Preventative Services Task Force on prostate cancer incidence by age, stage, race, and Gleason score is unknown. This study described the timing and magnitude of changes in prostate cancer incidence trends in the United States by month of diagnosis, and evaluated trends by age, Gleason score, and stage at diagnosis. We analyzed prostate cancer incidence trends using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program data for men diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer from 2007 through 2012. JoinPoint analysis was used to detect changes in the rate of annual percent change (APC) in prostate cancer incidence for all diagnoses and by age, Gleason score, race, and stage. Prostate cancer incidence declined at an estimated -19.6% APC beginning May 2011. This decline was observed in all age groups. Low-grade tumors (Gleason score ≤6) showed a steeper decline (-29.1% APC) than high-grade tumors (Gleason score 8-10: -10.8% APC). Only stage I/II and stage III tumors saw declines (-24.2% and -16.7% APC, respectively). A sharp decline in prostate cancer incidence began before release of the United States Preventative Services Task Force October 2011 draft and May 2012 final screening recommendation. The greatest change occurred with incidence of low-grade tumors, although there is concern that some high-grade tumors may now go undetected. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Titan III Mars Explorer Transfer Orbital Stage Delivery to the PHSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video presents live footage of the delivery of the Titan III Mars Explorer Transfer Orbital Stage (TOS) to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF). The TOS is a single-stage, solid propellant upper stage vehicle used to propel a spacecraft from low Earth orbit toward it's ultimate destination. The TOS is delivered to the PHSF where it is designed to accommodate a variety of NASA and NASA customer payloads and can be used as a payload processing facility (PPF) or a hazardous processing facility (HPF).

  8. Genetic Analysis in Blood and Tumor Samples From Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Breast Cancer Receiving Palbociclib and Endocrine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-16

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  9. A Plasma Biomarker Panel to Identify Surgically Resectable Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasenthil, Seetharaman; Huang, Ying; Liu, Suyu; Marsh, Tracey; Chen, Jinyun; Stass, Sanford A; KuKuruga, Debra; Brand, Randall; Chen, Nanyue; Frazier, Marsha L; Jack Lee, J; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sen, Subrata; McNeill Killary, Ann

    2017-08-01

    Blood-based biomarkers for early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are urgently needed. Current biomarkers lack high sensitivity and specificity for population screening. The gold-standard biomarker, CA 19-9, also fails to demonstrate the predictive value necessary for early detection. To validate a functional genomics-based plasma migration signature biomarker panel, plasma tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), tenascin C (TNC-FN III-C), and CA 19-9 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in three early-stage PDAC plasma cohorts, including two independent blinded validation cohorts containing a total of 43 stage I, 163 stage II, 86 chronic pancreatitis, 31 acute biliary obstruction, and 108 controls. Logistic regression models developed classification rules combining TFPI and/or TNC-FN III-C with CA 19-9 for patient cases and control subjects, with or without adjustment for age and diabetes status. Model classification performance was evaluated and analyses repeated among subpopulations without diabetes and pancreatitis history. Two-sided P values were calculated using bootstrap method. The TFPI/TNC-FN III-C/CA 19-9 panel improved CA 19-9 performance in all early-stage cohorts, including discriminating stage IA/IB/IIA, stage IIB, and all early-stage cancer from healthy controls. Statistical significance was reached for a number of subcohorts, including for all early-stage cancer vs healthy controls (cohort 1 AUC = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.86 to 0.96, P  = .04; cohort 3 AUC = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.89, P  = .045). Among subcohorts without diabetes and pancreatitis history, the panel approaches potential clinical utility for early detection to discriminate early-stage PDAC from healthy controls including an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.87 (95% CI = 0.77 to 0.95) for stage I/IIA, an AUC of 0.93 (95% CI = 0.87 to 0.98) for stage IIB, and a statistically significant AUC of 0.89 (95% CI = 0

  10. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  11. Stage distribution of breast cancer diagnosed before and after implementation of population-based mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofvind, S. [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway). Research; Skaane, P. [Oslo Univ. Hospital Ullevaal (Norway). Dept. of Radiology

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The German mammographic screening program is very similar to the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), which started about 10 years earlier. This study analyzes the stage distribution of invasive breast cancers diagnosed in the pre-screening and screening period, and evaluates the overall mortality in women aged 55 - 74 in the pilot and non-pilot counties of the NBCSP. Materials and Methods: The NBCSP invites women aged 50 - 69 to participate in two-view mammography biennially. Chi-square statistics were used to compare percentages of the stage and treatment of invasive breast cancers diagnosed in women residing in the four pilot counties in the pre-screening (1984 - 1995) and screening (1996 - 2007) period. An ecological approach was used to analyze the age-specific mortality in the pilot and non-pilot counties for the period 1970 - 2007. Results: 50 % of the breast cancers diagnosed in the pre-screening period, 70 % of the cases detected with screening, 43 % of the interval cancers, and 52 % of the cancers diagnosed outside the NBCSP were stage I. Stage III + was present in 11 % of the cancers in the pre-screening period, and in 1 % of the cancers detected with screening. In the screening period, the breast cancer mortality rate decreased substantially more in the pilot counties than in the non-pilot counties. Conclusion: The stage distribution of breast cancer diagnosed in the NBCSP is prognostically favorable compared to cancers diagnosed outside the screening program. The reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate was more pronounced in the four pilot counties compared to the non-pilot counties. It is necessary to evaluate the program based on individual data. (orig.)

  12. The association between fatalistic beliefs and late stage at diagnosis of lung and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Liu, Michael Pang-Hsiang; Abel, Gary A.; Wardle, Jane; Keating, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatalistic beliefs may be implicated in longer help-seeking intervals, and consequently, greater risk of advanced stage at cancer diagnosis. Methods We examined associations between fatalism and stage at diagnosis in a population-based cohort of 4,319 U.S. patients with newly-diagnosed lung or colorectal cancer participating in the Cancer Care Outcomes and Research Surveillance (CanCORS) study. Fatalistic beliefs were assessed with an established measure. A fatalism score (range 4-16) was created by summing Likert-scale responses to four items. Cancer stage at diagnosis was abstracted from medical records by trained staff. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between fatalism score and advanced stage at diagnosis (IV vs I-III), adjusting for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Results Overall, 917 (21%) patients had stage IV cancers (lung: 28%, colorectal: 16%). The mean fatalism score was 10.7 (median=11, inter-quartile range 9-12). In adjusted analyses, a higher fatalism score was associated with greater odds of stage IV diagnosis (odds ratio per unit increase in fatalism=1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.08, p=0.003). Patients with the highest fatalism score had an adjusted 8.9% higher frequency of stage IV diagnosis compared with patients with the lowest score (25.4% vs. 16.5%). Discussion In this large and socioeconomically, geographically and ethnically diverse population of patients with lung and colorectal cancer, fatalistic beliefs were associated with higher risk of advanced stage at diagnosis. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm causation. Impact These findings support the value of incorporating information about the curability of early-stage cancers in public education campaigns. PMID:25650183

  13. Outcomes in patients with aggressive or refractory disease from REVEL: A randomized phase III study of docetaxel with ramucirumab or placebo for second-line treatment of stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Martin; Paz-Ares, Luis; Bidoli, Paolo; Cappuzzo, Federico; Dakhil, Shaker; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Borghaei, Hossein; Johnson, Melissa; Jotte, Robert; Pennell, Nathan A; Shepherd, Frances A; Tsao, Anne; Thomas, Michael; Carter, Gebra Cuyun; Chan-Diehl, Faye; Alexandris, Ekaterine; Lee, Pablo; Zimmermann, Annamaria; Sashegyi, Andreas; Pérol, Maurice

    2017-10-01

    The REVEL study demonstrated improved efficacy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with ramucirumab plus docetaxel, independent of histology. This exploratory analysis characterized the treatment effect in REVEL patients who were refractory to prior first-line treatment. Refractory patients had a best response of progressive disease to first-line treatment. Endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QoL), and safety. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed for OS and PFS, and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test was used for response. QoL was assessed with the Lung Cancer Symptom Scale. Sensitivity analyses were performed on subgroups of the intent-to-treat population with limited time on first-line therapy. Of 1253 randomized patients in REVEL, 360 (29%) were refractory to first-line treatment. Baseline characteristics were largely balanced between treatment arms. In the control arm, median OS for refractory patients was 6.3 versus 10.3 months for patients not meeting this criterion, demonstrating the poor prognosis of refractory patients. Median OS (8.3 vs. 6.3 months; HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.68-1.08), median PFS (4.0 vs. 2.5 months; HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.88), and ORR (22.5% vs. 12.6%) were improved in refractory patients treated with ramucirumab compared to placebo, without new safety concerns or further deteriorating patient QoL. The effect of ramucirumab in refractory patients is similar to that in the intent-to-treat population. The benefit/risk profile for refractory patients suggests that ramucirumab plus docetaxel is an appropriate treatment option even in this difficult-to-treat population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Southwest Oncology Group Trial S9912: intraperitoneal cisplatin and paclitaxel plus intravenous paclitaxel and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin as primary chemotherapy of small-volume residual stage III ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harriet O; Moon, James; Wilczynski, Sharon P; Tiersten, Amy D; Hannigan, Edward V; Robinson, William R; Rivkin, Saul E; Anderson, Garnet L; Liu, P Y; Markman, Maurie

