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Sample records for cancer stage iii

  1. Locally advanced breast cancer (stage III and stage IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baracat, F.F.; Grabert, H.; Lima, G.R. de; Pontes, M.; Ferraro, O.; Santana, A.; Brook, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    The results concerning to the treatment of 193 patients with locally advanced breast cancer-stage III and stage IV are analysed. All the patients were treated with radical radiotherapy plus total mastectomy about 6 weeks later; 53 pacients received also chemotherapy (CMF - 12 courses) and 52 were oophorectomized. (M.A.C) [pt

  2. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  3. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material...... were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  4. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  5. Systems Support Mapping in Guiding Self-Management in Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8

  6. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Estrogen Receptor Status; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Status; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

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    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  9. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  10. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage II and III rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Liting; Song Yongwen; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao; Qian Tunan; Li Yexiong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy, compared with surgery alone for rectal cancer. Methods: From January 1994 to October 1997, 192 patients with stage II or III rectal cancer were treated by radical resection and postoperative radiotherapy (Group S + R) and 51 patients with the same stage lesions underwent surgery alone (Group S). The median dose of radiation was 50(32-62) Gy. Kaplan-Meier method and Log-rank test were used for analysis. Results: The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 60.3% and 58.3%, respectively. The overall 5-year survival rate was 59.4% in Group S + R and 64.7% in Group S, and the 5-year disease-free survival rates were 57.0% and 66.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences between either group (P=0.601 and P=0.424). The disease-free survival was not significantly prolonged in Group S + R as compared with that of Group S. The local recurrence rate was evidently reduced in Group S + R (15.8% v 26.8%, P=0.043). Conclusion: Local recurrence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rectal cancer. Postoperative radiotherapy, though reduces the incidence of local recurrence, does not improve the survival in the treatment of stage II and III diseases

  11. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  12. Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Tongue Cancer

  13. The relation between lymph node status and survival in Stage I-III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J.; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study involved a large nationwide Danish cohort to evaluate the hypothesis that a high lymph node harvest has a positive effect on survival in curative resected Stage I-III colon cancer and a low lymph node ratio has a positive effect on survival in Stage III colon cancer. Method......: Analysis of overall survival was conducted using a nationwide Danish cohort of patients treated with curative resection of Stage I-III colon cancer. All 8901 patients in Denmark diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and treated with curative resection in the period 2003-2008 were identified from...... independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High lymph node count was associated with improved overall survival in colon cancer. Lymph node ratio was superior to N-stage in differentiating overall survival in Stage III colon cancer. Stage migration was observed....

  14. Improvements in 5-year outcomes of stage II/III rectal cancer relative to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Hay, John; Phang, P Terry; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Kennecke, Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Stage for stage, rectal cancer has historically been associated with inferior survival compared with colon cancer. Randomized trials of rectal cancer have generally demonstrated improvements in locoregional relapse but not survival. We compared therapy and outcomes of colon versus rectal cancer in 2 time cohorts to determine if relative improvements have occurred. Patients with resected stage II/III colorectal cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency in 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 were identified. The higher of clinical or pathologic stage was used for patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared for rectal and colon cancer between the 2 cohorts. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 1427 patients were included, with 375 from 1989/1990 and 1052 from 2001/2002. Between 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 there were significant increases in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for both rectal and colon cancer (Prectal cancer. DSS significantly improved for rectal (Pcolon cancer (P=0.069). Five-year OS was significantly inferior for rectal versus colon cancer in 1989/1990 (46.1% vs. 57.2%, P=0.023) and was similar to that of colon cancer in 2001/2002 (63.7% vs. 66.2%, P=0.454). Advances in locoregional and systemic therapy significantly improved survival among patients with rectal cancer. DSS and OS are now similar between colon and rectal cancer for both stage II and III disease.

  15. Resectable stage III lung cancer: CT, surgical, and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, I.R.; Muller, N.L.; Miller, R.R.; Evans, K.G.; Nelems, B.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with stage IIIa lung cancer have improved survival following surgery. The authors reviewed the CT, surgical, and pathologic findings in 26 patients with completely resected stage IIIa lung cancer. These include examples of the different subsets of stage IIIa disease. CT correctly predicted chest-wall invasion in only two of ten patients, pericardial involvement in one of three, and tumor extension to within 2 cm of the carina in one of three patients. It detected mediastinal nodal disease in eight of 11 patients. CT is of limited value in assessing chest-wall or pericardial extension; however, such extension does not preclude complete resection. Ipsilateral nodal involvement also doses not preclude surgery

  16. Treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and limited-disease small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Sharouni, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and limited disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). We described a systematic review on the clinical results of radiotherapy, combined or not with chemotherapy, for inoperable NSCLC stage III with the aim to define the

  17. T4 category revision enhances the accuracy and significance of stage III breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Uwe; Singer, Gad; Langer, Igor; Schötzau, Andreas; Herberich, Linda; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Wight, Edward

    2006-06-15

    Because of the considerable heterogeneity in breast carcinoma with noninflammatory skin involvement (T4b/Stage IIIB), a revision was proposed of the TNM staging system that would classify these tumors exclusively based on their tumor size and lymph node status. In the current study, the authors evaluated how implementation of this proposal will affect Stage III noninflammatory breast cancer. Two hundred seven patients who were classified with noninflammatory Stage III breast cancer were treated consecutively between 1990 and 1999 at the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland. To assess the extent of T4b/Stage IIIB tumors independent of the clinicopathologic feature of skin involvement, the reclassification was undertaken. Of 68 patients who had nonmetastatic T4b breast cancer, 37 patients (54.4%) had a tumor extent in accordance with Stage I/II and had improved disease-specific survival (DSS) compared with patients who had Stage III breast cancer (P = .008). Excluding those patients from Stage III led to a 17.9% reduction of the number of patients in this group (n = 170 patients). The 10-year DSS declined from 48.5% to 42.9%. Considerable numbers of patients who are classified with noninflammatory Stage IIIB breast cancer show only a limited disease extent. Through a revision of the T4 category, these low-risk patients were excluded from the highest nonmetastatic TNM stage, and overstaging could be avoided. This procedure decreased the degree of heterogeneity of the entire Stage III group and may result in a more precise assessment of this disease entity. Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.

  18. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  19. Microsatellite instability is associated with reduced disease specific survival in stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, H M; Ryan, E; Balasubramanian, I; Kennelly, R; Geraghty, R; Sclafani, F; Fennelly, D; McDermott, R; Ryan, E J; O'Donoghue, D; Hyland, J M P; Martin, S T; O'Connell, P R; Gibbons, D; Winter, Des; Sheahan, K

    2016-11-01

    Up to 15% of colorectal cancers exhibit microsatellite instability (MSI), where errors in replication go unchecked due to defects in the mismatch repair system. This study aimed to determine survival in a large single-centre series of 1250 consecutive colorectal cancers subjected to universal MSI testing. Clinical and pathological features of patients with colorectal cancer identified on prospectively maintained colorectal and pathology databases at St. Vincent's University Hospital from 2004 to May 2012 were examined. Mismatch repair (MMR) status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier curves, the log-rank test and Cox regression were used to associate survival with clinical and pathological characteristics. Of the 1250 colorectal cancers in the study period, 11% exhibited MSI (n = 138). Patients with MSI tumours had significantly lower rates of lymph node and distant metastases (MSI N+ rate: 24.8% compared with MSS N+ rate: 46.2%, p colon cancer. However, patients with Stage III MSI colon cancers had a worse DSS than those with MSS tumours. Stage III MSI tumours exhibited higher rates of lymphovascular invasion and perineural invasion than Stage I/II MSI tumours. MSI is associated with a reduced risk of nodal and distant metastases, with an improved DSS in Stage I/II colon cancer. However, when MSI tumours progress to Stage III these patients had worse outcomes and pathological features. New strategies for this cohort of patients may be required to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Acupuncture in Reducing Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Participants With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-30

    Anatomic Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage III Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Grade 1 Peripheral Motor Neuropathy, CTCAE; Grade 1 Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy, CTCAE; Grade 2 Peripheral Motor Neuropathy, CTCAE; Grade 2 Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy, CTCAE; Prognostic Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage III Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v8

  1. Factors Affecting Adjuvant Therapy in Stage III Pancreatic Cancer—Analysis of the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Krishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adjuvant therapy after curative resection is associated with survival benefit in stage III pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the factors affecting the outcome of adjuvant therapy in stage III pancreatic cancer and compared overall survival with different modalities of adjuvant treatment. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with stage III pancreatic cancer listed in the National Cancer Database (NCDB who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. Patients were stratified based on adjuvant therapy they received. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: We analyzed a cohort included 1731 patients who were recipients of adjuvant therapy for stage III pancreatic cancer within the limits of our database. Patients who received adjuvant chemoradiation had the longest postdiagnosis survival time, followed by patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, and finally patients who received no adjuvant therapy. On multivariate analysis, advancing age and patients with Medicaid had worse survival, whereas Spanish origin and lower Charlson comorbidity score had better survival. Conclusions: Our study is the largest trial using the NCDB addressing the effects of adjuvant therapy specifically in stage III pancreatic cancer. Within the limits of our study, survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was more apparent with longer duration from date of diagnosis.

  2. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  3. Cancer care coordinators in stage III colon cancer: a cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Tony; Collinson, Lucie; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; Foster, Rachel; Dennett, Elizabeth; Sarfati, Diana

    2015-08-05

    There is momentum internationally to improve coordination of complex care pathways. Robust evaluations of such interventions are scarce. This paper evaluates the cost-utility of cancer care coordinators for stage III colon cancer patients, who generally require surgery followed by chemotherapy. We compared a hospital-based nurse cancer care coordinator (CCC) with 'business-as-usual' (no dedicated coordination service) in stage III colon cancer patients in New Zealand. A discrete event microsimulation model was constructed to estimate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs from a health system perspective. We used New Zealand data on colon cancer incidence, survival, and mortality as baseline input parameters for the model. We specified intervention input parameters using available literature and expert estimates. For example, that a CCC would improve the coverage of chemotherapy by 33% (ranging from 9 to 65%), reduce the time to surgery by 20% (3 to 48%), reduce the time to chemotherapy by 20% (3 to 48%), and reduce patient anxiety (reduction in disability weight of 33%, ranging from 0 to 55%). Much of the direct cost of a nurse CCC was balanced by savings in business-as-usual care coordination. Much of the health gain was through increased coverage of chemotherapy with a CCC (especially older patients), and reduced time to chemotherapy. Compared to 'business-as-usual', the cost per QALY of the CCC programme was $NZ 18,900 (≈ $US 15,600; 95% UI: $NZ 13,400 to 24,600). By age, the CCC intervention was more cost-effective for colon cancer patients costs, meaning the cost-effectiveness was roughly comparable between ethnic groups. Such a nurse-led CCC intervention in New Zealand has acceptable cost-effectiveness for stage III colon cancer, meaning it probably merits funding. Each CCC programme will differ in its likely health gains and costs, making generalisation from this evaluation to other CCC interventions difficult. However, this evaluation suggests

  4. Patterns of Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients with Stage II/III Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    High-level evidence supports adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer. We examined the influence of socio demographic factors on patterns of adjuvant radiotherapy for resected Stage II/III rectal cancer. Methods. Patients undergoing surgical resection for stage II/III rectal cancer were identified in SEER registry. Results. A total of 21,683 patients were identified. Majority of patients were male (58.8%), white (83%), and with stage III (54.9%) and received radiotherapy (66%). On univariate analysis, male gender, stage III, younger age, year of diagnosis, and higher socioeconomic status (SES) were associated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered in 84.4% of patients <50; however, only 32.8% of those are >80 years. Logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in the use of radiotherapy in younger patients who are 50 (OR, 10.3), with stage III (OR, 1.21), males (OR, 1.18), and with higher SES. Conclusions. There is a failure to conform to standard adjuvant radiotherapy in one-third of patients, and this is associated with older age, stage II, area-level of socioeconomic deprivation, and female sex.

  5. Comparison of outcomes in patients with stage III versus limited stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, Praveena; Metcalfe, Su K; Metcalfe, Justin; Chen, Yuhchyau; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Standard therapy for metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes palliative systemic chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recent studies of patients with limited metastases treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have shown encouraging survival. We hypothesized that patients treated with SBRT for limited metastases have comparable outcomes with those treated with curative-intent radiation for Stage III NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of NSCLC patients treated with curative-intent radiotherapy at the University of Rochester from 2000-2008. We identified 3 groups of patients with NSCLC: stage III, stage IV, and recurrent stage IV (initial stage I-II). All stage IV NSCLC patients treated with SBRT had ≤ 8 lesions. Of 146 patients, 88% had KPS ≥ 80%, 30% had > 5% weight loss, and 95% were smokers. The 5-year OS from date of NSCLC diagnosis for stage III, initial stage IV and recurrent stage IV was 7%, 14%, and 27% respectively. The 5-year OS from date of metastatic diagnosis was significantly (p < 0.00001) superior among those with limited metastases (≤ 8 lesions) versus stage III patients who developed extensive metastases not amenable to SBRT (14% vs. 0%). Stage IV NSCLC is a heterogeneous patient population, with a selected cohort apparently faring better than Stage III patients. Though patients with limited metastases are favorably selected by virtue of more indolent disease and/or less bulky disease burden, perhaps staging these patients differently is appropriate for prognostic and treatment characterization. Aggressive local therapy may be indicated in these patients, though prospective clinical studies are needed

  6. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  7. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non–small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4–85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1–91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  8. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    . Data on patients with stage III colonic cancer operated between January 1, 2005 and August 31, 2012 were retrieved. Perioperative variables, surgical modality, and time to adjuvant therapy (8 weeks) were evaluated and Cox regression was performed to identify factors influencing survival...

  9. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yen Huang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group, and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group. The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107. Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  10. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  11. Short Course Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy in Treating Patients With Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-17

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Sarcoma

  12. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  13. A proteomics panel for predicting optimal primary cytoreduction in stage III/IV ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Signe; Høgdall, Estrid; Engelholm, Svend A

    2009-01-01

    for CA-125. In addition, serum was analyzed for 7 biomarkers using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These biomarkers were combined into a single-valued ovarian-cancer-risk index (OvaRI). CA-125 and OvaRI were evaluated as predictors of cytoreduction in 75......The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate CA-125 and a 7-marker panel as predictors of incomplete primary cytoreduction in patients with stage III/IV ovarian cancer (OC). From September 2004 to January 2008, serum from 201 patients referred to surgery for a pelvic tumor was analyzed...... stage III/IV patients using receiver operating characteristic curves. Complete primary cytoreduction (no macroscopic residual disease) was achieved in 31% (23/75) of the patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.66 for CA-125 and 0.75 for OvaRI. The sensitivity...

  14. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, Brian; Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin; Stoddard, Greg; Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K.; Poppe, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  15. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Stoddard, Greg [Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  16. Intensity of adjuvant chemotherapy regimens and grade III-V toxicities among elderly stage III colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erning, F N; Razenberg, L G E M; Lemmens, V E P P; Creemers, G J; Pruijt, J F M; Maas, H A A M; Janssen-Heijnen, M L G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide insight in the use, intensity and toxicity of therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) and capecitabine monotherapy (CapMono) among elderly stage III colon cancer patients treated in everyday clinical practice. Data from the Netherlands Cancer Registry were used. All stage III colon cancer patients aged ≥70 years diagnosed in the southeastern part between 2005 and 2012 and treated with CAPOX or CapMono were included. Differences in completion of all planned cycles, cumulative dosages and toxicity between both regimens were evaluated. One hundred ninety-three patients received CAPOX and 164 patients received CapMono; 33% (n = 63) of the patients receiving CAPOX completed all planned cycles of both agents, whereas 55% (n = 90) of the patients receiving CapMono completed all planned cycles (P characteristics, CapMono was associated with a lower odds of developing grade III-V toxicity than CAPOX (odds ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.33-0.89). For patients treated with CAPOX, the most common toxicities were gastrointestinal (29%), haematological (14%), neurological (11%) and other toxicity (13%). For patients treated with CapMono, dermatological (17%), gastrointestinal (13%) and other toxicity (11%) were the most common. CAPOX is associated with significantly more grade III-V toxicities than CapMono, which had a pronounced impact on the cumulative dosage received and completion of all planned cycles. In this light, CapMono seems preferable over CAPOX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  18. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer in the oldest old: results beyond clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anasooya; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Rothenberger, David A; Kwaan, Mary; Weinberg, Armin D; Parsons, Helen M; Gupta, Pankaj; Al-Refaie, Waddah B

    2013-01-15

    Randomized trials demonstrating the benefits of chemotherapy in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III colon cancer underrepresent persons aged ≥ 75 years. The generalizability of these studies to a growing elderly population remains unknown. Using the California Cancer Registry for 1994 through 2008, the authors conducted a population-based study of postcolectomy patients aged 50 years to 94 years with stage III (N1M0) colon adenocarcinoma. A 2-sided chi-square test and Cochran-Armitage test for trend were used to compare patient and tumor characteristics associated with receipt of chemotherapy across age groups. Multivariate regression was used to assess the association between older age and receipt of chemotherapy. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to evaluate the association between chemotherapy and mortality, with propensity score adjustment. Approximately 44% (12,382 patients) of the study cohort was aged ≥ 75 years. Persons aged ≥ 75 years were found to be less likely to have received adjuvant chemotherapy than those aged colon cancer in the elderly. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  20. Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients With Pathologic Stage III Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Samir; Portelance, Lorraine; Gilbert, Lucy; Tan, Leonard; Stanimir, Gerald; Duclos, Marie; Souhami, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess prognostic factors and patterns of recurrence in patients with pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2003, 107 patients with pathologic International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage III endometrial adenocarcinoma confined to the pelvis were treated at our institution. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) was delivered to 68 patients (64%). The influence of multiple patient- and treatment-related factors on pelvic and distant control and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up for patients at risk was 41 months. Five-year actuarial OS was significantly improved in patients treated with adjuvant RT (68%) compared with those with resection alone (50%; p = 0.029). Age, histology, grade, uterine serosal invasion, adnexal involvement, number of extrauterine sites, and treatment with adjuvant RT predicted for improved survival in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that grade, uterine serosal invasion, and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of survival. Five-year actuarial pelvic control was improved significantly with the delivery of adjuvant RT (74% vs. 49%; p = 0.011). Depth of myometrial invasion and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of pelvic control in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Multiple prognostic factors predicting for the outcome of pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer patients were identified in this analysis. In particular, delivery of adjuvant RT seems to be a significant independent predictor for improved survival and pelvic control, suggesting that pelvic RT should be routinely considered in the management of these patients

  1. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  4. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Hayashi, Yasushi [Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m{sup 2}) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m 2 ) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  7. Radiotherapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Masao; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1999-01-01

    Surgery has been regarded as the standard treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer in the early stage, while radiotherapy has become an effective alternative for medically inoperable patients and those who refuse surgery. We reviewed the records of 31 patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy between 1980 and 1997. There were 15 patients in stage I and 16 in stage II. The variables analyzed for influence on cause-specific survival and loco-regional control were: age, performance status, clinical stage, tumor size, tumor site, radiation field, radiation dose, and combination with chemotherapy. The overall and cause-specific 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-years survival rates were 71% and 77%; 63% and 73%; 34% and 48%; and 17% and 32%, respectively. Five-year survival rate for patients with peripheral tumor in the lung was 72%, with 70% loco-regional control, while the 5-year survival rate of patients whose tumor originated in the central region was 20%, with 25% loco-regional control. These differences had marginal significance on univariate analysis (P=0.07), but only tumor site (central vs peripheral) showed marginal significant influence on cause-specific survival (P=0.08) and loco-regional control (P=0.07) on multivariate analysis. There were no fatal complications, including radiation-induced myelopathy. The present series showed satisfactory results with definitive radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer, with results similar to those in recent reports of radiotherapy. The only significant variable was that patients with peripheral tumors had a better prognosis than patients with central tumors. (author)

  8. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  11. Radiotherapy alone for elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kanehara, Masasi; Doi, Mihoko; Furonaka, Osamu; Miyazu, Yuka; Hada, Yosihiro

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated solely with radiotherapy during the period 1986 to 1995. Our study was designed to assess the influence of age on survival and malnutrition in patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) and patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). Radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival period of 11.5 months in the younger group and 6.3 months in the elderly group (p=0.0043). With the Cox multivariate model, good performance status, age less than 75 years, and good response were significant favorable independent predictors. Furthermore, the elderly group patients more frequently died of respiratory infections and had lower prognostic nutritional indexes than the younger group patients before and after radiotherapy. These findings suggested elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated with radiotherapy alone had a poor prognosis and that malnutrition caused by radiotherapy was a factor contributing to the risk of death from respiratory infection in such patients. (author)

  12. Cost-utility analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdkiattikorn, Panattharin; Chaikledkaew, Usa; Lausoontornsiri, Wirote; Chindavijak, Somjin; Khuhaprema, Thirawud; Tantai, Narisa; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2015-01-01

    In Thailand, there has been no economic evaluation study of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer patients after resection. This study aims to evaluate the cost-utility of all chemotherapy regimens currently used in Thailand compared with the adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV) plus capecitabine as the first-line therapy for metastatic disease in patients with stage III colon cancer after resection. A cost-utility analysis was performed to estimate the relevant lifetime costs and health outcomes of chemotherapy regimens based on a societal perspective using a Markov model. The results suggested that the adjuvant 5-FU/LV plus capecitabine as the first-line therapy for metastatic disease would be the most cost-effective chemotherapy. The adjuvant FOLFOX and FOLFIRI as the first-line treatment for metastatic disease would be cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 299,365 Thai baht per QALY gained based on a societal perspective if both prices of FOLFOX and FOLFIRI were decreased by 40%.

  13. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Outcome for stage II and III rectal and colon cancer equally good after treatment improvement over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Joern, Fischer; Hellmich, Gunter; Gunter, Hellmich; Jackisch, Thomas; Thomas, Jackisch; Puffer, Erik; Erik, Puffer; Zimmer, Jörg; Jörg, Zimmer; Bleyl, Dorothea; Dorothea, Bleyl; Kittner, Thomas; Thomas, Kittner; Witzigmann, Helmut; Helmut, Witzigmann; Stelzner, Sigmar; Sigmar, Stelzner

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the outcome for stage II and III rectal cancer patients compared to stage II and III colonic cancer patients with regard to 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), overall survival, and local and combined recurrence rates over time. This prospective cohort study identified 3,355 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum and treated in our colorectal unit between 1981 and 2011, for investigation. The study was restricted to International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stages II and III. Postoperative mortality and histological incomplete resection were excluded, which left 995 patients with colonic cancer and 726 patients with rectal cancer for further analysis. Five-year CSS rates improved for colonic cancer from 65.0% for patients treated between 1981 and 1986 to 88.1% for patients treated between 2007 and 2011. For rectal cancer patients, the respective 5-year CSS rates improved from 53.4% in the first observation period to 89.8% in the second one. The local recurrence rate for rectal cancer dropped from 34.2% in the years 1981-1986 to 2.1% in the years 2007-2011. In the last decade of observation, prognosis for rectal cancer was equal to that for colon cancer (CSS 88.6 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.409). Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer has continued to improve over the last three decades. After major changes in treatment strategy including introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant (radio)chemotherapy, prognosis for stage II and III rectal cancer is at least as good as for stage II and III colonic cancer.

  15. Cost-utility analysis of chemotherapy regimens in elderly patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairson, David R; Parikh, Rohan C; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2014-10-01

    Chemotherapy prolongs survival for stage III colon cancer patients but community-level evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of treatment for elderly patients is limited. Comparisons were between patients receiving no chemotherapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and FOLFOX (5-FU + oxaliplatin). A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the Surveillance Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Patients (≥65 years) with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III colon cancer at diagnosis in 2004-2009 were identified. The 3-way propensity score matched sample included 3,534 patients. Effectiveness was measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Medicare costs (2010 US dollars) were estimated from diagnosis until death or end of study. FOLFOX patients experienced 6.06 median life-years and 4.73 QALYs. Patients on 5-FU had 5.75 median life-years and 4.50 median QALYs, compared to 3.42 and 2.51, respectively, for the no chemotherapy patients. Average total healthcare costs ranged from US$85,422 for no chemotherapy to US$168,628 for FOLFOX. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) for 5-FU versus no chemotherapy were US$17,131 per life-year gained and US$20,058 per QALY gained. ICERs for FOLFOX versus 5-FU were US$139,646 per life-year gained and US$188,218 per QALY gained. Results appear to be sensitive to age, suggesting that FOLFOX performs better for patients 65-69 and 80+ years old while 5-FU appears most effective and cost effective for the age groups 70-74 and 75-79 years. FOLFOX appears more effective and cost effective than other strategies for colon cancer treatment of older patients. Results were sensitive to age, with ICERs exhibiting a U-shaped pattern.

  16. Prognostic impact of interhospital variation in adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with Stage II/III colorectal cancer: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Kawai, K; Tanaka, T; Hata, K; Sugihara, K; Nozawa, H

    2018-05-12

    Clinical guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for high-risk patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer. However, chemotherapeutic administration rates differ significantly between hospitals. We assessed the prognostic benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with Stage IIb/c colorectal cancer, and the prognostic impact of interhospital variations in the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III colorectal cancer. We conducted a multicentre, retrospective study of 17 757 patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer treated between 1997 and 2008 in 23 hospitals in Japan. Hospitals were classified as high-rate (rate > 42.8%) or low-rate (rate ≤ 42.8%), chemotherapy prescribing clinics. The 5-year overall survival (OS) of patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly higher than for those not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (85.7% vs 79.2%, P colorectal cancer (both P colorectal cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy, with patients who were treated in hospitals with high adjuvant chemotherapy rates demonstrating better prognoses. Colorectal Disease © 2018 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  18. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification

  19. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. A.; Choi, I. B.; Kang, K. M.; Jang, J. Y.; Song, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kuak, M. S.; Shinn, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    This study was tried to evaluate the potential benefits of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Between April 1992 and March 1994, 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Historical control group consisted of 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone. Total radiation dose ranged from 5580 cGy to 7000 cGy with median of 5940 cGy. Complete response rate was higher in chemoradiation therapy (CRT) group than radiation therapy (RT) group. In subgroup analyses for patients with good performance status, CRT group showed significantly higher overall survival rate compared with RT group. The prognostic factors affecting survival rate were performance status and pathologic subtype in CRT group. In RT alone group, performance status and stage (IIIa vs IIIb) were identified as a prognostic factors. The incidence of RTOG/EORTC grade 3-4 pulmonary toxicity ahd no significant differences in between CRT group and RT group (16% vs. 6%). The incidence of WHO grade 3-4 pulmonary fibrosis also had no significant differences in both group (38% vs. 25%). In analyses for relationship of field size and pulmonary toxicity, the patients who treated with field size beyond 200 cm 2 had significantly higher rates of pulmonary toxicities. The CRT group showed significantly higher local control rate than RT group. There were no significant differences of survival rate in status showed higher overall survival rate in CRT group than RT group. In spite of higher incidence of acute toxicities with concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the survival gain in subgroup of patients with good performance status were encouraging. CRT group showed higher rate of early death within 1 year, higher 2 year survival rate compared with RT group. Therefore, to evaluate the accurate effect on survival of concurrent chemoradiation therapy, systematic follow-up for long term

  20. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and its relation to survival among patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, A C R K; van Erning, F N; van Gestel, Y R B M; Creemers, G J M; Punt, C J A; van Oijen, M G H; Lemmens, V E P P

    2015-11-01

    Currently available data suggest that delaying the start of adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer patients has a detrimental effect on survival. We analysed which factors impact on the timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and evaluated the influence on overall survival (OS). Stage III colon cancer patients who underwent resection and received adjuvant chemotherapy between 2008 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy was subdivided into: ⩽ 4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-16 weeks post-surgery. Multivariable regressions were performed to assess the influence of several factors on the probability of starting treatment within 8 weeks post-surgery and to evaluate the association of timing of adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-year OS. 6620 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, 14% commenced after 8 weeks. Factors associated with starting treatment after 8 weeks were older age (Odds ratio (OR) 65-74 versus colon cancer patients within 8 weeks post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  2. Estimating the adjuvant chemotherapy effect in elderly stage II and III colon cancer patients in an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Yeol; Cha, In-Ho; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Nam Kyu; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Roh, Jae Kyung; Shin, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has been known as a standard treatment for patients with resected colon cancer. However, in elderly colon cancer patients, the characteristics of patients are heterogeneous with regard to life expectancy and comorbidities. Thus, with regard to the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer, it is difficult to extrapolate data of clinical trials from the younger into the older general population. Data for 382 elderly colon cancer patients were analyzed: 217 in Stage II and 165 in Stage III. The efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy was evaluated in elderly colon cancer patients after a match by the propensity score method. For matched patients with Stage II colon cancer, there was no significant efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in the risk of death during all follow-up periods (P-value, 0.06-0.37). Though there was a tendency that the adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the death rate during the follow-up periods, it was not statistically significant. In the case of Stage III, the adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly effective in matched patients for 5-year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.90) and overall survival (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.94). Adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients with Stage II colon cancer is not effective, whereas elderly patients with Stage III with adjuvant chemotherapy appear to have a better survival rate in the general population. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W; Kelsey, Chris R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  4. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Kristin; Chino, Junzo P.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Ready, Neal; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  5. Variation in use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage III breast cancer : Results of the Dutch national breast cancer audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, Pauline E.R.; van Bommel, A.C.M.; Siesling, S.; Wouters, M. W.J.M.; Vrancken Peeters, M.T.F.D.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is important in the optimal treatment of patients with locally advanced (stage III) breast cancer (BC). The objective of this study was to examine the clinical practice of NAC for stage III BC patients in all Dutch hospitals participating in BC care.

  6. A cohort study of metformin exposure and survival in patients with stage I-III colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    BENNETT, KATHLEEN

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background: Preclinical evidence suggests a beneficial effect of metformin in colorectal cancer. This study aimed to investigate associations between metformin exposure and colorectal cancer–specific survival using population-level data. Methods: Adult patients with stage I–III colorectal cancer diagnosed from 2001 to 2006 were identified from the National Cancer Registry Ireland. Use of metformin and other antidiabetic medications was determined from a linked national prescr...

  7. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  8. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Despite the presence of interplay effect, the

  9. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  10. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adult Disease, Akashi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author).

  11. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi

    1994-01-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author)

  12. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  13. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to peptide vaccination predicts survival in stage III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Junichiro; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Sukegawa, Yasushi; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Hida, Jin-Ichi; Hazama, Shoichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2018-02-23

    We previously reported a phase I clinical trial of a peptide vaccine ring finger protein 43 (RNF43) and 34-kDa translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOMM34) combined with uracil-tegafur (UFT)/LV for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), and demonstrated the safety and immunological responsiveness of this combination therapy. In this study, we evaluated vaccination-induced immune responses to clarify the survival benefit of the combination therapy as adjuvant treatment. We enrolled 44 patients initially in an HLA-masked fashion. After the disclosure of HLA, 28 patients were in the HLA-A*2402-matched and 16 were in the unmatched group. In the HLA-matched group, 14 patients had positive CTL responses specific for the RNF43 and/or TOMM34 peptides after 2 cycles of treatment and 9 had negative responses; in the HLA-unmatched group, 10 CTL responses were positive and 2 negative. In the HLA-matched group, 3-year relapse-free survival (RFS) was significantly better in the positive CTL subgroup than in the negative-response subgroup. Patients with negative vaccination-induced CTL responses showed a significant trend towards shorter RFS than those with positive responses. Moreover, in the HLA-unmatched group, the positive CTL response subgroup showed an equally good 3-year RFS as in the HLA-matched group. In conclusion, vaccination-induced CTL response to peptide vaccination could predict survival in the adjuvant setting for stage III CRC. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in stage I-II synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollamudi, Smitha V; Gelman, Rebecca S; Peiro, Gloria; Schneider, Lindsey; Connolly, James L; Schnitt, Stuart; Silver, Barbara; Harris, Jay R

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether patients with early-stage SBBC can be safely and effectively treated with bilateral BCT. MATERIALS and METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of 26 patients with clinical Stage I-II SBBC treated between 1968-1989 with bilateral BCT. SBBC was defined as tumors diagnosed no more than one month apart, with both sides demonstrating invasive cancer. Maximum (max) clinical stage was based on the more advanced breast tumor. Median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 32-85 years); menopausal status was 6 pre-, 16 post-, 3 peri-, and 1 unknown at diagnosis. Median follow-up for surviving pts is 95 months (range, 68-157). Outcome was compared to 1325 pts with unilateral Stage I or II breast cancer, within the same age range, treated during the same time period. There were no significant differences in median age, median total dose, tumor size, estrogen receptor (ER) status, pathologic nodal status, and use of systemic therapy between the study population and the comparison group. Local recurrence (LR) was evaluated as true recurrence (TR, i.e., in the original tumor bed), marginal miss (MM, at the edge of the boost field), or elsewhere (E). Median total dose to the primary was 6100 cGy (range, 5000-7000). Pathology was available for review in 19 cases. Cytology (nuclear and cytoplasmic features) was similar in (7(19)) evaluable cases, and architecture (growth pattern, ie, papillary, solid) was similar in (5(19)) cases. The presence of either cytologic or architectural similarity was noted in(9(19)) cases. 7 of 19 pts who had axillary lymph node evaluation on at least one side had pathological confirmation of lymph node metastasis. Stage was the same in both breasts in 13 cases (10 Stage I, 3 Stage II); ER status data was complete in 11 pts, and the same in both primaries in 9 cases. Cosmetic results and complications after BCT were scored. Statistical significance was evaluated by use of the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: The 5-yr actuarial

  15. Roles of chemoradio therapy for stage III or IV advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Takuya; Iwai, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Minamino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yukawa, Hisaya; Inoue, Toshiya; Yamashita, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of chemoradio therapy (CRT), which was performed on 31 patients with advanced head and neck cancers of stage III or IV at Kansai Medical University between September 1999 and December 2000, was examined. The CRT consisted of continuous infusion of 5FU (500 mg/m 2 ) for 120 hours, prior to drip infusion of CDDP (50 mg/m 2 ) for 2 hours and conventional radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, 5 days/w). The 31 patients with these cancers were divided into two groups; a non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group underwent CRT (60-70 Gy of total radiation dose and two courses of chemotherapy) without surgery. The patients in the operative group received surgical treatment followed by CRT (40 Gy of total radiation dose and one course of chemotherapy). The results of CRT indicated 87.1% of the response rate (RR), and 29.0% of the complete response rate (CR) in the group. The CR rate was lower than in other reports. However, the combination of CRT and the subsequent operation indicated a disease-free survival rate of 61.3% and reduction of the recurrence rate to 17.4%. Eight of 9 patients of CR after CRT without surgery revealed NED. On the other hand, the results indicated that all 10 patients of PR after CRT showed tumor residue, 9 of 10 patients of PR showed NED after additional surgery. Therefore, it is likely that the patients of CR do not need the additional surgery, however, the patients of PR are strongly recommended the surgery to improve the local control rate as well as survival rate. Although adverse reactions of CRT on patients included mucositis, leucopenia, thrombopenia and dermatitis, the symptoms ranged within grade 3. (author)

  16. Organ preservation in stage II and III head and neck cancer utilizing alternate week concomitant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, David B.; Vokes, Everett; Mittal, Bharat B.; Stenson, Kerstin; Kies, M.; Pelzer, H.; Nautiyal, Jaishanker; Kozloff, Mark; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Haraf, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase II trial was conducted to determine the efficacy and rate of organ preservation of alternate week concomitant chemoradiotherapy in stage II and III head and neck cancer. Methods: Forty-nine patients (10 stage II and 39 stage III) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region have been entered into a prospective phase II trial. Pretreatment evaluation included history and physical examination, computed tomography of the neck, bone scan, chest x-ray, panendoscopy and biopsy confirmation of malignancy. Therapy is given in 2 week cycles consisting of 5 days of concomitant chemoradiotherapy followed by a nine day break during which no treatment is given. Each cycle of treatment consists of 1.0 gm hydroxyurea P.O. every 12 hours for 6 days (11 doses per cycle) and 800mg/m 2 /d continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil along with concomitant radiation therapy (RT) administered in 1.8-2.0 Gy daily fractions for five days. This alternate week (week on/week off) schedule is continued for a total of 7 cycles resulting in an overall treatment time of 13 weeks and a total RT dose of 70 Gy. Extent of initial surgery included biopsy only (59.2%), minimal laser debulking (12.2%), and resection with or without neck dissection (28.6%). Results: The majority of patients are male (71.4%), with a median age of 61.3 years. Primary sites included oral cavity (16.3%), oropharynx (12.2%), larynx (57.1%), hypopharynx (8.1%), and nasopharynx (4.1%). T stage included T3 (32 patients, 65.3%), T2 (16 patients, 32.7%), and T1 (1 patient). N stage included N1 (17 patients, 34.7%), and N0 (32 patients, 65.3%). With a median follow-up of 27 months, the overall response rate is 100% (91.7 complete response, and 8.3% partial response). The 5 year actuarial local control, disease free survival, and overall survival is 90.1%, 88.3%, and 65.0%, respectively. One patient has failed with distant disease alone. Four patients had isolated local failures and (3(4)) were

  17. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Waxweiller, Timothy; Koo, Phillip; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Rusthoven, Chad; Gaspar, Laurie; Kavanagh, Brian; Miften, Moyed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assess each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional avoidance

  18. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Waxweiller, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Koo, Phillip [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Rusthoven, Chad; Gaspar, Laurie; Kavanagh, Brian; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assess each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional

  19. The benefit of microsatellite instability is attenuated by chemotherapy in stage II and stage III gastric cancer: Results from a large cohort with subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Shin, Hyun Beak; Jo, Ara; Choi, Hyeji; Seo, Sang Hyuk; Bang, Hui-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported that the prognosis of microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) gastric cancer is similar to that of MSI-low/microsatellite stable (MSI-L/MSS) gastric cancer. The reason for this seemed to be related to the effects of chemotherapy. To verify this hypothesis, we expanded the study population and reanalyzed the prognosis of MSI-H gastric cancer. Data from 1,276 patients with Stage II and III gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. The prognosis of MSI-H tumors in comparison with MSI-L/MSS tumors was analyzed, according to the administration of chemotherapy and other clinicopathologic features. A total of 361 (28.3%) patients did not receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 47 and MSI-L/MSS = 314), whereas 915 (71.7%) patients did receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 58 and MSI-L/MSS = 857). The hazard ratio of MSI-H versus MSI-L/MSS was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.94, p = 0.031) when chemotherapy was not received and 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.71, p = 0.466) when chemotherapy was received. In subgroup analyses, the prognosis of MSI-H was better in Stage III, women, with lymph node metastasis, and undifferentiated histology subgroups when chemotherapy was not received. However, in patients treated with chemotherapy, prognosis was worse for MSI-H tumors in Stage III, undifferentiated histology, and diffuse type subgroups of gastric cancer. In conclusion, MSI-H tumors were associated with a good prognosis in Stage II and III gastric cancer when patients were treated by surgery alone, and the benefits of MSI-H status were attenuated by chemotherapy. © 2015 UICC.

  20. Prognostic significance of the PC10 index for patients with stage II and III oesophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Irie, Toshiyuki; Nozawa, Kumiko; Nakajima, Kotaro [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takahashi, Atsushi [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Pathology; Watanabe, Teruo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Pathology; Tanaka, Naomi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1999-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody PC10 is used for immunohistochemical staining of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The percentage of PC10-positive cancer cells is defined as the PC10 index. We evaluated the relationship between the PC10 index in pretreatment endoscopic biopsies and the prognoses of 47 patients with Stage II-III oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy. The patients with a PC10 index >40% had significantly poorer prognoses than the other patients (p=0.0007). Proportional hazards model analysis indicated that only the PC10 index was a prognostic factor (p=0.0009). The patient group of complete responders showed significantly lower PC10 indices compared to patients with a partial response or no change (p=0.049). The PC10 index can be a good predictive indicator of the prognosis in patients with Stage II-III oesophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  1. Prognostic implication of serum hepatocyte growth factor in stage II/III breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyori; Youk, Jeonghwan; Yang, Yaewon; Kim, Tae-Yong; Min, Ahrum; Ham, Hye-Seon; Cho, Seongcheol; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Keam, Bhumsuk; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Han Suk; Han, Wonshik; Park, In Ae; Kim, Tae-You; Noh, Dong-Young; Im, Seock-Ah

    2016-03-01

    In stage II/III breast cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is a standard treatment. Although several biomarkers are used to predict prognosis in breast cancer, there is no reliable predictive biomarker for NAC success. Recently, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and cMet signaling pathway demonstrated to be involved in breast cancer tumor progression, and its potential as a biomarker is under active investigation. In this study, we assessed the potential of serum HGF as a prognostic biomarker for NAC efficacy. Venous blood samples were drawn from patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer and treated with NAC in Seoul National University Hospital from August 2004 to November 2009. Serum HGF level was determined using an ELISA system. We reviewed the medical records of the patients and investigated the association of HGF level with patients' clinicopathologic characteristics. A total of 121 female patients (median age = 45 years old) were included. Median level of HGF was 934 pg/ml (lower quartile: 772, upper quartile: 1145 pg/ml). Patients with higher HGF level than median value were significantly more likely to have clinically detectable regional node metastasis (p = 0.017, Fisher's exact test). Patients with complete and partial response according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th Edition criteria tended to have higher HGF level (p = 0.105 by t test). Patients with an HGF level higher than the upper quartile value had longer relapse-free survival than the other patients (106 vs. 85 months, p = 0.008). High serum HGF levels in breast cancer patients are associated with clinically detectable regional node metastasis and, paradoxically, with longer relapse-free survival in stage II/III breast cancer.

