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Sample records for cancer series genetic

  1. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  2. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  3. Risk factors for colorectal cancer in patients with multiple serrated polyps: a cross-sectional case series from genetics clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Buchanan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with multiple serrated polyps are at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC. Recent reports have linked cigarette smoking with the subset of CRC that develops from serrated polyps. The aim of this work therefore was to investigate the association between smoking and the risk of CRC in high-risk genetics clinic patients presenting with multiple serrated polyps.We identified 151 Caucasian individuals with multiple serrated polyps including at least 5 outside the rectum, and classified patients into non-smokers, current or former smokers at the time of initial diagnosis of polyposis. Cases were individuals with multiple serrated polyps who presented with CRC. Controls were individuals with multiple serrated polyps and no CRC. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to estimate associations between smoking and CRC with adjustment for age at first presentation, sex and co-existing traditional adenomas, a feature that has been consistently linked with CRC risk in patients with multiple serrated polyps. CRC was present in 56 (37% individuals at presentation. Patients with at least one adenoma were 4 times more likely to present with CRC compared with patients without adenomas (OR = 4.09; 95%CI 1.27 to 13.14; P = 0.02. For females, the odds of CRC decreased by 90% in current smokers as compared to never smokers (OR = 0.10; 95%CI 0.02 to 0.47; P = 0.004 after adjusting for age and adenomas. For males, there was no relationship between current smoking and CRC. There was no statistical evidence of an association between former smoking and CRC for both sexes.A decreased odds for CRC was identified in females with multiple serrated polyps who currently smoke, independent of age and the presence of a traditional adenoma. Investigations into the biological basis for these observations could lead to non-smoking-related therapies being developed to decrease the risk of CRC and colectomy in these patients.

  4. Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufunmilayo F. Olopade MD, FACP, Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and Director of the Cancer Risk Clinic Department of Medicine, BSD Section of Hematology/Oncology University of Chicago, presented "Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention".

  5. Genetics of Endometrial Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Okuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancers exhibit a different mechanism of tumorigenesis and progression depending on histopathological and clinical types. The most frequently altered gene in estrogen-dependent endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors is PTEN. Microsatellite instability is another important genetic event in this type of tumor. In contrast, p53 mutations or Her2/neu overexpression are more frequent in non-endometrioid tumors. On the other hand, it is possible that the clear cell type may arise from a unique pathway which appears similar to the ovarian clear cell carcinoma. K-ras mutations are detected in approximately 15%–30% of endometrioid carcinomas, are unrelated to the existence of endometrial hyperplasia. A β-catenin mutation was detected in about 20% of endometrioid carcinomas, but is rare in serous carcinoma. Telomere shortening is another important type of genomic instability observed in endometrial cancer. Only non-endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors were significantly associated with critical telomere shortening in the adjacent morphologically normal epithelium. Lynch syndrome, which is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of cancer susceptibility and is characterized by a MSH2/MSH6 protein complex deficiency, is associated with the development of non-endometrioid carcinomas.

  6. [Genetic diagnostics of cancer diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobilanschi, Joana

    2013-11-27

    Cancer is caused by genetic alterations, but only 10% of the cancer diseases are inherited. The probability for an individual or a family of having inherited cancer, individual consequences of the respective results of genetic testing, as well as its costs and reimbursement by the health insurance must be addressed by expert genetic counseling which at-risk requires special expertise. Identification of a germline mutation which may predispose to a variety of different cancer types allows determination of an individual's specific life time risk in symptomatic as well as in a-symptomatic family members. Identification of the underlying defective gene in heritable cancer disorders also enables optimized preventive and novel therapeutic approaches specifically targeting the underlying molecular pathomechanisms.

  7. Genetic counseling of the cancer survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvihill, J.J.; Byrne, J.

    1989-01-01

    Each year, tens of thousands of persons are diagnosed with cancer, are treated, and become survivors while still in their reproductive years. Their concerns about possible germ-cell damage as a result of life-saving radiation, chemotherapy, or both are plausible, based on evidence from animal models and from somatic cell mutations in human beings. A 40-year follow-up of survivors of the atomic bomb blasts in Japan showed no detectable genetic damage and suggested that the human gonad is more resistant to radiogenic mutation than the laboratory mouse. The pooled results of studying 12 series of offspring of cancer patients showed a 4% rate of major birth defects (similar to that of the general population) and an excess of fetal loss and low birth weight in offspring of women who received abdominal radiotherapy. According to preliminary evaluation of a new National Cancer Institute collaboration with five cancer registries, offspring of survivors of childhood cancers had no more birth defects than expected and, beyond an increase in probably familial cancers in children younger than 5, no overall increase in childhood cancer. Ideally, genetic and reproductive counseling should take place as soon as cancer is diagnosed (before therapy starts) and again when pregnancy is contemplated. 28 references

  8. Functional DNA: Teaching Infinite Series through Genetic Analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, R. Travis

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an extended analogy that connects infinite sequences and series to the science of genetics, by identifying power series as "DNA for a function." This analogy allows standard topics such as convergence tests or Taylor approximations to be recast in a "forensic" light as mathematical analogs of genetic concepts such as DNA…

  9. Genetic etiology of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Johar; Sabiha, Bibi; Jan, Hanif Ullah; Haider, Syed Adnan; Khan, Abid Ali; Ali, Saima S

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. It accounts for 2.5% of all new cancer cases and 1.9% of all cancer deaths annually. More than 90% of oral cancers (occurring in the mouth, lip, and tongue) are oral squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate of oral cancer varies widely throughout the world, with an evident prevalence in South Asian countries. This high incidence occurs in correlation with oral cancer-associated behaviors such as alcohol, tobacco use. Researchers have reported that these behaviors lead to genetic variations in tumor suppressor genes (APC, p53), proto-oncogenes (Myc), oncogene (Ras) and genes controlling normal cellular processes (EIF3E, GSTM1). Processes such as segregation of chromosomes, genomic copy number, loss of heterozygosity, telomere stabilities, regulations of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA damage repairs and defects in notch signaling pathways are involved in causing oral cancer. In order to develop preventive and therapeutic options, it is necessary to comprehend the basic molecular mechanisms forcing oral tumorigenesis. This review examines, in detail, the mechanisms of genetic alteration which are considered to be responsible for the initiation of oral cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic predisposition to kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2016-10-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease but is made up of a number of different types of cancer classified by histology that are disparate in presentation, clinical course, and genetic basis. Studies of families with inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have provided the basis for our understanding of the causative genes and altered metabolic pathways in renal cancer with different histologies. Von Hippel-Lindau disease was the first renal cancer disorder with a defined genetic basis. Over the next two decades, the genes responsible for a number of other inherited renal cancer syndromes including hereditary papillary renal carcinoma, Birt-Hogg-Dube´syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma, and succinate dehydrogenase-associated renal cancer were identified. Recently, renal cell carcinoma has been confirmed as part of the clinical phenotype in individuals from families with BAP1-associated tumor predisposition syndrome and MiTF-associated cancer syndrome. Here we summarize the clinical characteristics of and causative genes for these and other inherited RCC syndromes, the pathways that are dysregulated when the inherited genes are mutated, and recommended clinical management of patients with these inherited renal cancer syndromes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Cancer: Some genetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2014-09-22

    Sep 22, 2014 ... The current disappointing situation as regards research trials aiming at constructing ..... parallels that can be found between stem cells and cancer cells ...... specific strand segments is a prerequisite for successful effects,.

  12. Genetic cancer risk assessment in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, S.

    2004-01-01

    The advent of genetic testing has made a dramatic impact on the management of individuals with inherited susceptibility to cancer and their relatives. Genetic counsel ing, with or without testing, is warranted when clues to familial cancer are recognized. Today, genetic testing for classic cancer genetic syndromes is now the standard of care, and has been complemented by genetic testing for other situations commonly encountered in clinical practice. Genetic testing for colorectal cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, thyroid cancer, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer raise important issues about the parameters for testing. Genetic cancer risk assessment can lead to measurable reductions in morbidity and mortality through strategies that rely on surveillance, chemo prevention, and risk-reducing surgery

  13. Application Form for NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, and others) may fill out this application form to be listed in the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genetics Services Directory.

  14. Inclusion Criteria for NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, and others) must meet these criteria before applying to be listed in the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genetics Services Directory.

  15. Molecular genetics of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radice, P.; Pierotti, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two decades, molecular studies have enlightened the complexity of the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells. To date, more than 40 different genes or loci have been found to be altered in breast carcinomas. Although some of these genes, as for example ERBB2, appear to be mutated in a high proportion of cases, their mechanism of action and their role in the different stages of cancer development are still poorly understood. More recently, two major determinants of the inherited predisposition to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been isolated. As a consequence, it is now possible to screen families with a positive history of breast carcinomas for the identification of mutations carriers, in order to address these individuals into adequate programs of cancer surveillance and prevention

  16. Genetic susceptibility to cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    1995-01-01

    The normal development and function of tissues are under the regulation of programmed expression of genes involved in the proliferation and differentiation. Tumor development can be identified as the abnormal or deregulated expression of such genes. Two distinct classes of genes have been implicated in cancer development; oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. Those genes are potential target for radiation carcinogenesis. However, contemporal view of mutations of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in radiogenic and non-radiogenic human cancers do not match to the spectrum of radiation-induced mutation in the selected genes, and raise the question whether radiations are primarily responsible for the initiation of carcinogenesis by mutation of those genes as primary target. There is now a growing evidence for the radiation to stimulate cell growth, which is followed by suppression. Such stimulatory effects of radiation may evoke the growth-promoting and -suppressing genes, or oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. This may lead to a testable proposition that constitutively present gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and/or loss-of-function mutations in tumor-suppressor genes, accumulated spontaneously or environmentally, may play a significant role in the radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  17. Improving your genetic literacy in epilepsy-A new series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nigel C K; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2015-11-01

    Advances in epilepsy genetics have been rapid, and it is challenging for clinicians on the ground to keep pace with these advances. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Genetics Commission has thus crafted a new Genetic Literacy series targeted at busy clinicians. Our goal is to help provide a concise, accessible resource on epilepsy genetics for the busy, on-the-ground clinician so that he/she can apply that knowledge at point-of-care to help patients. This new series is grounded in educational theories and evidence to ensure that learning is effective and efficient. We hope that by promoting and encouraging continuing medical education in epilepsy genetics, this eventually translates to better patient management and therefore better patient health outcomes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Progress in cancer genetics: lessons from pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goggins, M.; Kern, S. E.; Offerhaus, J. A.; Hruban, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    In the near future advances in the molecular basis of cancer are expected to facilitate cancer diagnosis, to rationalize treatment, to facilitate screening, and to identify individuals requiring cancer prevention strategies. The literature was reviewed concerning the genetic alterations that

  19. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... cancer, childhood Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  20. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  1. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  2. Genetic counseling about cancer in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Manrique, Javier E.; Dirección de Promoción de la Salud, Prevención y Control Nacional del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas. Lima, Perú. Cirujano oncólogo.; Sullcahuamán-Allende, Yasser; Unidad de Genética y Biología Molecular, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas. Lima, Perú. médico genetista.; Limache-García, Abel; Dirección de Promoción de la Salud, Prevención y Control Nacional del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas. Lima, Perú. enfermero.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease caused by changes in the DNA sequence or expression. Based on the origin of these changes, cancer can be classified as sporadic, and hereditary or familial. Based on the cancer records in Peru, it is expected that 5 to 30% of all patients with cancer, i.e. about 2,000 to 12,000 people, have hereditary cancer, meaning that a similar number of families have a higher risk of developing cancer compared to the general population. Therefore, the purpose of genetic co...

  3. Cancer Genetics Overview (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Genetics Overview discusses hereditary cancers and the role of genetic variants (mutations). Get information about genetic counseling, familial cancer syndromes, genomic sequencing, germline and somatic testing, ethical and legal issues and more in this summary for clinicians.

  4. Real coded genetic algorithm for fuzzy time series prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shilpa; Bisht, Dinesh C. S.; Singh, Phool; Mathpal, Prakash C.

    2017-10-01

    Genetic Algorithm (GA) forms a subset of evolutionary computing, rapidly growing area of Artificial Intelligence (A.I.). Some variants of GA are binary GA, real GA, messy GA, micro GA, saw tooth GA, differential evolution GA. This research article presents a real coded GA for predicting enrollments of University of Alabama. Data of Alabama University is a fuzzy time series. Here, fuzzy logic is used to predict enrollments of Alabama University and genetic algorithm optimizes fuzzy intervals. Results are compared to other eminent author works and found satisfactory, and states that real coded GA are fast and accurate.

  5. Genetic prognostic markers in colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Houlston, R S; Tomlinson, I P

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of molecular genetics to colorectal cancer has been restricted largely to relatively rare inherited tumours and to the detection of germline mutations predisposing to these cancers. However, much is now also known about somatic events leading to colorectal cancer. A number of studies has been undertaken examining possible relations between genetic features and prognostic indices. While many of these studies are small and inconclusive, it is clear that a number of different pa...

  6. Detecting structural breaks in time series via genetic algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Fischer, Paul; Hilbert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    of the time series under consideration is available. Therefore, a black-box optimization approach is our method of choice for detecting structural breaks. We describe a genetic algorithm framework which easily adapts to a large number of statistical settings. To evaluate the usefulness of different crossover...... and mutation operations for this problem, we conduct extensive experiments to determine good choices for the parameters and operators of the genetic algorithm. One surprising observation is that use of uniform and one-point crossover together gave significantly better results than using either crossover...... operator alone. Moreover, we present a specific fitness function which exploits the sparse structure of the break points and which can be evaluated particularly efficiently. The experiments on artificial and real-world time series show that the resulting algorithm detects break points with high precision...

  7. Environmental and genetic interactions in human cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, M.C.

    Humans, depending upon their genetic make-up, differ in their susceptibility to the cancer-causing effects of extrinsic agents. Clinical and laboratory studies on the hereditary disorder, ataxia telangiectasia (AT) show that persons afflicted with this are cancer-prone and unusually sensitive to conventional radiotherapy. Their skin cells, when cultured, are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation, being defective in the enzymatic repair of radiation-induced damange to the genetic material, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). This molecular finding implicates DNA damage and its imperfect repair as an early step in the induction of human cancer by radiation and other carcinogens. The parents of AT patients are clincally normal but their cultured cells are often moderately radiosensitive. The increased radiosensitivity of cultured cells offers a means of identifying a presumed cancer-prone subpopulation that should avoid undue exposure to certain carcinogens. The radioresponse of cells from patients with other cancer-associated genetic disorders and persons suspected of being genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer has also been measured. Increased cell killing by γ-rays appears in the complex genetic disease, tuberous sclerosis. Cells from cancer-stricken members of a leukemia-prone family are also radiosensitive, as are cells from one patient with radiation-associated breast cancer. These radiobiological data, taken together, strongly suggest that genetic factors can interact with extrinsic agents and thereby play a greater causative role in the development of common cancers in man than previously thought. (L.L.)

  8. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M. [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia); University of New South Wales, Kensington Campus, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersen, Desiree C., E-mail: dpetersen@ccia.unsw.edu.au [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia)

    2010-06-08

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk.

  9. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M.; Petersen, Desiree C.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk

  10. Cancer Genetics and Signaling | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer, Genetics, and Signaling (CGS) Group at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick  offers a competitive postdoctoral training and mentoring program focusing on molecular and genetic aspects of cancer. The CGS Fellows Program is designed to attract and train exceptional postdoctoral fellows interested in pursuing independent research career tracks. CGS Fellows participate in a structured mentoring program designed for scientific and career development and transition to independent positions.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  12. Genetic testing and your cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000842.htm Genetic testing and your cancer risk To use the sharing features on this page, ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  13. Intention to seek information on cancer genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Andrews

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The public has a high interest in seeking personal genetic information, which holds implications for health information seeking research and health care policy. Rapid advances in cancer genetics research promise early detection, prevention and treatment, yet consumers may have greater difficulty finding and using the information they may need to make informed decisions regarding their personal health and the future of their families. Design. A statewide telephone survey was conducted of non-institutionalized Kentucky residents 18 years of age or older to investigate factors associated with the intention to seek cancer genetics information, including the need for such information seeking help. Results. The results show that intention to seek cancer genetics information, if testing were readily available, is moderately high (62.5% of those responding; n=835, and that status as a racial minority, the perception that cancer runs in one's family, and frequent worrying about cancer risk are statistically significant predictors of intent to seek genetics information. Conclusion. . We argue that an already complex health information environment will be even more difficult for individuals to navigate as genetic research becomes more ubiquitous in health care. An increase in demand for genetics information in various forms, as suggested by these results and those of other studies, implies that enduring intervention strategies are needed to help individuals acquire necessary health information literacy skills, with special attention given to racial minorities.

  14. Endometrial cancer : from a molecular genetic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Smid-Koopman (Ellen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe first observations indicative of a role of genetic factors in carcinogenesis were made as early as 1912, when Rous demonstrated that a filterable agent (i.e. virus) could induce cancer in chicken (Rous 1965). In 1914, Boveri postulated a "genetic" theory on carcinogenesis by

  15. Update on Sporadic Colorectal Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Karin M

    2018-05-01

    Our understanding of the genetics of colorectal cancer has changed dramatically over recent years. Colorectal cancer can be classified in multiple different ways. Along with the advent of whole-exome sequencing, we have gained an understanding of the scale of the genetic changes found in sporadic colorectal cancer. We now know that there are multiple pathways that are commonly involved in the evolution of colorectal cancer including Wnt/β-catenin, RAS, EGFR, and PIK3 kinase. Another recent leap in our understanding of colorectal cancer genetics is the recognition that many, if not all tumors, are actually genetically heterogeneous within individual tumors and also between tumors. Recent research has revealed the prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications of various specific mutations, including specific mutations in BRAF and KRAS . There is increasing interest in the use of mutation testing for screening and surveillance through stool and circulating DNA testing. Recent advances in translational research in colorectal cancer genetics are dramatically changing our understanding of colorectal cancer and will likely change therapy and surveillance in the near future.

  16. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Skin Cancer includes information about genes and hereditary syndromes associated with basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma skin cancer. Get comprehensive information about the genetics of skin cancer and interventions in this summary for clinicians.

  17. Lung cancer, genetic predisposition and smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob; Korhonen, Tellervo; Holst, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to disentangle genetic and environmental causes in lung cancer while considering smoking status. Methods: Four Nordic twin cohorts (43 512 monozygotic (MZ) and 71 895 same sex dizygotic (DZ) twin individuals) had smoking data before cancer diagnosis. We used time...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: parathyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skeletal problems. These problems include increased urine production (polyuria), deposits of calcium in the kidneys (nephrocalcinosis) leading ... Institute: Parathyroid Cancer Treatment PDQ National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Primary Hyperparathyroidism Educational ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Malignant tumor of urinary bladder Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Bladder Cancer General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  20. [The genetics of thrombosis in cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, José Manuel; López, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial and complex disease in which the interaction of genetic factors (estimated at 60%) and environmental factors (e.g., the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, immobility and cancer) determine the risk of thrombosis for each individual. In particular, the association between thrombosis and cancer is well established. Approximately 20% of patients with cancer develop a thromboembolic event over the course of the natural history of the tumor process, with thrombosis being the second leading cause of death for these patients. One of the greatest challenges currently facing the field of oncology is the identification of patients at high risk of VTE who can benefit from thromboprophylaxis. Currently, there is a VTE risk prediction model for patients with cancer (the Khorana risk score); however, its ability to identify patients at high risk is very low. It is important to note that this score, which is based on five clinical parameters, ignores the genetic variability associated with VTE risk. In this article, we present the preliminary results of the Oncothromb study, whose objective is to develop an individual VTE risk prediction model for patients with cancer who are treated with outpatient chemotherapy. Our model includes the clinical and genetic data on each patient (Thrombo inCode(®) genetic profile). Only by integrating multiple layers of biological information (clinical, plasmatic and genetic) we could obtain models that provide accurate information as to which patients are at high risk of developing a thromboembolic event associated with cancer so as to take appropriate prophylactic measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Facing Forward Series: Life After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment Coping with your feelings Going back to work and relating with friends and coworkers Show this booklet to the people who are close to you so they understand what life is like after cancer treatment. Take it with ...

  2. Rare endocrine cancers have novel genetic alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A molecular characterization of adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare cancer of the adrenal cortex, analyzed 91 cases for alterations in the tumor genomes and identified several novel genetic mutations as likely mechanisms driving the disease as well as whole genome doubling as a probable driver of the disease.

  3. Stars in Nutrition and Cancer Lecture Series | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This lecture series features extraordinary contributors or "stars" in the field of cancer and nutrition research. Speakers highlight the important role that nutrition plays in modifying cancer development. Past lectures are videotaped and available for viewing. |

  4. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jan;73(2):169-75. doi: 10.1002/pros.22552. Epub 2012 Jun 21. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Nakagawa H. Prostate cancer genomics by high-throughput technologies: genome-wide association study and sequencing analysis. Endocr ...

  5. Genetic determinants of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gonzalez-Zuloeta Ladd (Angela)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the Western world and it is estimated that women who survive to the age of 85 years will have a 1 in 9 lifetime probability of developing this type of neoplasia (1, 2). The degree of risk is not spread homogeneously across the

  6. Genetic Determinants of Gastric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Boccia (Stefania)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractResults show that gastric cancer risk is increased by the inheritance of the variant alleles of the metabolic genes SULT1A1 and CYP2E1 *6, especially among smokers and drinkers, respectively. An additional increased risk is conferred by the inheritance of GSTT1 null variant, especially

  7. Applications of genetic programming in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worzel, William P; Yu, Jianjun; Almal, Arpit A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2009-02-01

    The theory of Darwinian evolution is the fundamental keystones of modern biology. Late in the last century, computer scientists began adapting its principles, in particular natural selection, to complex computational challenges, leading to the emergence of evolutionary algorithms. The conceptual model of selective pressure and recombination in evolutionary algorithms allow scientists to efficiently search high dimensional space for solutions to complex problems. In the last decade, genetic programming has been developed and extensively applied for analysis of molecular data to classify cancer subtypes and characterize the mechanisms of cancer pathogenesis and development. This article reviews current successes using genetic programming and discusses its potential impact in cancer research and treatment in the near future.

  8. Prostate Cancer Risk in Relation to IGF-I and Its Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study Within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaaks, Rudolf J

    2005-01-01

    A large genetic association study is being conducted, to examine relationships of prostate cancer risk with polymorphic variation in a series of selected candidate genes that are involved in pathways...

  9. Prostate Cancer Risk in Relation to IGF-I and Its Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study Within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaaks, Rudolf

    2004-01-01

    A large genetic association study is being conducted, to examine relationships of prostate cancer risk with polymorphic variation in a series of selected candidate genes that are involved in pathways...

  10. Prostate Cancer Risk in Relation to IGF-1 and its Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study Within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaaks, Rudolf J

    2006-01-01

    Purpose and scope: A large genetic association study is being conducted to examine relationships of prostate cancer risk with polymorphic variation in a series of selected candidate genes that are involved in pathways...

  11. Awareness of Cancer Susceptibility Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Phuong L.; Vadaparampil, Susan Thomas; Breen, Nancy; McNeel, Timothy S.; Wideroff, Louise; Graubard, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic testing for several cancer susceptibility syndromes is clinically available; however, existing data suggest limited population awareness of such tests. Purpose To examine awareness regarding cancer genetic testing in the U.S. population aged ≥25 years in the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys. Methods The weighted percentages of respondents aware of cancer genetic tests, and percent changes from 2000–2005 and 2005–2010, overall and by demographic, family history, and healthcare factors were calculated. Interactions were used to evaluate the patterns of change in awareness between 2005 and 2010 among subgroups within each factor. To evaluate associations with awareness in 2005 and 2010, percentages were adjusted for covariates using multiple logistic regression. The analysis was performed in 2012. Results Awareness decreased from 44.4% to 41.5% (pAwareness increased between 2005 and 2010 in most subgroups, particularly among individuals in the South (p-interaction=0.03) or with a usual place of care (p-interaction=0.01). In 2005 and 2010, awareness was positively associated with personal or family cancer history and high perceived cancer risk, and inversely associated with racial/ethnic minorities, age 25–39 or ≥60 years, male gender, lower education and income levels, public or no health insurance, and no provider contact in 12 months. Conclusions Despite improvement from 2005 to 2010, ≤50% of the U.S. adult population was aware of cancer genetic testing in 2010. Notably, disparities persist for racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with limited health care access or income. PMID:24745633

  12. Genetic factors and breast cancer laterality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, Magid H

    2014-01-01

    between patients and their first-degree relatives in regards to cancer laterality and possibly age at initial diagnosis of cancer may suggest an underlying inherited genetic predisposition

  13. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  14. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unrau, P.; Doerffer, K.

    1998-01-01

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author)

  15. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P; Doerffer, K

    1998-01-01

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author) 1 tab., 4 figs.

  16. Eye and rare genetic diseases: Case series and literature review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diseases are generally characterised by a multi visceral pathogenesis. Although orphan, these diseases interest many disciplines due to their clinical expression. Eye is sometimes part of the clinical polymorphism of some rare genetic diseases. Ocular signs are in some cases leading to the diagnosis of these ...

  17. Biotechnology, Genetic Engineering and Society. Monograph Series: III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, George H.

    New techniques have expanded the field of biotechnology and awarded scientists an unprecedented degree of control over the genetic constitutions of living things. The knowledge of DNA science is the basis for this burgeoning industry which may be a major force in human existence. Just as it is possible to move genetic material from one organism to…

  18. Automated Feature Design for Time Series Classification by Genetic Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Dustin Yewell

    2014-01-01

    Time series classification (TSC) methods discover and exploit patterns in time series and other one-dimensional signals. Although many accurate, robust classifiers exist for multivariate feature sets, general approaches are needed to extend machine learning techniques to make use of signal inputs. Numerous applications of TSC can be found in structural engineering, especially in the areas of structural health monitoring and non-destructive evaluation. Additionally, the fields of process contr...

  19. Signature of genetic associations in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishwas; Nandan, Amrita; Sharma, Amitesh Kumar; Singh, Harpreet; Bharadwaj, Mausumi; Sinha, Dhirendra Narain; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2017-10-01

    Oral cancer etiology is complex and controlled by multi-factorial events including genetic events. Candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and next-generation sequencing identified various chromosomal loci to be associated with oral cancer. There is no available review that could give us the comprehensive picture of genetic loci identified to be associated with oral cancer by candidate gene studies-based, genome-wide association studies-based, and next-generation sequencing-based approaches. A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed database to identify the loci associated with oral cancer by exclusive candidate gene studies-based, genome-wide association studies-based, and next-generation sequencing-based study approaches. The information of loci associated with oral cancer is made online through the resource "ORNATE." Next, screening of the loci validated by candidate gene studies and next-generation sequencing approach or by two independent studies within candidate gene studies or next-generation sequencing approaches were performed. A total of 264 loci were identified to be associated with oral cancer by candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and next-generation sequencing approaches. In total, 28 loci, that is, 14q32.33 (AKT1), 5q22.2 (APC), 11q22.3 (ATM), 2q33.1 (CASP8), 11q13.3 (CCND1), 16q22.1 (CDH1), 9p21.3 (CDKN2A), 1q31.1 (COX-2), 7p11.2 (EGFR), 22q13.2 (EP300), 4q35.2 (FAT1), 4q31.3 (FBXW7), 4p16.3 (FGFR3), 1p13.3 (GSTM1-GSTT1), 11q13.2 (GSTP1), 11p15.5 (H-RAS), 3p25.3 (hOGG1), 1q32.1 (IL-10), 4q13.3 (IL-8), 12p12.1 (KRAS), 12q15 (MDM2), 12q13.12 (MLL2), 9q34.3 (NOTCH1), 17p13.1 (p53), 3q26.32 (PIK3CA), 10q23.31 (PTEN), 13q14.2 (RB1), and 5q14.2 (XRCC4), were validated to be associated with oral cancer. "ORNATE" gives a snapshot of genetic loci associated with oral cancer. All 28 loci were validated to be linked to oral cancer for which further fine-mapping followed by gene-by-gene and gene

  20. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familial prostate cancer is associated with certain inherited gene mutations (variants). Learn about the hereditary prostate cancer genes, genetic testing, clinical management, and psychosocial issues in this expert-reviewed summary.

  1. Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling Share Tweet ... knowledge for others with this disease,” Prowell says. Breast Cancer Symptoms for Men Each year, about 2,000 ...

  2. Genetics and tumor genomics in familial colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, Janneke Willemijn

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world and in about 30% hereditary factors play a role. Although several genetic factors that predispose families to CRC are known, in many families affected with CRC the underlying genetics remain elusive. The work described in

  3. Prevalence and detection of psychosocial problems in cancer genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijzenga, W.; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Hahn, D.E.E.; van der Kolk, L.E.; Sidharta, G.N.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Only a minority of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling experience heightened levels of psychological distress, but many more experience a range of cancer genetic-specific psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of such psychosocial problems, and to

  4. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Guo (Qi); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); S. Kar (Siddhartha); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); B. Holleczek (B.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); C.D. Berg (Christine); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large

  5. A cancer genetics education campaign: delivering parallel messages to clinicians and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piniewski-Bond, Joanne; Celestino, Paul B; Mahoney, Martin C; Farrell, Carolyn D; Bauer, Joseph E; Hastrup, Janice L; Cummings, K Michael

    2003-01-01

    Up to 10% of all cancers are thought to have a familial basis through complex interactions between genes and environment. A community-wide education campaign was conducted that included several elements: a five part television news series; an educational newsletter; web site pages and links to educational materials; a Continuing Medical Education (CME) program for professionals; and an evaluation survey. Survey estimates revealed that 39000 households recalled seeing the series; 14800 households changed their views about the risks of hereditary cancers; and about 9900 households were made more aware/informed about cancer and hereditary risk. This awareness campaign broadened public knowledge about the myths and realities associated with genetic factors and cancer risk. It reinforced the importance of early screening for persons at high risk of cancer due to hereditary factors.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Diffuse Gastric Cancer MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastric Cancer National Cancer ... Option Overview General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  7. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  8. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated WithConstipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Laugsand, Eivor Alette; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Methods: Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation a...

  9. Genetic basis of interindividual susceptibility to cancer cachexia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer cachexia is a complex and multifactorial disease. Evolving definitions highlight the fact that a diverse range of biological processes contribute to cancer cachexia. Part of the variation in who will and who will not develop cancer cachexia may be genetically determined. As new definitions, classifications and biological ...

  10. WHO HAS TO UNDERGO CANCER GENETIC TESTING? A PERSPECTIVE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rinaldi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing is a medical tool employed to screen changes in genes linked to cancer and other genetic diseases. Genetic tests are available for breast, ovarian, colon, thyroid, and some other cancers and they represent the main tool for early identification of the “risk” subjects. The choice to undergo genetic testing by a healthy or affected cancer patient with family history of the cancer has to be the fruit of a careful and prudent assessment of the advantages and disadvantages discussed during oncogenetic counselling. The latter, in turn, in the case of a patient's positive and informed choice, must constantly affiliate the genetic testing, in order to preserve the prediction and information role of the test as much as possible.

  11. Influence of genetic discrimination perceptions and knowledge on cancer genetics referral practice among clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowstuter, Katrina J; Sand, Sharon; Blazer, Kathleen R; MacDonald, Deborah J; Banks, Kimberly C; Lee, Carol A; Schwerin, Barbara U; Juarez, Margaret; Uman, Gwen C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2008-09-01

    To describe nongenetics clinicians' perceptions and knowledge of cancer genetics and laws prohibiting genetic discrimination, attitudes toward the use of cancer genetic testing, and referral practices. Invitations to participate were sent to a random stratified sample of California Medical Association members and to all members of California Association of Nurse Practitioners and California Latino Medical Association. Responders in active practice were eligible and completed a 47-item survey. There were 1181 qualified participants (62% physicians). Although 96% viewed genetic testing as beneficial for their patients, 75% believed fear of genetic discrimination would cause patients to decline testing. More than 60% were not aware of federal or California laws prohibiting health insurance discrimination--concern about genetic discrimination was selected as a reason for nonreferral by 11%. A positive attitude toward genetic testing was the strongest predictor of referral (odds ratio: 3.55 [95% confidence interval: 2.24-5.63], P genetic discrimination, the less likely a participant was to refer (odds ratio: 0.72 [95% confidence interval: 0.518-0.991], P genetic discrimination law was associated with comfort recommending (odds ratio: 1.18 [95% confidence interval: 1.11-1.25], P genetic discrimination and knowledge deficits may be barriers to cancer genetics referrals. Clinician education may help promote access to cancer screening and prevention.

  12. Weaving a Tapestry from Threads Spun by Geneticists: The Series Perspectives on Genetics, 1987–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, William F.

    2016-01-01

    The Perspectives column was initiated in 1987 when Jan Drake, Editor-in-Chief of GENETICS, invited Jim Crow and William Dove to serve as coeditors of “Anecdotal, Historical, and Critical Commentaries.” As the series evolved over 21 years, under the guidance of Crow and Dove, the input of stories told by geneticists from many countries created a panorama of 20th-century genetics. Three recurrent themes are visible: how geneticists have created the science (as solitary investigators, in pairs, or in cooperative groups); how geneticists work hard, but find ways to have fun; and how public and private institutions have sustained the science of genetics, particularly in the United States. This article ends by considering how the Perspectives series and other communication formats can carry forward the core science of genetics from the 20th into the 21st century. PMID:27384024

  13. Prevalence and detection of psychosocial problems in cancer genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijzenga, W; Bleiker, E M A; Hahn, D E E; Van der Kolk, L E; Sidharta, G N; Aaronson, N K

    2015-12-01

    Only a minority of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling experience heightened levels of psychological distress, but many more experience a range of cancer genetic-specific psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of such psychosocial problems, and to identify possible demographic and clinical variables associated significantly with them. Consenting individuals scheduled to undergo cancer genetic counseling completed the Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer (PAHC) questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Distress Thermometer (DT) prior to or immediately following their counseling session. More than half of the 137 participants reported problems on three or more domains of the PAHC, most often in the domains 'living with cancer' (84%), 'family issues' (46%), 'hereditary predisposition' (45%), and 'child-related issues' (42%). Correlations between the PAHC, the HADS and the DT were low. Previous contact with a psychosocial worker, and having a personal history of cancer were associated significantly with HADS scores, but explained little variance (9%). No background variables were associated significantly with the DT. Previous contact with a psychosocial worker, and having children were significantly associated with several PAHC domains, again explaining only a small percentage of the variance (2-14%). The majority of counselees experience specific cancer genetic counseling-related psychosocial problems. Only a few background variables are associated significantly with distress or psychosocial problems. Thus we recommend using the PAHC or a similar problem-oriented questionnaire routinely in cancer genetic counseling to identify individuals with such problems.

  14. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  15. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hughes, Chanita

    2004-01-01

    .... The objectives of this study are to develop a Culturally Tailored Genetic (CTGC) protocol for African American women and evaluate its impact on decision-making and satisfaction about BRCAl/2 testing, quality of life, and cancer control practices...

  16. Combinations of genetic data in a study of oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling Thyge; Møller, Gert Lykke; Mondal, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    In the single locus strategy a number of genetic variants are analyzed, in order to find variants that are distributed significantly different between controls and patients. A supplementary strategy is to analyze combinations of genetic variants. A combination that is the genetic basis...... for a polygenic disorder will not occur in in control persons genetically unrelated to patients, so the strategy is to analyze combinations of genetic variants present exclusively in patients. In a previous study of oral cancer and leukoplakia 325 SNPs were analyzed. This study has been supplemented...

  17. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genetics risk assessment and genetic counseling includes family history, psychosocial assessments, and education on hereditary cancer syndromes, testing, and risk. Get more information including the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetic testing in this summary for clinicians.

  18. Population genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: founder mutations to genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, William D; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The current standard model for identifying carriers of high-risk mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes (CSGs) generally involves a process that is not amenable to population-based testing: access to genetic tests is typically regulated by health-care providers on the basis of a labour-intensive assessment of an individual's personal and family history of cancer, with face-to-face genetic counselling performed before mutation testing. Several studies have shown that application of these selection criteria results in a substantial proportion of mutation carriers being missed. Population-based genetic testing has been proposed as an alternative approach to determining cancer susceptibility, and aims for a more-comprehensive detection of mutation carriers. Herein, we review the existing data on population-based genetic testing, and consider some of the barriers, pitfalls, and challenges related to the possible expansion of this approach. We consider mechanisms by which population-based genetic testing for cancer susceptibility could be delivered, and suggest how such genetic testing might be integrated into existing and emerging health-care structures. The existing models of genetic testing (including issues relating to informed consent) will very likely require considerable alteration if the potential benefits of population-based genetic testing are to be fully realized.

  19. Genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer: An evolving hallmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, N; Mathew, B B; Jatawa, S K; Tiwari, A

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a major health-care concern. A successful treatment of bladder cancer depends on its early diagnosis at the initial stage. Genetic instability is an essential early step toward the development of bladder cancer. This instability is found more often at the chromosomal level than at the nucleotide level. Microsatellite and chromosomal instability markers can be used as a prognostic marker for screening bladder cancer. Bladder cancer can be distinguished in two different categories according to genetic instability: Cancers with chromosomal level instability and cancers with nucleotide level instability. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair (MMR) system and its correlation with other biologic pathway, both are essential to understand the basic mechanisms of cancer development. Microsatellite instability occurs due to defects in DNA MMR genes, including human mutL homolog 1 and human mutL homolog 2. Chromosomal alterations including deletions on chromosome 3, 8, 9, 11, 13, 17 have been detected in bladder cancer. In the current review, the most recent literature of genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer has been summarized.

  20. Genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer: An evolving hallmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Wadhwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is a major health-care concern. A successful treatment of bladder cancer depends on its early diagnosis at the initial stage. Genetic instability is an essential early step toward the development of bladder cancer. This instability is found more often at the chromosomal level than at the nucleotide level. Microsatellite and chromosomal instability markers can be used as a prognostic marker for screening bladder cancer. Bladder cancer can be distinguished in two different categories according to genetic instability: Cancers with chromosomal level instability and cancers with nucleotide level instability. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA mismatch repair (MMR system and its correlation with other biologic pathway, both are essential to understand the basic mechanisms of cancer development. Microsatellite instability occurs due to defects in DNA MMR genes, including human mutL homolog 1 and human mutL homolog 2. Chromosomal alterations including deletions on chromosome 3, 8, 9, 11, 13, 17 have been detected in bladder cancer. In the current review, the most recent literature of genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer has been summarized.

  1. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes include Lynch syndrome and several polyposis syndromes (familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and serrated polyposis syndrome). Learn about the genetics, clinical manifestations, management, and psychosocial aspects of these and other hereditary colon cancer syndromes in this expert-reviewed summary.

  2. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Gómez García, Encarna; Ruijs, Mariëlle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  3. Genetic counseling and testing for gynecological cancers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    undergraduates of universities in Ibadan to genetic counseling and testing (GCT) for ... questionnaire, information on their understanding of GCT, perception of implications, and ... by genetic counseling from suitably trained health-care providers and genetic testing of selected high-risk individuals ..... Multiple sexual partners.

  4. Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Surgeon’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Marie Agnese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As surgeons who care for patients with breast cancer, the possibility of a cancer diagnosis being related to a hereditary predisposition is always a consideration. Not only are we as surgeons always trying to identify these patients and families, but also we are often asked about a potential hereditary component by the patients and their family members. It is therefore critical that we accurately assess patients to determine who may benefit from genetic testing. Importantly, the potential benefit for identifying a hereditary breast cancer extends beyond the patient to other family members and the risk may not be only for the development of breast cancers, but for other cancers as well. As a surgeon with additional training in clinical cancer genetics, I have perhaps a unique perspective on the issue and feel that a review of some of the more practical considerations is important.