    2009-08-01

    While primary cisplatin-based intraperitoneal chemotherapy has been shown to favorably impact survival in small-volume residual advanced ovarian cancer, there is a need to develop strategies that improve the effectiveness of this approach. A multi-center phase 2 trial was conducted that added intravenous pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (day 8; 30-40 mg/m(2)) to a regimen of intraperitoneal cisplatin (day 2; 75 mg/m(2)) and intravenous (day 1; 135 mg/m(2)) plus intraperitoneal (day 8; 60 mg/m(2)) paclitaxel. Treatment was initially delivered on an every 3-week schedule, but was modified to an every 4-week program due to excessive toxicity. Patients were to receive 6 cycles of this regimen. Of 68 patients entering this trial, 63 patients were eligible and evaluable, of whom 39 (62%) completed 6 cycles. Overall, 32 (51%) experienced at least 1 grade 4 or worse toxicity (most commonly hematologic) including 5 treatment-related deaths. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 25 months (2-year PFS: 52%) and median overall survival 51 months, an outcome similar to previous reports of cisplatin-based intraperitoneal chemotherapy in comparable patient populations. Seventeen patients (27% of all eligible patients) were without evidence of disease recurrence >4 years following entry into the trial. Both the overall trial outcome, and specifically the excessively severe systemic toxicity of this regimen would prevent its future development in this exact form. The provocative PFS in a subset of individuals should encourage the development of alternative strategies designed to optimize the delivery of regional therapy in ovarian cancer management.

  15. Trametinib and TAS-102 in Treating Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-23

    RAS Family Gene Mutation; Stage III Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7

  16. Colorectal cancer survival by stage of cases diagnosed in Mallorca, Spain, between 2006 and 2011 and factors associated with survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M; Montaño, J; Esteva, M; Barceló, A; Franch, P

    2016-04-01

    To establish cause-specific survival by stage of colorectal cancer up to 8 years from diagnosis, and to identify factors which explain and predict the likelihood of survival. Retrospective follow-up study of people diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer during 2006-2011, identified through the Mallorca Cancer Registry. DCO and lymphomas were excluded. Sex, age, diagnostic method, site, histology, T, N, M, and stage, date of diagnosis, date of follow-up or death, and cause of death were collected. End point of follow-up was 31st December 2013. Multiple imputation (MI) method was performed to obtain stage when unknown. Actuarial and Kaplan-Meier methods were used for survival analysis. Extended Cox models were built to identify factors that explain and predict survival. 2889 cases were identified, 41.7% in women and 58.3% in men, with a mean age of 70.5 years. Unknown stage represented 15.3% of cases. After MI, 15% were in stage I, 26.7% were in II, 32.7% in III, and 25.6% in IV. Survival was 56% at the end of the 5th year. Survival by stage changed significantly after MI and was estimated to 83% at stage I, 73% at II, 62% at III, and 16% at IV. Extended Cox model showed that survival worsened with age, mucinous histology, and stage. Risk of dying was 17.0 times higher in stage IV compared to stage I, 3.7 times in stage III, and 1.6 times in stage II. More than half of colorectal cancer patients will survive 5 years after diagnosis, but only if diagnosed in stages I-III. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extent of pelvic lymphadenectomy and use of adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy for early-stage endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Machida, Hiroko; Ragab, Omar M; Takiuchi, Tsuyoshi; Pham, Huyen Q; Roman, Lynda D

    2017-03-01

    To examine trends of adjuvant radiotherapy choice and to examine associations between pelvic lymphadenectomy and radiotherapy choice for women with early-stage endometrial cancer. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program was used to identify surgically treated stage I-II endometrial cancer between 1983 and 2012 (type 1 n=79,474, and type 2 n=25,020). Piecewise linear regression models were used to examine temporal trends of intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) and whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) use, pelvic lymphadenectomy rate, and sampled node counts. Multivariable binary logistic regression models were used to identify independent predictors for ICBT use. There was a significant increase in ICBT use and decrease in WPRT use during the study period. ICBT use exceeded WPRT use in 2003 for type 1 stage IA, and in 2007 for type 1 stage IB and type 2 stage IA diseases. In addition, number of sampled pelvic nodes significantly increased over time in type 1-2 stage I-II diseases (mean, 7.0-12.7 in 1988 to 15.2-17.6 in 2012, all P10 nodes versus no lymphadenectomy in stage IA (1.38/2.40), IB (2.75/6.32), and II (1.36/2.91) diseases. Similar trends were observed for type 2 cancer: adjusted-odds ratios for stage IA (1.69/3.73), IB (2.25/5.65), and II (1.36/2.19) diseases. Our results suggest that surgeons and radiation oncologists are evaluating the extent of pelvic lymphadenectomy when counseling women with early-stage endometrial cancer for adjuvant radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The newly proposed clinical and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging classifications for gastric adenocarcinoma for the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Haejin; Ravetch, Ethan; Langdon-Embry, Marisa; Palis, Bryan; Ajani, Jaffer A; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Kelsen, David P; Sano, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    New stage grouping classifications for clinical (cStage) and post-neoadjuvant treatment (ypStage) stage for gastric adenocarcinoma have been proposed for the eighth edition of the AJCC manual. This article summarizes the analysis for these stages. Gastric adenocarcinoma patients diagnosed in 2004-2009 were identified from the National Cancer Database (NCDB). The cStage cohort included both surgical and nonsurgical cases, and the ypStage cohort included only patients who had chemotherapy or radiation therapy before surgery. Survival differences between the stage groups were determined by the log-rank test and prognostic accuracy was assessed by concordance index. Analysis was performed using SAS 9.4 (SAS, Cary, NC, USA). Five strata for cStage and four strata for ypStage were developed. The 5-year survival rates for cStages were 56.77%, 47.39%, 33.1%, 25.9%, and 5.0% for stages I, IIa, IIb, III, and IV, respectively, and the rates for ypStage were 74.2%, 46.3%, 19.2%, and 11.6% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The log-rank test showed that survival differences were well stratified and stage groupings were ordered and distinct (p < 0.0001). The proposed cStage and ypStage classification was sensitive and specific and had high prognostic accuracy (cStage: c index = 0.81, 95% CI, 0.79-0.83; ypStage: c index = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.73-0.87). The proposed eighth edition establishes two new staging schemata that provide essential prognostic data for patients before treatment and for patients who have undergone surgery following neoadjuvant therapy. These additions are a significant advance to the AJCC staging manual and will provide critical guidance to clinicians in making informed decisions throughout the treatment course.

  19. Nivolumab, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-20

    Name Human Papillomavirus Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the vagina. The vagina is the canal leading from the cervix (the opening of uterus ) to ... Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer Coping with Cancer Questions to Ask Your Doctor about ...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from hard- ...

  2. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the lungs. Enlarge Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their ... Cell Lung Cancer Tobacco (includes help with quitting) Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to Quit Secondhand Smoke and Cancer For general cancer information and other ...

  3. IDEAL-CRT: A Phase 1/2 Trial of Isotoxic Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage II/III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, David B., E-mail: david.landau@kcl.ac.uk [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, Laura [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Baker, Angela [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Bates, Andrew T. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bayne, Michael C. [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Counsell, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Garcia-Alonso, Angel [North Wales Cancer Centre, Rhyl (United Kingdom); Harden, Susan V. [Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hicks, Jonathan D. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hughes, Simon R. [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Illsley, Marianne C. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guilford (United Kingdom); Khan, Iftekhar [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Laurence, Virginia [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Malik, Zafar; Mayles, Helen; Mayles, William Philip M. [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Nazia [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ngai, Yenting [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Parsons, Emma [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity and early survival data for IDEAL-CRT, a trial of dose-escalated concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients received tumor doses of 63 to 73 Gy in 30 once-daily fractions over 6 weeks with 2 concurrent cycles of cisplatin and vinorelbine. They were assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to esophageal dose. In group 1, tumor doses were determined by an experimental constraint on maximum esophageal dose, which was escalated following a 6 + 6 design from 65 Gy through 68 Gy to 71 Gy, allowing an esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be determined from early and late toxicities. Tumor doses for group 2 patients were determined by other tissue constraints, often lung. Overall survival, progression-free survival, tumor response, and toxicity were evaluated for both groups combined. Results: Eight centers recruited 84 patients: 13, 12, and 10, respectively, in the 65-Gy, 68-Gy, and 71-Gy cohorts of group 1; and 49 in group 2. The mean prescribed tumor dose was 67.7 Gy. Five grade 3 esophagitis and 3 grade 3 pneumonitis events were observed across both groups. After 1 fatal esophageal perforation in the 71-Gy cohort, 68 Gy was declared the esophageal maximum tolerated dose. With a median follow-up of 35 months, median overall survival was 36.9 months, and overall survival and progression-free survival were 87.8% and 72.0%, respectively, at 1 year and 68.0% and 48.5% at 2 years. Conclusions: IDEAL-CRT achieved significant treatment intensification with acceptable toxicity and promising survival. The isotoxic design allowed the esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be identified from relatively few patients.