  2. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillet, T.; MOrere, J.F.; Piperno-Neuman, S.; Boaziz, C.; Breau, J.L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and whether the response to induction chemotherapy can predict the response to subsequent chemoradiotherapy and survival. In conclusion, there is a statistically significant relationship not only between the response to ICT and the response to CCrt, but also between the response to ICT and the local outcome and survival. (authors)

  3. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-24

    Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy by bronchial arterial infusion in patients with unresectable stage III squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Jiang, Sen; Ni, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy administered via bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) on unresectable stage III lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This was a single-arm retrospective study of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GP) administered via BAI to patients with unresectable lung SCC. Data regarding the post-treatment response rate, downstage rate, and surgery rate, as well as progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), quality of life, and post-BAI side effects were collected. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and May 2014. The response rate was 72.2%, and the downstage rate was 22.2%. Among the patients who were downstaged, 16 (44.4%) patients were because of their T stage, and 5 (13.9%) patients were downstaged due to to their N stage. The surgery rate was 52.8%, the 1-year survival rate was 75.4%, and the 2-year survival rate was 52.1%. The median PFS was 14.0 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.4], and the median OS was 25.0 months (95% CI: 19.1-30.9). The quality of life was significantly improved, and the chemotherapy was well tolerated. Compared with intravenous neoadjuvant chemotherapy, BAI chemotherapy significantly improved the surgery rate, prolonged PFS and OS, and improved the quality of life in patients with unresectable stage III lung SCC.

  5. TS gene polymorphisms are not good markers of response to 5-FU therapy in stage III colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariña-Sarasqueta, A; Gosens, M J E M; Moerland, E; van Lijnschoten, I; Lemmens, V E P P; Slooter, G D; Rutten, H J T; van den Brule, Adriaan J C

    2011-08-01

    Although the predictive and prognostic value of thymidylate synthase (TS) expression and gene polymorphism in colon cancer has been widely studied, the results are inconclusive probably because of methodological differences. With this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of TS gene polymorphisms genotyping in therapy response in stage III colon carcinoma patients treated with 5-FU adjuvant chemotherapy. 251 patients diagnosed with stage III colon carcinoma treated with surgery followed by 5-FU based adjuvant therapy were selected. The variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5'untranslated region of the TS gene were genotyped. There was a positive association between tumor T stage and the VNTR genotypes (p = 0.05). In both univariate and multivariate survival analysis no effects of the studied polymorphisms on survival were found. However, there was an association between both polymorphisms and age. Among patients younger than 60 years, the patients homozygous for 2R seemed to have a better overall survival, whereas among the patients older than 67 this longer survival was seen by the carriers of other genotypes. We conclude that the TS VNTR and SNP do not predict response to 5-FU therapy in patients with stage III colon carcinoma. However, age appears to modify the effects of TS polymorphisms on survival.

  6. Geographic variation and sociodemographic disparity in the use of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Janki M; Lairson, David R; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the geographic variation and sociodemographic disparities in the use of oxaliplatin chemotherapy, which has not been widely studied in the past. Our results suggest that chemotherapy use varies across geographic regions. Patterns of use that relate specifically to oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy can inform providers and researchers how newer regimens are being used as standard chemotherapy in a real-world setting. According to the National Cancer Comprehensive Network (NCCN), oxaliplatin with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5-FU/LV) is the recommended adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with resected stage III colon cancer. Age and race are considered strong predictors of chemotherapy receipt, whereas geographic disparity has received minimal attention. The purpose of this study was to examine geographic variation and sociodemographic disparity in the use of chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer, focusing specifically on oxaliplatin. A retrospective cohort of 4106 Medicare patients was identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)/Medicare linked database. Descriptive statistics show how oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy was used in various geographic regions among different age and racial groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between receipt of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy and geographic region while adjusting for other sociodemographic and tumor characteristics. Only 49% of the patients with stage III disease received adjuvant chemotherapy within 3 to 6 months of colon cancer-specific surgery. Patients aged 66 to 70 years were 78% more likely to receive chemotherapy than were those aged 80 years and older (Pcancer care to all patients according to their preferences and needs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  8. Tumor cavitation in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy: incidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phernambucq, Erik C J; Hartemink, Koen J; Smit, Egbert F; Paul, Marinus A; Postmus, Pieter E; Comans, Emile F I; Senan, Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Commonly reported complications after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) include febrile neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and pneumonitis. We studied the incidence of tumor cavitation and/or "tumor abscess" after CCRT in a single-institutional cohort. Between 2003 and 2010, 87 patients with stage III NSCLC underwent cisplatin-based CCRT and all subsequent follow-up at the VU University Medical Center. Diagnostic and radiotherapy planning computed tomography scans were reviewed for tumor cavitation, which was defined as a nonbronchial air-containing cavity located within the primary tumor. Pulmonary toxicities scored as Common Toxicity Criteria v3.0 of grade III or more, occurring within 90 days after end of radiotherapy, were analyzed. In the entire cohort, tumor cavitation was observed on computed tomography scans of 16 patients (18%). The histology in cavitated tumors was squamous cell (n = 14), large cell (n = 1), or adenocarcinoma (n = 1). Twenty patients (23%) experienced pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more, other than radiation pneumonitis. Eight patients with a tumor cavitation (seven squamous cell carcinoma) developed severe pulmonary complications; tumor abscess (n = 5), fatal hemorrhage (n = 2), and fatal embolism (n = 1). Two patients with a tumor abscess required open-window thoracostomy post-CCRT. The median overall survival for patients with or without tumor cavitation were 9.9 and 16.3 months, respectively (p = 0.09). With CCRT, acute pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more developed in 50% of patients with stage III NSCLC, who also had radiological features of tumor cavitation. The optimal treatment of patients with this presentation is unclear given the high risk of a tumor abscess.

  9. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score as a predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Marlies S; Kuppen, Peter J K; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Tezcan, Haluk; Putter, Hein; Clark-Langone, Kim; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; Shak, Steve; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-11-01

    The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay is a validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III colon cancer patients. We conducted a prospectively designed study to validate this assay for prediction of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients from the Dutch Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) trial. RNA was extracted from fixed paraffin-embedded primary rectal tumor tissue from stage II and III patients randomized to TME surgery alone, without (neo)adjuvant treatment. Recurrence Score was assessed by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction using previously validated colon cancer genes and algorithm. Data were analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for stage and resection margin status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Recurrence Score predicted risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 2.21, P = .01), risk of distant recurrence (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.17, P = .03), and rectal cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.34, P = .007). The effect of Recurrence Score was most prominent in stage II patients and attenuated with more advanced stage (P(interaction) ≤ .007 for each endpoint). In stage II, five-year cumulative incidence of recurrence ranged from 11.1% in the predefined low Recurrence Score group (48.5% of patients) to 43.3% in the high Recurrence Score group (23.1% of patients). The 12-gene Recurrence Score is a predictor of recurrence risk and cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery alone, suggesting a similar underlying biology in colon and rectal cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III and IV bladder cancer: results of 170 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoumi Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Bayoumi,1 Tarek Heikal,2 Hossam Darweish2 1Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Medical Oncology, Damietta Cancer Institute, Ministry of Health, Damietta, Egypt Background: Radical cystectomy (RC with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancers. However, the locoregional recurrence rate is still significantly higher for locally advanced cases post-RC. The underuse of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in such cases after RC is related mainly to a lack of proven survival benefit. Here we are reporting our long-term Egyptian experience with bladder cancer patients treated with up-front RC with or without conformal PORT. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 170 locally advanced bladder cancer (T3–T4, N0/N1, M0 patients who had RC performed with or without PORT at Damietta Cancer Institute during the period of 1998–2006. The treatment outcomes and toxicity profile of PORT were evaluated and compared with those of a non-PORT group of patients. Results: Ninety-two patients received PORT; 78 did not. At median follow-up of 47 months (range, 17–77 months, 33% locoregional recurrences were seen in the PORT group versus 55% in the non-PORT group (P<0.001. The overall distant metastasis rate in the whole group was 39%, with no difference between the two groups. The 5-year disease-free survival for the whole group of patients was 53%±11%, which was significantly affected by additional PORT, and 65%±13% compared with 40%±9% for the non-PORT group (P=0.04. The pathological subtypes did not affect 5-year disease-free survival significantly (P=0.9. The 5-year overall survival was 44%±10%. Using multivariate analysis, PORT, stage, and extravesical extension (positive surgical margins were found to be important prognostic factors for locoregional control. Stage and lymph node status were important prognosticators for distant metastasis

  11. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  12. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  13. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having ≤10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  14. Clinical outcome of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer patients after definitive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Primarily combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used to treat unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the results are not satisfactory. In this study treatment results were retrospectively analyzed and the prognostic factors related to survival were identified. From March 1999 to January 2004, 102 patients with stage IIIA/IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Radiotherapy involved a daily dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy five times a week; 60 Gy was set as the total dose. Maximal chemotherapy was given to patients with normal kidney, liver, and bone marrow functions. The 5-year overall survival rate was 22.2%; the median survival was 18 months. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53 months. The complete or partial response rate was 85%. At the time of the last follow-up, 21 patients were alive and 81 patients had died, including 5 patients who had died due to radiation pneumonitis. There were significant differences in survival and in the fatal radiation pneumonitis rate between patients with superior lobe lesions and those with middle or inferior lobe lesions. Patients whose primary tumor is located in the superior lobe appear to have a better clinical outcome.

  15. Use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer in Puerto Rico: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Ríos-Motta, Ruth; Veintidós-Feliú, Alejandro; Hunter-Mellado, Robert; Torres-Cintrón, Carlos R.; Suárez-Ramos, Tonatiuh; Magno, Priscilla

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study aims to examine factors associated with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and the use of oxaliplatin after curative resection in stage III colon cancer patients and assesses the effect of their use in three-year survival. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted using Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry-Health Insurance Linkage Database. The study cohort consisted of stage III colon cancer patients with a curative surgery in the period 2008–2012. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between adjuvant chemotherapy and oxaliplatin use and overall survival and risk of death, respectively. Results Overall, 75% of the study population received adjuvant chemotherapy during the study period. Factors statistically associated with receiving adjuvant chemotherapy within four months after resection included being married (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.64; 95% CI 1.18–2.28; p = 0.003), and being enrolled in Medicare (AOR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.03–2.75; p = 0.039) or Medicaid and Medicare dual eligible (AOR 1.66; 95% CI: 1.06–2.60; p = 0.028). However, patients aged ≥70 years were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (AOR 0.22; 95%CI 0.14–0.36; p<0.001). Discussion We observed a significant reduction in mortality in adjuvant chemotherapy treated patients. Similarly, patients <70 years treated with oxaliplatin had significantly lower risk of death than those who did not, although for patients ≥70 years no statistical significance was achieved. Future studies should assess effective interventions to reduce barriers to access guideline-based recommended colon cancer treatment. PMID:29584752

  16. Influence of conformal radiotherapy technique on survival after chemoradiotherapy for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, David J; Koshy, Matthew; Liptay, Michael J; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-07-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy is a core treatment modality for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although radiotherapy (RT) technologies have advanced dramatically, to the authors' knowledge relatively little is known regarding the importance of irradiation technique on outcome, particularly given the competing risk of distant metastasis. The National Cancer Data Base was used to determine predictors of overall survival (OS) in patients with AJCC stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy, focusing on the importance of conformal RT (CRT). Patients with stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy between 2003 and 2005 in the National Cancer Data Base were included. RT technique was defined as conventional, 3-dimensional-conformal, or intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), the latter 2 combined as CRT. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed for univariable and multivariable analyses of OS. The median, 3-year, and 5-year survival outcomes for the 13,292 patients were 12.9 months, 19%, and 11%, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year survival probabilities of patients receiving CRT versus no CRT were 22% versus 19% and 14% versus 11%, respectively (P < .0001). On multivariable analysis, CRT was found to be significantly associated with improved OS (hazards ratio, 0.89). This effect was confirmed on sensitivity analyses, including restricting the cohort to minimum 6-month survivors, young patients with stage IIIA disease, and propensity score-matching. Institutional academic status and patient volume were not found to be associated with OS. CRT was found to be independently associated with a survival advantage. These results reflect the importance of optimal locoregional therapy in patients with stage III NSCLC and provide motivation for further study of advanced RT technologies in patients with NSCLC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  17. Adherence to treatment guidelines and survival for older patients with stage II or III colon cancer in Texas from 2001 through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Ning; Ho, Vivian; Ding, Minming; He, Weiguo; Niu, Jiangong; Yang, Ming; Du, Xianglin L; Zorzi, Daria; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Giordano, Sharon H

    2018-02-15

    Treatment guidelines for colon cancer recommend colectomy with lymphadenectomy of at least 12 lymph nodes for patients with stage I to stage III disease as surgery adherence (SA) and adjuvant chemotherapy for individuals with stage III disease. Herein, the authors evaluated adherence to these guidelines among older patients in Texas with colon cancer and the associated survival outcomes. Using Texas Cancer Registry data linked with Medicare data, the authors included patients with AJCC stage II and III colon cancer who were aged ≥66 years and diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. SA and adjuvant chemotherapy adherence rates to treatment guidelines were estimated. The chi-square test, general linear regression, survival probability, and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with adherence and survival. The rate of SA increased from 47.2% to 84% among 6029 patients with stage II or stage III disease from 2001 to 2011, and the rate of adjuvant chemotherapy increased from 48.9% to 53.1% for patients with stage III disease during the same time period. SA was associated with marital status, tumor size, surgeon specialty, and year of diagnosis. Patient age, sex, marital status, Medicare state buy-in status, comorbidity status, and year of diagnosis were found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year survival probability for patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment was the highest at 87% for patients with stage II disease and was 73% for those with stage III disease. After adjusting for demographic and tumor characteristics, improved cancer cause-specific survival was associated with the receipt of stage-specific, guideline-concordant treatment for patients with stage II or stage III disease. The adherence to guideline-concordant treatment among older patients with colon cancer residing in Texas improved over time, and was associated with better survival outcomes. Future studies should be focused on identifying interventions to

  18. Preliminary investigation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jindong; Lu Changxing; Wang Jiaming; Liu Jun; Li Hongxuan; Wang Changlu; Gao Lanting; Zhao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and treatment-related toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: SBRT was applied to 30 patients, including clinically staged T 1 , T 2 (≤5 cm) or T 3 (chest wall primary tumors only), N 0 , M 0 ,biopsy-confirmed NSCLC. All patients were precluded from lobotomy because of physical condition or comorbidity. No patients developed tumors of any T-stage in the proximal zone. SBRT was performed with the total dose of 50 Gy to 70 Gy in 10 - 11 fractions during 12 - 15 days. prescription line was set onthe edge of the PTV. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%. The number of patients who completed the 1-, and 2-year follow-up were 15, and 10, respectively. All 30 patients completed therapy as planned. The complete response (CR), partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 37%, 53% and 3%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 4-36 months), Kaplan-Meier local control at 2 years was 94%. The 2-year overall survival was 84% and the 2-year cancer specific survival was 90%. Seven patients(23%) developed Grade 2 pneumonitis, no grade > 2 acute or late lung toxicity was observed. No one developed chest wall pain. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver 50 Gy to 70 Gy of SBRT in 10 - 11 fractions for medically inoperable patients with stage I / II NSCLC. It was associated with low incidence of toxicities and provided sustained local tumor control.The preliminary investigation indicated the cancer specific survival probability of SBRT was high. It is necessary to perform similar investigation in a larger number of patients with long-term follow-up. (authors)

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy and risk of gastrointestinal, hematologic, and cardiac toxicities in elderly patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chung-Yuan; Chan, Wenyaw; Delclos, George P; Du, Xianglin L

    2012-06-01

    Randomized trials have established the effectiveness of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III resectable colon cancer but the toxicity has not been well established outside the trial setting. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of various toxicity-related endpoints among the elderly patients. Patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 1991 to 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Chemotherapy use within 3 months after tumor resection was identified from submitted claims. We reported the 3-month cumulative incidence rate (CIR) for gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities. The risk of ischemic heart disease in relation to chemotherapy use and length was assessed using Cox regression models, stratified by age and comorbidity subgroups. Of the 12,099 patients, 63.9% (n=7740) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Common gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities among chemotherapy group include volume depletion disorder (CIR=9.1%), agranulocytosis (CIR=3.4%), diarrhea (CIR=2.4%), nausea and vomiting (CIR=2.3%). Chemotherapy use was significantly associated with the onset of these toxicities [hazard ratio (HR)=2.76; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=2.42-3.15]. The risk of ischemic heart disease was slightly associated with chemotherapy use (HR=1.08, 95% CI=0.96-1.22), but significant only among patients aged colon cancer. On account of the effects of these side effects on treatment discontinuation, rehospitalization, and overall health status, some close monitoring and preventive measures may be emphasized to maximize the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  20. Effect of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFX RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy for Stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-nine patients treated in a randomized study were retrospectively analyzed. Group I patients were treated by HFX RT with 1.2 Gy twice daily with a total dose of 64.8 Gy in 27 treatment days, while Groups II and III patients were treated by the same HFX RT and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide (every week in Group II and every other week in Group III). Interfraction intervals of either 4.5-5 h or 5.5-6 h were used for each patient. Results: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) had a better prognosis than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h) (median survival: 22 vs. 7 months; 5-year survival rate: 27% vs. 0%, p = 0.00000). This phenomenon was observed in all treatment groups. Patients ≥ 60 years of age, with Stage IIIA disease, or with previous weight loss ≤ 5% were treated more often with the shorter intervals than those 5%, respectively, but in all of these subgroups of patients, the shorter intervals were associated with a better prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the interfraction interval was an independent prognostic factor, together with sex, age, performance status, and stage. The shorter intervals were associated with an increased incidence of acute high grade toxicity, but not with an increase in late toxicity. Conclusion: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) appeared to have a better survival than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h). Prospective randomized studies are warranted to further investigate the influence of interfraction interval in HFX RT

  1. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano P, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Radiation therapy alone in stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix - a 17-year experience in Southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Paulo R.F.; Braga-Filho, Aroldo; Barletta, Antonio; Ilha, Ligia A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: External irradiation followed by intracavitary therapy (EBIC) has been considered the standard treatment for stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix. For different reasons, some patients are not suited for intracavitary therapy (ICT), and the treatment may be given entirely by external beam irradiation alone (EBRTA). The purpose of our study is to discuss treatment results and complications for patients undergoing EBIC or EBRTA. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study was carried out on 202 eligible patients with stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix admitted for radiotherapy from 1980-1997. Ninety-three patients were able to receive EBIC (50 Gy, 8 MV RX whole pelvis followed by one session of 38-45 Gy ICT to point A). The remaining received EBRTA (50-70 Gy for 5-9 or more weeks). Median follow-up procedure was 18.5 months (range: 4-182) for all patients and 26 months (range 4-147) for the patients at risk. Results: The most frequent reason for precluding ICT was large residual tumor volume (32.1%). Ten-year overall survival rates, relapse free survival, and pelvic failure rate for the EBIC and EBRTA patients were, respectively, 22.5% x 15.6% (p = 0.0087), 23.5% x 14.8% (p = 0.005), and 51.6% x 68.8% (p = 0.005). However, when the same comparisons were performed with EBIC patients x EBRTA patients receiving a high dose schedule (60 Gy/6-8 wk to 70 Gy/7-9 wk), the results of the EBIC group remained higher, but the differences became insignificant: respectively, 22.5% x 18.9% (p = 0.17), 23.5% x 15.3% (p = 0.052), and 51.6% x 60.0% (p = 0.10). The distribution of complications was similar in both groups. Conclusions: We found that EBIC was the best treatment modality in our patients with stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix, whereas for patients who were not candidates for ICT, EBRTA with a high dose schedule appears to be an efficient and safe alternative

  3. Emerging Therapies for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera S. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC includes radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery in certain individualized cases. In unresectable NSCLC, chemoradiation has been the standard of care for the past three decades. Local and distant failure remains high in this group of patients, so dose escalation has been studied in both single institution and national clinical trials. Though initial studies showed a benefit to dose escalation, phase III studies examining dose escalation using standard fractionation or hyperfractionation have failed to show a benefit. Over the last 17 years, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has shown a high degree of safety and local control for stage I lung cancers and other localized malignancies. More recently, phase I/II studies using SBRT for dose escalation after conventional chemoradiation in locally advanced NSCLC have been promising with good apparent safety. Immunotherapy also offers opportunities to address distant disease and preclinical data suggest immunotherapy in tandem with SBRT may be a rational way to induce an “abscopal effect” although there are little clinical data as yet. By building on the proven concept of conventional chemoradiation for patients with locally advanced NSCLC with a subsequent radiation dose intensification to residual disease with SBRT concurrent with immunotherapy, we hope address the issues of metastatic and local failures. This “quadmodality” approach is still in its infancy but appears to be a safe and rational approach to the improving the outcome of NSCLC therapy.

  4. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguang Shi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]. The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001 than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response.

  5. A prospective phase II trial of EGCG in treatment of acute radiation-induced esophagitis for stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hanxi; Xie, Peng; Li, Xiaolin; Zhu, Wanqi; Sun, Xindong; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Xiaoting; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute radiation-induced esophagitis (ARIE) is one of main toxicities complicated by thoracic radiotherapy, influencing patients’ quality of life and radiotherapy proceeding seriously. It is difficult to be cured rapidly so far. Our phase I trial preliminarily showed that EGCG may be a promising strategy in the treatment of ARIE. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with stage III lung cancer from the Shandong Tumor Hospital & Institute in China from January 2013 to September 2014. All patients received concurrent or sequential chemo-radiotherapy, or radiotherapy only. EGCG was administrated once ARIE appeared. EGCG was given with the concentration of 440 μmol/L during radiotherapy and additionally two weeks after radiotherapy. RTOG score, dysphagia and pain related to esophagitis were recorded every week. Results: Thirty-seven patients with stage IIIA and IIIB lung cancer were enrolled in this trial. In comparison to the original, the RTOG score in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th week after EGCG prescription and the 1st, 2nd week after radiotherapy decreased significantly (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001, 0.102, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). The pain score of each week was significantly lower than the baseline (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.006, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: This trial confirmed that the oral administration of EGCG is an effective and safe method to deal with ARIE. A phase III randomized controlled trial is expected to further corroborate the consequence of EGCG in ARIE treatment

  6. Intravital Microscopy in Evaluating Patients With Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, or Stage IA-IV Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-04

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  7. A lymph node ratio of 10% is predictive of survival in stage III colon cancer: a French regional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Charles; Mauvais, François; Cosse, Cyril; Rebibo, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Paul; Dromer, Didier; Aubert, Christine; Carton, Sophie; Dron, Bernard; Dadamessi, Innocenti; Maes, Bernard; Perrier, Guillaume; Manaouil, David; Fontaine, Jean-François; Gozy, Michel; Panis, Xavier; Foncelle, Pierre Henri; de Fresnoy, Hugues; Leroux, Fabien; Vaneslander, Pierre; Ghighi, Caroline; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node ratio (LNR) (positive lymph nodes/sampled lymph nodes) is predictive of survival in colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to validate the LNR as a prognostic factor and to determine the optimum LNR cutoff for distinguishing between "good prognosis" and "poor prognosis" colon cancer patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, patients with TNM stage III colon cancer operated on with at least of 3 years of follow-up and not lost to follow-up were included in this retrospective study. The two primary endpoints were 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) as a function of the LNR groups and the cutoff. One hundred seventy-eight patients were included. There was no correlation between the LNR group and 3-year OS (P=0.06) and a significant correlation between the LNR group and 3-year DFS (P=0.03). The optimal LNR cutoff of 10% was significantly correlated with 3-year OS (P=0.02) and DFS (P=0.02). The LNR was not an accurate prognostic factor when fewer than 12 lymph nodes were sampled. Clarification and simplification of the LNR classification are prerequisites for use of this system in randomized control trials. An LNR of 10% appears to be the optimal cutoff.

  8. Radiation therapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer in patients aged 75 years and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masaya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Katano, Susumu

    1996-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1992, 32 patients aged 75 and older with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were given definitive radiation therapy. These patients did not undergo surgery because of old age, poor cardiac/pulmonary condition, or refusal to give consent. The mean age was 79 years, and 11 patients were over 80 years old. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 25 patients and adenocarcinoma in 7. The clinical T and N stage was T1N0 in 4 patients, T2N0 in 9, and T2N0 in 19. The total dose of radiation therapy given to each patient exceeded 60 Gy using 10-MV X-rays. The treatment was completed in all 32 patients without treatment-related complications. The 2- and 5-year overall actuarial survival rates were 40% and 16%, respectively. Eleven intercurrent deaths occurred, including 7 patients who died of heart disease. The 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 57% and 36%, respectively. None of the patients developed severe pneumonitis requiring hospitalization. All but three patients received radiation therapy on an inpatient basis. The mean duration of the hospital stay for initial treatment was 56 days, and mean ratio to total survival period (mean 739 days) was 8%. Although many elderly patients have concurrent medical complications such as heart disease and chronic pulmonary disease, the present study showed that elderly patients with clinical stage I-II NSCLC can expert a realistic probability of long-term survival with definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  9. Second cancers after conservative surgery and radiation for stages I-II breast cancer: identifying a subset of women at increased risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, Barbara; Hanlon, Alexandra; Freedman, Gary; Nicolaou, Nicos; Anderson, Penny

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk and patterns of second malignancy in a group of women treated with conservative surgery and radiation in a relatively contemporary manner for early-stage invasive breast cancer, and to identify a subgroup of these women at increased risk for a second cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1978 to 1994, 1,253 women with unilateral Stage I-II breast cancer underwent wide excision, axillary dissection, and radiation. The median follow-up was 8.9 years, with 446 patients followed for ≥10 years. The median age was 55 years. Sixty-eight percent had T1 tumors and 74% were axillary-node negative. Radiation was directed to the breast only in 78%. Adjuvant therapy consisted of chemotherapy in 19%, tamoxifen in 19%, and both in 8%. Factors analyzed for their association with the cumulative incidence of all second malignancies, contralateral breast cancer, and non-breast cancer malignancy were: age, menopausal status, race, family history, obesity, smoking, tumor size, location, histology, pathologic nodal status, region(s) treated with radiation, and the use and type of adjuvant therapy. Results: One hundred seventy-six women developed a second malignancy (87 contralateral breast cancers at a median interval of 5.8 years, and 98 non-breast cancer malignancies at a median interval of 7.2 years). Nine women had both a contralateral breast cancer and non-breast cancer second malignancy. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences of a second malignancy were 5% and 16% for all cancers, 3% and 7% for contralateral breast cancer, 3% and 8%, for all second non-breast cancer malignancies, and 1% and 5%, respectively, for second non-breast cancer malignancies, excluding skin cancers. Patient age was a significant factor for contralateral breast cancer and non-breast cancer second malignancy. Young age was associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer, while older age was associated with an increased the risk of a second non-breast cancer

  10. Overexpression of the S100A2 protein as a prognostic marker for patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUDA, TAIKI; ISHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; MOGUSHI, KAORU; OKAZAKI, SATOSHI; ISHIGURO, MEGUMI; IIDA, SATORU; MIZUSHIMA, HIROSHI; TANAKA, HIROSHI; UETAKE, HIROYUKI; SUGIHARA, KENICHI

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify a novel prognostic biomarker related to recurrence in stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Stage II and III CRC tissue mRNA expression was profiled using an Affymetrix Gene Chip, and copy number profiles of 125 patients were generated using an Affymetrix 250K Sty array. Genes showing both upregulated expression and copy number gains in cases involving recurrence were extracted as candidate biomarkers. The protein expression of the candidate gene was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of tissue from 161 patients. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was also examined. We identified 9 candidate genes related to recurrence of stage II and III CRC, whose mRNA expression was significantly higher in CRC than in normal tissue. Of these proteins, the S100 calcium-binding protein A2 (S100A2) has been observed in several human cancers. S100A2 protein overexpression in CRC cells was associated with significantly worse overall survival and relapse-free survival, indicating that S100A2 is an independent risk factor for stage II and III CRC recurrence. S100A2 overexpression in cancer cells could be a biomarker of poor prognosis in stage II and III CRC recurrence and a target for treatment of this disease. PMID:26783118

  11. Evaluation of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator on 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV) treated with radiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Shuji; Imajo, Yoshinari; Hamada, Fumio; Miyaji, Chihiro

    1982-01-01

    The clinical effect of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator OK-432 and/or PSK was studied about 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV). In 91 cases in stage III, fifty percent survival period was found to be 11.5 months for 63 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 7.5 months for 28 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. In 81 cases in stage IV, fifty percent survival period was found to be 6.7 months for 45 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 3.3 months for 36 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. (author)

  12. Early tumor shrinkage served as a prognostic factor for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Men; Hu, Yan; Yang, Yonghua; Yang, Jiyuan; Cai, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death. About 80% of patients are diagnosed at stage III in the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is extremely important to understand the progression of this disease which has low survival times despite the advancing treatment modalities. We aimed to investigate the relationship between early tumor shrinkage (ETS) after initial concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT) and survival outcome in patients with stage III (NSCLC). A retrospective review of 103 patients with stage III NSCLC who had received C-CRT from January 2006 to October 2011 was performed. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of Cisplatin/Vp-16 and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 66 Gy (range 60-70 Gy). All patients received a computed tomography (CT) examination before treatment. Also subsequently, chest CT scans were performed with the same imaging parameters at approximately 5 weeks after the initiation of treatment. ETS is here stratified by a decrease in tumor size ≥30% and cancer-related death (P < .05) in stage IIINSCLC. ETS may be served as a useful prognostic factor to predict the outcome of stage III NSCLC patients treated with CCRT.

  13. The expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 in predicting postoperative tumour progression in stages I-II colon cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Yao, Yunfeng; Xue, Weicheng; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Peng, Yifan; Gu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of chemokine receptors in stage I/II colon cancer is unclear. We assessed the prognostic value of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and CXCR4 in stage I/II colon cancer. 145 patients with stage I/II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery alone from 2000 to 2007 were investigated. Chemokine receptor expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The associations between CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological variables were analysed using the χ2 test, and the relationships between chemokine receptors and a 5-year disease-free survival were analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The high-expression rates of CXCR3 and CXCR4 were 17.9% (26/145) and 38.6% (56/145), respectively. There were no significant associations between the expressions of CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological factors including gender, age, tumour location, histological differentiation, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion and pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The 5-year disease-free survival was not significantly different between low-expression groups and high-expression groups of CXCR3 and CXCR4. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum CEA and a number of retrieved lymph nodes, rather than chemokine receptors, were independent prognosticators. CXCR3 and CXCR4 are not independent prognosticators for stage I/II colon cancer after curative surgery.

  14. Staging for vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Neville F; Barlow, Ellen L

    2015-08-01

    Vulvar cancer has been staged by the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) since 1969, and the original staging system was based on clinical findings only. This system provided a very good spread of prognostic groupings. Because vulvar cancer is virtually always treated surgically, the status of the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor and this can only be determined with certainty by histological examination of resected lymph nodes, FIGO introduced a surgical staging system in 1988. This was modified in 1994 to include a category of microinvasive vulvar cancer (stage IA), because such patients have virtually no risk of lymph node metastases. This system did not give a reasonably even spread of prognostic groupings. In addition, patients with stage III disease were shown to be a heterogeneous group prognostically, and the number of positive nodes and the morphology of those nodes were not taken into account. A new surgical staging system for vulvar cancer was introduced by FIGO in 2009. Initial retrospective analyses have suggested that this new staging system has overcome the major deficiencies in the 1994 system. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of metformin in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage III colorectal cancer: randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fatatry, Basma Mahrous; Ibrahim, Osama Mohamed; Hussien, Fatma Zakaria; Mostafa, Tarek Mohamed

    2018-06-21

    Peripheral sensory neuropathy is the most prominently reported adverse effect of oxaliplatin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate metformin role in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. From November 2014 to May 2016, 40 patients with stage III colorectal cancer completed 12 cycles of FOLFOX-4 regimen. Twenty patients in the control arm received FOLFOX-4 regimen only, and 20 patients in the metformin arm, received the same regimen along with metformin 500 mg three times daily. The metformin efficacy was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE version 4.0), a12-item neurotoxicity questionnaire (Ntx-12) from the validated Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group and, the brief pain inventory short form "worst pain" item. In addition to neurotensin, malondialdehyde and interleukin-6 serum levels assessment. At the end of the 12th cycle, there were less patients with grade 2 and 3 neuropathy in metformin arm as compared to control arm. (60 versus 95%, P = 0.009) In addition, metformin arm showed significantly higher total scores of Ntx-12 questionnaire than control arm (24.0 versus 19.2, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the mean pain score in metformin arm was significantly lower than those of control arm, (6.7 versus 7.3, P = 0.005). Mean serum levels of malondialdehyde and neurotensin were significantly lower in metformin arm after the 6th and the 12th cycles. Metformin may be a promising drug in protecting colorectal cancer patients against oxaliplatin-induced chronic peripheral sensory neuropathy.

  16. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  17. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  18. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute⊕ Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruijt Hans FM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC. In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0 will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs and/or micrometastases (MMs at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+ and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+ are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS. Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265

  19. CDX2 prognostic value in stage II/III resected colon cancer is related to CMS classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, C; Taieb, J; Balogoun, R; Marisa, L; de Reyniès, A; Laurent-Puig, P

    2017-05-01

    Caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is involved in colon cancer (CC) oncogenesis and has been proposed as a prognostic biomarker in patients with stage II or III CC. We analyzed CDX2 expression in a series of 469 CC typed for the new international consensus molecular subtype (CMS) classification, and we confirmed results in a series of 90 CC. Here, we show that lack of CDX2 expression is only present in the mesenchymal subgroup (CMS4) and in MSI-immune tumors (CMS1) and not in CMS2 and CMS3 colon cancer. Although CDX2 expression was a globally independent prognostic factor, loss of CDX2 expression is not associated with a worse prognosis in the CMS1 group, but is highly prognostic in CMS4 patients for both relapse free and overall survival. Similarly, lack of CDX2 expression was a bad prognostic factor in MSS patients, but not in MSI. Our work suggests that combination of the consensual CMS classification and lack of CDX2 expression could be a useful marker to identify CMS4/CDX2-negative patients with a very poor prognosis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Tanai, Chiharu; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P 80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  1. Can we eliminate neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in favor of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy for select stage II/III rectal adenocarcinomas: Analysis of the National Cancer Data base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Richard J; Liu, Yuan; Patel, Kirtesh; Zhong, Jim; Steuer, Conor E; Kooby, David A; Russell, Maria C; Gillespie, Theresa W; Landry, Jerome C

    2017-03-01

    Stage II and III rectal cancers have been effectively treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) followed by definitive resection. Advancements in surgical technique and systemic therapy have prompted investigation of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy (NMAC) regimens with the elimination of radiation (RT). The objective of the current study was to investigate factors that predict for the use of NCRT versus NMAC and compare outcomes using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) for select stage II and III rectal cancers. In the NCDB, 21,707 patients from 2004 through 2012 with clinical T2N1 (cT2N1), cT3N0, or cT3N1 rectal cancers were identified who had received NCRT or NMAC followed by low anterior resection. Kaplan-Meier analyses, log-rank tests, and Cox-proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted along with propensity score matching analysis to reduce treatment selection bias. The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS) rate was 75% for patients who received NCRT versus 67.2% for those who received NMAC (P elimination of neoadjuvant RT for select patients with stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma was associated with worse OS and should not be recommended outside of a clinical trial. Cancer 2017;123:783-93. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  2. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1) gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Top1) is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III C...

  3. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans

  4. Edrecolomab alone or in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer: a randomised study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Nagy, Attila; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Figer, Arie; Skovsgaard, Torben; Monson, John; Barone, Carlo; Fountzilas, George; Riess, Hanno; Moylan, Eugene; Jones, Delyth; Dethling, Juergen; Colman, Jessica; Coward, Lorna; Macgregor, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    Edrecolomab is a murine monoclonal antibody to the cell-surface glycoprotein 17-1A, which is expressed on epithelial tissues and on various carcinomas. Preliminary data suggested that it might be of use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with resected stage III colon cancer. We did a randomised

  5. Edrecolomab alone or in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer: a randomised study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C.J.A.; Nagy, A.; Douillard, J.Y.; Figer, A.; Skovsgaard, T.; Monson, J.; Barone, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Riess, H.; Moylan, E.; Jones, D.; Dethling, J.; Colman, J.; Coward, L.; MacGregor, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edrecolomab is a murine monoclonal antibody to the cell-surface glycoprotein 17-1A, which is expressed on epithelial tissues and on various carcinomas. Preliminary data suggested that it might be of use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with resected stage III colon cancer. We did a

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the cancer. This blockage can cause the kidney to enlarge or stop working. Stage IIIB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  7. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Sanoff, Hanna K.; Stitzenberg, Karyn B.; Baron, John A.; Lund, Jennifer L.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age < 50) populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics...

  8. Macrophage markers in serum and tumor have prognostic impact in American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I/II melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine O.; Schmidt, Henrik; Møller, Holger John

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages...... melanomas from 190 patients were available for immunohistochemical analyzes of CD163(+) and CD68(+) macrophage infiltration. They were estimated semiquantitatively in three different tumor compartments: tumor nests, tumor stroma, and at the invasive front of the tumor. RESULTS: Serum sCD163 treated......, HR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8; P = .003). Melanomas with dense CD163(+) macrophage infiltration in tumor stroma and CD68(+) macrophage infiltration at the invasive front were associated with poor overall survival (CD163, HR = 2.7; 95% CI, 0.8 to 9.3; P = .11; and CD68, HR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.8; P...

  9. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  10. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  11. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  12. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, David V. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Division of Quantitative Sciences, Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E., E-mail: LECourt@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  13. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  14. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the uterus and fallopian tube. The second panel (stage IIB) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the colon. The third ...

  15. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  16. Development of a nomogram combining clinical staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT image features in non-small-cell lung cancer stage I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Visvikis, Dimitris; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Perdrisot, Remy; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine; Guillevin, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a nomogram by exploiting intratumour heterogeneity on CT and PET images from routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions to identify patients with the poorest prognosis. This retrospective study included 116 patients with NSCLC stage I, II or III and with staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Primary tumour volumes were delineated using the FLAB algorithm and 3D Slicer trademark on PET and CT images, respectively. PET and CT heterogeneities were quantified using texture analysis. The reproducibility of the CT features was assessed on a separate test-retest dataset. The stratification power of the PET/CT features was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The best standard metric (functional volume) was combined with the least redundant and most prognostic PET/CT heterogeneity features to build the nomogram. PET entropy and CT zone percentage had the highest complementary values with clinical stage and functional volume. The nomogram improved stratification amongst patients with stage II and III disease, allowing identification of patients with the poorest prognosis (clinical stage III, large tumour volume, high PET heterogeneity and low CT heterogeneity). Intratumour heterogeneity quantified using textural features on both CT and PET images from routine staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions can be used to create a nomogram with higher stratification power than staging alone. (orig.)

  17. Association Between Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbal Therapy and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Mao, Jun J; Sun, Lingyun; Yang, Lin; Li, Jie; Hao, Yingxu; Li, Huashan; Hou, Wei; Chu, Yuping; Bai, Yu; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jinwan; Shen, Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Jianping; Yang, Yufei

    2017-11-01

    Chinese cancer patients often use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) herbal medicine during or after active cancer treatments. However, little is known about how TCM herbal medicine impacts cancer outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate the association between TCM herbal therapy and survival outcomes in patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer. We conducted an eight-center prospective cohort study in China among patients who had undergone radical resection for stage II and III colorectal cancer. All patients received comprehensive conventional treatments according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, and follow-up visits were conducted over five years. We defined high exposure as a patient's use of TCM individualized herbs for more than one year, ascertained via clinical interviews. The primary outcome was disease-free survival (DFS), with overall survival (OS) as a secondary outcome. Between April 2007 and February 2009, we enrolled 312 patients into the cohort; 166 (53.2%) met the definition of high exposure to TCM herbs. Adjusting for covariates, high exposure to TCM was associated with both better DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.39 to 0.98) and OS (HR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.14 to 0.68). In subgroup exploratory analysis, the effects demonstrated that the differences in outcomes were statistically significant in patients who had received chemotherapy. Longer duration of TCM herbal use is associated with improved survival outcomes in stage II and III colorectal cancer patients in China. More research is needed to evaluate the effects and underlying mechanisms of herbal medicine on colorectal cancer outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.K.; Ahn, S.D.; Yi, B.Y.; Chang, H.S.; Lee, J.H.; Suh, C.W.; Lee, J.S.; Kim, S.H.; Koh, Y.S.; Kim, W.S.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, W.D.; Sohn, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This phase II study has been conducted to determine the feasibility, toxicity, response rate, local control, distant metastasis, and survival of hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with mitomycin C, vinblastine, and cisplatin in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and also to find the most ideal 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. Materials and Methods: From Aug 1993, 173 patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were entered into this trial and 146 (84%) completed the treatment. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was given to a total dose of 65-70 Gy (120 cGy/fx, bid) with concurrent 2 cycles of MVP chemotherapy (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 d1 and d28). Of these 146 patients who completed the treatment, 78 received noncoplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy using 4-6 fields and 17 received coplanar segmented conformal radiotherapy. Clinical tumor response was assessed one month after the completion of radiotherapy by computerized tomography (CT) scan. Toxicity was graded by RTOG and SWOG criteria. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung was calculated to find the correlation with radiation pneumonitis. Results: Nineteen (13%) had stage IIIa and 127 (87%) had IIIb disease including 16 with pleural effusion and 20 with supraclavicular lymph node metastases. Response rate was 74%, including 20% complete response and 54% partial response. With a minimum follow up of 12 months, overall survival was 60% at 1 year, 30% at 2 years and median survival was 15 months. Patients achieving a complete response (n=29) had a 2-year overall survival of 46.5% compared to 28.7% for partial responders (n=79) (p=.001). Actuarial local control was 66.7% at 1 year and 43.7% at 2 years. Actuarial distant free survival was 52.3% at 1 year and 39.8% at 2 years. Major hematologic toxicity (Gr 3-4) occurred in 33% of the patients but treatment delay

  19. Long-term outcomes after proton therapy, with concurrent chemotherapy, for stage II–III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Ly, Ngoc Bui; Komaki, Ritsuko; Levy, Lawrence B.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mehran, Reza J.; Lu, Charles; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We report long-term disease control, survival, and toxicity for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer prospectively treated with concurrent proton therapy and chemotherapy on a nonrandomized case-only observational study. Methods: All patients received passive-scatter proton therapy, planned with 4D-CT–based simulation; all received proton therapy concurrent with weekly chemotherapy. Endpoints were local and distant control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The 134 patients (21 stage II, 113 stage III; median age 69 years) had a median gross tumor volume (GTV) of 70 cm 3 (range, 5–753 cm 3 ); 77 patients (57%) received 74 Gy(RBE), and 57 (42%) received 60–72 Gy(RBE) (range, 60–74.1 Gy(RBE)). At a median follow-up time of 4.7 years, median OS times were 40.4 months (stage II) and 30.4 months (stage III). Five-year DFS rates were 17.3% (stage II) and 18.0% (stage III). OS, DFS, and local and distant control rates at 5 years did not differ by disease stage. Age and GTV were related to OS and DFS. Toxicity was tolerable, with 1 grade 4 esophagitis and 16 grade 3 events (2 pneumonitis, 6 esophagitis, 8 dermatitis). Conclusion: This report of outcomes after proton therapy for 134 patients indicated that this regimen produced excellent OS with tolerable toxicity

  20. Accelerated split-course (Type B) thoracic radiation therapy plus vinorelbine/carboplatin combination chemotherapy in Stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iaffaioli, R.V.; Tortoriello, A.; Facchini, G.; Maccauro, M.; Dimitri, P.; Ravo, V.; Muto, P.; Crovella, F.