  5. Genetic and environmental factors in experimental and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, S.; Takebe, H.; Gelboin, H.V.; MaChahon, B.; Matsushima, T.; Sugimura, T.

    1980-01-01

    Recently technological advances in assaying mutagenic principles have revealed that there are many mutagens in the environment, some of which might be carcinogenic to human beings. Other advances in genetics have shown that genetic factors might play an important role in the induction of cancer in human beings, e.g., the high incidence of skin cancers in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. These proceedings deal with the relationships between genetic and environmental factors in carcinogenesis. The contributors cover mixed-function oxidases, pharmacogenetics, twin studies, DNA repair, immunology, and epidemiology.

  6. Genetic evidence linking lung cancer and COPD: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crapo JD

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert P Young1,4, Raewyn J Hopkins1, Gregory D Gamble1, Carol Etzel2, Randa El-Zein2, James D Crapo31Department of Medicine and School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Epidemiology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA; 4Synergenz Biosciences Ltd, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: Epidemiological studies indicate that tobacco smoke exposure accounts for nearly 90% of cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer. However, genetic factors may explain why 10%–30% of smokers develop these complications. This perspective reviews the evidence suggesting that COPD is closely linked to susceptibility to lung cancer and outlines the potential relevance of this observation. Epidemiological studies show that COPD is the single most important risk factor for lung cancer among smokers and predates lung cancer in up to 80% of cases. Genome-wide association studies of lung cancer, lung function, and COPD have identified a number of overlapping “susceptibility” loci. With stringent phenotyping, it has recently been shown that several of these overlapping loci are independently associated with both COPD and lung cancer. These loci implicate genes underlying pulmonary inflammation and apoptotic processes mediated by the bronchial epithelium, and link COPD with lung cancer at a molecular genetic level. It is currently possible to derive risk models for lung cancer that incorporate lung cancer-specific genetic variants, recently identified “COPD-related” genetic variants, and clinical variables. Early studies suggest that single nucleotide polymorphism-based risk stratification of smokers might help better target novel prevention and early diagnostic strategies in lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk model

  7. Understanding participation by African Americans in cancer genetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jasmine A; Barg, Frances K; Weathers, Benita; Guerra, Carmen E; Troxel, Andrea B; Domchek, Susan; Bowen, Deborah; Shea, Judy A; Halbert, Chanita Hughes

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic factors that contribute to racial differences in cancer outcomes may reduce racial disparities in cancer morbidity and mortality. Achieving this goal will be limited by low rates of African American participation in cancer genetics research. We conducted a qualitative study with African American adults (n = 91) to understand attitudes about participating in cancer genetics research and to identify factors that are considered when making a decision about participating in this type of research. Participants would consider the potential benefits to themselves, family members, and their community when making a decision to participate in cancer genetics research. However, concerns about exploitation, distrust of researchers, and investigators' motives were also important to participation decisions. Individuals would also consider who has access to their personal information and what would happen to these data. Side effects, logistical issues, and the potential to gain knowledge about health issues were also described as important factors in decision making. African Americans may consider a number of ethical, legal, and social issues when making a decision to participate in cancer genetics research. These issues should be addressed as part of recruitment efforts.

  8. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before 50). Dave has Lynch syndrome and had colorectal cancer at 28. Amy found out she has Lynch syndrome when she was diagnosed with colorectal cancer days after turning 47. Why is it Important ...

  9. HER2 Genetic Link to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    When researchers discovered the HER2 gene's importance to breast cancer growth, this led to the development of trastuzumab and other treatments that have improved survival for women with HER2-positive breast cancer.

  10. Review- Cancer: Some genetic considerations | Salem | Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malignant transformation of normal cells to cancer cells represents an enigmatic phenomenon because of the many ambiguous controversies embodied within most of its aspects. Within a clinical context, cancer, with very few exceptions, is a dreadful disease that ends lethally. Within a biological context, however, cancer is ...

  11. Role of genetic testing for inherited prostate cancer risk: Philadelphia prostate cancer consensus conference 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.N. Giri (Veda); Knudsen, K.E. (Karen E.); Kelly, W.K. (William K.); Abida, W. (Wassim); G.L. Andriole (Gerald); C.H. Bangma (Chris); Bekelman, J.E. (Justin E.); Benson, M.C. (Mitchell C.); A. Blanco (Amie); Burnett, A. (Arthur); Catalona, W.J. (William J.); Cooney, K.A. (Kathleen A.); M.R. Cooperberg (Matthew); D. Crawford (David); Den, R.B. (Robert B.); Dicker, A.P. (Adam P.); S. Eggener (Scott); N.E. Fleshner (Neil); Freedman, M.L. (Matthew L.); F. Hamdy (Freddie); Hoffman-Censits, J. (Jean); Hurwitz, M.D. (Mark D.); Hyatt, C. (Colette); Isaacs, W.B. (William B.); Kane, C.J. (Christopher J.); Kantoff, P. (Philip); R.J. Karnes (Jeffrey); Karsh, L.I. (Lawrence I.); Klein, E.A. (Eric A.); Lin, D.W. (Daniel W.); Loughlin, K.R. (Kevin R.); Lu-Yao, G. (Grace); Malkowicz, S.B. (S. Bruce); Mann, M.J. (Mark J.); Mark, J.R. (James R.); McCue, P.A. (Peter A.); Miner, M.M. (Martin M.); Morgan, T. (Todd); Moul, J.W. (Judd W.); Myers, R.E. (Ronald E.); Nielsen, S.M. (Sarah M.); Obeid, E. (Elias); Pavlovich, C.P. (Christian P.); Peiper, S.C. (Stephen C.); D.F. Penson (David F.); D.P. Petrylak (Daniel P); Pettaway, C.A. (Curtis A.); R. Pilarski (Robert); P. Pinto (Peter); Poage, W. (Wendy); Raj, G.V. (Ganesh V.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); M. Robson (Mark); Rosenberg, M.T. (Matt T.); Sandler, H. (Howard); A.O. Sartor (Oliver); Schaeffer, E. (Edward); Schwartz, G.F. (Gordon F.); Shahin, M.S. (Mark S.); N.D. Shore (Neal); Shuch, B. (Brian); Soule, H.R. (Howard R.); S.A. Tomlins (Scott A); Trabulsi, E.J. (Edouard J.); Uzzo, R. (Robert); Griend, D.J.V. (Donald J. Vander); P.C. Walsh (Patrick); Weil, C.J. (Carol J.); Wender, R. (Richard); Gomella, L.G. (Leonard G.)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Guidelines are limited for genetic testing for prostate cancer (PCA). The goal of this conference was to develop an expert consensus-driven working framework for comprehensive genetic evaluation of inherited PCA in the multigene testing era addressing genetic counseling,

  12. Spontaneous chromosome aberrations in cancer cells. Evidence of existence of hidden genetic lesions in genetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poryadkova-Luchnik, N.A.; Kuz'mina, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations spontaneously observed in cancer cells were quantitively studied under the effect of non-mutagenic (suboptimal temperature, low content of propilgallate and caffeine) and mutagenic (ionizing radiation) factors. Human larynx cancer cells during several years or gamma-irradiation were used to carry out experiments. The experiments linked with cloning of the initial population and investigation into chromosome aberrations in 22 clones demonstrated persuasively the occurrence of latent genetic lesions in cancer cells

  13. Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Cancer) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell) includes the hereditary cancer syndromes von Hippel-Lindau disease, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, and hereditary papillary renal carcinoma. Get comprehensive information on these syndromes in this clinician summary.

  14. Approximate k-NN delta test minimization method using genetic algorithms: Application to time series

    CERN Document Server

    Mateo, F; Gadea, Rafael; Sovilj, Dusan

    2010-01-01

    In many real world problems, the existence of irrelevant input variables (features) hinders the predictive quality of the models used to estimate the output variables. In particular, time series prediction often involves building large regressors of artificial variables that can contain irrelevant or misleading information. Many techniques have arisen to confront the problem of accurate variable selection, including both local and global search strategies. This paper presents a method based on genetic algorithms that intends to find a global optimum set of input variables that minimize the Delta Test criterion. The execution speed has been enhanced by substituting the exact nearest neighbor computation by its approximate version. The problems of scaling and projection of variables have been addressed. The developed method works in conjunction with MATLAB's Genetic Algorithm and Direct Search Toolbox. The goodness of the proposed methodology has been evaluated on several popular time series examples, and also ...

  15. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers includes information on BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants (breast and ovarian cancer) and Lynch syndrome (endometrial cancer). Get more information about hereditary breast and gynecologic cancer syndromes in this clinician summary.

  16. Ovarian cancer at young age: the contribution of mismatch-repair defects in a population-based series of epithelial ovarian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Malander, S; Måsbäck, A

    2007-01-01

    age is a hallmark of heredity, and ovarian cancers associated with HNPCC have been demonstrated to develop at a particularly early age. We used the Swedish Cancer Registry to identify a population-based series of 98 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers that developed before 40 years. Mucinous......At least one of ten patients with ovarian cancer is estimated to develop their tumor because of heredity with the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) being the major genetic causes. Cancer at young...... and endometrioid cancers were overrepresented and were diagnosed in 27% and 16% of the tumors, respectively. Immunostaining using antibodies against MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 was used to assess the mismatch-repair status and revealed loss of expression of MLH1/PMS2 in two cases, loss of MSH2/MSH6 in one case...

  17. Genetic Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S; Giannakis, Marios; Wells, Daniel K; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Quist, Michael; Nowak, Jonathan A; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Inamura, Kentaro; Morikawa, Teppei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Connolly, Charles; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Geybels, Milan S; Grady, William M; Hsu, Li; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Kim, Yeon Joo; Krystofinski, Paige; Leiserson, Mark D M; Montoya, Dennis J; Nadel, Brian B; Pellegrini, Matteo; Pritchard, Colin C; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Quist, Elleanor H; Raphael, Ben J; Salipante, Stephen J; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Shinbrot, Eve; Shirts, Brian; Shukla, Sachet; Stanford, Janet L; Sun, Wei; Tsoi, Jennifer; Upfill-Brown, Alexander; Wheeler, David A; Wu, Catherine J; Yu, Ming; Zaidi, Syed H; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Garraway, Levi A; Hudson, Thomas J; Fuchs, Charles S; Ribas, Antoni; Ogino, Shuji; Peters, Ulrike

    2018-06-01

    To understand the genetic drivers of immune recognition and evasion in colorectal cancer, we analyzed 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumor samples, including 179 classified as microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high). This set includes The Cancer Genome Atlas colorectal cancer cohort of 592 samples, completed and analyzed here. MSI-high, a hypermutated, immunogenic subtype of colorectal cancer, had a high rate of significantly mutated genes in important immune-modulating pathways and in the antigen presentation machinery, including biallelic losses of B2M and HLA genes due to copy-number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. WNT/β-catenin signaling genes were significantly mutated in all colorectal cancer subtypes, and activated WNT/β-catenin signaling was correlated with the absence of T-cell infiltration. This large-scale genomic analysis of colorectal cancer demonstrates that MSI-high cases frequently undergo an immunoediting process that provides them with genetic events allowing immune escape despite high mutational load and frequent lymphocytic infiltration and, furthermore, that colorectal cancer tumors have genetic and methylation events associated with activated WNT signaling and T-cell exclusion. Significance: This multi-omic analysis of 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumors reveals that it should be possible to better monitor resistance in the 15% of cases that respond to immune blockade therapy and also to use WNT signaling inhibitors to reverse immune exclusion in the 85% of cases that currently do not. Cancer Discov; 8(6); 730-49. ©2018 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 663 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Forecasting nonlinear chaotic time series with function expression method based on an improved genetic-simulated annealing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhou, Bi-hua; Zhou, Shu-dao; Sheng, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a novel function expression method to forecast chaotic time series, using an improved genetic-simulated annealing (IGSA) algorithm to establish the optimum function expression that describes the behavior of time series. In order to deal with the weakness associated with the genetic algorithm, the proposed algorithm incorporates the simulated annealing operation which has the strong local search ability into the genetic algorithm to enhance the performance of optimization; besides, the fitness function and genetic operators are also improved. Finally, the method is applied to the chaotic time series of Quadratic and Rossler maps for validation. The effect of noise in the chaotic time series is also studied numerically. The numerical results verify that the method can forecast chaotic time series with high precision and effectiveness, and the forecasting precision with certain noise is also satisfactory. It can be concluded that the IGSA algorithm is energy-efficient and superior.

  19. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address...... this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested...... that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We...

  20. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta-analysis ......BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta......-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference...... panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24...

  1. Establishing a Cancer Genetics Programme in Asia - the Singapore Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieng Wei-Shieng

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer genetics is now an established oncology subspecialty with the primary prevention role of identifying high-risk individuals through genetic information for enrolment into screening and preventive programmes. Integrated into major Western centres since the late 1990s, such a programme has been established in Singapore since 2001. Our programme has evaluated 367 index patients comprising mainly breast and colorectal cancer cases. Cancer patients were receptive to genetic counselling, but cost posed a major barrier to genetic testing. However, when the cost barrier was removed through government subsidy plans, more than half of high-risk patients still declined testing. The major barriers were reluctance to involve family members, perception that the information would not change management, and fears of negative feelings. Confirmed mutation carriers were compliant to screening and receptive to prophylactic surgery. Uptake of predictive testing among cancer-free family members has been low, possibly arising from the stigma associated with cancer in our Asian culture. These potential barriers are being addressed through government subsidy plans, continuing education to increase awareness, and being culturally sensitive when dealing with the Asian family.

  2. Courting the future: cancer and genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Describing this double issue of MEDICC Review could be an exercise for a first-year philosophy course in logic. It's not about "cancer and genetics" in Cuba. It's about cancer in Cuba and about genetics in Cuba, not about exploring relationships between them. Nevertheless, while the marriage of the two themes was fortuitous, in that the two had long been scheduled for the journal in 2014, there is a certain felicity to their sharing an issue. To date, the outstanding accomplishments of genetics have been most helpful for conditions occurring at the beginning of life and cancer is largely (though not exclusively) a disease related to aging. But the two are intrinsically connected: Although only a few of the more than 100 different diseases grouped under the term cancer are known to be hereditary, every cancer begins with a mutation in one or more genes, whether the mutation is inherited, due to an exposure, or is simply a random error in the millions of cell divisions that are part and parcel of cellular reproduction. Our cover image, a stained-glass window by Cuban artist Rosa María de la Terga at Cuba's National Medical Genetics Center, illustrates the elegance of the DNA molecule, the intricate key to life.

  3. Circadian pathway genetic variation and cancer risk: evidence from genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Tropea, Saveria; Benna, Clara; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo

    2018-02-19

    (ARNTL2, CSNK1E, NR1D2 and PER2) and two for breast cancer (PER1, RORC). Our findings, based on the largest series ever utilized for ARTP-based gene and pathway analysis, support the hypothesis that circadian pathway genetic variation is involved in cancer predisposition.

  4. Cancer Screening and Genetics: A Tale of Two Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Jada G.; Edwards, Heather M.; Khoury, Muin J.; Taplin, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The long-standing medical tradition to “first do no harm” is reflected in population-wide evidence-based recommendations for cancer screening tests that focus primarily on reducing morbidity and mortality. The conventional cancer screening process is predicated on finding early-stage disease that can be treated effectively; yet emerging genetic and genomic testing technologies have moved the target earlier in the disease development process to identify a probabilistic predisposition to diseas...

  5. Molecular genetics of cancer and tumorigenesis: Drosophila models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Min Deng

    2011-01-01

    Why do some cells not respond to normal control of cell division and become tumorous? Which signals trigger some tumor cells to migrate and colonize other tissues? What genetic factors are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer development? What environmental factors play a role in cancer formation and progression? In how many ways can our bodies prevent and restrict the growth of cancerous cells?How can we identify and deliver effective drugs to fight cancer? In the fight against cancer,which kills more people than any other disease,these and other questions have long interested researchers from a diverse range of fields.To answer these questions and to fight cancer more effectively,we must increase our understanding of basic cancer biology.Model organisms,including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,have played instrumental roles in our understanding of this devastating disease and the search for effective cures.Drosophila and its highly effective,easy-touse,and ever-expanding genetic tools have contributed toand enriched our knowledge of cancer and tumor formation tremendously.

  6. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    To analyze patients with kidney cancer referred for evaluation at a high-volume genetics service at a comprehensive cancer center and identify factors associated with positive tests for hereditary cancer syndromes. A retrospective review of patients referred to the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was performed, and patients with a personal history of kidney cancer were identified. Patient and disease characteristics were reviewed. In all, 4 variables including age at diagnosis of kidney tumor, presence of syndromic manifestations, family history of kidney cancer, and number of primary malignancies were evaluated for association with positive test results in 2 groups: patients tested for renal cell carcinoma syndromes and Lynch syndrome. Guidance for genetic testing strategy in patients with kidney cancer is provided. Between 1999 and 2012, 120 patients with a history of kidney cancer were evaluated by the Clinical Genetics Service. The mean age at kidney cancer diagnosis was 52 years (interquartile range: 42-63), with 57% being women. A family history of kidney cancer was reported by 39 patients (33%). Time between diagnosis of first cancer and genetic consultation was 5 years in the remaining 23%. Overall, 95 patients were tested for genetic abnormalities with 27 (28%) testing positive. Testing for renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-related syndromes was performed on 43 patients, with 13 testing positive (30%). Lynch syndrome testing was positive in 9 patients (32%) after 28 were tested. In RCC-associated syndromes, young age of diagnosis was associated with positive test results. Conversely, syndromic manifestations and increasing number of primary malignancies were associated with positive Lynch testing. The discovery of inherited kidney cancer syndromes has provided a unique opportunity to identify patients at increased risk for cancer. Factors associated with positive genetic testing are unique to different syndromes. These data

  7. Competences, education and support for new roles in cancer genetics services: outcomes from the cancer genetics pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Catherine; Burton, Hilary; Farndon, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 the Department of Health in collaboration with Macmillan Cancer Support set up service development projects to pilot the integration of genetics in mainstream medicine in the area of cancer genetics.In developing these services, new roles and responsibilities were devised that required supporting programmes of education and training. The NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre has worked with the projects to draw together their experience in these aspects. New roles include the Cancer Family Nurse Specialist, in which a nurse working in a cancer setting was trained to identify and manage genetic or family history concerns, and the Genetic Risk Assessment Practitioner--a small team of practitioners working within a secondary care setting to deliver a standardised risk assessment pathway. Existing roles were also adapted for a different setting, in particular the use of genetic counsellors working in a community ethnic minority setting. These practitioners undertook a range of clinical activities that can be mapped directly to the 'UK National Workforce Competences for Genetics in Clinical Practice for Non-genetics Healthcare Staff' framework developed by Skills for Health and the NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre (2007; draft competence framework). The main differences between the various roles were in the ordering of genetic tests and the provision of advice on invasive preventive options such as mastectomy. Those involved in service development also needed to develop competences in project management, business skills, audit and evaluation, working with users, general management (personnel, multi-agency work and marketing), educational supervision, IT, public and professional outreach, and research. Important resources to support the development of new roles and competences included pathways and guidelines, a formal statement of competences, a recognised syllabus, appropriate and timely courses, the availability of a

  8. Genetic variability of the mTOR pathway and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Campa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway integrates various signals, regulating ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis as a function of available energy and amino acids, and assuring an appropriate coupling of cellular proliferation with increases in cell size. In addition, recent evidence has pointed to an interplay between the mTOR and p53 pathways. We investigated the genetic variability of 67 key genes in the mTOR pathway and in genes of the p53 pathway which interact with mTOR. We tested the association of 1,084 tagging SNPs with prostate cancer risk in a study of 815 prostate cancer cases and 1,266 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC. We chose the SNPs (n = 11 with the strongest association with risk (p<0.01 and sought to replicate their association in an additional series of 838 prostate cancer cases and 943 controls from EPIC. In the joint analysis of first and second phase two SNPs of the PRKCI gene showed an association with risk of prostate cancer (OR(allele = 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94, p = 1.3 x 10⁻³ for rs546950 and OR(allele = 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.93, p = 5.6 x 10⁻⁴ for rs4955720. We confirmed this in a meta-analysis using as replication set the data from the second phase of our study jointly with the first phase of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS project. In conclusion, we found an association with prostate cancer risk for two SNPs belonging to PRKCI, a gene which is frequently overexpressed in various neoplasms, including prostate cancer.

  9. Screening for breast cancer in a high-risk series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodard, E.D.; Hempelmann, L.H.; Janus, J.; Logan, W.; Dean, P.

    1982-01-01

    A unique cohort of women at increased risk of breast cancer because of prior X-ray treatment of acute mastitis and their selected high-risk siblings were offered periodic breast cancer screening including physical examination of the breasts, mammography, and thermography. Twelve breast cancers were detected when fewer than four would have been expected based on age-specific breast cancer detection rates from the National Cancer institute/American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Demonstration Detection Projects. Mammograpy was positive in all cases but physical examination was positive in only three cases. Thermography was an unreliable indicator of disease. Given the concern over radiation-induced risk, use of low-dose technique and of criteria for participation that select women at high risk of breast cancer will maximize the benefit/risk ratio for mammography screening

  10. Levels of Evidence: Cancer Genetics Studies (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levels of Evidence for Cancer Genetics Studies addresses the process and challenges of developing evidence-based summaries. Get information about how to weigh the strength of the evidence from cancer genetics studies in this summary for clinicians.

  11. COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, L. A.; Brenner, H.; Buch, S.; Campbell, H.; Carracedo, A.; Carvajal-Carmona, L.; Castells, A.; Castellví-Bel, S.; Cheadle, J. P.; Devilee, P.; Dunlop, M.; Echeverry, M.; Gallinger, S.; Galvan, A.; Hampe, J.; Hemminki, K.; Ho, J. W. C.; Hofstra, R. M. W.; Hudson, T. J.; Kirac, I.; Lerch, M. M.; Li, L.; Lindblom, A.; Lipton, L.; Matsuda, K.; Maughan, T. S.; Moreno, V.; Morreau, H.; Naccarati, Alessio; Nakamura, Y.; Peterlongo, P.; Pharoah, P. D.; Sieber, O.; Radice, P.; Ruiz-Ponte, C.; Schafmayer, C.; Schmidt, C. A.; von Schönfels, W.; Schreiber, S.; Scott, R.; Sham, P.; Souček, P.; Tenesa, A.; Tomplinson, P. M.; Velez, A.; Villanueva, C. M.; Vodička, Pavel; Völzke, H.; van Wezel, T.; Wijnen, J.T.; Zanke, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2012), s. 143-151 ISSN 0267-8357 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : identification of low-risk variants * disease causing variants * susceptibility alleles Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.500, year: 2012

  12. Accuracy of family history of cancer : clinical genetic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Boonstra, AE; Reefhuis, J; Hordijk-Hos, JM; de Walle, HEK; Oosterwijk, JC; Cornel, MC

    Family medical history is the cornerstone of clinical genetic diagnosis and management in cases of familial cancer. The soundness of medical decisions can be compromised if reports by the family on affected relatives are inaccurate. Although very time consuming, family medical histories are

  13. College of Science Magazine explores genetic medicine, cancer therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The newest issue of the College of Science Magazine features a host of scientific research projects underway at Virginia Tech. New avenues in genetic medicine, environmental links to breast cancer, and resistance training for diabetics are just a few of the topics.

  14. Genetically modified dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 153-155 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cell s * cancer vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  15. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or enviro...

  16. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hughes, Chanita

    2005-01-01

    .... The objectives of this study are to develop a Culturally Tailored Genetic (CTGC) protocol for African American women and evaluate its impact on decision-making and satisfaction about BRCA1/2 testing, quality of life, and cancer control practices...

  17. Genetic toxicology and cancer risk assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choy, Wai Nang

    2001-01-01

    ... their risks to humans are obvious goals for the protection of public health. When exposure is unavoidable, an accurate estimation of human risk as a result of exposure is essential for making regulatory decisions. Quantitative cancer risk assessment is an intricate process that utilizes knowledge from many different scien...

  18. Genetic basis of familial isolated hyperparathyroidism: a case series and a narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontikides, Nikolaos; Karras, Spyridon; Kaprara, Athina; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Mintziori, Gesthimani; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Memi, Eleni; Krassas, Gerasimos

    2014-07-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a heterogeneous clinical entity. In the clinical setting, the diagnosis and management of familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and other familial hyperparathyroidism (FHPT) forms continue to rely on clinical, laboratory, and histological findings, with careful examination of the family. In this article, we report a case series of FIHP in a four-generation Greek family, with no identifiable gene mutations. Clinical approach and long-term follow-up are discussed and a narrative review of the genetic basis of this entity has been performed.

  19. Genetic epidemiology of sporadic colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Pardini, Barbara; Souček, P.; Novotný, J.; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Hánová, Monika; Tulupová, Elena; Poláková, Veronika; Halamková, J.; Hemminki, K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 18, Supplement 1 (2006), S8-S8 ISSN 1107-3756. [The 11th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and 9th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine . 12.10.2006-14.10.2006, Hersonissos] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2626; GA MZd NR8563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : DNA repair genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  20. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their family history of cancer. Depending on a woman’s family history, the doctor or nurse may then use a ... against routine genetic counseling or BRCA testing of women whose family history is not associated with an increased risk for ...

  1. The role of genetic factors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and iron overload - a prospective series of 234 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Natalie; Chaze, Iphigénie; Alary, Anne-Sophie; Tachon, Gaëlle; Cunat, Séverine; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Bismuth, Michael; Larrey, Dominique; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Schved, Jean-François; Donnadieu-Rigole, Hélène; Blanc, Pierre; Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia

    2016-05-01

    Iron overload (IO) in HFE-related hereditary haemochromatosis is associated with increased risk of liver cancer. This study aimed to investigate the role of other genes involved in hereditary IO among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC diagnosed in our institution were included in this prospective study. Those with ferritin levels ≥300 μg/L (males) or ≥200 μg/L (females) and/or transferrin saturation ≥50% (males) or ≥45% (females) had liver iron concentration (LIC) evaluated by MRI. HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were screened. Genetic analyses of genes involved in hereditary IO (HFE, HJV/HFE2, HAMP, TFR2, SLC40A1, GNPAT) were performed in patients with increased LIC. A total of 234 patients were included; 215 (92%) had common acquired risk factors of HCC (mainly alcoholism or chronic viral hepatitis). 119 patients had abnormal iron parameters. Twelve (5.1%) were C282Y homozygotes, three were compound C282Y/H63D heterozygotes. LIC was measured by MRI in 100 patients. Thirteen patients with a LIC>70 μmol/g were enrolled in further genetic analyses: two unrelated patients bore the HAMP:c.-153C>T mutation at the heterozygous state, which is associated with increased risk of IO and severe haemochromatosis. Specific haplotypes of SLC40A1 were also studied. Additional genetic risk factors of IO were found in 18 patients (7.7%) among a large series of 234 HCC patients. Screening for IO and the associated at-risk genotypes in patients who have developed HCC, is useful for both determining etiologic diagnosis and enabling family screening and possibly primary prevention in relatives. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Genetic changes associated with testicular cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Louise C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2016-10-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is a highly heritable cancer primarily affecting young white men. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been particularly effective in identifying multiple common variants with strong contribution to TGCT risk. These loci identified through association studies have implicated multiple genes as associated with TGCT predisposition, many of which are unique among cancer types, and regulate processes such as pluripotency, sex specification, and microtubule assembly. Together these biologically plausible genes converge on pathways involved in male germ cell development and maturation, and suggest that perturbation of them confers susceptibility to TGCT, as a developmental defect of germ cell differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetics, Cytogenetics, and Epigenetics of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Migliore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the colorectal cancer (CRC cases are sporadic, only 25% of the patients have a family history of the disease, and major genes causing syndromes predisposing to CRC only account for 5-6% of the total cases. The following subtypes can be recognized: MIN (microsatellite instability, CIN (chromosomal instability, and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype. CIN occurs in 80–85% of CRC. Chromosomal instability proceeds through two major mechanisms, missegregation that results in aneuploidy through the gain or loss of whole chromosomes, and unbalanced structural rearrangements that lead to the loss and/or gain of chromosomal regions. The loss of heterozygosity that occur in the first phases of the CRC cancerogenesis (in particular for the genes on 18q as well as the alteration of methylation pattern of multiple key genes can drive the development of colorectal cancer by facilitating the acquisition of multiple tumor-associated mutations and the instability phenotype.

  4. History, genetics, and strategies for cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrinos, Fay; Stoffel, Elena M

    2014-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the third cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The majority of CRC cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events, but up to 6% are attributed to known monogenic disorders that confer a markedly increased risk for the development of CRC and multiple extracolonic malignancies. Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited CRC syndrome and is associated with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2 but also MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Although the risk of CRC and endometrial cancer may approach near 75% and 50%, respectively, in gene mutation carriers, the identification of these individuals and at-risk family members through predictive genetic testing provides opportunities for cancer prevention including specialized cancer screening, intensified surveillance, and/or prophylactic surgeries. This article will provide a review of the major advances in risk assessment, molecular genetics, DNA mutational analyses, and cancer prevention and management made since Lynch syndrome was first described 100 years ago. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost

  6. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology.

  7. Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer: Genetics and Molecular Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ceu; Camargo, M C; Leite, Marina; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Rabkin, Charles S; Machado, José C

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most incident and the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for this disease. Gastric cancer is the final outcome of a cascade of events that takes decades to occur and results from the accumulation of multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes are crucial for tumor cells to expedite and sustain the array of pathways involved in the cancer development, such as cell cycle, DNA repair, metabolism, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immune surveillance. Comprehensive molecular analyses of gastric cancer have disclosed the complex heterogeneity of this disease. In particular, these analyses have confirmed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer is a distinct entity. The identification of gastric cancer subtypes characterized by recognizable molecular profiles may pave the way for a more personalized clinical management and to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for screening, prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of gastric cancer progression.

  8. Synthetic Genetic Targeting of Genome Instability in Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajesh, Babu V.; Guppy, Brent J.; McManus, Kirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death throughout the World. A limitation of many current chemotherapeutic approaches is that their cytotoxic effects are not restricted to cancer cells, and adverse side effects can occur within normal tissues. Consequently, novel strategies are urgently needed to better target cancer cells. As we approach the era of personalized medicine, targeting the specific molecular defect(s) within a given patient’s tumor will become a more effective treatment strategy than traditional approaches that often target a given cancer type or sub-type. Synthetic genetic interactions are now being examined for their therapeutic potential and are designed to target the specific genetic and epigenetic phenomena associated with tumor formation, and thus are predicted to be highly selective. In general, two complementary approaches have been employed, including synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, to target aberrant expression and/or function associated with tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, respectively. Here we discuss the concepts of synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, and explain three general experimental approaches designed to identify novel genetic interactors. We present examples and discuss the merits and caveats of each approach. Finally, we provide insight into the subsequent pre-clinical work required to validate novel candidate drug targets

  9. Time series segmentation: a new approach based on Genetic Algorithm and Hidden Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toreti, A.; Kuglitsch, F. G.; Xoplaki, E.; Luterbacher, J.

    2009-04-01

    The subdivision of a time series into homogeneous segments has been performed using various methods applied to different disciplines. In climatology, for example, it is accompanied by the well-known homogenization problem and the detection of artificial change points. In this context, we present a new method (GAMM) based on Hidden Markov Model (HMM) and Genetic Algorithm (GA), applicable to series of independent observations (and easily adaptable to autoregressive processes). A left-to-right hidden Markov model, estimating the parameters and the best-state sequence, respectively, with the Baum-Welch and Viterbi algorithms, was applied. In order to avoid the well-known dependence of the Baum-Welch algorithm on the initial condition, a Genetic Algorithm was developed. This algorithm is characterized by mutation, elitism and a crossover procedure implemented with some restrictive rules. Moreover the function to be minimized was derived following the approach of Kehagias (2004), i.e. it is the so-called complete log-likelihood. The number of states was determined applying a two-fold cross-validation procedure (Celeux and Durand, 2008). Being aware that the last issue is complex, and it influences all the analysis, a Multi Response Permutation Procedure (MRPP; Mielke et al., 1981) was inserted. It tests the model with K+1 states (where K is the state number of the best model) if its likelihood is close to K-state model. Finally, an evaluation of the GAMM performances, applied as a break detection method in the field of climate time series homogenization, is shown. 1. G. Celeux and J.B. Durand, Comput Stat 2008. 2. A. Kehagias, Stoch Envir Res 2004. 3. P.W. Mielke, K.J. Berry, G.W. Brier, Monthly Wea Rev 1981.

  10. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated With Constipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Eivor A; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-06-18

    To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation and 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 15 candidate genes related to opioid- or constipation-signaling pathways (HTR3E, HTR4, HTR2A, TPH1, ADRA2A, CHRM3, TACR1, CCKAR, KIT, ARRB2, GHRL, ABCB1, COMT, OPRM1, and OPRD1). The non-genetic factors significantly associated with constipation were type of laxative, mobility and place of care among patients receiving laxatives (N=806), in addition to Karnofsky performance status and presence of metastases among patients not receiving laxatives (N=762) (Pconstipation. Five SNPs, rs1800532 in TPH1, rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs4437575 in ABCB1, rs10802789 in CHRM3, and rs2020917 in COMT were associated with constipation (Phospitalization, Karnofsky performance status, presence of metastases, and five SNPs within TPH1, OPRM1, ABCB1, CHRM3, and COMT may contribute to the variability in constipation among cancer patients treated with opioids. Knowledge of these factors may help to develop new therapies and to identify patients needing a more individualized approach to treatment.

  11. Asymmetry in family history implicates nonstandard genetic mechanisms: application to the genetics of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice R Weinberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies typically target inherited autosomal variants, but less studied genetic mechanisms can play a role in complex disease. Sex-linked variants aside, three genetic phenomena can induce differential risk in maternal versus paternal lineages of affected individuals: 1. maternal effects, reflecting the maternal genome's influence on prenatal development; 2. mitochondrial variants, which are inherited maternally; 3. autosomal genes, whose effects depend on parent of origin. We algebraically show that small asymmetries in family histories of affected individuals may reflect much larger genetic risks acting via those mechanisms. We apply these ideas to a study of sisters of women with breast cancer. Among 5,091 distinct families of women reporting that exactly one grandmother had breast cancer, risk was skewed toward maternal grandmothers (p<0.0001, especially if the granddaughter was diagnosed between age 45 and 54. Maternal genetic effects, mitochondrial variants, or variant genes with parent-of-origin effects may influence risk of perimenopausal breast cancer.

  12. Genetic susceptibility loci, pesticide exposure and prostate cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Koutros

    Full Text Available Uncovering SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms-environment interactions can generate new hypotheses about the function of poorly characterized genetic variants and environmental factors, like pesticides. We evaluated SNP-environment interactions between 30 confirmed prostate cancer susceptibility loci and 45 pesticides and prostate cancer risk in 776 cases and 1,444 controls in the Agricultural Health Study. We used unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Multiplicative SNP-pesticide interactions were calculated using a likelihood ratio test. After correction for multiple tests using the False Discovery Rate method, two interactions remained noteworthy. Among men carrying two T alleles at rs2710647 in EH domain binding protein 1 (EHBP1 SNP, the risk of prostate cancer in those with high malathion use was 3.43 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.44-8.15 (P-interaction= 0.003. Among men carrying two A alleles at rs7679673 in TET2, the risk of prostate cancer associated with high aldrin use was 3.67 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.43, 9.41 (P-interaction= 0.006. In contrast, associations were null for other genotypes. Although additional studies are needed and the exact mechanisms are unknown, this study suggests known genetic susceptibility loci may modify the risk between pesticide use and prostate cancer.

  13. CGPD: Cancer Genetics and Proteomics Database - A Dataset for Computational Analysis and Online Cancer Diagnostic Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rizwan Riaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer Genetics and Proteomics Database (CGPD is a repository for genetics and proteomics data of those Homo sapiens genes which are involved in Cancer. These genes are categorized in the database on the basis of cancer type. 72 genes of 13 types of cancers are considered in this database yet. Primers, promoters and peptides of these genes are also made available. Primers provided for each gene, with their features and conditions given to facilitate the researchers, are useful in PCR amplification, especially in cloning experiments. CGPD also contains Online Cancer Diagnostic Center (OCDC. It also contains transcription and translation tools to assist research work in progressive manner. The database is publicly available at http://www.cgpd.comyr.com.

  14. Cancer-related inflammation, the seventh hallmark of cancer: links to genetic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colotta, Francesco; Allavena, Paola; Sica, Antonio; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory conditions in selected organs increase the risk of cancer. An inflammatory component is present also in the microenvironment of tumors that are not epidemiologically related to inflammation. Recent studies have begun to unravel molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. In the tumor microenvironment, smoldering inflammation contributes to proliferation and survival of malignant cells, angiogenesis, metastasis, subversion of adaptive immunity, reduced response to hormones and chemotherapeutic agents. Recent data suggest that an additional mechanism involved in cancer-related inflammation (CRI) is induction of genetic instability by inflammatory mediators, leading to accumulation of random genetic alterations in cancer cells. In a seminal contribution, Hanahan and Weinberg [(2000) Cell, 100, 57-70] identified the six hallmarks of cancer. We surmise that CRI represents the seventh hallmark.

  15. Distinct genetic alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ashktorab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon cancer (CRC development often includes chromosomal instability (CIN leading to amplifications and deletions of large DNA segments. Epidemiological, clinical, and cytogenetic studies showed that there are considerable differences between CRC tumors from African Americans (AAs and Caucasian patients. In this study, we determined genomic copy number aberrations in sporadic CRC tumors from AAs, in order to investigate possible explanations for the observed disparities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH using a 105k chip to identify copy number aberrations in samples from 15 AAs. In addition, we did a population comparative analysis with aCGH data in Caucasians as well as with a widely publicized list of colon cancer genes (CAN genes. There was an average of 20 aberrations per patient with more amplifications than deletions. Analysis of DNA copy number of frequently altered chromosomes revealed that deletions occurred primarily in chromosomes 4, 8 and 18. Chromosomal duplications occurred in more than 50% of cases on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, 20 and X. The CIN profile showed some differences when compared to Caucasian alterations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chromosome X amplification in male patients and chromosomes 4, 8 and 18 deletions were prominent aberrations in AAs. Some CAN genes were altered at high frequencies in AAs with EXOC4, EPHB6, GNAS, MLL3 and TBX22 as the most frequently deleted genes and HAPLN1, ADAM29, SMAD2 and SMAD4 as the most frequently amplified genes. The observed CIN may play a distinctive role in CRC in AAs.

  16. Non-genetic health professionals' attitude towards, knowledge of and skills in discussing and ordering genetic testing for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, Kirsten F. L.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Allain, Dawn C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic health professionals (NGHPs) have insufficient knowledge of cancer genetics, express educational needs and are unprepared to counsel their patients regarding their genetic test results. So far, it is unclear how NGHPs perceive their own communication skills. This study was undertaken to

  17. Internal combustion engine control for series hybrid electric vehicles by parallel and distributed genetic programming/multiobjective genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwin, D.; Stewart, P.; Stewart, J.