  4. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  5. Analyzing proteasomal subunit expression reveals Rpt4 as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is the key to improving survival rates and as such a need exists to identify patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in oncogenesis and cancer cell survival, and proteasome inhibitors are in clinical use for a number of malignancies including multiple myeloma. In our study, we examined the protein expression of several key components of the UPS in colorectal cancer using immunohistochemistry to determine expression levels of ubiquitinylated proteins and the proteasomal subunits, 20S core and Rpt4 in a cohort of 228 patients with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that neither the intensity of either ubiquitinylated proteins or the 20S core was predictive in either Stage II or III colon cancer for disease free survival or overall survival. In contrast, in Stage II patients increased Rpt4 staining was significantly associated with disease free survival (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.605; p = 0.0217). Our data suggest that Rpt4 is an independent prognostic variable for Stage II colorectal cancer and may aid in the decision of which patients undergo adjuvant chemotherapy.

  6. Updated guidelines on the preoperative staging of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Recent studies have provided prognostic information and recommendations for staging thyroid cancers that have changed the staging and management guidelines for the disease. Consequently, minimal extrathyroidal extension (ETE) was removed from the T3 stage classification in the eighth edition of the TNM staging system by the American Joint Committee on Cancer. New T categories have been subsequently added, including T3a, defined as a tumor >4 cm in its greatest dimension, limited to the thyroid gland, and T3b, defined as a tumor of any size with gross ETE invading only the strap muscles. In this article, the author reviews the changes in the TNM staging system for thyroid cancer, with an emphasis on ultrasonography in preoperative staging.

  7. Protocol Coordinator III | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides programmatic and logistical support for the operations of clinical research Provides deployment of clinical support services for clinical research Streamlines the protocol development timeline Provides data and documents collection and compilation for regulatory filing with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory authorities Provides technical review and report preparation Provides administrative coordination and general logistical support for regulatory activities Ensures the provision of training for investigators and associate staff to reinforce and enhance a Good Clinical Practices (GCP) culture Oversees quality assurance and quality control, performs regulatory review of clinical protocols, informed consent and other clinical documents Tracks and facilitates a portfolio of protocols through each process step (Institutional Review Board [IRB], Regulatory Affairs Compliance [RAC], Data Safety Monitoring Board [DSMB], Office of Protocol Services) Assists clinical investigators in preparing clinical research protocols, including writing and formatting consent forms Prepares protocol packages for review and ensures that protocol packages include all required material and complies with CCR, NCI and NIH policies Collaborates with investigators to resolve any protocol/data issues Coordinates submission of protocols for scientific and ethical review by the Branch scientific review committees, the NCI IRB, and the clinical trial sponsor or the FDA Monitors the review process and maintains detailed, complete and accurate approval records for each protocol at the various stages of the review process, including new protocol submissions, amendments to protocols, and continuing reviews, as well as other submissions such as adverse events Attends and prepares minutes for the Branch Protocol Review Committees Contacts coordinators at other centers for protocols that are performed there to obtain review committee approvals at those centers

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and esophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the pretherapeutic assessment of patients with proven or suspected lung cancer. EUS-FNA and EBUS-TBNA have been shown to have...... a good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical staging in patients with suspected and proven lung cancer, but until then surgical staging remains the gold...

  9. GIS-based NEXRAD Stage III precipitation database: automated approaches for data processing and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongjie; Zhou, Xiaobing; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Hendrickx, Jan M. H.; Small, Eric E.

    2005-02-01

    This study develops a geographical information system (GIS) approach for automated processing of the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) Stage III precipitation data. The automated processing system, implemented by using commercial GIS and a number of Perl scripts and C/C++ programs, allows for rapid data display, requires less storage capacity, and provides the analytical and data visualization tools inherent in GIS as compared to traditional methods. In this paper, we illustrate the development of automatic techniques to preprocess raw NEXRAD Stage III data, transform the data to a GIS format, select regions of interest, and retrieve statistical rainfall analysis over user-defined spatial and temporal scales. Computational expense is reduced significantly using the GIS-based automated techniques. For example, 1-year Stage III data processing (˜9000 files) for the West Gulf River Forecast Center takes about 3 days of computation time instead of months of manual work. To illustrate the radar precipitation database and its visualization capabilities, we present three application examples: (1) GIS-based data visualization and integration, and ArcIMS-based web visualization and publication system, (2) a spatial-temporal analysis of monsoon rainfall patterns over the Rio Grande River Basin, and (3) the potential of GIS-based radar data for distributed watershed models. We conclude by discussing the potential applications of automated techniques for radar rainfall processing and its integration with GIS-based hydrologic information systems.

  10. A mid-term follow-up of Koutsogiannis' osteotomy in adult-acquired flatfoot stage II and "early stage III".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvinius, Camilla; Manrique, Elena; Urda, Antonio; Cardoso, Zulema; Galeote, Jose Enrique; Marco, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Koutsogiannis' osteotomy has been widely described to treat adult-acquired flatfoot. However, few articles describe its midterm follow-up. Our aim was to study clinical and radiological outcomes at least one year after surgery and to analyze whether a combined procedure on the medial soft tissue affected these outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of 30 feet of patients who underwent a Koutsogiannis' osteotomy due to adult-acquired flatfoot stage II and "early stage III": a stage III acquired flatfoot without any important structural deformities. The parameters studied were additional medial soft tissue procedures, clinical outcome through the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and midfoot score as well as complications and radiological measurements. Sixteen cases were "early stage III" and 14 stage II. Thirteen patients underwent an associated posterior tibial tendon (PTT) revision: in three cases an end-to-end suture was possible, seven cases needed a FDL transposition, and three underwent synovectomy. Statistically significant improvement was found in the AOFAS score although no significant changes were seen radiologically. No additional benefit was found with the revision of the posterior tibial tendon. As to clinical and radiological results, no differences were found between stage II and "early stage III". Five cases presented a mild dysesthesia but only one patient needed neurolysis. We consider the Koutsogiannis' osteotomy to be a safe and effective procedure to reduce pain in patients with stage II and "early stage III" adult-acquired flatfoot. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  11. Comorbidities and the Risk of Late-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T. Fleming

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The degree to which comorbidities affect the diagnosis of prostate cancer is not clear. The purpose of this study was to determine how comorbidities affect the stage at which prostate cancer is diagnosed in elderly white and black men. We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute merged with Medicare claims data. For each patient, we estimated associations between stage of disease at diagnosis and each of the 27 comorbidities. The sample included 2,489 black and 2,587 white men with staged prostate cancer. Coronary artery disease, benign hypertension, and dyslipidemia reduced the odds of late-stage prostate cancer. A prior diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease, severe renal disease, or substance abuse increased the odds of being diagnosed with late-stage disease. The study shows some effect modification by race, particularly among white men with substance abuse, cardiac conduction disorders, and other neurologic conditions. The strongest predictors of late-stage prostate cancer diagnosis for both white and black men were age at diagnosis of at least 80 years and lack of PSA screening. Comorbidities do affect stage at diagnosis, although in different ways. Four hypotheses are discussed to explain these findings.