    1996-01-01

    43 patients with stage III NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) entered a phase II study aimed at evaluating the toxicity and the activity of a combined modality programme including an accelerated split-course schedule (type B) of thoracic radiation therapy and a combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and carboplatin. An objective response was achieved in 18/42 evaluable patients (5 complete and 13 partial responses), for an overall response rate of 43% (95% confidence interval, 28-58%). Four complete responses had a duration which exceeded 16 months. Treatment was well tolerated; grade III myelotoxicity occurred in only 14% of patients and treatment was delayed in only 2 cases because of grade 3 oesophagitis. Both tolerability and efficacy data suggest that this regimen holds promise for the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Is a reassessment necessary in modern times?

    OpenAIRE

    Billiet, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Background: The role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pathologically involved mediastinal lymph nodes (N2) remains unclear. Despite a reduction of local recurrence (LR), its effect on overall survival (OS) remains unproven. Therefore we conducted a review of the current literature. Methods: To investigate the benefit and safety of modern PORT, we identified published phase III trials for PORT. We inves...

  2. Safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil after mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection for stage iii lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Satoru; Souda, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Takahari, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yuji; Takii, Yasumasa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for stage III lower rectal cancer worldwide. However, in Japan, the standard treatment is TME with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection (LPLD) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. We examined the safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (modified FOLFOX6) after TME with LPLD. This retrospective study included 33 patients who received modified FOLFOX6 after TME with LPLD for stage III lower rectal cancer. The overall completion rate of 12 cycles of adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was 76%. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in eight patients (24%). Sensory neuropathy was observed in 32 patients (97%) with 4 (12%) having a grade 3 event. The disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 45% at 3 years. Adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was feasible in patients with stage III lower rectal cancer after TME with LPLD. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. The survival of patients with Stage III Colon Cancer is improved in HNPCC compared with sporadic cases. A Danish registry based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Line Merrild; Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Bülow, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) seem to have a better prognosis than those with sporadic colon cancer (CC)s. The aim was to compare survival after stage III CC in patients with HNPCC with those having sporadic CC. METHOD: 230 patients with hereditary cancer...... from The Danish HNPCC-Register and 3557 patients with sporadic CC from The Danish Colorectal Cancer Database, diagnosed during May 2001-December 2008 were included. HNPCC patients were classified according to Mismatch Repair mutation status and family pedigree. Sporadic cases had no known family...... history of cancer. Patient characteristics, geographic differences and survival data were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall survival (OS) was better in HNPCC patients compared to sporadic CC after stratification for sex and age (p=0.02; CI 1.04-1.7). The 5-year survival was 70% in HNPCC patients compared...

  4. Proteomic biomarkers apolipoprotein A1, truncated transthyretin and connective tissue activating protein III enhance the sensitivity of CA125 for detecting early stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Charlotte H; Yip, Christine; Badgwell, Donna; Fung, Eric T; Coombes, Kevin R; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Karen H; Bast, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    The low prevalence of ovarian cancer demands both high sensitivity (>75%) and specificity (99.6%) to achieve a positive predictive value of 10% for successful early detection. Utilizing a two stage strategy where serum marker(s) prompt the performance of transvaginal sonography (TVS) in a limited number (2%) of women could reduce the requisite specificity for serum markers to 98%. We have attempted to improve sensitivity by combining CA125 with proteomic markers. Sera from 41 patients with early stage (I/II) and 51 with late stage (III/IV) epithelial ovarian cancer, 40 with benign disease and 99 healthy individuals, were analyzed to measure 7 proteins [Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1), truncated transthyretin (TT), transferrin, hepcidin, ß-2-microglobulin (ß2M), Connective Tissue Activating Protein III (CTAPIII), and Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4)]. Statistical models were fit by logistic regression, followed by optimization of factors retained in the models determined by optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion. A validation set included 136 stage I ovarian cancers, 140 benign pelvic masses and 174 healthy controls. In a training set analysis, the 3 most effective biomarkers (Apo-A1, TT and CTAPIII) exhibited 54% sensitivity at 98% specificity, CA125 alone produced 68% sensitivity and the combination increased sensitivity to 88%. In a validation set, the marker panel plus CA125 produced a sensitivity of 84% at 98% specificity (P=0.015, McNemar's test). Combining a panel of proteomic markers with CA125 could provide a first step in a sequential two-stage strategy with TVS for early detection of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Prognostic value of BRAF and KRAS mutation status in stage II and III microsatellite instable colon cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Cuba, E. M. V.; Snaebjornsson, P.; Heideman, D. A. M.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Bosch, L. J. W.; Fijneman, R. J. A.; Belt, E.; Bril, H.; Stockmann, H. B. A. C.; Hooijberg, E.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.; Nagtegaal, I. D.; Coupé, V. H. M.; Carvalho, B.; Meijer, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) has been associated with favourable survival in early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. The BRAF V600E mutation has been associated with worse survival in MSS CRC. This mutation occurs in 40% of MSI CRC and it is unclear

  6. A phase II study of cisplatin, oral administration of etoposide, OK-432 and radiation therapy for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshinao; Takahashi, Jutaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of giving cisplatin, etoposide, and OK-432 concurrently with conventional radiotherapy (RTx) for patient's with inoperable stage III, based on the TNM classification according to the International Union against Cancer staging system for lung cancer (1987) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 1992 to December 1994, 31 patients with cytologically or histologically confirmed stage III NSCLC were treated with RTx, to a total dose of 56-64 Gy, with concurrent daily oral administration of etoposide (25 mg) and cisplatin (20 mg) for 5 days during the third or fourth week from the start of RTx. The subcutaneous injection of 1 or 2 KE of OK-432, three times a week, for the duration of radiotherapy also started from the beginning of RTx. The number of eligible patients was 29 (26 men and 3 women). Their mean age was 66 years (range, 55-77 years). Six patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) of 0; 15, 1; 8; 2. Three were stage IIIA, and 26, stage IIIB. Histologically, 2 had adenocarcinoma, 23, squamous cell carcinoma, and 4, large cell carcinoma. In 27 of the 29 patients, the RTx schedule was completed. There were no treatment-related deaths. Grade 4 toxicity (according to World Health Organisation criteria) leukopenia (700/μl) was observed in 1 patient. The response rate was 79% and the median survival was 17 months. Survival rates at 1, 2 and 3 years were 62%, 31%, and 21%, respectively. The local failure rate was 51%. The combination of cisplatin, etoposide, and OK-432, given concurrently with conventional RTx is feasible and effective for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (author)

  7. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  9. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the omentum. The cancer ... lymph nodes behind the peritoneum. In stage IIIC, cancer is found in one or both ovaries or fallopian tubes and has spread to the ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  13. Phase 3 Trial of Postoperative Chemotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Gastric Cancer Treated With R0 Gastrectomy and D2 Lymph Node Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Bae, Jae-Moon; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Dae Yong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare chemotherapy alone with chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV(M0) gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Methods and Materials: The chemotherapy arm received 5 cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL), and the chemoradiation therapy arm received 1 cycle of FL, then radiation therapy of 45 Gy concurrently with 2 cycles of FL, followed by 2 cycles of FL. Intent-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analyses were performed. Results: Between May 6, 2002 and June 29, 2006, a total of 90 patients were enrolled. Forty-four were randomly assigned to the chemotherapy arm and 46 to the chemoradiation therapy arm. Treatment was completed as planned by 93.2% of patients in the chemotherapy arm and 87.0% in the chemoradiation therapy arm. Overall intent-to-treat analysis showed that addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) but not disease-free survival. In subgroup analysis for stage III, chemoradiation therapy significantly prolonged the 5-year LRRFS and disease-free survival rates compared with chemotherapy (93.2% vs 66.8%, P=.014; 73.5% vs 54.6%, P=.056, respectively). Conclusions: Addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy could improve the LRRFS in stage III gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection.

  14. Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer: Analysis of therapeutic results in 112 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Oguri, Senri; Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Koike, Izumi; Hata, Masaharu; Tohnai, Iwai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and rate of organ preservation in patients with stage III or IV oral cancer treated with retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy. Materials and methods: One hundred and twelve patients with stage III and IV oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy. Catheterization from the superficial temporal and occipital arteries was performed. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 , cisplatin, total 150 mg/m 2 ) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total of 60 Gy) for 6 weeks. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 46.2 months (range, 10–76 months). After intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy, primary site complete response was achieved in 98 (87.5%) of 112 cases. Five-year survival and local control rates were 71.3% and 79.3%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included mucositis in 92.0%, neutropenia in 30.4%, dermatitis in 28.6%, anemia in 26.8%, and thrombocytopenia in 7.1% of patients. Grade 3 toxicities included dysphagia in 72.3%, nausea/vomiting in 21.4%, fever in 8.0%, and renal failure in 0.9% of patients. Conclusion: Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer provided good overall survival and local control

  15. Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine, Palonosetron Hydrochloride, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Cisplatin in Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Nausea and Vomiting; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  16. A phase I study of postoperative concurrent radiotherapy and oral doxifluridine and leucovorin for II/III stage rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Tang Yuan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yueping; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of chemotherapy of oral doxifluridine (5-dFUR) and leucovorin with concurrent standard radiotherapy(RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Patients aged 18-75 years old, Kamofsky scored ≥70%, stage II/III rectal cancer after curative surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in the fraction of 2.0 Gy per day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. 5-dFUR was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in escalating doses, and oral leucovorin was administered in a fixed dose of 30 mg/(m 2 ·d), both 3 times daily, from the 1 st day of RT to the last day. The DLTs included grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologie toxicity. Results: From Aug. 2005 to Mar. 2007, 16 patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 450 mg/(m 2 ·d) (3 patients), 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (6 patients) and 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) (7 patients). Diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea/vomit were the most common side effects although all neutropenia was less grade 3. The DLT was observed in 1 patient at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (grade 4 diarrhea), but none in the following 3 patients at the same dose level. At 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) level, the first patient quitted the study due to a severe abdominal cramp pain in the 3rd week of RT. In the following 3 enrolled patients, one suffered grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea/vomit and grade 2 neutropenia and fever. Grade 3 diarrhea was also observed in all the additional 3 patients at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level. So the dose escalation was ended up to 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). Four of 16 patients didn't complete the scheduled concurrent chemoradiotherapy due to severe side effects, including 1 at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level, and 3 at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). The DLTs were observed as grade 3/4 diarrhea, grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, fatigue and nausea/vomit. Conclusions: Diarrhea is the most common and

  17. Comorbidity and Karnofksy performance score are independent prognostic factors in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: an institutional analysis of patients treated on four RTOG studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Selim; Byhardt, Roger W.; Gore, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic role of comorbidity in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated definitively with radiotherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 112 patients with clinical Stage III NSCLC (American Joint Commission on Cancer 1997) enrolled in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group studies (83-11, 84-03, 84-07, and 88-08 nonchemotherapy arms) at a single institution were analyzed retrospectively for overall survival (OS) and comorbidity. Of the 112 patients, 105 (94%) completed their assigned radiotherapy. The median assigned dose was 50.4 Gy to the lymphatics (range 45-50.4 Gy) and 70.2 Gy to the primary tumor (range 60-79.2 Gy). Comorbidity was rated retrospectively using the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics (CIRS-G) and Charlson scales. Karnofsky performance scores (KPSs) and weight loss were prospectively recorded. Because only 8 patients had a KPS of 70). Results: The median survival was 10.39 months (range 7.87-12.91). The 2-, 3-, and 5-year OS rate was 20.5%, 12.5%, and 7.1%, respectively. On univariate analysis, clinical stage (IIIA vs. IIIB) was found to be a statistically significant factor influencing OS (p=0.026), and the histologic features, grade, tumor size as measured on CT scans, age, tobacco use, weight loss ≥5%, and total dose delivered to the primary tumor were not. A KPS of ≤70 (p=0.001), the presence of a CIRS-G score of 4 (extremely severe; p=0.0002), and a severity index of >2 (p 2 were independently associated with inferior OS; clinical tumor stage was not found to be an independent prognostic factor. Conclusion: KPS and comorbidity are important independent prognostic factors in Stage III NSCLC. Comorbidity should be included in protocols studying advanced stage NSCLC and used for stratification

  18. Detection of internal mammary lymph node metastasis with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with stage III breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Min Jung; Lee, Jong Jin; Kim, Hye Ok; Chae, Sun-Young; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seol Hoon [Ulsan University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sei Hyun; Lee, Jong Won; Son, Byung Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Gyung-Yub [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The present study assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the detection of internal mammary node (IMN) metastasis in patients with clinical stage III breast cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with clinical stage III breast cancer and underwent pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were prospectively reviewed by two board-certified nuclear medicine physicians in a blinded manner. The intensities of IMNs were graded into four categories (no activity and lower, similar, and higher activities than that of the mediastinal blood pool). IMNs were measured from the combined CT (largest diameter of the short axis). Histologic data of the IMNs were obtained by ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy or surgical excision. The PPV was calculated for pathologically confirmed IMNs. Visual grade, maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}), and sizes were analyzed according to the pathology results. There were 249 clinical stage III breast cancer patients (age 48.0 ± 10.1 years, range 26-79 years) who had undergone initial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment. Excluding 33 cases of stage IV breast cancer, 62 of 216 patients had visible IMNs on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and histologic confirmation was obtained in 31 patients. There were 27 metastatic and four nonmetastatic nodes (PPV 87.1 %). Metastatic nodes mostly presented with visual grade 3 (83.9 %), and SUV{sub max} and size were 3.5 ± 4.3 and 5.6 ± 2.0 mm, respectively. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has a high PPV for IMN metastasis in clinical stage III breast cancer, indicating the possibility of metastasis in IMNs with FDG uptake similar to/lower than that of the blood pool or small-sized nodes. (orig.)

  19. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  20. Predictive value of PET-CT for pathological response in stages II and III breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García-Esquinas, Marta A; Arrazola García, Juan; García-Sáenz, José A; Furió-Bacete, V; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel E; Ortega Candil, Aída; Cabrera Martín, María N; Carreras Delgado, José L

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively study the value of PET-CT with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response of locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients. A written informed consent and approval were obtained from the Ethics Committee. PET-CT accuracy in the prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC was studied in primary tumors and lymph node metastasis in 43 women (mean age: 50 years: range: 27-71 years) with histologically proven breast cancer between December 2009 and January 2011. PET-CT was performed at baseline and after NAC. SUV(max) percentage changes (ΔSUV(max)) were compared with pathology findings at surgery. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to discriminate between locoregional pCR and non-pCR. In patients not achieving pCR, it was investigated if ΔSUV(max) could accurately identify the residual cancer burden (RCB) classes: RCB-I (minimal residual disease (MRD)), RCB-II (moderate RD), and RCB-III (extensive RD). pCR was obtained in 11 patients (25.6%). Residual disease was found in 32 patients (74.4%): 16 (37.2%) RCB-I, 15 (35.6%) RCB-II and 2 (4.7%) RCB-III. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 90.9%, 90.6%, and 90.7%, respectively. Specificity was 94.1% in the identification of a subset of patients who had either pCR or MRD. Accuracy of ΔSUV(max) in the locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients after NAC is high for the identification of pCR cases. Its specificity is potentially sufficient to identify a subgroup of patients who could be managed with conservative surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV; Gammagrafia osea: utilidad en la evaluacion y seguimiento de pacientes con cancer de mama en estadio clinico II, III, IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano P, R A

    1996-12-31

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Impact of tumor extent and location on treatment outcome in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saito, Yoshihiro

    1996-01-01

    The results of treatment of 141 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiation therapy at Gunma University Hospital between 1976 and 1989 were retrospectively analyzed. Radiation was given with standard fractionation for a planned prophylactic dose of 40 Gy over 4 weeks and a definitive dose of 60 Gy over 6 weeks or more. The two- and five-year survival rates were 27% and 12% for stage IIIA, and 18% and 8% for stage IIIB, respectively (P=0.052). By univariate analysis, a primary tumor less than 5 cm in diameter was also an important predictor of survival (P=0.008). As for tumor location, the patients with primary tumors in the upper lobes or the superior segment of the lower lobes of the lung lived longer than those with primary tumors at any other site (P=0.032). Patients with epidermoid carcinoma had a higher survival rate at 5 years than those with other histologic types (14% vs 3%, P=0.074). Multivariate analysis showed that among tumor characteristics, the site of the primary tumor, the pattern of tumor spread and N stage were significantly associated with overall survival. Among the patients with stage III NSCLC, those with stage IIIA epidermoid carcinoma in the upper lobe or the superior segment of the lower lobe of the lung were considered to be the most favorable candidates for definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  3. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  4. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.oberije@maastro.nl [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, KU Leuven (Belgium); Houben, Ruud [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deasy, Joseph O. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  5. Treatment Variation of Sequential versus Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, I; Damhuis, R A; Ten Berge, M G; Rosskamp, M; van Eycken, L; de Ruysscher, D; Belderbos, J S A

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the standard treatment regimen in non-surgical locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) is recommended in patients who are unfit to receive CCRT or when the treatment volume is considered too large. In this study, we investigated the proportion of CCRT/SCRT in the Netherlands and Belgium. Furthermore, patient and disease characteristics associated with SCRT were assessed. An observational study was carried out with data from three independent national registries: the Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Dutch Lung Cancer Audit-Radiotherapy (DLCA-R). Differences in patient and disease characteristics between CCRT and SCRT were tested with unpaired t-tests (for continuous variables) and with chi-square tests (for categorical variables). A prognostic model was constructed to determine patient and disease parameters predictive for the choice of SCRT. This study included 350 patients from the BCR, 780 patients from the NCR and 428 patients from the DLCA-R. More than half of the stage III NSCLC patients in the Netherlands (55%) and in Belgium more than a third (35%) were treated with CCRT. In both the Dutch and Belgian population, higher age and more advanced N-stage were significantly associated with SCRT. Performance score, pulmonary function, comorbidities and tumour volume were not associated with SCRT. In this observational population-based study, a large treatment variation in non-surgical stage III NSCLC patients was observed between and within the Netherlands and Belgium. Higher age and N-stage were significantly associated with the choice for SCRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  7. Expression of vascular endothelial factor protein in the tumor tissues of patients with Stages I-II ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Karapetyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To define tumor markers is presently the most interesting and promising direction for the diagnosis of malignancies. The expression of the major angiogenesis factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in primary tumor tissue was studied in ovarian cancer (OC patients to define the prognostic value of the marker.The study enrolled 48 patients with OC. The immunohistochemical technique was used to examine VEGF expression in the primary tu- mor tissue. The frequency of VEGF expression, which was associated with lower relapse-free survival rates, was found to be high (85.4% in OC patients (p > 0.05.The tumor expression of the angiogenic factor VEGF was shown to provide prognostic information in early-stage ovarian epithelial cancer.

  8. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  9. Cisplatin vs. carboplatin-based chemoradiotherapy in patients >65 years of age with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezer, Nicole; Smith, Cardinale B.; Galsky, Matthew D.; Mhango, Grace; Gu, Fei; Gomez, Jorge; Strauss, Gary M.; Wisnivesky, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Combined chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is considered the standard care for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There have been limited data comparing outcomes of carboplatin vs. cisplatin-based CRT, particularly in elderly. Material and methods: From the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare registry, we identified 1878 patients >65 years of age with unresected stage III NSCLC that received concurrent CRT between 2002 and 2009. We fitted a propensity score model predicting use of cisplatin-based therapy and compared adjusted overall and lung-cancer specific survival of carboplatin- vs. cisplatin-treated patients. Rates of severe toxicity requiring hospital admission were compared in propensity score adjusted analyses. Results: Overall 1552 (83%) received carboplatin (77% in combination with paclitaxel) and 17% cisplatin (67% in combination with etoposide). Adjusted cox models showed similar overall (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–1.12) and lung cancer-specific (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.84–1.17) survival among patients treated with carboplatin vs. cisplatin. Adjusted rates of neutropenia (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.21–0.61), anemia (OR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.51–0.89), and thrombocytopenia (OR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.31–0.85) were lower among carboplatin-treated patients; other toxicities were not different between groups. Conclusion: Carboplatin-based CRT is associated with similar long-term survival but lower rates of toxicity. These findings suggest carboplatin may be the most appropriate chemotherapeutic agent for elderly stage III patients

  10. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  11. Effect of a Shortened Duration of FOLFOX Chemotherapy on the Survival Rate of Patients with Stage II and III Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Woong Bae; Hong, Kwang Dae; Kim, Jung-Sik; Joung, Sung-Yup; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung-Wook

    2018-01-01

    FOLFOX chemotherapy is widely used as an adjuvant treatment for advanced colon cancer. The duration of adjuvant chemotherapy is usually set to 6 months, which is based on a former study of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin chemotherapy. However, the FOLFOX regimen is known to have complications, such as peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to compare the survival rates and complications experienced by patients receiving either 4 or 6 months of FOLFOX chemotherapy. Retrospective data analysis was performed for stage II and III patients who underwent radical resection of colon cancer. We compared the 5-year survival rates and the occurrence of complications in patients who completed only 8 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy with patients who completed 12 cycles of chemotherapy. Among 188 patients who underwent adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy for stage II or III colon cancer, 83 (44.1%) completed 6 months of FOLFOX chemotherapy and 64 (34.0%) patients discontinued after 4 months of chemotherapy. The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates did not show a significant difference. Patients in the 6-month group had peripheral neuropathy more frequently (p = 0.028). Five-year overall and disease-free survival were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Large-scale prospective studies are necessary for the analysis of complications and survival rates. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. KRAS as a predictor of poor prognosis and benefit from postoperative FOLFOX chemotherapy in patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Li; Tan, Shuyun; Kim, George P; Dou, Ruoxu; Chen, Dianke; Cai, Yue; Fu, Xinhui; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    The KRAS gene frequently mutates in colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we investigated the prognostic and predictive role of KRAS mutation in patients with stage II or III CRC. A consecutive cohort of patients with stage II or III CRC from a single center database was studied. The association between KRAS status, adjuvant FOLFOX therapy, and 3-year disease-free survival (3-y DFS) was analyzed. Of our 433 patients, 166 (38.3%) exhibited the KRAS mutation. Among the 190 patients who did not receive adjuvant therapy, those with KRAS mutation tumors had a worse 3-y DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.924; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.078-3.435; P = 0.027). Among patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, KRAS mutation was not correlated with worse 3-y DFS (HR, 1.083; 95% CI, 0.618-1.899; P = 0.781). Adjuvant chemotherapy improved 3-y DFS only among patients with KRAS mutant tumors (78.0% vs 69.2%) on multivariate analysis adjusted for age, stage, grade, site, vessel invasion, and carcinoembryonic antigen level (HR, 0.454; 95% CI, 0.229-0.901; P = 0.024). In contrast, there was no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in the KRAS wild-type group (84.3% vs 82.0%). KRAS mutation indicates poor prognosis. FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy benefits patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer with KRAS mutant tumors and is worth further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictive and prognostic value of tumor volume and its changes during radical radiotherapy of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaesmann, Lukas [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Niyazi, Maximilian; Fleischmann, Daniel [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site Munich, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Blanck, Oliver; Baumann, Rene [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Baues, Christian; Klook, Lisa; Rosenbrock, Johannes; Trommer-Nestler, Maike [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiotherapy, Cologne (Germany); Dobiasch, Sophie [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Eze, Chukwuka [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Gauer, Tobias; Goy, Yvonne [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Sautter, Lisa [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany); Hausmann, Jan [University Medical Center Duesseldorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Kaul, David; Thieme, Alexander H. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Krug, David; Schmitt, Daniela [University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO) and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Maeurer, Matthias [University Medical Center Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Panje, Cedric M. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Suess, Christoph [University Medical Center Regensburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg (Germany); Ziegler, Sonia [University Medical Center Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Ebert, Nadja [University Medical Center Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medenwald, Daniel [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Ostheimer, Christian [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Halle (Saale) (Germany); Collaboration: Young DEGRO Trial Group

    2018-02-15

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes heterogeneous presentation of the disease including lymph node involvement and large tumour volumes with infiltration of the mediastinum, heart or spine. In the treatment of stage III NSCLC an interdisciplinary approach including radiotherapy is considered standard of care with acceptable toxicity and improved clinical outcome concerning local control. Furthermore, gross tumour volume (GTV) changes during definitive radiotherapy would allow for adaptive replanning which offers normal tissue sparing and dose escalation. A literature review was conducted to describe the predictive value of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy especially focussing on overall survival. The literature search was conducted in a two-step review process using PubMed registered /Medline registered with the key words ''stage III non-small cell lung cancer'' and ''radiotherapy'' and ''tumour volume'' and ''prognostic factors''. After final consideration 17, 14 and 9 studies with a total of 2516, 784 and 639 patients on predictive impact of GTV, GTV changes and its impact on overall survival, respectively, for definitive radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC were included in this review. Initial GTV is an important prognostic factor for overall survival in several studies, but the time of evaluation and the value of histology need to be further investigated. GTV changes during RT differ widely, optimal timing for re-evaluation of GTV and their predictive value for prognosis needs to be clarified. The prognostic value of GTV changes is unclear due to varying study qualities, re-evaluation time and conflicting results. The main findings were that the clinical impact of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy is still unclear due to heterogeneous study designs with varying quality

  14. Predictive and prognostic value of tumor volume and its changes during radical radiotherapy of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaesmann, Lukas; Niyazi, Maximilian; Fleischmann, Daniel; Blanck, Oliver; Baumann, Rene; Baues, Christian; Klook, Lisa; Rosenbrock, Johannes; Trommer-Nestler, Maike; Dobiasch, Sophie; Eze, Chukwuka; Gauer, Tobias; Goy, Yvonne; Giordano, Frank A.; Sautter, Lisa; Hausmann, Jan; Henkenberens, Christoph; Kaul, David; Thieme, Alexander H.; Krug, David; Schmitt, Daniela; Maeurer, Matthias; Panje, Cedric M.; Suess, Christoph; Ziegler, Sonia; Ebert, Nadja; Medenwald, Daniel; Ostheimer, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes heterogeneous presentation of the disease including lymph node involvement and large tumour volumes with infiltration of the mediastinum, heart or spine. In the treatment of stage III NSCLC an interdisciplinary approach including radiotherapy is considered standard of care with acceptable toxicity and improved clinical outcome concerning local control. Furthermore, gross tumour volume (GTV) changes during definitive radiotherapy would allow for adaptive replanning which offers normal tissue sparing and dose escalation. A literature review was conducted to describe the predictive value of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy especially focussing on overall survival. The literature search was conducted in a two-step review process using PubMed registered /Medline registered with the key words ''stage III non-small cell lung cancer'' and ''radiotherapy'' and ''tumour volume'' and ''prognostic factors''. After final consideration 17, 14 and 9 studies with a total of 2516, 784 and 639 patients on predictive impact of GTV, GTV changes and its impact on overall survival, respectively, for definitive radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC were included in this review. Initial GTV is an important prognostic factor for overall survival in several studies, but the time of evaluation and the value of histology need to be further investigated. GTV changes during RT differ widely, optimal timing for re-evaluation of GTV and their predictive value for prognosis needs to be clarified. The prognostic value of GTV changes is unclear due to varying study qualities, re-evaluation time and conflicting results. The main findings were that the clinical impact of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy is still unclear due to heterogeneous study designs with varying quality

  15. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [de

  16. Demographics and Outcomes of Stage I-II Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared with Wide Local Excision in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Truong, Minh Tam; Sahni, Debjani

    2018-02-03

    The optimal surgical approach (wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs micrographic surgery (MOHS)) for treating Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is yet to be determined. To compare survival outcomes in patients with early stage MCC treated with MOHS versus WLE. A retrospective review of all cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of MCC of clinical Stage I-II MCC treated with WLE or MOHS was performed. 1,795 cases of Stage I-II MCC were identified who underwent WLE (N=1,685) or MOHS (N=110). There was no difference in residual tumor on surgical margins between the two treatment groups (p=0.588). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in overall survival between the treatment modalities (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.72-1.45, p=0.897). There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups on propensity score matched analysis. Disease specific survival was not reported as this data in not available in the NCDB. MOHS appears to be as effective as WLE in treating early stage MCC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Jensen, Alexandra D; Sterzing, Florian; Munter, Marc W; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  18. Treatment outcomes regarding the addition of targeted agents in the therapeutic portfolio for stage II-III rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jin-Tung; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Huang, John; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2017-11-24

    To evaluate the impact of targeted agents in stage II-III rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). A retrospective study was performed in 124 consecutive patients with clinically T 3 N 0-2 M 0 -staged rectal cancer incorporating targeted agents in CCRT. Pathologic complete response was detected in 34.2% (n=26) of bevacizumab+FOLFOX-treated patients (n=76), which was significantly higher (p=0.019, post-hoc statistical power =35.87%) than that (n=10, 20.8%) of the cetuximab+FOLFOX-treated patients (n=48). Patients receiving cetuximab+FOLFOX therapy tended to develop severe liver toxicity (91.7%, n=44 versus 17.1%, n=13, panalysis within bevacizumab+FOLFOX-treated patients with either wild-type (n=36) or mutant (n=40) K-ras status indicated K-ras status did not significantly influence the treatment outcomes. The addition of bevacizumab instead of cetuximab to FOLFOX in the neoadjuvant settings for T 3 N 0-2 M 0 -staged rectal cancer could induce a promising rate of pathologic complete response and lesser hepatotoxicity.

  19. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L.; Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy

  20. Could semiquantitative FDG analysis add information to the prognosis in patients with stage II/III breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy); Ghiotto, Cristina; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Medical Oncology 2 Unit, Padua (Italy); Saibene, Tania; Michieletto, Silvia; Fernando, Bozza [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Breast Unit, Padua (Italy); Orvieto, Enrico [University Hospital of Padua, Department of Pathology, Padua (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We investigated whether maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and whole-body (WB) SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could improve prognostic stratification in patients with stage II/III breast cancer (BC). We prospectively enrolled 99 consecutive women (median age 50 years, range 27 - 77 years) with pathologically proven stage II/III BC who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were measured in all malignant lesions. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to test for relationships among WB SUVmax, WB MTV, WB TLG, and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), after adjustment for age, and histopathological and immunohistochemical features (oestrogen/progesterone and HER2 expression, proliferation index and grade). The median values of WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were 16.2 (range 1.5 - 33.1), 14 cm{sup 3} (range 0.03 - 708.6 cm{sup 3}) and 62.5 (0.06 - 3869.4), respectively. All WB semiquantitative values were higher in patients with higher TNM stage, although not significantly (all p > 0.05). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 30 months, with a range of 13 - 45 months. Both PFS and OS of patients with low WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were longer than that of patients with high WB values for progression, although not statistically significant. However, stratifying the patients in accordance with the stage of disease, both PFS and OS were significantly lower in patients with high WB TLG and stage III than in patients with stage II (p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, WB MTV and WB TLG were independent prognostic factors for PFS (hazard ratio 1.004, 95 % confidence interval 1.002 - 1.006, p < 0.001, and hazard ratio 1.001, 95 % confidence interval 1.000 - 1.001, p = 0.011, respectively). The addition of WB TLG to clinical data may provide a more detailed

  1. The Effects of Comorbidity and Age on RTOG Study Enrollment in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Are Eligible for RTOG Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Selim; Byhardt, Roger W.; Gore, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of measured comorbidity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) combined modality therapy (CMT) study enrollment in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-one patients with a Karnofsky Performance Score ≥70 and clinical Stage III NSCLC were analyzed retrospectively for comorbidity, RTOG study eligibility, and enrollment at initial consultation. Effect of comorbidity scores (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) were tested on patient selection for CMT, RTOG enrollment, and overall survival. Results: Comorbidity (Grade 4; p 2, p = 0.001), and weight loss (>5%, p = 0.001). Thirty-three patients (19%) were enrolled in a CMT RTOG study (Group 1). Forty-nine patients (29%) were eligible but not enrolled (Group 2), and 57 (33%) were ineligible (Group 3). The most common ineligibility reasons were weight loss (67%) and comorbidity in the exclusion criteria of the RTOG studies (63%). Group 1 patients were the youngest (p = 0.02), with the lowest comorbidity scores (p 2; p = 0.006) and age (≥70; p = 0.05) were independent factors influencing RTOG study enrollment in patients meeting study eligibility requirements (Groups 1 and 2). Conclusions: Comorbidity scales could be useful in stratification of patients in advanced lung cancer trials and interpretation of results particularly regarding the elderly population.

  2. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O’Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non–SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM–IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM–IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer–specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  3. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  4. Stages of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under a microscope . Stage II In stage II , cancer has spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ... spread to one lymph node in the groin . Cancer has also spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ...

  5. The effects of inpatient exercise therapy on the length of hospital stay in stages I-III colon cancer patients: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki-Yong; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Min, Jihee; Jeong, Duck Hyoun; Chu, Sang Hui; Lee, Ji Won; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Jones, Lee W; Jeon, Justin Y; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of a postsurgical, inpatient exercise program on postoperative recovery in operable colon cancer patients We conducted the randomized controlled trial with two arms: postoperative exercise vs. usual care. Patients with stages I-III colon cancer who underwent colectomy between January and December 2011 from the Colorectal Cancer Clinic, were recruited for the study. Subjects in the intervention group participated in the postoperative inpatient exercise program consisted of twice daily exercise, including stretching, core, balance, and low-intensity resistance exercises. The usual care group was not prescribed a structured exercise program. The primary endpoint was the length of hospital stay. Secondary endpoints were time to flatus, time to first liquid diet, anthropometric measurements, and physical function measurements. A total of 31 (86.1 %) patients completed the trial, with adherence to exercise interventions at 84.5 %. The mean length of hospital stay was 7.82 ± 1.07 days in the exercise group compared with 9.86 ± 2.66 days in usual care (mean difference, 2.03 days; 95 % confidence interval (CI), -3.47 to -0.60 days; p = 0.005) in per-protocol analysis. The mean time to flatus was 52.18 ± 21.55 h in the exercise group compared with 71.86 ± 29.2 h in the usual care group (mean difference, 19.69 h; 95 % CI, -38.33 to -1.04 h; p = 0.036). Low-to-moderate-intensity postsurgical exercise reduces length of hospital stay and improves bowel motility after colectomy procedure in patients with stages I-III colon cancer.

  6. CD133 expression is not an independent prognostic factor in stage II and III colorectal cancer but may predict the better outcome in patients with adjuvant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mia-Jan, Khalilullah; Jung, So Young; Kim, Ik-Yong; Oh, Sung Soo; Choi, EunHee; Chang, Sei Jin; Kang, Tae Young; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are notorious for their capacity of tumor progression, metastasis or resistance to chemo-radiotherapy. However, the undisputed role of cancer stem marker, CD133, in colorectal cancers (CRCs) is not clear yet. We assessed 271 surgically-resected stage II and III primary CRCs with (171) and without (100) adjuvant therapy after surgery. CD133 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and real-time RT-PCR. CD133 promoter methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing. The CD133 IHC expression was significantly correlated with mRNA expression (p=0.0257) and inversely correlated with the promoter methylation (p=0.0001). CD133 was expressed more frequently in rectal cancer (p=0.0035), and in moderately differentiated tumors (p=0.0378). In survival analysis, CD133 expression was not significantly correlated with overall survival (OS) (p=0.9689) as well as disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.2103). However, CD133+ tumors were significantly associated with better OS in patients with adjuvant therapy compared to those without adjuvant therapy (p<0.0001, HR 0.125, 95% CI 0.052-0.299). But the patients with CD133- tumors did not show any significant difference of survival according to adjuvant therapy (p=0.055, HR 0.500, 95% CI 0.247-1.015). In stage II and III CRCs, CD133 IHC expression may signify the benefit for adjuvant therapy although it is not an independent prognostic factor

  7. Role of 10-Gy boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery for stage I-II breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notani, Masafumi; Uchida, Nobue; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    According to the Guidelines for breast-conserving therapy of the Japanese Breast Cancer Society, the surgical margin is ''negative'' when the minimum distance between the tumor edge and the margin of the resected specimen is more than 5 mm. The value of boost radiation for early breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin remains unclear. A total of 137 patients with stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery between July 1987 and August 2002. All of the patients had negative margins according to the Japanese guidelines. Their median age was 50 years and the median follow-up period was 62 months. The entire ipsilateral breast was irradiated to a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions). Then an additional 10 Gy (5 fractions) was given to 79 patients, using 6- to 12-MeV electrons (boost group), while 58 patients (no-boost group) received no further radiation. Factors influencing local recurrence were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. For the entire population, the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence rates were 96.0%, 96.8%, 94.2%, and 1.67%, respectively. Boost radiation reduced local recurrence, but the improvement was not significant (P=0.070). Univariate and multivariate analyses failed to detect any factors that were significantly associated with local control. There were no severe complications in either group and there were no differences between the groups in the cosmetic outcome. Boost radiation can be performed for stage I-II breast cancer with negative margins (Japanese guidelines), and showed a tendency to decrease local recurrence. A large randomized controlled study is necessary to establish final conclusions. (author)

  8. Phase II trial of recombinant human endostatin in combination with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Yong; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qi-Chao; Yu, Zhong-Hua; Li, Jian-Cheng; Cheng, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Long; Hu, Xiao; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Hong-Lian; Xu, Zu-Min; Lu, Ru-Biao; Deng, Xiao-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Endostar combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were treated with Endostar (7.5 mg/m 2 /d) for 7 days at weeks 1, 3, 5, and 7, while two cycles of docetaxel (65 mg/m 2 ) and cisplatin (65 mg/m 2 ) were administered on days 8 and 36, with concurrent thoracic radiation to a dose of 60–66 Gy. Primary end points were short-term efficacy and treatment-related toxicity. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled into the study, and 48 were assessable. Of the 48 patients, 83% had stage IIIB and 65% had N3 disease. Median follow-up was 25.0 months. Overall response rate was 77%. The estimated median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.9 months, and the estimated median overall survival (OS) was 24.0 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local control rates were 75%, 67%, and 51%, PFS rates were 48%, 27%, and 16%, and OS rates were 81%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. All toxicities were tolerable with proper treatment. Conclusions: The combination of Endostar with CCRT for locally advanced NSCLC patients was feasible and showed promising survival and local control rates

  9. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allal, A.S. [Geneva Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Monney, M.; Rosset, A.; Ozsahin, M. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Radiographie; Guillemin, C. [Cantonal Radiotherapy Department Sion (Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Wirksamkeit der akzelerierten Bestrahlung in bezug auf die Bewaeltigung der Tumorzellrepopulation waehrend einer Radiotherapie ist vor kurzem nachgewiesen worden. Das Verhaeltnis zwischen therapeutischem Effekt und Toxizitaet duerfte fuer fuenfwoechige Schemen

  10. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT to monitor early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Bin; Chen, Bin; Wang, Ting; Chen, Minglong; Ji, Tiefeng; Gao, Shi; Ma, Qingjie [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changchun (China); Song, Yan [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Breast Surgery, Changchun (China); Wang, Xueju [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Pathology, Changchun (China)

    2015-08-15

    Monitoring of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is important for optimal management of patients with breast cancer. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT is a newly developed imaging modality for evaluating tumor vascular status. In this study, we investigated the application of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT in evaluating therapy response to NCT in patients with stage II or III breast cancer. Thirty-three patients were scheduled to undergo {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT at baseline, after the first and second cycle of NCT. Four patients had extremely low {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, and were not included in the subsequent studies. Changes in tumor to nontumor (T/N) ratio were compared with pathological tumor responses classified using the residual cancer burden system. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to compare the power to identify responders between the end of the first and the end of the second cycle of NCT. The impact of breast cancer subtype on {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake was evaluated. The correlation between {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake and pathological tumor response was also evaluated in each breast cancer subtype. Surgery was performed after four cycles of NCT and pathological analysis revealed 18 responders and 15 nonresponders. In patients with clearly visible {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT were 86.7 %, 85.7 % and 86.7 % after the first cycle of NCT, and 92.9 %, 93.3 % and 93.3 % after the second cycle, respectively. Among these patients, the HER-2-positive group demonstrated both higher T/N ratios and a greater change in T/N ratio than patients with other breast cancer subtypes (P < 0.05). A strong correlation was found between changes in T/N ratio and pathological tumor response in the HER-2-positive group (P < 0.03). {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT seems to be useful for determining the pathological

  11. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage II–III resectable rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jin Ho [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Uk [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Um, Jun Won [University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is better than postoperative CRT in oncologic outcome and toxicity is contentious in prospective randomized clinical trials. We systematically analyze and compare the treatment result, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate between preoperative CRT and postoperative CRT in stage II–III rectal cancer. We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from 1990 to 2014 for relevant trials. Only phase III randomized studies performing CRT and curative surgery were selected and the data were extracted. Meta-analysis was used to pool oncologic outcome and toxicity data across studies. Three randomized phase III trials were finally identified. The meta-analysis results showed significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence rate in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.84; p = 0.004). The 5-year distant recurrence rate (p = 0.55), relapse-free survival (p = 0.14), and overall survival (p = 0.22) showed no significant difference between two groups. Acute toxicity was significantly lower in the preoperativeCRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between two groups in perioperative and chronic complications (p = 0.53). The sphincter-saving rate was not significantly different between two groups (p = 0.24). The conversion rate from abdominoperineal resection to low anterior resection in low rectal cancer was significantly higher in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). As compared to postoperative CRT, preoperative CRT improves only locoregional control, not distant control and survival, with similar chronic toxicity and sphincter preservation rate in rectal cancer patients.