    2011-02-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining a stable rectified DC output from the three-phase AC generator in a series-hybrid vehicle powertrain. The series-hybrid prime power source generally comprises an internal combustion (IC) engine driving a three-phase permanent magnet generator whose output is rectified to DC. A recent development has been to control the engine/generator combination by an electronically actuated throttle. This system can be represented as a nonlinear system with significant time delay. Previously, voltage control of the generator output has been achieved by model predictive methods such as the Smith Predictor. These methods rely on the incorporation of an accurate system model and time delay into the control algorithm, with a consequent increase in computational complexity in the real-time controller, and as a necessity relies to some extent on the accuracy of the models. Two complementary performance objectives exist for the control system. Firstly, to maintain the IC engine at its optimal operating point, and secondly, to supply a stable DC supply to the traction drive inverters. Achievement of these goals minimises the transient energy storage requirements at the DC link, with a consequent reduction in both weight and cost. These objectives imply constant velocity operation of the IC engine under external load disturbances and changes in both operating conditions and vehicle speed set-points. In order to achieve these objectives, and reduce the complexity of implementation, in this article a controller is designed by the use of Genetic Programming methods in the Simulink modelling environment, with the aim of obtaining a relatively simple controller for the time-delay system which does not rely on the implementation of real time system models or time delay approximations in the controller. A methodology is presented to utilise the miriad of existing control blocks in the Simulink libraries to automatically evolve optimal control

  18. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had...... been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P... and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted....

  19. Genetic variation in adipokine genes and risk of colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechlivanis, S.; Bermejo, J. L.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel; Försti, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 160, č. 6 (2009), s. 933-940 ISSN 0804-4643 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430; GA MZd NR8563 Grant - others:EU(SE) LSHC-CT-2004-503465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : colorectal cancer * diabetes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.539, year: 2009

  20. Cytokine Genetic Variations and Fatigue Among Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Irwin, Michael R.; Castellon, Steven; Arevalo, Jesusa; Cole, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Fatigue is a common adverse effect of cancer treatment and may persist for years after treatment completion. However, risk factors for post-treatment fatigue have not been determined. On the basis of studies suggesting an inflammatory basis for fatigue, this study tested the hypothesis that expression-regulating polymorphisms in proinflammatory cytokine genes would predict post-treatment fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients and Methods Women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer (n = 171) completed questionnaires to assess fatigue and other behavioral symptoms (ie, depressive symptoms, memory complaints, sleep disturbance) and provided blood for genotyping within 3 months after primary treatment. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral-blood leukocytes and assayed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter regions of three cytokine genes: ILB −511 C>T (rs16944), IL6 −174 G>C (rs1800795), and TNF −308 G>A (rs1800629). An additive genetic risk score was computed by summing the number of high-expression alleles (zero, one, or two) across all three polymorphisms. Results The genetic risk index was significantly associated with fatigue; as the number of high-expression alleles increased, so did self-reported fatigue severity (P = .002). Analyses of individual SNPs showed that TNF −308 and IL6 −174 were independently associated with fatigue (P = .032). The genetic risk index was also associated with depressive symptoms (P = .007) and memory complaints (P = .016). Conclusion These findings further implicate inflammatory processes as contributors to cancer-related fatigue and suggest a new strategy for identifying and treating patients at risk for this symptom based on genetic variants in proinflammatory cytokine genes. PMID:23530106

  1. Genetic variants in selenoprotein genes increase risk of colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Méplan, C.; Hughes, D. J.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Souček, P.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Hlavatá, I.; Vrána, D.; Vodička, Pavel; Hesketh, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 6 (2010), s. 1074-1079 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA310/07/1430; GA ČR GP305/09/P194 Grant - others:EU(XE) FP6-505360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : colorectal cancer * Selenium Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.402, year: 2010

  2. Patients with Acromegaly Presenting with Colon Cancer: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray B. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Frequent colonoscopy screenings are critical for early diagnosis of colon cancer in patients with acromegaly. Case Presentations. We performed a retrospective analysis of the incidental diagnoses of colon cancer from the ACCESS trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01995734. Colon cancer was identified in 2 patients (4.5%. Case  1 patient was a 36-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove the pituitary adenoma. After surgery, the patient underwent routine colonoscopy screening, which revealed a 40 mm tubular adenoma in the descending colon. A T1N1a carcinoma was surgically removed, and 1 of 22 lymph nodes was positive for metastatic disease, leading to a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. Case  2 patient was a 50-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove a 2 cm pituitary adenoma. The patient reported severe cramping and lower abdominal pain, and an invasive 8.1 cm3 grade 2 adenocarcinoma with signet rings was identified in the ascending colon and removed. Of the 37 lymph nodes, 34 were positive for the presence of tumor cells, and stage 3c colon cancer was confirmed. Conclusion. Current guidelines for colonoscopy screening at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly and at appropriate follow-up intervals should be followed.

  3. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Győri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2%), 5 NRAS (3.1%), 2 HRAS (1.0%) and 1 KRAS (0.5%) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6%) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5%) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature.

  4. Genetic bases of the radiosensitivity of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaloge, S.; Marsiglia, H.

    2005-01-01

    Local-regional radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic means in the management of breast cancer. Three questions however arise from the important advances, achieved in this domain in the past years. The first question concerns the possibilities to identify and overcome the radioresistance of a subset of tumours. The second question is how to recognize women likely to benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy, and therefore to diminish treatment indications in other groups. Finally, the third question is how to identify subjects at high risk for long term injury following breast irradiation, in order to adapt techniques and indications in such populations. The major advances of breast cancer molecular genetics in the past years should provide clinicians with tools to answer these important questions. In this paper, we review the molecular germ line (BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM,...) and somatic (p53, tyrosine kinase receptors, as well as actors of cell cycle, signal transduction, apoptosis, DNA repair...) main bases of breast cancer radiosensitivity. Recent methods of exploration of the genetic background of both the host and the tumours (gene and protein expression profiles) are also reviewed as major tools of breast cancer management in the next few years. (author)

  5. Lobular breast cancer: incidence and genetic and non-genetic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossus, Laure; Benusiglio, Patrick R

    2015-03-13

    While most invasive breast cancers consist of carcinomas of the ductal type, about 10% are invasive lobular carcinomas. Invasive lobular and ductal carcinomas differ with respect to risk factors. Invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with exposure to female hormones, and therefore its incidence is more subject to variation. This is illustrated by US figures during the 1987 to 2004 period: after 12 years of increases, breast cancer incidence declined steadily from 1999 to 2004, reflecting among other causes the decreasing use of menopausal hormone therapy, and these variations were stronger for invasive lobular than for invasive ductal carcinoma. Similarly, invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with early menarche, late menopause and late age at first birth. As for genetic risk factors, four high-penetrance genes are tested in clinical practice when genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is suspected, BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CDH1. Germline mutations in BRCA1 and TP53 are predominantly associated with invasive ductal carcinoma, while BRCA2 mutations are associated with both ductal and lobular cancers. CDH1, the gene coding for the E-cadherin adhesion protein, is of special interest as mutations are associated with invasive lobular carcinoma, but never with ductal carcinoma. It was initially known as the main susceptibility gene for gastric cancer of the diffuse type, but the excess of breast cancers of the lobular type in CDH1 families led researchers to identify it also as a susceptibility gene for invasive lobular carcinoma. The risk of invasive lobular carcinoma is high in female mutation carriers, as about 50% are expected to develop the disease. Carriers must therefore undergo intensive breast cancer screening, with, for example, yearly magnetic resonance imaging and mammogram starting at age 30 years.

  6. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated With Constipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Eivor A; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Methods: Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation and 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 15 candidate genes related to opioid- or constipation-signaling pathways (HTR3E, HTR4, HTR2A, TPH1, ADRA2A, CHRM3, TACR1, CCKAR, KIT, ARRB2, GHRL, ABCB1, COMT, OPRM1, and OPRD1). Results: The non-genetic factors significantly associated with constipation were type of laxative, mobility and place of care among patients receiving laxatives (N=806), in addition to Karnofsky performance status and presence of metastases among patients not receiving laxatives (N=762) (P<0.01). Age, gender, body mass index, cancer diagnosis, time on opioids, opioid dose, and type of opioid did not contribute to the inter-individual differences in constipation. Five SNPs, rs1800532 in TPH1, rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs4437575 in ABCB1, rs10802789 in CHRM3, and rs2020917 in COMT were associated with constipation (P<0.01). Only rs2020917 in COMT passed the Benjamini–Hochberg criterion for a 10% false discovery rate. Conclusions: Type of laxative, mobility, hospitalization, Karnofsky performance status, presence of metastases, and five SNPs within TPH1, OPRM1, ABCB1, CHRM3, and COMT may contribute to the variability in constipation among cancer patients treated with opioids. Knowledge of these factors may help to develop new therapies and to identify patients needing a more individualized approach to treatment. PMID:26087058

  7. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... the breast cancer cells do not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of HER2/neu ...

  8. Cancer Prevention Programs in the Workplace. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Michael P.

    When employees develop cancer, businesses bear not only the direct medical costs of the disease, but also the indirect costs associated with lost work time, disability payments, loss of a trained employee, and retraining. Research has confirmed that aggressive prevention and screening programs can be, and indeed are, effective in limiting the…

  9. MMP9 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: a report from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Genetics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yongbin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2011-04-01

    In addition to tumor invasion and angiogenesis, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9 also contributes to carcinogenesis and tumor growth. Genetic variation that may influence MMP9 expression was evaluated among participants of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Genetics Study (SBCGS) for associations with breast cancer susceptibility. In stage 1, 11 MMP9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped by the Affymetrix Targeted Genotyping System and/or the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 among 4,227 SBCGS participants. One SNP was further genotyped using the Sequenom iPLEX MassARRAY platform among an additional 6,270 SBCGS participants. Associations with breast cancer risk were evaluated by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) from logistic regression models that included adjustment for age, education, and genotyping stage when appropriate. In Stage 1, rare allele homozygotes for a promoter SNP (rs3918241) or a non-synonymous SNP (rs2274756, R668Q) tended to occur more frequently among breast cancer cases (P value = 0.116 and 0.056, respectively). Given their high linkage disequilibrium (D' = 1.0, r (2) = 0.97), one (rs3918241) was selected for additional analysis. An association with breast cancer risk was not supported by additional Stage 2 genotyping. In combined analysis, no elevated risk of breast cancer among homozygotes was found (OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 0.8-1.8). Common genetic variation in MMP9 was not found to be significantly associated with breast cancer susceptibility among participants of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Genetics Study.

  10. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Sze Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The potential of genetic programming (GP on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. Method GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS. The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM and logistic regression (LR are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. Result The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341 when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Discussion Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis.

  11. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mei Sze; Tan, Jing Wei; Chang, Siow-Wee; Yap, Hwa Jen; Abdul Kareem, Sameem; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2016-01-01

    The potential of genetic programming (GP) on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS). The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341) when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis.

  12. Experience of parental cancer in childhood is a risk factor for psychological distress during genetic cancer susceptibility testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, I.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Brocker-Vriends, A. H. J. T.; van Asperen, C. J.; Sijmons, R. H.; Seynaeve, C.; Van Gool, A. R.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Tibben, A.

    Background: This study explores the effect of age at the time of parental cancer diagnosis or death on psychological distress and cancer risk perception in individuals undergoing genetic testing for a specific cancer susceptibility. Patients and methods: Cancer-related distress, worry and risk

  13. Experience of parental cancer in childhood is a risk factor for psychological distress during genetic cancer susceptibility testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, I.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Bröcker-Vriends, A. H. J. T.; van Asperen, C. J.; Sijmons, R. H.; Seynaeve, C.; van Gool, A. R.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Tibben, A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the effect of age at the time of parental cancer diagnosis or death on psychological distress and cancer risk perception in individuals undergoing genetic testing for a specific cancer susceptibility. Cancer-related distress, worry and risk perception were assessed in 271

  14. The genetic alteration of p53 in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Baik, Hee Jong; Kim, Chang Min; Kim, Mi Hee [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    Genetic alterations in the p53 gene have been detected in various human malignancies, and its alterations inactive the function of p53 as a tumor suppressor. Point mutation and gene deletion are the main mechanisms of p53 inactivation. To determine the incidence of genetic alteration of p53 and their clinical implications in Korean patients of esophageal cancer, we investigated p53 alterations in 26 esophageal cancer tissues paired with its normal tissue by Southern blot analysis, PCR-SSCP, and direct sequencing. Allelic loss of chromosome 17p occurred in 12 out of 21 informative cases(57%) by Southern blot analysis, and 16 cases showed mobility shift in PCR-SSCP, so overall incidence of p53 gene alterations was 77%(20/26). The mutations detected was randomly dispersed over exon4-8 and was frequently G-T transversion and C:T transitions. Three identical mutations were clustered at codon 213 suggested the same etiologic agents in this cases. The p53 gene alterations play a significant role in the development of esophageal cancers, however, no relationship between p53 mutation and clinical data was detected so far. 9 refs. (Author).

  15. Colorectal Cancer Genetic Heterogeneity Delineated by Multi-Region Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Wang Lu

    Full Text Available Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH leads to an underestimation of the mutational landscape portrayed by a single needle biopsy and consequently affects treatment precision. The extent of colorectal cancer (CRC genetic ITH is not well understood in Chinese patients. Thus, we conducted deep sequencing by using the OncoGxOne™ Plus panel, targeting 333 cancer-specific genes in multi-region biopsies of primary and liver metastatic tumors from three Chinese CRC patients. We determined that the extent of ITH varied among the three cases. On average, 65% of all the mutations detected were common within individual tumors. KMT2C aberrations and the NCOR1 mutation were the only ubiquitous events. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the tumors evolved in a branched manner. Comparison of the primary and metastatic tumors revealed that PPP2R1A (E370X, SETD2 (I1608V, SMAD4 (G382T, and AR splicing site mutations may be specific to liver metastatic cancer. These mutations might contribute to the initiation and progression of distant metastasis. Collectively, our analysis identified a substantial level of genetic ITH in CRC, which should be considered for personalized therapeutic strategies.

  16. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Brédart

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With advances in breast cancer (BC gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83% in France and 180 (97% in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively, returned the ‘Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer’ questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the “living with cancer” and “children-related issues” domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = −0.05, higher anxiety (b = 0.78, and having children (b = 1.51, but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  17. Beliefs about Cancer and Diet among Those Considering Genetic Testing for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Aunchalee E. L.; Upton, Rachel; Lee, Seungjin; Panter, Abby T.; Hadley, Don W.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention among individuals considering genetic testing for Lynch Syndrome. Design: Family-centered, cascade recruitment; baseline assessment of a longitudinal study. Setting: Clinical research setting. Participants: Participants were 390 persons, ages 18 and older, including persons…

  18. Ethnic Background and Genetic Variation in the Evaluation of Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in ...

  19. Snus (nass and oral cancer: A case series report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alsadat Hashemipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Snus (nass is a form of snuff used in a similar manner to American dipping tobacco, but it does not typically result in a need for spitting. Possible hazards associated with this material include malignant and premalignant lesions in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The use of smokeless tobacco has increased in the Middle East in recent decades, particularly among teenagers and young adults. Therefore, practitioners must be able to recognize malignant and premalignant lesions. Although, an estimated 10-25% of the world′s population uses smokeless tobacco, this practice is virtually unknown in Iran. The aim of this study is to report a series of cases of squamous cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma occurring in the users of snus, who referred to the Department of Oral Medicine in Kerman Dental School.

  20. On-off intermittency in time series of spontaneous paroxysmal activity in rats with genetic absence epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hramov, Alexander; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Midzyanovskaya, I.S.; Sitnikova, E.; Rijn, C.M. van

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we consider the on-off intermittency phenomena observed in time series of spontaneous paroxysmal activity in rats with genetic absence epilepsy. The method to register and analyze the electroencephalogram with the help of continuous wavelet transform is also suggested

  1. 76 FR 28439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ...; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer... currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web... included in the NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory on NCI's Cancer.gov Web site. The information...

  2. Genetic susceptibility for specific cancers. Medical liability of the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, M J

    1999-12-01

    The use of genetic profiling techniques to detect individuals with an increased susceptibility to heritable cancers has provoked recent legal interest in the duties of the attending physician and in the rights of patients and their families. In the current study specific prima facie and recently litigated cases are presented and explored to delineate the issues facing physicians and to illustrate the prerogatives of patients who are caught up in a heritable cancer enigma. Various courts have attempted to answer questions involving lawsuits in which incidents of breast/ovarian carcinoma and colon carcinoma have provoked claims of negligence against health care providers. Health care workers involved in the care of these patients have specific duties to these individuals. It would appear that physicians are being forced to assume the additional duty of delving into a patient's family history of cancer through multiple generations. This duty is followed by a responsibility to provide detailed counseling to those patients in whom such activity impacts the diagnosis and management of familial cancer.

  3. Twists and turns in life and science. Foundation Series in Cancer Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 1 (2008), s. 1-32 ISSN 0065-230X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cancer * oncogene * src Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.721, year: 2008

  4. A Model for Understanding the Genetic Basis for Disparity in Prostate Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0529 TITLE: A Model for Understanding the Genetic Basis for Disparity in Prostate Cancer Risk PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...AND SUBTITLE A Model for Understanding the Genetic Basis for Disparity in Prostate Cancer Risk 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in

  5. 46,XX males: a case series based on clinical and genetics evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour Lashkari, F; Totonchi, M; Zamanian, M R; Mansouri, Z; Sadighi Gilani, M A; Sabbaghian, M; Mohseni Meybodi, A

    2017-09-01

    46,XX male sex reversal syndrome is one of the rarest sex chromosomal aberrations. The presence of SRY gene on one of the X chromosomes is the most frequent cause of this syndrome. Based on Y chromosome profile, there are SRY-positive and SRY-negative forms. The purpose of our study was to report first case series of Iranian patients and describe the different clinical appearances based on their genetic component. From the 8,114 azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic patients referred to Royan institute, we diagnosed 57 cases as sex reversal patients. Based on the endocrinological history, we performed karyotyping, SRY and AZF microdeletion screening. Patients had a female karyotype. According to available hormonal reports of 37 patients, 16 cases had low levels of testosterone (43.2%). On the other hand, 15 males were SRY positive (90.2%), while they lacked the spermatogenic factors encoding genes on Yq. Commencing the testicular differentiation in males, the SRY gene is considered to be very important in this process. Due to homogeneous results of karyotyping and AZF deletion, there are both positive and negative SRY cases that show similar sex reversal phenotypes. Evidences show that there could be diverse phenotypic differences that could be raised from various reasons. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. [Genetic, epidemiologic and clinical study of familial prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valéri, Antoine

    2002-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most frequent cancer among men over 50 and its frequency increases with age. It has become a significant public health problem due to the ageing population. Epidemiologists report familial aggregation in 15 to 25% of cases and inherited susceptibility with autosomal dominant or X-linked model in 5 to 10% of cases. Clinical and biological features of familial CaP remain controversial. To perform: (1) Genetic study of familial Cap (mapping of susceptibility genes), (2) epidemiologic study (prevalence, associated cancers in the genealogy, model of transmission), and clinical study of familial CaP. (I) conducting a nationwide family collection (ProGène study) with 2+ CaP we have performed a genomewide linkage analysis and identified a predisposing locus on 1q42.2-43 named PCaP (Predisposing to Cancer of the Prostate); (II) conducting a systematic genealogic analysis of 691 CaP followed up in 3 University departments of urology (Hospitals of Brest, Paris St Louis and Nancy) we have observed: (1) 14.2% of familial and 3.6% of hereditary CaP, (2) a higher risk of breast cancer in first degree relatives of probands (CaP+) in familial CaP than in sporadic CaP and in early onset CaP (< 55 years) when compared with late onset CaP ([dG]75 years), (3) an autosomal dominant model with brother-brother dependance), (4) the lack of specific clinical or biological feature (except for early onset) in hereditary CaP when compared with sporadic CaP. (1) The mapping of a susceptibility locus will permit the cloning of a predisposing gene on 1q42.2-43, offer the possibility of genetic screening in families at risk and permit genotype/phenotype correlation studies; (2) the transmission model will improve parameteric linkage studies; (3) the lack of distinct specific clinical patterns suggest diagnostic and follow up modalities for familial and hereditary CaP similar to sporadic cancer while encouraging early screening of families at risk, given the earlier

  7. Genetics of breast cancer: Applications to the Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer research has yielded several important results including the strong susceptibility genes,BRCA1 and BRCA2 and more recently 19 genes and genetic loci that confer a more moderate risk.The pace of discovery is accelerating as genetic technology and computational methods improve. These discoveries will change the way that breast cancer risk is understood in Mexico over the next few decades.La investigación en cáncer de mama ha dado varios resultados importantes incluyendo los genes fuertemente susceptibles, BRCA1 y BRCA2, y más recientemente 19 genes y loci genéticos que confieren un riesgo moderado. El ritmo de los descubrimientos se acelera conforme mejora la tecnología y métodos computacionales.Estosdescubrimientoscambiarán la forma en que la investigación del cáncer es comprendida en México en las próximas décadas.

  8. Hereditary breast/ovarian cancer--pitfalls in genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, E; Gershoni-Baruch, R

    2001-10-01

    Genetic counseling and risk assessment, given to women with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, are regularly based on pedigree analysis. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population, hereditary breast/ovarian cancer is mainly attributed to three founder mutations, namely, 185delAG, 5382insC, and 6174delT, in BRCA1/2 genes. The overall frequency of these mutations, in the Jewish Ashkenazi population, is as high as 2.5%. Based on clinical and family history data, the results of BRCA molecular testing, in Ashkenazi individuals at risk, are appropriately anticipated in most cases. Here we report on five families, in which the segregation of BRCA1/2 mutations, in affected and unaffected family members, was unexpected, emphasizing the need to test, for founder mutations, every Ashkenazi individual at risk, irrespective of the genotype of affected family members. Ultimately, risk assessments and recommendations, in Ashkenazi women, should be invariably based on the results of genetic testing.

  9. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2 have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease.

  10. Nature, Nurture, and Cancer Risks: Genetic and Nutritional Contributions to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoratou, Evropi; Timofeeva, Maria; Li, Xue; Meng, Xiangrui; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-08-21

    It is speculated that genetic variants are associated with differential responses to nutrients (known as gene-diet interactions) and that these variations may be linked to different cancer risks. In this review, we critically evaluate the evidence across 314 meta-analyses of observational studies and randomized controlled trials of dietary risk factors and the five most common cancers (breast, lung, prostate, colorectal, and stomach). We also critically evaluate the evidence across 13 meta-analyses of observational studies of gene-diet interactions for the same cancers. Convincing evidence for association was found only for the intake of alcohol and whole grains in relation to colorectal cancer risk. Three nutrient associations had highly suggestive evidence and another 15 associations had suggestive evidence. Among the examined gene-diet interactions, only one had moderately strong evidence.

  11. Blood type, ABO genetic variants, and ovarian cancer survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Gabriella D.; Levinson, Rebecca T.; Toole, Hilary; Snyder, Malcolm-Robert; Deng, Angie; Crispens, Marta A.; Khabele, Dineo; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Objective Blood type A and the A1 allele have been associated with increased ovarian cancer risk. With only two small studies published to date, evidence for an association between ABO blood type and ovarian cancer survival is limited. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of Tumor Registry confirmed ovarian cancer cases from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center with blood type from linked laboratory reports and ABO variants from linked Illumina Exome BeadChip data. Associations with overall survival (OS) were quantified by hazard ratios (HR) and confidence intervals (CI) from proportional hazards regression models; covariates included age, race, stage, grade, histologic subtype, and year of diagnosis. Results ABO phenotype (N = 694) and/or genotype (N = 154) data were available for 713 predominantly Caucasian (89.3%) cases. In multivariable models, blood type A had significantly better OS compared to either O (HR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.60–0.93) or all non-A (HR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.63–0.94) cases. Similarly, missense rs1053878 minor allele carriers (A2) had better OS (HR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.25–0.99). Among Caucasians, this phenotype association was strengthened, but the genotype association was attenuated; instead, four variants sharing moderate linkage disequilibrium with the O variant were associated with better OS (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.39–0.99) in unadjusted models. Conclusions Blood type A was significantly associated with longer ovarian cancer survival in the largest such study to date. This finding was supported by genetic analysis, which implicated the A2 allele, although O related variants also had suggestive associations. Further research on ABO and ovarian cancer survival is warranted. PMID:28448592

  12. Blood type, ABO genetic variants, and ovarian cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella D Cozzi

    Full Text Available Blood type A and the A1 allele have been associated with increased ovarian cancer risk. With only two small studies published to date, evidence for an association between ABO blood type and ovarian cancer survival is limited.We conducted a retrospective cohort study of Tumor Registry confirmed ovarian cancer cases from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center with blood type from linked laboratory reports and ABO variants from linked Illumina Exome BeadChip data. Associations with overall survival (OS were quantified by hazard ratios (HR and confidence intervals (CI from proportional hazards regression models; covariates included age, race, stage, grade, histologic subtype, and year of diagnosis.ABO phenotype (N = 694 and/or genotype (N = 154 data were available for 713 predominantly Caucasian (89.3% cases. In multivariable models, blood type A had significantly better OS compared to either O (HR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.60-0.93 or all non-A (HR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.63-0.94 cases. Similarly, missense rs1053878 minor allele carriers (A2 had better OS (HR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.25-0.99. Among Caucasians, this phenotype association was strengthened, but the genotype association was attenuated; instead, four variants sharing moderate linkage disequilibrium with the O variant were associated with better OS (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.39-0.99 in unadjusted models.Blood type A was significantly associated with longer ovarian cancer survival in the largest such study to date. This finding was supported by genetic analysis, which implicated the A2 allele, although O related variants also had suggestive associations. Further research on ABO and ovarian cancer survival is warranted.

  13. [Psychological distress in applicants for genetic screening for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, C; Pedinielli, J-L; Manouvrier, S

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The development of a DNA based diagnostic test has allowed for the genetic screening of many hereditary diseases. In addition to the identification of the deleterious gene, this screening process has led to the recognition of developing illnesses at high risk. In recent years, a number of genes predisposing to an inherited cancer syndrome have been identified. Our purpose in this study was to determine whether subjects at risk who test for inherited colorectal cancer, are likely to develop a higher level of psychological distress than the norm, taking into consideration the particular history of this familial disease. The demographic and psychosocial aspects of our population was described using: 1) the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), 2) the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D), 3) a perceived risk for the gene carrier, 4) subjective perception of personal vulnerability and 5) the role of the medical status (affected or not), which places the subject in either predisposition or predictive testing. Results show that our population had a higher predisposition for depressive disorders (chi2=9,3. p=0.002) and a significantly higher state of anxiety (chi2=9,3. p=0.002), prior to genetic counselling, compared with other populations. We found no evidence in the medical status, nor the perceived risk. However, the assessment of one's own personal vulnerability is related to psychological distress. These results highlight the particular vulnerability of subjects undergoing genetic testing as well as showing the pertinence of proposing psychological help throughout the process of these new specific diagnoses.

  14. Reduced rate of human papillomavirus infection and genetic overtransmission of TP53 72C polymorphic variant lower cervical cancer incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsbeih, Ghazi A; Al-Harbi, Najla M; Bin Judia, Sara S; Khoja, Hatim A; Shoukri, Mohamed M; Tulbah, Asma M

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer is a predominantly human papillomavirus (HPV)-driven disease worldwide. However, its incidence is unexplainably low in western Asia, including Saudi Arabia. Using this paradigm, we investigated the role of HPV infection rate and host genetic predisposition in TP53 G72C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) presumed to affect cancer incidence. Patients treated between 1990 and 2012 were reviewed, and a series of 232 invasive cervical cancer cases were studied and compared with 313 matched controls without cancer. SNP was genotyped by way of direct sequencing. HPV linear array analysis was used to detect and genotype HPV in tumor samples. The incidence of cervical cancer revealed bimodal peaks at 42.5 years, with a slighter rebound at 60.8 years. Among all cases, 77% were HPV-positive and 16 HPV genotypes were detected-mostly genotypes 16 (75%) and 18 (9%)-with no difference by age, histology, or geographical region. Although the TP53 G72C genotype was not associated with overall cervical cancer risk, it was significantly associated with HPV positivity (odds ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.90; P = .016). Furthermore, the variant C allele was significantly overtransmitted in the population (P Cervical cancer incidence displays bimodal curve peaking at a young age with secondary rebound at older age. The combination of relative low HPV infection and variant TP53 72C allele overtransmission provide a plausible explanation for the low incidence of cervical cancer in our population. Therefore, HPV screening and host SNP genotyping may provide more relevant biomarkers to gauge the risk of developing cervical cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2459-66. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  15. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it's alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author)

  16. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it`s alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author).

  17. Genetic Variation Linked to Lung Cancer Survival in White Smokers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR investigators have discovered evidence that links lung cancer survival with genetic variations (called single nucleotide polymorphisms) in the MBL2 gene, a key player in innate immunity. The variations in the gene, which codes for a protein called the mannose-binding lectin, occur in its promoter region, where the RNA polymerase molecule binds to start transcription, and in the first exon that is responsible for the correct structure of MBL. The findings appear in the September 19, 2007, issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  18. Risk Perception and Psychological Distress in Genetic Counselling for Hereditary Breast and/or Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, G; De Luca, R; Dorangricchia, P; Lo Coco, G; Guarnaccia, C; Fanale, D; Calò, V; Russo, A

    2017-10-01

    Oncological Genetic Counselling (CGO) allows the identification of a genetic component that increases the risk of developing a cancer. Individuals' psychological reactions are influenced by both the content of the received information and the subjective perception of their own risk of becoming ill or being a carrier of a genetic mutation. This study included 120 participants who underwent genetic counselling for breast and/or ovarian cancer. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between their cancer risk perception and the genetic risk during CGO before receiving genetic test results, considering the influence of some psychological variables, in particular distress, anxiety and depression. Participants completed the following tools during a psychological interview: a socio-demographic form, Cancer Risk Perception (CRP) and Genetic Risk Perception (GRP), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Distress Thermometer (DT). The data seem to confirm our hypothesis. Positive and significant correlations were found between the observed variables. Moreover, genetic risk perception determined an increase in depressive symptomatology and cancer risk perception led to an increase in anxious symptomatology, specifically in participants during cancer treatment. The present results suggest the importance of assessing genetic and cancer risk perception in individuals who undergo CGO, to identify those who are at risk of a decrease in psychological well-being and of developing greater psychological distress.

  19. 76 FR 14034 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: In... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-based Application Form and Update Mailer. [[Page 14035

  20. Mutational profiles of breast cancer metastases from a rapid autopsy series reveal multiple evolutionary trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avigdor, Bracha Erlanger; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Hicks, Jessica L; Shin, James; Sukumar, Saraswati; Fetting, John; Argani, Pedram; Park, Ben H; Wheelan, Sarah J

    2017-12-21

    Heterogeneity within and among tumors in a metastatic cancer patient is a well-established phenomenon that may confound treatment and accurate prognosis. Here, we used whole-exome sequencing to survey metastatic breast cancer tumors from 5 patients in a rapid autopsy program to construct the origin and genetic development of metastases. Metastases were obtained from 5 breast cancer patients using a rapid autopsy protocol and subjected to whole-exome sequencing. Metastases were evaluated for sharing of somatic mutations, correlation of copy number variation and loss of heterozygosity, and genetic similarity scores. Pathological features of the patients' disease were assessed by immunohistochemical analyses. Our data support a monoclonal origin of metastasis in 3 cases, but in 2 cases, metastases arose from at least 2 distinct subclones in the primary tumor. In the latter 2 cases, the primary tumor presented with mixed histologic and pathologic features, suggesting early divergent evolution within the primary tumor with maintenance of metastatic capability in multiple lineages. We used genetic and histopathological evidence to demonstrate that metastases can be derived from a single or multiple independent clones within a primary tumor. This underscores the complexity of breast cancer clonal evolution and has implications for how best to determine and implement therapies for early- and late-stage disease.

  1. Alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility in Europe: the ARCAGE project: study samples and data collection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lagiou, Pagona

    2009-02-01

    Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) include those of the oral cavity, pharynx (other than nasopharynx), larynx, and esophagus. Tobacco smoking and consumption of alcoholic beverages are established causes of UADT cancers, whereas reduced intake of vegetables and fruits are likely causes. The role of genetic predisposition and possible interactions of genetic with exogenous factors, however, have not been adequately studied. Moreover, the role of pattern of smoking and drinking, as well as the exact nature of the implicated dietary variables, has not been clarified. To address these issues, the International Agency for Research on Cancer initiated in 2002 the alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility (ARCAGE) in Europe project, with the participation of 15 centers in 11 European countries. Information and biological data from a total of 2304 cases and 2227 controls have been collected and will be used in a series of analyses. A total of 166 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 76 genes are being studied for genetic associations with UADT cancers. We report here the methodology of the ARCAGE project, main demographic and lifestyle characteristics of the cases and controls, as well as the distribution of cases by histology and subsite. About 80% of cases were males and fewer than 20% of all cases occurred before the age of 50 years. Overall, the most common subsite was larynx, followed by oral cavity, oropharynx, esophagus and hypopharynx. Close to 90% of UADT cancers were squamous cell carcinomas. A clear preponderance of smokers and alcohol drinkers among UADT cases compared with controls was observed.

  2. [A survey of willingness about genetic counseling and tests in patients of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Qiu, L; Wu, M

    2017-11-21

    Objective: To analyze patients' tendency towards genetics counseling and tests based on a prospective cohort study on hereditary ovarian cancer. Methods: From February 2017 to June 2017, among 220 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer in Peking Union Medical College Hospital, we collected epidemiological, pathological and tendency towards genetics counseling and tests via medical records and questionnaire.All patients would get education about hereditary ovarian cancer by pamphlets and WeChat.If they would receive further counseling, a face to face interview and tests will be given. Results: Among all 220 patients, 10 (4.5%) denied further counseling.For 210 patients receiving genetic counseling, 170 (81%) accepted genetic tests.In multivariate analysis, risk factors relevant to acceptance of genetic tests included: being charged by physicians of gynecologic oncology for diagnosis and treatment, receiving counseling in genetic counseling clinics, and having family history of breast cancer.For patients denying genetic tests, there were many subjective reasons, among which, "still not understanding genetic tests" (25%) and "unable bear following expensive targeting medicine" . Conclusions: High proportion patients of epithelial ovarian cancer would accept genetic counseling and tests.Genetic counseling clinics for gynecologic oncology would further improve genetic tests for patients.

  3. Tutorial dialogues and gist explanations of genetic breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Colin L; Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F; Cedillos-Whynott, Elizabeth M; Brust-Renck, Priscila G; Weil, Audrey M

    2015-09-01

    The intelligent tutoring system (ITS) BRCA Gist is a Web-based tutor developed using the Shareable Knowledge Objects (SKO) platform that uses latent semantic analysis to engage women in natural-language dialogues to teach about breast cancer risk. BRCA Gist appears to be the first ITS designed to assist patients' health decision making. Two studies provide fine-grained analyses of the verbal interactions between BRCA Gist and women responding to five questions pertaining to breast cancer and genetic risk. We examined how "gist explanations" generated by participants during natural-language dialogues related to outcomes. Using reliable rubrics, scripts of the participants' verbal interactions with BRCA Gist were rated for content and for the appropriateness of the tutor's responses. Human researchers' scores for the content covered by the participants were strongly correlated with the coverage scores generated by BRCA Gist, indicating that BRCA Gist accurately assesses the extent to which people respond appropriately. In Study 1, participants' performance during the dialogues was consistently associated with learning outcomes about breast cancer risk. Study 2 was a field study with a more diverse population. Participants with an undergraduate degree or less education who were randomly assigned to BRCA Gist scored higher on tests of knowledge than those assigned to the National Cancer Institute website or than a control group. We replicated findings that the more expected content that participants included in their gist explanations, the better they performed on outcome measures. As fuzzy-trace theory suggests, encouraging people to develop and elaborate upon gist explanations appears to improve learning, comprehension, and decision making.

  4. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  5. Integrated screening concept in women with genetic predisposition for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bick, U.

    1997-01-01

    Breast cancer is in 5% of cases due to a genetic disposition. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are by far the most common breast cancer susceptibility genes. For a woman with a genetic predisposition, the individual risk of developing breast cancer sometime in her life is between 70 and 90%. Compared to the spontaneous forms of breast cancer, woman with a genetic predisposition often develop breast cancer at a much younger age. This is why conventional screening programs on the basis of mammography alone cannot be applied without modification to this high-risk group. In this article, an integrated screening concept for women with genetic prodisposition for breast cancer using breast self-examination, clinical examination, ultrasound, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is introduced. (orig.) [de

  6. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study

    OpenAIRE

    Chu Annie TW; Bonanno George A; Ho Judy WC; Ho Samuel MY; Chan Emily MS

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background - Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. Methods - A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer R...

  7. Awareness and uptake of direct-to-consumer genetic testing among cancer cases, their relatives, and controls: the Northwest Cancer Genetics Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Taryn O; Renz, Anne D; Snapinn, Katherine W; Bowen, Deborah J; Edwards, Karen L

    2012-07-01

    To determine if awareness of, interest in, and use of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing is greater in a sample of high-risk individuals (cancer cases and their relatives), compared to controls. Participants were recruited from the Northwest Cancer Genetics Network. A follow-up survey was mailed to participants to assess DTC genetic testing awareness, interest, and use. One thousand two hundred sixty-seven participants responded to the survey. Forty-nine percent of respondents were aware of DTC genetic testing. Of those aware, 19% indicated interest in obtaining and testing. Additional information supplied by respondents who reported use of DTC genetic tests indicated that 55% of these respondents likely engaged in clinical genetic testing, rather than DTC genetic testing. Awareness of DTC genetic testing was greater in our sample of high-risk individuals than in controls and population-based studies. Although interest in and use of these tests among cases in our sample were equivalent to other population-based studies, interest in testing was higher among relatives and people who self-referred for a registry focused on cancer than among cases and controls. Additionally, our results suggest that there may be some confusion about what constitutes DTC genetic testing.

  8. Numeral series hidden in the distribution of atomic mass of amino acids to codon domains in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlin, Åsa

    2015-03-21

    The distribution of codons in the nearly universal genetic code is a long discussed issue. At the atomic level, the numeral series 2x(2) (x=5-0) lies behind electron shells and orbitals. Numeral series appear in formulas for spectral lines of hydrogen. The question here was if some similar scheme could be found in the genetic code. A table of 24 codons was constructed (synonyms counted as one) for 20 amino acids, four of which have two different codons. An atomic mass analysis was performed, built on common isotopes. It was found that a numeral series 5 to 0 with exponent 2/3 times 10(2) revealed detailed congruency with codon-grouped amino acid side-chains, simultaneously with the division on atom kinds, further with main 3rd base groups, backbone chains and with codon-grouped amino acids in relation to their origin from glycolysis or the citrate cycle. Hence, it is proposed that this series in a dynamic way may have guided the selection of amino acids into codon domains. Series with simpler exponents also showed noteworthy correlations with the atomic mass distribution on main codon domains; especially the 2x(2)-series times a factor 16 appeared as a conceivable underlying level, both for the atomic mass and charge distribution. Furthermore, it was found that atomic mass transformations between numeral systems, possibly interpretable as dimension degree steps, connected the atomic mass of codon bases with codon-grouped amino acids and with the exponent 2/3-series in several astonishing ways. Thus, it is suggested that they may be part of a deeper reference system. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Increasing Power by Sharing Information from Genetic Background and Treatment in Clustering of Gene Expression Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Sura Zaki Alrashid; Muhammad Arifur Rahman; Nabeel H Al-Aaraji; Neil D Lawrence; Paul R Heath

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of gene expression time series gives insight into which genes may be co-regulated, allowing us to discern the activity of pathways in a given microarray experiment. Of particular interest is how a given group of genes varies with different conditions or genetic background. This paper develops
a new clustering method that allows each cluster to be parameterised according to whether the behaviour of the genes across conditions is correlated or anti-correlated. By specifying correlati...