  12. Impact of body mass index on ovarian cancer survival varies by stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Elisa V; Lee, Valerie S; Qin, Bo; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Powell, C Bethan; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2017-07-11

    Research on the effect of body mass index (BMI) on ovarian cancer survival is inconsistent, but previous studies did not consider the possible impact of ascites, bowel obstruction, or cachexia, which commonly occur in late-stage disease. We evaluated the association of BMI, before and around the time of diagnosis, with overall and disease-specific survival in a cohort study of primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancers diagnosed from 2000 to 2013 in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) (n=1184). Deaths were identified through December 2014, with a median follow-up of 37 months. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate overall and ovarian cancer-specific mortality, accounting for prognostic variables including age at diagnosis, race, stage, grade, histology, comorbidities, treatment, post-treatment CA125 levels, ascites, and bowel obstruction. There was no evidence of an association between BMI and overall or ovarian cancer-specific survival. However, we found strong effect modification by stage (P interaction <0.01). Compared with normal prediagnosis BMI (18.5-24.9 kg m -2 ), for women who were obese before diagnosis (BMI⩾35 kg m -2 ) ovarian cancer-specific survival was lower among those diagnosed at stages I/II (hazard ratio (HR): 3.40; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-9.99), but increased among those diagnosed with stage IV disease (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-0.96). Associations were attenuated after excluding those diagnosed with cachexia (n=82) and further adjustment for ascites and bowel obstruction, with no evidence of effect modification by these factors. Associations of obesity with ovarian cancer survival may differ by stage, with decreased survival among those with localised disease and increased survival among those with late-stage disease. Stage-specific effects of obesity on survival suggest a tailored approach to improve prognosis may be appropriate.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camisao, Claudia C. [Hospital Sao Lucas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ccamisao@inca.gov.br; Brenna, Sylvia M.F. [Hospital Maternidade Leonor Mendes de Barros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lombardelli, Karen V.P. [Hospital do Cancer (HCII), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Djahjah, Maria Celia R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Ginecologia

    2007-05-15

    Cervical cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related death of women, especially in developing countries. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics recommends staging during surgery, however, surgical-pathologic staging would not be feasible in cases of more advanced cancers. Generally, in these cases, the staging is performed by means of clinical and gynecological examination and basic imaging studies. However, such an approach fails to demonstrate the actual extent of the disease, and does not include significant prognostic factors such as tumor volume, stromal invasion and lymph node involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging has increasingly been utilized in cervical cancer staging, since at early stages of the disease its performance may be compared to intraoperative findings and, at advanced stages, it shows to be superior to the clinical evaluation. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging presents an excellent imaging resolution for the different densities of pelvic structures, does not require ionizing radiation, is comfortable for the patient, improves de staging, allowing the early detection of recurrence and the identification of reliable prognostic factors which contribute to the therapeutic decision making process and results prediction with an excellent cost-effectiveness. The present article is aimed at reviewing the most significant aspects of magnetic resonance imaging in the cervical cancer staging. (author)

  14. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment Past Issues / ... Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include the following: Taking estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after menopause . Taking tamoxifen to prevent or treat breast cancer . ... and You: Support for People With Cancer Radiation Therapy and You: Support for ... and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The ...

  16. Survival for colon and rectal cancer in Estonia: role of staging and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innos, Kaire; Soplepmann, Jaan; Suuroja, Tiit; Melnik, Priit; Aareleid, Tiiu

    2012-04-01

    International comparisons have indicated low colorectal cancer (CRC) survival in Estonia, compared to other European countries. The objective of this paper is to analyse long-term survival as well as staging and treatment patterns of CRC in Estonia. The analysis included all incident cases of CRC diagnosed in Estonia in 1997 (n = 546), identified through the Estonian Cancer Registry and followed up for 10 years after diagnosis. Staging and treatment data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Relative survival rate (RSR) was used to estimate the outcome. The 5-year RSR was 51% for colon cancer and 38% for rectal cancer; the corresponding 10-year RSR was 50% and 39%. We observed no excess mortality for early disease. For stages II and III, the survival was markedly higher in colon cancer (5-year RSR 79% and 66%, respectively) compared to rectal cancer (66% and 30%, respectively). Around 30% of cases were diagnosed with distant disease. Among radically operated colon and rectal cancer patients, the 10-year RSR was 90% and 70%, respectively. Most patients with available pathological information had one to four lymph nodes examined. Survival has notably improved for colon cancer, but not for rectal cancer in Estonia. High proportion of cases with distant metastasis at first diagnosis along with inadequate staging and low proportion of patients treated with curatively intended surgery and appropriate chemotherapy and radiotherapy may have contributed to this outcome. Progress could be achieved by earlier diagnosis and implementing higher standards for staging and treatment. These conclusions are likely to be relevant also for other Eastern European countries.

  17. Axillary staging for breast cancer during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, S N; Amant, F; Cardonick, E H

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Safety of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for breast cancer during pregnancy is insufficiently explored. We investigated efficacy and local recurrence rate in a large series of pregnant patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who underwent SLN biopsy during...... pregnancy were identified from the International Network on Cancer, Infertility and Pregnancy, the German Breast Group, and the Cancer and Pregnancy Registry. Chart review was performed to record technique and outcome of SLN biopsy, locoregional and distant recurrence, and survival. RESULTS: We identified...... were alive and free of disease. Eleven patients experienced a locoregional relapse, including 1 isolated ipsilateral axillary recurrence (0.7%). Eleven (7.6%) patients developed distant metastases, of whom 9 (6.2%) died of breast cancer. No neonatal adverse events related to SLN procedure during...

  18. Prostate cancer: multiparametric MR imaging for detection, localization, and staging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, C.M.A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Hambrock, T.; Yakar, D.; Somford, D.M.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vos, P.C.; Huisman, H.J.; Oort, I.M. van; Witjes, J.A.; Heerschap, A.; Futterer, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    This review presents the current state of the art regarding multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of prostate cancer. Technical requirements and clinical indications for the use of multiparametric MR imaging in detection, localization, characterization, staging, biopsy guidance, and active

  19. Capmatinib, Ceritinib, Regorafenib, or Entrectinib in Treating Patients With BRAF/NRAS Wild-Type Stage III-IV Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-20

    ALK Fusion Protein Expression; BRAF wt Allele; Invasive Skin Melanoma; MET Fusion Gene Positive; NRAS wt Allele; NTRK1 Fusion Positive; NTRK2 Fusion Positive; NTRK3 Fusion Positive; RET Fusion Positive; ROS1 Fusion Positive; Stage III Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7

  20. Definitive IMRT for Stage III Thymic Carcinoma: A Brief Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Dooley

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThymic carcinoma is a rare malignancy often presenting at an advanced stage. Radiosurgery and chemotherapy are often the only treatment options available to physicians.MethodsA 70-year old man presented with an unresectable Stage III thymic tumor and was treated with 45Gy in 12 fractions followed by a boost of 21.6 Gy in 12 fractions. He was also treated with bortezomib for multiple myeloma unrelated to his primary malignancy.ResultsThe patient made a full recovery following the radiation regimen and remained disease free four years after treatmentConclusionExclusive treatment with IMRT provides a viable treatment option for patients presenting with advanced stage thymic carcinoma.

  1. The role of laparoscopy in staging of different gynaecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, K Y; Ngan, Hextan Y S

    2015-08-01

    Apart from cervical and vaginal cancers that are staged by clinical examination, most gynaecological cancers are staged surgically. Not only can pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy offer accurate staging information that helps determine patients' prognosis and hence their treatment plan, but it may also provide a therapeutic effect under certain circumstances. In the past, such a procedure required a big laparotomy incision. With the advent of laparoscopic lighting and instrument, laparoscopic lymphadenectomy became popular since the late 1980s. Dargent et al. published the first report on laparoscopic staging in cervical cancers, and many studies then followed. To date, there are numerous case series and trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic surgery in managing gynaecological cancers. In general, compared with laparotomy, laparoscopic lymphadenectomy has less intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pain, fewer wound complications, shorter length of hospital stay and more speedy recovery. However, this is at the expense of longer operative time. The incidence of port-site metastasis is extremely low, although it may be higher in advanced ovarian cancer. Preliminary data showed that there was no significant effect on recurrence and survival, but long-term data are lacking. In this article, the roles of laparoscopy in staging of uterine, cervical and ovarian cancers, the three most common gynaecological cancers, will be reviewed. Novel technologies such as robot-assisted surgery, single-port surgery and sentinel node biopsy will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment for information about childhood thyroid cancer. Age, gender, and being exposed to radiation can affect the ... is made by the pituitary gland in the brain. It stimulates the release of thyroid hormone and ...