  12. Feasibility and efficacy of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer in comparison with conventionally fractionated 3D-CRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yixing; Shi, Shiming; Ye, Luxi; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Jianying; Zeng, Zhaochong

    2016-05-01

    The standard treatment for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still 60 Gy in conventional fractions combined with concurrent chemotherapy; however, the resulting local controls are disappointing. The aim of this study was to compare and assess the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated chemoradiotherapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional fractionation as opposed to using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Sixty-nine patients with stage III (AJCC 7th edition) NSCLC who underwent definitive radiation treatment at our institution between July 2011 and November 2013 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered in the HT group (n=34), whereas 60 Gy in 30 fractions in the 3D-CRT group (n=35). Primary endpoints were toxicity, overall response rate, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The median follow-up period was 26.4 months. V20 (P=0.005), V30 (P=0.001), V40 (P=0.004), mean lung dose (P=0.000) and max dose of spinal cord (P=0.005) were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group. There was no significant difference in the incidences of acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ grade 2 between the two groups, whereas the incidences of acute radiation esophagitis ≥ grade 2 were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.027). Two-year overall response rate was significantly higher in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.015). One- and 2-year OS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (95.0% and 68.7%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (85.5% and 47.6%, respectively; P=0.0236). One- and 2-year PFS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (57.8% and 26.3%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (32.7% and 11.4%, respectively; P=0.0351). Univariate analysis indicated that performance status (PS), T stage and radiotherapy technique were significant prognostic factors for both OS

  13. Results of radiation therapy combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy for stage III prostate cancer. Comparison of two different definitions of PSA failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Sasaki, Yoshihide; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    We herein report the clinical outcome of radical radiation therapy combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) for stage III (International Union Against Cancer [UICC] 1997: UICC 97) prostate cancer. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure-free survival was assessed according to two different definitions, and the appropriateness of each definition is discussed. Between October 1997 and December 2000, 27 patients with stage III prostate cancer were enrolled in this study. The median pretreatment PSA level was 29 ng/ml (range, 7.4-430 ng/ml). The Gleason score (GS) was 7 or more in 22 patients (81%). All patients received 3 months of NHT with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogue, in combination with an antiandrogen (flutamide), given during the first 2 weeks, followed by 70-Gy external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in 35 fractions. The initial 46 Gy was given with a four-field technique, while the remainder was given with a dynamic conformal technique. No adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT) was given. The median follow-up time was 63 months. PSA levels decreased to the normal range (<4 ng/ml) after irradiation in all but one patient. The 5-year PSA failure-free survival was 34.8% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition and it was 43.0% according to the ''nadir plus 2'' definition. Discordance of the results between the two definitions was seen in two patients. The 5-year overall and cause-specific survivals were 83.0% and 93.3%, respectively. No severe acute or late adverse effects were observed. Seventy Gy of EBRT following 3 months of NHT produced therapeutic results comparable to those reported in other studies which used long-term AHT. The value of long-term AHT for Japanese men should be tested in a clinical trial. (author)

  14. Assessing the initiation and completion of adjuvant chemotherapy in a large nationwide and population-based cohort of elderly patients with stage-III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chung-Yuan; Delclos, George L; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2011-12-01

    Randomized trials conducted in the 1980s have established the effectiveness of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in treating stage-III colon cancer. However, the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy is just the first step for survival improvement. Little is known about the actual completion rate of such a therapy in the community. The objectives of this study were to measure the initiation and completion rate of adjuvant chemotherapy and to identify the associated factors. We studied 12,265 patients aged 65+ diagnosed with stage-III colon cancer between 1991 and 2005 who were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database. Chemotherapy initiation was defined as at least one claim indicating the use of chemotherapy. The first and last claims were used to measure the length of chemotherapy. A complete course of chemotherapy was defined as 8-13 months for 1991-1995 cohort and 5-7 months for 1996-2005 cohort according to clinical guideline. Of the 12,265 patients, 64.4% received adjuvant chemotherapy within 3 months after tumor resection. Among those who had chemotherapy initiated, 62.2% (or 38.0% of 12,265 patients) received a complete course of chemotherapy. Patient's age at diagnosis, marital status, and comorbidity score were the significant predictors for chemotherapy initiation. These variables remained significant in predicting chemotherapy completion after adjusting for year of diagnosis and other factors. In conclusion, initiation and completion of chemotherapy was largely influenced by patient's age, marital status and comorbidity. Further investigation is needed to explore the cause of these differences in adherence to standard treatment that is essential for better quality of cancer care.

  15. The Effect of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy on Overall Survival in 237 Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Zhao Lujun; Hayman, James; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Kong Fengming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and their interaction in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 237 consecutive Stage III NSCLC patients were evaluated. Median follow-up was 69.0 months. Patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone (n = 106), sequential chemoradiation (n = 69), or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Radiation dose ranged from 30 to 102.9 Gy (median 60 Gy), corresponding to a bioequivalent dose (BED) of 39 to 124.5 Gy (median 72 Gy). Results: The median OS of the entire cohort was 12.6 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rates were 22.4% and 10.0%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression model demonstrated that Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.020), weight loss < 5% (p = 0.017), chemotherapy (yes vs. no), sequence of chemoradiation (sequential vs. concurrent; p < 0.001), and BED (p < 0.001) were significant predictors of OS. For patients treated with RT alone, sequential chemoradiation, and concurrent chemoradiation, median survival was 7.4, 14.9, and 15.8 months, and 5-year OS was 3.3%, 7.5%, and 19.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). The effect of higher radiation doses on survival was independent of whether chemotherapy was given. Conclusion: Radiation dose and use of chemotherapy are independent predictors of OS in Stage III NSCLC, and concurrent chemoradiation is associated with the best survival. There is no interaction between RT dose and chemotherapy.

  16. Postmastectomy radiotherapy reduces locoregional and disease recurrence in patients with stage II–III triple-negative breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XX

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Xingxing Chen,1,2,* Fan Xia,1,2,* Jurui Luo,1,2,* Jinli Ma,1,2 Zhaozhi Yang,1,2 Li Zhang,1,2 Yan Feng,1,2 Zhimin Shao,2,3 Xiaoli Yu,1,2 Xiaomao Guo1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; 3Department of Breast Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: This study investigated the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT in patients with stage II–III triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC and modified radical mastectomy (MRM.Patients and methods: A total of 104 women with stage II–III TNBC who received NAC and MRM at our institution between January 2000 and July 2007 were identified. Patients were divided into 2 groups (PMRT and non-PMRT for statistical analysis.Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months (range 12–123 months. The 5 year cumulative locoregional recurrence (LRR and disease recurrence (DR rates were 26.5% and 49.6%, respectively. Despite their more adverse prognostic features, patients with PMRT had lower 5 year cumulative LRR and DR rates than those without PMRT (LRR: 18.3% vs 52.2%, respectively, p=0.0005; DR: 45% vs 69.1%, p=0.0334, respectively. On multivariate analysis of the entire study cohort, forgoing PMRT was significantly associated with developing LRR and DR. Subset analysis revealed that PMRT significantly reduced the 5 year LRR rate in patients with pre-chemotherapy clinical stages IIA (8.3% vs 46.2%, p=0.019 and IIIA (16% vs 66.7%, p=0.003. PMRT also significantly reduced the 5 year DR rate in patients with pre-chemotherapy clinical stage IIA (24.5% vs 69.3%, p=0.0151 and ≥IIIB (70.8% vs 100%, p=0.0481.Conclusion: In our cohort of patients with TNBC treated with NAC and MRM, PMRT significantly improved locoregional control and disease

  17. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Consolidation chemotherapy improves progression-free survival in stage III small-cell lung cancer following concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XR

    2016-09-01

    for PFS. Multivariate analysis for OS also showed that having undergone PCI (P<0.001 and having received CCT (P=0.006 were independent significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: CCT can improve PFS for patients with stage IIIA and IIIB SCLC following CCRT without significantly increasing treatment-related toxicities. Keywords: stage III, small-cell lung cancer, consolidation chemotherapy, survival analysis, prognosis, toxicities 

  19. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  20. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing; Xia Tingyi; Yuan Zhiyong; Liu Hui; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe; Zhang Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  1. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Atsushi; Yamashita, Kazuki; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Akihito; Inukai, Michio; Yamakawa, Toshiki; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Yoshimitsu, Masanori; Toyota, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Taketoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Okajima, Masazumi

    2016-01-01

    Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were eligible. Patients were treated with folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) for 3 months followed by capecitabine (2,500 mg/m 2 on days 1-14 every 3 weeks) for 3 months. Primary end points were frequency and the grade of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as evaluated using the physician-based Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE) grading and the patient-based scale, self-reported Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire. Ninety-one patients were enrolled and 86 patients assessed. Eighty-four percent of patients completed the planned oxaliplatin-based therapy for 3 months, and 63% of patients completed all treatments for the full 6 months. Overall incidences of grade 3 or 4 peripheral sensory or motor neuropathy according to the CTCAE were 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Regarding the peripheral sensory neuropathy, the proportion of Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (grade C-E) and CTCAE (grade 2-4) at months 1.5/3/6 were 11.3/22.1/29.4% and 5.3/4.4/11.3%, respectively (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.47). A sequential approach to adjuvant chemotherapy with 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine was tolerated by patients and associated with a low incidence of neuropathy.

  2. MVP Chemotherapy and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Stage III Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer - Randomized for maintenance Chemotherapy vs. Observation; Preliminary Report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Euk Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Suh, Cheol Won

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of MVP chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), authors have conducted a prospective randomized study since January 1991. Stage IIIa or IIIb unresectable NSCLC patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID) up to 6500 cGY following 3 cycles of induction MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 ) and randomized for either observation or 3 cycles of maintenance MVP chemotherapy. Until August 1991, 18 patients were registered to this study. 4 cases were stage IIIa and 14 were stage IIIb. Among 18 cases 2 were lost after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and 16 were analyzed for this preliminary report. The response rate of induction chemotherapy was 62.5%; partial response, 50% and minimal response, 12.5%. Residual tumor of the one partial responder was completely disappeared after radiotherapy. Among 6 cases who were progressed during induction chemotherapy, 4 of them were also progressed after radiotherapy. All patients were tolerated BID radiotherapy without definite increase of acute complications, compared with conventional radiotherapy group. But at the time of this report, one patient expired in two month after the completion of the radiotherapy because of treatment related complication. Although the longer follow up is needed, authors are encouraged with higher response rate and acceptable toxicity of this treatment. Authors believe that this study is worthwhile to continue

  3. Trachelectomy for cancer of the cervix: dargent's operation. Vaginal hysterectomy for early cancer of the cervix stage IA1 and CIN III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Radical vaginal trachelectomy is today an established method of treating selected women with cervical cancer stage IA2 and IB1, with tumour size less than 2cm without precluding future childbearing. This technique has been used for more than 20 years with reassuring oncological safety and excellent...

  4. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p 70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of ≥12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of ≥12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells was an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control and survival in patients irradiated for NSCLC. EPO-R expression showed a trend

  5. A pilot study (SWOG S0429 of weekly cetuximab and chest radiotherapy for poor-risk stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhchyau eChen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with poor performance status (PS or co-morbidities are often not candidates for standard chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT due to poor tolerance to treatments. A pilot study for poor-risk stage III NSCLC patients was conducted combining cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, with chest radiation (RT. Methods: Stage III NSCLC patients with Zubrod PS 2, or Zubrod PS 0-1 with poor pulmonary function and co-morbidities prohibiting chemoRT were eligible. A loading dose of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 was delivered week one, followed by weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2/RT to 64.5 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions, and maintenance weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2 for two years or until disease progression. H-score for EGFR protein expression was conducted in available tumors.Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Twenty two were assessed for outcome and toxicity. Median survival was 14 months and median progression-free survival was 8 months. The response rate was 47% and disease control rate was 74%. Toxicity assessment revealed 22.7% overall ≥ Grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities. Grade 3 esophagitis was observed in one patient (5%. The skin reactions were mostly Grade 1 or 2 except two of 22 (9% had Grade 3 acne and 1/22 (5% had Grade 3 radiation skin burn. Grade 3-4 hypomagnesemia was seen in 4 (18% patients. One patient (5% had elevated cardiac troponin and pulmonary emboli. H-score did not reveal prognostic significance. An initially planned second cohort of the study did not commence due to slow accrual, which would have added weekly docetaxel to cetuximab/RT after completion of the first cohort of patients. Conclusions: Concurrent weekly cetuximab/chest RT followed by maintenance cetuximab for poor-risk stage III NSCLC was well tolerated. Further studies with larger sample sizes will be useful to establish the optimal therapeutic ratio of this regimen.

  6. Human papillomavirus genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic factors for patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    -specific survival (DSS) in patients diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. PATIENTS AND METHODS: HPV genotyping polymerase chain reaction (high-risk subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) and immunohistochemical expression of p16 were analyzed......PURPOSE: Carcinomas of the anal canal are strongly associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Expression of p16 is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection. In a retrospective study, we evaluated HPV genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic markers of overall survival (OS) and disease...... by using paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies from 143 anal carcinomas. The patients were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. RESULTS: HPV16 was detected in 81.0% of the tumors, followed by HPV33 (5.1%), HPV18 (2.2%), and HPV58 (0.7%). p16 positivity was found in 92.9% of the tumors...

  7. IMPROVING THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF RETENTION DISORDERS OF THE UPPER URINARY TRACT IN PATIENTS WITH STAGES IIB–III CANCER OF THE CERVIX UTERI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study investigates the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment in patients with retention disorders upper urinary tract cervical cancer stage IIB III after more than 3 months after combined radiotherapy. In the apartment complex to the diagnosis of renal ultrasound and radioisotope study of renal excretory function added to the study ureteral emissions by color Doppler sonography. Information on ureteral emissions revealed a violation of the early passage of urine in 23.1 % of patients with renal ultrasound revealed no pathology. On the basis of violations ureteral emissions increase in the number of patients, respectively, are assigned to nonoperative treatment (anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic therapy. As a result, decreased by 14.2 % (p = 0.034, female patients, which showed drainage of the upper urinary tract.

  8. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichbaum Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. Methods/design The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border, heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Discussion Intensity-modulated WAR provides

  9. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Debus, Juergen; Kieser, Meinhard; Sterzing, Florian; Krause, Sonja; Lindel, Katja; Harms, Wolfgang; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border), heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Intensity-modulated WAR provides a new promising option in the consolidation treatment of

  10. Immunotherapy (excluding checkpoint inhibitors) for stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer treated with surgery or radiotherapy with curative intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianwei; Li, Rui; Tiselius, Eva; Roudi, Raheleh; Teghararian, Olivia; Suo, Chen; Song, Huan

    2017-12-16

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common lung cancer, accounting for approximately 80% to 85% of all cases. For patients with localised NSCLC (stages I to III), it has been speculated that immunotherapy may be helpful for reducing postoperative recurrence rates, or improving the clinical outcomes of current treatment for unresectable tumours. While several new agents have now entered phase III clinical trials, we felt a systematic review was needed to address the question of the effectiveness and safety of immunotherapy in patients with stages I to III NSCLC. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of immunotherapy (excluding checkpoint inhibitors) in patients with localised NSCLC (stages I to III) who received surgery or radiotherapy with curative intent. We searched the following databases (from inception to 20 January 2017): CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL, and five trial registers. We also manually checked abstracts or reports from relevant conference proceedings and the reference lists of included trials. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in adults (≥ 18 years) with histologically-confirmed early-stage (stages I to III) NSCLC after surgical resection, and those with unresectable locally advanced stage III NSCLC who had received radiotherapy with curative intent. For patients who had received primary surgical treatment, postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy was allowed if it was used for both experimental and control groups. Two review authors independently selected eligible trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We used survival analysis to pool time-to-event data, expressing the intervention effect as a hazard ratio (HR). We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data, and mean differences for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Due to clinical heterogeneity (immunotherapeutic agents with different underlying mechanisms), we used random-effects models for our meta-analyses. We

  11. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1 as A Biomarker for Diagnosis 
and Prognosis of Stage I-II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning LIU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increased macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1, member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, was found in patients serum with epithelial tumors. Therefore, our aim was to delineate the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum MIC-1 in patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A total of 152 consecutive patients with stage I–II NSCLC were prospectively enrolled and underwent follow up after total resection of tumor. Serum MIC-1 level was detected in lung cancer patients by ELISA, 48 benign pulmonary disease patients and 105 healthy controls, and was correlated with clinical features and prognosis of patients. Results The level of MIC-1 of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that of controls (P<0.001 and benign pulmonary disease patients (P<0.001. A threshold of 1,000 pg/mL could be used to diagnose early-stage NSCLC with 70.4% sensitivity and 99.0% specificity. The level of MIC-1 was associated with elder age (P=0.001, female (P=0.03 and T2 (P=0.022. A threshold of 1,465 pg/mL could identify patients with early poor outcome with 72.2% sensitivity and 66.1% specificity. The overall 3-year survival rate in patients with high level of MIC-1 (≥1,465 pg/mL was significantly lower than that of patients with low MIC-1 level (77.6% vs 94.8%. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that a high level of MIC-1 was an independent risk factor for compromised overall survival (HR=3.37, 95%CI: 1.09-10.42, P=0.035. Conclusion High level of serum MIC-1 could be served as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and poorer outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  12. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [de

  13. Phase I study of cisplatin analogue nedaplatin, paclitaxel, and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    The standard treatment of unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer is concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients in good general condition, but where the optimal chemotherapeutic regimen has not been determined. Patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer received nedaplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel on day 1 every 4 weeks for 3-4 cycles and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions for 6 weeks) starting on day 1. The dose of paclitaxel was escalated from 120 mg/m 2 in level 1, 135 mg/m 2 in level 2 to 150 mg/m 2 in level 3. A total of 18 patients (14 males and 4 females, with a median age of 62.5 years) were evaluated in this study. Full cycles of chemotherapy were administered in 83% of patients in level 1, and in 50% of patients in levels 2 and 3. No more than 50% of patients developed grade 4 neutropenia. Transient grade 3 esophagitis and infection were noted in one patient, and unacceptable pneumonitis was noted in three (17%) patients, two of whom died of the toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), evaluated in 15 patients, noted in one of the six patients in level 1, three of the six patients in level 2 and one of the three patients in level 3. One DLT at level 2 developed later as radiation pneumonitis. Thus, the maximum tolerated dose was determined to be level 1. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 67% (41-87%) with 12 partial responses. The doses of paclitaxel and nedaplatin could not be escalated as a result of severe pulmonary toxicity. (author)

  14. A phase ii study of concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide for elderly patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandrovic, Jasna; Radosavljevic-Asic, Gordana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy and concurrent carboplatin/oral etoposide in elderly (> 70 years) patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and June 1993, a total of 58 patients entered a phase II study. Carboplatin (400 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously on days 1 and 29, and etoposide (50 mg/m 2 ) was given orally on days 1-21 and 29-42. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered starting on day 1, with a total dose of 51 Gy in 34 fractions over 3.5 weeks. Results: In 55 evaluable patients, the complete response rate was 27% and the overall response rate was 65%. For the 55 patients, the median survival time was 10 months, and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 45%, 24%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time until relapse was 8 months and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 45%, 20%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 14 months and the 5-year local control rate was 13%; the median time to distant metastasis was 18 months and the 5-year distant metastasis-free rate was 15%. Hematological, esophageal, and bronchopulmonary acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 22%, 7%, and 4% of the patients, respectively. There was no grade 5 toxicity or late grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide produced relatively low and acceptable toxicity. The survival results appeared to be comparable to those obtained in nonelderly patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated by full-dose radiation

  15. Appropriate customization of radiation therapy for stage II and III rectal cancer: Executive summary of an ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Karyn A; Patton, Caroline E; Fisher, George A; Hoffe, Sarah E; Haddock, Michael G; Parikh, Parag J; Kim, John; Baxter, Nancy N; Czito, Brian G; Hong, Theodore S; Herman, Joseph M; Crane, Christopher H; Hoffman, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    To summarize results of a Clinical Practice Statement on radiation therapy for stage II-III rectal cancer, which addressed appropriate customization of (neo)adjuvant radiation therapy and use of non-surgical therapy for patients who are inoperable or refuse abdominoperineal resection. The RAND/University of California, Los Angeles, Appropriateness Method was applied to combine current evidence with multidisciplinary expert opinion. A systematic literature review was conducted and used by the expert panel to rate appropriateness of radiation therapy options for different clinical scenarios. Treatments were categorized by median rating as Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate. In the neoadjuvant setting, chemoradiation was rated Appropriate and the ratings indicated short-course radiation therapy, chemotherapy alone, and no neoadjuvant therapy are potential options in selected patients. However, neoadjuvant endorectal brachytherapy was rated Rarely Appropriate. For adjuvant therapy, chemoradiation (plus ≥4 months of chemotherapy) was rated Appropriate and chemotherapy alone May Be Appropriate for most scenarios. For medically inoperable patients, definitive external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy alone were rated May Be Appropriate, whereas endorectal brachytherapy and chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy were possible approaches for some scenarios. The last option, definitive chemoradiation, was rated Appropriate to May Be Appropriate based on performance status. Finally, for patients with low-lying tumors refusing abdominoperineal resection, definitive chemoradiation alone, chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy, and chemoradiation plus external beam radiation therapy were all rated Appropriate. This Clinical Practice Statement demonstrated the central role of radiation therapy in stage II-III rectal cancer management and evaluated ways to better individualize its use in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and definitive settings

  16. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  17. A phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction cisplatin (CDDP) and vinorelbine (VNR) for stage III Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kubota, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ogino, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction chemotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and materials: Treatment consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks followed by HART, 3 times a day (1.5, 1.8, 1.5 Gy, 4-h interval) for a total dose of 57.6 Gy. Results: Thirty patients were eligible. Their median age was 64 years (range, 46-73 years), 24 were male, 6 were female, 8 had performance status (PS) 0, 22 had PS 1, 9 had Stage IIIA, and 21 had Stage IIIB. All but 1 patient completed the treatment. Common grade ≥3 toxicities during the treatment included neutropenia, 25; infection, 5; esophagitis, 5; and radiation pneumonitis, 3. The overall response rate was 83%. The median survival was 24 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-34 months), and the 2-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI, 32-68%). The median progression-free survival was 10 months (95% CI, 8-20 months). Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy after induction of cisplatin and vinorelbine was feasible and promising. Future investigation employing dose-intensified radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is needed

  18. Superior outcome of women with stage I/II cutaneous melanoma: Pooled analysis of four European organisation for research and treatment of cancer phase III trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Joosse (Arjen); S. Collette (Sandra); S. Suciu (Stefan); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar); F.J. Lejeune (Ferdy); U.R. Kleeberg (Ulrich); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); E.G.E. de Vries (Elisabeth)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Several studies observed a female advantage in the prognosis of cutaneous melanoma, for which behavioral factors or an underlying biologic mechanism might be responsible. Using complete and reliable follow-up data from four phase III trials of the European Organisation for

  19. Impact of VEGF and VEGF receptor 1 (FLT1) expression on the prognosis of stage III esophageal cancer patients after radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Golke, H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Inst. of Pathology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Schild, S.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Kilic, E. [Inst. of Pathology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Inst. of Pathology, Univ. Hospital Basel-Stadt (Switzerland)

    2008-08-15

    Background and purpose: high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is negatively associated with clinical outcome. The prognostic value of VEGF receptor 1 (FLT1) is unclear. This retrospective study investigated the impact of tumor expression of VEGF and FLT1 on outcome in 68 stage III esophageal cancer patients. Material and methods: the impact of tumor VEGF and FLT expression (< 10% vs. > 10%) and five additional potential prognostic factors on overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LC) was retrospectively evaluated. These factors included T-stage (T3 vs. T4), N-stage (NO vs. N1), treatment (radiochemotherapy plus resection vs. radiochemotherapy alone), erythropoietin (ERYPO {sup registered} 10000, Janssen-Cilag, Neuss, Germany) administration during radiotherapy, and majority of hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy (< 12 vs. {>=} 12 g/dl). Subgroup analyses were performed for patients receiving resection (R0 vs. R1/2 resection). The factors found to be significant on univariate analyses (Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test) were included in multivariate analyses performed with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: on univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with T3 stage (p = 0.011), surgery (p = 0.019), and hemoglobin {>=} 12 g/dl (p < 0.001). Improved LC was associated with T3 stage (p = 0.025), hemoglobin {>=} 12 g/dl (p < 0.001), and VEGF negativity (p = 0.045). On multivariate analyses, only hemoglobin maintained significance. In patients having surgery, R0 resection was significantly better than R1/2 resection for OS (p < 0.001) and LC (p < 0.001). Conclusion: preradiotherapy tumor VEGF expression appears negatively correlated with outcomes, whereas FLT1 expression appears to have no significant impact on OS and LC. (orig.)

  20. Impact of VEGF and VEGF receptor 1 (FLT1) expression on the prognosis of stage III esophageal cancer patients after radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, D.; Golke, H.; Schild, S.E.; Kilic, E.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is negatively associated with clinical outcome. The prognostic value of VEGF receptor 1 (FLT1) is unclear. This retrospective study investigated the impact of tumor expression of VEGF and FLT1 on outcome in 68 stage III esophageal cancer patients. Material and methods: the impact of tumor VEGF and FLT expression ( 10%) and five additional potential prognostic factors on overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LC) was retrospectively evaluated. These factors included T-stage (T3 vs. T4), N-stage (NO vs. N1), treatment (radiochemotherapy plus resection vs. radiochemotherapy alone), erythropoietin (ERYPO registered 10000, Janssen-Cilag, Neuss, Germany) administration during radiotherapy, and majority of hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy (< 12 vs. ≥ 12 g/dl). Subgroup analyses were performed for patients receiving resection (R0 vs. R1/2 resection). The factors found to be significant on univariate analyses (Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test) were included in multivariate analyses performed with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: on univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with T3 stage (p = 0.011), surgery (p = 0.019), and hemoglobin ≥ 12 g/dl (p < 0.001). Improved LC was associated with T3 stage (p = 0.025), hemoglobin ≥ 12 g/dl (p < 0.001), and VEGF negativity (p = 0.045). On multivariate analyses, only hemoglobin maintained significance. In patients having surgery, R0 resection was significantly better than R1/2 resection for OS (p < 0.001) and LC (p < 0.001). Conclusion: preradiotherapy tumor VEGF expression appears negatively correlated with outcomes, whereas FLT1 expression appears to have no significant impact on OS and LC. (orig.)

  1. Prognostic significance of bcl-2 expression in stage III breast cancer patients who had received doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel as adjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Wan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bcl-2 is positively regulated by hormonal receptor pathways in breast cancer. A study was conducted to assess the prognostic significances of clinico-pathologic variables and of ER, PR, p53, c-erbB2, bcl-2, or Ki-67 as markers of relapse in breast cancer patients who had received the identical adjuvant therapy at a single institution. Methods A cohort of 151 curatively resected stage III breast cancer patients (M:F = 3:148, median age 46 years who had 4 or more positive lymph nodes and received doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel (AC/T as adjuvant chemotherapy was analyzed for clinico-pathologic characteristics including disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS. Patients with positive ER and/or PR expression received 5 years of tamoxifen following AC/T. The protein expressions of biomarkers were assessed immunohistochemically. Results The median follow-up duration was 36 months, and 37 patients (24.5% experienced a recurrence. Univariate analyses indicated that the tumor size (P = 0.038 and the number of involved lymph nodes (P P = 0.013, bcl-2 positivity (P = 0.002 and low p53 expression (P = 0.032 were found to be significantly associated with a prolonged DFS. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified 10 or more involved lymph nodes (HR 7.366; P P = 0.030, and c-erbB2 over-expression (HR 3.535; P = 0.001 as independent indicators of poorer DFS. In addition, bcl-2 expression was found to be significantly correlated with the expressions of ER and PR, and inversely correlated with the expressions of p53, c-erbB2 and Ki-67. Patients with bcl-2 expression had a significantly longer DFS than those without, even in the ER (+ subgroup. Moreover, OS was significantly affected by ER, bcl-2 and c-erbB2. Conclusion Bcl-2 is an independent prognostic factor of DFS in curatively resected stage III breast cancer patients and appears to be a useful prognostic factor in combination with c-erbB2 and the

  2. Prognostic significance of bcl-2 expression in stage III breast cancer patients who had received doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel as adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-Hun; Noh, Dong-Young; Heo, Dae Seog; Ha, Sung Whan; Bang, Yung-Jue; Im, Seock-Ah; Oh, Do-Youn; Lee, Se-Hoon; Chie, Eui Kyu; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae-You; Park, In Ae

    2007-01-01

    Bcl-2 is positively regulated by hormonal receptor pathways in breast cancer. A study was conducted to assess the prognostic significances of clinico-pathologic variables and of ER, PR, p53, c-erbB2, bcl-2, or Ki-67 as markers of relapse in breast cancer patients who had received the identical adjuvant therapy at a single institution. A cohort of 151 curatively resected stage III breast cancer patients (M:F = 3:148, median age 46 years) who had 4 or more positive lymph nodes and received doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel (AC/T) as adjuvant chemotherapy was analyzed for clinico-pathologic characteristics including disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients with positive ER and/or PR expression received 5 years of tamoxifen following AC/T. The protein expressions of biomarkers were assessed immunohistochemically. The median follow-up duration was 36 months, and 37 patients (24.5%) experienced a recurrence. Univariate analyses indicated that the tumor size (P = 0.038) and the number of involved lymph nodes (P < 0.001) significantly affected the recurrences. However, the type of surgery, the histology, histologic grade, the presence of endolymphatic emboli, and a close resection margin did not. Moreover, ER positivity (P = 0.013), bcl-2 positivity (P = 0.002) and low p53 expression (P = 0.032) were found to be significantly associated with a prolonged DFS. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified 10 or more involved lymph nodes (HR 7.366; P < 0.001), negative bcl-2 expression (HR 2.895; P = 0.030), and c-erbB2 over-expression (HR 3.535; P = 0.001) as independent indicators of poorer DFS. In addition, bcl-2 expression was found to be significantly correlated with the expressions of ER and PR, and inversely correlated with the expressions of p53, c-erbB2 and Ki-67. Patients with bcl-2 expression had a significantly longer DFS than those without, even in the ER (+) subgroup. Moreover, OS was significantly affected by ER, bcl

  3. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Lori J.; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age ≤ 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  4. Incidence of chemotherapy- and chemoradiotherapy-induced amenorrhea in premenopausal women with stage II/III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Juefeng; Gai, Ya; Li, Guichao; Tao, Zhonghua; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    The incidence rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) in young individuals are increasing. There has been a significant improvement in overall survival in CRC because of advances in adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy over the past decades. However, these procedures may compromise the function of the reproductive system, and ovarian failure and premature menopause may occur. The objective of this analysis was to determine the incidence of long-term amenorrhea (≥ 12 months) in women with CRC aged 40 years and younger after adjuvant treatment. The authors identified 162 premenopausal women with CRC aged 40 years or younger who were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from January 2008 to December 2012. One hundred twenty-three patients met all eligibility criteria and had sufficient follow-up for evaluation. The median age at diagnosis in patients with colon and rectal cancers was, respectively, 36 and 35 years (range, 17-40 and 24-40 years). All patients had regular menses before treatment; 3 patients with colon cancer (4.2%) experienced long-term amenorrhea, and 48 patients with rectal cancer (94.1%) experienced long-term amenorrhea. The incidence of amenorrhea was significantly lower in patients with colon cancer (4.2%; 3 of 72) than in patients with rectal cancer (94.1%; 48 of 51) (P amenorrhea in patients with colon and rectal cancers was 4.2% and 94.1%, respectively. We believe our data support the fact that young female patients with CRC, especially those with rectal cancer who are scheduled to undergo pelvic irradiation, should be counseled regarding fertility preservation options, including ovarian transposition and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue, embryo, or oocyte. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quality of Sleep and Related Factors During Chemotherapy in Patients with Stage I/II Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Hsuan Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: The study showed poor sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in patients with breast cancer during the active phase of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy may bring symptom distress to patients and adversely influence sleep quality.

  6. Daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy with docetaxel (DOC) and cisplatin (CDDP) using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery for stage III and IV oral cancer. Possibility of organ preservation in advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2006-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via the superficial temporal artery has become feasible for daily concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. This novel method was used for oral cancer, and its efficacy was evaluated. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial infusions (Docetaxel (DOC) total 60 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin (CDDP) total 100 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent radiotherapy (total 40 Gy) for four weeks as preoperative therapy. Thirty-four patients with stage III and IV oral cancer received surgery after this treatment, and pathological CR was obtained in 31 patients (91%). The possibility of organ preservation for advanced oral cancer was evaluated from this result. Patients with oral cancer stage III and IV were treated for four-week daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the clinical response was evaluated after treatment. Clinical CR of primary sites was obtained in 15 patients, and the same treatment was continued one or two weeks. Thirteen patients (80%) were disease-free in the primary sites, and two (20%) relapsed. Two patients died of distant metastasis, and one died of local recurrence. This method can preserve organs and minimize functional disturbance, thus contributing to patient QOL. (author)

  7. Effect of More vs Less Frequent Follow-up Testing on Overall and Colorectal Cancer-Specific Mortality in Patients With Stage II or III Colorectal Cancer: The COLOFOL Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Syk, Ingvar; Smedh, Kenneth; Laurberg, Søren; Nielsen, Dennis T; Petersen, Sune H; Renehan, Andrew G; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Påhlman, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2018-05-22

    Intensive follow-up of patients after curative surgery for colorectal cancer is common in clinical practice, but evidence of a survival benefit is limited. To examine overall mortality, colorectal cancer-specific mortality, and colorectal cancer-specific recurrence rates among patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer who were randomized after curative surgery to 2 alternative schedules for follow-up testing with computed tomography and carcinoembryonic antigen. Unblinded randomized trial including 2509 patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer treated at 24 centers in Sweden, Denmark, and Uruguay from January 2006 through December 2010 and followed up for 5 years; follow-up ended on December 31, 2015. Patients were randomized either to follow-up testing with computed tomography of the thorax and abdomen and serum carcinoembryonic antigen at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after surgery (high-frequency group; n = 1253 patients) or at 12 and 36 months after surgery (low-frequency group; n = 1256 patients). The primary outcomes were 5-year overall mortality and colorectal cancer-specific mortality rates. The secondary outcome was the colorectal cancer-specific recurrence rate. Both intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were performed. Among 2555 patients who were randomized, 2509 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis (mean age, 63.5 years; 1128 women [45%]) and 2365 (94.3%) completed the trial. The 5-year overall patient mortality rate in the high-frequency group was 13.0% (161/1253) compared with 14.1% (174/1256) in the low-frequency group (risk difference, 1.1% [95% CI, -1.6% to 3.8%]; P = .43). The 5-year colorectal cancer-specific mortality rate in the high-frequency group was 10.6% (128/1248) compared with 11.4% (137/1250) in the low-frequency group (risk difference, 0.8% [95% CI, -1.7% to 3.3%]; P = .52). The colorectal cancer-specific recurrence rate was 21.6% (265/1248) in the high-frequency group compared with 19

  8. The Prognostic Relevance of Sentinel Lymph Node Metastases Assessed by PHGR1 mRNA Quantification in Stage I to III Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Oltedal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regional lymph node (LN metastasis is a strong and well-established prognostic factor in colon cancer, and recent data suggest a prognostic value of detecting micrometastases and isolated tumor cells in regional LNs. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical relevance of detecting sentinel lymph node (SLN metastases in colon cancer patients by measuring the novel metastasis marker PHGR1 mRNA. METHODS: Using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, we measured PHGR1 mRNA levels in SLNs and primary tumors from 206 patients surgically treated for stage I to III colon cancer and 52 normal LNs from patients undergoing surgery for benign colon diseases. The prognostic impact of these findings was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional-hazards regression. RESULTS: Compared to normal LNs, elevated PHGR1 mRNA levels were detected in SLNs from 56 (89% of the 63 patients with pN+ disease. Furthermore, 68 (48% of the 143 node-negative (pN0 patients had elevated PHGR1 mRNA levels in SLNs, suggesting occult metastases. With a median follow-up of 7.2 years, a significantly shorter recurrence-free (P=.005 and disease-specific (P=.02 survival was observed in patients with elevated PHGR1 mRNA levels in SLNs. Multivariable modeling showed that the SLN PHGR1 mRNA level was an independent prognostic factor. However, when the survival analyses were restricted to pN0 patients, no significant prognostic information was found. CONCLUSION: Measuring PHGR1 mRNA in SLNs provided independent prognostic information on operable colon cancer patients but not in the pN0 subgroup.

  9. DYPD genotyping to predict toxicity in patients with stage III colon cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in the PETACC-8 phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boige, Valérie; Vincent, Marc; Alexandre, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding resection of the primary tumour with few or absent symptoms in patients with synchronous unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). A potential benefit of resection of the primary tumour is to prevent complications of the primary tumour in later s...

  10. Study protocol of the B-CAST study: a multicenter, prospective cohort study investigating the tumor biomarkers in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Megumi; Mori, Masaki; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Kanazawa, Akiyoshi; Kobayashi, Michiya; Okajima, Masazumi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Miyakoda, Keiko; Sugihara, Kenichi; Kotake, Kenjiro; Nishimura, Genichi; Tomita, Naohiro; Ichikawa, Wataru; Takahashi, Keiichi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Kondo, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy. Several oral fluorouracil (5-FU) derivatives with different properties are available in Japan, but which drug is the most appropriate for each patient has not been established. Although efficacy prediction of 5-FU derivatives using expression of 5-FU activation/metabolism enzymes in tumors has been studied, it has not been clinically applied. The B-CAST study is a multicenter, prospective cohort study aimed to identify the patients who benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with each 5-FU regimen, through evaluating the relationship between tumor biomarker expression and treatment outcome. The frozen tumor specimens of patients with stage III colon cancer who receives postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy are examined. Protein expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). mRNA expression of TP, DPD, thymidylate synthase (TS) and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) are evaluated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The patients’ clinical data reviewed are as follow: demographic and pathological characteristics, regimen, drug doses and treatment duration of adjuvant therapy, types and severity of adverse events, disease free survival, relapse free survival and overall survival. Then, relationships among the protein/mRNA expression, clinicopathological characteristics and the treatment outcomes are analyzed for each 5-FU derivative. A total of 2,128 patients from the 217 institutions were enrolled between April 2009 and March 2012. The B-CAST study demonstrated that large-scale, multicenter translational research using frozen samples was feasible when the sample shipment and Web-based data collection were well organized. The results

  11. Cardiac Toxicity After Radiotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Dose-Escalation Trials Delivering 70 to 90 Gy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Deal, Allison M.; Lipner, Matthew; Zagar, Timothy M.; Wang, Yue; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lee, Carrie B.; Jensen, Brian C.; Rosenman, Julian G.; Socinski, Mark A.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The significance of radiotherapy (RT) –associated cardiac injury for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear, but higher heart doses were associated with worse overall survival in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 study. We assessed the impact of heart dose in patients treated at our institution on several prospective dose-escalation trials. Patients and Methods From 1996 to 2009, 127 patients with stage III NSCLC (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, 0 to 1) received dose-escalated RT to 70 to 90 Gy (median, 74 Gy) in six trials. RT plans and cardiac doses were reviewed. Records were reviewed for the primary end point: symptomatic cardiac events (symptomatic pericardial effusion, acute coronary syndrome, pericarditis, significant arrhythmia, and heart failure). Cardiac risk was assessed by noting baseline coronary artery disease and calculating the WHO/International Society of Hypertension score. Competing risks analysis was used. Results In all, 112 patients were analyzed. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 8.8 years. Twenty-six patients (23%) had one or more events at a median of 26 months to first event (effusion [n = 7], myocardial infarction [n = 5], unstable angina [n = 3], pericarditis [n = 2], arrhythmia [n = 12], and heart failure [n = 1]). Heart doses (eg, heart mean dose; hazard ratio, 1.03/Gy; P = .002,), coronary artery disease (P < .001), and WHO/International Society of Hypertension score (P = .04) were associated with events on univariable analysis. Heart doses remained significant on multivariable analysis that accounted for baseline risk. Two-year competing risk–adjusted event rates for patients with heart mean dose < 10 Gy, 10 to 20 Gy, or ≥ 20 Gy were 4%, 7%, and 21%, respectively. Heart doses were not associated with overall survival. Conclusion Cardiac events were relatively common after high-dose thoracic RT and were independently associated with both heart dose and

  12. Dose-response relationship in locoregional control for patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhen; Liao Zhongxing; Jin Jing; Ajani, Jaffer; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melenda; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.; Swisher, Stephen; Ho, Linus; Yao, James; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between radiation dose and locoregional control (LRC) for patients with Stage II-III unresectable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods and materials: The medical records of 69 consecutive patients with clinical Stage II or III esophageal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1998 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 69 patients, 43 had received ≤51 Gy (lower dose group) and 26 >51 Gy (higher dose group). The median dose in the lower and higher dose groups was 30 Gy (range, 30-51 Gy) and 59.4 Gy (range, 54-64.8 Gy), respectively. Two fractionation schedules were used: rapid fractionation, delivering 30 Gy at 3 Gy/fraction within 2 weeks, and standard fractionation, delivering ≥45 Gy at 1.8-2 Gy/fraction daily. Total doses of 5% (46.2% vs. 23.3%). The lower dose group had more N1 tumors, but the tumor classification and stage grouping were similar in the two groups. The median follow-up time for all patients was 22 months (range, 2-56 months). Patients in the higher dose group had a statistically significant better 3-year local control rate (36% vs. 19%, p = 0.011), disease-free survival rate (25% vs. 10%, p = 0.004), and overall survival rate (13% vs. 3%, p = 0.054). A trend toward a better distant-metastasis-free survival rate was noted in the higher dose group (72% vs. 59%, p = 0.12). The complete clinical response rate was significantly greater in the higher dose group (46% vs. 23%, p = 0.048). In both groups, the most common type of first failure was persistence of the primary tumor. Significantly fewer patients in the higher dose group had tumor persistence after treatment (p = 0.02). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in the pattern of locoregional or distant failure. The long-term side effects of chemoradiotherapy were similar in the two groups, although

  13. Results of induction chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and concurrent weekly paclitaxel for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua; Bao Yong; Chen Ming; Zhang Li; Xu Guangchuan; Li Kaixin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plus concurrent weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC in favorable conditions were treated with 2 to 4 cycles of carboplatin (AUC=5-6, d1) combined with paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 , d1), then followed by weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent 3DCRT within 34 weeks. The prescription dose of radiotherapy was given as high as possible while total lung V 20 ≤31% and total dose of the spinal cord ≤50 Gy. Results: ICT was well tolerated. During the concurrent chemoradiotherapy,the treatment of 4 patients was ended ahead of the schedule because of severe pulmonary and cardiac toxicities; the treatment of 2 patients was delayed for 7 and 12 days because of fatigue. Leucopenia(33/56) was in grade 1-2 except 1 patient in grade 3. Lymphocytopenia was severe (54/56,42 in grade 3). Three patients developed grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis, and 3 developed grade 3-4 radiation-induced pneumonitis. There was one patients each who developed grade 2,3, and 4 late esophageal damage, respectively. Nine developed grade 2 pulmonary fibrosis. The overall response rate was 69.7%. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72.3%. The 1-year local progression-free survival rate was 62.7%. Conclusions: The schedule of ICT followed by weekly paclitaxel and concurrent 3DCRT can be well tolerated by most of the favorable patients with stage III NSCLC, and the toxicity is tolerable. Results of this study are encouraging, though long-term results should be followed up. (authors)

  14. Survival outcomes after radiation therapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer after adoption of computed tomography-based simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aileen B; Neville, Bridget A; Sher, David J; Chen, Kun; Schrag, Deborah

    2011-06-10

    Technical studies suggest that computed tomography (CT) -based simulation improves the therapeutic ratio for thoracic radiation therapy (TRT), although few studies have evaluated its use or impact on outcomes. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) -Medicare linked data to identify CT-based simulation for TRT among Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) between 2000 and 2005. Demographic and clinical factors associated with use of CT simulation were identified, and the impact of CT simulation on survival was analyzed by using Cox models and propensity score analysis. The proportion of patients treated with TRT who had CT simulation increased from 2.4% in 1994 to 34.0% in 2000 to 77.6% in 2005. Of the 5,540 patients treated with TRT from 2000 to 2005, 60.1% had CT simulation. Geographic variation was seen in rates of CT simulation, with lower rates in rural areas and in the South and West compared with those in the Northeast and Midwest. Patients treated with chemotherapy were more likely to have CT simulation (65.2% v 51.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.48 to 1.88; P simulation. Controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics, CT simulation was associated with lower risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.73 to 0.82; P simulation. CT-based simulation has been widely, although not uniformly, adopted for the treatment of stage III NSCLC and is associated with higher survival among patients receiving TRT.