  10. Rexin-G, a targeted genetic medicine for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Erlinda M; Hall, Frederick L

    2010-05-01

    Rexin-G, a tumor-targeted retrovector bearing a cytocidal cyclin G1 construct, is the first targeted gene therapy vector to gain fast track designation and orphan drug priorities for multiple cancer indications in the US. This review describes the major milestones in the clinical development of Rexin-G: from the molecular cloning and characterization of the human cyclin G1 proto-oncogene in 1994, to the design of the first knockout constructs and genetic engineering of the targeted delivery system from 1995 to 1997, through the initial proofs-of-concept, molecular pharmacology and toxicology studies of Rexin-G in preclinical cancer models from 1997 to 2001, to the pioneering clinical studies in humans from 2002 to 2004, which--together with the advancements in bioprocess development of high-potency clinical grade vectors circa 2005 - 2006--led to the accelerated approval of Rexin-G for all solid tumors by the Philippine FDA in 2007 and the rapid progression of clinical studies from 2007 to 2009 to the cusp of pivotal Phase III trials in the US. In recording the development of Rexin-G as a novel form of targeted biological therapy, this review also highlights important aspects of vector design engineering which served to overcome the physiological barriers to gene delivery as it addresses the key regulatory issues involved in the development of a targeted gene therapy product. Progressive clinical development of Rexin-G demonstrates the potential safety and efficacy of targeted genetic medicine, while validating the design engineering of the molecular biotechnology platform.

  11. Exploring Asian Indian and Pakistani views about cancer and participation in cancer genetics research: toward the development of a community genetics intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Amy E; Mohanty, Salini; Selvan, Preethi; Lum, Ray; Giri, Veda N

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality among the three million Asian Indian/Pakistanis (AIPs) in the USA. AIPs have traditionally been underrepresented in cancer-related research, although reasons remain largely unexplored. We sought to understand AIP's awareness and perceptions of cancer to improve their participation in risk assessment and cancer genetics research. Four focus groups, stratified by gender and birthplace (US-born vs. foreign-born), were held at an AIP cultural center. Discussions focused on knowledge and awareness of cancer risk; how AIP culture influences cancer perceptions; access to health care services for cancer screening, diagnosis, or treatment; and willingness to or experiences with participating in cancer genetics research. Sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and content analyzed using NVivo ® 11 for dominant themes. Thirty-two AIP adults participated in a focus group. Information on family cancer history is challenging to obtain due to the desire for privacy, cancer stigma, and loss of medical records. Interest in genetic testing for cancer risk was mixed: some were in favor of knowing their personal risk, yet many noted that future generations in their family would benefit more by knowing their risk. Participants felt that the AIP community has largely been overlooked in recruitment efforts for research studies. Recommendations for improving recruitment efforts included partnering with community events and festivities, posting culturally and linguistically relevant recruitment materials, and focusing on population-wide health improvement. Understanding the culture and perceptions of AIPs, separate from Asian Americans at large, will allow for more tailored approaches for including this population in cancer genetics research.

  12. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Vital Oncogenes and a New Molecular Genetic Paradigm for Cancer Initiation Progression and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been declared repeatedly that cancer is a result of molecular genetic abnormalities. However, there has been no working model describing the specific functional consequences of the deranged genomic processes that result in the initiation and propagation of the cancer process during carcinogenesis. We no longer need to question whether or not cancer arises as a result of a molecular genetic defect within the cancer cell. The legitimate questions are: how and why? This article reviews the preeminent data on cancer molecular genetics and subsequently proposes that the sentinel event in cancer initiation is the aberrant production of fused transcription activators with new molecular properties within normal tissue stem cells. This results in the production of vital oncogenes with dysfunctional gene activation transcription properties, which leads to dysfunctional gene regulation, the aberrant activation of transduction pathways, chromosomal breakage, activation of driver oncogenes, reactivation of stem cell transduction pathways and the activation of genes that result in the hallmarks of cancer. Furthermore, a novel holistic molecular genetic model of cancer initiation and progression is presented along with a new paradigm for the approach to personalized targeted cancer therapy, clinical monitoring and cancer diagnosis. PMID:27649156

  13. Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and its functional characterisation: The PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campa, D.; Rizzato, C.; Capurso, G.; Giese, N.; Funel, N.; Greenhalf, W.; Souček, P.; Gazouli, M.; Pezzilli, R.; Pasquali, C.; Talar-Wojnarowska, R.; Cantore, M.; Andriulli, A.; Scarpa, A.; Jamroziak, K.; Delle Fave, G.; Costello, E.; Khaw, K. T.; Heller, A.; Key, T. K.; Theodoropoulos, G.; Malecka-Panas, E.; Mambrini, A.; Bambi, F.; Landi, S.; Pedrazzoli, S.; Bassi, C.; Pacetti, P.; Piepoli, A.; Tavano, F.; di Sebastiano, P.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Basso, D.; Plebani, M.; Fogar, P.; Buechler, M. W.; Bugert, P.; Vodička, Pavel; Boggi, U.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Werner, J.; Canzian, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2013), s. 95-99 ISSN 1590-8658 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cancer susceptibility * genetic polymorphisms * genetic susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.889, year: 2013

  14. Rapid genetic counseling and testing in newly diagnosed breast cancer : Surgical and psychosocial implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, M.R.

    2018-01-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for breast cancer have traditionally been offered to eligible patients after completion of their primary treatment. Women with hereditary breast cancer, caused by a germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, have an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer and

  15. Oral mucosa and lung cancer: Are genetic changes in the oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-03

    Feb 3, 2016 ... to lung cancer, although other risk factors (such as genetic tendency) ... analysis of oral mucosa identifying individuals predisposed to lung cancer. ... of the study is that oral epithelial cells of smokers who have lung cancer are ... Stratec Molecular, Berlin, Germany). p53 codon 72 ..... Validity and reliability of.

  16. Chances and changes : psychological impact of genetic counselling and DNA testing for breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Sandra van

    2006-01-01

    The cumulative lifetime risk of developing breast cancer for a Dutch woman is about 12%. In some families breast cancer seems to occur even more frequently or women fall ill at a relatively young age. Such families may have a genetic susceptibility towards breast cancer. To learn more about the

  17. Implication of Gastric Cancer Molecular Genetic Markers in Surgical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsova, Marina V; Strelnikov, Vladimir V; Tanas, Alexander S; Bykov, Igor I; Zaletaev, Dmitry V; Rudenko, Viktoria V; Glukhov, Alexander I; Kchorobrich, Tatiana V; Li, Yi; Tarasov, Vadim V; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated aberrant methylation of genes CDH1, RASSF1A, MLH1, N33, DAPK, expression of genes hTERT, MMP7, MMP9, BIRC5 (survivin), PTGS2, and activity of telomerase of 106 gastric tumor samples obtained intra-operatively and 53 gastric tumor samples from the same group of patients obtained endoscopically before surgery. Biopsy specimens obtained from 50 patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis were used as a control group. Together with tissue samples obtained from different sites remote to tumors, a total of 727 samples have been studied. The selected parameters comprise a system of molecular markers that can be used in both diagnostics of gastric cancer and in dynamic monitoring of patients after surgery. Special attention was paid to the use of molecular markers for the diagnostics of malignant process in the material obtained endoscopically since the efficacy of morphological diagnostics in biopsies is compromised by intratumoral heterogeneity, which may prevent reliable identification of tumor cells in the sampling. Our data indicated that certain molecular genetic events provided more sensitive yet specific markers of the tumor. We demonstrated that molecular profiles detected in preoperative biopsies were confirmed by the material obtained intra-operatively. The use of endoscopic material facilitates gastric tumors pre-operative diagnostics, improving early detection of gastric cancer and potential effective treatment strategies.

  18. Genetic and epigenetic markers in colorectal cancer screening: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish Pratap; Rai, Sandhya; Suyal, Shradha; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Nand Kumar; Agarwal, Akash; Srivastava, Sameer

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogenous disease which develops from benign intraepithelial lesions known as adenomas to malignant carcinomas. Acquired alterations in Wnt signaling, TGFβ, MAPK pathway genes and clonal propagation of altered cells are responsible for this transformation. Detection of adenomas or early stage cancer in asymptomatic patients and better prognostic and predictive markers is important for improving the clinical management of CRC. Area covered: In this review, the authors have evaluated the potential of genetic and epigenetic alterations as markers for early detection, prognosis and therapeutic predictive potential in the context of CRC. We have discussed molecular heterogeneity present in CRC and its correlation to prognosis and response to therapy. Expert commentary: Molecular marker based CRC screening methods still fail to gain trust of clinicians. Invasive screening methods, molecular heterogeneity, chemoresistance and low quality test samples are some key challenges which need to be addressed in the present context. New sequencing technologies and integrated omics data analysis of individual or population cohort results in GWAS. MPE studies following a GWAS could be future line of research to establish accurate correlations between CRC and its risk factors. This strategy would identify most reliable biomarkers for CRC screening and management.

  19. Epidemiology, major risk factors and genetic predisposition for breast cancer in the Pakistani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Uzma; Ismail, Muhammad; Mehmood, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of breast cancer is related to genetic as well as cultural, environmental and life-style factors. Variations in diversity of these factors among different ethnic groups and geographical areas emphasize the immense need for studies in all racial-ethnic populations. The incidence of breast cancer in Pakistan is highest in Asians after Jews in Israel and 2.5 times higher than that in neighboring countries like Iran and India, accounting for 34.6% of female cancers. The Pakistani population is deficient in information regarding breast cancer etiology and epidemiology, but efforts done so far had suggested consanguinity as a major risk factor for frequent mutations leading to breast cancer and has also shed light on genetic origins in different ethnic groups within Pakistan. World-wide research efforts on different ethnicities have enhanced our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer but despite these discoveries, 75% of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained, highlighting the fact that the majority of breast cancer susceptibility genes remain unidentified. For this purpose Pakistani population provides a strong genetic pool to elucidate the genetic etiology of breast cancer because of cousin marriages. In this review, we describe the known breast cancer predisposition factors found in the local Pakistani population and the epidemiological research work done to emphasize the importance of exploring factors/variants contributing to breast cance, in order to prevent, cure and decrease its incidence in our country.

  20. Online Series presents Cancer Prevention Through Immunomodulation. Does Diet Play a Role? | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are increasingly harnessing the power of the immune system to prevent cancer. Nutrition provides an opportunity for a generalized immune activation and reduction of cancer risk in certain populations. Research on several foods and bioactive food components as immunologic modulators is showing promising results. |

  1. Genetic Alterations in the Molecular Subtypes of Bladder Cancer: Illustration in the Cancer Genome Atlas Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woonyoung; Ochoa, Andrea; McConkey, David J; Aine, Mattias; Höglund, Mattias; Kim, William Y; Real, Francisco X; Kiltie, Anne E; Milsom, Ian; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Lerner, Seth P

    2017-09-01

    Recent whole genome mRNA expression profiling studies revealed that bladder cancers can be grouped into molecular subtypes, some of which share clinical properties and gene expression patterns with the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer and the molecular subtypes found in other solid tumors. The molecular subtypes in other solid tumors are enriched with specific mutations and copy number aberrations that are thought to underlie their distinct progression patterns, and biological and clinical properties. The availability of comprehensive genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other large projects made it possible to correlate the presence of DNA alterations with tumor molecular subtype membership. Our overall goal was to determine whether specific DNA mutations and/or copy number variations are enriched in specific molecular subtypes. We used the complete TCGA RNA-seq dataset and three different published classifiers developed by our groups to assign TCGA's bladder cancers to molecular subtypes, and examined the prevalence of the most common DNA alterations within them. We interpreted the results against the background of what was known from the published literature about the prevalence of these alterations in nonmuscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancers. The results confirmed that alterations involving RB1 and NFE2L2 were enriched in basal cancers, whereas alterations involving FGFR3 and KDM6A were enriched in luminal tumors. The results further reinforce the conclusion that the molecular subtypes of bladder cancer are distinct disease entities with specific genetic alterations. Our observation showed that some of subtype-enriched mutations and copy number aberrations are clinically actionable, which has direct implications for the clinical management of patients with bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk perception after genetic counseling in patients with increased risk of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rantala Johanna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Counselees are more aware of genetics and seek information, reassurance, screening and genetic testing. Risk counseling is a key component of genetic counseling process helping patients to achieve a realistic view for their own personal risk and therefore adapt to the medical, psychological and familial implications of disease and to encourage the patient to make informed choices 12. The aim of this study was to conceptualize risk perception and anxiety about cancer in individuals attending to genetic counseling. Methods The questionnaire study measured risk perception and anxiety about cancer at three time points: before and one week after initial genetic counseling and one year after completed genetic investigations. Eligibility criteria were designed to include only index patients without a previous genetic consultation in the family. A total of 215 individuals were included. Data was collected during three years period. Results Before genetic counseling all of the unaffected participants subjectively estimated their risk as higher than their objective risk. Participants with a similar risk as the population overestimated their risk most. All risk groups estimated the risk for children's/siblings to be lower than their own. The benefits of preventive surveillance program were well understood among unaffected participants. The difference in subjective risk perception before and directly after genetic counseling was statistically significantly lower in all risk groups. Difference in risk perception for children as well as for population was also statistically significant. Experienced anxiety about developing cancer in the unaffected subjects was lower after genetic counseling compared to baseline in all groups. Anxiety about cancer had clear correlation to perceived risk of cancer before and one year after genetic investigations. The affected participants overestimated their children's risk as well as risk for anyone in

  3. Time series analyses of breathing patterns of lung cancer patients using nonlinear dynamical system theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewatia, D K; Tolakanahalli, R P; Paliwal, B R; Tomé, W A

    2011-04-07

    The underlying requirements for successful implementation of any efficient tumour motion management strategy are regularity and reproducibility of a patient's breathing pattern. The physiological act of breathing is controlled by multiple nonlinear feedback and feed-forward couplings. It would therefore be appropriate to analyse the breathing pattern of lung cancer patients in the light of nonlinear dynamical system theory. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the one-dimensional respiratory time series of lung cancer patients based on nonlinear dynamics and delay coordinate state space embedding. It is very important to select a suitable pair of embedding dimension 'm' and time delay 'τ' when performing a state space reconstruction. Appropriate time delay and embedding dimension were obtained using well-established methods, namely mutual information and the false nearest neighbour method, respectively. Establishing stationarity and determinism in a given scalar time series is a prerequisite to demonstrating that the nonlinear dynamical system that gave rise to the scalar time series exhibits a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, i.e. is chaotic. Hence, once an appropriate state space embedding of the dynamical system has been reconstructed, we show that the time series of the nonlinear dynamical systems under study are both stationary and deterministic in nature. Once both criteria are established, we proceed to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), which is an invariant quantity under time delay embedding. The LLE for all 16 patients is positive, which along with stationarity and determinism establishes the fact that the time series of a lung cancer patient's breathing pattern is not random or irregular, but rather it is deterministic in nature albeit chaotic. These results indicate that chaotic characteristics exist in the respiratory waveform and techniques based on state space dynamics should be employed for tumour motion management.

  4. Time series analyses of breathing patterns of lung cancer patients using nonlinear dynamical system theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewatia, D K; Tolakanahalli, R P; Paliwal, B R; Tome, W A, E-mail: tewatia@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-04-07

    The underlying requirements for successful implementation of any efficient tumour motion management strategy are regularity and reproducibility of a patient's breathing pattern. The physiological act of breathing is controlled by multiple nonlinear feedback and feed-forward couplings. It would therefore be appropriate to analyse the breathing pattern of lung cancer patients in the light of nonlinear dynamical system theory. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the one-dimensional respiratory time series of lung cancer patients based on nonlinear dynamics and delay coordinate state space embedding. It is very important to select a suitable pair of embedding dimension 'm' and time delay '{tau}' when performing a state space reconstruction. Appropriate time delay and embedding dimension were obtained using well-established methods, namely mutual information and the false nearest neighbour method, respectively. Establishing stationarity and determinism in a given scalar time series is a prerequisite to demonstrating that the nonlinear dynamical system that gave rise to the scalar time series exhibits a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, i.e. is chaotic. Hence, once an appropriate state space embedding of the dynamical system has been reconstructed, we show that the time series of the nonlinear dynamical systems under study are both stationary and deterministic in nature. Once both criteria are established, we proceed to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), which is an invariant quantity under time delay embedding. The LLE for all 16 patients is positive, which along with stationarity and determinism establishes the fact that the time series of a lung cancer patient's breathing pattern is not random or irregular, but rather it is deterministic in nature albeit chaotic. These results indicate that chaotic characteristics exist in the respiratory waveform and techniques based on state space dynamics should be employed

  5. Time series analyses of breathing patterns of lung cancer patients using nonlinear dynamical system theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewatia, D K; Tolakanahalli, R P; Paliwal, B R; Tome, W A

    2011-01-01

    The underlying requirements for successful implementation of any efficient tumour motion management strategy are regularity and reproducibility of a patient's breathing pattern. The physiological act of breathing is controlled by multiple nonlinear feedback and feed-forward couplings. It would therefore be appropriate to analyse the breathing pattern of lung cancer patients in the light of nonlinear dynamical system theory. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the one-dimensional respiratory time series of lung cancer patients based on nonlinear dynamics and delay coordinate state space embedding. It is very important to select a suitable pair of embedding dimension 'm' and time delay 'τ' when performing a state space reconstruction. Appropriate time delay and embedding dimension were obtained using well-established methods, namely mutual information and the false nearest neighbour method, respectively. Establishing stationarity and determinism in a given scalar time series is a prerequisite to demonstrating that the nonlinear dynamical system that gave rise to the scalar time series exhibits a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, i.e. is chaotic. Hence, once an appropriate state space embedding of the dynamical system has been reconstructed, we show that the time series of the nonlinear dynamical systems under study are both stationary and deterministic in nature. Once both criteria are established, we proceed to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), which is an invariant quantity under time delay embedding. The LLE for all 16 patients is positive, which along with stationarity and determinism establishes the fact that the time series of a lung cancer patient's breathing pattern is not random or irregular, but rather it is deterministic in nature albeit chaotic. These results indicate that chaotic characteristics exist in the respiratory waveform and techniques based on state space dynamics should be employed for tumour motion management.

  6. Surgical staging identified false HPV-negative cases in a large series of invasive cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Karl Ulrich; Liebrich, Clemens; Luyten, Alexander; Zander, Martina; Iftner, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We examined a large series of biopsy-proven invasive cervical cancers with surgical staging and HPV re-testing to estimate the relevance of HPV-negative cervical cancers in a Caucasian population. We prospectively collected smears from 371 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of cervical cancer for HC2 testing of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). In HC2-negative cases, smears and paraffin embedded tissue blocks underwent additional HPV genotyping. HC2 tests showed 31/371 cases (8.8%) had negative findings. Surgical staging showed that 21/31 HC2-negative cases (68%) were not cervical cancer. Overall, 340/350 cases of primary cervical cancer confirmed by surgical staging tested HC2 positive (97.2%). Non-high-risk HPV subtypes were detected in five cases (one HPV-53, one HPV-70, and three HPV-73) and high-risk subtypes in four patients with HC2-negative cervical cancer (two HPV 16 and two HPV-18). The remaining case, a primary undifferentiated carcinoma of the uterine cervix, tested negative for HPV-DNA with all tests. The main explanation for HPV-negative cervical cancer was a false diagnosis, followed by cancers associated with non-HR-HPV types, and false-negative HR-HPV results. Truly HPV negative seem to be very rare in Caucasian populations. Retrospective analyses without surgical staging may overestimate the proportion of HPV negative cervical cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Clendenen

    Full Text Available Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  8. Does the diagnosis of breast or ovarian cancer trigger referral to genetic counseling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C Bethan; Littell, Ramey; Hoodfar, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Fiona; Pressman, Alice

    2013-03-01

    Kaiser Permanente Northern California is a large integrated health care delivery system in the United States that has guidelines for referring women with newly diagnosed BRCA1-and BRCA2-associated cancers for genetic counseling. This study assesses adherence to genetic counseling referral guidelines within this health system. Chart review was performed to identify patients with cancer who met the following pathology-based Kaiser Permanente Northern California guidelines for referral for genetic counseling: invasive breast cancer, younger than age 40; nonmucinous epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer, younger than age 60; women with synchronous or metachronous primary cancers of the breast and ovaries; and male breast cancer. We assessed compliance with referral guidelines. An electronic notice was sent to the managing physician of patients with newly diagnosed cancer to assess the feasibility of this intervention. A total of 340 patients were identified with breast cancer at younger than age 40 or with ovarian, peritoneal, or tubal cancer between January and June, 2008. Upon chart review, 105 of these patients met pathology-based criteria for referral to genetic counseling, of whom 47 (45%) were referred within the 2-year study period. Of the 67 subjects with breast cancer, 40 subjects (60%) were referred. In contrast, only 7 (21%) of 33 patients with ovarian cancer were referred (P < 0.001). A pilot study was performed to test the feasibility of notifying managing oncologists with an electronic letter alerting them of eligibility for genetic referral of patients with new diagnosis (n = 21). In the 3 to 6 months after this notification, 12 of these 21 patients were referred for counseling including 5 of 7 patients with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. There is a missed opportunity for referring patients to genetic counseling, especially among patients with ovarian cancer. A pilot study suggests that alerting treating physicians is a feasible

  9. The Impact of Mental Illness on Uptake of Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer in a Multiethnic Cohort of Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Marra G; Shapiro, Peter A; Coe, Austin; Trivedi, Meghna S; Crew, Katherine D

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated whether mental illness is a barrier to genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in multiethnic breast cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 308 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer and eligible for HBOC genetic testing seen in the breast clinic of an academic, urban medical center from 2007 to 2015. Uptake of genetic services and history of mental health disorder (MHD), defined as a psychiatric diagnosis or treatment with an antidepressant, mood stabilizer, anxiolytic, or antipsychotic medication, were ascertained by medical chart review. The mean age at breast cancer diagnosis was 56 years, with 44% non-Hispanic whites, 37% Hispanics, and 15% non-Hispanic blacks. Ninety-nine (32%) women met study criteria for MHD, 73% had a genetics referral, 57% had genetic counseling, and 54% completed BRCA testing. Uptake of genetic counseling services did not differ by race/ethnicity or presence of MHD. In multivariable analysis, younger age at diagnosis, Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, and family history of breast cancer were associated with HBOC genetic counseling. A relatively high proportion of breast cancer patients eligible for HBOC genetic testing were referred to a genetic counselor and referral status did not vary by MHD or race/ethnicity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hybrid analysis for indicating patients with breast cancer using temperature time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lincoln F; Santos, Alair Augusto S M D; Bravo, Renato S; Silva, Aristófanes C; Muchaluat-Saade, Débora C; Conci, Aura

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment in early stages increase cure chances. The temperature of cancerous tissue is generally higher than that of healthy surrounding tissues, making thermography an option to be considered in screening strategies of this cancer type. This paper proposes a hybrid methodology for analyzing dynamic infrared thermography in order to indicate patients with risk of breast cancer, using unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques, which characterizes the methodology as hybrid. The dynamic infrared thermography monitors or quantitatively measures temperature changes on the examined surface, after a thermal stress. In the dynamic infrared thermography execution, a sequence of breast thermograms is generated. In the proposed methodology, this sequence is processed and analyzed by several techniques. First, the region of the breasts is segmented and the thermograms of the sequence are registered. Then, temperature time series are built and the k-means algorithm is applied on these series using various values of k. Clustering formed by k-means algorithm, for each k value, is evaluated using clustering validation indices, generating values treated as features in the classification model construction step. A data mining tool was used to solve the combined algorithm selection and hyperparameter optimization (CASH) problem in classification tasks. Besides the classification algorithm recommended by the data mining tool, classifiers based on Bayesian networks, neural networks, decision rules and decision tree were executed on the data set used for evaluation. Test results support that the proposed analysis methodology is able to indicate patients with breast cancer. Among 39 tested classification algorithms, K-Star and Bayes Net presented 100% classification accuracy. Furthermore, among the Bayes Net, multi-layer perceptron, decision table and random forest classification algorithms, an

  11. Online Series presents The Impact of Obesity on Cancer Risk | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is a critical public health problem which is worsening over time. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one third (34.9% or 78.6 million) of U.S. adults are obese. Growing obesity incidence is associated with detrimental health consequences including cancer. Experts in the field of nutrition and cancer will present the latest data and

  12. The risk for cancer and genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.

    1997-01-01

    According to recent studies, the risk for thyroid cancer is not increased after radioiodine treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. Only the risk of cancer of the stomach seems to be increased slightly in patents treated with I-131 because of functional autonomy. However, the risk for gastric cancer is not increased after higher activities of I-131 because of thyroid cancer. There is no increased risk for genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  13. Genetic Modification of Oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xing; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Qi; Harper, James; Carroll, Danielle; Galinski, Mark S; Suzich, JoAnn; Jin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Clinical development of a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as an oncolytic agent for cancer therapy has been hampered by its select agent status due to its pathogenicity in avian species. Using reverse genetics, we have generated a lead candidate oncolytic NDV based on the mesogenic NDV-73T strain that is no longer classified as a select agent for clinical development. This recombinant NDV has a modification at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site to reduce the efficiency of F protein cleavage and an insertion of a 198-nucleotide sequence into the HN-L intergenic region, resulting in reduced viral gene expression and replication in avian cells but not in mammalian cells. In mammalian cells, except for viral polymerase (L) gene expression, viral gene expression is not negatively impacted or increased by the HN-L intergenic insertion. Furthermore, the virus can be engineered to express a foreign gene while still retaining the ability to grow to high titers in cell culture. The recombinant NDV selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells and is able to drive potent tumor growth inhibition following intratumoral or intravenous administration in a mouse tumor model. The candidate is well positioned for clinical development as an oncolytic virus. Avian paramyxovirus type 1, NDV, has been an attractive oncolytic agent for cancer virotherapy. However, this virus can cause epidemic disease in poultry, and concerns about the potential environmental and economic impact of an NDV outbreak have precluded its clinical development. Here we describe generation and characterization of a highly potent oncolytic NDV variant that is unlikely to cause Newcastle disease in its avian host, representing an essential step toward moving NDV forward as an oncolytic agent. Several attenuation mechanisms have been genetically engineered into the recombinant NDV that reduce chicken pathogenicity to a level that is acceptable worldwide without impacting viral production in

  14. Ethical, legal and social implications of prenatal and preimplantation genetic testing for cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C-W; Hui, E C

    2009-01-01

    With the progress in cancer genetics and assisted reproductive technologies, it is now possible for cancer gene mutation carriers not only to reduce cancer mortality through the targeting of surveillance and preventive therapies, but also to avoid the birth of at-risk babies through the choice of different means of reproduction. Thus, the incidence of hereditary cancer syndromes may be decreased in the future. The integration of cancer genetic testing and assisted reproductive technologies raises certain ethical, legal and social issues beyond either genetic testing or assisted reproductive technology itself. In this paper, the reproductive decisions/choices of at-risk young couples and the ethical, legal and social concerns of prenatal genetic testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for susceptibility to hereditary cancer syndromes are discussed. Specifically, three ethical principles related to the integration of cancer genetic testing and assisted reproductive technologies, i.e. informed choice, beneficence to children and social justice, and their implications for the responsible translation of these medical techniques into common practice of preventive medicine are highlighted.

  15. Opportunities During Early Life for Cancer Prevention: Highlights From a Series of Virtual Meetings With Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Dawn M.; Buchanan, Natasha D.

    2018-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that early life exposures can affect lifetime cancer risk. In 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Cancer Prevention Across the Lifespan Workgroup hosted a series of virtual meetings with select experts to discuss the state of the evidence linking factors during the prenatal period and early childhood to subsequent risk of both pediatric and adult cancers. In this article, we present the results from a qualitative analysis of the meeting transcripts and summarize themes that emerged from our discussions with meeting participants. Themes included the state of the evidence linking early life factors to cancer risk, research gaps and challenges, the level of evidence needed to support taking public health action, and the challenges of communicating complex, and sometimes conflicting, scientific findings to the public. Opportunities for collaboration among public health agencies and other stakeholders were identified during these discussions. Potential next steps for the CDC and its partners included advancing and building upon epidemiology and surveillance work, developing and using evidence from multiple sources to inform decision-making, disseminating and communicating research findings in a clear and effective way, and expanding collaborations with grantees and other partners. As the science on early life factors and cancer risk continues to evolve, there are opportunities for collaboration to translate science into actionable public health practice. PMID:27940972

  16. Qigong program on insomnia and stress in cancer patients: A case series report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, the interest in Qigong as an alternative therapy has grown following reports of its ability to regulate psychological factors in cancer patients. This is a case series to evaluate the outcome measures of Qigong when used as an adjunct to standard medical care to treat insomnia and stress in cancer patients. Patients and methods: The Qigong program was applied to four cancer patients with insomnia, stress, and anxiety. The program consisted of 30-min sessions involving exercise, patting of the 12 meridians, and spontaneous breathing exercises three times a week for a period of 4 weeks. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was measured as the primary outcome, while the Stress Scale, the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Functional Assessment Cancer Therapy–General determined the secondary outcomes. Insomnia, stress, and anxiety levels were examined weekly, while quality of life was examined on the first visit and the last visit. Results: The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Stress Scale scores were reduced after conduct of the Qigong program. Conclusion: This study could provide a better understanding of Qigong’s influence on insomnia and stress in cancer patients. However, a larger controlled trial should be conducted to confirm these findings.

  17. Gastric wall shortening in early gastric cancer: upper gastrointestinal series and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Jae; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Eun Ah; Kim, Kyu Sun; Yun, Ku Sub; Kim, Ho Chul; Bae, Sang Hun; Kang, Gu; Shin, Hyung Sik

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the causes of gastric wall shortening in early gastric cancer, upper gastrointestinal study was correlated with pathologic findings. We evaluated 41 cases (M:F = 1.7:1, average age = 49) of early gastric cancer, retrospectively. The gastric wall shortening were classified as Grade I; none, Grade II; intermediate, and Grade III; prominent. Pathologic findings such as size of lesions, depth of tumor invasion, degree of the submucosal fibrosis, degree of thickness of the submucosa and muscularis propria, and morphologic patterns of lesions including conversing mucosal folds were correlated with the degree of gastric wall shortening on upper gastrointestinal series. Submucosal fibrosis was present in 4 cases in Grade I (n = 21), 4 cases in Grade II (n = 6) and 8 cases in Grade III (n = 10). Positive conversing mucosal folds were seen in 5 cases in Grade I (n = 17), 0 case in Grade II (n = 2) and 9 cases in Grade III (n = 9). Gastric wall shortening was significantly associated with submucosal fibrosis and conversing mucosal folds of early gastric cancer. (ρ = 0.0001, and ρ = 0.02, respectively) Upper gastrointestinal finding of gastric wall protrusion in patients with early gastric cancer should not misinterprete as advanced gastric cancer since the finding could be a result of submucosal fibrosis

  18. The impact of direct-to-consumer marketing of cancer genetic testing on women according to their genetic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Jan T; Byers, Tim; Axell, Lisen; Ku, Lisa; Jacobellis, Jillian

    2008-12-01

    To assess the impact of direct-to-consumer marketing for genetic testing among women of varying genetic risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Telephone surveys were conducted with 315 women in Denver, Colorado, one target audience for the Myriad BRACAnalysis ad campaign. Genetic risk was determined from personal and family history and grouped by probability of having a BRCA1/2 mutation (low or =10%). High-risk women were more knowledgeable about BRACAnalysis and more likely to recall the media ads than were low-risk women (60 vs. 39%, P audience. Concern about breast cancer was not appreciably increased. A large percentage of low-risk women (not candidates for testing) expressed interest in testing, suggesting the campaign was too broad. A campaign targeted at high-risk women, who may benefit from testing might be preferred.

  19. Molecular and genetic epidemiology of cancer in low- and medium-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and molecular factors can play an important role in an individual's cancer susceptibility and response to carcinogen exposure. Cancer susceptibility and response to carcinogen exposure can be either through inheritance of high penetrance but rare germline mutations that constitute heritable cancer syndromes, or it can be inherited as common genetic variations or polymorphisms that are associated with low to moderate risk for development of cancer. These polymorphisms can interact with environmental exposures and can influence an individual's cancer risk through multiple pathways, including affecting the rate of metabolism of carcinogens or the immune response to these toxins. Thus, these genetic polymorphisms can account for some of the geographical differences seen in cancer prevalence between different populations. This review explores the role of molecular epidemiology in the field of cancer prevention and control in low- and medium-income countries. Using data from Human Genome Project and HapMap Project, genome-wide association studies have been able to identify multiple susceptibility loci for different cancers. The field of genetic and molecular epidemiology has been further revolutionized by the discovery of newer, faster, and more efficient DNA-sequencing technologies including next-generation sequencing. The new DNA-sequencing technologies can play an important role in planning and implementation of cancer prevention and screening strategies. More research is needed in this area, especially in investigating new biomarkers and measuring gene-environment interactions. Copyright © 2014 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Women’s Satisfaction with Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast-Ovarian Cancer: Psychological Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tercyak, Kenneth P.; DeMarco, Tiffani A.; Mars, Bryn D.; Peshkin, Beth N.

    2004-01-01

    Women who participate in BRCA1/2 cancer genetic counseling do so for a variety of reasons, including learning quantitative risk information about their chances of developing hereditary breast-ovarian cancer at some point during their lifetimes. For these women, obtaining pre-test and disclosure genetic counseling with a professional affords them numerous potential benefits, including adequate preparation for, and accurate interpretation of, their test results. In consequence, women commonly r...

  1. DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Samuelsson, Johanna K.; Alonso, Sergio; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Perucho, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Genetic somatic alterations are fundamental hallmarks of cancer. In addition to point and other small mutations targeting cancer genes, solid tumors often exhibit aneuploidy as well as multiple chromosomal rearrangements of large fragments of the genome. Whether somatic chromosomal alterations and aneuploidy are a driving force or a mere consequence of tumorigenesis remains controversial. Recently it became apparent that not only genetic but also epigenetic alterations play a major role in ca...

  2. Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0681 TITLE: Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0681Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated...effects, urinary morbidity, rectal injury, sexual dysfunction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  3. Series Hybrid Electric Vehicle Power System Optimization Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tianjun; Li, Bin; Zong, Changfu; Wu, Yang

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), compared with conventional vehicles, have complex structures and more component parameters. If variables optimization designs are carried on all these parameters, it will increase the difficulty and the convergence of algorithm program, so this paper chooses the parameters which has a major influence on the vehicle fuel consumption to make it all work at maximum efficiency. First, HEV powertrain components modelling are built. Second, taking a tandem hybrid structure as an example, genetic algorithm is used in this paper to optimize fuel consumption and emissions. Simulation results in ADVISOR verify the feasibility of the proposed genetic optimization algorithm.

  4. Genetic alterations in lung cancer: Assessing limitations in routine clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Espiga Macedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer mortality worldwide, responsible for approximately 1.1 million deaths per year. Median survival is short, both as most tumours are diagnosed at an advanced stage and because of the limited efficacy of available treatments. The development of tumour molecular genetics carries the promise of altering this state of affairs, as it should lead to a more precise classification of tumours, identify specific molecular targets for therapy and, above all, allow the development of new methods for early diagnosis. Despite numerous studies demonstrating the usefulness of molecular genetic techniques in the study of lung cancer, its routine clinical use in Portugal has, however, been limited.In this study, we used a p53 mutation screen in multiple clinical samples from a series of lung cancer patients to attempt to identify the main practical limitations to the integration of molecular genetics in routine clinical practice. Our results suggest that the main limiting factor is the availability of samples with good quality DNA; a problem that could be overcome by alterations in common sample collection and storage procedures. Resumo: O cancro do pulmão é a causa mais frequente de mortalidade por cancro no mundo, sendo responsável por cerca de 1,1 milhões de mortes por ano. A sobrevivência média dos doentes é geralmente curta, por a doença se encontrar em estádios avançados na altura do diagnóstico, mas também devido à falta de eficácia dos tratamentos disponíveis. O advento da genética molecular dos tumores trouxe consigo a possibilidade de modificar esta situação, quer através do refinamento do diagnóstico, quer da identificação de alvos terapêuticos específicos, quer sobretudo por – pelo menos em teoria – permitir o diagnóstico precoce da doença. No entanto, e apesar de numerosos trabalhos terem já demonstrado a utilidade

  5. African American Women’s Limited Knowledge and Experiences with Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Graves, Kristi D.; Christopher, Juleen; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Talley, Costellia; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast cancer have the potential benefit of early detection and early interventions in African American women. However, African American women have low use of these services compared to White women. We conducted two focus groups with African American women diagnosed with breast cancer (affected group, n=13) and women with at least one first-degree relative with breast/ovarian cancer (unaffected group, n= 8). A content analysis approach was employed to analyze interview data. Breast cancer survivors had more knowledge about genetic counseling and testing than participants who were unaffected with cancer. However, knowledge about genetic counseling was limited in both groups. Barriers to pursuing genetic counseling and testing included poor understanding of the genetic counseling and testing process, fear of carrying the mutation, concerns about discrimination, and cost. Motivators to participate in genetic counseling and testing included desire to help family members, insurance coverage, and potential of benefiting the larger African American community. Education efforts are needed to increase genetic counseling and testing awareness in the African American community. PMID:24186304

  6. African American women's limited knowledge and experiences with genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Vanessa B; Graves, Kristi D; Christopher, Juleen; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Talley, Costellia; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast cancer have the potential benefit of early detection and early interventions in African American women. However, African American women have low use of these services compared to White women. We conducted two focus groups with African American women diagnosed with breast cancer (affected group, n = 13) and women with at least one first-degree relative with breast/ovarian cancer (unaffected group, n = 8). A content analysis approach was employed to analyze interview data. Breast cancer survivors had more knowledge about genetic counseling and testing than participants who were unaffected with cancer. However, knowledge about genetic counseling was limited in both groups. Barriers to pursuing genetic counseling and testing included poor understanding of the genetic counseling and testing process, fear of carrying the mutation, concerns about discrimination, and cost. Motivators to participate in genetic counseling and testing included desire to help family members, insurance coverage, and potential of benefiting the larger African American community. Education efforts are needed to increase genetic counseling and testing awareness in the African American community.

  7. Colorectal Cancer in the Family: Psychosocial Distress and Social Issues in the Years Following Genetic Counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleiker Eveline MA

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined: (1 levels of cancer-specific distress more than one year after genetic counselling for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; (2 associations between sociodemographic, clinical and psychosocial factors and levels of distress; (3 the impact of genetic counselling on family relationships, and (4 social consequences of genetic counselling. Methods In this cross-sectional study, individuals who had received genetic counselling for HNPCC during 1986–1998 completed a self-report questionnaire by mail. Results 116 individuals (81% response rate completed the questionnaire, on average 4 years after the last counselling session. Of all respondents, 6% had clinically significant levels of cancer-specific distress (Impact of Event Scale, IES. Having had contact with a professional psychosocial worker for cancer risk in the past 10 years was significantly associated with higher levels of current cancer specific distress. Only a minority of the counselees reported any adverse effects of genetic counselling on: communication about genetic counselling with their children (9%, family relationships (5%, obtaining life insurance (8%, choice or change of jobs (2%, and obtaining a mortgage (2%. Conclusion On average, four years after genetic counselling for HNPCC, only a small minority of counselled individuals reports clinically significant levels of distress, or significant family or social problems.

  8. A novel series of conferences tackling the hurdles confronting the translation of novel cancer immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bot Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While there has been significant progress in advancing novel immune therapies to the bedside, much more needs to be done to fully tap into the potential of the immune system. It has become increasingly clear that besides practical and operational challenges, the heterogeneity of cancer and the limited efficacy profile of current immunotherapy platforms are the two main hurdles. Nevertheless, the promising clinical data of several approaches point to a roadmap that carries the promise to significantly advance cancer immunotherapy. A new annual series sponsored by Arrowhead Publishers and Conferences aims at bringing together scientific and business leadership from academia and industry, to identify, share and discuss most current priorities in research and translation of novel immune interventions. This Editorial provides highlights of the first event held earlier this year and outlines the focus of the second meeting to be held in 2013 that will be dedicated to stem cells and immunotherapy.