  3. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  4. Laparoscopic staging for apparent stage I epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Alexander; Keating, Nancy L; Clemmer, Joel T; Bregar, Amy J; Wright, Jason D; Boruta, David M; Schorge, John O; Del Carmen, Marcela G; Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Whereas advances in minimally invasive surgery have made laparoscopic staging technically feasible in stage I epithelial ovarian cancer, the practice remains controversial because of an absence of randomized trials and lack of high-quality observational studies demonstrating equivalent outcomes. This study seeks to evaluate the association of laparoscopic staging with survival among women with clinical stage I epithelial ovarian cancer. We used the National Cancer Data Base to identify all women who underwent surgical staging for clinical stage I epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed from 2010 through 2012. The exposure of interest was planned surgical approach (laparoscopy vs laparotomy), and the primary outcome was overall survival. The primary analysis was based on an intention to treat: all women whose procedures were initiated laparoscopically were categorized as having had a planned laparoscopic procedure, regardless of subsequent conversion to laparotomy. We used propensity methods to match patients who underwent planned laparoscopic staging with similar patients who underwent planned laparotomy based on observed characteristics. We compared survival among the matched cohorts using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression. We compared the extent of lymphadenectomy using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Among 4798 eligible patients, 1112 (23.2%) underwent procedures that were initiated laparoscopically, of which 190 (17%) were converted to laparotomy. Women who underwent planned laparoscopy were more frequently white, privately insured, from wealthier ZIP codes, received care in community cancer centers, and had smaller tumors that were more frequently of serous and less often of mucinous histology than those who underwent staging via planned laparotomy. After propensity score matching, time to death did not differ between patients undergoing planned laparoscopic vs open staging (hazard ratio, 0.77, 95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.09; P = .13). Planned

  5. Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    properly manage the treatment of patients, the staging of lung cancer needs to be accurately performed. Surgical resection is mostly preferred when the...integrate the photoacoustic imaging modality into endoscopy through trachea is the limited room for the implementation of scanning. We have identified...disciplinary research team involving researchers in imaging, molecular targeting, tunable focusing, cancer biology, and surgical oncology

  6. Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida JG56 BMS building 1275 center Dr. Gainesville FL 32601 xx 9... nanoparticle /dye for lymph node imaging have also been tested. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Endoscopic photoacoustic imaging, lung cancer, tumor staging, tunable...cancer. This technology focused application has put together a truly multi-disciplinary research team involving researchers in imaging, molecular

  7. Feasibility of sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy in stage I testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, Pieter J.; Horenblas, Simon; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Hoefnagel, Cornelis A.; Nieweg, Omgo E.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of lymphoscintigraphy for sentinel node identification in testicular cancer. Five patients with clinical stage I testicular cancer were prospectively included. A single dose of technetium-99m nanocolloid (mean dose 99 MBq, volume 0.2 ml) was

  8. Genomic aberrations relate early and advanced stage ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, A.; Peyrot, W.J.; Berns, P.M.J.J.; van der Burg, M.E.L.; Veerbeek, J.H.W.; Trimbos, J.B.; Cadron, I.; van Diest, P.J.; van Wieringen, W.N.; Krijgsman, O.; Meijer, G.A.; Piek, J.M.J.; Timmers, P.J.; Vergote, I.; Verheijen, R.H.; Ylstra, B.; Zweemer, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Because of the distinct clinical presentation of early and advanced stage ovarian cancer, we aim to clarify whether these disease entities are solely separated by time of diagnosis or whether they arise from distinct molecular events. Methods Sixteen early and sixteen advanced stage

  9. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Fischer, Barbara Malene B; Mortensen, Jann

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has become a widely used technology for preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCT) have established its efficacy over conventional staging, but no studies have assessed its cost...

  10. Positron Emission Tomography in Staging of Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westreenen, Henderik Leendert van

    2005-01-01

    Curative treatment of patients with esophageal cancer mainly depends on the stage of disease. Until now, surgical resection is the only curative option in patients with locoregional stage of the disease, but is accompanied by substantial morbidity and even mortality. Patients with distant metastases

  11. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan J Sathianathen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting.

  12. Angle Class III malocclusion with anteroposterior and vertical discrepancy in the final stage of growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo B. P de Arruda

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an anteroposterior dental discrepancy with or without anteroposterior and vertical skeletal changes. Patients usually seek orthodontic treatment because facial appearance is compromised in most cases. The present study describes the clinical case of a 12-year and 6-month-old girl in her final stage of pubertal growth presenting Class III malocclusion with anteroposterior and vertical discrepancies. Initial treatment consisted of maxillary expansion using a Hass expander followed by the use of a Petit facemask for a minimum of 16 hours a day. During corrective treatment, Class III elastics were used to complement protraction. At the end of the treatment, skeletal discrepancy had improved, and the ANB angle increased from 0 to 2o. Angle Class III malocclusion, anterior crossbite and open bite were corrected. This case was presented to the Committee of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate.

  13. Staging colorectal cancer with the TNM 7(th)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puppa, Giacomo; Poston, Graeme; Jess, Per

    2013-01-01

    lesions encountered, in particular, during radiological staging of patients with colorectal cancer. In this article the diagnosis of these lesions with multiple imaging modalities, their frequency, significance and relevance to staging and disease management are described in a multidisciplinary way...... MX category for stage assigning, its abandoning seems reasonable. The recognition of the importance of small lesion characterization raises the need for applying a separate category; therefore a proposal for their categorization is put forward. By using the proposed categorization the lack...

  14. Adjuvant Dabrafenib plus Trametinib in Stage III BRAF-Mutated Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Georgina V; Hauschild, Axel; Santinami, Mario; Atkinson, Victoria; Mandalà, Mario; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Larkin, James; Nyakas, Marta; Dutriaux, Caroline; Haydon, Andrew; Robert, Caroline; Mortier, Laurent; Schachter, Jacob; Schadendorf, Dirk; Lesimple, Thierry; Plummer, Ruth; Ji, Ran; Zhang, Pingkuan; Mookerjee, Bijoyesh; Legos, Jeff; Kefford, Richard; Dummer, Reinhard; Kirkwood, John M

    2017-11-09

    Combination therapy with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib plus the MEK inhibitor trametinib improved survival in patients with advanced melanoma with BRAF V600 mutations. We sought to determine whether adjuvant dabrafenib plus trametinib would improve outcomes in patients with resected, stage III melanoma with BRAF V600 mutations. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 870 patients with completely resected, stage III melanoma with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations to receive oral dabrafenib at a dose of 150 mg twice daily plus trametinib at a dose of 2 mg once daily (combination therapy, 438 patients) or two matched placebo tablets (432 patients) for 12 months. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, distant metastasis-free survival, freedom from relapse, and safety. At a median follow-up of 2.8 years, the estimated 3-year rate of relapse-free survival was 58% in the combination-therapy group and 39% in the placebo group (hazard ratio for relapse or death, 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.58; Pmelanoma. Adjuvant use of combination therapy with dabrafenib plus trametinib resulted in a significantly lower risk of recurrence in patients with stage III melanoma with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations than the adjuvant use of placebo and was not associated with new toxic effects. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis; COMBI-AD ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01682083 ; EudraCT number, 2012-001266-15 .).

  15. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  16. Staging with computed tomography of patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrom, M. L.; Brisling, S.; Klausen, T. W.

    2018-01-01

    to overstaging among all individuals was calculated as the number needed to harm 11.7 (95% CI, 9–16). Conclusions There is basis for improvement of CT-based preoperative staging of patients with colorectal cancer. Supplementary modalities may be needed for correct staging of patients preoperatively, especially......Purpose Accurate staging of colonic cancer is important for patient stratification. We aimed to correlate the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative computed tomography (CT) with final histopathology as reference standard. Methods Data was collected retrospectively on 615 consecutive patients operated...... for colonic cancer. Evaluation was based upon T-stage. Patients were stratified into high-risk and low-risk groups, based on the extent of tumor invasion beyond the proper muscle layer of more or less than 5 mm. The Kendall tau correlation coefficient was used to calculate concordance between radiological (r...

  17. Epacadostat and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-09

    Mucosal Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uveal Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Nasopharyngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that slides through the CT scanner, which takes x-ray pictures of the inside of the head and neck. PET scan (positron emission tomography scan) : ... is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of ... External-beam radiation therapy of the head and neck. A machine is used to aim ...

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Laryngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that slides through the CT scanner, which takes x-ray pictures of the inside of the head and neck. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) : A procedure ... is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of ... External-beam radiation therapy of the head and neck. A machine is used to aim ...

  20. Stages of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram . The picture can be printed to be looked at later. CT scan (CAT ... use this content on your website or other digital platform? Our syndication services page shows you how. National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US ... ...