  15. Comparison of toxicity and outcomes of concurrent radiotherapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel or cisplatin/etoposide in stage III non–small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, Mun Sem; Sia, Joseph; Starmans, Maud H W; Tafreshi, Ali; Harris, Sam; Feigen, Malcolm; White, Shane; Zimet, Allan; Lambin, Philippe; Boutros, Paul C; Mitchell, Paul; John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has become the standard of care for patients with unresectable stage III non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The comparative merits of two widely used regimens: carboplatin/paclitaxel (PC) and cisplatin/etoposide (PE), each with concurrent radiotherapy, remain largely undefined. Records for consecutive patients with stage III NSCLC treated with PC or PE and ≥60 Gy chest radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed for outcomes and toxicity. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox modeling with the Wald test. Comparison across groups was done using the student's t and chi-squared tests. Seventy-five (PC: 44, PE: 31) patients were analyzed. PC patients were older (median 71 vs. 63 years; P = 0.0006). Other characteristics were comparable between groups. With PE, there was significantly increased grade ≥3 neutropenia (39% vs. 14%, P = 0.024) and thrombocytopenia (10% vs. 0%, P = 0.039). Radiation pneumonitis was more common with PC (66% vs. 38%, P = 0.033). Five treatment-related deaths occurred (PC: 3 vs. PE: 2, P = 1.000). With a median follow-up of 51.6 months, there were no significant differences in relapse-free survival (median PC 12.0 vs. PE 11.5 months, P = 0.700) or overall survival (median PC 20.7 vs. PE 13.7 months; P = 0.989). In multivariate analyses, no factors predicted for improved survival for either regimen. PC was more likely to be used in elderly patients. Despite this, PC resulted in significantly less hematological toxicity but achieved similar survival outcomes as PE. PC is an acceptable CCRT regimen, especially in older patients with multiple comorbidities

  16. Definitive radiotherapy alone over 60 Gy for patients unfit for combined treatment to stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer: retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Su Ssan; Jeong, Yuri; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Wonsik; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are frequently treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone, due to poor performance status or underlying disease. We investigated the effectiveness of RT over 60 Gy administered alone to NSCLC patients who were unfit or rejecting for combination treatment. From April 2002 to July 2010, 83 patients with stage II-III NSCLC, aged over 60 years, treated by RT alone with a curative aim were analyzed. Radiation was targeted to the primary tumor and clinically involved lymph nodes. A total dose of 66 Gy in 30 fractions (2.2 Gy/fraction) was delivered once daily (5 fractions weekly). One month after completing RT, initial tumor responses were evaluated. Median age of patients was 73 years (range, 60 – 82 years). The median survival time was 18.6 months (range, 2–135). The actuarial overall survival rates at 2 and 3 years were 39 % and 23 %, and cause-specific survival rate at 2 and 3 years were 57 % and 47 %, respectively. When primary tumor was controlled, the 2- and 3-year CSS were 56 % and 45 %, but 32 % and 23 % in those patients with local failure, respectively (P = 0.017). Additionally, the local control rate was associated with the initial tumor response (P = 0.01). No patient experienced grade 4+ toxicity. For stage II-III NSCLC patients aged over 60 years and unfit or rejecting for combination treatment, RT alone showed promising result. Long-term disease control can be expected if an early tumor response to radiation is achieved, which could result in improved overall survival rates

  17. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Sasai, Keisuke; Veld, Aart A. van't; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D_2 − D_9_8, where D_2 and D_9_8 are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to 98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects have limited impact on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and

  18. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin C. Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in younger (age < 50 populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute’s Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n=6,862. Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age < 50 and older (age 50–69, age ≥ 70 CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13% and Hispanic (15% than patients aged 50–69 years (11% and 10%, resp. and ≥70 years (7% each. A larger proportion of young white (41% and Hispanic (33% patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%. The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%. Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  19. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Sanoff, Hanna K; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Baron, John A; Lund, Jennifer L; Sandler, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 ( n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age age 50-69, age ≥ 70) CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13%) and Hispanic (15%) than patients aged 50-69 years (11% and 10%, resp.) and ≥70 years (7% each). A larger proportion of young white (41%) and Hispanic (33%) patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%). The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%). Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  20. Daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal artery. Preoperative therapy for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Mitsudo, Kenji; Nishiguchi, Hiroaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Ueda, Minoru; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2005-01-01

    Recently, daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using new superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal arterial artery is attracting attention. The catheter with curved tip is inserted superselectively to the feeding artery of the tumor via the superficial temporal artery, allowing long-term catheterization. Forty-one patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy/4 weeks) and superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy using docetaxel (total dose: 60 mg/m 2 , 15 mg/m 2 /week) and cisplatin (total dose: 100 mg/m 2 , 5 mg/m 2 /day) were concurrently performed daily, followed by surgery. In 35 patients, intra-arterial infusion was successful (success rate: 85.4%) and no major complication was observed. The clinical effects were complete response (CR) in 29 patients (82.9%), and pathological effects of resected tumor after surgery were pathological CR in 31 (88.6%). This method promises to be a new strategy of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer: guideline implementation, patterns of use and outcomes in daily practice in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Chantal W. M.; Koopman, Miriam; Mol, Linda; Redekop, William K.; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how well guidelines about adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer are followed in daily practice. We evaluated the current guideline, which is based on the MOSAIC trial, by examining implementation, treatment patterns and disease-free survival. We analysed a population-based

  2. Systemic immune-inflammation index predicting chemoradiation resistance and poor outcome in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Suo Tong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that the existence of systemic inflammation response is correlated with poor prognosis in several solid tumors. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the association between systemic immune-inflammation index (SII and therapy response and overall survival in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The prognostic values of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR, platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR, and prognostic nutritional index (PNI were also evaluated. Methods In total, 332 patients with new diagnosis of stage III NSCLC were included in this retrospective analysis. SII was defined as platelet counts × neutrophil counts/lymphocyte counts. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the optimal cut-off value for SII, NLR, PLR and PNI. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis were performed to identify the factors correlated with overall survival. Results Applying cut-offs of ≥ 660 (SII, ≥ 3.57 (NLR, ≥ 147 (PLR, ≤ 52.95 (PNI, SII ≥ 660 was significantly correlated with worse ECOG PS (< 0.001, higher T stage (< 0.001, advanced clinical stage (p = 0.019, and lower response rate (p = 0.018. In univariate analysis, SII ≥ 660, NLR ≥ 3.57, PLR ≥ 147, and PNI ≤ 52.95 were significantly associated with worse overall survival (p all < 0.001. Patients with SII ≥ 660 had a median overall survival of 10 months, and patients with SII < 660 showed a median overall survival of 30 months. In multivariate analysis only ECOG PS (HR, 1.744; 95% CI 1.158–2.626; p = 0.008, T stage (HR, 1.332; 95% CI 1.032–1.718; p = 0.028, N stage (HR, 1.848; 95% CI 1.113–3.068; p = 0.018, SII (HR, 2.105; 95% CI 1.481–2.741; p < 0.001 and NLR ≥ 3.57 (HR, 1.934; 95% CI 1.448–2.585; p < 0.001 were independently correlated with overall survival. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the SII is an

  3. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schneeweiss, Andreas [University of Heidelberg, Nationales Centrum fuer Tumorerkrankungen (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Sohn, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynecology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Es wurden Akut- und Langzeittoxizitaet sowie Ueberlebensdaten der konsolidierenden intensitaetsmodulierten Ganzabdomenbestrahlung (&apos

  4. Front-line intraperitoneal versus intravenous chemotherapy in stage III-IV epithelial ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancer with minimal residual disease: a competing risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yen-Hou; Li, Wai-Hou; Chang, Yi; Peng, Chia-Wen; Cheng, Ching-Hsuan; Chang, Wei-Pin; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2016-03-17

    In the analysis of survival data for cancer patients, the problem of competing risks is often ignored. Competing risks have been recognized as a special case of time-to-event analysis. The conventional techniques for time-to-event analysis applied in the presence of competing risks often give biased or uninterpretable results. Using a prospectively collected administrative health care database in a single institution, we identified patients diagnosed with stage III or IV primary epithelial ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers with minimal residual disease after primary cytoreductive surgery between 1995 and 2012. Here, we sought to evaluate whether intraperitoneal chemotherapy outperforms intravenous chemotherapy in the presence of competing risks. Unadjusted and multivariable subdistribution hazards models were applied to this database with two types of competing risks (cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality) coded to measure the relative effects of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. A total of 1263 patients were recruited as the initial cohort. After propensity score matching, 381 patients in each arm entered into final competing risk analysis. Cumulative incidence estimates for cancer-specific mortality were statistically significantly lower (p = 0.017, Gray test) in patients receiving intraperitoneal chemotherapy (5-year estimates, 34.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 29.5-39.6%, and 10-year estimates, 60.7%; 95% CI, 52.2-68.0%) versus intravenous chemotherapy (5-year estimates, 41.3%; 95% CI, 36.2-46.3%, and 10-year estimates, 67.5%, 95% CI, 61.6-72.7%). In subdistribution hazards analysis, for cancer-specific mortality, intraperitoneal chemotherapy outperforms intravenous chemotherapy (Subdistribution hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96) after correcting other covariates. In conclusion, results from this comparative effectiveness study provide supportive evidence for previous published randomized trials that intraperitoneal chemotherapy

  5. Self-Advocacy Serious Game in Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-05

    Ovarian Cancer Stage III; Ovarian Cancer Stage IV; Breast Cancer Stage IV; Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB; Cervical Cancer Stage IVA; Cervical Cancer Stage IVB; Endometrial Cancer Stage III; Endometrial Cancer Stage IV; Vulvar Cancer, Stage III; Vulvar Cancer, Stage IV; Vaginal Cancer Stage III; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVA; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVB

  6. Significant reduction of normal tissue dose by proton radiotherapy compared with three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Stage I or Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Zhang Xiaodong; Wang Xiaochun; Kang Yixiu; Riley, Beverly C.; Bilton, Stephen C.; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dose-volume histograms (DVH) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by photon or proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms were compared between photon, including three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and proton plans at doses of 66 Gy, 87.5 Gy in Stage I (n = 10) and 60-63 Gy, and 74 Gy in Stage III (n 15). Results: For Stage I, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 31.8%, 24.6%, and 15.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 66 Gy, whereas they were 13.4%, 12.3%, and 10.9%, respectively, with proton with dose escalation to 87.5 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) (p = 0.002). For Stage III, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 54.1%, 46.9%, and 34.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 63 Gy, whereas they were 39.7%, 36.6%, and 31.6%, respectively, for proton with dose escalation to 74 CGE (p = 0.002). In all cases, the doses to lung, spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and integral dose were lower with proton therapy even compared with IMRT. Conclusions: Proton treatment appears to reduce dose to normal tissues significantly, even with dose escalation, compared with standard-dose photon therapy, either 3D-CRT or IMRT

  7. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2–4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2–4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2–4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2–4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  8. Polymorphisms in folate-metabolizing enzymes and response to 5-fluorouracil among patients with stage II or III rectal cancer (INT-0144; SWOG 9304).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Cornelia M; Rankin, Cathryn; Toriola, Adetunji T; Makar, Karen W; Altug-Teber, Özge; Benedetti, Jacqueline K; Holmes, Rebecca S; Smalley, Stephen R; Blanke, Charles D; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-11-01

    Recurrence and toxicity occur commonly among patients with rectal cancer who are treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The authors hypothesized that genetic variation in folate-metabolizing genes could play a role in interindividual variability. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the associations between genetic variants in folate-metabolizing genes and clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. The authors investigated 8 functionally significant polymorphisms in 6 genes (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR] [C677T, A1298C], SLC19A1 [G80A], SHMT1 [C1420T], dihydrofolate reductase [DHFR] [Del19bp], TS 1494del,and TSER) involved in folate metabolism in 745 patients with TNM stage II or III rectal cancer enrolled in a phase 3 adjuvant clinical trial of 3 regimens of 5-FU and radiotherapy (INT-0144 and SWOG 9304). There were no statistically significant associations noted between polymorphisms in any of the genes and overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity in the overall analyses. Nevertheless, there was a trend toward worse DFS among patients with the variant allele of MTHFR C677T compared with wild-type, particularly in treatment arm 2, in which patients with the MTHFR C677T TT genotype had worse overall survival (hazards ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.93 [P = .03]) and DFS (hazards ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.03 [P = .02]) compared with those with homozygous wild-type. In addition, there was a trend toward reduced hematological toxicity among patients with variants of SLC19A1 G80A in treatment arm 1 (P for trend, .06) and reduced esophagitis/stomatitis noted among patients with variants of TSER in treatment arm 3 (P for trend, .06). Genetic variability in folate-metabolizing enzymes was found to be associated only to a limited degree with clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  9. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Oberije, Cary [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Wiersma, Terry [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gy eonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); DeRuyck, Kim [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Warner, Andrew [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palma, David A. [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  10. Outcome of patients with stage III or inoperable WT treated on the second United Kingdom WT protocol (UKWT2); a United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, R G; Hutton, C; Middleton, H; Imeson, J; Pritchard, J; Kelsey, A; Marsden, H B; Vujanic, G M; Taylor, R E

    2004-04-01

    The aims of UKWT2 included consolidating the results for stage III patients obtained in UKWT1 and improving the outcome for patients with inoperable tumours by giving vincristine, actinomycin-D and doxorubicin in an intensive schedule (Intensive AVA). The second UK WT trial (UKWT2) ran between July 1986 and September 1991 accruing 448 patients. One hundred and six patients were diagnosed and treated for stage III disease. Six had clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) and seven had rhabdoid tumours of the kidney (RTK) and are analysed separately. One other patient was excluded from overall analysis. Ninety-two patients were followed for a median of 115 months. Seventy-five received standard chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy according to protocol. Seventeen had stage III disease at immediate nephrectomy, but radiotherapy was omitted by physician choice. Thirty-three patients had inoperable disease at diagnosis and received pre-nephrectomy chemotherapy. Overall survival (OS) at 4 years for stage III favourable histology (FH) patients receiving abdominal RT was 83% (CI: 73-89). For children with stage III disease in whom RT was omitted the OS was 82% (CI: 59-97) and for inoperable disease 94% (CI: 78-98). The overall and event-free survival (EFS) of children with stage III CCSK was 100% and was achieved with the majority of patients not receiving radiotherapy (CI: 48-100). Three of seven children with RTK are alive EFS and OS 43% (CI: 10-73). For patients treated by abdominal radiotherapy the overall local control rate was 94.4% (CI: 86.4-98.5*%), 96.7% (CI: 88.5-99.6%) for flank RT and 83.3% (51.6-98.0%) for whole abdominal radiotherapy (WRT). The outcome for stage III FH disease was similar to that reported for UKWT1 and NWTS-3. The combination of abdominal RT together with 3-drug chemotherapy achieves a high abdominal tumour control rate. Flank RT is probably sufficient for localised tumour rupture. The high cure rates for children in this trial with

  11. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Versmessen Harijati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. Methods A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS or mastectomy (MA were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. Results On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms, nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better

  12. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versmessen, Harijati; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Van Parijs, Hilde; Miedema, Geertje; Voordeckers, Mia; Adriaenssens, Nele; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR) and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT) have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy (MA) were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error) was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms), nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better long-term recovery from fatigue than CR patients. ANOVA

  13. DNA Topoisomerase I Gene Copy Number and mRNA Expression Assessed as Predictive Biomarkers for Adjuvant Irinotecan in Stage II/III Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Vainer, Ben; Nielsen, Signe L

    2016-01-01

    FISH and follow-up data were obtained from 534 patients. TOP1 gain was identified in 27 % using a single-probe enumeration strategy (≥ 4 TOP1 signals per cell), and in 31 % when defined by a TOP1/CEN20 ratio ≥ 1.5. The effect of additional irinotecan was not dependent on TOP1 FISH status. TOP1 m......PURPOSE: Prospective-retrospective assessment of the TOP1 gene copy number and TOP1 mRNA expression as predictive biomarkers for adjuvant irinotecan in stage II/III colon cancer (CC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays were obtained from an adjuvant CC trial...... (PETACC3) where patients were randomized to 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid with or without additional irinotecan. TOP1 copy number status was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a TOP1/CEN20 dual-probe combination. TOP1 mRNA data were available from previous analyses. RESULTS: TOP1...

  14. S-1 plus cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy versus cisplatin alone with concurrent radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lei; Xu, Shidong; Xu, Jianyu; Yang, Chaoyang; Wang, Junfeng; Sun, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation (SCCR) over cisplatin alone plus concurrent thoracic radiation (CCR) for unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between January 2009 and November 2011, 40 eligible patients with NSCLC were included and divided randomly into two groups. Twenty patients received SCCR with S-1 (orally at 40 mg/m 2 per dose, b.i.d.) on days 1 through 14, cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 on day 1) every 4 weeks for two cycles, and radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions over 6 weeks) beginning on day 1. Twenty subjects received CCR (cisplatin and radiotherapy, the same as for SCCR). The 3-year overall response rate was 59.3% and 52.4% for the SCCR and CCR groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant, while the median overall survival was 33 months (range, 4–41 months) and 24 months (range, 2–37 months), respectively (P = 0.048). The median progression-free survival was 31 months for SCCR (range, 5–39 months), whereas it was 20 months (range, 2–37 months) for CCR (P = 0.037). The toxicity profile was similar in both groups. In summary, we demonstrated that S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation was more effective than cisplatin plus radiotherapy in NSCLC patients with acceptable toxicity

  15. Clinicopathologic Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy versus Conventional Chemoradiotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting for Resectable Stages II and III Low Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess for differences in clinical, radiologic, and pathologic outcomes between patients with stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma treated neoadjuvantly with conventional external beam radiotherapy (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (EBT. Methods. Patients undergoing neoadjuvant EBT received 4 consecutive daily 6.5 Gy fractions without chemotherapy, while those undergoing 3DRT or IMRT received 28 daily 1.8 Gy fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Data was collected prospectively for 7 EBT patients and retrospectively for 25 historical 3DRT/IMRT controls. Results. Time to surgery was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P<0.001. There was a trend towards higher rate of pathologic CR for EBT (P=0.06. Rates of margin and lymph node positivity at resection were similar for all groups. Acute toxicity was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P=0.025. Overall and progression-free survival were noninferior for EBT. On MRI, EBT achieved similar complete response rate and reduction in tumor volume as 3DRT and IMRT. Histopathologic comparison showed that EBT resulted in more localized treatment effects and fewer serosal adhesions. Conclusions. EBT offers several practical benefits over conventional radiotherapy techniques and appears to be at least as effective against low rectal cancer as measured by short-term outcomes.

  16. Three Versus 6 Months of Oxaliplatin-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer: Disease-Free Survival Results From a Randomized, Open-Label, International Duration Evaluation of Adjuvant (IDEA) France, Phase III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Thierry; Vernerey, Dewi; Mineur, Laurent; Bennouna, Jaafar; Desrame, Jérôme; Faroux, Roger; Fratte, Serge; Hug de Larauze, Marine; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Chibaudel, Benoist; Bez, Jeremie; Dauba, Jérôme; Louvet, Christophe; Lepere, Céline; Dupuis, Olivier; Becouarn, Yves; Mabro, May; Egreteau, Joëlle; Bouche, Olivier; Deplanque, Gaël; Ychou, Marc; Galais, Marie Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Dourthe, Louis Marie; Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Khalil, Ahmed; Bonnetain, Franck; de Gramont, Aimery; Taieb, Julien

    2018-05-20

    Purpose Reduction of adjuvant treatment duration may decrease toxicities without loss of efficacy in stage III colon cancer. This could offer clear advantages to patients and health care providers. Methods In International Duration Evaluation of Adjuvant Chemotherapy (IDEA) France, as part of the IDEA international collaboration, patient with colon cancer patients were randomly assigned to 3 and 6 months of modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6: infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPOX) by physician choice. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS), and analyses were descriptive. Results A total of 2,010 eligible patients received either 3 or 6 months of chemotherapy (modified intention-to-treat population); 2,000 (99%) had stage III colon cancer (N1: 75%, N2: 25%); 1,809 (90%) received mFOLFOX6, and 201 (10%) received CAPOX. The median age was 64 years, and the median follow-up time was 4.3 years. Overall, 94% (3 months) and 78% (6 months) of patients completed treatment (fluoropyrimidines ± oxaliplatin). Maximal grade 2 and 3 neuropathy rates were 28% and 8% in the 3-month arm and 41% and 25% in the 6-month arm ( P < .001). Final rates of residual neuropathy greater than grade 1 were 3% in the 3-month arm and 7% in the 6-month arm ( P < .001). There were 578 DFS events: 314 and 264 in the 3- and 6-month arms, respectively. The 3-year DFS rates were 72% and 76% in the 3- and 6-month arms, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.46; P = .0112). In the 3 and 6-month arms, respectively, for patients who received mFOLFOX6, the 3-year DFS rates were 72% and 76% (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.51); for the T4 and/or N2 population, they were 58% and 66% (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.82); and for the T1-3N1 population, they were 81% and 83% (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.49). Conclusion IDEA France, in which 90% of patients received mFOLFOX6, shows superiority of 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy compared

  17. Adjuvant post-operative radiotherapy vs radiotherapy plus 5-FU and levamisole in patients with TNM stage II-III resectable rectal cancer. A phase III randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cafiero, F.; Gipponi, M.; Di Somma, C. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Geneo (Italy). Istituto di Oncologia Clinica] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Loco-regional and distant relapses contribute to impair the outcome of rectal cancer patients. As to the former, either pre-or post-operative radiation therapy (RT) significantly reduce loco-regional recurrence; post-operative chemotherapy (CT), alone or in different combinations with RT, is effective in improving both disease-free survival and survival. However, many drawbacks still exist regarding the method of RT delivery as well as the toxicity of combination adjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of this trial is to assess the effectiveness and toxicity of adjuvant post-operative RT vs combined RT and CT (5-FU plus levamisole) in patients with TNM stage II-III resectable rectal cancer (pT3-4, pN0, M0; pT1-4, pN1-3, M0). The primary endpoint is overall survival; secondary endpoints are disease-free survival rate of loco-regional recurrence, and treatment-related toxicity/morbidity. (author).

  18. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  19. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non–small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non–small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade ≥4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade ≥3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  20. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  1. Failure of misonidazole-sensitized radiotherapy to impact upon outcome among stage III-IV squamous cancers of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazekas, J.; Pajak, T.F.; Wasserman, T.; Marcial, V.; Davis, L.; Kramer, S.; Rotman, M.; Stetz, J.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the RTOG research effort in the treatment of advanced, inoperable squamous cancer of the head and neck region, the hypoxic cell sensitizer, misonidazole, was selected for investigation as an adjuvant to definitive irradiation. Based upon a pilot experience (78-02) showing a 67% complete response rate among 36 AJC Stage III-IV patients receiving full-dose irradiation and 6 weekly p.o. doses of misonidazole, a phase III trial was carried out from '79-'83. Three hundred and six patients were entered, 42% of whom had oropharyngeal primaries and with 78% of all cases representing T3 or T4 (inoperable) lesions. Only 16% of the entire series presented with N0 necks. Fractionation was altered among the misonidazole-receiving patients, in contrast to standard 5 treatments per week among control patients, such that 2 separate treatments were given on each day of p.o. misonidazole administration (2.0 gm/m2/wk X 6 doses, 2.5 Gy in a.m., 2.1 Gy in p.m.). Total tumor doses were identical among the two treatment arms except that a limitation of 40.0 Gy to spinal cord was specified for sensitized radiotherapy vs. 45.0 Gy for control patients. Primary tumor clearance was observed to be 55-60%, with minor variations according to tumor stage and site. The local regional control rate among radiotherapy-alone patients was 26% at 2 years compared to 22% (2 years) within the misonidazole-receiving group. Analysis of survival revealed no advantage to the sensitized patients, with 55 +/- 2% surviving 1 year and 22 +/- 1% living 3 years following treatment in both treatment categories. Distant metastases as first site of failure (12-13%) and the local failure among initial complete responders (46%) showed no advantage to the misonidazole group. Although a misonidazole dosage of 2.0 gm/m2/wk X 6 (12 gm/m2 total) is well tolerated, no clinical benefit was demonstrated in this randomized trial

  2. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tatsuya [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Takegawa, Hideki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Anneyuko I. [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Korevaar, Erik W., E-mail: e.w.korevaar@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D{sub 2} − D{sub 98}, where D{sub 2} and D{sub 98} are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to <98% (clinical threshold) in 3 of 10 patients for robust 5-mm evaluations. However, the TC remained >98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range

  3. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  4. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  5. ERCC2 2251A>C genetic polymorphism was highly correlated with early relapse in high-risk stage II and stage III colorectal cancer patients: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Chen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early relapse in colorectal cancer (CRC patients is attributed mainly to the higher malignant entity (such as an unfavorable genotype, deeper tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis and advance cancer stage and poor response to chemotherapy. Several investigations have demonstrated that genetic polymorphisms in drug-targeted genes, metabolizing enzymes, and DNA-repairing enzymes are all strongly correlated with inter-individual differences in the efficacy and toxicity of many treatment regimens. This preliminary study attempts to identify the correlation between genetic polymorphisms and clinicopathological features of CRC, and evaluates the relationship between genetic polymorphisms and chemotherapeutic susceptibility of Taiwanese CRC patients. To our knowledge, this study discusses, for the first time, early cancer relapse and its indication by multiple genes. Methods Six gene polymorphisms functional in drug-metabolism – GSTP1 Ile105Val, ABCB1 Ile1145Ile, MTHFR Ala222Val, TYMS double (2R or triple (3R tandem repeat – and DNA-repair genes – ERCC2 Lys751Gln and XRCC1 Arg399Gln – were assessed in 201 CRC patients using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique and DNA sequencing. Patients were diagnosed as either high-risk stage II (T2 and 3 N0 M0 or III (any T N1 and 2 M0 and were administered adjuvant chemotherapy regimens that included 5-fluorouracil (5FU and leucovorin (LV. The correlations between genetic polymorphisms and patient clinicopathological features and relapses were investigated. Results In this study, the distributions of GSTP1 (P = 0.003, ABCB1 (P = 0.001, TYMS (P ERCC2 (P XRCC1 (P = 0.006 genotypes in the Asian population, with the exception of MTHFR (P = 0.081, differed significantly from their distributions in a Caucasian population. However, the unfavorable genotype ERCC2 2251A>C (P = 0.006, tumor invasion depth (P = 0.025, lymph node metastasis (P = 0

  6. Impact of low skeletal muscle mass and density on short and long-term outcome after resection of stage I-III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, Jeroen L A; Coebergh van den Braak, Robert R J; Lalmahomed, Zarina S; Vrijland, Wietske W; Dekker, Jan W T; Zimmerman, David D E; Vles, Wouter J; Coene, Peter-Paul L O; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2018-06-06

    Preoperative low skeletal muscle mass and density are associated with increased postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing curative colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery. However, the long-term effects of low skeletal muscle mass and density remain uncertain. Patients with stage I-III CRC undergoing surgery, enrolled in a prospective observational cohort study, were included. Skeletal muscle mass and density were measured on CT. Patients with high and low skeletal muscle mass and density were compared regarding postoperative complications, disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). In total, 816 patients (53.9% males, median age 70) were included; 50.4% had low skeletal muscle mass and 64.1% low density. The severe postoperative complication rate was significantly higher in patients with low versus high skeletal muscle and density (20.9% versus 13.6%, p = 0.006; 20.0% versus 11.8%, p = 0.003). Low skeletal muscle mass (OR 1.91, p = 0.018) and density (OR 1.87, p = 0.045) were independently associated with severe postoperative complications. Ninety-day mortality was higher in patients with low skeletal muscle mass and density compared with patients with high skeletal muscle mass and density (3.6% versus 1.7%, p = 0.091; 3.4% versus 1.0%, p = 0.038). No differences in DFS were observed. After adjustment for covariates such as age and comorbidity, univariate differences in OS and CSS diminished. Low skeletal muscle mass and density are associated with short-term, but not long-term, outcome in patients undergoing CRC surgery. These findings recommend putting more emphasis on preoperative management of patients at risk for surgical complications, but do not support benefit for long-term outcome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Cisplatin and etoposide versus carboplatin and paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: an analysis of Veterans Health Administration data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Davila, Rafael; Devisetty, Kiran; Szabo, Aniko; Sparapani, Rodney; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Gore, Elizabeth M; Moran, Amy; Williams, Christina D; Kelley, Michael J; Whittle, Jeffrey

    2015-02-20

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen to use with radiotherapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer is unknown. Here, we compare the outcome of patents treated within the Veterans Health Administration with either etoposide-cisplatin (EP) or carboplatin-paclitaxel (CP). We identified patients treated with EP and CP with concurrent radiotherapy from 2001 to 2010. Survival rates were compared using Cox proportional hazards regression models with adjustments for confounding provided by propensity score methods and an instrumental variables analysis. Comorbidities and treatment complications were identified through administrative data. A total of 1,842 patients were included; EP was used in 27% (n = 499). Treatment with EP was not associated with a survival advantage in a Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio [HR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10), a propensity score matched cohort (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.24), or a propensity score adjusted model (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10). In an instrumental variables analysis, there was no survival advantage for patients treated in centers where EP was used more than 50% of the time as compared with centers where EP was used in less than 10% of the patients (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.26). Patients treated with EP, compared with patients treated with CP, had more hospitalizations (2.4 v 1.7 hospitalizations, respectively; P kidney disease/dehydration (30.5% v 21.2%, respectively; P patients treated with EP versus CP had similar overall survival, but EP was associated with increased morbidity. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Hanna, Gerard G; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; Harrow, Stephen; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil; Faivre-Finn, Corinne

    2016-04-15

    The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of 'isotoxic' radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West-Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. NCT01836692; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  10. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuruta A

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Atsushi Tsuruta,1,* Kazuki Yamashita,2,* Hiroaki Tanioka,3 Akihito Tsuji,4,5 Michio Inukai,6 Toshiki Yamakawa,7 Tomoki Yamatsuji,8 Masanori Yoshimitsu,9 Kazuhiro Toyota,10 Taketoshi Yamano,11 Takeshi Nagasaka,12 Masazumi Okajima13 On behalf of the Japan Southwest Oncology Group (JSWOG 1Department of Digestive Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School Hospital, 2Department of Surgery, 3Department of Medical Oncology, Okayama Rosai Hospital, Okayama, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, 5Department of Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University Hospital, Kagawa, 6Department of Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital, Okayama, 7Department of Surgery, Kagawa Prefectural Central Hospital, Takamatsu, 8Department of General Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, 9Department of Surgery, Hiroshima City Asa Hospital, Hiroshima, 10Department of Surgery, National Hospital Organization Higashihirosima Medical Center, Higashihiroshima, 11Department of Surgery, Kurashiki Medical Center, 12Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, 13Department of Surgery, Hiroshima City Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients and methods: Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were

  11. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  12. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-14

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC V6 and v7; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  14. Stages of Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  15. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Staging Lung Cancer: Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Girish S; Viswanathan, Chitra; Carter, Brett W; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Truong, Mylene T; Sabloff, Bradley S

    2018-05-01

    The updated eighth edition of the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) classification for lung cancer includes revisions to T and M descriptors. In terms of the M descriptor, the classification of intrathoracic metastatic disease as M1a is unchanged from TNM-7. Extrathoracic metastatic disease, which was classified as M1b in TNM-7, is now subdivided into M1b (single metastasis, single organ) and M1c (multiple metastases in one or multiple organs) descriptors. In this article, the rationale for changes in the M descriptors, the utility of preoperative staging with PET/computed tomography, and the treatment options available for patients with oligometastatic disease are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Broncho-pulmonary toxicity in stage III non small cell lung cancer patients treated with taxol containing chemotherapy and concurrent preoperative or definitive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M. Maddie; Gupta-Burt, Shalina; Recine, Diane C.; Faber, L. Penfield; Warren, William H.; LaFollette, Suzanne; Lincoln, Sarah T.; Bonomi, Philip D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The objective of this trial was to test the feasibility of taxol containing combination chemotherapy and concurrent radiation as preoperative or definitive treatment for stage III non small cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients were treated on this trial. The initial regimen was (Group 1 pts.): paraplatin (P) (AUC of 4) on day 2, etoposide (E) 50 mg po days 1-5 and 8-12, cisplatin (C) 50 mg/m2 on day 21 and taxol (T) 35 mg/m2 escalated to 45 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, 24 hr. infusion. After treatment of 10 pts., the regimen was modified as follows (Group 2 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1, E 40 mg/m2 IV daily and days 2-5, and T 80 mg/m2 escalated to 120 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. After the next 16 pts., the regimen was modified again as follows (Group 3 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1 and T 120 mg/m2 escalated to 140 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. Seven patients were treated on the latest version of the regimen for a total of 33 pts. The radiation given was uniform throughout the 3 groups. A dose of 4000 cGy in 20 fxs was given in the surgical arm and 6000 cGy in 30 fxs in the non surgical arm. Treatments were given at 200 cGy/fx. once a day, on a 2 weeks on, 2 weeks off basis. The RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria was used to grade pneumonitis. Post-operative complications were defined as occurring early (less than or equal to 30 days) or late (greater than 30 days) following surgery. Results: Sixteen of the 33 patients went to surgery. Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis developed in 4 of the 33 patients (12%). There were no episodes of Grade 4 pneumonitis. Grade 3 pneumonitis occured in: One patient in Group 1, (RT dose 5800 cGy), 2 pts in Group 2 (RT dose 4000 cGy and 6000 cGy, respectively), and 1 pt in Group 3 (RT dose 6000 cGy). Major post-operative complications occurred in 6 of the 16 patients (37.5%) who went to surgery. In Group 1, 1 pt. required oxygen supplementation secondary to a significant

  18. Radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy in lung cancer. A retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, D. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano (Milan) (Italy); De Rose, F.; Navarria, P.; Clerici, E.; Franzese, C.; Comito, T.; Tozzi, A.; Iftode, C.; D' Agostino, G. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Cozzi, L.; Sorsetti, M. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Milan (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    This study aimed to analyse the feasibility and acute toxicity of radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy (RT) for elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We conducted a retrospective evaluation of treatment with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of elderly patients affected by stage III inoperable NSCLC. The dose prescription was 56 Gy in 20 fractions, 55 Gy in 22 fractions, or 50 Gy in 20 fractions. Target volume included only the primary lesion and the infiltrated lymph nodes. The primary end point was acute and late toxicity, while secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In all, 41 patients were included in this analysis. The mean age of the patients was 78.6 years, and 22 patients had staged IIIA while 19 patients had stage IIIB disease. All but one patient had pathological nodal involvement; 15 patients received chemotherapy before RT. Acute grade 1-2 toxicity was recorded in 25 (61%) patients. Late toxicity was recorded in 13 (32%) patients. No cases of G3 or G4 toxicity were recorded. Complete response was obtained in two (5%) patients, 26 (63%) showed a partial response, and two (5%) experience disease progression. At a mean follow-up of 9.9 months (range, 1.1-25.4), 17 patients had died from disease progression, one died from other causes, and 23 were alive. Median OS was 13.7 ± 1.5 months (95% CI: 10.7-16.7), OS at 12 and 18 months was 51.3 ± 9.5% and 35.1 ± 10.1%, respectively. Median PFS was 13.7 ± 2.3 months (95% CI: 9.1-18.2), and PFS at 12 and 18 months was 50.1 ± 9.9% and 38.9 ± 10.4%, respectively. Radical hypo-fractionated VMAT is a promising treatment for locally advanced NSCLC in the elderly. The use of hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for lung cancer in older patients can be considered a valuable approach, particularly for patients with poor performance status or refusing other treatment approaches. (orig.) [German] Durchfuehrbarkeit und Nebenwirkungen der radikalen

  19. Risk and predictors for early radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent or sequential chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Zang, Shuang; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The rate of radiation pneumonitis (RP) for patients receiving chemoradiotherapy has been various across studies. Whether it is related to different chemotherapy schedules used in combination with radiation therapy were evaluated in this study. New factors associated with RP were also investigated. A total of 369 consecutive patients with Stage III non small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy were followed after radiotherapy (RT). Among them 262 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy and 107 patients received only sequential chemotherapy after RT. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The rate of grade ≥ 2 were 39.7%, 31% and 33.6% in the concurrent DP (docetaxel/cisplatin), concurrent NP (vinorelbine/cisplatin) and sequential group, and grade ≥ 3 RP were 18.4%, 9.5%, and 11.2% respectively. The rate of grade ≥ 3 RP was significantly higher in concurrent DP group than that in concurrent NP group (p = 0.04). RP occurred earlier in concurrent DP group than that in the other two groups. There were no significant differences in response rate among the three groups. In the multivariate analysis, age (OR = 1.99, p = 0.038 and OR = 8.90, p < 0.001), chemotherapy schedule (OR = 1.45, p = 0.041 and OR = 1.98, p = 0.013), mean lung dose(OR = 1.42, p < 0.001 and OR = 1.64, p < 0.001), and planning target volume(OR = 1.004, p = 0.001 and OR = 1.005, p = 0.021) were predictors for both grade ≥ 2 and grade ≥ 3 RP. Response to treatment was a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP only (OR = 4.39, p = 0.034). Response to treatment was found to be a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP. Compared to concurrent NP schedule, concurrent DP schedule achieved similar response to treatment but resulted in a higher risk of grade ≥ 3 RP

  20. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-Random iced for Adjuvant Chemotherapy vs. Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do

    1993-01-01

    Since Jan. 1991 a prospective randomized study for Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) has been conducted to evaluate the response rate and tolerance of induction chemotherapy with MVP followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy and evaluate the efficacy of maintenance chemotherapy in Asan Medical Center. All patients in this study were treated with hypefractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID, 0480 cGy/54 fx) following 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy, MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m2, Vinblastin B mg/ m2, Cisplatin 60 Mg/ m2) and then the partial and complete responders from induction chemotherapy were randomized to 3 cycles of adjuvant MVP chemotherapy group and observation group. 48 patients were registered to this study until December 1992; among 48 patients 3 refused further treatment after induction chemotherapy and 6 received incomplete radiation therapy because of patient refusal, 39 completed planned therapy. Twenty-three(58%) patients including 2 complete responders showed response from induction chemotherapy. Among the 21 patients who achieved a partial response after induction chemotherapy, 1 patient rendered complete clearance of disease and 10 patients showed further regression of tumor following hypefractionated radiotherapy. Remaining 10 patients showed stable disease or progression after radiotherapy. Of the sixteen patients judged to have stable disease or progression after induction chemotherapy, seven showed more than partial remission after radiotherapy but nine showed no response in spite of radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients who completed induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 25 patients(64%) including 3 complete responders showed more than partial remission. Nineteen patients were randomized after radiotherapy. Nine patients were allocated to adjuvant chemotherapy group and 4/9 shewed further regression of tumor after adjuvant chemotherapy. For the time being, there is no suggestion of a difference between the adjuvant

  1. Dilemmas in Lung Cancer Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Ioannis

    2018-05-01

    The advent of the 8th edition of the lung cancer staging system reflects a further meticulous evidence-based advance in the stratification of the survival of patients with lung cancer. Although addressing many limitations of earlier staging systems, several limitations in staging remain. This article reviews from a radiological perspective the limitations of the current staging system, highlighting the process of TNM restructuring, the residual issues with regards to the assignment of T, N, M descriptors, and their associated stage groupings and how these dilemmas impact guidance of multidisciplinary teams taking care of patients with lung cancer. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  3. Pooled Analysis of Individual Patient Data on Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Elderly Patients Compared With Younger Patients Who Participated in US National Cancer Institute Cooperative Group Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Zhang, Ying; Vokes, Everett E; Schiller, Joan H; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Karen; Curran, Walter J; Schild, Steven E; Movsas, Benjamin; Clamon, Gerald; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Blumenschein, George R; Socinski, Mark A; Ready, Neal E; Akerley, Wallace L; Cohen, Harvey J; Pang, Herbert H; Wang, Xiaofei

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Elderly patients may experience increased rates of adverse events (AEs) or less benefit from concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods Individual patient data were collected from 16 phase II or III trials conducted by US National Cancer Institute-supported cooperative groups of concurrent chemoradiotherapy alone or with consolidation or induction chemotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer from 1990 to 2012. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and AEs were compared between patients age ≥ 70 (elderly) and those younger than 70 years (younger). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for survival time and CIs were estimated by single-predictor and multivariable frailty Cox models. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratio (ORs) for AEs and CIs were obtained from single-predictor and multivariable generalized linear mixed-effect models. Results A total of 2,768 patients were classified as younger and 832 as elderly. In unadjusted and multivariable models, elderly patients had worse OS (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.31 and HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.29, respectively). In unadjusted and multivariable models, elderly and younger patients had similar progression-free survival (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.10 and HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.09, respectively). Elderly patients had a higher rate of grade ≥ 3 AEs in unadjusted and multivariable models (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.70 and OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.74, respectively). Grade 5 AEs were significantly higher in elderly compared with younger patients (9% v 4%; P < .01). Fewer elderly compared with younger patients completed treatment (47% v 57%; P < .01), and more discontinued treatment because of AEs (20% v 13%; P < .01), died during treatment (7.8% v 2.9%; P < .01), and refused further treatment (5.8% v 3.9%; P = .02). Conclusion Elderly patients in concurrent

  4. Roll of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Kidney cancer. Stage III. Results to 5 years. Observational, descriptive, retrospective, quantitative and comparative study with data numerical description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lione, M.; Tissera, N.; Mandachain, M.