  9. Genetically modified vaccines augment the efficacy of cancer surgery and chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2009), s. 199-200 ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : genetically modified vaccines * cancer surgery and chemotherapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2009

  10. Genetic Counselors' Experiences Regarding Communication of Reproductive Risks with Autosomal Recessive Conditions found on Cancer Panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, Sarah; Tryon, Rebecca; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Zierhut, Heather A

    2016-04-01

    The development of hereditary cancer genetic testing panels has altered genetic counseling practice. Mutations within certain genes on cancer panels pose not only a cancer risk, but also a reproductive risk for autosomal recessive conditions such as Fanconi anemia, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome, and ataxia telangiectasia. This study aimed to determine if genetic counselors discuss reproductive risks for autosomal recessive conditions associated with genes included on cancer panels, and if so, under what circumstances these risks are discussed. An on-line survey was emailed through the NSGC list-serv. The survey assessed 189 cancer genetic counselors' experiences discussing reproductive risks with patients at risk to carry a mutation or variant of uncertain significance (VUS) in a gene associated with both an autosomal dominant cancer risk and an autosomal recessive syndrome. Over half (n = 82, 55 %) reported having discussed reproductive risks; the remainder (n = 66, 45 %) had not. Genetic counselors who reported discussing reproductive risks primarily did so when patients had a positive result and were of reproductive age. Reasons for not discussing these risks included when a patient had completed childbearing or when a VUS was identified. Most counselors discussed reproductive risk after obtaining results and not during the informed consent process. There is inconsistency as to if and when the discussion of reproductive risks is taking place. The wide variation in responses suggests a need to develop professional guidelines for when and how discussions of reproductive risk for autosomal recessive conditions identified through cancer panels should occur with patients.

  11. A case series report of cancer patients undergoing group body psychotherapy [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Grossert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disturbances in bodily wellbeing represent a key source of psychosocial suffering and impairment related to cancer. Therefore, interventions to improve bodily wellbeing in post-treatment cancer patients are of paramount importance. Notably, body psychotherapy (BPT has been shown to improve bodily wellbeing in subjects suffering from a variety of mental disorders. However, how post-treatment cancer patients perceive and subjectively react to group BPT aiming at improving bodily disturbances has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been described. Methods: We report on six patients undergoing outpatient group BPT that followed oncological treatment for malignant neoplasms. The BPT consisted of six sessions based on a scientific embodiment approach, integrating body-oriented techniques to improve patients’ awareness, perception, acceptance, and expression regarding their body. Results: The BPT was well accepted by all patients. Despite having undergone different types of oncological treatment for different cancer types and locations, all subjects reported having appreciated BPT and improved how they perceived their bodies. However, individual descriptions of improvements showed substantial heterogeneity across subjects. Notably, most patients indicated that sensations, perceptions, and other mental activities related to their own body intensified when proceeding through the group BPT sessions. Conclusion: The findings from this case series encourage and inform future studies examining whether group BPT is efficacious in post-treatment cancer patients and investigating the related mechanisms of action. The observed heterogeneity in individual descriptions of perceived treatment effects point to the need for selecting comprehensive indicators of changes in disturbances of bodily wellbeing as the primary patient-reported outcome in future clinical trials. While increases in mental activities related to their own body are commonly

  12. Detection of skeletal muscle metastases on initial staging of lung cancer: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchino, Marialuisa; Valente, Tullio; Somma, Francesco; de Rosa, Ilaria; Bifulco, Marco; Rea, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Estimation of skeletal muscle metastases (SMMs) at the time of diagnosis and/or initial staging of lung cancer. Retrospective evaluation of clinical charts and imaging data suggestive of SMMs of patients with histology-proved lung cancer over a 5-year period. SMMs were identified in 46 out of 1,754 patients. Single and multiple (62.9% of cases) SMMs were detected by total body multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). They were associated with poorly differentiated (43%) and advanced adenocarcinomas (52%) without clinically relevant symptoms and/or signs. Psoas and buttock muscles were most frequently involved (33.3%). MDCT findings consisted of well-defined homogeneously hyperdense oval masses (31%), lesions with ring-like enhancement and central hypoattenuation (68%), or large abscess-like necrotic lesions (24%). Sonography revealed well-defined hypoechoic masses (41.6%), ill-defined hypoechoic lesions (33.3%), or anechoic areas with a necrotic centre (25%). Positron emission tomography revealed that all SMMs were metabolically active. SMMs are uncommon but not negligible in lung cancer, with an estimated prevalence of 2.62% in our series. Although histology remains the recommended method, use of high-performance imaging techniques and increased clinical suspicion may improve their early detection. Efforts addressing their effect on the natural history of lung cancer are needed.

  13. Intracavitary irradiation of early rectal cancer for cure. A series of 186 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papillon, J.

    1975-01-01

    If radical surgery is the only rational policy for most cases of rectal cancer, the problem of local treatment in poor surgical risk patients should be discussed in selected cases. Only limited, fairly-well-differentiated tumors, still confined to the rectal wall may have a sufficiently low probability of lymphatic spread to be amenable to local treatment. Rectal cancer, usually regarded as being slightly radiosensitive when treated by external irradiation, proves to be highly radiosensitive in the case of early cancer treated by intracavitary irradiation. This method is able to control a large amount of limited polypoid and ulcerative adenocarcinomas. In a series of 133 cases followed more than 5 years, the rate of death from cancer is only 9 percent, and the 5-year survival rate is 78 percent. As compared with local excision or electrocoagulation, intracavitary irradiation has several advantages. It does not require colostomy nor anesthesia. Contact x-ray therapy is an ambulatory treatment applicable even to elderly and fragile patients. There is no danger of fistula in the case of tumor of the anterior wall in female patients. It preserves all the chances of cure by subsequent surgery in case of failure. (auth)

  14. Sampling genetic diversity in the sympatrically and allopatrically speciating Midas cichlid species complex over a 16 year time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunje Paul ME

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Speciation often occurs in complex or uncertain temporal and spatial contexts. Processes such as reinforcement, allopatric divergence, and assortative mating can proceed at different rates and with different strengths as populations diverge. The Central American Midas cichlid fish species complex is an important case study for understanding the processes of speciation. Previous analyses have demonstrated that allopatric processes led to species formation among the lakes of Nicaragua as well as sympatric speciation that is occurring within at least one crater lake. However, since speciation is an ongoing process and sampling genetic diversity of such lineages can be biased by collection scheme or random factors, it is important to evaluate the robustness of conclusions drawn on individual time samples. Results In order to assess the validity and reliability of inferences based on different genetic samples, we have analyzed fish from several lakes in Nicaragua sampled at three different times over 16 years. In addition, this time series allows us to analyze the population genetic changes that have occurred between lakes, where allopatric speciation has operated, as well as between different species within lakes, some of which have originated by sympatric speciation. Focusing on commonly used genetic markers, we have analyzed both DNA sequences from the complete mitochondrial control region as well as nuclear DNA variation at ten microsatellite loci from these populations, sampled thrice in a 16 year time period, to develop a robust estimate of the population genetic history of these diversifying lineages. Conclusion The conclusions from previous work are well supported by our comprehensive analysis. In particular, we find that the genetic diversity of derived crater lake populations is lower than that of the source population regardless of when and how each population was sampled. Furthermore, changes in various estimates of

  15. Investigating the genetic relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and cancer using GWAS summary statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Yen Chen Anne; Cho, Kelly; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Cormack, Jean; Blalock, Kendra; Campbell, Peter T.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Figueiredo, Jane; James Gauderman, W.; Gong, Jian; Green, Roger C.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Harju, John F.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Li, Li; Lin, Yi; Manion, Frank J.; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Peters, Ulrike; Raskin, Leon; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hunter, David J.; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Ahsan, Habib; Whittemore, Alice S.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Crisponi, Laura; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Easton, Douglas F.; Turnbull, Clare A.; Rahman, Nazneen; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher; Schumacher, Fred; Travis, Ruth C.; Riboli, Elio; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brhane, Yonathan; McLaughlin, John; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; Christiani, David C.; Amos, Christopher I; Liang, Liming; Driver, Jane A.; IGAP Consortium, Colorectal Transdisciplinary Study (CORECT); Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE)

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence from both epidemiology and basic science suggest an inverse association between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer. We examined the genetic relationship between AD and various cancer types using GWAS summary statistics from the IGAP and GAME-ON consortia. Sample size ranged from

  16. Prediction of individual genetic risk to prostate cancer using a polygenic score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szulkin, Robert; Whitington, Thomas; Eklund, Martin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polygenic risk scores comprising established susceptibility variants have shown to be informative classifiers for several complex diseases including prostate cancer. For prostate cancer it is unknown if inclusion of genetic markers that have so far not been associated with prostate ca...

  17. The assessment of genetic risk of breast cancer : a set of GP guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Vlieland, TPMV; Hageman, GCHA; Oosterwijk, JC; Springer, MP; Kievit, J

    Background. Assessing a genetic risk for developing breast cancer is not an easy task for a GP. Current expert guidelines for referring and counselling women with a family history positive for breast cancer are complex and difficult to apply in general practice, and have only two strategies (to

  18. Potential role of genetic markers in the management of kidney cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junker, K.; Ficarra, V.; Kwon, E.D.; Leibovich, B.C.; Thompson, R.H.; Oosterwijk, E.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Kidney cancer is not a single entity but comprises a number of different types of cancer that occur in the kidney including renal cell tumours as the most common type. Four major renal cell tumour subtypes can be distinguished based on morphologic and genetic characteristics. To

  19. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. M...

  20. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (Guillermo); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Migrant breast cancer patients and their participation in genetic counseling : results from a registry-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J E; van Dulmen, A M; Velthuizen, M E; Theunissen, E B M; Vrouenraets, B C; Kimmings, A N; van Dalen, T; van Ooijen, B; Witkamp, A J; van der Aa, M A; Ausems, M G E M

    Certain ethnic groups seem to have less access to cancer genetic counseling. Our study was to investigate the participation in cancer genetic counseling among migrant breast cancer patients of Turkish and Moroccan origin. Hospital medical records of Turkish and Moroccan and of a comparative group of

  3. Migrant breast cancer patients and their participation in genetic counseling: results from a registry-based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Velthuizen, M.E.; Theunissen, E.B.M.; Vrouenraets, B.C.; Kimmings, A.N.; Dalen, T. van; Ooijen, B. van; Witkamp, A.J.; Aa, M.A. van der; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Certain ethnic groups seem to have less access to cancer genetic counseling. Our study was to investigate the participation in cancer genetic counseling among migrant breast cancer patients of Turkish and Moroccan origin. Hospital medical records of Turkish and Moroccan and of a comparative group of

  4. Migrant breast cancer patients and their participation in genetic counseling: results from a registry-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Velthuizen, M.E.; Theunissen, E.B.; Vrouenraets, B.C.; Kimmings, A.N.; Dalen, T. van; Ooijen, B. van; Witkamp, A.J.; Aa, M.A. van der; Ausems, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Certain ethnic groups seem to have less access to cancer genetic counseling. Our study was to investigate the participation in cancer genetic counseling among migrant breast cancer patients of Turkish and Moroccan origin. Hospital medical records of Turkish and Moroccan and of a comparative group of

  5. Randomized trial of proactive rapid genetic counseling versus usual care for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Marc D; Peshkin, Beth N; Isaacs, Claudine; Willey, Shawna; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B; Nusbaum, Rachel; Hooker, Gillian; O'Neill, Suzanne; Jandorf, Lina; Kelly, Scott P; Heinzmann, Jessica; Zidell, Aliza; Khoury, Katia

    2018-04-02

    Breast cancer patients who carry BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutations may consider bilateral mastectomy. Having bilateral mastectomy at the time of diagnosis not only reduces risk of a contralateral breast cancer, but can eliminate the need for radiation therapy and yield improved reconstruction options. However, most patients do not receive genetic counseling or testing at the time of their diagnosis. In this trial, we tested proactive rapid genetic counseling and testing (RGCT) in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in order to facilitate pre-surgical genetic counseling and testing. We recruited newly diagnosed breast cancer patients at increased risk for carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation. Of 379 eligible patients who completed a baseline survey, 330 agreed to randomization in a 2:1 ratio to RGCT (n = 220) versus UC (n = 108). Primary outcomes were genetic counseling and testing uptake and breast cancer surgical decisions. RGCT led to higher overall (83.8% vs. 54.6%; p genetic counseling uptake compared to UC. Despite higher rates of genetic counseling, RGCT did not differ from UC in overall (54.1% vs. 49.1%, p > 0.10) or pre-surgical (30.6% vs. 27.4%, p > 0.10) receipt of genetic test results nor did they differ in uptake of bilateral mastectomy (26.6% vs. 21.8%, p > 0.10). Although RGCT yielded increased genetic counseling participation, this did not result in increased rates of pre-surgical genetic testing or impact surgical decisions. These data suggest that those patients most likely to opt for genetic testing at the time of diagnosis are being effectively identified by their surgeons.

  6. Comprehensive Genetic Characterization of Intraprostatic Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer in African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Response and Eradication of Androgen Receptor Amplification with High-dose Testosterone in Prostate Cancer ." Eur Urol 71(6): 997-998. Case Report...34 Prostate -specific Antigen Response and Eradication of Androgen Receptor Amplification with High-dose Testosterone in Prostate Cancer ." Eur Urol 71...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0379 TITLE: Comprehensive genetic characterization of intraprostatic chronic inflammation and prostate cancer in

  7. Influence of race/ethnicity on genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Andrea D; Hall, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Risk assessment coupled with genetic counseling and testing for the cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) has become an integral element of comprehensive patient evaluation and cancer risk management in the United States for individuals meeting high-risk criteria for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). For mutation carriers, several options for risk modification have achieved substantial reductions in future cancer risk. However, several recent studies have shown lower rates of BRCA1/2 counseling and testing among minority populations. Here, we explore the role of race/ethnicity in cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling and genetic testing for HBOC and the BRCA1/2 cancer predisposition genes. Barriers to genetic services related to race/ethnicity and underserved populations, including socioeconomic barriers (e.g., time, access, geographic, language/cultural, awareness, cost) and psychosocial barriers (e.g., medical mistrust, perceived disadvantages to genetic services), as well as additional barriers to care once mutation carriers are identified, will be reviewed.

  8. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort) was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9%) reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8%) had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ≥ 20% and 214 (23.7%) had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%). The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65). These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3%) indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers. PMID:21637504

  9. The Candidate Cancer Gene Database: a database of cancer driver genes from forward genetic screens in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kenneth L; Nyre, Erik T; Abrahante, Juan; Ho, Yen-Yi; Isaksson Vogel, Rachel; Starr, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cancer driver gene mutations is crucial for advancing cancer therapeutics. Due to the overwhelming number of passenger mutations in the human tumor genome, it is difficult to pinpoint causative driver genes. Using transposon mutagenesis in mice many laboratories have conducted forward genetic screens and identified thousands of candidate driver genes that are highly relevant to human cancer. Unfortunately, this information is difficult to access and utilize because it is scattered across multiple publications using different mouse genome builds and strength metrics. To improve access to these findings and facilitate meta-analyses, we developed the Candidate Cancer Gene Database (CCGD, http://ccgd-starrlab.oit.umn.edu/). The CCGD is a manually curated database containing a unified description of all identified candidate driver genes and the genomic location of transposon common insertion sites (CISs) from all currently published transposon-based screens. To demonstrate relevance to human cancer, we performed a modified gene set enrichment analysis using KEGG pathways and show that human cancer pathways are highly enriched in the database. We also used hierarchical clustering to identify pathways enriched in blood cancers compared to solid cancers. The CCGD is a novel resource available to scientists interested in the identification of genetic drivers of cancer. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions HLRCC Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer ( HLRCC ) is a disorder in which affected individuals ...

  11. A Follow-Up Community Survey of Knowledge and Beliefs About Cancer and Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Shannon M; Hastrup, Janice L; Hyland, Andrew; Rivard, Cheryl

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess changes since the launch of the US Surgeon General's campaign in the public's beliefs about the role of genetics in the etiology of cancer, as well as changes in recording family health history. We conducted a survey of 480 Western New York adults, assessing: (1) experiences with cancer, (2) beliefs about cancer and genetics, and (3) practices of recording family health history. Most respondents were aware of the importance of family history. The sample also showed increased knowledge about cancer and genetics compared with a previous survey. However, only 7 % kept written records that included medical conditions, which was not different from a previous survey. Time constraints, apathy, and reluctance to find out negative health information were the most reported barriers. Results suggest a need for continued education of the public, with increased emphasis on written family health records.

  12. [Genetic structure in five Phlebotominae (Lutzomyia spp.), townsendi series, verrucarum group, in Colombia (Diptera: Prychodidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Claribel; Ruiz-García, Manuel; Munstermann, Leonard; Ferro, Cristina

    2008-12-01

    Sixteen isoenzyme patterns were analyzed for five Colombian Lutzomyia species. The average unbiased expected heterozygosity levels ranged from 0.098 (Lu. youngi) to 0.215 (Lu. torrvida). The five species samples, taken all the isoenzymes employed, were significantly deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium by homozygous excess with classical as well as Markov chain exact tests. Possible causes: (1) Wahlund effect within populations due to subdivision and/or sampling. Endogamy could be discarded because these loci were affected by highly different levels of homozygous excess. (2) Null alleles could be not discarded, at least for some isoenzymes. The hierarchical Wright's F analysis showed high and significant values for each parameter. The average F(IT) value was 0.655 with a conspicous homozygous excess at a global level (all species taken together); the average F(IS) value was significantly positive (0.515) as well, with homozygous excess within each species. The genetic heterogeneity between the fives species was noteworthy (F(ST) 0.288), indicating clear genetic differentiation. The more related species pairs were Lu. longiflocosa-Lu. torvida (0.959) and Lu torvida-Lu. spinicrassa (0.960); while Lu. torvida-Lu. youngi (0.805) and Lu. quasitownsendi-Lu. youngi (0.796) were the most divergent (Nei's genetic identity matrix). UPGMA and Wagner algorithms showed that the most divergent species was Lu. youngi, whereas the most related were Lu. longiflocosa-Lu. torvida and Lu torvida-Lu. spinicrassa. A spatial autocorrelation analysis (Moran's I index) revealed a very weak, or inexistent spatial structure, which means that the speciation events between these species were independent from the geographic distances from where they currently live.

  13. Novel genetic variants in miR-191 gene and familial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jie; DiCioccio, Richard; Odunsi, Kunle; Lele, Shashikant B; Zhao, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Half of the familial aggregation of ovarian cancer can't be explained by any known risk genes, suggesting the existence of other genetic risk factors. Some of these unknown factors may not be traditional protein encoding genes. MicroRNA (miRNA) plays a critical role in tumorigenesis, but it is still unknown if variants in miRNA genes lead to predisposition to cancer. Considering the fact that miRNA regulates a number of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and oncogenes, genetic variations in miRNA genes could affect the levels of expression of TSGs or oncogenes and, thereby, cancer risk. To test this hypothesis in familial ovarian cancer, we screened for genetic variants in thirty selected miRNA genes, which are predicted to regulate key ovarian cancer genes and are reported to be misexpressed in ovarian tumor tissues, in eighty-three patients with familial ovarian cancer. All of the patients are non-carriers of any known BRCA1/2 or mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Seven novel genetic variants were observed in four primary or precursor miRNA genes. Among them, three rare variants were found in the precursor or primary precursor of the miR-191 gene. In functional assays, the one variant located in the precursor of miR-191 resulted in conformational changes in the predicted secondary structures, and consequently altered the expression of mature miR-191. In further analysis, we found that this particular variant exists in five family members who had ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that there are novel genetic variants in miRNA genes, and those certain genetic variants in miRNA genes can affect the expression of mature miRNAs and, consequently, might alter the regulation of TSGs or oncogenes. Additionally, the variant might be potentially associated with the development of familial ovarian cancer

  14. Clinicopathologic and prognostic features of breast cancer in young women: a series from North of Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkach, Joaira; Mansouri, Mohamed; Derkaoui, Touria; Loudiyi, Ali; Fihri, Mohamed; Hassani, Samia; Barakat, Amina; Ghailani Nourouti, Naima; Bennani Mechita, Mohcine

    2017-11-09

    Literature data reported a higher frequency of breast cancer in young women (BCYW) in developing countries. BCYW is associated with delayed diagnosis, aggressive biology and poor prognosis. However, our knowledge of biological profile, treatment received and outcome of young patients is still limited in Morocco. We propose to analyze clinicopathologic, therapeutic and prognostic features of BCYW among a series of patients native and/or inhabitant of North of Morocco. We carried out a retro-prospective study of 331 infiltrating breast cancer cases registered between January 2010 and December 2015. Details of tumor pathology, treatment and outcome were collected. Disease-Free Survival (DFS) and Overall Survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 82 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 40 or younger (24.8%). Median age was 36 years. More than one quarter (26%) of patients had family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Advanced stages accounted for 34.2% of cases. Median tumor diameter was 2.8 cm. Intermediate and high-grade tumors represented 47.6% and 40.2%, respectively. Nodal involvement was present in 58.5% and lymphovascular invasion was found in 47.7% of the patients. About two thirds (66.2%) of tumors were hormone receptor positive, 29.2% over-expressed HER2 receptor and 23% were triple negative. Patients underwent breast conserving surgery in 38.2% of cases, 61.7% were offered adjuvant chemotherapy and 84.6% received hormone therapy. Five-year DFS and OS were respectively 88.9% and 75.6%. Locoregional recurrence occurred in 2.8% of cases and 8.3% of patients developed distant metastases. Our findings are in accordance with previous studies that have shown a higher frequency of breast cancer among Moroccan young women. In line with literature data, clinicopathologic profile seems to be aggressive and prognosis is pejorative in our series.

  15. Risk Estimation as a Decision-Making Tool for Genetic Analysis of the Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Chang-Claude

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available For genetic counselling of a woman on familial breast cancer, an accurate evaluation of the probability that she carries a germ-line mutation is needed to assist in making decisions about genetic-testing.

  16. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Evaluation of a Series of 2-Amino-Naphthoquinones against Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago A. P. de Moraes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of a series of aminonaphthoquinones resulting from the reaction of suitable aminoacids with 1,4-naphthoquinone was assayed against SF-295 (glioblastoma, MDAMB-435 (breast, HCT-8 (colon, HCT-116 (colon, HL-60 (leukemia, OVCAR-8 (ovarian, NCI-H358M (bronchoalveolar lung carcinoma and PC3-M (prostate cancer cells and also against PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results demonstrated that all the synthetic aminonaphthoquinones had relevant cytotoxic activity against all human cancer lines used in this experiment. Five of the compounds showed high cytotoxicity and selectivity against all cancer cell lines tested (IC50 = 0.49 to 3.89 µg·mL−1. The title compounds were less toxic to PBMC, since IC50 was 1.5 to eighteen times higher (IC50 = 5.51 to 17.61 µg·mL−1 than values shown by tumour cell lines. The mechanism of cell growth inhibition and structure–activity relationships remains as a target for future investigations.

  17. Psychosocial aspects of hereditary cancer (PAHC) questionnaire: development and testing of a screening questionnaire for use in clinical cancer genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijzenga, W; Bleiker, E M A; Hahn, D E E; Kluijt, I; Sidharta, G N; Gundy, C; Aaronson, N K

    2014-08-01

    Up to three-quarters of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling and testing report psychosocial problems specifically related to that setting. The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate the screening properties of a questionnaire designed to assess specific psychosocial problems related to cancer genetic counseling. We adopted the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group guidelines to develop the Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer (PAHC) questionnaire, a 26-item questionnaire organized into six problem domains: genetics, practical issues, family, living with cancer, emotions, and children. The Distress Thermometer and a question per domain on the perceived need for extra psychosocial services were included as well. We administered the questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale to 127 counselees at the time of genetic counseling and 3 weeks after DNA test disclosure. As a gold standard to evaluate the screening properties of the questionnaire, participants underwent a semi-structured interview with an experienced social worker who assessed the presence and severity of problems per domain. A cutoff score representing responses of 'quite a bit' or 'very much' to one or more items within a given problem domain yielded moderate to high sensitivity across domains. A cutoff of 4 on the Distress Thermometer yielded high sensitivity. The questions regarding the perceived need for extra psychosocial services yielded high specificity and negative predictive values. The Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer questionnaire in combination with the Distress Thermometer can be used as a first-line screener for psychosocial problems within the cancer genetic counseling setting. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Acceptance of Referral for Cancer-Risk Counseling in Population of Women Undergoing Breast Biopsy: Variables Predicting Followup at a Cancer Genetics Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Neill, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    ..., Shattuck-Eidens, Frank, and BRCAPRO models. Questionnaires assessing psychological status, and knowledge and attitudes about breast cancer, cancer risk counseling, and genetic testing were used to identify predictors of referral uptake...

  19. Cost sharing and hereditary cancer risk: predictors of willingness-to-pay for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matro, Jennifer M; Ruth, Karen J; Wong, Yu-Ning; McCully, Katen C; Rybak, Christina M; Meropol, Neal J; Hall, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Increasing use of predictive genetic testing to gauge hereditary cancer risk has been paralleled by rising cost-sharing practices. Little is known about how demographic and psychosocial factors may influence individuals' willingness-to-pay for genetic testing. The Gastrointestinal Tumor Risk Assessment Program Registry includes individuals presenting for genetic risk assessment based on personal/family cancer history. Participants complete a baseline survey assessing cancer history and psychosocial items. Willingness-to-pay items include intention for: genetic testing only if paid by insurance; testing with self-pay; and amount willing-to-pay ($25-$2,000). Multivariable models examined predictors of willingness-to-pay out-of-pocket (versus only if paid by insurance) and willingness-to-pay a smaller versus larger sum (≤$200 vs. ≥$500). All statistical tests are two-sided (α = 0.05). Of 385 evaluable participants, a minority (42%) had a personal cancer history, while 56% had ≥1 first-degree relative with colorectal cancer. Overall, 21.3% were willing to have testing only if paid by insurance, and 78.7% were willing-to-pay. Predictors of willingness-to-pay were: 1) concern for positive result; 2) confidence to control cancer risk; 3) fewer perceived barriers to colorectal cancer screening; 4) benefit of testing to guide screening (all p testing (all p testing, and anticipate benefits to reducing cancer risk. Identifying factors associated with willingness-to-pay for genetic services is increasingly important as testing is integrated into routine cancer care.

  20. [Genetic variants in miRNAs and its association with breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Gómez, Susana; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel; Dolores-Vergara, Maria; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, breast cancer represents the first cause of cancer death in females. At the molecular level, non-coding RNAs and especially microRNAs have played an important role in the origin and development of this neoplasm In the Anglo-Saxon population, diverse genetic variants in microRNA genes and in their targets are associated with the development of this disease. In the Mexican population it is not known if these or other variants exist. Identification of these or new variants in our population is fundamental in order to have a better understanding of cancer development and to help establish a better diagnostic strategy. DNA was isolated from mammary tumors, adjacent tissue and peripheral blood of Mexican females with or without cancer. From DNA, five microRNA genes and three of their targets were amplified and sequenced. Genetic variants associated with breast cancer in an Anglo- Saxon population have been previously identified in these sequences. In the samples studied we identified seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two had not been previously described and were identified only in women with cancer. The new variants may be genetic predisposition factors for the development of breast cancer in our population. Further experiments are needed to determine the involvement of these variants in the development, establishment and progression of breast cancer.

  1. Translating genomics: cancer genetics, public health and the making of the (de)molecularised body in Cuba and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how cancer genetics has emerged as a focus for research and healthcare in Cuba and Brazil. Drawing on ethnographic research undertaken in community genetics clinics and cancer genetics services, the article examines how the knowledge and technologies associated with this novel area of healthcare are translated and put to work by researchers, health professionals, patients and their families in these two contexts. It illuminates the comparative similarities and differences in how cancer genetics is emerging in relation to transnational research priorities, the history and contemporary politics of public health and embodied vulnerability to cancer that reconfigures the scope and meaning of genomics as "personalised" medicine.

  2. Non-genetic health professionals' attitude towards, knowledge of and skills in discussing and ordering genetic testing for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, Kirsten F L; Smets, Ellen M A; Allain, Dawn C

    2016-04-01

    Non-genetic health professionals (NGHPs) have insufficient knowledge of cancer genetics, express educational needs and are unprepared to counsel their patients regarding their genetic test results. So far, it is unclear how NGHPs perceive their own communication skills. This study was undertaken to gain insight in their perceptions, attitudes and knowledge. Two publically accessible databases were used to invite NGHPs providing cancer genetic services to complete a questionnaire. The survey assessed: sociodemographic attributes, experience in ordering hereditary cancer genetic testing, attitude, knowledge, perception of communication skills (e.g. information giving, decision-making) and educational needs. Of all respondents (N = 49, response rate 11%), most have a positive view of their own information giving (mean = 53.91, range 13-65) and decision making skills (64-77% depending on topic). NGHPs feel responsible for enabling disease and treatment related behavior (89-91%). However, 20-30% reported difficulties managing patients' emotions and did not see management of long-term emotions as their responsibility. Correct answers on knowledge questions ranged between 41 and 96%. Higher knowledge was associated with more confidence in NGHPs' own communication skills (r(s) = .33, p = 0.03). Although NGHPs have a positive view of their communication skills, they perceive more difficulties managing emotions. The association between less confidence in communication skills and lower knowledge level suggests awareness of knowledge gaps affects confidence. NGHPs might benefit from education about managing client emotions. Further research using observation of actual counselling consultations is needed to investigate the skills of this specific group of providers.

  3. Identification and replication of the interplay of four genetic high-risk variants for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Ickstadt, Katja; Gerullis, Holger; Otto, Thomas; Roth, Emanuel; Volkert, Frank; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Moormann, Oliver; Banfi, Gergely; Nyirady, Peter; Vermeulen, Sita H; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Johnson, Alison; Karagas, Margaret R; Kogevinas, Manolis; Malats, Nuria; Schwenn, Molly; Silverman, Debra T; Koutros, Stella; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2017-12-07

    Little is known whether genetic variants identified in genome-wide association studies interact to increase bladder cancer risk. Recently, we identified two- and three-variant combinations associated with a particular increase of bladder cancer risk in a urinary bladder cancer case-control series (Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at TU Dortmund (IfADo), 1501 cases, 1565 controls). In an independent case-control series (Nijmegen Bladder Cancer Study, NBCS, 1468 cases, 1720 controls) we confirmed these two- and three-variant combinations. Pooled analysis of the two studies as discovery group (IfADo-NBCS) resulted in sufficient statistical power to test up to four-variant combinations by a logistic regression approach. The New England and Spanish Bladder Cancer Studies (2080 cases and 2167 controls) were used as a replication series. Twelve previously identified risk variants were considered. The strongest four-variant combination was obtained in never smokers. The combination of rs1014971[AA] near apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3A (APOBEC3A) and chromobox homolog 6 (CBX6), solute carrier family 1s4 (urea transporter), member 1 (Kidd blood group) (SLC14A1) exon single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1058396[AG, GG], UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A complex locus (UGT1A) intron SNP rs11892031[AA] and rs8102137[CC, CT] near cyclin E1 (CCNE1) resulted in an unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.59 (95% CI = 1.93-3.47; P = 1.87 × 10-10), while the individual variant ORs ranged only between 1.11 and 1.30. The combination replicated in the New England and Spanish Bladder Cancer Studies (ORunadjusted = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10-2.33; P = 0.013). The four-variant combination is relatively frequent, with 25% in never smoking cases and 11% in never smoking controls (total study group: 19% cases, 14% controls). In conclusion, we show that four high-risk variants can statistically interact to confer

  4. Genetic basis of kidney cancer: Role of genomics for the development of disease-based therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W. Marston

    2012-01-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease; it is made up of a number of different types of cancer, including clear cell, type 1 papillary, type 2 papillary, chromophobe, TFE3, TFEB, and oncocytoma. Sporadic, nonfamilial kidney cancer includes clear cell kidney cancer (75%), type 1 papillary kidney cancer (10%), papillary type 2 kidney cancer (including collecting duct and medullary RCC) (5%), the microphalmia-associated transcription (MiT) family translocation kidney cancers (TFE3, TFEB, and MITF), chromophobe kidney cancer (5%), and oncocytoma (5%). Each has a distinct histology, a different clinical course, responds differently to therapy, and is caused by mutation in a different gene. Genomic studies identifying the genes for kidney cancer, including the VHL, MET, FLCN, fumarate hydratase, succinate dehydrogenase, TSC1, TSC2, and TFE3 genes, have significantly altered the ways in which patients with kidney cancer are managed. While seven FDA-approved agents that target the VHL pathway have been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced kidney cancer, further genomic studies, such as whole genome sequencing, gene expression patterns, and gene copy number, will be required to gain a complete understanding of the genetic basis of kidney cancer and of the kidney cancer gene pathways and, most importantly, to provide the foundation for the development of effective forms of therapy for patients with this disease. PMID:23038766

  5. MP-GeneticSynth: inferring biological network regulations from time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Alberto; Paltrinieri, Daniele; Manca, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    MP-GeneticSynth is a Java tool for discovering the logic and regulation mechanisms responsible for observed biological dynamics in terms of finite difference recurrent equations. The software makes use of: (i) metabolic P systems as a modeling framework, (ii) an evolutionary approach to discover flux regulation functions as linear combinations of given primitive functions, (iii) a suitable reformulation of the least squares method to estimate function parameters considering simultaneously all the reactions involved in complex dynamics. The tool is available as a plugin for the virtual laboratory MetaPlab. It has graphical and interactive interfaces for data preparation, a priori knowledge integration, and flux regulator analysis. Availability and implementation: Source code, binaries, documentation (including quick start guide and videos) and case studies are freely available at http://mplab.sci.univr.it/plugins/mpgs/index.html. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Academic Training: Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 1, 2, 3 and 4 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. de Madrid, Spain In the real world, there exist a huge number of problems that require getting an optimum or near-to-optimum solution. Optimization can be used to solve a lot of different problems such as network design, sets and partitions, storage and retrieval or scheduling. On the other hand, in nature, there exist many processes that seek a stable state. These processes can be seen as natural optimization processes. Over the last 30 years several attempts have been made to develop optimization algorithms, which simulate these natural optimization processes. These attempts have resulted in methods such as Simulated Annealing, based on natural annealing processes or Evolutionary Computation, based on biological evolution processes. Geneti...

  7. Academic Training: Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms - Lecture serie

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 1, 2, 3 and 4 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. de Madrid, Spain In the real world, there exist a huge number of problems that require getting an optimum or near-to-optimum solution. Optimization can be used to solve a lot of different problems such as network design, sets and partitions, storage and retrieval or scheduling. On the other hand, in nature, there exist many processes that seek a stable state. These processes can be seen as natural optimization processes. Over the last 30 years several attempts have been made to develop optimization algorithms, which simulate these natural optimization processes. These attempts have resulted in methods such as Simulated Annealing, based on nat...

  8. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic variation in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and colon and rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are part of the TGF-β-signaling pathway; genetic variation in these genes may be involved in colorectal cancer. In this study we evaluated the association between genetic variation in BMP1 (11 tagSNPs), BMP2 (5 tagSNPs), BMP4 (3 tagSNPs), BMPR1A (9 tagSNPs), BMPR1B (21 tagSNPs), BMPR2 (11 tagSNPs), and GDF10 (7 tagSNPs) with risk of colon and rectal cancer and tumor molecular phenotype. We used data from population-based case-control studies (colon cancer n=1574 cases, 1970 controls; rectal cancer n=791 cases, 999 controls). We observed that genetic variation in BMPR1A, BMPR1B, BMPR2, BMP2, and BMP4 was associated with risk of developing colon cancer, with 20 to 30% increased risk for most high-risk genotypes. A summary of high-risk genotypes showed over a twofold increase in colon cancer risk at the upper risk category (OR 2.49 95% CI 1.95, 3.18). BMPR2, BMPR1B, BMP2, and GDF10 were associated with rectal cancer. BMPR2 rs2228545 was associated with an almost twofold increased risk of rectal cancer. The risk associated with the highest category of the summary score for rectal cancer was 2.97 (95% CI 1.87, 4.72). Genes in the BMP-signaling pathway were consistently associated with CIMP+ status in combination with both KRAS-mutated and MSI tumors. BMP genes interacted statistically significantly with other genes in the TGF-β-signaling pathway, including TGFβ1, TGFβR1, Smad 3, Smad 4, and Smad 7. Our data support a role for genetic variation in BMP-related genes in the etiology of colon and rectal cancer. One possible mechanism is via the TGF-β-signaling pathway. PMID:21387313

  10. Epigenetics and genetics in endometrial cancer: new carcinogenic mechanisms and relationship with clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer worldwide among females. An increased incidence and a younger age of patients are also predicted to occur, and therefore elucidation of the pathological mechanisms is important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, epigenetic mechanisms have been examined. Silencing of genes by DNA hypermethylation, hereditary epimutation of DNA mismatch repair genes and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs may underlie carcinogenesis in endometrial cancer. New therapies include targeting epigenetic changes using histone deacetylase inhibitors. Some cases of endometrial cancer may also be hereditary. Thus, patients with Lynch syndrome which is a hereditary disease, have a higher risk for developing endometrial cancer than the general population. Identification of such disease-related genes may contribute to early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer.

  11. Synchronous Onset of Breast and Pancreatic Cancers: Results of Germline and Somatic Genetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synchronous cancers have occasionally been detected at initial diagnosis among patients with breast and ovarian cancer. However, simultaneous coexistence and diagnosis of breast and pancreas cancer has not previously been reported. Case Report: Paternal transmission of a germline BRCA2 mutation to a patient who was diagnosed at age 40 with locally advanced breast and pancreas cancer is presented. Somatic genomic analysis of both cancers with next-generation DNA sequencing confirmed the germline result and reported a variety of variants of unknown significance alterations, of which two were present in both the breast and pancreas cancers. Discussion: The possibility that genomic alterations could have been responsible for modulating the phenotypic or clinical expression of this rare presentation is considered. The authors call attention to the practice of privatizing the clinicogenetic information gained from genetic testing and call for health policy that will facilitate sharing in order to advance the outcomes of patients diagnosed with hereditary cancers.

  12. Assessing the genetic architecture of epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Dixon, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    studies show that certain genetic variants confer susceptibility to all subtypes while other variants are subtype-specific. Here, we perform an extensive analysis of the genetic architecture of EOC subtypes. To this end, we used data of 10,014 invasive EOC patients and 21,233 controls from the Ovarian...

  13. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and nongenetic risk factors in Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M; Wolff, Roger K; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Giuliano, Anna R; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Slattery, Martha L

    2015-11-01

    Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified SNPs among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele OR: 0.94 (95% confidence intervals, 0.74-1.20), 1.20 (0.94-1.53), and 1.49 (1.28-1.75) for current, former, and never hormone therapy users, respectively, Pinteraction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72-1.42), 1.19 (0.98-1.45), and 1.69 (1.26-2.26) for never, 12 months breastfeeding, respectively, Pinteraction 0.014]. The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and nongenetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Height, selected genetic markers and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2017-01-01

    Background:Evidence on height and prostate cancer risk is mixed, however, recent studies with large data sets support a possible role for its association with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.Methods:We analysed data from the PRACTICAL consortium consisting of 6207 prostate cancer cases...... and 6016 controls and a subset of high grade cases (2480 cases). We explored height, polymorphisms in genes related to growth processes as main effects and their possible interactions.Results:The results suggest that height is associated with high-grade prostate cancer risk. Men with height >180 cm...... are at a 22% increased risk as compared to men with height prostate cancer risk. The aggregate scores of the selected variants identified a significantly increased risk of overall prostate cancer...