  1. Impact of Marital Status on Tumor Stage at Diagnosis and on Survival in Male Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekolujo, Orimisan Samuel; Tadisina, Shourya; Koduru, Ujwala; Gernand, Jill; Smith, Susan Jane; Kakarala, Radhika Ramani

    2017-07-01

    The effect of marital status (MS) on survival varies according to cancer type and gender. There has been no report on the impact of MS on survival in male breast cancer (MBC). This study aims to determine the influence of MS on tumor stage at diagnosis and survival in MBC. Men with MBC ≥18 years of age in the SEER database from 1990 to 2011 were included in the study. MS was classified as married and unmarried (including single, divorced, separated, widowed). Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the 5-year cancer-specific survival. Multivariate regression analyses were done to determine the effect of MS on presence of Stage IV disease at diagnosis and on cancer-specific mortality. The study included 3,761 men; 2,647 (70.4%) were married. Unmarried men were more often diagnosed with Stage IV MBC compared with married (10.7% vs. 5.5%, p < .001). Unmarried men (compared with married) were significantly less likely to undergo surgery (92.4% vs. 96.7%, p < .001). Overall unmarried males with Stages II, III, and IV MBC have significantly worse 5-year cancer-specific survival compared with married. On multivariate analysis, being unmarried was associated with increased hazard of death (HR = 1.43, p < .001) and increased likelihood of Stage IV disease at diagnosis ( OR = 1.96, p < .001). Unmarried males with breast cancer are at greater risk for Stage IV disease at diagnosis and poorer outcomes compared with married males.

  2. The utility of abbreviated patient-reported outcomes for predicting survival in early stage colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tina; Speers, Caroline H; Kennecke, Hagen F; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-05-15

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly used in clinical settings. Prior research suggests that PROs collected at baseline may be associated with cancer survival, but most of those studies were conducted in patients with breast or lung cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between prospectively collected PROs and cancer-specific outcomes in patients with early stage colorectal cancer. Patients who had newly diagnosed stage II or III colorectal cancer from 2009 to 2010 and had a consultation at the British Columbia Cancer Agency completed the brief Psychosocial Screen for Cancer (PSSCAN) questionnaire, which collects data on patients' perceived social supports, quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression, and general health. PROs from the PSSCAN were linked with the Gastrointestinal Cancers Outcomes Database, which contains information on patient and tumor characteristics, treatment details, and cancer outcomes. Cox regression models were constructed for overall survival (OS), and Fine and Gray regression models were developed for disease-specific survival (DSS). In total, 692 patients were included. The median patient age was 67 years (range, 26-95 years), and the majority had colon cancer (61%), were diagnosed with stage III disease (54%), and received chemotherapy (58%). In general, patients felt well supported and reported good overall health and QOL. On multivariate analysis, increased fatigue was associated with worse OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.99; P = .00007) and DSS (HR, 1.63; P = .03), as was lack of emotional support (OS: HR, 4.36; P = .0003; DSS: HR, 1.92; P = .02). Although most patients described good overall health and QOL and indicated that they were generally well supported, patients who experienced more pronounced fatigue or lacked emotional support had a higher likelihood of worse OS and DSS. These findings suggest that abbreviated PROs can inform and assist clinicians to identify patients who have a worse

  3. Local staging of prostate cancer with transrectal ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T; Nerstrom, H; Iversen, P

    1992-01-01

    A literature review was undertaken to investigate whether transrectal ultrasound can predict the local stage of prostate cancer. Twelve papers were found which correlated ultrasound findings with surgical findings and another paper reported on strategic staging biopsies guided by transrectal...... localized disease defined by digital rectal examination, may be superior as the initial staging tool. We conclude that transrectal ultrasound has too low a specificity to upgrade the diagnostic results of digital rectal examination, but that it may be more useful as the primary staging tool and for guidance...

  4. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bazzaz Pishtewan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations.

  5. Risk of falling in Parkinson's disease at the Hoehn-Yahr stage III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Eng, M; Saeki, Keigo; Kiriyama, Takao; Eura, Nobuyuki; Ikeda, Masanori; Izumi, Tesseki; Kitauti, Takanori; Furiya, Yoshiko; Sugie, Kazuma; Ikada, Yoshito; Ueno, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to predict the risk of falling, especially in patients with good motor ability, and the mechanisms underlying the relation between gait patterns and falling in Parkinson's disease (PD) remain unclear. We investigated factors related to falling, including walking speed and time, in patients with Hoehn-Yahr stage III PD. We performed clinical assessments and evaluated balance in 30 patients with PD. Information on falling was obtained from questionnaires and personal interviews. Gait patterns were analyzed with the use of an originally designed, suddenly narrowed path. Gait velocity was slower in fallers than in non-fallers (p = 0.047). Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part II (UPDRS part II) score, fear of falling, and gait velocity were significantly related to falling on analysis with a single logistic model. When a multiple logistic model was used, the UPDRS part II score was significantly related to falling (OR: 1.48, p = 0.037, 95% CI: 1.02-2.16). Patients with Hoehn-Yahr stage III PD showed slow gait velocity attributed to fear of falling before arrival at a narrowed entrance or while walking on a narrowed path. The UPDRS part II score is significantly related to the risk of future falls. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Prognostic significance and gene expression profiles of p53 mutations in microsatellite-stable stage III colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkat R Katkoori

    Full Text Available Although the prognostic value of p53 abnormalities in Stage III microsatellite stable (MSS colorectal cancers (CRCs is known, the gene expression profiles specific to the p53 status in the MSS background are not known. Therefore, the current investigation has focused on identification and validation of the gene expression profiles associated with p53 mutant phenotypes in MSS Stage III CRCs. Genomic DNA extracted from 135 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, was analyzed for microsatellite instability (MSI and p53 mutations. Further, mRNA samples extracted from five p53-mutant and five p53-wild-type MSS-CRC snap-frozen tissues were profiled for differential gene expression by Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Differentially expressed genes were further validated by the high-throughput quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA, and confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Survival rates were estimated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. A higher incidence of p53 mutations was found in MSS (58% than in MSI (30% phenotypes. Both univariate (log-rank, P = 0.025 and multivariate (hazard ratio, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-5.08 analyses have demonstrated that patients with MSS-p53 mutant phenotypes had poor CRC-specific survival when compared to MSS-p53 wild-type phenotypes. Gene expression analyses identified 84 differentially expressed genes. Of 49 down-regulated genes, LPAR6, PDLIM3, and PLAT, and, of 35 up-regulated genes, TRIM29, FUT3, IQGAP3, and SLC6A8 were confirmed by qNPA, qRT-PCR, and IHC platforms. p53 mutations are associated with poor survival of patients with Stage III MSS CRCs and p53-mutant and wild-type phenotypes have distinct gene expression profiles that might be helpful in identifying aggressive subsets.

  7. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  8. Multidisciplinary management of very advanced stage III and IV melanoma: Proof-of-principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Haim; Ben-Ami, Eytan; Shapira-Frommer, Roni; Schachter, Jacob

    2012-08-01

    Patients with potentially resectable advanced stage III and IV melanoma are a selected subgroup that gain maximal advantage if treated in a melanoma center. Surgery combined with chemo/chemobiotherapy may yield durable remission and long-term palliation. Thirty-seven non-randomly selected patients underwent systemic therapy with the aim of consolidating treatment by surgery. Data were collected prospectively, and analyzed retrospectively. The median follow-up from diagnosis was 50 (3-307) months and 15 (1-156) months when calculated from the last intervention. Twenty-two males and 15 females, with a median age at diagnosis of 44 (20-71) years, with 13 trunk, 13 extremity, 3 head and neck and 8 unknown primary melanomas were included. There were 17 stage III and 20 stage IV patients with a median Breslow thickness of 3.7 (0.45-26) mm. Chemo/chemobiotherapy achieved 7 clinical complete responses (cCRs), 28 partial responses (PRs) and 2 instances of stable disease. Six of the 7 cCRs were operated on, securing pathological complete response in 5 and PR in one. Four of these five and the PR patient still have no evidence of disease (NED). Twenty-one of 30 PR patients were rendered NED by surgery; 14 of these 21 patients succumbed to melanoma, and one is alive with stable disease. Overall, 11 of 37 patients have not succumbed to melanoma, with a median of 72 (14-156) months survival following the last intervention. Of the eight patients with unknown primary melanomas, five have not succumbed to melanoma, with a median of 89 (30-156) months survival following the last intervention. Patients with marginally resectable stage III and IV melanoma have a significant 30% chance, according to this series, for durable remission if treated by a multidisciplinary team in a melanoma center using induction chemobiotherapy and surgery. Results are more favorable for patients with an unknown primary lesion. In view of the currently approved new effective treatments for melanoma, this