    2007-01-01

    Kidney cancer represents 3 % of the tumors in adults. In the United States, the 45% is diagnosed in early stages. Its natural history is characterized for being absolutely unpredictable and probably related to hormonal, immunologic and unknown factors. There are patients in advanced stage with prolonged or low average survival and even with metastasis declination. These particularities along with the lack of prospective random studies make difficult to establish which is the roll of the adjuvant radiotherapy, being considered not standard since 1997 [es

  5. GILT - A randomised phase III study of oral vinorelbine and cisplatin with concomitant radiotherapy followed by either consolidation therapy with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin or best supportive care alone in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Wuerzburg (Germany); Huber, Rudolf M. [University Hospital Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL CPC-M), Munich (Germany); Engel-Riedel, Walburga [University Hospital Merheim, Dept. of Pneumonology, Cologne (Germany); Andreas, Stefan [Dept. of Pneumonology, Immenhausen (Germany); Kollmeier, Jens [Helios Emil-von-Behring Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Staar, Susanne [Municipal Hospital Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Dickgreber, Nicolas [University Hospital Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Vaissiere, Nathalie; Almeida, Cecilia de [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Boulogne (France); Edlich, Birgit [Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is considered standard for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consolidation chemotherapy (CC) following CRT is intended to further improve outcomes, yet studies have shown discordant results. This phase III study assessed CRT followed by best supportive care (BSC) or consolidation with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin. Patients received two cycles of oral vinorelbine (50 mg/m{sup 2} days 1, 8 and 15) + cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} days 1-4) q4w + radiotherapy (RT; 66 Gy). Patients with at least stable disease (SD) were randomised to either two cycles oral vinorelbine (60-80 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 and 8) + cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} day 1) q3w + BSC or BSC alone. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 279 patients were enrolled for CRT and 201 patients were randomised to CC or BSC. Both CRT and CC were well tolerated, with limited radiation-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC/BSC: oesophagitis-related events 12.9 %/3.1 %/0 %; grade 3 pneumonitis 0 %/0 %/2 %) and chemotherapy-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC: neutropenia 11.2 %/22.1 %; leukopenia 18.3 %/26.7 %; grade 3 nausea 5.0 %/2.3 %, grade 3 vomiting 3.2 %/3.5 %). Median PFS from randomisation was 6.4 (5.0-8.7) and 5.5 (3.8-7.4) months in the CC and BSC arms (hazard ratio, HR = 0.93 [0.69-1.26]; p = 0.63), respectively; median overall survival (OS) 20.8 (13.5-25.3) and 18.5 (13.6-24.7) months, respectively. Consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent CRT did not prolong PFS or OS. Concurrent RT with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin demonstrated a favourable safety profile and represents a suitable treatment regimen for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Simultane Radiochemotherapie (CRT) wird als Standardtherapie beim inoperablen Stadium III des nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) angesehen. Konsolidierende Chemotherapie (CC) nach der CRT zielt darauf ab, das Therapieergebnis zu verbessern, allerdings zeigen Studien

  6. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  7. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is found early. Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer include vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by cervical cancer or by other conditions . Check with your ...

  8. Correlation of F-18 FDG PET with morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced (stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Bonnet, R.; Presselt, N.; Przetak, C.; Junker, K.; Schneider, C.P.; Hoeffken, K.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To determine the role of 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, findings in 32 patients were analyzed prospectively in an ongoing multicenter trial (LUCAS-MD, Germany). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria was histologically confirmed NSCLC stage IIIA/IIIB. For staging all patients received a PET scan in addition to a spiral CT and/or MRI before therapy. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of chemotherapy with paclitaxel (225 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6), each d1 q22 and a block of chemoradiation (45Gy, 1.5Gy b.i.d., concomitant with paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC = 2), each d1, d8, d15) followed by surgery. All patients received a second PET after completion of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Whole-body PET (ECAT Exact 47) studies (attenuation corrected, iteratively reconstructed) were obtained 60 min. after injection of 6 MBq/kg body weight F-18 FDG. For semi-quantitative analysis, the tumor standardized uptake values (SUV), the tumor to background SUV ratio (T/B ratio), the metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and the metabolic tumor index (MTI = SUV x MTD) were assessed in all primary tumors and in metastatic lymph nodes. Additionally, image fusion of PET with CT data was applied (using a HERMES Computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden). Results: So far, all patients (7/32) with complete metabolic response in lymph node metastases detected by PET, had no vital tumor cells (morphometric regression grade III). In primary tumors showing complete metabolic response, the regression grade was IIB (less than 10% vital tumor cells) or III. Conclusion: Morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. PET precedes the tumor response as measured by CT after neoadjuvant treatment and may predict the long term therapeutic outcome in stage III NSCLC

  9. A Phase III Trial Comparing Two Dose-dense, Dose-intensified Approaches (ETC and PM(Cb)) for Neoadjuvant Treatment of Patients With High-risk Early Breast Cancer (GeparOcto)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; HER2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  10. Mature Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing 5-Flourouracil with Leucovorin to 5-Flourouracil with Levamisole as Adjuvant Therapy of Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer- The Israel Cooperative Oncology Group (ICOG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Figer, Aviram Nissan, Adi Shani, Riva Borovick, Mariana Stiener, Mario Baras, Herbert R. Freund, Aaron Sulkes, Alexander Stojadinovic, Tamar Peretz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was shown in patients with Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. This study evaluates long-term (10-year outcome in patients with CRC randomly assigned to adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5FU+LV or 5-FU/Levamisole (5FU+LEV.Methods: Between 1990 and 1995, 398 patients with curatively resected Stage II-III CRC were randomly assigned to adjuvant 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV for 12 months.Results: No difference was evident in 10-year relapse-free or overall survival between study groups. Grade III toxicity was similar between groups; however, neurotoxicity was significantly greater with 5FU+LEV (p=0.02 and gastrointestinal toxicity with 5FU+LV (p=0.03. Female patients treated with 5FU+LEV had improved overall survival.Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment of CRC is still based on leucovorin modulated fluorouracil. The long-term follow-up results of this trial indicate that the adjuvant treatment of Stage II-III CRC with 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV is equally effective. The finding of improved survival in female subjects treated with 5FU+LEV warrants further study to determine if Levamisole is a better modulator of 5-FU than Leucovorin in this patient subset.

  11. Prognostic value of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels for patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    1998-01-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) levels have been reported to be useful as prognostic factors, indicators of clinical response, and predictors for recurrence in patients with lung cancer treated by surgery or chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were useful as independent prognostic factors in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy alone. The serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured in 158 and 47 patients, respectively, before radiation therapy. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured by sandwich radioimmunoassay using the CEA-RIA (radioimmunoassay) kit and the SCC-RIA kit. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were above reference values in 19% and 30% of the patients, respectively. The 5-year survival rates were significantly better for patients with a negative SCC Ag result than for those with positive SCC Ag levels (p=0.0001), though no significant difference in survival rates was seen by CEA positivity (p=0.25). SCC Ag positivity (p=0.0006) and stage (p=0.04) were the important prognostic factors, as determined by multivariate analyses. Pretreatment serum SCC Ag level may be useful as an independent prognostic factor in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who are treated with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  12. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Masaharu; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade ≥3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC

  13. Phase II Trial of Combined Modality Therapy With Concurrent Topotecan Plus Radiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy for Unresectable Stage III and Selected Stage IV Non-Small-Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung, Steven K.; Ross, Helen J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and the role of consolidation chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unknown. Topotecan is active against NSCLC, can safely be combined with RT at effective systemic doses, and can be given by continuous infusion, making it an attractive study agent against locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In this pilot study, 20 patients were treated with infusion topotecan 0.4 mg/m 2 /d with three-dimensional conformal RT to 63 Gy both delivered Monday through Friday for 7 weeks. Patients without progression underwent consolidation chemotherapy with etoposide and a platinum agent for one cycle followed by two cycles of docetaxel. The study endpoints were treatment response, time to progression, survival, and toxicity. Results: Of the 20 patients, 19 completed induction chemoradiotherapy and 13 completed consolidation. Of the 20 patients, 18 had a partial response and 1 had stable disease after induction chemoradiotherapy. The 3-year overall survival rate was 32% (median, 18 months). The local and distant progression-free survival rate was 30% (median, 21 months) and 58% (median, not reached), respectively. Three patients developed central nervous system metastases, 1 within 228 days, 1 within 252 days, and 1 within 588 days. Three patients had pulmonary emboli. Therapy was well tolerated with 1 of 20 developing Grade 4 lymphopenia. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was seen in 17 of 20 patients but was not clinically significant. Other Grade 3 toxicities included esophagitis in 3, esophageal stricture in 2, fatigue in 8, and weight loss in 1. Grade 3 pneumonitis occurred in 6 of 20 patients. Conclusion: Continuous infusion topotecan with RT was well tolerated and active in the treatment of poor-risk patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC

  14. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy combined with daily cisplatin in stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scolaro, T; Ardizzoni, A; Giudici, S; Grossi, F; Cosso, M; Pennucci, M C; Bacigalupo, A; Rosso, R; Vitale, V

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: Results of radical radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC can be improved by either concurrent daily low-dose Cisplatin as radiosensitizer (Shaake-Koning, N Engl J Med, 1992; 326: 524) or by using neoadiuvant chemotherapy (Dillman, N Engl J Med, 1990; 323: 940). The aim of present study was to evaluate the activity and feasibility of a new chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) regimen in which both strategies of RT improvement will be used. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (pts) were treated with induction CT (Cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. day 1,22 + Vinblastine 5 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. day 1,8,15,22,29) followed by RT (60 Gy/30 fractions in 6 wks) combined with Cisplatin 5 mg/m{sup 2} daily before RT. Patients' characteristics were: 29 pts were male and 1 female; median age 60.5 yrs (range 44-69); median PS 1 (range 0-1); 21 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma; stage III A in 9 pts and stage IIIB in 21 pts. Results: Twenty-three pts were evaluable for RT plus daily Cisplatin toxicity and 29 for CT toxicity (according to WHO). For RT plus daily cisplatin hematological toxicity consisted of grade III leukopenia in 22%, grade III anemia 9% and grade III thrombocytopenia in 9% of pts. Only 2 patients developed severe esophagitis. Only one case of radiation pneumonitis was reported. For induction CT hematological toxicity consisted of grade III-IV leukopenia in 31%, grade II anemia 10% and grade IV thrombocitopenia in 14% of cases. Non-hematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade I peripheral neuropaty and occured in 17% of pts. One case of minor hearing loss and 4 cases of tinnitus were observed at the end of treatment. Twenty-seven pts were evaluable for response. Response rate was 59% with 7 CRs (26%) and 9 PRs (33%); 1 patient had SD (4%), 5 pts PD (20%) and 5 pts (19%) died early (3 for early progression, 1 for toxicity and 1 for cardiac failure). All pts with CR are still alive with a median event-free survival of 23.9 months (range 12

  15. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy combined with daily cisplatin in stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scolaro, T.; Ardizzoni, A.; Giudici, S.; Grossi, F.; Cosso, M.; Pennucci, M.C.; Bacigalupo, A.; Rosso, R.; Vitale, V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Results of radical radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC can be improved by either concurrent daily low-dose Cisplatin as radiosensitizer (Shaake-Koning, N Engl J Med, 1992; 326: 524) or by using neoadiuvant chemotherapy (Dillman, N Engl J Med, 1990; 323: 940). The aim of present study was to evaluate the activity and feasibility of a new chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) regimen in which both strategies of RT improvement will be used. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (pts) were treated with induction CT (Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,22 + Vinblastine 5 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,8,15,22,29) followed by RT (60 Gy/30 fractions in 6 wks) combined with Cisplatin 5 mg/m 2 daily before RT. Patients' characteristics were: 29 pts were male and 1 female; median age 60.5 yrs (range 44-69); median PS 1 (range 0-1); 21 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma; stage III A in 9 pts and stage IIIB in 21 pts. Results: Twenty-three pts were evaluable for RT plus daily Cisplatin toxicity and 29 for CT toxicity (according to WHO). For RT plus daily cisplatin hematological toxicity consisted of grade III leukopenia in 22%, grade III anemia 9% and grade III thrombocytopenia in 9% of pts. Only 2 patients developed severe esophagitis. Only one case of radiation pneumonitis was reported. For induction CT hematological toxicity consisted of grade III-IV leukopenia in 31%, grade II anemia 10% and grade IV thrombocitopenia in 14% of cases. Non-hematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade I peripheral neuropaty and occured in 17% of pts. One case of minor hearing loss and 4 cases of tinnitus were observed at the end of treatment. Twenty-seven pts were evaluable for response. Response rate was 59% with 7 CRs (26%) and 9 PRs (33%); 1 patient had SD (4%), 5 pts PD (20%) and 5 pts (19%) died early (3 for early progression, 1 for toxicity and 1 for cardiac failure). All pts with CR are still alive with a median event-free survival of 23.9 months (range 12.3-41.9). Actuarial

  16. Hope for progress after 40 years of futility? Novel approaches in the treatment of advanced stage III and IV non-small-cell-lung cancer: Stereotactic body radiation therapy, mediastinal lymphadenectomy, and novel systemic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fung Kee Fung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a leading cause of cancer mortality. The majority of patients present with advanced (stage III-IV disease. Such patients are treated with a variety of therapies including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite decades of work, however, overall survival in this group has been resistant to any substantial improvement. This review briefly details the evolution to the current standard of care for advanced NSCLC, advances in systemic therapy, and novel techniques (stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT], and transcervical extended mediastinal lymphadenectomy [TEMLA] or video-assisted mediastinal lymphadenectomy [VAMLA] that have been used in localized NSCLC. The utility of these techniques in advanced stage therapy and potential methods of combining these novel techniques with systemic therapy to improve survival are discussed.

  17. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb. The cancer may occur as soon as 5 years ... thyroid cancer, drugs may be given to prevent the body from making thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone that can ...

  18. Stages of Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... outside of the body. This is called a colostomy . Lymph nodes that contain cancer may also be ... this operation. Enlarge Resection of the colon with colostomy. Part of the colon containing the cancer and ...

  19. Prolonged Survival in Stage III Melanoma with Ipilimumab Adjuvant Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Grob, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    undergone complete resection of stage III melanoma. Methods After patients had undergone complete resection of stage III cutaneous melanoma, we randomly assigned them to receive ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram (475 patients) or placebo (476) every 3 weeks for four doses, then every 3 months...

  20. Recommendations for implementing stereotactic radiotherapy in peripheral stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: report from the Quality Assurance Working Party of the randomised phase III ROSEL study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W; Cuijpers, Johan P; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A van der; Schuring, Danny; Senan, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    A phase III multi-centre randomised trial (ROSEL) has been initiated to establish the role of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with operable stage IA lung cancer. Due to rapid changes in radiotherapy technology and evolving techniques for image-guided delivery, guidelines had to be developed in order to ensure uniformity in implementation of stereotactic radiotherapy in this multi-centre study. A Quality Assurance Working Party was formed by radiation oncologists and clinical physicists from both academic as well as non-academic hospitals that had already implemented stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer. A literature survey was conducted and consensus meetings were held in which both the knowledge from the literature and clinical experience were pooled. In addition, a planning study was performed in 26 stage I patients, of which 22 were stage 1A, in order to develop and evaluate the planning guidelines. Plans were optimised according to parameters adopted from RTOG trials using both an algorithm with a simple homogeneity correction (Type A) and a more advanced algorithm (Type B). Dose conformity requirements were then formulated based on these results. Based on current literature and expert experience, guidelines were formulated for this phase III study of stereotactic radiotherapy versus surgery. These guidelines can serve to facilitate the design of future multi-centre clinical trials of stereotactic radiotherapy in other patient groups and aid a more uniform implementation of this technique outside clinical trials

  1. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score in NSABP C-07 as a predictor of recurrence in patients with stage II and III colon cancer treated with fluorouracil and leucovorin (FU/LV) and FU/LV plus oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Clark-Langone, Kim M; Millward, Carl; Paik, Soonmyung; Sharif, Saima; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-12-20

    Accurate assessments of recurrence risk and absolute treatment benefit are needed to inform colon cancer adjuvant therapy. The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay has been validated in patients with stage II colon cancer from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9581 and Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) trials. We conducted an independent, prospectively designed clinical validation study of Recurrence Score, with prespecified end points and analysis plan, in archival specimens from patients with stage II and III colon cancer randomly assigned to fluorouracil (FU) or FU plus oxaliplatin in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-07. Recurrence Score was assessed in 892 fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens (randomly selected 50% of patients with tissue). Data were analyzed by Cox regression adjusting for stage and treatment. Continuous Recurrence Score predicted recurrence (hazard ratio for a 25-unit increase in score, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.55; P < .001), as well as disease-free and overall survival (both P < .001). Recurrence Score predicted recurrence risk (P = .001) after adjustment for stage, mismatch repair, nodes examined, grade, and treatment. Recurrence Score did not have significant interaction with stage (P = .90) or age (P = .76). Relative benefit of oxaliplatin was similar across the range of Recurrence Score (interaction P = .48); accordingly, absolute benefit of oxaliplatin increased with higher scores, most notably in patients with stage II and IIIA/B disease. The 12-gene Recurrence Score predicts recurrence risk in stage II and stage III colon cancer and provides additional information beyond conventional clinical and pathologic factors. Incorporating Recurrence Score into the clinical context may better inform adjuvant therapy decisions in stage III as well as stage II colon cancer.

  2. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  3. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  4. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi, E-mail: junsaito@sannet.ne.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi [Division of Respiratory Disease, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shibuya, Kei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  5. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Kato, Shingo; Shibuya, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m 2 , and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  6. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  7. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. When the esophagus and ...

  8. Stages of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above the waist. Tiny tubules in the kidneys filter and clean the blood . They take out waste ... to bladder cancer. Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals, or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment ...

  9. Stages of Parathyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome . Treatment with radiation therapy may increase the risk of developing a parathyroid adenoma. Signs and symptoms of parathyroid cancer include weakness, feeling tired, and a lump in the neck. Most ...

  10. CpG island methylator phenotype is associated with response to adjuvant irinotecan-based therapy for stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiovitz, Stacey; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Renfro, Lindsay A; Nam, Eunmi; Foster, Nathan R; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Luo, Yanxin; Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Monnat, Raymond J; Emond, Mary J; Maizels, Nancy; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Goldberg, Richard M; Saltz, Leonard B; Venook, Alan; Warren, Robert S; Grady, William M

    2014-09-01

    The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), defined by a high frequency of aberrantly methylated genes, is a characteristic of a subclass of colon tumors with distinct clinical and molecular features. Cohort studies have produced conflicting results on responses of CIMP-positive tumors to chemotherapy. We assessed the association between tumor CIMP status and survival of patients receiving adjuvant fluorouracil and leucovorin alone or with irinotecan (IFL). We analyzed data from patients with stage III colon adenocarcinoma randomly assigned to groups given fluorouracil and leucovorin or IFL after surgery, from April 1999 through April 2001. The primary end point of the trial was overall survival and the secondary end point was disease-free survival. DNA isolated from available tumor samples (n = 615) was used to determine CIMP status based on methylation patterns at the CACNA1G, IGF2, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1 loci. The effects of CIMP on survival were modeled using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards; interactions with treatment and BRAF, KRAS, and mismatch repair (MMR) status were also investigated. Of the tumor samples characterized for CIMP status, 145 were CIMP positive (23%). Patients with CIMP-positive tumors had shorter overall survival times than patients with CIMP-negative tumors (hazard ratio = 1.36; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.84). Treatment with IFL showed a trend toward increased overall survival for patients with CIMP-positive tumors, compared with treatment with fluorouracil and leucovorin (hazard ratio = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.37-1.05; P = .07), but not for patients with CIMP-negative tumors (hazard ratio = 1.38; 95% CI: 1.00-1.89; P = .049). In a 3-way interaction analysis, patients with CIMP-positive, MMR-intact tumors benefited most from the addition of irinotecan to fluorouracil and leucovorin therapy (for the interaction, P = .01). CIMP was more strongly associated with response to IFL than MMR status. Results for disease

  11. Correlation of FDG-PET measurements with morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Docetaxel (D) and carboplatin (C) combination chemotherapy (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced NSCLC. Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined modality induction is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy with etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin (VIP) has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. Finally, erythropoietin (EPO) may prevent the decrease in hemoglobin levels that was seen in a previous study of DC (median drop 2.7 g/dl) and thus may enhance treatment efficacy. The aim of the present study was to correlate FDG-PET studies with histomorphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Epo. 33 patients (pts) with NSCLC stage IIIA (7 pts) or IIIB (24 pts) were enrolled and received treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 dl and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles. Epo was given at 10,000 IU s.c. three times a week. All pts received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of 33 enrolled patients, 22 were evaluable for response by CT imaging. 14/22 pts (64 %) achieved PR. Of the 22 responders, 20 were evaluable for repeated FDG-PET studies. 13/20 pts had a decrease of standardized uptake values (SUV) and of the metabolic tumor index (MTI) by >50 %, 9/20 had SUV <2.5 (CR). Seven of these 9 pts underwent tumor resection, and specimens were subjected to morphometric analysis. In 7/7 cases, no vital tumor cells were detected in the specimens. In contrast to our previous study, hemoglobin levels increased by a median of 0.3 g/dl. Morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. FDG-PET appears to be a useful non-invasive diagnostic tool to predict pathologic response and potentially long-term outcome in stage III NSCLC. (author)

  12. Relationship between tumor gene expression and recurrence in four independent studies of patients with stage II/III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus adjuvant fluorouracil plus leucovorin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael J; Lavery, Ian; Yothers, Greg; Paik, Soonmyung; Clark-Langone, Kim M; Lopatin, Margarita; Watson, Drew; Baehner, Frederick L; Shak, Steven; Baker, Joffre; Cowens, J Wayne; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-09-01

    These studies were conducted to determine the relationship between quantitative tumor gene expression and risk of cancer recurrence in patients with stage II or III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV) to develop multigene algorithms to quantify the risk of recurrence as well as the likelihood of differential treatment benefit of FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy for individual patients. We performed quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on RNA extracted from fixed, paraffin-embedded (FPE) tumor blocks from patients with stage II or III colon cancer who were treated with surgery alone (n = 270 from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP] C-01/C-02 and n = 765 from Cleveland Clinic [CC]) or surgery plus FU/LV (n = 308 from NSABP C-04 and n = 508 from NSABP C-06). Overall, 761 candidate genes were studied in C-01/C-02 and C-04, and a subset of 375 genes was studied in CC/C-06. A combined analysis of the four studies identified 48 genes significantly associated with risk of recurrence and 66 genes significantly associated with FU/LV benefit (with four genes in common). Seven recurrence-risk genes, six FU/LV-benefit genes, and five reference genes were selected, and algorithms were developed to identify groups of patients with low, intermediate, and high likelihood of recurrence and benefit from FU/LV. RT-qPCR of FPE colon cancer tissue applied to four large independent populations has been used to develop multigene algorithms for estimating recurrence risk and benefit from FU/LV. These algorithms are being independently validated, and their clinical utility is being evaluated in the Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) study.

  13. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or ... have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used: Surgery ... Whipple procedure : A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas , ...

  14. Evidence for vacancy migration in stage III for copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antesberger, G.; Sonnenberg, K.; Wienhold, P.; Coltman, R.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Specimens doped with interstitial clusters and single vacancies have been annealed isochronally through the temperature range of stage III. Combining this annealing with a test irradiation after each annealing step reactions of mobile single test interstitials with the doping defects were studied. These reactions provide information about the variation of the doping defect structure during annealing. The experimental results suggest that vacancy clusters are formed in stage III

  15. Results From the Phase III Randomized Trial of Onartuzumab Plus Erlotinib Versus Erlotinib in Previously Treated Stage IIIB or IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: METLung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Edelman, Martin J; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Paz-Ares, Luis; Mocci, Simonetta; Phan, See; Shames, David S; Smith, Dustin; Yu, Wei; Paton, Virginia E; Mok, Tony

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The phase III OAM4971g study (METLung) examined the efficacy and safety of onartuzumab plus erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer selected by MET immunohistochemistry whose disease had progressed after treatment with a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned at a one-to-one ratio to receive onartuzumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg or intravenous placebo plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) in the intent-to-treat population. Secondary end points included median progression-free survival, overall response rate, biomarker analysis, and safety. Results A total of 499 patients were enrolled (onartuzumab, n = 250; placebo, n = 249). Median OS was 6.8 versus 9.1 months for onartuzumab versus placebo (stratified hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.65; P = .067), with a greater number of deaths in the onartuzumab arm (130 [52%] v 114 [46%]). Median progression-free survival was 2.7 versus 2.6 months (stratified HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.20; P = .92), and overall response rate was 8.4% and 9.6% for onartuzumab versus placebo, respectively. Exploratory analyses using MET fluorescence in situ hybridization status and gene expression showed no benefit for onartuzumab; patients with EGFR mutations showed a trend toward shorter OS with onartuzumab treatment (HR, 4.68; 95% CI, 0.97 to 22.63). Grade 3 to 5 adverse events were reported by 56.0% and 51.2% of patients, with serious AEs in 33.9% and 30.7%, for experimental versus control arms, respectively. Conclusion Onartuzumab plus erlotinib did not improve clinical outcomes, with shorter OS in the onartuzumab arm, compared with erlotinib in patients with MET-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

  16. Early stage cervical cancer of the uterine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuuko; Fujiwara, Hisaya

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the present state of radiotherapy (RT) of early stage cervical cancer involving the history, outcomes of clinical trials, procedure for each stage, irradiation methods, concurrent chemo-RT (CCRT), late adverse events, and QOL after RT. It has a history of >100 years from the brachytherapy with radium, but is not yet completely established even now. There are many RT trials hitherto. Retrospectively, no significant difference is seen in outcomes of radical RT and surgery: 80-90% efficacy for stage I and 60-80% for II in the former, respectively, and 80-96% and 65-80%, in the latter. Between RT and surgery, there is a report of randomized comparative study in Italy. In Japan, reported are comparative outcomes based on patients' choice for therapy, retrospective studies including authors' one, prospective multi-institutional cooperative trials by Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group, and Treatment Guidelines for Cervical Cancer (2007). RT procedure depends on the stage defined by FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) and at stages I-II, intracavitary RT is major with optimal dose 29 Gy/5 fractions for I, and 23/4 Gy with external total pelvic radiation 50 Gy for II. In external radiation, the planning target volume includes the whole pelvic field with 1.8-2 Gy/5 weeks and optionally, the extended field when metastasis suspicious. Intracavitary RT with application device in the uterine is of significance for the cancer as 50% complete cure even in stage III is reported. CCRT brings about good prognosis, which is shown in a Japanese trial to compare postoperative RT alone and CCRT with CDDP and 5-FU. The late adverse events are seen mainly in the large bowel and studies of QOL, an important factor for choice of treatment, are now in progress. (T.T.)

  17. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy Using Carboplatin, Tegafur-Uracil and Leucovorin for Stage III and IV Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of GORTEC Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesneau, Melanie; Pointreau, Yoann; Chapet, Sophie; Martin, Laurent; Pommier, Pascal; Alfonsi, Marc; Laguerre, Brigitte; Feham, Nasreddine; Berger, Christine; Garaud, Pascal; Calais, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of locally advanced, nonresectable, head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, the optimal chemotherapy regimen is still controversial. The objective of this Phase II study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant treatment using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, carboplatin, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 77 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma Stage III and IVA were enrolled between October 2003 and July 2005. Of the 77 patients, 72 were eligible. They were treated with tegafur-uracil (300 mg/m 2 /d) and leucovorin (75 mg/d) from Days 1 to 19 and from Days 29 to 47 and carboplatin (70 mg/m 2 intravenously for 4 consecutive days), in three cycles every 21 days. Conventional radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Results: With a mean follow-up of 22.8 months, the 3-year locoregional control, overall survival and disease-free survival actuarial rate was 33.1%, 41.9%, and 27.2%, respectively. The compliance of the treatment was correct. The main acute toxicity was mucositis, with 62% Grade 3-4. Three patients (4.2%) died of acute toxicity. The incidence and severity of late toxicity was acceptable, with 32% Grade 3 and no Grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: The protocol of concomitant chemoradiotherapy using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, and carboplatin for locally advanced unresectable head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma is feasible. The compliance was correct. The incidence and severity of the acute and late toxicities were acceptable, but not improved. The efficacy of this regimen seems equivalent to the main protocols of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. It represents a possible alternative for patients without an intravenous catheter.

  18. Fertility preservation with ovarian stimulation and time to treatment in women with stage II-III breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, A Jo; Chambers, Julia; Mcauley, Fiona; Kaplan, Tessa; Letourneau, Joseph; Hwang, Jimmy; Kim, Mi-Ok; Melisko, Michelle E; Rugo, Hope S; Esserman, Laura J; Rosen, Mitchell P

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether fertility preservation with ovarian stimulation (OS) results in treatment delay in breast cancer (BC) patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy (NAT). This is a retrospective study of women screened for the prospective neoadjuvant ISPY2 trial at the University of California San Francisco. All patients were years old, p = 0.06), and more likely to be childless (79.4 vs 31.2%, p 40 days, with no significant difference between STIM and control groups (mean 39.8 days vs 40.9 days, p = 0.75). Mean time from diagnosis to fertility consultation was 16.3 days. With median follow-up of 79 months, 16 (19.5%) patients have recurred or died from BC. Rates of pCR, recurrence, and death were similar in both groups. Six of 34 STIM patients have undergone embryo transfer, resulting in one patient with two live births. Fertility preservation with OS can be performed in the neoadjuvant setting without delay in initiation of systemic therapy and should be discussed with all early-stage BC patients of reproductive age.

  19. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  20. MR staging accuracy for endometrial cancer based on the new FIGO stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Eun; Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Bae, Duk Soo; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Bohyun

    2011-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been frequently used to determine a preoperative treatment plan for gynecologic cancers. However, the MR accuracy for staging an endometrial cancer is not satisfactory based on the old FIGO staging system. Purpose: To evaluate MR accuracy for staging endometrial cancer using the new FIGO staging system. Material and Methods: Between January 2005 and May 2009, 199 women underwent surgery due to endometrial cancer. In each patient, an endometrial cancer was staged using MR findings based on the old FIGO staging system and then repeated according to the new FIGO staging system for comparison. Histopathologic findings were used as a standard of reference. Results: The accuracy of MRI in the staging of endometrial carcinoma stage I, II, III, and IV using the old FIGO staging system were 80% (159/199), 89% (178/199), 90% (179/199), and 99% (198/199), respectively, compared to 87% (174/199), 97% (193/199), 90% (179/199), and 99% (198/199), respectively, when using the new FIGO staging criteria. The overall MR accuracy of the old and new staging systems were 51% (101/199) and 81% (161/199), respectively. Conclusion: MRI has become a more useful tool in the preoperative staging of endometrial cancers using the new FIGO staging system compared to the old one with increased accuracy

  1. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  2. Results of paclitaxel (day 1 and 8 and carboplatin given on every three weeks in advanced (stage III-IV non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salepci Taflan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both paclitaxel (P and carboplatin (C have significant activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The weekly administration of P is active, dose intense, and has a favorable toxicity profile. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 51 consecutive patients receiving C and day 1 and 8 P chemotherapy (CT regimen in advanced stage NSCLC to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity. Methods Patients treated in our institutions having pathologically proven NSCLC, no CNS metastases, adequate organ function and performance status (PS ECOG 0–2 were given P 112.5 mg/m2 intravenously (IV over 1 hour on day 1 and 8, followed by C AUC 5 IV over 1 hour, repeated in every three weeks. PC was given for maximum of 6 cycles. Results Median age was 58 (age range 39–77 and 41 patients (80% were male. PS was 0/1/2 in 29/17/5 patients and stage was IIIA/IIIB/IV in 3/14/34 patients respectively. The median number of cycles administered was 3 (1–6. Seven patients (14% did not complete the first 3 cycles either due to death, progression, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to P or lost to follow up. Best evaluable response was partial response (PR in 45% and stable disease (SD in 18%. Twelve patients (24% received local RT. Thirteen patients (25% received 2nd line CT at progression. At a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 1–20, 25 (49% patients died and 35 patients (69% progressed. Median overall survival (OS was 11 ± 2 months (95% CI; 6 to 16, 1-year OS ratio was 44%. Median time to progression (TTP was 6 ± 1 months (95% CI; 4 to 8, 1-year progression free survival (PFS ratio was 20%. We observed following grade 3 toxicities: asthenia (10%, neuropathy (4%, anorexia (4%, anemia (4%, hypersensitivity to P (2%, nausea/vomiting (2%, diarrhea (2% and neutropenia (2%. Two patients (4% died of febrile neutropenia. Doses of CT were reduced or delayed in 12 patients (24%. Conclusions P on day 1 and 8 and C every three weeks is practical and fairly

  3. Evolving concepts in staging and treatment of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloothaak, D.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    For localized colorectal cancer (CRC), lymph node metastases are the most powerful prognostic factor for disease specific and overall survival. In the first part of the thesis, we explore the prognostic role of lymph nodes in patients with stage I/II colon cancer. In these patients, nodal metastases

  4. Dose painting by contours versus dose painting by numbers for stage II/III lung cancer: Practical implications of using a broad or sharp brush

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, Gert; Steenhuijsen, Jacco; Bal, Matthieu; De Jaeger, Katrien; Schuring, Danny; Theuws, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence rates are high in patients with locally advanced NSCLC treated with 60 to 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. It is hypothesised that boosting volumes with high SUV on the pre-treatment FDG-PET scan potentially increases local control while maintaining acceptable toxicity levels. We compared two approaches: threshold-based dose painting by contours (DPBC) with voxel-based dose painting by numbers (DPBN). Materials and methods: Two dose painted plans were generated for 10 stage II/III NSCLC patients with 66 Gy at 2-Gy fractions to the entire PTV and a boost dose to the high SUV areas within the primary GTV. DPBC aims for a uniform boost dose at the volume encompassing the SUV 50%-region (GTV boost ). DPBN aims for a linear relationship between the boost dose to a voxel and the underlying SUV. For both approaches the boost dose was escalated up to 130 Gy (in 33 fractions) or until the dose limiting constraint of an organ at risk was met. Results: For three patients (with relatively small peripheral tumours) the dose within the GTV could be boosted to 130 Gy using both strategies. For the remaining patients the boost dose was confined by a critical structure (mediastinal structures in six patients, lungs in one patient). In general the amount of large brush DPBC boosting is limited whenever the GTV boost is close to any serial risk organ. In contrast, small brush DPBN inherently boosts at a voxel-by-voxel basis allowing significant higher dose values to high SUV voxels more distant from the organs at risk. We found that the biological SUV gradients are reasonably congruent with the dose gradients that standard linear accelerators can deliver. Conclusions: Both large brush DPBC and sharp brush DPBN techniques can be used to considerably boost the dose to the FDG avid regions. However, significantly higher boost levels can be obtained using sharp brush DPBN although sometimes at the cost of a less increased dose to the low SUV regions.

  5. Randomized phase III clinical trial comparing the combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) with the combination of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin (modified FOLFOX6) as adjuvant therapy in patients with operated high-risk stage II or stage III colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pectasides, Dimitrios; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Papaxoinis, George; Gourgioti, Georgia; Makatsoris, Thomas; Raptou, Georgia; Vrettou, Eleni; Sgouros, Joseph; Samantas, Epaminontas; Basdanis, George; Papakostas, Pavlos; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Kalofonos, Haralambos P.; Scopa, Chrisoula D.; Pentheroudakis, George; Fountzilas, George

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the trial was to compare two active adjuvant chemotherapy regimens in patients with early stage colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients were assigned to oxaliplatin, leucovorin and 5-FU for 12 cycles (group A, FOLFOX6) or oxaliplatin and capecitabine for eight cycles (group B, CAPOX). Primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS). Tumors were classified as mismatch repair proficient (pMMR) or deficient (dMMR) according to MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression. KRAS exon two and BRAF V600E mutational status were also assessed. Between 2005 and 2008, 441 patients were enrolled, with 408 patients being eligible. After a median follow-up of 74.7 months, 3-year DFS was 79.8 % (95 % CI 76.5–83.4) in the FOLFOX group and 79.5 % (95 % CI 75.9–83.1) in the CAPOX group (p = 0.78). Three-year OS was 87.2 % (95 % CI 84.1-91.1) in the FOLFOX and 86.9 % (95 % CI 83.4–89.9) in the CAPOX group (p = 0.84). Among 306 available tumors, 11.0 % were dMMR, 34.0 % KRAS mutant and 4.9 % BRAF mutant. Multivariate analysis showed that primary site in the left colon, earlier TNM stage and the presence of anemia at diagnosis were associated with better DFS and overall survival (OS), while grade one–two tumors were associated with better OS. Finally, a statistically significant interaction was detected between the primary site and MMR status (p = 0.010), while KRAS mutated tumors were associated with shorter DFS. However, the sample was too small for safe conclusions. No significant differences were observed in the efficacy of FOLFOX versus CAPOX as adjuvant treatment in high-risk stage II or stage III CRC patients, but definitive conclusions cannot be drawn because of the small sample size

  6. Impact of chemotherapy relative dose intensity on cause-specific and overall survival for stage I-III breast cancer: ER+/PR+, HER2- vs. triple-negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Yu, Qingzhao; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Loch, Michelle; Chen, Vivien W; Fontham, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Tekeda

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the impact of chemotherapy relative dose intensity (RDI) on cause-specific and overall survival for stage I-III breast cancer: estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor positive, human epidermal-growth factor receptor negative (ER+/PR+ and HER2-) vs. triple-negative (TNBC) and to identify the optimal RDI cut-off points in these two patient populations. Data were collected by the Louisiana Tumor Registry for two CDC-funded projects. Women diagnosed with stage I-III ER+/PR+, HER2- breast cancer, or TNBC in 2011 with complete information on RDI were included. Five RDI cut-off points (95, 90, 85, 80, and 75%) were evaluated on cause-specific and overall survival, adjusting for multiple demographic variables, tumor characteristics, comorbidity, use of granulocyte-growth factor/cytokines, chemotherapy delay, chemotherapy regimens, and use of hormone therapy. Cox proportional hazards models and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were estimated and adjusted by stabilized inverse probability treatment weighting (IPTW) of propensity score. Of 494 ER+/PR+, HER2- patients and 180 TNBC patients, RDI PR+, HER2- patients, 85% was the only cut-off point at which the low RDI was significantly associated with worse overall survival (HR = 1.93; 95% CI 1.09-3.40). Among TNBC patients, 75% was the cut-off point at which the high RDI was associated with better cause-specific (HR = 2.64; 95% CI 1.09, 6.38) and overall survival (HR = 2.39; 95% CI 1.04-5.51). Higher RDI of chemotherapy is associated with better survival for ER+/PR+, HER2- patients and TNBC patients. To optimize survival benefits, RDI should be maintained ≥ 85% in ER+/PR+, HER2- patients, and ≥ 75% in TNBC patients.

  7. Interpretation of recovery stage III in gold. [Electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, A.; Frank, W. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physik; Stuttgart Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische und Angewandte Physik)

    1983-05-01

    The paper compares a recent investigation of Stage-III recovery on electron-irradiated gold by Sonnenberg and Dedek with earlier work on cold-worked or quenched gold. The experimental results of Sonnenberg and Dedek are found to be in excellent agreement with those of Schuele, Seeger, Schumacher, and King, who showed that in Au Stage III is due to the migration of an elementary intrinsic point defect with migration enthalpy Hsup(III) = (0.71 +- 0.02)eV. Since the monovacancy migration enthalpy Hsub(IVsup(M)) = (0.83 +- 0.02)eV obtained by Schuele et al. has been confirmed by other workers and independent techniques, it is concluded that Hsup(III) represents the migration enthalpy of isolated self-interstitials.