  15. Multiclass classification for skin cancer profiling based on the integration of heterogeneous gene expression series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Juan Manuel; Castillo, Daniel; Herrera, Luis Javier; San Román, Belén; Valenzuela, Olga; Ortuño, Francisco Manuel; Rojas, Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    Most of the research studies developed applying microarray technology to the characterization of different pathological states of any disease may fail in reaching statistically significant results. This is largely due to the small repertoire of analysed samples, and to the limitation in the number of states or pathologies usually addressed. Moreover, the influence of potential deviations on the gene expression quantification is usually disregarded. In spite of the continuous changes in omic sciences, reflected for instance in the emergence of new Next-Generation Sequencing-related technologies, the existing availability of a vast amount of gene expression microarray datasets should be properly exploited. Therefore, this work proposes a novel methodological approach involving the integration of several heterogeneous skin cancer series, and a later multiclass classifier design. This approach is thus a way to provide the clinicians with an intelligent diagnosis support tool based on the use of a robust set of selected biomarkers, which simultaneously distinguishes among different cancer-related skin states. To achieve this, a multi-platform combination of microarray datasets from Affymetrix and Illumina manufacturers was carried out. This integration is expected to strengthen the statistical robustness of the study as well as the finding of highly-reliable skin cancer biomarkers. Specifically, the designed operation pipeline has allowed the identification of a small subset of 17 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from which to distinguish among 7 involved skin states. These genes were obtained from the assessment of a number of potential batch effects on the gene expression data. The biological interpretation of these genes was inspected in the specific literature to understand their underlying information in relation to skin cancer. Finally, in order to assess their possible effectiveness in cancer diagnosis, a cross-validation Support Vector Machines (SVM

  16. Genetic variation in genes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campa, Daniele; McKay, James; Sinilnikova, Olga

    2009-01-01

    and FASN) is related to breast cancer risk and body-mass index (BMI) by studying 1,294 breast cancer cases and 2,452 controls from the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC). We resequenced the FAS gene and combined information of SNPs found by resequencing and SNPs from public databases....... Using a tagging approach and selecting 20 SNPs, we covered all the common genetic variation of these genes. In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between the SNPs in the FAS, ChREBP and SREPB-1 genes and an increased risk of breast cancer overall...

  17. Use of Whole Genome Sequencing for Diagnosis and Discovery in the Cancer Genetics Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B. Foley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential of whole-genome sequencing (WGS to improve patient diagnosis and care, the empirical value of WGS in the cancer genetics clinic is unknown. We performed WGS on members of two cohorts of cancer genetics patients: those with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 176 and those without (n = 82. Initial analysis of potentially pathogenic variants (PPVs, defined as nonsynonymous variants with allele frequency < 1% in ESP6500 in 163 clinically-relevant genes suggested that WGS will provide useful clinical results. This is despite the fact that a majority of PPVs were novel missense variants likely to be classified as variants of unknown significance (VUS. Furthermore, previously reported pathogenic missense variants did not always associate with their predicted diseases in our patients. This suggests that the clinical use of WGS will require large-scale efforts to consolidate WGS and patient data to improve accuracy of interpretation of rare variants. While loss-of-function (LoF variants represented only a small fraction of PPVs, WGS identified additional cancer risk LoF PPVs in patients with known BRCA1/2 mutations and led to cancer risk diagnoses in 21% of non-BRCA cancer genetics patients after expanding our analysis to 3209 ClinVar genes. These data illustrate how WGS can be used to improve our ability to discover patients' cancer genetic risks.

  18. CRISPR-Cas9: a promising genetic engineering approach in cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Son, Young-Jin; Uddin, Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab; Yusuf, Md. Abdullah; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Banu, Laila Anjuman

    2018-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea possess adaptive immunity against foreign genetic materials through clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) systems. The discovery of this intriguing bacterial system heralded a revolutionary change in the field of medical science. The CRISPR and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) based molecular mechanism has been applied to genome editing. This CRISPR-Cas9 technique is now able to mediate precise genetic corrections or disruptions in in vitro and in vivo environments. The accuracy and versatility of CRISPR-Cas have been capitalized upon in biological and medical research and bring new hope to cancer research. Cancer involves complex alterations and multiple mutations, translocations and chromosomal losses and gains. The ability to identify and correct such mutations is an important goal in cancer treatment. In the context of this complex cancer genomic landscape, there is a need for a simple and flexible genetic tool that can easily identify functional cancer driver genes within a comparatively short time. The CRISPR-Cas system shows promising potential for modeling, repairing and correcting genetic events in different types of cancer. This article reviews the concept of CRISPR-Cas, its application and related advantages in oncology. PMID:29434679

  19. [Assisted Reproduction and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis in Patients Susceptible to Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselá, K; Kocur, T; Horák, J; Horňák, M; Oráčová, E; Hromadová, L; Veselý, J; Trávník, P

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproduction, as well as pregnancy itself, in patients with breast cancer or other hereditary type of cancer, is a widely discussed topic. In the past, patients treated for breast cancer were rarely involved in the discussion about reproductive possibilities or infertility treatment. However, current knowledge suggests, that breast cancer is neither a contraindication to pregnancy, nor to assisted reproduction techniques. On the contrary, assisted reproduction and preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods might prevent the transmission of genetic risks to the fetus. In this review we summarize data concerning pregnancy risks in patients with increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, we introduce current possibilities and approaches to fertility preservation prior to assisted reproduction treatment as well as novel methods improving the safety of fertility treatment. In the second part of this review, we focus on karyomapping--an advanced molecular genetic tool for elimination of germinal mutations in patients with predisposition to cancer. Moreover, the rapid development of preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods contributes to detection of both chromosomal aneuploidy and causal mutations in a relatively short time-span.

  20. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa in the Middle East: clinical and genetic studies in a series of consanguineous families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Aoi; Lestringant, Gilles G; Paperna, Tamar; Bergman, Reuven; Gershoni, Ruth; Frossard, Philippe; Kanaan, Moien; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Richard, Gabriele; Pfendner, Ellen; Uitto, Jouni; Pulkkinen, Leena; Sprecher, Eli

    2002-04-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a group of inherited blistering diseases characterized by epidermal-dermal separation resulting from mutations that affect the function of critical components of the basement membrane zone. This group of autosomal recessive diseases is especially prevalent in regions where consanguinity is common, such as the Middle East. However, the clinical and genetic epidemiology of JEB in this region remains largely unexplored. The aim of the present study was to assess a series of consanguineous JEB families originating from the Middle East. We identified 7 families referred to us between 1998 and 1999 and originating from the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Yemen, and Israel. Histologic, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy studies were performed to direct the subsequent molecular analysis. DNA obtained from all family members was amplified by means of polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis with subsequent direct sequencing. In 6 families presenting with the clinical and histologic features distinctive for JEB, mutations in genes encoding 1 of the 3 subunit polypeptides of laminin-5 were identified. Two families each had mutations in LAMB3, 2 in LAMA3, and 2 in LAMC2. Out of 7 distinct mutations, 5 were novel and 2 were recurrent. No relationship was found between the presence of nonsense/frameshift mutations in laminin-5 genes and perinatal mortality, contradicting a major genotype-phenotype correlation previously reported in the European and US literature. Similarly, none of the recurrent LAMB3 hot spot mutations previously described in other populations was found in our series. Finally, in a family with the clinical diagnosis of generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa, a homozygous non-sense mutation in Col17A1 gene (encoding the BPAG2 antigen) was identified. The present report suggests (1) the existence of a unique spectrum of mutations in the Middle East

  1. Ethnic Background and Genetic Variation in the Evaluation of Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort’s ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be studied and

  2. Ethnic background and genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort's ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be studied and employed.

  3. Factors influencing and modifying the decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Alexander L; Jaju, Prajakta D; Li, Shufeng; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2017-05-01

    Across cancers, the decision to pursue genetic testing is influenced more by subjective than objective factors. However, skin cancer, which is more prevalent, visual, and multifactorial than many other malignancies, may offer different motivations for pursuing such testing. The primary objective was to determine factors influencing the decision to receive genetic testing for skin cancer risk. A secondary objective was to assess the impact of priming with health questions on the decision to receive testing. We distributed anonymous online surveys through ResearchMatch.org to assess participant health, demographics, motivations, and interest in pursuing genetic testing for skin cancer risk. Two surveys with identical questions but different question ordering were used to assess the secondary objective. We received 3783 responses (64% response rate), and 85.8% desired testing. Subjective factors, including curiosity, perceptions of skin cancer, and anxiety, were the most statistically significant determinants of the decision to pursue testing (P < .001), followed by history of sun exposure (odds ratio 1.85, P < .01) and history of skin cancer (odds ratio 0.5, P = .01). Age and family history of skin cancer did not influence this decision. Participants increasingly chose testing if first queried about health behaviors (P < .0001). The decision to pursue hypothetical testing may differ from in-clinic decision-making. Self-selected, online participants may differ from the general population. Surveys may be subject to response bias. The decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer is primarily determined by subjective factors, such as anxiety and curiosity. Health factors, including skin cancer history, also influenced decision-making. Priming with consideration of objective health factors can increase the desire to pursue testing. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethnic background and genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Jing

    Full Text Available The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort's ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be

  5. The influence of acculturation and breast cancer-specific distress on perceived barriers to genetic testing for breast cancer among women of African descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussner, Katarina M; Thompson, Hayley S; Jandorf, Lina; Edwards, Tiffany A; Forman, Andrea; Brown, Karen; Kapil-Pair, Nidhi; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Schwartz, Marc D; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B

    2009-09-01

    Rising health disparities are increasingly evident in relation to use of genetic services (including genetic counseling and testing) for breast cancer risk, with women of African descent less likely to use genetic services compared with Whites. Meanwhile, little is known regarding potential within-group acculturation and psychological differences underlying perceived barriers to genetic testing among women of African descent. Hypothesized contributions of acculturation factors and breast cancer-specific distress to perceived barriers to genetic testing were examined with a statistical analysis of baseline data from 146 women of African descent (56% US born and 44% foreign born) meeting genetic breast cancer risk criteria and participating in a larger longitudinal study that included the opportunity for free genetic counseling and testing. Perceived barriers assessed included: (1) anticipation of negative emotional reactions, (2) stigma, (3) confidentiality concerns, (4) family-related worry, and (5) family-related guilt associated with genetic testing. In multivariate analyses, being foreign born was a significant predictor of anticipated negative emotional reactions about genetic testing (beta=0.26; SE=0.11; p=0.01). Breast cancer-specific distress scores (avoidance symptoms) were positively related to anticipated negative emotional reactions (beta=0.02; SE=0.005; p=barriers to genetic testing among women of African descent. The potential utility of culturally tailored genetic counseling services taking into account such influences and addressing emotional and psychological concerns of women considering genetic testing for breast cancer should be investigated.

  6. Genetics and Genomics: Discovery, Validation, and Utility of Novel Tools for management of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Shindel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomics is the science of how genes influence human health and disease states. It differs from traditional genetic screening in that the transcriptional activity (or other markers in full panels of related genes are studied. Compared to simple genetic testing, assessment of expression levels in a panel of genes provides a more nuanced and holistic understanding of genetic modulation of human disease. Genomic testing may be used to great effect in resolving controversial questions on detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Genomic tests are currently in use for numerous facets of prostate cancer care, including screening, biopsy, and treatment planning. The clinical validity (predictive capacity of these assays has been well established; studies on clinical utility (i.e. usefulness of these tests in guiding patient/provider decisions have shown promising results. Men’s health specialists should be familiar with the role genomic testing will play in contemporary management of prostate cancer.

  7. The Genetics and Molecular Alterations of Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, R.F. de

    2015-01-01

    The prospect that pancreatic cancer will be the second most common cause of cancer death by 2030 is worrisome. Considering that the approximate 6% overall 5-year survival has not merely changed in the past decades illustrates the need to revert the bleak prognosis. Centralization of surgery

  8. Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer (PAHC) questionnaire: development and testing of a screening questionnaire for use in clinical cancer genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijzenga, W.; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Hahn, D.E.E.; Kluijt, I.; Sidharta, G.N.; Gundy, C.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Up to three-quarters of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling and testing report psychosocial problems specifically related to that setting. The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate the screening properties of a questionnaire designed to assess specific

  9. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result of discu......The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result...... of discussions within the ICGC on how to address the challenge of identifying mutations that contribute to oncogenesis, tumor maintenance or response to therapy, and recommend computational techniques to annotate somatic variants and predict their impact on cancer phenotype....

  10. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on common genetic variants in women of East Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wanqing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Guo, Xingyi; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Brennan, Paul; Chen, Shou-Tung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Ito, Hidemi; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Teo, Soo H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wu, Anna H; Yip, Cheng Har; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Kang, Daehee; Xiang, Yongbing; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-08

    Approximately 100 common breast cancer susceptibility alleles have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The utility of these variants in breast cancer risk prediction models has not been evaluated adequately in women of Asian ancestry. We evaluated 88 breast cancer risk variants that were identified previously by GWAS in 11,760 cases and 11,612 controls of Asian ancestry. SNPs confirmed to be associated with breast cancer risk in Asian women were used to construct a polygenic risk score (PRS). The relative and absolute risks of breast cancer by the PRS percentiles were estimated based on the PRS distribution, and were used to stratify women into different levels of breast cancer risk. We confirmed significant associations with breast cancer risk for SNPs in 44 of the 78 previously reported loci at P women in the middle quintile of the PRS, women in the top 1% group had a 2.70-fold elevated risk of breast cancer (95% CI: 2.15-3.40). The risk prediction model with the PRS had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.606. The lifetime risk of breast cancer for Shanghai Chinese women in the lowest and highest 1% of the PRS was 1.35% and 10.06%, respectively. Approximately one-half of GWAS-identified breast cancer risk variants can be directly replicated in East Asian women. Collectively, common genetic variants are important predictors for breast cancer risk. Using common genetic variants for breast cancer could help identify women at high risk of breast cancer.

  11. About Genetic Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clinical care in many areas of medicine. Assisted Reproductive Technology/Infertility Genetics Cancer Genetics Cardiovascular Genetics Cystic Fibrosis Genetics Fetal Intervention and Therapy Genetics Hematology Genetics Metabolic Genetics ...

  12. Update on Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Morphological, Molecular, and Genetic Features of the Most Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Ragazzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is the most aggressive form of thyroid cancer. It shows a wide spectrum of morphological presentations and the diagnosis could be challenging due to its high degree of dedifferentiation. Molecular and genetic features of ATC are widely heterogeneous as well and many efforts have been made to find a common profile in order to clarify its cancerogenetic process. A comprehensive review of the current literature is here performed, focusing on histopathological and genetic features.

  13. Alternate service delivery models in cancer genetic counseling: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hudson Buchanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state of science regarding service delivery models such as telephone counseling, telegenetics and group counseling. Research on comparative effectiveness of these models in traditional individual, in-person genetic counseling has been promising for improving access to care in a manner acceptable to patients. Yet, it has not fully evaluated the short- and long-term patient- and system-level outcomes that will help answer the question of whether these models achieve the same beneficial psychosocial and behavioral outcomes as traditional cancer genetic counseling. We propose a research agenda focused on comparative effectiveness of available service delivery models and how to match models to patients and practice settings. Only through this rigorous research can clinicians and systems find the optimal balance of clinical quality, ready and secure access to care, and financial sustainability. Such research will be integral to achieving the promise of genomic medicine in oncology.

  14. Strategies for Integrated Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Gene Expression Variation in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Louise B; Andersen, Lars; Makalic, Enes

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis...... to integration strategies used for analyzing genetic risk factors for cancer. We critically examine the ability of these strategies to handle the complexity of the human genome and also accommodate information about the biological and functional interactions between the elements that have been measured...

  15. Strategies for Integrated Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Gene Expression Variation in Cancer: Addressing the Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Louise Bruun; Andersen, Lars; Makalic, Enes

    2016-01-01

    to integration strategies used for analyzing genetic risk factors for cancer. We critically examine the ability of these strategies to handle the complexity of the human genome and also accommodate information about the biological and functional interactions between the elements that have been measured......The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis...

  16. Fanconi anaemia: genetics, molecular biology, and cancer – implications for clinical management in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M; Chandler, K; Tischkowitz, M; Meyer, S

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disease with congenital and developmental abnormalities, cross-linker hypersensitivity and extreme cancer predisposition. With better understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of the disease, and improved clinical management, FA has been transformed from a life-limiting paediatric disease to an uncommon chronic condition that needs lifelong multidisciplinary management, and a paradigm condition for the understanding of the gene-environment interaction in the aetiology of congenital anomalies, haematopoiesis and cancer development. Here we review genetic, molecular and clinical aspects of FA, and discuss current controversies and future prospects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis: Genetic regulation of human breast carcinoma metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Danny R; Steeg, Patricia S; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W

    2000-01-01

    The present is an overview of recent data that describes the genetic underpinnings of the suppression of cancer metastasis. Despite the explosion of new information about the genetics of cancer, only six human genes have thus far been shown to suppress metastasis functionally. Not all have been shown to be functional in breast carcinoma. Several additional genes inhibit various steps of the metastatic cascade, but do not necessarily block metastasis when tested using in vivo assays. The implications of this are discussed. Two recently discovered metastasis suppressor genes block proliferation of tumor cells at a secondary site, offering a new target for therapeutic intervention

  18. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  19. Enzymes for N-Glycan Branching and Their Genetic and Nongenetic Regulation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Kizuka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available N-glycan, a fundamental and versatile protein modification in mammals, plays critical roles in various physiological and pathological events including cancer progression. The formation of N-glycan branches catalyzed by specific N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases [GnT-III, GnT-IVs, GnT-V, GnT-IX (Vb] and a fucosyltransferase, Fut8, provides functionally diverse N-glycosylated proteins. Aberrations of these branches are often found in cancer cells and are profoundly involved in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we focus on the GlcNAc and fucose branches of N-glycans and describe how their expression is dysregulated in cancer by genetic and nongenetic mechanisms including epigenetics and nucleotide sugar metabolisms. We also survey the roles that these N-glycans play in cancer progression and therapeutics. Finally, we discuss possible applications of our knowledge on basic glycobiology to the development of medicine and biomarkers for cancer therapy.

  20. Subjective versus objective risk in genetic counseling for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperduti Isabella

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the fact that genetic counseling in oncology provides information regarding objective risks, it can be found a contrast between the subjective and objective risk. The aims of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of the perceived risk compared to the objective risk estimated by the BRCApro computer model and to evaluate any associations between medical, demographic and psychological variables and the accuracy of risk perception. Methods 130 subjects were given medical-demographic file, Cancer and Genetic Risk Perception, Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale. It was also computed an objective evaluation of the risk by the BRCApro model. Results The subjective risk was significantly higher than objective risk. The risk of tumour was overestimated by 56%, and the genetic risk by 67%. The subjects with less cancer affected relatives significantly overestimated their risk of being mutation carriers and made a more innacurate estimation than high risk subjects. Conclusion The description of this sample shows: general overestimation of the risk, inaccurate perception compared to BRCApro calculation and a more accurate estimation in those subjects with more cancer affected relatives (high risk subjects. No correlation was found between the levels of perception of risk and anxiety and depression. Based on our findings, it is worth pursuing improved communication strategies about the actual cancer and genetic risk, especially for subjects at "intermediate and slightly increased risk" of developing an hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer or of being mutation carrier.

  1. A deficiency in chromatin repair, genetic instability, and predisposition to cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, K.K.; Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.R.; Tarone, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This review traces steps leading to malignant neoplastic transformation of rodent and human cells in culture and in vivo. Emphasis is placed on an abnormal response characterized by persistent chromatid damage following irradiation of cells in culture with X-rays or fluorescent light during G2 phase of the cell cycle. Evidence is presented that deficient or unbalanced DNA repair during G2 accounts for the abnormal response. This G2 repair deficiency can be inherited or acquired by normal tissue cells during the process of or following attainment of infinite lifespan. It appears as an early, possibly initiating step in neoplastic transformation. It characterizes all human tumor cells examined irrespective of histopathology or tissue of origin. It has a genetic basis. In an animal model, the BALB/c mouse, this phenotype is associated with genes on chromosomes 1 and 4. It characterizes skin fibroblasts and blood lymphocytes from individuals with genetic or familial conditions predisposing to cancer and can be used to identify clinically normal family members carrying a gene(s) for any one of the three cancer-prone genetic disorders studied to date. Furthermore, it can provide the basis of a test for carriers of genes predisposing to a high risk of cancer. We conclude that the G2 repair deficiency, whether inherited or acquired, is a prerequisite for cancer development and that it accounts for the genetic instability of the cancer cell. 167 refs

  2. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  3. Multi-disciplinary summit on genetics services for women with gynecologic cancers: A Society of Gynecologic Oncology White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Leslie M; Pothuri, Bhavana; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Diaz, John P; Buchanan, Adam; Witkop, Catherine T; Bethan Powell, C; Smith, Ellen Blair; Robson, Mark E; Boyd, Jeff; Coleman, Robert L; Lu, Karen

    2017-08-01

    To assess current practice, advise minimum standards, and identify educational gaps relevant to genetic screening, counseling, and testing of women affected by gynecologic cancers. The Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) organized a multidisciplinary summit that included representatives from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the American Society Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), and patient advocacy groups, BrightPink and Facing our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE). Three subject areas were discussed: care delivery models for genetic testing, barriers to genetic testing, and educational opportunities for providers of genetic testing. The group endorsed current SGO, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), and NSGC genetic testing guidelines for women affected with ovarian, tubal, peritoneal cancers, or DNA mismatch repair deficient endometrial cancer. Three main areas of unmet need were identified: timely and universal genetic testing for women with ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancers; education regarding minimum standards for genetic counseling and testing; and barriers to implementation of testing of both affected individuals as well as cascade testing of family members. Consensus building among all stakeholders resulted in an action plan to address gaps in education of gynecologic oncology providers and delivery of cancer genetics care. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Barriers and Facilitators for Utilization of Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment Services in Young Female Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age are more likely to carry a cancer predisposing genetic mutation. Per the current NCCN recommendations, women diagnosed under age 50 should be referred to cancer genetic counseling for further risk evaluation. This study seeks to assess patient-reported barriers and facilitators to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among a community-based population of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS. Methods. Through the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, a state-based cancer registry, 488 women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 in 2006-2007 were identified. They received a mail survey regarding family history and facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment. Results. Responses were received from 289 women (59.2%. One hundred twenty-two (42.2% reported having received cancer genetic counseling. The most frequent reason identified for receiving services was to benefit their family's future. The top reasons for not attending were “no one recommended it” and “medical insurance coverage issues.” Discussion. This study is the first published report using a state cancer registry to determine facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among YBCS. These findings demonstrate the need for additional awareness and education about appropriate indications for genetic services.

  5. Barriers and Facilitators for Utilization of Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment Services in Young Female Breast Cancer Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.; McLosky, J.; Wasilevich, E.; Callo, S. L.; Duquette, D.; Copeland, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age are more likely to carry a cancer predisposing genetic mutation. Per the current NCCN recommendations, women diagnosed under age 50 should be referred to cancer genetic counseling for further risk evaluation. This study seeks to assess patient-reported barriers and facilitators to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among a community-based population of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS). Methods. Through the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, a state-based cancer registry, 488 women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 in 2006-2007 were identified. They received a mail survey regarding family history and facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment. Results. Responses were received from 289 women (59.2%). One hundred twenty-two (42.2%) reported having received cancer genetic counseling. The most frequent reason identified for receiving services was to benefit their family's future. The top reasons for not attending were “no one recommended it” and “medical insurance coverage issues.” Discussion. This study is the first published report using a state cancer registry to determine facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among YBCS. These findings demonstrate the need for additional awareness and education about appropriate indications for genetic services.

  6. Genetic structure of Mexican Mestizo women with breast cancer based on three STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Rivera-Prieto, Roxana A; Ortíz-Lopez, Rocio; Rivas, Fernando; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this population genetics study was to compare the genetic structure of Mexican women with breast cancer (BrCa) with previously reported data of four random populations (Nuevo León, Hispanics, Chihuahua, and Central Region of Mexico). A sample of 115 unrelated women with BrCa and whose four grandparents were born in five zones of Mexico were interviewed at a reference hospital in Northeastern Mexico. Noncodifying STRs D7S820, D13S317, and D16S39 were analyzed; genotype distribution was in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations for all three markers. Similar allele frequencies among four random populations and this selected population were found. According with this and previous studies using molecular and nonmolecular nuclear DNA markers not associated with any disease, Mexican Mestizo population is genetically homogeneous and therefore, genetic causes of BrCa are less heterogeneous, simplifying genetic epidemiologic studies.

  7. Colorectal cancer: genetic abnormalities, tumor progression, tumor heterogeneity, clonal evolution and tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Ugo; Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana

    2018-04-13

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Most colorectal cancer occurrences are sporadic, not related to genetic predisposition or family history; however, 20-30% of patients with colorectal cancer have a family history of colorectal cancer and 5% of these tumors arise in the setting of a Mendelian inheritance syndrome. In many patients, the development of a colorectal cancer is preceded by a benign neoplastic lesion: either an adenomatous polyp or a serrated polyp. Studies carried out in the last years have characterized the main molecular alterations occurring in colorectal cancers, showing that the tumor of each patient displays from two to eight driver mutations. The ensemble of molecular studies, including gene expression studies, has led to two proposed classifications of colorectal cancers, with the identification of four/five non-overlapping groups. The homeostasis of the rapidly renewing intestinal epithelium is ensured by few stem cells present at the level of the base of intestinal crypts. Various experimental evidence suggests that colorectal cancers may derive from the malignant transformation of intestinal stem cells or of intestinal cells that acquire stem cell properties following malignant transformation. Colon cancer stem cells seem to be involved in tumor chemoresistance, radioresistance and relapse.

  8. Association between N142D genetic polymorphism of GSTO2 and susceptibility to colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Mohammad; Saadat, Iraj; Omidvari, Shahpour; Saadat, Mostafa

    2011-10-01

    Expression pattern analysis has been revealed that glutathione S-transferase omega 2 (GSTO2, a member of class omega) is ubiquitously expressed. Over expression of GSTO2 induced apoptosis. The gene encoding GSTO2 was localized to human chromosome 10q24.3, a region that may harbor gene(s) involved in the developing of colorectal cancer. To investigate the association between GSTO2 N142D genetic polymorphism and susceptibility to colorectal cancer the present study was done. We studied 63 (26 females, 37 males) colorectal cancer patients and 126 (52 females, 74 males) healthy individuals. The control subjects were frequency matched for age and gender with the colorectal cancer group. The genotypes were performed using RFLP-PCR method. The ND and DD genotypes were not associated with risk of colorectal cancer, in comparison with the NN genotype. Family history for cancer in the first degree of relatives significantly differed between cases and controls (P = 0.012). The profiles of GSTO2 genotypes and family history in control and cancerous groups were compared to each other. Subjects with NN genotype and positive family history significantly were at high risk to develop colorectal cancer in comparison with subjects with DD or ND genotypes and negative family history (P = 0.003). Present findings indicating that GSTO2 NN genotype increase the risk of colorectal cancer in persons with positive family history for cancer in the first degree relatives.

  9. Genetically engineered dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2001), s. 475-478 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cell s * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.330, year: 2001

  10. GENETICS OF BREAST CANCER AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Geršak

    2008-12-01

    The findings of pharmacogenomic studies about polymorphisms in oestrogen synthesizingand metabolizing genes could have an important clinical value: before prescribing HRT,we would offer women genetic counselling and define their genotype. Thus, we would beable to organize an individualized postmenopausal period for each woman accordingly

  11. Increasing Power by Sharing Information from Genetic Background and Treatment in Clustering of Gene Expression Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sura Zaki Alrashid

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clustering of gene expression time series gives insight into which genes may be co-regulated, allowing us to discern the activity of pathways in a given microarray experiment. Of particular interest is how a given group of genes varies with different conditions or genetic background. This paper develops
a new clustering method that allows each cluster to be parameterised according to whether the behaviour of the genes across conditions is correlated or anti-correlated. By specifying correlation between such genes,more information is gain within the cluster about how the genes interrelate. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an irreversible neurodegenerative disorder that kills the motor neurons and results in death within 2 to 3 years from the symptom onset. Speed of progression for different patients are heterogeneous with significant variability. The SOD1G93A transgenic mice from different backgrounds (129Sv and C57 showed consistent phenotypic differences for disease progression. A hierarchy of Gaussian isused processes to model condition-specific and gene-specific temporal co-variances. This study demonstrated about finding some significant gene expression profiles and clusters of associated or co-regulated gene expressions together from four groups of data (SOD1G93A and Ntg from 129Sv and C57 backgrounds. Our study shows the effectiveness of sharing information between replicates and different model conditions when modelling gene expression time series. Further gene enrichment score analysis and ontology pathway analysis of some specified clusters for a particular group may lead toward identifying features underlying the differential speed of disease progression.

  12. Genetic determinants of psychic resilience after a diagnosis of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette; Drago, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Comorbidity between cancer and psychiatric disorders including adjustment disorder, depressive disorders or angst can seriously influence the prognosis and the quality of life of patients. The identification of the psychological and biological profile of patients at risk for such comorbidity is n...... on the investigation of the Gene X Environment and the epigenetic control over the activation of the HPA axis is proposed as a tool to refine the definition of the biologic profile at risk for comorbidity between psychiatry and cancer....... is not yet available. Classical candidate genes such as the BDNF, the 5-HTLPR and genes whose products are involved in inflammatory events have received some attention, but results are inconclusive.the present review the association between cancer and psychiatric disorders is reviewed, a focus...

  13. Inflammatory Dietary Pattern, IL-17F Genetic Variant, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Ae; Lee, Jeonghee; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Shin, Aesun; Kim, Jeongseon

    2018-06-05

    A proinflammatory diet may increase the risk of colorectal cancer, but its role may differ according to individuals' genetic variants. We aimed to examine whether a specific dietary pattern reflecting inflammation was associated with a risk of colorectal cancer and whether IL-17F genetic variant altered this association. In a study of 695 colorectal cancer cases and 1846 controls, we derived a reduced rank regression dietary pattern using 32 food groups as predictors and the plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration as the response. High CRP levels were associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer (OR (95% CI) = 3.58 (2.65⁻4.82) for the highest quartile vs. lowest quartile). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, high pattern scores were associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer (OR (95% CI) = 9.98 (6.81⁻14.62) for the highest quartile vs. lowest quartile). When stratified by the IL-17F rs763780 genotype, this association was stronger for individuals carrying the C allele ( p for interaction = 0.034), particularly for individuals with rectal cancer ( p for interaction = 0.011). In conclusion, a dietary pattern reflecting inflammation was significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Moreover, this association could be modified according to the IL-17F rs763780 genotype and anatomic site.

  14. Genetic Variants in the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway as Indicators of Bladder Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzynski, Jeanne A; Hildebrandt, Michelle A; Kamat, Ashish M; Lin, Jie; Ye, Yuanqing; Dinney, Colin P N; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-12-01

    Genetic factors that influence bladder cancer risk remain largely unknown. Previous research has suggested that there is a strong genetic component underlying the risk of bladder cancer. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a key modulator of cellular proliferation through its regulation of stem cell homeostasis. Furthermore, variants in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway have been implicated in the development of other cancers, leading us to believe that this pathway may have a vital role in bladder cancer development. A total of 230 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 40 genes in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were genotyped in 803 bladder cancer cases and 803 healthy controls. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms were nominally significant for risk. Individuals with 2 variants of LRP6: rs10743980 were associated with a decreased risk of bladder cancer in the recessive model in the initial analysis (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58-0.99, p=0.039). This was validated using the bladder genome-wide association study chip (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27-1.00, p=0.049 and for combined analysis p=0.007). Together these findings implicate variants in the Wnt/β-catenin stem cell pathway as having a role in bladder cancer etiology. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic variation in 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase and colon cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl L Thompson

    Full Text Available 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH is a metabolic antagonist of COX-2, catalyzing the degradation of inflammation mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and other prostanoids. Recent studies have established the 15-PGDH gene as a colon cancer suppressor.We evaluated 15-PDGH as a colon cancer susceptibility locus in a three-stage design. We first genotyped 102 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 15-PGDH gene, spanning ∼50 kb up and down-stream of the coding region, in 464 colon cancer cases and 393 population controls. We then genotyped the same SNPs, and also assayed the expression levels of 15-PGDH in colon tissues from 69 independent patients for whom colon tissue and paired germline DNA samples were available. In the final stage 3, we genotyped the 9 most promising SNPs from stages 1 and 2 in an independent sample of 525 cases and 816 controls (stage 3.In the first two stages, three SNPs (rs1365611, rs6844282 and rs2332897 were statistically significant (p<0.05 in combined analysis of association with risk of colon cancer and of association with 15-PGDH expression, after adjustment for multiple testing. For one additional SNP, rs2555639, the T allele showed increased cancer risk and decreased 15-PGDH expression, but just missed statistical significance (p-adjusted = 0.063. In stage 3, rs2555639 alone showed evidence of association with an odds ratio (TT compared to CC of 1.50 (95% CI = 1.05-2.15, p = 0.026.Our data suggest that the rs2555639 T allele is associated with increased risk of colon cancer, and that carriers of this risk allele exhibit decreased expression of 15-PGDH in the colon.

  16. Genetic Predictors of Response to Systemic Therapy in Esophagogastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjigian, Yelena Y; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Jonsson, Philip; Chatila, Walid K; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Ku, Geoffrey Y; Riches, Jamie C; Tuvy, Yaelle; Kundra, Ritika; Bouvier, Nancy; Vakiani, Efsevia; Gao, Jianjiong; Heins, Zachary J; Gross, Benjamin E; Kelsen, David P; Zhang, Liying; Strong, Vivian E; Schattner, Mark; Gerdes, Hans; Coit, Daniel G; Bains, Manjit; Stadler, Zsofia K; Rusch, Valerie W; Jones, David R; Molena, Daniela; Shia, Jinru; Robson, Mark E; Capanu, Marinela; Middha, Sumit; Zehir, Ahmet; Hyman, David M; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Ladanyi, Marc; Rosen, Neal; Ilson, David H; Berger, Michael F; Tang, Laura; Taylor, Barry S; Solit, David B; Schultz, Nikolaus

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of esophagogastric cancer is rapidly rising, but only a minority of patients derive durable benefit from current therapies. Chemotherapy as well as anti-HER2 and PD-1 antibodies are standard treatments. To identify predictive biomarkers of drug sensitivity and mechanisms of resistance, we implemented prospective tumor sequencing of patients with metastatic esophagogastric cancer. There was no association between homologous recombination deficiency defects and response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with microsatellite instability-high tumors were intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy but more likely to achieve durable responses to immunotherapy. The single Epstein-Barr virus-positive patient achieved a durable, complete response to immunotherapy. The level of ERBB2 amplification as determined by sequencing was predictive of trastuzumab benefit. Selection for a tumor subclone lacking ERBB2 amplification, deletion of ERBB2 exon 16, and comutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase, RAS, and PI3K pathways were associated with intrinsic and/or acquired trastuzumab resistance. Prospective genomic profiling can identify patients most likely to derive durable benefit to immunotherapy and trastuzumab and guide strategies to overcome drug resistance. Significance: Clinical application of multiplex sequencing can identify biomarkers of treatment response to contemporary systemic therapies in metastatic esophagogastric cancer. This large prospective analysis sheds light on the biological complexity and the dynamic nature of therapeutic resistance in metastatic esophagogastric cancers. Cancer Discov; 8(1); 49-58. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Sundar and Tan, p. 14 See related article by Pectasides et al., p. 37 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: successful systematic implementation of a group approach to genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Patrick R; Di Maria, Marina; Dorling, Leila; Jouinot, Anne; Poli, Antoine; Villebasse, Sophie; Le Mentec, Marine; Claret, Béatrice; Boinon, Diane; Caron, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The increase in referrals to cancer genetics clinics, partially associated with the "Angelina Jolie effect", presents a challenge to existing services, many are already running at full capacity. More efficient ways to deliver genetic counselling are therefore urgently needed. We now systematically offer group instead of standard individual counselling to patients with suspected Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Group sessions last 30 min. The first twenty consist of a presentation by the genetic counsellor, the next ten of a discussion involving a cancer geneticist and a psychologist. A short individual consultation ensues, where personal and family issues are addressed and consent obtained. Blood is drawn afterwards. Satisfaction and knowledge are evaluated. We report data for the Oct-2014-Aug-2015 period. 210 patients attended group counselling, up to eight simultaneously. We always fitted them within a 4-h time frame. Mean satisfaction score was 41/43. Knowledge scores increased from 3.1/6 to 4.9/6 post-counselling (p value group counselling, we have withstood increases in referrals without compromising care. The "Angelina Jolie effect" and rapid developments in personalized medicine threaten to overwhelm cancer genetics clinics. In this context, our innovative approach should ensure that all patients have access to approved services.

  18. What factors impact upon a woman’s decision to undertake genetic cancer testing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Anne Quinlivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The advent of human genome project has lead to genetic tests that identify high-risk states for certain cancers. Many are privately marketed on the Internet. Despite the availability of tests, limited data has evaluated factors that lead to test uptake. The aim of the present study was to explore the attitudes of a cohort of new mothers towards uptake of a genetic cancer test with a 50% predictive value of cancer.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken. The project targeted women who had recently given birth at an Australian tertiary referral hospital. Women were asked about a theoretical blood test that detected an increased risk for the development of cancer. Attitudes and knowledge questionnaires were completed. Results: Of 232 consecutive women approached, 32 declined, giving a response rate of 86.2%. Only 63 (31.5% women stated they would have the test. Absence of religious belief, higher level of education, better knowledge of terms used in genetics, an absence of concern over emotional, employment and insurance discrimination and previous acceptance of Down syndrome screening in pregnancy were each associated with significantly higher rate of test uptake in univariate analysis (all pConclusion: Concern over discrimination and having made a prior decision to have genetic testing were the principal factors associated with decision-making.

  19. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  20. Mobile Phone Technology to Increase Genetic Counseling for Women with Ovarian Cancer and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Development- Graphic Designer Milestone: Creation of usual care brochure , logo, and other graphics for ll/2014 50 intervention. Subtask 4d...Participants will be randomized using a list created by the statistician. All women will receive a pamphlet on hereditary cancer risk and genetic

  1. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  2. International Cancer of the Head and Neck, Genetics and Environment (InterCHANGE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Evaluate the Association Between Certain Environmental Exposures (e.g. Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, Betel Nut Chewing…) and Head and Neck Cancers; Assess the Effect of Genetic Factors, Including Both SNP and Copy Number Variation (CNV) Through Analysis of Both Main Effect and Gene-gene Interaction

  3. Colorectal cancer and detoxification enzymes, with emphasis on enzyme modulation and genetic polymorphisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logt, E.M.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The aetiology of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex and involves genetic and lifestyle factors. To deal with the daily load of carcinogens, present in food, tobacco smoke etc., humans possess an efficient system of defence against such compounds and an important role is reserved for the

  4. NIH Scientists Map Genetic Changes That Drive Tumors in a Common Pediatric Soft-Tissue Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Release NIH scientists map genetic changes that drive tumors in a common pediatric soft-tissue cancer ... of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp ...

  5. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  6. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovari...