  9. Metabolomics provide new insights on lung cancer staging and discrimination from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deja, Stanislaw; Porebska, Irena; Kowal, Aneta; Zabek, Adam; Barg, Wojciech; Pawelczyk, Konrad; Stanimirova, Ivana; Daszykowski, Michal; Korzeniewska, Anna; Jankowska, Renata; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are widespread lung diseases. Cigarette smoking is a high risk factor for both the diseases. COPD may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Thus, it is crucial to be able to distinguish between these two pathological states, especially considering the early stages of lung cancer. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools are required to properly determine lung cancer progression because this information directly impacts the type of the treatment prescribed. In this study, serum samples collected from 22 COPD and 77 lung cancer (TNM stages I, II, III, and IV) patients were analyzed. Then, a collection of NMR metabolic fingerprints was modeled using discriminant orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS-DA) and further interpreted by univariate statistics. The constructed discriminant models helped to successfully distinguish between the metabolic fingerprints of COPD and lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.972, AUC test=0.993), COPD and early lung cancer patients (AUC training=1.000, AUC test=1.000), and COPD and advanced lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.983, AUC test=1.000). Decreased acetate, citrate, and methanol levels together with the increased N-acetylated glycoproteins, leucine, lysine, mannose, choline, and lipid (CH3-(CH2)n-) levels were observed in all lung cancer patients compared with the COPD group. The evaluation of lung cancer progression was also successful using OPLS-DA (AUC training=0.811, AUC test=0.904). Based on the results, the following metabolite biomarkers may prove useful in distinguishing lung cancer states: isoleucine, acetoacetate, and creatine as well as the two NMR signals of N-acetylated glycoproteins and glycerol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lymphadenectomy in surgical stage I epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svolgaard, Olivia; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Nielsen, Marie Louise S

    2014-01-01

    with surgical stage I. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 216 women (34%) of whom 13 (6%) had lymph node metastases. At 5-year follow up 85% remained alive in the lymphadenectomy group compared with 80% in the control group (p = 0.064). The lymphadenectomy fraction increased from 24% in 2005 to 55% in 2011. When...... 2005-2011. SAMPLE: All women registered in the nationwide Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database from 1 January 2005 to 1 May 2011, presenting with a tumor macroscopically confined to the ovary without visible evidence of abdominal spread at the time of the initial exploration (surgical stage I). METHOD......: Descriptive and survival analyses of data from Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The annual proportion of women with surgical stage I disease who received lymphadenectomy and the survival in the two groups. RESULTS: Of 2361 women with epithelial ovarian cancer, 627 were identified...

  11. Heterogeneity of Disease Classified as Stage III in Wilms Tumor: A Report From the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreafico, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.spreafico@istitutotumori.mi.it [Pediatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Gandola, Lorenza [Department of Radiology/Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); D' Angelo, Paolo [Pediatric Oncology, Ospedale dei Bambini G. di Cristina, Palermo (Italy); Terenziani, Monica [Pediatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Collini, Paola [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Bianchi, Maurizio [Pediatric Department, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Torino (Italy); Provenzi, Massimo [Pediatric Unit, Ospedali Riuniti Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy); Indolfi, Paolo [Pediatric Oncology, Pediatric Department, II University, Napoli (Italy); Pession, Andrea [Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Unit ' Lalla Seragnoli' , Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Nantron, Marilina [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Istituto G. Gaslini, Genova (Italy); Di Cataldo, Andrea [Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Marchiano, Alfonso [Department of Radiology/Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Catania, Serena; Fossati Bellani, Franca [Pediatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Piva, Luigi [Pediatric Surgery Unit, Urology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Results: Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% {+-} 4% and 92% {+-} 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% {+-} 7%, as opposed to 98% {+-} 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% {+-} 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed.

  12. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis: is travel time important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kevin A; Boscoe, Francis P; Johnson, Christopher J; Goldberg, Daniel W; Sherman, Recinda; Cockburn, Myles

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have produced inconsistent results in their examination of the potential association between proximity to healthcare or mammography facilities and breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Using a multistate dataset, we re-examine this issue by investigating whether travel time to a patient's diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility impacts breast cancer stage at diagnosis. We studied 161,619 women 40 years and older diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from ten state population based cancer registries in the United States. For each woman, we calculated travel time to their diagnosing facility and nearest mammography facility. Logistic multilevel models of late versus early stage were fitted, and odds ratios were calculated for travel times, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, census tract poverty, rural/urban residence, health insurance, and state random effects. Seventy-six percent of women in the study lived less than 20 min from their diagnosing facility, and 93 percent lived less than 20 min from the nearest mammography facility. Late stage at diagnosis was not associated with increasing travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility. Diagnosis age under 50, Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, high census tract poverty, and no health insurance were all significantly associated with late stage at diagnosis. Travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility was not a determinant of late stage of breast cancer at diagnosis, and better geographic proximity did not assure more favorable stage distributions. Other factors beyond geographic proximity that can affect access should be evaluated more closely, including facility capacity, insurance acceptance, public transportation, and travel costs.

  13. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  14. [Cytological finding in the pre- and early stages of cervix carcinoma--a contribution to the evaluation of Papanicolau III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, G; Büttner, H H; Neumann, H G; Rhode, E; Beust, M

    1977-01-01

    Cytologic findings and the histologic diagnosis are compared in 326 cervical cones. We have found following ratio of the groups Papanicolaou (Pap) III: Pap IV--in dysplasia 1: 1: 1, in "more dysplasia than carcinoma in situ (CIS)" 1:2:2. The Pap IV dominates in "pure" CIS and in cones with "more CIS than dysplasia". We take out of the Pap III ("with cytologic control") cases named "Pap III with necessity for histologic diagnosis". We have found in this subgroup of Pap III prestages or early stages of cervical carcinoma.

  15. Breast cancer by stage of disease at diagnosis, central Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owora, Arthur H; Wendelboe, Aaron; Thompson, David; Campbell, Janis

    2010-10-01

    We describe factors associated with an initial diagnosis of stage IV breast cancer to identify segments of Oklahoma's population that need earlier screening. We obtained data from the Central Oklahoma chapter of Susan G. Komen for the Cure and from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry. All analyses were cross-sectional and ecologic. The distributions of breast cancer stage at diagnosis for ten central Oklahoma counties were analyzed with respect to age group, race/ethnicity, insurance status, family income, and the percent of women who reported [not] receiving a mammogram in the previous twelve months. The percentage of African American women diagnosed with stage IV disease (7.8%) was nearly double that in white (4.2%) and other races (4.1%; p < 0.01). After controlling for confounding variables, the proportion of women diagnosed with breast cancer at stage IV was still higher among African American than among white females (p < 0.01) and females aged 65+ years (p = 0.02). The availability of breast cancer screening services should be increased among African American women in central Oklahoma.

  16. Mn(II) Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase Complex Mnx: A Coordinated Two-Stage Mn(II)/(III) and Mn(III)/(IV) Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Alexandra V; Romano, Christine A; Tao, Lizhi; Stich, Troy A; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M; Spiro, Thomas G

    2017-08-23

    The bacterial manganese oxidase MnxG of the Mnx protein complex is unique among multicopper oxidases (MCOs) in carrying out a two-electron metal oxidation, converting Mn(II) to MnO2 nanoparticles. The reaction occurs in two stages: Mn(II) → Mn(III) and Mn(III) → MnO2. In a companion study , we show that the electron transfer from Mn(II) to the low-potential type 1 Cu of MnxG requires an activation step, likely forming a hydroxide bridge at a dinuclear Mn(II) site. Here we study the second oxidation step, using pyrophosphate (PP) as a Mn(III) trap. PP chelates Mn(III) produced by the enzyme and subsequently allows it to become a substrate for the second stage of the reaction. EPR spectroscopy confirms the presence of Mn(III) bound to the enzyme. The Mn(III) oxidation step does not involve direct electron transfer to the enzyme from Mn(III), which is shown by kinetic measurements to be excluded from the Mn(II) binding site. Instead, Mn(III) is proposed to disproportionate at an adjacent polynuclear site, thereby allowing indirect oxidation to Mn(IV) and recycling of Mn(II). PP plays a multifaceted role, slowing the reaction by complexing both Mn(II) and Mn(III) in solution, and also inhibiting catalysis, likely through binding at or near the active site. An overall mechanism for Mnx-catalyzed MnO2 production from Mn(II) is presented.

  17. Intraoperative radiotherapy in stage I and II lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaris, B.S.; Nori, D.; Martini, N.

    1987-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States. Treatment depends on the type and stage of lung cancer. For stage I and II cancer, surgery is usually the treatment of choice. Radiation therapy is used in patients who are considered poor risks for surgical resection. Intraoperative brachytherapy is an effective alternative to external irradiation in this group of patients. From 1958 to 1984, 55 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer were explored at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and found to have surgical stage I or II tumors, which were considered to be unresectable mainly because of severe obstructive pulmonary disease precluding adequate resection. All these patients were treated with intraoperative brachytherapy at the time of the thoracotomy. Forty-four percent of these patients received in addition external irradiation, mainly to the mediastinum. The overall 5-year survival calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method was 32%, and the local disease-free survival was 63%. Cox regression multivariant analysis demonstrated that there is a distinct subgroup with a better prognosis based on tumor site and patient's age--ie, patients who were younger than 58 years of age and had right-side lesions.