  8. Colorectal cancer stages transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyao Huo

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression differences in different stages of CRC. Gene expression data on 433 CRC patient samples were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Gene expression differences were evaluated across CRC stages using linear regression. Genes with p≤0.001 in expression differences were evaluated further in principal component analysis and genes with p≤0.0001 were evaluated further in gene set enrichment analysis. A total of 377 patients with gene expression data in 20,532 genes were included in the final analysis. The numbers of patients in stage I through IV were 59, 147, 116 and 55, respectively. NEK4 gene, which encodes for NIMA related kinase 4, was differentially expressed across the four stages of CRC. The stage I patients had the highest expression of NEK4 genes, while the stage IV patients had the lowest expressions (p = 9*10-6. Ten other genes (RNF34, HIST3H2BB, NUDT6, LRCh4, GLB1L, HIST2H4A, TMEM79, AMIGO2, C20orf135 and SPSB3 had p value of 0.0001 in the differential expression analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that the patients from the 4 clinical stages do not appear to have distinct gene expression pattern. Network-based and pathway-based gene set enrichment analyses showed that these 11 genes map to multiple pathways such as meiotic synapsis and packaging of telomere ends, etc. Ten of these 11 genes were linked to Gene Ontology terms such as nucleosome, DNA packaging complex and protein-DNA interactions. The protein complex-based gene set analysis showed that four genes were involved in H2AX complex II. This study identified a small number of genes that might be associated with clinical stages of CRC. Our analysis was not able to find a molecular basis for the current clinical staging for CRC based on the gene expression patterns.

  9. CT staging of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dighe, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton SM5 2TT (United Kingdom); Swift, I. [Department of Surgery, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon CR7 7YE (United Kingdom); Brown, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton SM5 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gina.brown@rmh.nhs.uk

    2008-12-15

    Computer tomography (CT) has been the principal investigation in the staging of colon cancers. The information obtained with routine CT has been limited to identifying the site of the tumour, size of the tumour, infiltration into surrounding structures and metastatic spread. The Foxtrot trial National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) has been specifically designed to evaluate the efficacy of neoadjuvant treatment in colon cancers by using preoperative chemotherapy with or without an anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody to improve outcome in high-risk operable colon cancer. Patients are selected based on their staging CT examination. The criteria for poor prognosis are T4 and T3 tumours with more than 5 mm extramural depth. Thus the success of the trial would depend upon the confidence of the radiologist to identify the patients that would receive the neoadjuvant treatment. The aim of this review is to explain the process of identifying high-risk features seen on the staging CT images. This will help to identify a cohort of patients that could truly benefit from neoadjuvant strategies.

  10. CT staging of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dighe, S.; Swift, I.; Brown, G.

    2008-01-01

    Computer tomography (CT) has been the principal investigation in the staging of colon cancers. The information obtained with routine CT has been limited to identifying the site of the tumour, size of the tumour, infiltration into surrounding structures and metastatic spread. The Foxtrot trial National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) has been specifically designed to evaluate the efficacy of neoadjuvant treatment in colon cancers by using preoperative chemotherapy with or without an anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody to improve outcome in high-risk operable colon cancer. Patients are selected based on their staging CT examination. The criteria for poor prognosis are T4 and T3 tumours with more than 5 mm extramural depth. Thus the success of the trial would depend upon the confidence of the radiologist to identify the patients that would receive the neoadjuvant treatment. The aim of this review is to explain the process of identifying high-risk features seen on the staging CT images. This will help to identify a cohort of patients that could truly benefit from neoadjuvant strategies

  11. A Phase 2 Trial of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results and Reflections Following Early Closure of a Single-Institution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Pham, Dat; Cury, James D.; Bajwa, Abubakr [Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); D' Agostino, Harry [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McCook, Barry [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Nichols, Romaine C. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has been shown to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) and could be used to safely escalate the radiation dose. We analyzed outcomes in a group of phase 2 study patients treated with dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From 2009 through 2013, LU02, a phase 2 trial of proton therapy delivering 74 to 80 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 NSCLC, was opened to accrual at our institution. Due to slow accrual and competing trials, the study was closed after just 14 patients (stage IIIA, 9 patients; stage IIIB, 5 patients) were accrued over 4 years. During that same time period, 55 additional stage III patients were treated with high-dose proton therapy, including 7 in multi-institutional proton clinical trials, 4 not enrolled due to physician preference, and 44 who were ineligible based on strict entry criteria. An unknown number of patients were ineligible for enrollment due to insurance coverage issues and thus were treated with photon radiation. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 52 months. Results: Two-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 57% and 25%, respectively. Median lengths of overall survival and progression-free survival were 33 months and 14 months, respectively. There were no acute grade 3 toxicities related to proton therapy. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and pulmonary toxicity each occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy was well tolerated with encouraging results among a small cohort of patients. Unfortunately, single-institution proton studies may be difficult to accrue and consideration for pragmatic and/or multicenter trial design should be considered when developing future proton clinical trials.

  12. MRE11-Deficiency Associated with Improved Long-Term Disease Free Survival and Overall Survival in a Subset of Stage III Colon Cancer Patients in Randomized CALGB 89803 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelitz, Thomas; Renfro, Lindsay; Foster, Nathan R.; Caracol, Amber; Welsch, Piri; Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William B.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Emond, Mary; Monnat, Raymond J.; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Colon cancers deficient in mismatch repair (MMR) may exhibit diminished expression of the DNA repair gene, MRE11, as a consequence of contraction of a T11 mononucleotide tract. This study investigated MRE11 status and its association with prognosis, survival and drug response in patients with stage III colon cancer. Patients and Methods Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 (Alliance) randomly assigned 1,264 patients with stage III colon cancer to postoperative weekly adjuvant bolus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FU/LV) or irinotecan+FU/LV (IFL), with 8 year follow-up. Tumors from these patients were analyzed to determine stability of a T11 tract in the MRE11 gene. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS), and a secondary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS). Non-proportional hazards were addressed using time-dependent covariates in Cox analyses. Results Of 625 tumor cases examined, 70 (11.2%) exhibited contraction at the T11 tract in one or both MRE11 alleles and were thus predicted to be deficient in MRE11 (dMRE11). In pooled treatment analyses, dMRE11 patients showed initially reduced DFS and OS but improved long-term DFS and OS compared with patients with an intact MRE11 T11 tract. In the subgroup of dMRE11 patients treated with IFL, an unexplained early increase in mortality but better long-term DFS than IFL-treated pMRE11 patients was observed. Conclusions Analysis of this relatively small number of patients and events showed that the dMRE11 marker predicts better prognosis independent of treatment in the long-term. In subgroup analyses, dMRE11 patients treated with irinotecan exhibited unexplained short-term mortality. MRE11 status is readily assayed and may therefore prove to be a useful prognostic marker, provided that the results reported here for a relatively small number of patients can be generalized in independent analyses of larger numbers of samples. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00003835 PMID:25310185

  13. MRE11-deficiency associated with improved long-term disease free survival and overall survival in a subset of stage III colon cancer patients in randomized CALGB 89803 trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pavelitz

    Full Text Available Colon cancers deficient in mismatch repair (MMR may exhibit diminished expression of the DNA repair gene, MRE11, as a consequence of contraction of a T11 mononucleotide tract. This study investigated MRE11 status and its association with prognosis, survival and drug response in patients with stage III colon cancer.Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 (Alliance randomly assigned 1,264 patients with stage III colon cancer to postoperative weekly adjuvant bolus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FU/LV or irinotecan+FU/LV (IFL, with 8 year follow-up. Tumors from these patients were analyzed to determine stability of a T11 tract in the MRE11 gene. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS, and a secondary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS. Non-proportional hazards were addressed using time-dependent covariates in Cox analyses.Of 625 tumor cases examined, 70 (11.2% exhibited contraction at the T11 tract in one or both MRE11 alleles and were thus predicted to be deficient in MRE11 (dMRE11. In pooled treatment analyses, dMRE11 patients showed initially reduced DFS and OS but improved long-term DFS and OS compared with patients with an intact MRE11 T11 tract. In the subgroup of dMRE11 patients treated with IFL, an unexplained early increase in mortality but better long-term DFS than IFL-treated pMRE11 patients was observed.Analysis of this relatively small number of patients and events showed that the dMRE11 marker predicts better prognosis independent of treatment in the long-term. In subgroup analyses, dMRE11 patients treated with irinotecan exhibited unexplained short-term mortality. MRE11 status is readily assayed and may therefore prove to be a useful prognostic marker, provided that the results reported here for a relatively small number of patients can be generalized in independent analyses of larger numbers of samples.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00003835.

  14. Management of stage III thymoma with postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.B.; Sagerman, R.H.; King, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of postoperative radiation therapy in 12 patients with Stage III thymoma treated during the period 1966-1986 were reviewed. Surgical therapy consisted of total resection in one, subtotal resection in seven, and biopsy only in four. Megavoltage irradiation in the dose range of 3,000-5,600 cGy was employed, with the majority receiving a dose of at least 5,000 cGy. The local control rate was 67%. The actuarial 5-year observed and adjusted survival rates were 57% and 75%, respectively. These results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy is an effective therapeutic modality in the control of Stage III thymoma

  15. Impact of Dose Reductions, Delays Between Chemotherapy Cycles, and/or Shorter Courses of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients: a Single-Center Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouros, Joseph; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Kouvatseas, George; Rapti, Anna; Stamoulis, George; Bisvikis, Anastasios; Res, Helen; Samantas, Epameinondas

    2015-12-01

    Most stage II or III colorectal cancer patients are receiving nowadays a 4 to 6-month course of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, delays between cycles, reductions in the doses of chemotherapy drugs, or even permanent omissions of chemotherapy cycles might take place due to side effects or patient's preference. We examined the impact of these treatment modifications on recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). We retrospectively collected data from colorectal cancer patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy in our Department. Patients were categorized in five groups based on whether they had or not delays between chemotherapy cycles, dose reductions, and permanent omissions of chemotherapy cycles. Three-year RFS and OS of the five different groups were compared using the log-rank test and the Sidak approach. Five hundred and eight patients received treatment. Twenty seven percent of the patients had the full course of chemotherapy; the others had delays, dose reductions, or early termination of the treatment. No statistically significant differences were observed in 3-year RFS and OS between the five groups. A trend for worse RFS was noticed with early termination of treatment. A similar trend was also noticed for OS but only for stage II patients. In colorectal cancer patients, receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, delays between chemotherapy cycles, dose reductions of chemotherapy drugs, or even early termination of the treatment course do not seem to have a negative impact in 3-year RFS and OS; however, due to the trend of worse RFS in patients receiving shorter courses of chemotherapy, further studies are needed.

  16. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M.; Wiech, T.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  17. Can we optimize chemo-radiation and surgery in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer based on evidence from randomized clinical trials? A hypothesis-generating study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dehing, Cary; Bentzen, Soren M.; Houben, Ruud; Dekker, Andre; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques; Hochstenbag, Monique; Boersma, Liesbeth; Geskes, Gijs; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Lammering, Guido; Lambin, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Improved local tumor control (LC) improves survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We estimated the capability of surgical and non-surgical options to improve LC further in this disease. Methods: Eligible studies were phase III trials reporting 2-year survival data as well as the incidence of LC and/or distant metastases. Effect estimates, as well as the statistical uncertainty of these, were combined in order to estimate the benefit in terms of LC from combining multiple modalities. Results: It was estimated that the highest rates of LC can be obtained with high-dose concurrent chemo-radiation followed by surgery. In this situation, escalating the pre-operative radiation dose from 45 to 66 Gy, delivered concurrently with chemotherapy, could increase LC from 58% to 76%. Toxicity may also be higher, but could not be estimated. Without surgery, the gain in LC from concurrent chemo-radiation versus sequential, corresponds to a radiation dose increase from 65 to 72 Gy. Conclusions: We hypothesize that high-dose concurrent chemo-radiation followed by surgery could be superior to other current treatment approaches for selected patients with stage III NSCLC, provided toxicity would be low. At present, high-dose concurrent chemo-radiation followed by surgery should be considered experimental.

  18. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Sumi, Minako; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuta, Koji; Tamura, Tomohide

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC

  20. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Ikuo, E-mail: isekine@ncc.go.jp [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  1. 18F-FDG PET for assessment of therapy response and preoperative re-evaluation after neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschmann, Susanne M.; Reimold, Matthias; Bares, Roland; Friedel, Godehard; Paulsen, Frank; Hehr, Thomas; Budach, Wilfried; Langen, Heinz-Jakob

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate FDG-PET for assessment of therapy response and for prediction of patient outcome after neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy (NARCT) of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Seventy patients with histologically proven stage III NSCLC underwent FDG-PET investigations before and after NARCT. Changes in FDG uptake and PET findings after completion of NARCT were compared with (1) the histology of tumour samples obtained at surgery or repeat mediastinoscopy, and (2) treatment results in terms of achieved operability and long-term survival. The mean average FDG uptake of the primary tumours in the patient group decreased significantly during NARCT (p = 0.004). Sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of FDG-PET were 94.5%, 80% and 91%, respectively, for the detection of residual viable primary tumour, and 77%, 68% and 73%, respectively, for the presence of lymph node metastases. A negative PET scan or a reduction in the standardised uptake value (SUV) of more than 80% was the best predictive factor for a favourable outcome of further treatment. Progressive disease according to PET (new tumour manifestations or increasing SUV) was significantly correlated with an unfavourable outcome (p = 0.005). In this subgroup, survival of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different from survival among those who did not undergo surgery, whereas for the whole patient group, complete tumour resection had a significant influence on outcome. FDG-PET is suitable to assess response to NARCT in patients with stage III NSCLC accurately. It was highly predictive for treatment outcome and patient survival. PET may be helpful in improving restaging after NARCT by allowing reliable assessment of residual tumour viability. (orig.)

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito, E-mail: hhorinou@ncc.go.jp [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Furuta, Koh [Department of Clinical Laboratories, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuta, Koji [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC.

  3. Is elective nodal irradiation beneficial in patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery for clinical stage II–III breast cancer? A multicentre retrospective study (KROG 12-05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J M; Park, W; Suh, C-O; Keum, K C; Kim, Y B; Shin, K H; Kim, K; Chie, E K; Ha, S W; Kim, S S; Ahn, S D; Shin, H S; Kim, J H; Lee, H-S; Lee, N K; Huh, S J; Choi, D H

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effects of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in clinical stage II–III breast cancer patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes (LNs) (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT). Methods: We retrospectively analysed 260 patients with ypN0 who received NAC followed by BCS and RT. Elective nodal irradiation was delivered to 136 (52.3%) patients. The effects of ENI on survival outcomes were evaluated. Results: After a median follow-up period of 66.2 months (range, 15.6–127.4 months), 26 patients (10.0%) developed disease recurrence. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients were 95.5% and 90.5%, respectively. Pathologic T classification (0−is vs 1 vs 2–4) and the number of LNs sampled (ENI. Elective nodal irradiation also did not affect survival outcomes in any of the subgroups according to pathologic T classification or the number of LNs sampled. Conclusions: ENI may be omitted in patients with ypN0 breast cancer after NAC and BCS. But until the results of the randomised trials are available, patients should be put on these trials. PMID:24481403

  4. Is elective nodal irradiation beneficial in patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery for clinical stage II-III breast cancer? A multicentre retrospective study (KROG 12-05).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J M; Park, W; Suh, C-O; Keum, K C; Kim, Y B; Shin, K H; Kim, K; Chie, E K; Ha, S W; Kim, S S; Ahn, S D; Shin, H S; Kim, J H; Lee, H-S; Lee, N K; Huh, S J; Choi, D H

    2014-03-18

    To evaluate the effects of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathologically negative lymph nodes (LNs) (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively analysed 260 patients with ypN0 who received NAC followed by BCS and RT. Elective nodal irradiation was delivered to 136 (52.3%) patients. The effects of ENI on survival outcomes were evaluated. After a median follow-up period of 66.2 months (range, 15.6-127.4 months), 26 patients (10.0%) developed disease recurrence. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients were 95.5% and 90.5%, respectively. Pathologic T classification (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) and the number of LNs sampled (ENI. Elective nodal irradiation also did not affect survival outcomes in any of the subgroups according to pathologic T classification or the number of LNs sampled. ENI may be omitted in patients with ypN0 breast cancer after NAC and BCS. But until the results of the randomised trials are available, patients should be put on these trials.

  5. An explorative analysis of ERCC1-19q13 copy number aberrations in a chemonaive stage III colorectal cancer cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background: Platinum-based chemotherapy has long been used in the treatment of a variety of cancers and functions by inducing DNA damage. ERCC1 and ERCC4 are involved in the removal of this damage and have previously been implicated in resistance to platinum compounds. The aim of the current inve...

  6. Topoisomerase 1(TOP1) gene copy number in stage III colorectal cancer patients and its relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    A Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) poison is frequently included in the treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, no predictive biomarkers for Top1 poisons are available. We here report a study on the TOP1 gene copy number in CRC patients and its association with patient prognosis...

  7. Phase I and pharmacologic study of the combination paclitaxel and carboplatin as first-line chemotherapy in stage III and IV ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, M. T.; van Warmerdam, L. J.; Rosing, H.; Schaefers, M. C.; Lai, A.; Helmerhorst, T. J.; Veenhof, C. H.; Birkhofer, M. J.; Rodenhuis, S.; Beijnen, J. H.; ten Bokkel Huinink, W. W.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the maximum-tolerated dose for the combination paclitaxel and carboplatin administered every 4 weeks and to gain more insight into the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in previously untreated ovarian cancer patients. Thirty-five chemotherapy-naive patients with

  8. Effect of concomitant use of immunomodulator (OK-432 and/or PSK) on primary lung cancer (stages III, IV) treated with radiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Imajo, Y.

    1982-01-01

    OK-432 (a lyophilized preparation of a low virulent strain, Su, of Streptococcus hemolytics (Group A) treated with penicillin G) and/or PSK (a protein-bound polysaccharide prepared from Coriolus versicolor) as an immunomodulator was administered to 209 patients of advanced lung cancer treated with radiation with combined chemotherapy. Their effects on immunological parameters and patients' survival periods were examined. Suppression of both PHA (phytohemagglutinin) skin test activities and lymphocyte blastoid transformation with PHA were reduced in the immunomodulator administered group compared with the non-administered group. Survival curves were evaluated between the patients with OK-432 and/or PSK and those without immunomodulator. It was suggested that OK-432 and/or PSK combined with radiation with combined chemotherapy was effective for the elongation of the survival period. These results indicated that the long-term administration of OK-432 and/or PSK was recommended for patients with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  9. Evaluation of a Hanging-Breast PET System for Primary Tumor Visualization in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer: Comparison With Standard PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Suzana C; Rebolleda, José Ferrér; Koolen, Bas B; Wesseling, Jelle; Jurado, Raúl Sánchez; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Del Puig Cózar Santiago, María; van der Noort, Vincent; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the performance of a mammography with molecular imaging PET (MAMMI-PET) system for breast imaging in the hanging-breast position for the visualization of primary breast cancer lesions and to compare this method with whole-body PET/CT. Between March 2011 and March 2014, a prospective evaluation included women with one or more histologically confirmed primary breast cancer lesions (index lesions). After injection of 180-240 MBq of (18)F-FDG, whole-body PET/CT and MAMMI-PET acquisitions were performed, index lesions were scored 0, 1, or 2 for FDG uptake relative to background. Detection and FDG uptake were compared by breast length, maximal tumor diameter, affected breast quadrants, tumor grade, and histologic and immunologic sub-types. Finally, the two PET modalities were compared for detection of index lesions. For 234 index lesions (diameter, 5-170 mm), the overall sensitivity was 88.9% for MAMMI-PET and 91% for PET/CT (p = 0.61). Twenty-three (9.8%) index lesions located too close to the pectoral muscle were missed with MAMMI-PET, and 20 index lesions were missed with PET/CT. Lesion visibility on MAMMI-PET images was influenced by tumor grade (p = 0.034) but not by cancer subtype (p = 0.65). Although in an overall evaluation MAMMI-PET was not superior to PET/CT, MAMMI-PET does have higher sensitivity for primary breast cancer lesions within the scanning range of the device. Optimization of the positioning device may increase visualization of the most dorsal lesions.

  10. Images of gastric cancer stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Aragon, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    The present work has the objective to review the importance of the images in the preoperating stage of the gastric cancer. It has been emphasized in the modalities of transabdominal ultrasound as much as endoscopic and TAC since they are most valuable in the stage. Certainly the importance of conventional radiology (gastroduodenal series) is also valuable in the stage of the tumor, specially in considering the depth of the same one. In order to make this overhaul, the recent bibliography was consulted but, specially the published one by Japaneses since they follow a classification and methodology different from the used one in most of the countries that belong to the World-wide Organization of the Health. They made an overhaul of approximately 200 cases of patients who have been diagnosed and treated in the Center of Detection of Gastric Cancer of Cartago. In each case review the file, radiological, sonographic and pathological studies, and the cases were chosen that better illustrated the exposed subjects. (Author) [es

  11. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd; Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [de

  12. Quality Assurance of 4D-CT Scan Techniques in Multicenter Phase III Trial of Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiotherapy (Radiosurgery or Surgery for Operable Early Stage (Stage 1A) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer [ROSEL] Study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Lieshout, Maarten van; Schuring, Danny; Heumen, Marielle J.T. van; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Senan, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scanning techniques in institutions participating in a Phase III trial of surgery vs. stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All 9 centers performed a 4D-CT scan of a motion phantom (Quasar, Modus Medical Devices) in accordance with their in-house imaging protocol for SBRT. A cylindrical cedar wood insert with plastic spheres of 15 mm (o15) and 30 mm (o30) diameter was moved in a cosine-based pattern, with an extended period in the exhale position to mimic the actual breathing motion. A range of motion of R = 15 and R = 25 mm and breathing period of T = 3 and T = 6 s were used. Positional and volumetric imaging accuracy was analyzed using Pinnacle version 8.1x at various breathing phases, including the mid-ventilation phase and maximal intensity projections of the spheres. Results: Imaging using eight CT scanners (Philips, Siemens, GE) and one positron emission tomography-CT scanner (Institution 3, Siemens) was investigated. The imaging protocols varied widely among the institutions. No strong correlation was found between the specific scan protocol parameters and the observed results. Deviations in the maximal intensity projection volumes averaged 1.9% (starting phase of the breathing cycle [o]15, R = 15), 12.3% (o15, R = 25), and -0.9% (o30, R = 15). The end-expiration volume deviations (13.4%, o15 and 2.5%, o30), were, on average, smaller than the end-inspiration deviations (20.7%, o15 and 4.5%, o30), which, in turn, were smaller than the mid-ventilation deviations (32.6%, o15 and 8.0%, o30). A slightly larger variation in the mid-ventilation origin position was observed (mean, -0.2 mm; range, -3.6-4.2) than in the maximal intensity projection origin position (mean, -0.1 mm; range, -2.5-2.5). The range of motion was generally underestimated (mean, -1.5 mm; range, -5.5-1). Conclusions: Notable differences were seen in the 4D-CT imaging protocols

  13. A phase III randomized study on the sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the conservative management of early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinnaro, Paola; Rambone, Rita; Giannarelli, Diana; Benassi, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two different timings of radiation treatment in patients with breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery and were candidates to receive adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 206 patients who had quadrantectomy and axillary dissection for breast cancer and were planned to receive adjuvant CMF chemotherapy were randomized to concurrent or sequential radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered only to the whole breast through tangential fields to a dose of 50 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost of 10-15 Gy in 4-6 fractions to the tumor bed. Results: No differences in 5-year breast recurrence-free, metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were observed in the two treatment groups. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. No evidence of an increased risk of toxicity was observed between the two arms. No difference in radiotherapy and in the chemotherapy dose intensity was observed in the two groups. Conclusions: In patients with negative surgical margins receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy can be delayed to up to 7 months. Concurrent administration of CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy is safe and might be reserved for patients at high risk of local recurrence, such as those with positive surgical margins or larger tumor diameters

  14. Adjuvant treatment and outcomes of stage III endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, C.; Ludbrook, J.; Davy, M.; Yeoh, E

    2003-01-01

    Surgery with staging using FIGO (1988) classification is accepted management for stage III endometrial carcinoma. The delivery of adjuvant therapy is controversial and tends to be individualised. Retrospective review of stage III endometrial carcinoma patients who underwent radical surgery at the Royal Adelaide and Queen Elizabeth Hospitals from 1984 to 2003 was carried out. Medical records were reviewed for details of patient characteristics, surgery, histopathology, adjuvant therapy and recurrence/survival. Sixty-six patients with a median age of 69 (37-97), had a median follow-up of 26 months (1-188 ). For all stage III patients, the actuarial 5-year disease-free and overall survivals were 50 and 43% respectively. Thirty-five patients received pelvic +/- paraaortic radiotherapy, 5 whole abdominal radiotherapy, 14 vaginal brachytherapy boost, 10 chemotherapy and 13 adjuvant hormones. Forty-six percent of patients recurred in a median time of 13 months (0-95). For these patients, the sites of first recurrence were pelvis in 27%, pelvis and abdomen in 23%, abdomen alone in 13%, distant alone in 27%, distant and abdominal in 7% and all three sites in 3%. On univariate analysis disease-free survival was impacted by; age, grade, parametrial involvement, number of extrauterine sites, lymphovascular invasion, adjuvant radiotherapy to the pelvis alone and postoperative macroscopic residual disease. Lymphovascular invasion, post-operative residual disease and adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy remained significant on multivariate analysis. These outcomes for stage III endometrial carcinoma are comparable to the current literature. Ongoing research is required to establish the most appropriate adjuvant therapy in these high risk patients

  15. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  17. Adding Erlotinib to Chemoradiation Improves Overall Survival but Not Progression-Free Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blumenschein, George R. [Department of Thoracic Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tang, Ximing [Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, J. Jack [Department of Biostatatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wistuba, Ignacio I. [Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Diane D. [Department of Biostatatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hong, Waun Ki [Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To test, in a single-arm, prospective, phase 2 trial, whether adding the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib to concurrent chemoradiotherapy for previously untreated, locally advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer would improve survival and disease control without increasing toxicity. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer received intensity modulated radiation therapy (63 Gy/35 fractions) on Monday through Friday, with chemotherapy (paclitaxel 45 mg/m², carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] = 2) on Mondays, for 7 weeks. All patients also received the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg orally 1/d) on Tuesday-Sunday for 7 weeks, followed by consolidation paclitaxel–carboplatin. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), toxicity, response, and disease control and whether any endpoint differed by EGFR mutation status. Results: Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 40 were former or never-smokers, and 41 were evaluable for EGFR mutations (37 wild-type [WT] and 4 mutated [all adenocarcinoma]). Median time to progression was 14.0 months and did not differ by EGFR status. Toxicity was acceptable (no grade 5, 1 grade 4, 11 grade 3). Twelve patients (26%) had complete responses (10 WT, 2 mutated), 27 (59%) partial (21 WT, 2 mutated, 4 unknown), and 7 (15%) none (6 WT, 2 mutated, 1 unknown) (P=.610). At 37.0 months' follow-up (range, 3.6-76.5 months) for all patients, median OS time was 36.5 months, and 1-, 2-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 67.4%, and 35.9%, respectively; none differed by mutation status. Twelve patients had no progression, and 34 had local and/or distant failure. Eleven of 27 distant failures were in the brain (7 WT, 3 mutated, 1 unknown). Conclusions: Toxicity and OS were promising, but time to progression did not meet expectations. The prevalence of

  18. [Diagnostic values of serum type III procollagen N-terminal peptide in type IV gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, S; Fujiki, T; Kanda, Y; Kumai, R; Yoshida, S

    1985-04-01

    Since increased synthesis of collagen has been demonstrated in tissue of type IV gastric cancer, we attempted to distinguish type IV gastric cancer from other cancers by measuring serum levels of type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (type III-N-peptide). Mean serum levels in type IV gastric cancer patients without metastasis were found to be elevated above normal values and developed a tendency to be higher than those in types I, II and III gastric cancer patients without metastasis. Highly positive ratios were found in patients with liver diseases including hepatoma and colon cancer, biliary tract cancer, and esophageal cancer patients with liver, lung or bone metastasis, but only 2 out of 14 of these cancer patients without such metastasis showed positive serum levels of type III-N-peptide. Positive cases in patients with type IV gastric cancer were obtained not only in the group with clinical stage IV but also in the groups with clinical stages II and III. In addition, high serum levels of type III-N-peptide in patients with type IV gastric cancer were seen not only in the cases with liver, lung or bone metastasis but also in cases with disseminated peritoneal metastasis alone. These results suggest that if the serum level of type III-N-peptide is elevated above normal values, type IV gastric cancer should be suspected after ruling out liver diseases, myelofibrosis and liver, lung or bone metastasis.

  19. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  20. Intermittent hemodialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Melchert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD is a form of renal replacement that is used in veterinary medicine for cases involving drug removal, electrolyte imbalance, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the present study was to verify the efficacy of IHD in dogs with CKD staged at grade III and to evaluate the effect of IHD on quality of life. Twelve dogs with CKD at stage III met the inclusion criteria and were divided equally into two groups. The control group (n=6 received only clinical treatment and intravenous fluid therapy, and the hemodialysis group (n=6 received clinical and IHD treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after treatments in both groups. We evaluated complications and clinical parameters of IHD every 30 minutes. Hemodialysis decreased serum urea, creatinine, and phosphorus. Despite the evident removal of nitrogen compounds, dialysis treatment did not increase survival time in these patients. The results of this study do not support the early use of dialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III.

  1. Radical surgery for early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women worldwide. Due to an effective screening programme, in the Netherlands cervical cancer is often detected in early stages of disease. For early stage (International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB/IIA) cervical

  2. Preoperative chemosensitivity testing as Predictor of Treatment benefit in Adjuvant stage III colon cancer (PePiTA): Protocol of a prospective BGDO (Belgian Group for Digestive Oncology) multicentric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendlisz, Alain; Maetens, Marion; Borbath, Ivan; Dresse, Damien; Houbiers, Ghislain; Fried, Michael; Awada, Ahmad; Piccart, Martine; Laethem, Jean-Luc Van; Flamen, Patrick; Golfinopoulos, Vassilis; Deleporte, Amelie; Paesmans, Marianne; Mansy, Hazem El; Garcia, Camilo; Peeters, Marc; Annemans, Lieven; Vandeputte, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Surgery is a curative treatment for patients with locally advanced colon cancer, but recurrences are frequent for those with stage III disease. FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve recurrence-free survival and overall survival by more than 20% and is nowadays considered a standard of care. However, the vast majority of patients will not benefit from receiving cytotoxic drugs because they have either already been cured by surgery or because their tumor cells are resistant to the chemotherapy, for which predictive factors are still not available. Identifying which patients are unlikely to respond to adjuvant chemotherapy from among those who are eligible for such treatment would be a major step towards treatment personalization. It would spare such patients from unnecessary toxicities and would improve the allocation of societal healthcare resources. PePiTA is a prospective, multicenter, non-randomised trial built on the hypothesis that preoperative chemosensitivity testing using FDG-PET/CT before and after one course of FOLFOX can identify the patients who are unlikely to benefit from 6 months of adjuvant FOLFOX treatment for stage III colon cancer. The study’s primary objective is to examine the ability of PET/CT-assessed tumor FDG uptake after one course of preoperative chemotherapy to predict the outcome of adjuvant therapy, as measured by 3-year disease-free survival. Secondary objectives are to examine the predictive value of changes in PET/CT-assessed tumor FDG uptake on overall survival, to define the best cut-off value of FDG uptake for predicting treatment outcome, and to analyse the cost-effectiveness of such preoperative chemo-sensitivity testing. At study planning, exploratory translational research objectives were 1) to assess the predictive value of circulating tumor cells for disease-free survival, 2) to examine the predictive value of single nucleotide polymorphisms for disease-free survival with respect to genes related either to

  3. Exploring Radiotherapy Targeting Strategy and Dose: A Pooled Analysis of Cooperative Group Trials of Combined Modality Therapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Steven E; Fan, Wen; Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Vokes, Everett E; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Karen; Pang, Herbert H; Wang, Xiaofei

    2018-04-21

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy(CRT) is standard therapy for locally-advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(LA-NSCLC)patients. This study was performed to examine thoracic radiotherapy(TRT) parameters and their impact on patient survival. We collected Individual patient data(IPD) from 3600LA-NSCLC patients participating in 16 cooperative group trials of concurrent CRT. The primary TRT parameters examined included field design strategy(elective nodal irradiation(ENI) compared to involved field TRT(IF-TRT)), total dose, and biologically effective dose(BED). Hazard ratios(HRs) for overall survival were calculated with univariable and multivariable Cox models. TRT doses ranged from 60 to 74 Gy with most treatments administered once-daily. ENI was associated with poorer survival than IF-TRT(univariable HR,1.37;95%CI,1.24-1.51,pENI patients were 24 and 16 months, respectively. Patients were divided into 3 dose groups: low total dose(60 Gy), medium total dose(>60Gy-66Gy) and high total dose(>66Gy-74 Gy). With reference to the low dose group, the multivariable HR's were 1.08 for the medium dose group(95%CI=0.93-1.25) and 1.12 for the high dose group(CI=0.97-1.30).The univariate p=0.054 and multivariable p=0.17. BED was grouped as follows: low(55.5 Gy 10 ). With reference to the low BED group, the HR was 1.00(95%CI=0.85-1.18) for the medium BED group and 1.10(95%CI=0.93-1.31) for the high BED group. The univariable p=0.076 and multivariable p=0.16. For LA-NSCLC patients treated with concurrent CRT, IF-TRT was associated with significantly better survival than ENI-TRT. TRT total and BED dose levels were not significantly associated with patient survival. Future progress will require research focusing on better systemic therapy and TRT. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Predictors of cervical cancer being at an advanced stage at diagnosis in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sudan, with more than two-thirds of all women with invasive cervical cancer being diagnosed at an advanced stage (stages III and IV). The lack of a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan may contribute to the late presentation...... of this cancer, but other factors potentially associated with advanced stages of cervical cancer at diagnosis are unknown. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between age, marital status, ethnicity, health insurance coverage, residence in an urban vs a rural setting, and stage (at...... diagnosis) of cervical cancer in Sudan....

  5. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  6. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David; Martineau, Antoine; Merlet, Pascal [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM, UMR 1101 LaTIM, Brest (France); Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [Miletrie Hospital, DACTIM, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Poitiers (France); Espie, Marc [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Roquancourt, Anne de [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and {sup 18}F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}. Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUV{sub max} values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUV{sub max} and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean} and TLG significantly differed among the three

  7. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different 18F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groheux, David; Martineau, Antoine; Merlet, Pascal; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris; Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze; Espie, Marc; Roquancourt, Anne de; Hindie, Elif

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline 18 F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment 18 F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUV max , SUV mean , metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and 18 F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in 18 F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUV max and SUV mean . Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUV max values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUV max and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUV max , SUV mean and TLG significantly differed among the three phenotype subgroups (HER2-positive, triple-negative and ER

  8. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  9. Molecular subtypes in stage II-III colon cancer defined by genomic instability: early recurrence-risk associated with a high copy-number variation and loss of RUNX3 and CDKN2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Berg

    Full Text Available We sought to investigate various molecular subtypes defined by genomic instability that may be related to early death and recurrence in colon cancer.We sought to investigate various molecular subtypes defined by instability at microsatellites (MSI, changes in methylation patterns (CpG island methylator phenotype, CIMP or copy number variation (CNV in 8 genes. Stage II-III colon cancers (n = 64 were investigated by methylation-specific multiplex ligated probe amplification (MS-MLPA. Correlation of CNV, CIMP and MSI, with mutations in KRAS and BRAFV600E were assessed for overlap in molecular subtypes and early recurrence risk by uni- and multivariate regression.The CIMP phenotype occurred in 34% (22/64 and MSI in 27% (16/60 of the tumors, with noted CIMP/MSI overlap. Among the molecular subtypes, a high CNV phenotype had an associated odds ratio (OR for recurrence of 3.2 (95% CI 1.1-9.3; P = 0.026. Losses of CACNA1G (OR of 2.9, 95% CI 1.4-6.0; P = 0.001, IGF2 (OR of 4.3, 95% CI 1.1-15.8; P = 0.007, CDKN2A (p16 (OR of 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6; P = 0.024, and RUNX3 (OR of 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-8.7; P = 0.002 were associated with early recurrence, while MSI, CIMP, KRAS or BRAF V600E mutations were not. The CNV was significantly higher in deceased patients (CNV in 6 of 8 compared to survivors (CNV in 3 of 8. Only stage and loss of RUNX3 and CDKN2A were significant in the multivariable risk-model for early recurrence.A high copy number variation phenotype is a strong predictor of early recurrence and death, and may indicate a dose-dependent relationship between genetic instability and outcome. Loss of tumor suppressors RUNX3 and CDKN2A were related to recurrence-risk and warrants further investigation.

  10. Oncological outcomes from trimodality therapy receiving definitive doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (≥60 Gy and factors influencing consideration for surgery in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A.L. Vyfhuis, MD PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Trimodality treatment significantly improves survival and FFR in patients with LA-NSCLC when definitive doses of radiation with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are employed. We identified important demographic features that predict the use of surgical intervention in patients with stage III NSCLC.

  11. Neoadjuvant FOLFOX 4 versus FOLFOX 4 with Cetuximab versus immediate surgery for high-risk stage II and III colon cancers: a multicentre randomised controlled phase II trial – the PRODIGE 22 - ECKINOXE trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Rullier, Anne; Luciani, Alain; Bonnetain, Franck; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Sarran, Antony; Monges, Geneviève; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Malicot, Karine; Leroy, Karen; Sobhani, Iradj; Bardier, Armelle; Moreau, Marie; Brindel, Isabelle; Seitz, Jean François; Taieb, Julien

    2015-01-01

    In patients with high risk stage II and stage III colon cancer (CC), curative surgery followed by adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy has become the standard of care. However, for 20 to 30 % of these patients, the current curative treatment strategy of surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy fails either to clear locoregional spread or to eradicate distant micrometastases, leading to disease recurrence. Preoperative chemotherapy is an attractive concept for these CCs and has the potential to impact upon both of these causes of failure. Optimum systemic therapy at the earliest possible opportunity may be more effective at eradicating distant metastases than the same treatment given after the delay and immunological stress of surgery. Added to this, shrinking the primary tumor before surgery may reduce the risk of incomplete surgical excision, and the risk of tumor cell shedding during surgery. PRODIGE 22 - ECKINOXE is a multicenter randomized phase II trial designed to evaluate efficacy and feasibility of two chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX-4 alone and FOLFOX-4 + Cetuximab) in a peri-operative strategy in patients with bulky CCs. Patients with CC deemed as high risk T3, T4 and/or N2 on initial abdominopelvic CT scan are randomized to either colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy (control arm), or 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX-4 (for RAS mutated patients). In RAS wild-type patients a third arm testing FOLFOX+ cetuximab has been added prior to colectomy. Patients in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms will receive postoperative treatment for 4 months (8 cycles) to complete their therapeutic schedule. The primary endpoint of the study is the histological Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) as defined by Ryan. The secondary endpoints are: treatment strategy safety (toxicity, primary tumor related complications under chemotherapy, peri-operative morbidity), disease-free and recurrence free survivals at 3 years, quality of life, carcinologic quality and

  12. Neoadjuvant FOLFOX 4 versus FOLFOX 4 with Cetuximab versus immediate surgery for high-risk stage II and III colon cancers: a multicentre randomised controlled phase II trial--the PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Rullier, Anne; Luciani, Alain; Bonnetain, Franck; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Sarran, Antony; Monges, Geneviève; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Malicot, Karine; Leroy, Karen; Sobhani, Iradj; Bardier, Armelle; Moreau, Marie; Brindel, Isabelle; Seitz, Jean François; Taieb, Julien

    2015-07-10

    In patients with high risk stage II and stage III colon cancer (CC), curative surgery followed by adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy has become the standard of care. However, for 20 to 30% of these patients, the current curative treatment strategy of surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy fails either to clear locoregional spread or to eradicate distant micrometastases, leading to disease recurrence. Preoperative chemotherapy is an attractive concept for these CCs and has the potential to impact upon both of these causes of failure. Optimum systemic therapy at the earliest possible opportunity may be more effective at eradicating distant metastases than the same treatment given after the delay and immunological stress of surgery. Added to this, shrinking the primary tumor before surgery may reduce the risk of incomplete surgical excision, and the risk of tumor cell shedding during surgery. PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE is a multicenter randomized phase II trial designed to evaluate efficacy and feasibility of two chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX-4 alone and FOLFOX-4 + Cetuximab) in a peri-operative strategy in patients with bulky CCs. Patients with CC deemed as high risk T3, T4 and/or N2 on initial abdominopelvic CT scan are randomized to either colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy (control arm), or 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX-4 (for RAS mutated patients). In RAS wild-type patients a third arm testing FOLFOX+ cetuximab has been added prior to colectomy. Patients in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms will receive postoperative treatment for 4 months (8 cycles) to complete their therapeutic schedule. The primary endpoint of the study is the histological Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) as defined by Ryan. The secondary endpoints are: treatment strategy safety (toxicity, primary tumor related complications under chemotherapy, peri-operative morbidity), disease-free and recurrence free survivals at 3 years, quality of life, carcinologic quality and

  13. Role of radiation therapy for stage III thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of the postoperative radiation therapy for patients with Stage III thymoma and to define the optimal radiotherapeutic regimen. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 24 patients with Stage III thymoma who were referred for postoperative radiation therapy in our institution from June, 1987 to May, 1999. Surgical therapy consisted of total resection in one patient, subtotal resection in seventeen, and biopsy alone in six patients. Age of the patients was ranged from 20 to 62 years with mean age of 47 years. Male to female ratio was 14 to 10. Radiation therapy was delivered with linear accelerator producing either 6 MeV or 10 MeV photons. The irradiated volume included anterior mediastinum and known residual disease. The supraclavicular fossae were not irradiated. The delivered total dose was ranged from 30 to 56 Gy. One patient received 30 Gy and eighteen patients received minimum of 50 Gy. Follow up period was ranged from 12 months to 8 years with median follow up of 40 months. The overall local control rate for entire group of patients was 67% at 5 years. The cumulative local failure rates at one, three and five year were 18%, 28% and 33%, respectively. In patients treated with subtotal resection and biopsy alone, local control rate was 76% and 33%, respectively. The actuarial observed survival rate at 5 years was 57%, and actuarial adjusted survival at 5 years was 72%. The difference between 5 year survival rates for patients treated with subtotal resection and biopsy alone was not statistically significant (62% vs 30%). We might conclude that postoperative radiation therapy was safe and effective treatment for patients with Stage III thymoma. Postoperative radiation therapy is recommended in cases where tumor margin is close or incomplete resection is accomplished

  14. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  15. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chansky, Kari; Detterbeck, Frank C; Nicholson, Andrew G

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Revisions to the TNM stage classifications for lung cancer, informed by the international database (N = 94,708) of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee, need external validation. The objective was to externally...... demonstrated consistent ability to discriminate TNM categories and stage groups for clinical and pathologic stage. CONCLUSIONS: The IASLC revisions made for the eighth edition of lung cancer staging are validated by this analysis of the NCDB database by the ordering, statistical differences, and homogeneity...... validate the revisions by using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of the American College of Surgeons. METHODS: Cases presenting from 2000 through 2012 were drawn from the NCDB and reclassified according to the eighth edition stage classification. Clinically and pathologically staged subsets of NSCLC...