  7. I'm so tired: biological and genetic mechanisms of cancer-related fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsevick, Andrea; Frost, Marlene; Zwinderman, Aeilko; Hall, Per; Halyard, Michele; Abertnethy, Amy P.; Baas, Frank; Barsevick, Andrea M.; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Chauhan, Cynthia; Cleeland, Charles S.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Klepstad, Pål; Martin, Nicholas G.; Miaskowski, Christine; Mosing, Miriam; Movsas, Benjamin; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Patrick, Donald L.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ropka, Mary E.; Shi, Quiling; Shinozaki, Gen; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Veenhoven, Ruut; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this paper is to discuss cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and address issues related to the investigation into potential biological and genetic causal mechanisms. The objectives are to: (1) describe CRF as a component of quality of life (QOL); (2) address measurement issues that

  8. Molecular genetic study of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Sik; Shim, Youn Sang; Lee, Je Ho

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed 15 cases of head and neck cancer (13 out of 15 were squqmous cell cancer.) by Southern blotting to identify the possible tumor suppressor gene. Firstly we searched the chromosome 17p with pYNZ22, pMCT35.1 and p144D6. 5 out of 7 informative cases showed loss of heterozygosity implying the loss of tumor suppressor gene near those loci. Afterwards analysis of these 5 cases is needed to identify the presence of tumor suppressor genes and the oncogenetic mechanism. (Author)

  9. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  10. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canzian, Federico; Calle, Eugenia E; Chanock, Stephen; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Dossus, Laure; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lenner, Per; Lund, Eiliv; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Quiros, Jose R; Riboli, Elio; Stram, Daniel O; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J; Cox, David G; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Gils, Carla H van; Ziegler, Regina G; Henderson, Katherine D; Henderson, Brian E; Berg, Christine; Bingham, Sheila; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians

  11. Association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer in ethnically diverse women from Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaima Al-Alem

    Full Text Available Non-Hispanic (nH Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors.We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the "Breast Cancer Care in Chicago" study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities.As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54-0.92 among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56-0.95 among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02 and higher grade (p = 0.012 in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03 in nH Blacks.Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups.

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer ... Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview ...

  13. DNA fingerprinting techniques for the analysis of genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Johanna K; Alonso, Sergio; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Perucho, Manuel

    2010-11-10

    Genetic somatic alterations are fundamental hallmarks of cancer. In addition to point and other small mutations targeting cancer genes, solid tumors often exhibit aneuploidy as well as multiple chromosomal rearrangements of large fragments of the genome. Whether somatic chromosomal alterations and aneuploidy are a driving force or a mere consequence of tumorigenesis remains controversial. Recently it became apparent that not only genetic but also epigenetic alterations play a major role in carcinogenesis. Epigenetic regulation mechanisms underlie the maintenance of cell identity crucial for development and differentiation. These epigenetic regulatory mechanisms have been found substantially altered during cancer development and progression. In this review, we discuss approaches designed to analyze genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer, especially DNA fingerprinting approaches to detect changes in DNA copy number and methylation. DNA fingerprinting techniques, despite their modest throughput, played a pivotal role in significant discoveries in the molecular basis of colorectal cancer. The aim of this review is to revisit the fingerprinting technologies employed and the oncogenic processes that they unveiled. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Patterns of Cancer Genetic Testing: A Randomized Survey of Oregon Clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S. L.; Zlot, A. I.; Silvey, S. K.; Silvey, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate use of genetic tests for population-based cancer screening, diagnosis of inherited cancers, and guidance of cancer treatment can improve health outcomes. We investigated clinicians’ use and knowledge of eight breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer genetic tests. Methods. We conducted a randomized survey of 2,191 Oregon providers, asking about their experience with fecal DNA, OncoVue, BRCA, MMR, CYP2D6, tumor gene expression profiling, UGT1A1, and KRAS. Results. Clinicians reported low confidence in their knowledge of medical genetics; most confident were OB-GYNs and specialists. Clinicians were more likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA and MMR than the other tests, and OB-GYNs were twice as likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA testing than primary care providers. Less than 10% of providers ordered/recommended OncoVue, fecal DNA, CYP2D6, or UGT1A1; less than 30% ordered/recommended tumor gene expression profiles or KRAS. The most common reason for not ordering/recommending these tests was lack of familiarity. Conclusions. Use of appropriate, evidence-based testing can help reduce incidence and mortality of certain cancers, but these tests need to be better integrated into clinical practice. Continued evaluation of emerging technologies, dissemination of findings, and an increase in provider confidence and knowledge are necessary to achieve this end.

  15. Use of fluorescent proteins and color-coded imaging to visualize cancer cells with different genetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are very bright and available in spectrally-distinct colors, enable the imaging of color-coded cancer cells growing in vivo and therefore the distinction of cancer cells with different genetic properties. Non-invasive and intravital imaging of cancer cells with fluorescent proteins allows the visualization of distinct genetic variants of cancer cells down to the cellular level in vivo. Cancer cells with increased or decreased ability to metastasize can be distinguished in vivo. Gene exchange in vivo which enables low metastatic cancer cells to convert to high metastatic can be color-coded imaged in vivo. Cancer stem-like and non-stem cells can be distinguished in vivo by color-coded imaging. These properties also demonstrate the vast superiority of imaging cancer cells in vivo with fluorescent proteins over photon counting of luciferase-labeled cancer cells.

  16. Identification of possible genetic polymorphisms involved in cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CRP is a predictive indicator of survival time of terminally ill cancer patients (Suh and Ahn 2007). ∗†. Glasgow ...... to body composition, sex, insulin levels and the A55V polymor- .... with survival and C-reactive protein levels in elderly men.

  17. Genetic basis of interindividual susceptibility to cancer cachexia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    response to therapy, quality of life and duration of survival. Cancer cachexia ..... protein (GCKR) binds and moves glucokinase (GK); thereby, controlling .... substrate metabolism through impairment of insulin action and insulin ..... men, but not in men. (van. R aalte et al. Jewell and. 2012. ). C idlow ski. 2007. A ssociated w ith.

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    several distinct advantages over surgical treatment, such as no complications from surgery, and a low risk of urinary incontinence , RT treatment takes...Khorana, Tissue factor and VEGF expression in prostate carcinoma: a tissue microarray study. Cancer Invest, 2009. 27(4): p. 430-4. 7. Crawford, E.D

  19. Genetic polymorphisms associated with breast cancer in malaysian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Munretnam, Khamsigan; Samsudin, Nurulhafizah; Lye, Say Hean; Hashim, Nikman Adli Nor; Ramzi, Nurul Hanis; Velapasamy, Sharmila; Wee, Ler Lian; Alex, Livy

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have discovered multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of common diseases. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the replication of previously published SNPs that showed statistical significance for breast cancer in the Malaysian population. In this case-control study, 80 subjects for each group were recruited from various hospitals in Malaysia. A total of 768 SNPs were genotyped and analyzed to distinguish risk and protective alleles. A total of three SNPs were found to be associated with increased risk of breast cancer while six SNPs showed protective effect. All nine were statistically significant SNPs (p ≤ 0.01), five SNPs from previous studies were successfully replicated in our study. Significant modifiable (diet) and non-modifiable (family history of breast cancer in first degree relative) risk factors were also observed. We identified nine SNPs from this study to be either conferring susceptibility or protection to breast cancer which may serve as potential markers in risk prediction.

  20. Genetic toxicology. From exposure detection to cancer prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipic, M.

    2002-01-01

    There is a general concern that many environmental chemicals to which humans are exposed are genotoxic and may cause cancer. The main problem is not only to identify the environmental genotoxic pollutants, but also to characterise their mode of action at cellular and molecular levels. To identify genotoxic environmental pollutants we are using selected in vitro short-term assays. (author)

  1. Hereditary kidney cancer syndromes: Genetic disorders driven by alterations in metabolism and epigenome regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    Although hereditary kidney cancer syndrome accounts for approximately five percent of all kidney cancers, the mechanistic insight into tumor development in these rare conditions has provided the foundation for the development of molecular targeting agents currently used for sporadic kidney cancer. In the late 1980s, the comprehensive study for hereditary kidney cancer syndrome was launched in the National Cancer Institute, USA and the first kidney cancer-associated gene, VHL, was identified through kindred analysis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome in 1993. Subsequent molecular studies on VHL function have elucidated that the VHL protein is a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which provided the basis for the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the HIF-VEGF/PDGF pathway. Recent whole-exome sequencing analysis of sporadic kidney cancer exhibited the recurrent mutations in chromatin remodeling genes and the later study has revealed that several chromatin remodeling genes are altered in kidney cancer kindred at the germline level. To date, more than 10 hereditary kidney cancer syndromes together with each responsible gene have been characterized and most of the causative genes for these genetic disorders are associated with either metabolism or epigenome regulation. In this review article, we describe the molecular mechanisms of how an alteration of each kidney cancer-associated gene leads to renal tumorigenesis as well as denote therapeutic targets elicited by studies on hereditary kidney cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. Reliability optimization of series-parallel systems with a choice of redundancy strategies using a genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, R. [Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11365/4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)], E-mail: tavakoli@ut.ac.ir; Safari, J. [Department of Industrial Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: jalalsafari@pideco.com; Sassani, F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)], E-mail: sassani@mech.ubc.ca

    2008-04-15

    This paper proposes a genetic algorithm (GA) for a redundancy allocation problem for the series-parallel system when the redundancy strategy can be chosen for individual subsystems. Majority of the solution methods for the general redundancy allocation problems assume that the redundancy strategy for each subsystem is predetermined and fixed. In general, active redundancy has received more attention in the past. However, in practice both active and cold-standby redundancies may be used within a particular system design and the choice of the redundancy strategy becomes an additional decision variable. Thus, the problem is to select the best redundancy strategy, component, and redundancy level for each subsystem in order to maximize the system reliability under system-level constraints. This belongs to the NP-hard class of problems. Due to its complexity, it is so difficult to optimally solve such a problem by using traditional optimization tools. It is demonstrated in this paper that GA is an efficient method for solving this type of problems. Finally, computational results for a typical scenario are presented and the robustness of the proposed algorithm is discussed.

  3. Reliability optimization of series-parallel systems with a choice of redundancy strategies using a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, R.; Safari, J.; Sassani, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a genetic algorithm (GA) for a redundancy allocation problem for the series-parallel system when the redundancy strategy can be chosen for individual subsystems. Majority of the solution methods for the general redundancy allocation problems assume that the redundancy strategy for each subsystem is predetermined and fixed. In general, active redundancy has received more attention in the past. However, in practice both active and cold-standby redundancies may be used within a particular system design and the choice of the redundancy strategy becomes an additional decision variable. Thus, the problem is to select the best redundancy strategy, component, and redundancy level for each subsystem in order to maximize the system reliability under system-level constraints. This belongs to the NP-hard class of problems. Due to its complexity, it is so difficult to optimally solve such a problem by using traditional optimization tools. It is demonstrated in this paper that GA is an efficient method for solving this type of problems. Finally, computational results for a typical scenario are presented and the robustness of the proposed algorithm is discussed

  4. Emerging technologies to create inducible and genetically defined porcine cancer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B Schook

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging need for new animal models that address unmet translational cancer research requirements. Transgenic porcine models provide an exceptional opportunity due to their genetic, anatomic and physiological similarities with humans. Due to recent advances in the sequencing of domestic animal genomes and the development of new organism cloning technologies, it is now very feasible to utilize pigs as a malleable species, with similar anatomic and physiological features with humans, in which to develop cancer models. In this review, we discuss genetic modification technologies successfully used to produce porcine biomedical models, in particular the Cre-loxP System as well as major advances and perspectives the CRISPR/Cas9 System. Recent advancements in porcine tumor modeling and genome editing will bring porcine models to the forefront of translational cancer research.

  5. Whole-genome and Transcriptome Sequencing of Prostate Cancer Identify New Genetic Alterations Driving Disease Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Shancheng; Wei, Gong-Hong; Liu, Dongbing

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global disparities in prostate cancer (PCa) incidence highlight the urgent need to identify genomic abnormalities in prostate tumors in different ethnic populations including Asian men. OBJECTIVE: To systematically explore the genomic complexity and define disease-driven genetic......-scale and comprehensive genomic data of prostate cancer from Asian population. Identification of these genetic alterations may help advance prostate cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment....... alterations in PCa. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The study sequenced whole-genome and transcriptome of tumor-benign paired tissues from 65 treatment-naive Chinese PCa patients. Subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 293 PCa-relevant genes was performed in another cohort of 145 prostate tumors. OUTCOME...

  6. Emerging Technologies to Create Inducible and Genetically Defined Porcine Cancer Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schook, Lawrence B; Rund, Laurie; Begnini, Karine R; Remião, Mariana H; Seixas, Fabiana K; Collares, Tiago

    2016-01-01

    There is an emerging need for new animal models that address unmet translational cancer research requirements. Transgenic porcine models provide an exceptional opportunity due to their genetic, anatomic, and physiological similarities with humans. Due to recent advances in the sequencing of domestic animal genomes and the development of new organism cloning technologies, it is now very feasible to utilize pigs as a malleable species, with similar anatomic and physiological features with humans, in which to develop cancer models. In this review, we discuss genetic modification technologies successfully used to produce porcine biomedical models, in particular the Cre-loxP System as well as major advances and perspectives the CRISPR/Cas9 System. Recent advancements in porcine tumor modeling and genome editing will bring porcine models to the forefront of translational cancer research.

  7. Is early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer a hallmark of a genetic susceptibility syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, C.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Erp, P.E.J. van; Feuth, T.; Jacobs, Y.H.A.; Brunner, H.G.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2008-01-01

    Most colorectal cancers show either microsatellite or chromosomal instability. A subset of colorectal cancers, especially those diagnosed at young age, is known to show neither of these forms of genetic instability and thus might have a distinct pathogenesis. Colorectal cancers diagnosed at young

  8. Professional challenges in cancer genetic testing: who is the patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Smutko, Gayun; Patel, Devanshi; Shannon, Kristen M; Ryan, Paula D

    2008-03-01

    In the genetic counseling setting, the health care provider can be challenged by opposing duties to members of the same family: protecting the privacy of the patient identified with a gene mutation and the ethical obligation to warn at-risk relatives. In a situation of nondisclosure between members of a family with a known disease-predisposing mutation, this type of dilemma can present in acute form for the provider who cares for different members of the family. This can hinder effective medical decision making. To minimize this effect, we recommend detailed pretest genetic counseling steps to empower the patient to communicate with their at-risk relatives their intent to pursue testing and willingness to share information. In addition, post-test counseling should reiterate the implications of a positive result for at-risk relatives and conclude with a written summary that patients can share with their family.

  9. Psychological impact of genetic counseling for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: the role of cancer history, gender, age, and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbring, Monika I; Kreddig, Nina; Deges, Gabriele; Epplen, Joerg T; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Stemmler, Susanne; Schulmann, Karsten; Willert, Joerg; Schmiegel, Wolf

    2011-04-01

    We prospectively examined the impact of an initial interdisciplinary genetic counseling (human geneticist, oncologist, and psycho-oncologist) on feelings of anxiety with a special focus on subgroups related to personal cancer history, gender, age, and education. At baseline, cancer-affected men revealed a significantly higher level of anxiety than unaffected men (pDepression Scale-A cases can be predicted by general distress (Brief Symptom Inventory) as well as by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-related cognitions of intrusion and avoidance (impact of event scale) with a correct classification of 86%. Although initial hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer counseling leads to an overall reduction of anxiety, differential effects of cancer history, gender, and age focus on subgroups of cancer-affected men, who may display unexpectedly high anxiety scores at baseline. Especially younger men do not seem to reduce this high anxiety level. Baseline anxiety was mainly determined by maladaptive situation-specific cognitions. Therefore, consulters should be more aware of anxiety-related cognitions in cancer-affected younger men.

  10. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Sharpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  11. Awareness of cancer susceptibility genetic testing: the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Phuong L; Vadaparampil, Susan Thomas; Breen, Nancy; McNeel, Timothy S; Wideroff, Louise; Graubard, Barry I

    2014-05-01

    Genetic testing for several cancer susceptibility syndromes is clinically available; however, existing data suggest limited population awareness of such tests. To examine awareness regarding cancer genetic testing in the U.S. population aged ≥25 years in the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys. The weighted percentages of respondents aware of cancer genetic tests, and percent changes from 2000-2005 and 2005-2010, overall and by demographic, family history, and healthcare factors were calculated. Interactions were used to evaluate the patterns of change in awareness between 2005 and 2010 among subgroups within each factor. To evaluate associations with awareness in 2005 and 2010, percentages were adjusted for covariates using multiple logistic regression. The analysis was performed in 2012. Awareness decreased from 44.4% to 41.5% (pAwareness increased between 2005 and 2010 in most subgroups, particularly among individuals in the South (pinteraction=0.03) or with a usual place of care (pinteraction=0.01). In 2005 and 2010, awareness was positively associated with personal or family cancer history and high perceived cancer risk, and inversely associated with racial/ethnic minorities, age 25-39 or ≥60 years, male gender, lower education and income levels, public or no health insurance, and no provider contact in 12 months. Despite improvement from 2005 to 2010, ≤50% of the U.S. adult population was aware of cancer genetic testing in 2010. Notably, disparities persist for racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with limited health care access or income. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The relationship between the belief in a genetic cause for breast cancer and bilateral mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Keith J; Myrtveit, Solbjørg Makalani; Partridge, Ann H; Stephens, Melika; Stanton, Annette L

    2015-05-01

    Most women develop causal beliefs following diagnosis with breast cancer and these beliefs can guide decisions around their care and management. Bilateral mastectomy rates are increasing, although the benefits of this surgery are only established in a small percentage of women. In this study we investigated the relationship between causal beliefs and the decision to have a bilateral mastectomy. Women (N = 2,269) from the Army of Women's breast cancer research registry completed an online survey. Women were asked what they believed caused their cancer and responses were coded into 8 causal categories. Participants were also asked about the type of surgery they underwent following their breast cancer diagnosis. The odds ratios for having a double mastectomy were calculated for each causal category using random/bad luck as a referent category. Hormonal factors (22%) and genetics (19%) were the most common causal belief, followed by don't know (19%), environmental toxins (11%), negative emotions (9%), poor health behavior (8%), other (6%) and random/bad luck (6%). Compared with the referent category, the odds ratio of having a bilateral mastectomy was significantly higher in both the genetics and hormonal causal belief groups (OR = 2.36, 95% CI [1.38, 4.02] and OR = 1.98, 95% CI [1.16, 3.38], respectively). Beliefs in a genetic cause for breast cancer are common and are associated with high rates of bilateral mastectomy. This is despite evidence that the actual genetic contribution to breast cancer is much lower than perceived and that bilateral mastectomy is, in most cases, unlikely to improve survival. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Next-generation sequencing for genetic testing of familial colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Agostini, Marco; Pedrazzani, Corrado; Bedin, Chiara; Urso, Emanuele D; Nitti, Donato; Turri, Giona; Scardoni, Maria; Fassan, Matteo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screening in families with high risk to develop colorectal cancer (CRC) prevents incurable disease and permits personalized therapeutic and follow-up strategies. The advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has revolutionized the throughput of DNA sequencing. A series of 16 probands for either familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 8 cases) or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; 8 cases) were investigated for intragenic mutations in five CRC familial syndromes-associated genes (APC, MUTYH, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6) applying both a custom multigene Ion AmpliSeq NGS panel and conventional Sanger sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic variants were detected in 13/16 FAP/HNPCC probands (81.3 %); one FAP proband presented two co-existing pathogenic variants, one in APC and one in MUTYH. Thirteen of these 14 pathogenic variants were detected by both NGS and Sanger, while one MSH2 mutation (L280FfsX3) was identified only by Sanger sequencing. This is due to a limitation of the NGS approach in resolving sequences close or within homopolymeric stretches of DNA. To evaluate the performance of our NGS custom panel we assessed its capability to resolve the DNA sequences corresponding to 2225 pathogenic variants reported in the COSMIC database for APC, MUTYH, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6. Our NGS custom panel resolves the sequences where 2108 (94.7 %) of these variants occur. The remaining 117 mutations reside inside or in close proximity to homopolymer stretches; of these 27 (1.2 %) are imprecisely identified by the software but can be resolved by visual inspection of the region, while the remaining 90 variants (4.0 %) are blind spots. In summary, our custom panel would miss 4 % (90/2225) of pathogenic variants that would need a small set of Sanger sequencing reactions to be solved. The multiplex NGS approach has the advantage of analyzing multiple genes in multiple samples simultaneously, requiring only a reduced number of Sanger sequences to resolve

  14. "Be ready against cancer, now": direct-to-consumer advertising for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William-Jones, Bryn

    2006-04-01

    A recent addition to the debate about the benefits and harms of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of medicines and pharmaceuticals is a growing critique of DTC marketing and sale of genetic tests. Academic and policy literatures exploring this issue have, however, tended to focus on the sale of genetic tests, paying rather less attention to the particular implications of advertising. The globalization of broadcast media and ever increasing access to the Internet mean that public exposure to advertising for medical technologies is a reality that national regulatory bodies will be hard pressed to constrain. Working through a case study detailing Myriad Genetics' 2002 pilot advertising campaign for their BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, this paper highlights some of the diverse and often overlooked and unregulated approaches to DTC advertising, and the associated social, ethical and policy implications.

  15. Molecular genetic approach for screening of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Ravnik-Glavač

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main goal of knowledge concerning human diseases is to transfer as much as possible useful information into clinical applications. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is the most common autosomal dominant inherited predisposition for colorectal cancer, accounting for 1–2% of all bowel cancer. The only way to diagnose HNPCC is by a family history consistent with the disease defined by International Collaborative Group on HNPCC (Amsterdam criteria I and II. The main molecular cause of HNPCC is a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair (MMR genes. Since HNPCC mutations have been detected also in families that did not fulfil the Amsterdam criteria, molecular genetic characteristics of HNPCC cancers have been proposed as valuable first step in HNPCC identification. Microsatellite instability is present in about 90% of cancers of HNPCC patients. However, of all MSI colorectal cancers 80– 90% are sporadic. Several molecular mechanisms have been uncovered that enable distinguishing to some extent between sporadic and HNPCC cancers with MSI including hypermethylation of hMLH1 promoter and frequent mutations in BAX and TGFBR2 in sporadic CRC with MSI-H.Conclusions: The determination of MSI status and careful separation of MSI positive colorectal cancer into sporadic MSIL, sporadic MSI-H, and HNPCC MSI-H followed by mutation detection in MMR genes is important for prevention, screening and management of colorectal cancer. In some studies we and others have already shown that large-scale molecular genetic analysis for HNPCC can be done and is sensitive enough to approve population screening. Population screening includes also colonoscopy which is restricted only to the obligate carriers of the mutation. This enables that the disease is detected in earlier stages which would greatly decrease medical treatment costs and most importantly decrease mortality. In Slovenia we have started population screening based

  16. Genetic Variants in Epigenetic Pathways and Risks of Multiple Cancers in the GAME-ON Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Reka; Scherer, Dominique; Kelemen, Linda E; Risch, Angela; Hazra, Aditi; Balavarca, Yesilda; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Moreno, Victor; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ogino, Shuji; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; Hung, Rayjean J; Goode, Ellen L; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2017-06-01

    Background: Epigenetic disturbances are crucial in cancer initiation, potentially with pleiotropic effects, and may be influenced by the genetic background. Methods: In a subsets (ASSET) meta-analytic approach, we investigated associations of genetic variants related to epigenetic mechanisms with risks of breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate carcinomas using 51,724 cases and 52,001 controls. False discovery rate-corrected P values (q values cancer type. For example, variants in BABAM1 were confirmed as a susceptibility locus for squamous cell lung, overall breast, estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast, and overall prostate, and overall serous ovarian cancer; the most significant variant was rs4808076 [OR = 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.19; q = 6.87 × 10 -5 ]. DPF1 rs12611084 was inversely associated with ER-negative breast, endometrioid ovarian, and overall and aggressive prostate cancer risk (OR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.91-0.96; q = 0.005). Variants in L3MBTL3 were associated with colorectal, overall breast, ER-negative breast, clear cell ovarian, and overall and aggressive prostate cancer risk (e.g., rs9388766: OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.03-1.08; q = 0.02). Variants in TET2 were significantly associated with overall breast, overall prostate, overall ovarian, and endometrioid ovarian cancer risk, with rs62331150 showing bidirectional effects. Analyses of subpathways did not reveal gene subsets that contributed disproportionately to susceptibility. Conclusions: Functional and correlative studies are now needed to elucidate the potential links between germline genotype, epigenetic function, and cancer etiology. Impact: This approach provides novel insight into possible pleiotropic effects of genes involved in epigenetic processes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 816-25. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Cancer genetics education in a low- to middle-income country: evaluation of an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hill

    Full Text Available Clinical genetic testing is becoming an integral part of medical care for inherited disorders. While genetic testing and counseling are readily available in high-income countries, in low- and middle-income countries like Kenya genetic testing is limited and genetic counseling is virtually non-existent. Genetic testing is likely to become widespread in Kenya within the next decade, yet there has not been a concomitant increase in genetic counseling resources. To address this gap, we designed an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya focused on the genetics of the childhood eye cancer retinoblastoma. The objectives were to increase retinoblastoma genetics knowledge, build genetic counseling skills and increase confidence in those skills.The workshop was conducted at the 2013 Kenyan National Retinoblastoma Strategy meeting. It included a retinoblastoma genetics presentation, small group discussion of case studies and genetic counseling role-play. Knowledge was assessed by standardized test, and genetic counseling skills and confidence by questionnaire.Knowledge increased significantly post-workshop, driven by increased knowledge of retinoblastoma causative genetics. One-year post-workshop, participant knowledge had returned to baseline, indicating that knowledge retention requires more frequent reinforcement. Participants reported feeling more confident discussing genetics with patients, and had integrated more genetic counseling into patient interactions.A comprehensive retinoblastoma genetics workshop can increase the knowledge and skills necessary for effective retinoblastoma genetic counseling.

  18. Cancer genetics education in a low- to middle-income country: evaluation of an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jessica A; Lee, Su Yeon; Njambi, Lucy; Corson, Timothy W; Dimaras, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing is becoming an integral part of medical care for inherited disorders. While genetic testing and counseling are readily available in high-income countries, in low- and middle-income countries like Kenya genetic testing is limited and genetic counseling is virtually non-existent. Genetic testing is likely to become widespread in Kenya within the next decade, yet there has not been a concomitant increase in genetic counseling resources. To address this gap, we designed an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya focused on the genetics of the childhood eye cancer retinoblastoma. The objectives were to increase retinoblastoma genetics knowledge, build genetic counseling skills and increase confidence in those skills. The workshop was conducted at the 2013 Kenyan National Retinoblastoma Strategy meeting. It included a retinoblastoma genetics presentation, small group discussion of case studies and genetic counseling role-play. Knowledge was assessed by standardized test, and genetic counseling skills and confidence by questionnaire. Knowledge increased significantly post-workshop, driven by increased knowledge of retinoblastoma causative genetics. One-year post-workshop, participant knowledge had returned to baseline, indicating that knowledge retention requires more frequent reinforcement. Participants reported feeling more confident discussing genetics with patients, and had integrated more genetic counseling into patient interactions. A comprehensive retinoblastoma genetics workshop can increase the knowledge and skills necessary for effective retinoblastoma genetic counseling.

  19. DNA Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Rectal Cancer: Benchmarking Its Impact on Prognosis, Neoadjuvant Response Prediction, and Clinical Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, Nicole; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J; Veerapong, Jula; Borras, Ester; Krishnan, Sunil; Bednarski, Brian; Messick, Craig A; Skibber, John M; Feig, Barry W; Lynch, Patrick M; Vilar, Eduardo; You, Y Nancy

    2016-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) hallmarks consensus molecular subtype 1 of colorectal cancer. It is being routinely tested, but little is known about dMMR rectal cancers. The efficacy of novel treatment strategies cannot be established without benchmarking the outcomes of dMMR rectal cancer with current therapy. We aimed to delineate the impact of dMMR on prognosis, the predicted response to fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant therapy, and implications of germline alterations in the MMR genes in rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 2012, 62 patients with dMMR rectal cancers underwent multimodality therapy. Oncologic treatment and outcomes as well as clinical genetics work-up were examined. Overall and rectal cancer-specific survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median age at diagnosis was 41 years. MMR deficiency was most commonly due to alterations in MSH2 (53%) or MSH6 (23%). After a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the 5-year rectal cancer-specific survival was 100% for stage I and II, 85.1% for stage III, and 60.0% for stage IV disease. Fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation was associated with a complete pathologic response rate of 27.6%. The extent of surgical resection was influenced by synchronous colonic disease at presentation, tumor height, clinical stage, and pelvic radiation. An informed decision for a limited resection focusing on proctectomy did not compromise overall survival. Five of the 11 (45.5%) deaths during follow-up were due to extracolorectal malignancies. dMMR rectal cancer had excellent prognosis and pathologic response with current multimodality therapy including an individualized surgical treatment plan. Identification of a dMMR rectal cancer should trigger germline testing, followed by lifelong surveillance for both colorectal and extracolorectal malignancies. We herein provide genotype-specific outcome benchmarks for comparison with novel interventions. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Identification of Genetic Susceptibility to Childhood Cancer through Analysis of Genes in Parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plon, Sharon E.; Wheeler, David A.; Strong, Louise C.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Pirics, Michael; Meng, Qingchang; Cheung, Hannah C.; Begin, Phyllis R.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lewis, Lora; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical cancer genetic susceptibility analysis typically proceeds sequentially beginning with the most likely causative gene. The process is time consuming and the yield is low particularly for families with unusual patterns of cancer. We determined the results of in parallel mutation analysis of a large cancer-associated gene panel. We performed deletion analysis and sequenced the coding regions of 45 genes (8 oncogenes and 37 tumor suppressor or DNA repair genes) in 48 childhood cancer patients who also (1) were diagnosed with a second malignancy under age 30, (2) have a sibling diagnosed with cancer under age 30 and/or (3) have a major congenital anomaly or developmental delay. Deleterious mutations were identified in 6 of 48 (13%) families, 4 of which met the sibling criteria. Mutations were identified in genes previously implicated in both dominant and recessive childhood syndromes including SMARCB1, PMS2, and TP53. No pathogenic deletions were identified. This approach has provided efficient identification of childhood cancer susceptibility mutations and will have greater utility as additional cancer susceptibility genes are identified. Integrating parallel analysis of large gene panels into clinical testing will speed results and increase diagnostic yield. The failure to detect mutations in 87% of families highlights that a number of childhood cancer susceptibility genes remain to be discovered. PMID:21356188

  1. Genetic instability model for cancer risk in A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    1998-01-01

    This review was written rather against Mendelsohn's reductionist model for cancer risk in A-bomb survivors in following chapters. Assumptions for carcinogenic process: mutation of a cell to the cancer cell and its proliferation. Multi-step theory for carcinogenesis and age of crisis: induction of cancer by accumulation of cancer-related gene mutations which being linear to time (age). Effect of exogenous hit in the multi-step theory: radiation as an exogenous hit to damage DNA. Dose-effect relationship for cancer risk in the survivors and the problem for the latent period: for solid tumors, dose-effect relationship is linear and shortening of the latent period is not observed. Considerations on cancer data in adulthood exposure/Indirect effect model in radiation carcinogenesis: solid cancer data supporting the indirect effect model. Possible mechanism for radiation-induced long-term increase of natural mutation frequency: genetic instability remaining in the irradiated cells which being a basis of the indirect effect model. Notes for considerations of carcinogenicity in exposed people/Difference in carcinogenic mechanisms due to age. The author concluded that the radiation-induced carcinogenesis is deeply related with the natural carcinogenesis and particularly for solid cancers, it can not be explained by the classic reductionist model. (K.H.)

  2. Recent advances in genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagasato, Masaki; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Aoki, Kazunori

    2017-05-01

    Adenoviruses are widely used to deliver genes to a variety of cell types and have been used in a number of clinical trials for gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. However, several concerns must be addressed for the clinical use of adenovirus vectors. Selective delivery of a therapeutic gene by adenovirus vectors to target cancer is precluded by the widespread distribution of the primary cellular receptors. The systemic administration of adenoviruses results in hepatic tropism independent of the primary receptors. Adenoviruses induce strong innate and acquired immunity in vivo. Furthermore, several modifications to these vectors are necessary to enhance their oncolytic activity and ensure patient safety. As such, the adenovirus genome has been engineered to overcome these problems. The first part of the present review outlines recent progress in the genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment. In addition, several groups have recently developed cancer-targeting adenovirus vectors by using libraries that display random peptides on a fiber knob. Pancreatic cancer-targeting sequences have been isolated, and these oncolytic vectors have been shown by our group to be associated with a higher gene transduction efficiency and more potent oncolytic activity in cell lines, murine models, and surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer. In the second part of this review, we explain that combining cancer-targeting strategies can be a promising approach to increase the clinical usefulness of oncolytic adenovirus vectors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Genetic variation of clock genes and cancer risk: a field synopsis and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benna, Clara; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Monticelli, Halenya; Pilati, Pierluigi; Nitti, Donato; Mocellin, Simone

    2017-04-04

    The number of studies on the association between clock genes' polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility has increased over the last years but the results are often conflicting and no comprehensive overview and quantitative summary of the evidence in this field is available. Literature search identified 27 eligible studies comprising 96756 subjects (cases: 38231) and investigating 687 polymorphisms involving 14 clock genes. Overall, 1025 primary and subgroup meta-analyses on 366 gene variants were performed. Study distribution by tumor was as follows: breast cancer (n=15), prostate cancer (n=3), pancreatic cancer (n=2), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=2), glioma (n=1), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n=1), colorectal cancer (n=1), non-small cell lung cancer (n=1) and ovarian cancer (n=1).We identified 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with cancer risk: NPAS2 rs10165970 (mixed and breast cancer shiftworkers), rs895520 (mixed), rs17024869 (breast) and rs7581886 (breast); CLOCK rs3749474 (breast) and rs11943456 (breast); RORA rs7164773 (breast and breast cancer postmenopausal), rs10519097 (breast); RORB rs7867494 (breast cancer postmenopausal), PER3 rs1012477 (breast cancer subgroups) and assessed the level of quality evidence to be intermediate. We also identified polymorphisms with lower quality statistically significant associations (n=30). Our work supports the hypothesis that genetic variation of clock genes might affect cancer risk. These findings also highlight the need for more efforts in this research field in order to fully establish the contribution of clock gene variants to the risk of developing cancer. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence on the association between clock genes' germline variants and the risk of developing cancer. To assess result credibility, summary evidence was graded according to the Venice criteria and false positive report probability (FPRP) was calculated to further validate

  4. [Association between HRE-2 gene polymorphism at codon 655 and genetic susceptibility of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xia; Zhang, Yong-jing; Liu, Bing; Ni, Qin; Jin, Ming-juan; Ma, Xin-yuan; Yao, Kai-yan; Li, Qi-long; Chen, Kun

    2009-06-01

    To explore the distribution of HER-2 genetic polymorphism at codon 655 and its association with susceptibility of colorectal cancer in Chinese. A population-based case-control study was carried out. 292 patients with colorectal cancer and 842 healthy controls were interviewed. Meanwhile, the genetic polymorphism of HRE-2 was detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequencies of Ile/Val+Val/Val genotypes and Val allele were both higher in cases (25.34% and 13.36%) than those in controls (18.41% and 9.74%) (P<0.05). Compared with Ile/Ile genotype, Ile/Val+Val/Val genotypes were significantly associated with colorectal cancer [ORadjusted=1.54, 95% CI: 1.11-2.14]. The adjusted odds ratio of interactions between this polymorphism and smoking, alcohol drinking were 1.43 (95%CI: 0.88-2.30) and 1.29 (95%CI: 0.73-2.29), respectively. The present findings suggest that HER-2 genetic polymorphism at codon 655 may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese. In addition, there are no interactions between this polymorphism and smoking, alcohol drinking, respectively.

  5. Telemedicine vs in-person cancer genetic counseling: measuring satisfaction and conducting economic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta SK

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Santanu K Datta1,2, Adam H Buchanan3, Gail P Hollowell4, Henry F Beresford5, Paul K Marcom1,3, Martha B Adams1,61Department of Medicine, Duke University; 2Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center; 3Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University; 4Department of Biology, North Carolina Central University; 5School of Nursing, Duke University; 6Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cancer genetic counseling (CGC provides benefits and is the standard of care for individuals at increased risk of having a hereditary cancer syndrome. CGC services are typically centered in urban medical centers, leading to limited access to counseling in rural communities. Telemedicine has the potential to improve access to CGC, increase efficient use of genetic counselors, and improve patient care in rural communities. For telemedicine CGC to gain wide acceptance and implementation it needs to be shown that individuals who receive telemedicine CGC have high satisfaction levels and that CGC is cost-effective; however little research has been conducted to measure the impact of telemedicine CGC. This paper describes the design and methodology of a randomized controlled trial comparing telemedicine with in-person CGC. Measurement of patient satisfaction and effectiveness outcomes are described, as is measurement of costs that are included in an economic analysis. Study design and methodologies used are presented as a contribution to future comparative effectiveness investigations in the telemedicine genetic counseling field.Keywords: cancer genetics, genetic counseling, rural health services, telemedicine, satisfaction, cost

  6. Strongly enhanced colorectal cancer risk stratification by combining family history and genetic risk score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigl K

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Korbinian Weigl,1,2 Jenny Chang-Claude,3,4 Phillip Knebel,5 Li Hsu,6 Michael Hoffmeister,1 Hermann Brenner1,2,7 1Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 2German Cancer Consortium (DKTK, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 3Unit of Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 4University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 5Department for General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 6Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 7Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT, Heidelberg, Germany Background and aim: Family history (FH and genetic risk scores (GRSs are increasingly used for risk stratification for colorectal cancer (CRC screening. However, they were mostly considered alternatively rather than jointly. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of individual and joint risk stratification for CRC by FH and GRS.Patients and methods: A GRS was built based on the number of risk alleles in 53 previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms among 2,363 patients with a first diagnosis of CRC and 2,198 controls in DACHS [colorectal cancer: chances for prevention through screening], a population-based case-control study in Germany. Associations between GRS and FH with CRC risk were quantified by multiple logistic regression.Results: A total of 316 cases (13.4% and 214 controls (9.7% had a first-degree relative (FDR with CRC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.86, 95% CI 1.52–2.29. A GRS in the highest decile was associated with a 3.0-fold increased risk of CRC (aOR 3.00, 95% CI 2.24–4.02 compared with the lowest decile. This association was tentatively more pronounced in older age groups. FH and GRS were essentially unrelated, and their

  7. Evaluation of coexistence of cancer and active tuberculosis; 16 case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Çakar

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is an important risk factor for cancer. Pulmonary TB and lung cancer(LC may mimic each other especially in the aspect of the clinical and radiological features. The aim of the study was to evaluate the features and risk factors of cases with coexistence cancer and active TB. Methodology: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with coexisting TB and cancer a period from 2009 to 2014. We evaluated demographic data, the ways diagnosis of TB cases, the location of TB and cancer, TB treatment results of the cases. Results: We recorded 374 TB cases in our dyspensary at this study period. In 16 (4% of these cases, a coexistence of cancer and TB was detected. The male/female ratio was 12/4. The mean age was 62,12 ± 15,13 years. There were TST results except three cases. There were ten pulmonary TB and six extra-pulmonary TB (four peripheral lymphadenopathy TB, one abdominal TB lymphadenopathy and one salivary gland TB. Cancer types were as follows; eight lung cancer, two breast cancer, one base of tongue, one endometrium cancer, one hypopharyngeal cancer, one stomach cancer, one bladder cancer and one maxillary cancer. Diagnosis of all cases was confirmed by bacteriologic and/or histopathological examination. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common type of cancers. This rate was 9/16. All TB cases were new. There were risk factors out of two case in the cases. Five cases were died during TB treatment. Others completed TB treatment without any complication. Conclusions: In our study, the coexistence of LC and pulmonary TB was more common. The local immunity is deteriorated in cancer cases. If there is pulmonary infiltrates in lung or peripheral lymphadenopathy, we must search tuberculosis too out of metastatic lesion and other infectious diseases. We should not make delay in the diagnosis of active TB in cancer cases. Keywords: Coexistent, Cancer, Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis treatment

  8. Comparison of Genetic Variants in Cancer-Related Genes between Chinese Hui and Han Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyong Tian

    Full Text Available The Chinese Hui population, as the second largest minority ethnic group in China, may have a different genetic background from Han people because of its unique demographic history. In this study, we aimed to identify genetic differences between Han and Hui Chinese from the Ningxia region of China by comparing eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms in cancer-related genes.DNA samples were collected from 99 Hui and 145 Han people from the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region in China, and SNPs were detected using an improved multiplex ligase detection reaction method. Genotyping data from six 1000 Genomes Project population samples (99 Utah residents with northern and western European ancestry (CEU, 107 Toscani in Italy (TSI, 108 Yoruba in Ibadan (YRI, 61 of African ancestry in the southwestern US (ASW, 103 Han Chinese in Beijing (CHB, and 104 Japanese in Tokyo (JPT were also included in this study. Differences in the distribution of alleles among the populations were assessed using χ2 tests, and FST was used to measure the degree of population differentiation.We found that the genetic diversity of many SNPs in cancer-related genes in the Hui Chinese in Ningxia was different from that in the Han Chinese in Ningxia. For example, the allele frequencies of four SNPs (rs13361707, rs2274223, rs465498, and rs753955 showed different genetic distributions (p0.000 between the Hui and Han populations.These results suggest that some SNPs associated with cancer-related genes vary among different Chinese ethnic groups. We suggest that population differences should be carefully considered in evaluating cancer risk and prognosis as well as the efficacy of cancer therapy.