  18. 5-FU Based Maintenance Therapy in RAS Wild Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer After Induction With FOLFOX Plus Panitumumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; RAS Wild Type; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  19. Talimogene Laherparepvec, Capecitabine, and Chemoradiation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7

  20. How to choose PET-CT or CT in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Practical experience in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, T.; Tao, X.; Liu, H.; Liu, S. [Dept. of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical Univ., SH (China); Zheng, X. [Dept. of Nutrition, ChangHai Hospital, Second Military Medical Univ., SH (China)

    2010-07-01

    How to use CT and PET-CT rationally to raise diagnosis, staging and prognostic assessment of lung cancer to a higher level at the best cost-effect ratio is a subject that Chinese clinicians and radiologists should face conscientiously. We review the rational application of CT and PET-CT in four aspects of lung cancer, including screening and detection, morphologic evaluation, haemodynamic or metabolic feature evaluation, and follow-up, staging and prognostic evaluation. As PET-CT is only available in class III-A hospitals today, CT is the most popular equipment in China. PET-CT is more valuable only in cases where CT presentation of lung cancer is atypical or difficult to determine, or in cases where the diagnosis of lung cancer has been initially confirmed, for which clinical staging and decision concerning on therapeutic regimens are needed. We also recommend the current strategies of CT and PET-CT managing of SPN in China. (orig.)

  1. Role of chemotherapy and targeted therapy in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Misako; Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant platinum based chemotherapy is accepted as standard of care in stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and is often considered in patients with stage IB disease who have tumors ≥ 4 cm. The survival advantage is modest with approximately 5% at 5 years. Areas covered: This review article presents relevant data regarding chemotherapy use in the perioperative setting for early stage NSCLC. A literature search was performed utilizing PubMed as well as clinical trial.gov. Randomized phase III studies in this setting including adjuvant and neoadjuvant use of chemotherapy as well as ongoing trials on targeted therapy and immunotherapy are also discussed. Expert commentary: With increasing utilization of screening computed tomography scans, it is possible that the percentage of early stage NSCLC patients will increase in the coming years. Benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage NSCLC patients remain modest. There is a need to better define patients most likely to derive survival benefit from adjuvant therapy and spare patients who do not need adjuvant chemotherapy due to the toxicity of such therapy. Trials for adjuvant targeted therapy, including adjuvant EGFR-TKI trials and trials of immunotherapy drugs are ongoing and will define the role of these agents as adjuvant therapy.

  2. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (III/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Hernández, C; Vich Pérez, P; Brusint, B; Cuadrado Rouco, C; Díaz García, N; Robles Díaz, L

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease with implications in all aspects of patientś life, therefore, family doctors must know this pathology in depth, in order to optimize the health care provided to these patients with the best available resources. This series of five articles on breast cancer is based on a review of the scientific literature of the last ten years. This third article will review the clinical context and the staging and prognostic factors of the disease. This summary report aims to provide a global, current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Collagen I and III and metalloproteinase gene and protein expression in prostate cancer in relation to Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Antonio H; Colli, Sicilia; Alves-Pereira, Jorge L; Martins, Max P; Sampaio, Francisco J B; Ramos, Cristiane F

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate if the expression of metalloproteinase, collagen I and III are related to Gleason score, preoperative PSA and pathological stage in prostate cancer. Our study group included radical prostatectomy specimens of 33 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma who underwent surgery from 2001 to 2009. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Gleason score=6 (13 patients), Gleason score=7 (10 patients), Gleason score ≥ 8 (10 patients). The control group included prostates of patients submitted to cystoprostatectomy and benign prostatic tissues adjacent to the cancer area. Specific areas of tissues were selected under microscope and further processed for collagen I and III analysis by real time PCR. In addition, 10 deparaffined sections of each group were used to evaluate collagen I, III and metalloproteinase immune expression. The results were correlated with Gleason score, preoperative PSA and pathological stage. We found significant difference in both collagen I and III gene expression between benign and tumoral areas in the prostate samples from Gleason score=6 (collagen I=0.4 ± 0.2 vs 5 ± 2.4, p Gleason score ≥ 8 (collagen I=8 ± 3.4 vs 1.4 ± 0.8, p Gleason score, preoperative PSA or pathological stage. There was a positive correlation between metalloproteinase expression and Gleason score (r(2)=0.47). The positive correlation between metalloproteinase expression and Gleason score suggests that metalloproteinase could be a promising factor to improve Gleason score evaluation. Its expression and regulation do not seem to be related with collagen degradation.

  4. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  5. Advanced-stage III/IV follicular lymphoma. Treatment strategies for individual patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzelmann, Frank; Bamberg, Michael; Weinmann, Martin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Ottinger, Hellmut [Dept. of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Univ. of Essen (Germany); Engelhard, Marianne [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Essen (Germany); Soekler, Martin [Dept. of Internal Medicine II, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Background: in patients with advanced-stage III/IV follicular lymphoma (FL), there are many treatment options available. The current challenge is to choose the optimal strategy for the individual patient. Methods: the literature was reviewed with respect to treatment strategies in patients with advanced FL by screening the PubMed databank. Results: in advanced-stage III/IV FL, median survival may approach 8-10 years. Treatment strategies include a watch-and-wait strategy, chemoimmunotherapy, monotherapy with rituximab, and - as an experimental approach so far - radioimmunotherapy. The use of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for patients in first remission or chemosensitive relapse prolongs progression-free survival while the effect on overall survival remains unclear compared to standard chemotherapy. However, long-term results are flawed by high relapse rates and risk of secondary malignancies. In patients with relapsed/chemoresistant disease, allogeneic HSCT constitutes the only curative approach but is associated with high treatment-related mortality. In the palliative setting, low-dose involved-field irradiation constitutes an effective treatment option in order to control local symptoms with potential long-lasting response. Conclusion: in case of advanced-disease FL, asymptomatic patients can be managed expectantly. In symptomatic patients, chemoimmunotherapy is regarded as standard therapy. In symptomatic elderly patients with relevant comorbidities, rituximab {+-} single-agent chemotherapy, or low-dose involved-field radiotherapy might be appropriate. For younger patients with chemoresistant/relapsed disease, allogeneic HSCT might be considered, since advances in supportive care and better patient selection have resulted in improved outcomes. (orig.)

  6. Thoracoscopic Decortication of Stage III Tuberculous Empyema Is Effective and Safe in Selected Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal B; Lingaraju, Vijay C; Yendamuri, Sai; Pulle, Mohan V; Sood, Jayashree

    2017-09-27

    Open decortication of advanced tuberculous empyema remains standard of care. As with other aspects of thoracic surgery, minimally invasive approaches are making inroads into procedures traditionally performed open. In this retrospective analysis, we sought to examine feasibility, efficacy, and outcomes of thoracoscopic decortication of stage III tuberculous empyema in our experience. The records of all patients in whom thoracoscopic decortication of stage III tuberculous empyema was performed between March 2012 and December 2015 were examined. Demographic and perioperative data were analyzed to assess the surgical outcomes of this study group. To assess long-term efficacy, patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. One hundred patients fit the study criteria, of these 67 were men. Ninety cases were successfully completed thoracoscopically. Mean operative time was 204 ± 34.2 minutes with mean blood loss of 384 ± 28 mL. Median chest drain duration and hospital stay was 7 days. There was no perioperative deaths. Morbidity rate was 33%, composed mostly of prolonged air leak (29%). Six-month follow-up revealed completely expanded lung in all patients except one with small apical asymptomatic air space. Intraoperative cultures were positive for mycobacteria in 25% patients. Six (6%) of these patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and required a modification in their antituberculous therapy. Thoracoscopic decortication of advanced tuberculous empyema is feasible, safe, and effective with good short- and long-term results in selected patients. In a substantial portion of patients, operative cultures required modifying drug treatment to treat underlying tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genomic aberrations relate early and advanced stage ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zaal; W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els); M.E.L. van der Burg (Maria); J.H.W. Veerbeek (Jan ); J.B. Trimbos; I. Cadron (Isabelle); P.J. van Diest (Paul); W.N. Wieringen (Wessel); O. Krijgsman (Oscar); G.A. Meijer (Gerrit); J.M.J. Piek (Jurgen ); P.J. Timmers (Petra); I. Vergote (Ignace