  16. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  17. Transesophageal Ultrasonography for Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  18. Staging of prostate cancer: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejos, J.; Alvarez, C.; Mariluis, C.; Paganini, L.; González, C.; De Luca, S.; Dieguez, A.; Villaronga, A.

    2013-01-01

    In our country prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in older men. An accurate staging is very important to establish treatment strategies.This article presents the 7th edition TNM staging system for prostate cancer, effective January 1, 2010. This has undergone major changes over the 6th edition. (authors) [es

  19. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  20. Breast cancer staging with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smathers, R.L.; D'Amelio, F.; Stockdale, F.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-three patients with biopsy-proved breast cancer underwent MR staging of the cervicothoracic spine, lumbosacral spine, liver, and thorax. In all cases, these findings have been compared with the results of clinical staging, laboratory tests, chest radiography, and radionuclide bone scanning. MR imaging was a valuable staging tool for patients with more than minimal breast cancer and indications for radionuclide bone scanning. MR imaging had the greatest clinical importance when it identified thoracic soft-tissue abnormalities, including axillary., lateral thoracic, supraclavicular, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The coronal and sagittal views were very valuable for detection of chest wall invasion, sternal involvement, and internal mammary adenopathy. Negative MR staging clinically reassured patients that aggressive local therapy bad curative potential. Positive MR staging avoided inappropriate aggressive local therapy and mastectomy. MR imaging can be recommended for improved breast cancer staging in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who have more than minimal disease

  1. TU-D-207B-02: Delta-Radiomics: The Prognostic Value of Therapy-Induced Changes in Radiomics Features for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fave, X; Court, L; Zhang, L; Yang, J; Mackin, D; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Balter, P; Jones, A; Gomez, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how radiomics features change during radiation therapy and whether those changes (delta-radiomics features) can improve prognostic models built with clinical factors. Methods: 62 radiomics features, including histogram, co-occurrence, run-length, gray-tone difference, and shape features, were calculated from pretreatment and weekly intra-treatment CTs for 107 stage III NSCLC patients (5–9 images per patient). Image preprocessing for each feature was determined using the set of pretreatment images: bit-depth resample and/or a smoothing filter were tested for their impact on volume-correlation and significance of each feature in univariate cox regression models to maximize their information content. Next, the optimized features were calculated from the intratreatment images and tested in linear mixed-effects models to determine which features changed significantly with dose-fraction. The slopes in these significant features were defined as delta-radiomics features. To test their prognostic potential multivariate cox regression models were fitted, first using only clinical features and then clinical+delta-radiomics features for overall-survival, local-recurrence, and distant-metastases. Leave-one-out cross validation was used for model-fitting and patient predictions. Concordance indices(c-index) and p-values for the log-rank test with patients stratified at the median were calculated. Results: Approximately one-half of the 62 optimized features required no preprocessing, one-fourth required smoothing, and one-fourth required smoothing and resampling. From these, 54 changed significantly during treatment. For overall-survival, the c-index improved from 0.52 for clinical factors alone to 0.62 for clinical+delta-radiomics features. For distant-metastases, the c-index improved from 0.53 to 0.58, while for local-recurrence it did not improve. Patient stratification significantly improved (p-value<0.05) for overallsurvival and distant

  2. TU-D-207B-02: Delta-Radiomics: The Prognostic Value of Therapy-Induced Changes in Radiomics Features for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fave, X; Court, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT Health Science Center, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang, L; Yang, J; Mackin, D; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Balter, P; Jones, A; Gomez, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine how radiomics features change during radiation therapy and whether those changes (delta-radiomics features) can improve prognostic models built with clinical factors. Methods: 62 radiomics features, including histogram, co-occurrence, run-length, gray-tone difference, and shape features, were calculated from pretreatment and weekly intra-treatment CTs for 107 stage III NSCLC patients (5–9 images per patient). Image preprocessing for each feature was determined using the set of pretreatment images: bit-depth resample and/or a smoothing filter were tested for their impact on volume-correlation and significance of each feature in univariate cox regression models to maximize their information content. Next, the optimized features were calculated from the intratreatment images and tested in linear mixed-effects models to determine which features changed significantly with dose-fraction. The slopes in these significant features were defined as delta-radiomics features. To test their prognostic potential multivariate cox regression models were fitted, first using only clinical features and then clinical+delta-radiomics features for overall-survival, local-recurrence, and distant-metastases. Leave-one-out cross validation was used for model-fitting and patient predictions. Concordance indices(c-index) and p-values for the log-rank test with patients stratified at the median were calculated. Results: Approximately one-half of the 62 optimized features required no preprocessing, one-fourth required smoothing, and one-fourth required smoothing and resampling. From these, 54 changed significantly during treatment. For overall-survival, the c-index improved from 0.52 for clinical factors alone to 0.62 for clinical+delta-radiomics features. For distant-metastases, the c-index improved from 0.53 to 0.58, while for local-recurrence it did not improve. Patient stratification significantly improved (p-value<0.05) for overallsurvival and distant

  3. Second-line Treatment of Stage III/IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC with pemetrexed in routine clinical practice: Evaluation of performance status and health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuette Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC improves overall survival. There is a lack of data regarding the impact on patients' overall health condition. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated performance status (PS and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL during second-line pemetrexed treatment in routine clinical practice. Methods Stage III/IV NSCLC patients who initiated second-line pemetrexed (standard vitamin and dexamethasone supplementation were observed for a maximum of 9 treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate the proportion of patients achieving improvement of Karnofsky Index (KI of ≥ 10% (absolute or maintaining KI ≥ 80% after the second treatment cycle ("KI benefit response". HR-QoL was self-rated using the EuroQoL-5D questionnaire (EQ-5D. Factors potentially associated with KI benefit response were evaluated using logistic regression models. Results Of 521 eligible patients (73.5% Stage IV, median age 66.3 yrs, 36.1% ≥ 70 yrs, 62.0% with KI ≥ 80%, 471 (90.4% completed at least 2 treatment cycles. 58.0% (95%CI 53.6%;62.2% achieved KI benefit response after the second cycle. Patients with baseline KI ≥ 80%, no Grade 3/4 toxicities during the first 2 cycles, or combination regimen as prior first-line therapy were more likely to achieve a KI benefit response. EQ-5D scores improved over time. Grade 3/4 toxicities were reported in 23.8% of patients (mainly fatigue/asthenia 15.9%, neutropenia 8.7%. Conclusions In this large prospective, non-interventional study of second-line pemetrexed treatment in patients with advanced NSCLC, including 36% elderly patients ( ≥ 70 years, physician-rated PS and self-rated HR-QoL were maintained or improved in the majority of patients. Trial registration Registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00540241 on October 4, 2007

  4. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... oncology nurse and a registered dietitian. Read More "Screening For Breast Cancer" Articles #BeBrave: A life-saving test / Breast Cancer ...

  5. Stage III nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: Improving results with endoscopic-assisted midfacial degloving and modification to the Fisch staging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saurin R; Keshri, Amit; Patadia, Simple; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Srivastava, Arun Kumar; Behari, Sanjay

    2015-10-01

    To study outcomes with endoscopic-assisted midfacial degloving for Fisch stage III nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and propose a new staging system. Retrospective study of patients with Fisch stage III juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) including preoperative angiography, intraoperative blood loss and residue/recurrence following surgery. Tertiary care superspecialty referral center. Fifteen consecutive patients with Fisch stage III JNA undergoing operations over a period of 18 months. Preoperative angiography details, intraoperative blood loss, residue/recurrence, complications of surgery. Transarterial embolization with particulate agents followed by endoscopic-assisted midfacial degloving provides excellent outcomes with Fisch stage III JNAs. The modified Fisch staging system proposed would allow better preoperative evaluation and comparison of outcomes with different treatment options for stage III JNAs. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The cost of unresectable stage III or stage IV melanoma in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maio Michele

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent decades, melanoma incidence has been increasing in European countries; in 2006, there were approximately 60,000 cases leading to 13,000 deaths. Within Europe there is some geographical variation in the incidence of melanoma, with the highest rates reported in Scandinavia (15 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year and the lowest in the Mediterranean countries (5 to 7 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Methods The present article is based on the information collected in the MELODY study (MELanoma treatment patterns and Outcomes among patients with unresectable stage III or stage IV Disease: a retrospective longitudinal survey. In that study, the medical charts of patients were reviewed to document current treatment patterns and to analyse information on patients, disease characteristics and healthcare resource utilization related to the treatment of advanced melanoma regarding patients who presented with a diagnosis of malignant melanoma (stage I to IV at participating sites between 01 July, 2005 and 30 June, 2006. Results Summarizing, though the length of the follow-up period varies among sample patients, an amount of the yearly cost per patient can be estimated, dividing the average per patient total cost (€ 5.040 by the average follow-up duration (17.5 months and reporting to one year; on these grounds, unresectable stage III or stage IV melanoma in Italy would cost € 3,456 per patient per year.

  7. Staging of intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric cancers with the OLGA and OLGIM staging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S-J; Choi, I J; Kook, M-C; Nam, B-H; Kim, C G; Lee, J Y; Ryu, K W; Kim, Y-W

    2013-11-01

    Operative link on gastritis assessment (OLGA) and Operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) staging systems have been proposed for gastric cancer (GC) risk estimation. To validate the OLGA and OLGIM staging systems in a region with high risk of GC. This retrospective study included 474 GC patients and age- and sex-matched health screening control persons in a cancer centre hospital. We classified gastritis patterns according to the OLGA and OLGIM systems using the histological database that a pathologist prospectively evaluated using the updated Sydney system. GC risk according to the OLGA and OLGIM stages was evaluated using logistic regression analysis. More GC patients had OLGA stages III-IV (46.2%) than controls (26.6%, P diffuse-type GCs (30.9%). OLGA stages III and IV were significantly associated with increased risk of GC [odds ratios (ORs), 2.09; P = 0.008 and 2.04; P = 0.014 respectively] in multivariate analysis. The association was more significant for intestinal-type (ORs, 4.76; P = 0.001 and 4.19; P = 0.002 respectively), but not diffuse-type GC. OLGIM stages from I to IV were significantly associated with increased risk of both intestinal-type (ORs, 3.64, 5.15, 7.89 and 13.20 respectively) and diffuse-type GC (ORs, 1.84, 2.59, 5.08 and 6.32 respectively) with a significantly increasing trend. As high OLGA and OLGIM stages are independent risk factors for gastric cancer, the staging systems may be useful for risk assessment in high-risk regions, especially for intestinal-type gastric cancer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos; Hitre, Erika; Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos; Oberna, Ferenc; Goedeny, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this phase II randomized study, the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT was compared with those after standard CRT alone in patients with locally advanced, unresectable head and neck cancer. Between January 2007 and June 2009, 66 patients with advanced (stage III or IV) unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) were randomly assigned to two groups: one receiving two cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil ICT followed by CRT with three cycles of cisplatin and one treated by CRT alone. Response rate, local tumor control (LTC), locoregional tumor control (LRTC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity results were assessed. Three patients from the ICT + CRT group did not appear at the first treatment, so a total of 63 patients were evaluated in the study (30 ICT + CRT group and 33 CRT group). Three patients died of febrile neutropenia after ICT. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 63 months (range 53-82 months). The rate of radiologic complete response was 63 % following ICT + CRT, whereas 70 % after CRT alone. There were no significant differences in the 3-year rates of LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %), and PFS (41 vs. 50 %) in the ICT + CRT group and in the CRT group, respectively. The rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly higher in the ICT + CRT group than in the CRT group (37 and 12 %; p = 0.024). Late toxicity (grade 2 or 3 xerostomia) developed in 59 and 42 % in the ICT + CRT and CRT groups, respectively. The addition of ICT to CRT did not show any advantage in our phase II trial, while the incidence of adverse events increased. The three deaths as a consequence of ICT call attention to the importance of

  9. Early prediction of therapy response and disease free survival after induction chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer by FDG-PET: Correlation between tumor FDG-metabolism and morphometric tumor response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Niesen, A.; Przetak, C.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Chemotherapy with Docetaxel and Carboplatin (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction VIP-chemotherapy has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. The aim of the present study was to correlate the tumor FDG metabolism as measured by F-18 FDG-PET with morphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Erythropoietin (10,000 IU Epo s.c. three times a week). Material and Methods: In this prospective multicenter study, 54 patients with NSCLC stage IIIA (9 patients) or IIIB (45 patients) were enrolled and received neoadjuvant treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 d1 and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles prior to surgery. Postoperatively, all patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. WB-PET-studies (ECAT Exact 47) were obtained p.i. of 400 MBq F-18 FDG. Standardized uptake values (SUV), metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and metabolic tumor index (MTI SUV x MTD) were assessed. Image fusion of PET and CT data was applied on a HERMES computer. Results: Of 54 enrolled patients, 46 were evaluable for response by CT. 30/46 patients (65%) achieved complete remission (CR, 1 patient) or partial remission (PR 29 patients.). Of the 46 patients, 37 patients completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Chx) and were studied before and after Chx by FDG-PET. 14 (30% of the 46 evaluable patients) had SUV < 2.5, corresponding to metabolic complete remission (mCR), 23 had PR or stable disease (non-mCR); in 9 patients, PET was not performed because of progressive disease demonstrated by CT. The R0-resection rate was 56% (27/48 evaluable patients). Of the 14 patients with metabolic CR, 9 were evaluated by morphometry. All had regression grades III (no vital tumor cells) or grade IIB (< 10% vital tumor cells and induced apoptosis). With a median

  10. Sixteen years follow-up results of a randomized phase II trial of neoadjuvant fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FAC) compared with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) in stage III breast cancer: GOCS experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, José Pablo; Leone, Julieta; Vallejo, Carlos Teodoro; Pérez, Juan Eduardo; Romero, Alberto Omar; Machiavelli, Mario Raul; Romero Acuña, Luis; Domínguez, María Ester; Langui, Mario; Fasce, Hebe Margot; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Ortiz, Eduardo; Iturbe, Julián; Zwenger, Ariel Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) allows direct evaluation of the tumor's sensitivity to therapy, eradication of micrometastatic disease and the possibility of performing breast conserving surgery. The aim of this study was to describe long-term results of NAC in stage III breast cancer patients. We evaluated 126 patients that participated in a phase II randomized trial of neoadjuvant FAC compared with CMF. Chemotherapy was administered for three cycles prior to definitive surgery and radiotherapy, and then for six cycles as adjuvant. Median follow-up was 4.5 years (range 0.2-16.4). Objective response rate (OR) was similar in both groups (61 % for FAC, 66 % for CMF, P = NS). There were no differences in median disease free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS) (5.1 vs 3.3 years and 6.7 vs 6.3 years for FAC and CMF, respectively). After 16 years of follow-up, 53 patients are still alive. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of pathologically involved lymph nodes (pLN) was the only factor associated with both, DFS and OS (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.0005, respectively). Both regimens were well tolerated, CMF had higher incidence of grade 3-4 leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and stomatitis, whereas alopecia was more common in FAC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report long-term outcomes of FAC and CMF in the neoadjuvant setting. Within the sensitivity of our study, both regimens showed similar OR, long-term toxicity, DFS, and OS rate at 16 years. After 5 years, the hazard of death seems to decline. The prolonged follow-up of this study provides a unique opportunity to evaluate factors that predict long-term outcomes. After 16 years of follow-up, the number of pLN remains the most powerful predictor of survival.

  11. Stage I/II endometrial carcinomas: preoperative radiotherapy: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Belichard, C.; Horiot, J.C.; Barillot, I.; Fraisse, J.; Collin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study is to analyse the indications and the results of treatment of endometrial carcinomas by preoperative radiotherapy. MATERIAL: From 1976 to 1995, 183 patients FIGO stage I or II were treated by preoperative radiotherapy consisting in 95 cases of external radiotherapy (XRT) and brachytherapy (BT) followed by surgery (S) and, in 88 cases of BT alone before surgery, XRT was indicated in cases of grade 2 or 3 and/or cervical involvement. METHODS: XRT was delivered with a 4-fields technique to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with a medial shielding at 30 Gy. BT was done with low dose rate Cs137 and Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators with two intra-uterine tubes and vaginal ovoieds. Complications were scored using the French-Italian syllabus. RESULTS: Five-year actuarial survival rates per stage are: Ia=91%, Ib=83%, II=71%, and per grade: G1=80%, G2=79%, G3=90%. Failures were pelvic in 5/183 (2.7%), vaginal in 4 cases (2%) and nodal in 2 cases (1%). Twelve patients developed metastases (6.5%). Complications were analysed during the radiotherapy, after the surgery and with unlimited follow-up. After BT/S, 12 grade 1, 1 grade 2 and 1 grade 3 complications were observed. In the group of patients treated by RT/BT/S, 22 grade 1, 11 grade 2, 4 grade 3 occurred. There is no statistical correlation between complications and parameters of treatment (XRT, hwt, HWT, reference dose to the bladder and rectum, dose rate of brachytherapy). SUMMARY: Preoperative irradiation is an effective and safe treatment of high risk stage I/II endometrial carcinomas. Results seem independent of the pathology grade

  12. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  13. Comparison of survival and toxicities of concurrent radiotherapy with Carboplatin/Paclitaxel or Cisplatin/Etoposide in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancers: retrospective analysis in the Department of Pneumology of CHU Nancy between 2008 and 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    In concomitant chemo-radiotherapy treatment for inoperable stage III NSCLC, different combinations of chemotherapies have been recommended. The objective of this study was to compare progression-free survival, overall survival, and tolerability of two treatment regimens: Cisplatin-etoposide concomitant radio-chemotherapy versus concomitant carboplatin-Paclitaxel based radio-chemotherapy in these patients. A retrospective analysis of 62 patients treated with concomitant radio-chemotherapy for inoperable stage III NSCLC has been carried out in the Department of Pneumology (University Hospital of Nancy). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the chemotherapy protocol, group 1: Cisplatin-etoposide (27 patients) and group 2: Carboplatin-Paclitaxel (35 patients). The two groups were comparable in terms of age and gender (mean age 58 in group 1 versus age 61 in group 2, and 85 pc of men in group 1 versus 80 pc in group 2). The median overall survival was 19 months in group 1 versus 15.3 months in group 2 (p = 0.22). The median progression-free survival was higher in group 1, 9 months versus 3.3 months in group 2 (p = 0.01). Hematologic toxicity was higher in group 1 than in group 2 (neutropenia 85.2 pc versus 54.3 pc, p = 0.01, anemia 92.3 pc versus 54.3 pc, p = 0.001). Radiation esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis rates were higher in group 1 than in group 2: 44.4 pc versus 11.4 pc (p = 0.01), and 44.4 pc versus 11.4 pc (p = 0.001) respectively. In this mono-centric and retrospective study, the Cisplatin-etoposide - thoracic radiotherapy combination to treat inoperable stage III NSCLC was associated with a significantly higher progression-free survival than the Carboplatin-Paclitaxel-radiotherapy combination. This increase in survival was accompanied by a significantly higher hematological and organ toxicity [fr

  14. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer: A Clinical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannarkatt, Joseph; Joseph, Joe; Kurniali, Peter C; Al-Janadi, Anas; Hrinczenko, Borys

    2017-04-01

    The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy can be challenging. Although the benefit of treatment is clear in most patients with stage III disease, the decision to provide chemotherapy after surgical resection in stage II disease must be made on an individual basis. Several trials have demonstrated the small but absolute benefits of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer for disease-free survival and overall survival. In an attempt to better understand the role of chemotherapy, several studies were performed that identified high-risk characteristics that can be used prognostically and predictively to aid in the clinical decision making process. ASCO, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the European Society of Medical Oncology have published guidelines describing these high-risk characteristics. Since then, several other molecular markers have emerged that may offer more information on a given patient's risk for recurrence. The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer must be made on an individual basis, considering the risks and benefits of treatment. In this short review, we will present the available evidence and offer possible directions for future study.

  15. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A; Johnson, N; Cornes, P; Simera, I; Collingwood, M; Williams, C; Kitchener, H

    2007-04-18

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy) in stage I endometrial cancer following total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH and BSO) remains unclear. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CancerLit, Physician Data Query (PDQ) of National Cancer Institute. Handsearching was also carried out where appropriate. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared adjuvant radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer were included. Quality of the studies was assessed and data collected using a predefined data collection form. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence and endometrial cancer death. Data on quality of life (QOL) and morbidity were also collected. A meta-analysis on included trials was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager Software 4.2. The meta-analysis was performed on four trials (1770 patients). The addition of pelvic external beam radiotherapy to surgery reduced locoregional recurrence, a relative risk (RR) of 0.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.44, p ASTEC; Lukka) are awaited. External beam radiotherapy carries a risk of toxicity and should be avoided in stage 1 endometrial cancer patients with no high risk factors.

  16. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Praeoperatives Staging des Rektumkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wiech, T. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  17. Health Care Coach Support in Reducing Acute Care Use and Cost in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Brain Glioblastoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Head and Neck Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progressive Disease; Recurrent Carcinoma; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bone Sarcoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IVA Bone Sarcoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Bone Sarcoma; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Surgical management of stage III pediatric empyema thoracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya Pratap; Shukla, Arvind Kumar; Sharma, Pramila; Shukla, Jyotsna

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to report 100 pediatric patients of empyema thoracis treated by open decortication, highlighting the presentation, delay in referral, operative findings, the response to surgical intervention, and follow-up. All the children who underwent open decortication for stage III empyema thoracis during the study period January 2015-December 2016 were included. Preoperative workup included hemogram, serum protein, chest radiographs, and contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CECT) scan of the chest. One hundred (65 males, 35 females) (age 2 months-13 years, mean 4.5 years) were operated during a 2-year period. Among them, 90% patients were referred 3 weeks after the onset of disease. Intercostal chest drainage (ICD) had been inserted in (95) 95% cases. Thickened pleura, multiloculated pus, and lung involvement were invariably seen on CECT scan. Bronchopleural fistula was present in five patients. Decortication and removal of necrotic tissue were performed in all the patients. Mean duration of postoperative ICD was 4 days. Follow-up ranged from 1 month to 2 years (mean 12 months). There was no mortality. Five patients had proven tuberculosis. Only 10% presented within the early period of the disease. The duration of the disease had a direct relationship with the thickness of the pleura and injury to the underlying lung. Delayed referral causes irreversible changes in the lung prolonging recovery. Meticulous open surgical debridement gives gratifying results. The status of the lung at the end of surgery is a major prognostic factor.

  19. Interactive Tailored Website to Promote Sun Protection and Skin Self-Check Behaviors in Patients With Stage 0-III Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage 0 Skin Melanoma; Stage I Skin Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage II Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma

  20. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  1. Roll of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Kidney cancer. Stage III. Results to 5 years. Observational, descriptive, retrospective, quantitative and comparative study with data numerical description; Rol de la radioterapia adyuvante. Cancer de rinion. Estadio III. Resultados a 5 anios. Estudio observacional, descriptivo, retrospectivo, cuantitativo y comparativo, con descripcion numerica de los datos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lione, M; Tissera, N; Mandachain, M [Centro de Oncologia y Terapia Radiante, Santa Rosa, La Pampa (Argentina)

    2007-07-01

    Kidney cancer represents 3 % of the tumors in adults. In the United States, the 45% is diagnosed in early stages. Its natural history is characterized for being absolutely unpredictable and probably related to hormonal, immunologic and unknown factors. There are patients in advanced stage with prolonged or low average survival and even with metastasis declination. These particularities along with the lack of prospective random studies make difficult to establish which is the roll of the adjuvant radiotherapy, being considered not standard since 1997. [Spanish] El cancer de rinion representa el 3% de los tumores en adultos. En Estados Unidos el 45% se diagnostica en estadios tempranos. Su historia natural se caracteriza por ser absolutamente impredecible, probablemente relacionado a factores hormonales, inmunologicos y desconocidos; hay pacientes con enfermedad avanzada con prolongada o corta supervivencia media e incluso con regresion de metastasis. Estas particularidades, juntamente con la falta de estudios prospectivos aleatorios dificultan establecer cual es el rol de la radioterapia adyuvante, considerandose no estandar desde 1997.

  2. Iyengar-Yoga Compared to Exercise as a Therapeutic Intervention during (Neoadjuvant Therapy in Women with Stage I–III Breast Cancer: Health-Related Quality of Life, Mindfulness, Spirituality, Life Satisfaction, and Cancer-Related Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désirée Lötzke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to test the effects of yoga on health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, cancer-related fatigue, mindfulness, and spirituality compared to conventional therapeutic exercises during (neoadjuvant cytotoxic and endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer. In a randomized controlled trial 92 women with breast cancer undergoing oncological treatment were randomly enrolled for a yoga intervention (YI (n=45 or for a physical exercise intervention (PEI (n=47. Measurements were obtained before (t0 and after the intervention (t1 as well as 3 months after finishing intervention (t2 using standardized questionnaires. Life satisfaction and fatigue improved under PEI (p<0.05 but not under YI (t0 to t2. Regarding quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 a direct effect (t0 to t1; p<0.001 of YI was found on role and emotional functioning, while under PEI only emotional functioning improved. Significant improvements (p<0.001 were observed at both t1 and t2 also for symptom scales in both groups: dyspnea, appetite loss, constipation, and diarrhea. There was no significant difference between therapies for none of the analyzed variables neither for t1 nor for t2. During chemotherapy, yoga was not seen as more helpful than conventional therapeutic exercises. This does not argue against its use in the recovery phase.

  3. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Hitre, Erika [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Chemotherapy and Clinical Pharmacology, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, Ferenc [Bacs-Kiskun County Hospital, Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Head and Neck Surgery, Kecskemet (Hungary); Goedeny, Maria [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-08-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this phase II randomized study, the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT was compared with those after standard CRT alone in patients with locally advanced, unresectable head and neck cancer. Between January 2007 and June 2009, 66 patients with advanced (stage III or IV) unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) were randomly assigned to two groups: one receiving two cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil ICT followed by CRT with three cycles of cisplatin and one treated by CRT alone. Response rate, local tumor control (LTC), locoregional tumor control (LRTC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity results were assessed. Three patients from the ICT + CRT group did not appear at the first treatment, so a total of 63 patients were evaluated in the study (30 ICT + CRT group and 33 CRT group). Three patients died of febrile neutropenia after ICT. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 63 months (range 53-82 months). The rate of radiologic complete response was 63 % following ICT + CRT, whereas 70 % after CRT alone. There were no significant differences in the 3-year rates of LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %), and PFS (41 vs. 50 %) in the ICT + CRT group and in the CRT group, respectively. The rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly higher in the ICT + CRT group than in the CRT group (37 and 12 %; p = 0.024). Late toxicity (grade 2 or 3 xerostomia) developed in 59 and 42 % in the ICT + CRT and CRT groups, respectively. The addition of ICT to CRT did not show any advantage in our phase II trial, while the incidence of adverse events increased. The three deaths as a consequence of ICT call attention to the importance of

  4. Larynx cancer in early stages: bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umana Herrera, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    A bibliographical analysis on the subject of early laryngeal cancer (neoplams staged as Tis, T1-T2 N0) was carried out through a bibliographic review of updated articles. The anatomy, epidemiology, generalities, clinical presentation and behavior of cancer were described. The biopsy, the clinical history, the physical examination and radiodiagnostic studies are used for a correct staging and according to the stage, to select the appropriate treatment. Treatment modalities and prescription dose for this type of cancer are compared and explained. The locoregional evaluation of glottic cancer is performed by Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Ultrasound (US) and Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET/CT). CAT and NMR have shown to be more accurate in the evaluation of glottic larynx cancer compared with clinical endoscopic examination alone. CAT, NMR, US and PET/CT were clearly more sensitive and specific in the assessment of the neck that only palpation. The preservation of the voice is an important parameter in choosing a therapeutic modality. Radiotherapy has proven to be the most used and known treatment. Radiation therapy with Cobalt 60 is commonly used in Costa Rica for the treatment of early larynx cancer [es

  5. Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease stage III with special reference to tumour burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Nissen, N I

    1988-01-01

    143 patients with Hodgkin's disease stage III (65 PS III, 78 CS III) were treated with radiotherapy alone (33 patients), combination chemotherapy alone (56 patients), or radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy (54 patients). They were followed till death or from 7 to 191 months. Prognostic fac...... regarding early stage disease to the effect that tumour burden is the single most important prognostic factor in Hodgkin's disease....

  6. Surveillance in stage I testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Rørth, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    Treatment results on 695 stage I testicular cancer patients followed with surveillance are described. Seminoma (SGCT) was present in 394 patients and nonseminoma (NSGCT) in 301 patients. Relapses were detected in 155 patients (22%), in 69 patients with SGCT (17%) and 86 with NSGCT (29...

  7. Exercise and Low-Dose Ibuprofen for Cognitive Impairment in Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-13

    Cognitive Impairment; Stage 0 Colorectal Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  8. Sequential versus "sandwich" sequencing of adjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of stage III uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sharon M; Chang-Halpenny, Christine; Hwang-Graziano, Julie

    2015-04-01

    To compare the efficacy and tolerance of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy delivered in sequential (chemotherapy followed by radiation) versus "sandwich" fashion (chemotherapy, interval radiation, and remaining chemotherapy) after surgery in patients with FIGO stage III uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma. From 2004 to 2011, we identified 51 patients treated at our institution fitting the above criteria. All patients received surgical staging followed by adjuvant chemoradiation (external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without high-dose rate (HDR) vaginal brachytherapy (VB)). Of these, 73% and 27% of patients received their adjuvant therapy in sequential and sandwich fashion, respectively. There were no significant differences in clinical or pathologic factors between patients treated with either regimen. Thirty-nine (76%) patients had stage IIIC disease. The majority of patients received 6 cycles of paclitaxel with carboplatin or cisplatin. Median EBRT dose was 45 Gy and 54% of patients received HDR VB boost (median dose 21 Gy). There were no significant differences in the estimated 5-year overall survival, local progression-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival between the sequential and sandwich groups: 87% vs. 77% (p=0.37), 89% vs. 100% (p=0.21), and 78% vs. 85% (p=0.79), respectively. No grade 3-4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicities were reported in either group. There was a trend towards higher incidence of grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity in the sandwich group. Adjuvant chemoradiation for FIGO stage III endometrioid uterine cancer given in either sequential or sandwich fashion appears to offer equally excellent early clinical outcomes and acceptably low toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Is knowledge translation adequate? A quality assurance study of staging investigations in early stage breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dolly; Hogeveen, Sophie; Sweet Goldstein, Miriam; George, Ralph; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Hoch, Jeffrey; Haq, Rashida; Simmons, Christine E

    2012-02-01

    After primary surgery, patients diagnosed with early stage breast cancer undergo radiological investigations based on pathologic stage of disease to rule out distant metastases. Published guidelines can aid clinicians in determining which tests are appropriate based on stage of disease. We wished to assess the consistency of radiological staging in an academic community oncology setting with standard guidelines and to determine the overall impact of non-adherence to these guidelines. A retrospective cohort study was conducted for new breast cancer patients seen at a single institution between January 2009 and April 2010. Patients were included if initial diagnosis and primary surgery was at this institution. Pathologic stage and radiological tests completed were recorded. A literature review was performed and the results were compared with those from this study to determine overall adherence rates. Subsequently, a cost analysis was performed to determine the financial impact at this centre. 231 patients met eligibility criteria for inclusion in this study. A large proportion of patients were over-staged with 129 patients (55%) undergoing unnecessary investigations according to guidelines. Specifically, 59% of stage I patients and 58% of stage II patients were over-investigated. Distant metastases at the time of diagnosis were found in three patients, all of whom had stage III disease (1.3%). The literature reviewed revealed similar non-adherence rates in other centres. The estimated cost of such non-adherence is in the range of $78 (CDN) per new early stage breast cancer patient seen at this centre. This oncology centre has a low adherence to practice guidelines for staging investigations in breast cancer patients, with 55% of patients undergoing unnecessary tests. Very few patients had metastases at diagnosis, and all had pathological stage III disease. Efforts may need to focus on improving knowledge translation across clinical oncology settings to increase

  10. Role of Surgical Versus Clinical Staging in Chemoradiated FIGO Stage IIB-IVA Cervical Cancer Patients—Acute Toxicity and Treatment Quality of the Uterus-11 Multicenter Phase III Intergroup Trial of the German Radiation Oncology Group and the Gynecologic Cancer Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone, E-mail: simone.marnitz-schulze@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne Medical Faculty, Cologne (Germany); Martus, Peter [Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Advanced Operative and Oncologic Gynecology, Asklepios Clinics, Hamburg (Germany); Stromberger, Carmen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne Medical Faculty, Cologne (Germany); Asse, Elke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Mallmann, Peter [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Affonso Júnior, Renato José [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de Cãncer de Barretos, Barretos (Brazil); Nunes, João Soares [Department of Clinical Oncology, Hospital de Cãncer de Barretos, Barretos (Brazil); Sehouli, Jalid [Department of Gynecology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Budach, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne Medical Faculty, Cologne (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: The Uterus-11 trial was designed to evaluate the role of surgical staging in patients with cervical cancer before primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The present report provides the toxicity data stratified by the treatment arm and technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 255 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA) were randomized to either surgical staging followed by CRT (arm A) or clinical staging followed by CRT (arm B). Patients with para-aortic metastases underwent extended field radiation therapy (RT). Brachytherapy was mandatory. The present report presents the acute therapy-related toxicities stratified by treatment arm and radiation technique. Results: A total of 240 patients were eligible (n=121 in arm A; n=119 in arm B). Of the 240 patients, 236 (98.3%) underwent external beam RT with a median total dose of 50.4 Gy. The mean treatment duration was 53 days. Of the patients, 60% underwent intensity modulated RT (IMRT). A total of 234 patients (97.5%) underwent chemotherapy, and 231 (96.3%) underwent brachytherapy, with a median single dose of 6 Gy covering the tumor to a median nominal total dose of 28 Gy. Treatment was well tolerated, with 0% grade ≥3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity, 6% grade 3 nausea, 3% grade 3 vomiting, and <2% grade 3 diarrhea. More patients after surgical staging experienced grade 2 anemia (54.3% in arm A vs 45.3% in arm B; P=.074) and grade 2 leukocytopenia (41.4% vs 31.6%; P=.56). Of the patients who received IMRT versus a 3-dimensional technique, 65.3% versus 33.7% presented with grade 2 anemia. Grade 3 gastrointestinal and grade 2 bladder toxicity were significantly reduced with the use of IMRT. Conclusions: The incidence and severity of acute therapy-related toxicity compared favorably with those from other randomized trials. Excellent adherence to treatment and treatment quality was achieved compared with patterns of

  11. Treatment outcomes of different prognostic groups of patients on cancer and leukemia group B trial 39801: induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy compared with chemoradiotherapy alone for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Hodgson, Lydia; Herndon, James E; Kelley, Michael J; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Ramnath, Nithya; Niell, Harvey B; Atkins, James N; Akerley, Wallace; Green, Mark R; Vokes, Everett E

    2009-09-01

    In Cancer and Leukemia Group B 39801, we evaluated whether induction chemotherapy before concurrent chemoradiotherapy would result in improved survival and demonstrated no significant benefit from the addition of induction chemotherapy. The primary objective of this analysis was to dichotomize patients into prognostic groups using factors predictive of survival and to investigate whether induction chemotherapy was beneficial in either prognostic group. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess the impact on survival of the following factors: (>or=70 versus or=13 g/dl), performance status (PS) (1 versus 0), weight loss (>or=5% versus or=5%, age >or=70 years, PS of 1, and hgb or=2 poor prognostic factors (n = 165) or or=2 versus patients with or=2 factors (HR = 0.86, 95% CI, 0.63-1.17; p = 0.34) or

  12. Disparities of Immunotherapy Utilization in Patients with Stage III Cutaneous Melanoma: A National Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qurayshi, Zaid; Crowther, Jason E; Hamner, John B; Ducoin, Christopher; Killackey, Mary T; Kandil, Emad

    2018-05-01

    Immunotherapy combined with surgery is associated with better survival than surgery alone in patients with advanced melanoma. This study examined the utilization of immunotherapy in relation to population characteristics and the associated survival benefit. This was a retrospective cohort study utilizing the US National Cancer Database. The study population included 6,165 adult patients (≥18 years) with stage III cutaneous melanoma (median follow-up=32 months). A total of 1,854 patients underwent immunotherapy in addition to surgery, which was associated with a survival benefit over surgery alone (hazard ratio(HR)=0.66, 95% confidence interval(CI)=0.56-0.77, pimmunotherapy utilization (all pimmunotherapy usage was found (p=0.07). Compared to other demographic factors, insurance status was associated with the greatest disparities in immunotherapy utilization and mortality for patients who underwent surgery for advanced melanoma. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Fluorescence photodiagnosis of early stage lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Sakai, H.; Konaka, C.; Okunaka, T.; Furukawa, K.; Saito, Y.; Aizawa, K.; Hayata, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Sputum cytology examination is the most effective method to detect early stage central type squamous cell carcinoma. As sputum-positive early stage lung cancer usually does not show any abnormal findings on chest X-ray film, fiberoptic bronchoscopy is subsequently performed for localization. However, sometimes cases do not show any abnormal findings of cancer endoscopically because they are very early stage cases. For the purpose of localization of invisible lesions the photodynamic reaction was employed in this study. Photodynamic reaction is achieved by transfer of energy of an excited photo-sensitizer induced by photoradiation of light. This phenomenon was already recognized in the beginning of this century. Study of tumor localization of the bronchial tree using hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) and a mercury arc lamp was first performed in the Mayo Clinic in 1960s. In 1978, krypton laser was used first as a light source by Profio and Doiron. Authors have been doing research on early localization of such endoscopically occult early lung cancer since 1978. They recently developed an image processing system using an excimer dye laser for early localization of lung cancer. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Paclitaxel/carboplatin with or without sorafenib in the first-line treatment of patients with stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: a randomized phase II study of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainsworth, John D; Thompson, Dana S; Bismayer, John A; Gian, Victor G; Merritt, William M; Whorf, Robert C; Finney, Lindsey H; Dudley, B Stephens

    2015-01-01

    This trial compared the efficacy and toxicity of standard first-line treatment with paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/carboplatin plus sorafenib in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. Patients with stage 3 or 4 epithelial ovarian cancer with residual measurable disease or elevated CA-125 levels after maximal surgical cytoreduction were randomized (1:1) to receive treatment with paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 , 3 h infusion, day 1) and carboplatin (AUC 6.0, IV, day 1) with or without sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily (PO BID). Patients were reevaluated for response after completing 6 weeks of treatment (two cycles); responding or stable patients received six cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin. Patients receiving the sorafenib-containing regimen continued sorafenib (400 PO BID) for a total of 52 weeks. Eighty-five patients were randomized and received treatment.Efficacy was similar for patients receiving paclitaxel/carboplatin/sorafenib versus paclitaxel/carboplatin: overall response rates 69% versus 74%; median progression-free survival 15.4 versus 16.3 months; 2 year survival 76% versus 81%. The addition of sorafenib added substantially to the toxicity of the regimen; rash, hand–foot syndrome, mucositis, and hypertension were significantly more common in patients treated with sorafenib. The addition of sorafenib to standard paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve efficacy and substantially increased toxicity in the first-line treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Based on evidence from this study and other completed trials, sorafenib is unlikely to have a role in the treatment of ovarian cancer

  15. Electronic Monitoring Device of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Function in Improving Patient-Centered Care in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-05

    Stage I Adult Liver Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Liver Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Liver Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Radiotherapy for stage IV oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kaori; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Motegi, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with stage IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy in our facility from January 1993 to August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. The age of the patients was 34-84 (median 62) years old. Thirty-four were male and 14 were female. Subsite of the tumor was anterior: 16, lateral: 39, posterior: 1, and superior: 1. Forty-nine patients were treated with chemotherapy. Induction chemotherapy (ICT) was done in 25 patients, ICT+concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in 15 patients, and CCRT in 9 patients. A dose of 60-82 Gy (median 72 Gy) by hyperfractionated radiotherapy, at 1.2 Gy/fraction twice a day, was delivered in 37 patients, and 60-72 Gy (median 66 Gy) with a conventional daily fractionation in 20 patients. Salvage surgery was performed in 5 patients as a part of primary treatment after radiotherapy. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate and disease-free survival rate were 52.9% and 51.4%, respectively. By univariate analysis, the impact of age, sex, T-stage, N-stage, histological differentiation, chemotherapy and fractionation of radiation therapy on survivals were evaluated. T-stage, N-stage and histological differentiation were significantly covariate correlated with survival. The treatment results were not satisfactory. Further investigation of the treatment strategy to improve the treatment outcome of advanced oropharyngeal cancer is desired. (author)

  17. Local radiological staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, V.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Rectal cancer is