  9. [Genetic-metabolic model of cancer cell behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dil'man, V M; Blagosklonnyĭ, M V

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that the transforming protein (type pp60) induce "insulinization" of the cell membrane. It is mostly due to this effect that the cell sensitivity to insulin and insulin-like factors of the body internal medium is enhanced, which in turn results in the increased glucosa transport into cell. The transforming protein is also supposed to increase the activity of the glycolysis key enzymes by phosphorylating them. The presence of these two effects seems to be sufficient enough to explain "the biochemical behaviour" of the cancerous cell.

  10. New insights in oncology: Epi-genetics and cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutovskikh, V.; Partensky, C.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a multi-etiologic, multistage disease with a prevalent genetic component, which happens when a large number of genes, critical for cell growth, death, differentiation, migration, and metabolic plasticity are altered irreversibly, so as to either 'gain' (oncogenes) or 'lose' (tumour suppressors) their function. Recent discoveries have revealed the previously underestimated etiologic importance of multiple epigenetic, that is to say, reversible factors (histone modifications, DNA methylation, non-coding RNA) involved in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of proteins, indispensable for the control of cancerous phenotype. Stable alterations of epigenetic machinery ('epi-mutations') turn out to play a critical role at different steps of carcinogenesis. In addition, due to substantial recent progress in stem cell biology, the new concept of cancer stem cells has emerged. This, along with newly discovered epigenetic cancer mechanisms, gives rise to a hope to overcome radio- and chemo-resistance and to eradicate otherwise incurable neoplasms. (authors)

  11. Genetic biomarkers for neoplastic colorectal cancer in peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Mirela; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Ionescu, Cristina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gologan, Serban; Teiusanu, Adriana; Arbanas, Tudor; Mircea, Diculescu

    2011-04-01

    Loss of genomic stability appears as a key step in colorectal carcinogenesis. Micronucleus (MN) designates a chromosome fragment or an entire chromosme which lags behind mitosis. MN may be noticed as an additional nucleus within the cytoplasm cell during the intermediate mitosis phases. We tested the hypothesis that MN and its related anomalies may be associated with the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured and microscopically examined. The frequency of micronuclei (FMN) and the presence of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in binucleated cells were compared in patients with of without colorectal neoplastic lesions. We included 45 patients undergoing colonoscopy, 23 males and 22 females, with a median age of 59. 17 patients had polyps, 11 colorectal cancer (CRC) and 17 had a normal colonoscopy. The FMN was significantly higher in women than in men (8.14 vs 4.17, p=0.008); NPB were significantly less frequent in patients with advanced adenomas (>10mm or vilous) or CRC (p=0.044) when compared with patients with normal colonoscopy, hiperplastic polyps or non-advanced adenomas. Micronuclei are more frequent in women, but its frequency was not significantly different in patients with advanced adenomas or CRC. Null or low frequency values for nucleoplasmic bridges presence in peripheral lymphocyte may be predictive for advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer.

  12. Genetic susceptibility to HPV infection and cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciag P.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC is one of the leading causes of death in developing countries. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is the major risk factor to develop malignant lesions in the cervix. Polymorphisms of the MHC and p53 genes seem to influence the outcome of HPV infection and progression to SCCC, although controversial data have been reported. MHC are highly polymorphic genes that encode molecules involved in antigen presentation, playing a key role in immune regulation, while p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that regulates cell proliferation. The HPV E6 protein from high-risk types binds p53 and mediates its degradation by the ubiquitin pathway. The role of these polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to HPV infection and to SCCC remains under investigation.

  13. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  14. Local-regional control in breast cancer patients with a possible genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Laura M.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Thames, Howard D.; Strom, Eric A.; McNeese, Marsha D.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Singletary, S. Eva; Heaton, Keith M.; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Local control rates for breast cancer in genetically predisposed women are poorly defined. Because such a small percentage of breast cancer patients have proven germline mutations, surrogates, such as a family history for breast cancer, have been used to examine this issue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate local-regional control following breast conservation therapy (BCT) in patients with bilateral breast cancer and a breast cancer family history. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of all 58 patients with bilateral breast cancer and a breast cancer family history treated in our institution between 1959 and 1998. The primary surgical treatment was a breast-conserving procedure in 55 of the 116 breast cancer cases and a mastectomy in 61. The median follow-up was 68 months for the BCT patients and 57 months for the mastectomy-treated patients. Results: Eight local-regional recurrences occurred in the 55 cases treated with BCT, resulting in 5- and 10-year actuarial local-regional control rates of 86% and 76%, respectively. In the nine cases that did not receive radiation as a component of their BCT, four developed local-regional recurrences (5- and 10-year local-regional control rates of BCT without radiation: 49% and 49%). The 5- and 10-year actuarial local-regional control rates for the 46 cases treated with BCT and radiation were 94% and 83%, respectively. In these cases, there were two late local recurrences, developing at 8 years and 9 years, respectively. A log rank comparison of radiation versus no radiation actuarial data was significant at p = 0.009. In the cases treated with BCT, a multivariate analysis of radiation use, patient age, degree of family history, margin status, and stage revealed that only the use of radiation was associated with improved local control (Cox regression analysis p = 0.021). The 10-year actuarial rates of local-regional control following mastectomy with and without radiation were 91% and 89

  15. Classification of biosensor time series using dynamic time warping: applications in screening cancer cells with characteristic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shesh N; Trainor, Patrick J; Khosravi, Farhad; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    The development of biosensors that produce time series data will facilitate improvements in biomedical diagnostics and in personalized medicine. The time series produced by these devices often contains characteristic features arising from biochemical interactions between the sample and the sensor. To use such characteristic features for determining sample class, similarity-based classifiers can be utilized. However, the construction of such classifiers is complicated by the variability in the time domains of such series that renders the traditional distance metrics such as Euclidean distance ineffective in distinguishing between biological variance and time domain variance. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is a sequence alignment algorithm that can be used to align two or more series to facilitate quantifying similarity. In this article, we evaluated the performance of DTW distance-based similarity classifiers for classifying time series that mimics electrical signals produced by nanotube biosensors. Simulation studies demonstrated the positive performance of such classifiers in discriminating between time series containing characteristic features that are obscured by noise in the intensity and time domains. We then applied a DTW distance-based k -nearest neighbors classifier to distinguish the presence/absence of mesenchymal biomarker in cancer cells in buffy coats in a blinded test. Using a train-test approach, we find that the classifier had high sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (81.8%) in differentiating between EpCAM-positive MCF7 cells spiked in buffy coats and those in plain buffy coats.

  16. Genetic Mutations and Epigenetic Modifications: Driving Cancer and Informing Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Krysta Mila; Boudreau, Jeanette E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer treatment is undergoing a significant revolution from “one-size-fits-all” cytotoxic therapies to tailored approaches that precisely target molecular alterations. Precision strategies for drug development and patient stratification, based on the molecular features of tumors, are the next logical step in a long history of approaches to cancer therapy. In this review, we discuss the history of cancer treatment from generic natural extracts and radical surgical procedures to site-specific and combinatorial treatment regimens, which have incrementally improved patient outcomes. We discuss the related contributions of genetics and epigenetics to cancer progression and the response to targeted therapies and identify challenges and opportunities for the success of precision medicine. The identification of patients who will benefit from targeted therapies is more complex than simply identifying patients whose tumors harbour the targeted aberration, and intratumoral heterogeneity makes it difficult to determine if a precision therapy is successful during treatment. This heterogeneity enables tumors to develop resistance to targeted approaches; therefore, the rational combination of therapeutic agents will limit the threat of acquired resistance to therapeutic success. By incorporating the view of malignant transformation modulated by networks of genetic and epigenetic interactions, molecular strategies will enable precision medicine for effective treatment across cancer subtypes. PMID:28685150

  17. Comparison of Attitudes Regarding Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Among Patients with Hereditary Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Thereasa A.; Liu, Mei; Etzel, Carol J.; Bannon, Sarah A.; Mork, Maureen E.; Ready, Kaylene; Saraiya, Devki S.; Grubbs, Elizabeth G.; Perrier, Nancy D.; Lu, Karen H.; Arun, Banu K.; Woodard, Terri L.; Schover, Leslie R.; Litton, Jennifer K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) allows couples to avoid having a child with an inherited condition, potentially reducing cancer burden in families with a hereditary cancer predisposition. This study investigated awareness and acceptance of PGD among patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. Methods Questionnaires were mailed to 984 adults with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 or 2. Associations between clinical, demographic, and psychosocial factors and awareness and acceptance of PGD were examined. Results Of 370 respondents (38% return rate), 28% felt their syndrome impacted family planning, 24% were aware of PGD, 72% felt that PGD should be offered, 43% would consider using PGD, and 29% were uncertain. Family experience and syndrome-specific characteristics, such as disease severity, quality of life and availability of medical interventions as well as gender, family planning stage, and religiosity impact perceptions of the acceptability of PGD, though a high level of uncertainty exists. Conclusion Hereditary cancer patients' opinions about the acceptability of PGD are similar to those of genetics and ethical experts. Patients should be told about PGD given that most had not heard of PGD, but feel that PGD should be offered. PMID:24072553

  18. Genetic variation in DNA repair gene XRCC7 (G6721T) and susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Meysam; Saadat, Iraj; Omidvari, Shahpour; Saadat, Mostafa

    2012-08-15

    The human XRCC7 is a DNA double-strand break (DSBs) repair gene, involved in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). It is speculated that DNA DSBs repair have an important role during development of breast cancer. The human XRCC7 is a NHEJ DSBs repair gene. Genetic variation G6721T of XRCC7 (rs7003908) is located in the intron 8 of the gene. This polymorphism may regulate splicing and cause mRNA instability. In the present study, we specifically investigated whether common G6721T genetic variant of XRCC7 was associated with an altered risk of breast cancer. The present study included 362 females with breast cancer. Age frequency-matched controls (362 persons) were randomly selected from the healthy female blood donors, according to the age distribution of the cases. Using RFLP-PCR based method, the polymorphism of XRCC7 was determined. The TG (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 0.83-1.74, P=0.320) and TT (OR=1.01, 95% CI: 0.67-1.53, P=0.933) genotypes had no significant effect on risk of breast cancer, in comparison with the GG genotype. Our present findings indicate that the TT and TG genotypes were not associated with an altered breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding the Needs of Young Women Regarding Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Genetic Testing: Convergence and Divergence among Patient-Counselor Perceptions and the Promise of Peer Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalanda Evans

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Young women from hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC families face a series of medical decisions regarding their cancer risk management and integrating this information into their life planning. This presents unique medical and psychosocial challenges that exist without comprehensive intervention. To help lay the groundwork for intervention, we conducted a qualitative study among young women from HBOC families (N = 12; Mean age = 22 and cancer genetic counselors (N = 12 to explicate domains most critical to caring for this population. Women and counselors were interviewed by telephone. The predominant interview themes included preventative care planning and risk management, decision making around the pros and cons of cancer risk assessment, medical management, and psychosocial stresses experienced. Young women endorsed psychosocial stress significantly more frequently than did counselors. Both groups noted the short- and long-term decision making challenges and the support and conflict engendered among familial relationships. Our results suggest young women value the support they receive from their families and their genetic counselors, but additional, external supports are needed to facilitate adaptation to HBOC risk. In feedback interviews focused on intervention planning with a subset of these young women (N = 9, they endorsed the predominant interview themes discovered as important intervention content, a structure that would balance discussion of medical information and psychosocial skill-building that could be tailored to the young women’s needs, and delivery by trained peers familiar with HBOC risk.

  20. Cancers and genetic defects resulting from the use of various energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1978-06-01

    A review of recent literature on carcinogenic effects of chemical products derived from the combustion of organic fuels suggests that the numbers of fatal cancers and genetic defects induced by utilization of fossil fuels may be much greater than the numbers induced by utilization of nuclear power to produce the same amount of energy. Despite the uncertainties involved in these estimates, the maximum risk of fatal cancers due to carcinogenic by-products associated with the production of electricity by any of these methods appears to be remarkably low compared with the risk of other fatal hazards in Canada and the U.S.A. (author)

  1. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC-associated breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muranen, Taru A; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations that confers a two- to threefold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion....... We have investigated this empirically using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). METHODS: Using genotype data from 39,139 (624 1100delC carriers) BC patients and 40,063 (224) healthy controls from 32 BCAC studies, we analyzed the combined risk effects of CHEK2*1100delC and 77...

  2. Association of education & lifestyle factors with the perception of genetic knowledge on the development of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The perception of genetic knowledge is useful for improving the heath behaviour change against developing cancers. However, no studies have investigated the perception of genetic knowledge on the development of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to examine demographic and lifestyle factors of the perception of genetic knowledge on the development of lung cancer. Methods: Data on 2,295 US adults (739 had the perception of genetic knowledge were taken from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate potential factors of the perception of genetic knowledge of lung cancer. Results: Participants aged ≥65 yr were more likely to have the perception of genetic knowledge than those aged 18-44 yr (OR=1.77, 95% CI=1.27-2.46. Higher education was associated with a greater perception of genetic knowledge (OR=1.47, 95% CI=1.16-1.87. Subjects with correct smoking attitude were more than three times more likely to have the perception of genetic knowledge (OR=3.15, 95% CI=2.10-4.72. Subjects with exercise were at an increased likelihood of having the perception of genetic knowledge than those without exercise (OR=1.63, 95% CI=1.24-2.13. Interpretation & conclusions: Positive associations were observed between education and lifestyle factors and the perception of genetic knowledge on the development of lung cancer among US adults. Strategies developed to improve the perception of genetic knowledge of lung cancer may target on individuals who are young, less educated, and lack correct smoking attitude or exercise.

  3. The knowledge value-chain of genetic counseling for breast cancer: an empirical assessment of prediction and communication processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Nabil; Blouin-Bougie, Jolyane; Jbilou, Jalila; Halilem, Norrin; Simard, Jacques; Landry, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: to analyze the genetic counseling process for breast cancer with a theoretical knowledge transfer lens and to compare generalists, medical specialists, and genetic counselors with regards to their genetic counseling practices. This paper presents the genetic counseling process occurring within a chain of value-adding activities of four main stages describing health professionals' clinical practices: (1) evaluation, (2) investigation, (3) information, and (4) decision. It also presents the results of a cross-sectional study based on a Canadian medical doctors and genetic counselors survey (n = 176) realized between July 2012 and March 2013. The statistical exercise included descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results indicate that even though all types of health professionals are involved in the entire process of genetic counseling for breast cancer, genetic counselors are more involved in the evaluation of breast cancer risk, while medical doctors are more active in the decision toward breast cancer risk management strategies. The results secondly demonstrate the relevance and the key role of genetic counselors in the care provided to women at-risk of familial breast cancer. This paper presents an integrative framework to understand the current process of genetic counseling for breast cancer in Canada, and to shed light on how and where health professionals contribute to the process. It also offers a starting point for assessing clinical practices in genetic counseling in order to establish more clearly where and to what extent efforts should be undertaken to implement future genetic services.

  4. Cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in differentiated type early gastric cancers with different mucin phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naomi; Watari, Jiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Tanno, Satoshi; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the biological impact and molecular pathogenesis of cellular phenotype in differentiated-type gastric cancers (DGCs), we investigated cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in early stage of DGCs. A total of 43 early gastric cancers (EGCs) were studied. EGCs were divided into 3 phenotypic categories: gastric (G type, n = 11), ordinary (O type, n = 20), and complete intestinal (CI type, n = 12) based on the combination of HGM, ConA, MUC2, and CD10. Proliferative index (PI), apoptotic index (AI), and p53 overexpression were investigated by immunohistochemical staining with anti-Ki-67, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling method, and p53 antibody, respectively. Using a high-resolution fluorescent microsatellite analysis system, microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were examined. Frameshift mutation analysis of transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor (TGF-betaRII) and bcl-2-associated X (BAX) in cancers with MSI was also performed. The mean AI/PI ratio values were 0.04 for G-type, 0.10 for O-type, and 0.13 for CI-type cancers--significantly lower in G type than in O and CI types (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). No difference in the incidence of MSI and LOH was seen among the 3 cellular phenotypes. However, the major pattern of MSI, which showed drastic and widely dispersed changes and is related to an increased risk for cancer, was significantly higher in G and O types than in CI type (P cancers. These results indicate that G-type cancers are likely to show more aggressive behaviors than CI-type cancers, and that O-type cancers show the intermediate characteristics of both types. However, the molecular pathogenesis of each phenotypic cancer is not associated with microsatellite alterations. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening ... What Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening ... Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening ... Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening ...

  8. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials.

  9. Secondary Analysis and Integration of Existing Data to Elucidate the Genetic Architecture of Cancer Risk and Related Outcomes, R21 | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications that propose to conduct secondary data analysis and integration of existing datasets and database resources, with the ultimate aim to elucidate the genetic architecture of cancer risk and related outcomes. The goal of this initiative is to address key scientific questions relevant to cancer epidemiology by supporting the analysis of existing genetic or genomic datasets, possibly in combination with environmental, outcomes, behavioral, lifestyle, and molecular profiles data.

  10. Secondary Analysis and Integration of Existing Data to Elucidate the Genetic Architecture of Cancer Risk and Related Outcomes, R01 | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications that propose to conduct secondary data analysis and integration of existing datasets and database resources, with the ultimate aim to elucidate the genetic architecture of cancer risk and related outcomes. The goal of this initiative is to address key scientific questions relevant to cancer epidemiology by supporting the analysis of existing genetic or genomic datasets, possibly in combination with environmental, outcomes, behavioral, lifestyle, and molecular profiles data.

  11. Attitudes Toward Breast Cancer Genetic Testing in Five Special Population Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J; Muñoz, Edgar; Holden, Alan E; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Smith, Selina A; Wong-Kim, Evaon; Wyatt, Stephen W; Suarez, Lucina

    2015-01-01

    This study examined interest in and attitudes toward genetic testing in 5 different population groups. The survey included African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, and Appalachian women with varying familial histories of breast cancer. A total of 49 women were interviewed in person. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical techniques were used to assess ethnic group differences. Overall, interest in testing was high. All groups endorsed more benefits than risks. There were group differences regarding endorsement of specific benefits and risks: testing to "follow doctor recommendations" (p=0.017), "concern for effects on family" (p=0.044), "distrust of modern medicine" (p=0.036), "cost" (p=0.025), and "concerns about communication of results to others" (p=0.032). There was a significant inverse relationship between interest and genetic testing cost (p<0.050), with the exception of Latinas, who showed the highest level of interest regardless of increasing cost. Cost may be an important barrier to obtaining genetic testing services, and participants would benefit by genetic counseling that incorporates the unique cultural values and beliefs of each group to create an individualized, culturally competent program. Further research about attitudes toward genetic testing is needed among Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Appalachians for whom data are severely lacking. Future study of the different Latina perceptions toward genetic testing are encouraged.

  12. Genetic variants of methyl metabolizing enzymes and epigenetic regulators: Associations with promoter CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Wouters, K.A.D.; Gottschalk, R.W.H.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Weijenberg, M.P.; Engeland, M. van

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation affects carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. Folate metabolizing enzymes may influence the bioavailability of methyl groups, whereas DNA and histone methyltransferases are involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We studied associations of genetic variants of

  13. Genetic, pathological and physiological determinants of transdermal fentanyl pharmacokinetics in 620 cancer patients of the EPOS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barratt, Daniel T; Bandak, Benedikte; Klepstad, Pål

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether CYP3A4/5 genetic variants, together with clinical and patient factors, influence serum fentanyl and norfentanyl concentrations and their ratio in cancer pain patients receiving transdermal fentanyl....

  14. Genetic association of the KLK4 locus with risk of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Lose

    Full Text Available The Kallikrein-related peptidase, KLK4, has been shown to be significantly overexpressed in prostate tumours in numerous studies and is suggested to be a potential biomarker for prostate cancer. KLK4 may also play a role in prostate cancer progression through its involvement in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a more aggressive phenotype, and metastases to bone. It is well known that genetic variation has the potential to affect gene expression and/or various protein characteristics and hence we sought to investigate the possible role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the KLK4 gene in prostate cancer. Assessment of 61 SNPs in the KLK4 locus (± 10 kb in approximately 1300 prostate cancer cases and 1300 male controls for associations with prostate cancer risk and/or prostate tumour aggressiveness (Gleason score <7 versus ≥ 7 revealed 7 SNPs to be associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer at the P(trend<0.05 significance level. Three of these SNPs, rs268923, rs56112930 and the HapMap tagSNP rs7248321, are located several kb upstream of KLK4; rs1654551 encodes a non-synonymous serine to alanine substitution at position 22 of the long isoform of the KLK4 protein, and the remaining 3 risk-associated SNPs, rs1701927, rs1090649 and rs806019, are located downstream of KLK4 and are in high linkage disequilibrium with each other (r(2 ≥ 0.98. Our findings provide suggestive evidence of a role for genetic variation in the KLK4 locus in prostate cancer predisposition.

  15. DNA repair genetic polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Novotný, J.; Šmerhovský, Z.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Poláková, Veronika; Hánová, Monika; Slyšková, Jana; Tulupová, Elena; Kumar, R.; Bortlík, M.; Barale, R.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 638, 1-2 (2008), s. 146-153 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2626; GA MZd NR8563 Grant - others:EU(SE) 505609 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Colorectal cancer * Individual susceptibility * DNA repair Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  16. Evaluating the Role of Genetic Markers in Prostate Cancer Progression: A Multiethnic Cohort Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    presentation of prostate tumors by a novel genetic variant in CYP3A4 . [see comment] [erratum appears in J Natl Cancer Inst 1999 Jun 16;91(12):1082...European ancestry18. Sequencing of the five coding exons of ZNF652 in 48 subjects (with an oversampling of risk allele carriers; Online Methods...the five coding exons of ZNF652 was performed in 48 subjects (20 homozygous for the risk vari- ant, 20 heterozygous for the risk variant and 8

  17. Evaluating the Genetic, Hormonal, and Exogenous Factors Affecting Somatic Copy Number Variation in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    assess genomic instability in different mammary epithelial populations in vivo and in vitro, 2) determine how mutations in heritable breast cancer genes...respectively, located on chromosome 6. When loci harboring the shRNAs are deleted by a spontaneous mutation event, affected cells become GFP and/or RFP...assay adapted from the yeast genetics literature, we will determine whether baseline deletion rates in normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs

  18. Synchronous primary ovarian and endometrial cancers: a series of cases and a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Dębska-Szmich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous cancers account for 0.7-1.8% of all gynecologic cancers. Among them, synchronous ovarian and endometrial cancers are predominant (40-53%. Patients with synchronous cancers have better prognosis than those with single disseminated cancer. We present 10 patients with synchronous ovarian and endometrial cancers who were treated at the Chemotherapy Department of the Medical University of Lodz in 2009-2013. The most often reported symptom of the disease was abnormal vaginal bleeding (6 patients. The range of the patients’ age was 48-62 and the median age was 56. Five patients had stage I of ovarian cancer, single patients had stage IIA, IIB and IIIB, 2 patients had stage IIIC. Three patients had I, 5 – II, and 2 – III stage of endometrial cancer. All patients had endometrioid type of endometrial cancer, 7 of them had also the same histological type of ovarian cancer. All patients had adjuvant chemotherapy because of ovarian cancer, none of them had adjuvant radiotherapy. One patient was lost to follow up. For other patients a median follow up was 13 months (range: 3-53 months. One patient experienced relapse, all patients are alive. Synchronous ovarian and endometrial cancers are usually diagnosed at an earlier stage, have lower histological grade and better prognosis than single cancers. The most common histological type of both endometrial and ovarian cancers is endometrioid carcinoma. The first symptoms reported by our patients and the course of the disease were concordant with data from the literature.

  19. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Pilar Zamora, M; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at p associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk.

  20. Awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic testing for cancer risk among ethnic minority groups: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Katie E J; Freeman, Madeleine; Fraser, Lindsay; Waller, Jo; Sanderson, Saskia C; Rahman, Belinda; Side, Lucy; Gessler, Sue; Lanceley, Anne

    2017-05-25

    Genetic testing for risk of hereditary cancer can help patients to make important decisions about prevention or early detection. US and UK studies show that people from ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive genetic testing. It is important to understand various groups' awareness of genetic testing and its acceptability to avoid further disparities in health care. This review aims to identify and detail awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic counselling/testing for cancer risk prediction in ethnic minority groups. A search was carried out in PsycInfo, CINAHL, Embase and MEDLINE. Search terms referred to ethnicity, genetic testing/counselling, cancer, awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions. Quantitative and qualitative studies, written in English, and published between 2000 and 2015, were included. Forty-one studies were selected for review: 39 from the US, and two from Australia. Results revealed low awareness and knowledge of genetic counselling/testing for cancer susceptibility amongst ethnic minority groups including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanics. Attitudes towards genetic testing were generally positive; perceived benefits included positive implications for personal health and being able to inform family. However, negative attitudes were also evident, particularly the anticipated emotional impact of test results, and concerns about confidentiality, stigma, and discrimination. Chinese Australian groups were less studied, but of interest was a finding from qualitative research indicating that different views of who close family members are could impact on reported family history of cancer, which could in turn impact a risk assessment. Interventions are needed to increase awareness and knowledge of genetic testing for cancer risk and to reduce the perceived stigma and taboo surrounding the topic of cancer in ethnic minority groups. More detailed research is needed in countries other than the US and

  1. Genetically engineered multivalent single chain antibody constructs for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surinder Batra

    2006-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches against the advanced stages of human solid tumors are palliative rather than curative. Many modalities, including, surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, either alone or in combination have met with only modest success for advanced metastatic cancers. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) combines the specificity of monoclonal antibodies with cytotoxic effects of radioisotopes. It is the ''smart'' way of delivering radiation to the known and occult metastatic cancer cells and is independent of drug toxicity and/or hormone resistance. The tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) containing the unique disaccharide sialyl-Tn, is highly expressed in majority of adenocarcinomas, including carcinomas of the prostate, breast, ovaries, pancreas and colon (80-90%) compared to undetectable expression in normal tissues. Monoclonal antibody CC49, reactive with TAG-72, after conjugation to potent gamma- and beta-emitting radionuclides, has been useful in selective systemic radiolocalization of disease and therapy of primary and metastatic tumor sites. However, limited therapeutic responses were observed in patients. Limited success of antibody based delivery of radioisotopes can be attributed to several factors including undesirable pharmacokinetics, poor tumor uptake and high immunogenicity of intact antibodies (IgGs). The primary factors contributing towards the failure of RIT include: (1) longer serum half-lives of the intact IgG molecules resulting in the radiotoxicity, (2) generation of human antibodies against murine antibodies (HAMA) that limits the frequency of dose administration, (3) poor diffusion rates of intact IgG due to the large size and (4) high interstitial fluid pressures (IFP) encountered in solid tumors. The major goal of our multidisciplinary project was to develop specific novel radiopharmaceuticals, with desired pharmacokinetics, for the diagnosis and therapy of solid tumors. To overcome the low uptake of radioactivity by tumors and to

  2. Genetic testing for hereditary melanoma and pancreatic cancer: a longitudinal study of psychological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinwall, Lisa G; Taber, Jennifer M; Leaf, Samantha L; Kohlmann, Wendy; Leachman, Sancy A

    2013-02-01

    CDKN2A/p16 mutations confer 76% lifetime risk of melanoma and up to 17% lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer. Our objective was to determine the short- and long-term impact of CDKN2A/p16 genetic counseling and test reporting on psychological distress, cancer worry, and perceived costs and benefits of testing. Prospective changes in anxiety, depression, and cancer worry following CDKN2A/p16 counseling and test reporting were evaluated at multiple assessments over 2 years among 60 adult members of melanoma-prone families; 37 participants completed the 2-year follow-up. Quantitative and qualitative assessments of the costs and benefits of testing were carried out. Outcomes were evaluated among unaffected noncarriers (n = 27), unaffected carriers (n = 15), and affected carriers (n = 18). Reported anxiety and depression were low. For carriers and noncarriers, anxiety decreased significantly throughout the 2-year period, whereas depression and melanoma worry showed short-term decreases. Worry about pancreatic cancer was low and decreased significantly. In all groups, test-related distress and uncertainty were low, regret was absent, and positive experiences were high. All participants (>93% at each assessment) reported at least one perceived benefit of genetic testing; only 15.9% listed any negative aspect. Carriers reported increased knowledge about melanoma risk and prevention (78.3%) and increased prevention and screening behaviors for self and family (65.2%). Noncarriers reported increased knowledge (95.2%) and emotional benefits (71.4%). Among US participants familiar with their hereditary melanoma risk through prior epidemiological research participation, CDKN2A/p16 genetic testing provides multiple perceived benefits to both carriers and noncarriers without inducing distress in general or worry about melanoma or pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Clinical verification of genetic results returned to research participants: findings from a Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, Mercy Y; Truitt, Anjali R; Tenney, Lederle; Fisher, Douglass; Lindor, Noralane M; Veenstra, David; Jarvik, Gail P; Newcomb, Polly A; Fullerton, Stephanie M

    2017-11-01

    The extent to which participants act to clinically verify research results is largely unknown. This study examined whether participants who received Lynch syndrome (LS)-related findings pursued researchers' recommendation to clinically verify results with testing performed by a CLIA-certified laboratory. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center site of the multinational Colon Cancer Family Registry offered non-CLIA individual genetic research results to select registry participants (cases and their enrolled relatives) from 2011 to 2013. Participants who elected to receive results were counseled on the importance of verifying results at a CLIA-certified laboratory. Twenty-six (76.5%) of the 34 participants who received genetic results completed 2- and 12-month postdisclosure surveys; 42.3% of these (11/26) participated in a semistructured follow-up interview. Within 12 months of result disclosure, only 4 (15.4%) of 26 participants reported having verified their results in a CLIA-certified laboratory; of these four cases, all research and clinical results were concordant. Reasons for pursuing clinical verification included acting on the recommendation of the research team and informing future clinical care. Those who did not verify results cited lack of insurance coverage and limited perceived personal benefit of clinical verification as reasons for inaction. These findings suggest researchers will need to address barriers to seeking clinical verification in order to ensure that the intended benefits of returning genetic research results are realized. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Hormonotherapy for breast cancer prevention: What about women with genetic predisposition to breast cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénéchal, Claire; Reyal, Fabien; Callet, Nasrine; This, Pascale; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fourme, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    In France, women carrying BRCA1/2 mutation, at an identified high risk of breast cancer are recommended to undergo breast MRI screening. That screening does not however prevent the risk of developing a breast cancer. The only alternative to breast cancer screening available in France is surgical prevention by prophylactic mastectomy. An interesting option for women who wish to reduce their breast cancer risk, but are unready for prophylactic mastectomy is a preventive hormonal treatment by aromatase inhibitors, or selective estrogens receptor modulators (SERMs). Reliable clinical trials show the efficiency of tamoxifen, raloxifen, exemestane, and anastrozole especially, in reducing breast cancer incidence by 33%, 34%, 65% and 53% respectively. This article tries to sum up the main published trials of breast cancer prevention with hormonal treatment, and presents the latest American and English clinical guidelines concerning hormonal prevention for women at high risk of breast cancer, and starts thinking about the possibilities of hormonoprevention, especially among women carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation in France. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Pancreatic cancer cell lines as patient-derived avatars: genetic characterisation and functional utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Erik S; Balaji, Uthra; Mannakee, Brian; Vail, Paris; Eslinger, Cody; Moxom, Christopher; Mansour, John; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K

    2018-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a therapy recalcitrant disease with the worst survival rate of common solid tumours. Preclinical models that accurately reflect the genetic and biological diversity of PDAC will be important for delineating features of tumour biology and therapeutic vulnerabilities. 27 primary PDAC tumours were employed for genetic analysis and development of tumour models. Tumour tissue was used for derivation of xenografts and cell lines. Exome sequencing was performed on the originating tumour and developed models. RNA sequencing, histological and functional analyses were employed to determine the relationship of the patient-derived models to clinical presentation of PDAC. The cohort employed captured the genetic diversity of PDAC. From most cases, both cell lines and xenograft models were developed. Exome sequencing confirmed preservation of the primary tumour mutations in developed cell lines, which remained stable with extended passaging. The level of genetic conservation in the cell lines was comparable to that observed with patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. Unlike historically established PDAC cancer cell lines, patient-derived models recapitulated the histological architecture of the primary tumour and exhibited metastatic spread similar to that observed clinically. Detailed genetic analyses of tumours and derived models revealed features of ex vivo evolution and the clonal architecture of PDAC. Functional analysis was used to elucidate therapeutic vulnerabilities of relevance to treatment of PDAC. These data illustrate that with the appropriate methods it is possible to develop cell lines that maintain genetic features of PDAC. Such models serve as important substrates for analysing the significance of genetic variants and create a unique biorepository of annotated cell lines and xenografts that were established simultaneously from same primary tumour. These models can be used to infer genetic and empirically determined

  6. Effects of interactions between common genetic variants and alcohol consumption on colorectal cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; Shin, Aesun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2018-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified approximately 40 common genetic loci associated with colorectal cancer risk. To investigate possible gene-environment interactions (GEIs) between GWAS-identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alcohol consumption with respect to colorectal cancer, a hospital-based case-control study was conducted. Results Higher levels of alcohol consumption as calculated based on a standardized definition of a drink (1 drink=12.5g of ethanol) were associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR=2.47, 95% CI=1.62-3.76 for heavy drinkers [>50g/day] compared to never drinkers; ptrendcolorectal cancer associated with the G allele of rs6687758 tended to increase among individuals in the heavier alcohol consumption strata. A statistically significant association between rs6687758 and colorectal cancer risk was observed among moderate alcohol drinkers who consumed between >12.5 and ≤50g of alcohol per day (OR=1.46, 95% CI=1.01-2.11). Methods A total of 2,109 subjects (703 colorectal cancer patients and 1,406 healthy controls) were recruited from the Korean National Cancer Center. For genotyping, 30 GWAS-identified SNPs were selected. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate associations of SNPs and alcohol consumption with colorectal cancer risk. We also tested GEIs between SNPs and alcohol consumption using a logistic model with multiplicative interaction terms. Conclusions Our results suggest that SNP rs6687758 at 1q41 may interact with alcohol consumption in the etiology of colorectal cancer. PMID:29464080

  7. Effects of interactions between common genetic variants and alcohol consumption on colorectal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; Shin, Aesun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2018-01-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified approximately 40 common genetic loci associated with colorectal cancer risk. To investigate possible gene-environment interactions (GEIs) between GWAS-identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alcohol consumption with respect to colorectal cancer, a hospital-based case-control study was conducted. Higher levels of alcohol consumption as calculated based on a standardized definition of a drink (1 drink=12.5g of ethanol) were associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR=2.47, 95% CI=1.62-3.76 for heavy drinkers [>50g/day] compared to never drinkers; p trend colorectal cancer associated with the G allele of rs6687758 tended to increase among individuals in the heavier alcohol consumption strata. A statistically significant association between rs6687758 and colorectal cancer risk was observed among moderate alcohol drinkers who consumed between >12.5 and ≤50g of alcohol per day (OR=1.46, 95% CI=1.01-2.11). A total of 2,109 subjects (703 colorectal cancer patients and 1,406 healthy controls) were recruited from the Korean National Cancer Center. For genotyping, 30 GWAS-identified SNPs were selected. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate associations of SNPs and alcohol consumption with colorectal cancer risk. We also tested GEIs between SNPs and alcohol consumption using a logistic model with multiplicative interaction terms. Our results suggest that SNP rs6687758 at 1q41 may interact with alcohol consumption in the etiology of colorectal cancer.

  8. ["Screening" in special situations. Assessing predictive genetic screening for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Susanna; Wild, Claudia; Schamberger, Chantal

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this health technology assessment was to analyse the current scientific and genetic counselling on predictive genetic testing for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer. Predictive genetic testing will be available for several common diseases in the future and questions related to financial issues and quality standards will be raised. This report is based on a systematic/nonsystematic literature search in several databases (e.g. EmBase, Medline, Cochrane Library) and on a specific health technology assessment report (CCOHTA) and review (American Gastroenterological Ass.), respectively. Laboratory test methods, early detection methods and the benefit from prophylactic interventions were analysed and social consequences interpreted. Breast and colorectal cancer are counted among the most frequently cancer diseases. Most of them are based on random accumulation of risk factors, 5-10% show a familial determination. A hereditary modified gene is responsible for the increased cancer risk. In these families, high tumour frequency, young age at diagnosis and multiple primary tumours are remarkable. GENETIC DIAGNOSIS: Sequence analysis is the gold standard. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a quick alternative method. The identification of the responsible gene defect in an affected family member is important. If the test result is positive there is an uncertainty whether the disease will develop or not, when and in which degree, which is founded in the geno-/phenotype correlation. The individual risk estimation is based upon empirical evidence. The test results affect the whole family. Currently, primary prevention is possible for familial adenomatous polyposis (celecoxib, prophylactic colectomy) and for hereditary mamma carcinoma (prophylactic mastectomy). The so-called preventive medical check-ups are early detection examinations. The evidence about early detection methods for colorectal cancer is better than for breast cancer. Prophylactic

  9. Pathway-based Analysis of the Hidden Genetic Heterogeneities in Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many cancers apparently showing similar phenotypes are actually distinct at the molecular level, leading to very different responses to the same treatment. It has been recently demonstrated that pathway-based approaches are robust and reliable for genetic analysis of cancers. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether such function-based approaches are useful in deciphering molecular heterogeneities in cancers. Therefore, we aimed to test this possibility in the present study. First, we used a NCI60 dataset to validate the ability of pathways to correctly partition samples. Next, we applied the proposed method to identify the hidden subtypes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Finally, the clinical significance of the identified subtypes was verified using survival analysis. For the NCI60 dataset, we achieved highly accurate partitions that best fit the clinical cancer phenotypes. Subsequently, for a DLBCL dataset, we identified three hidden subtypes that showed very different 10-year overall survival rates (90%, 46% and 20% and were highly significantly (P = 0.008 correlated with the clinical survival rate. This study demonstrated that the pathway-based approach is promising for unveiling genetic heterogeneities in complex human diseases.

  10. The impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: three years after testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Veronica R; Meiser, Bettina; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Gaff, Clara; St John, D James; Halliday, Jane L

    2007-05-01

    To fully assess predictive genetic testing programs, it is important to assess outcomes over periods of time longer than the 1-year follow-up reported in the literature. We conducted a 3-year study of individuals who received predictive genetic test results for previously identified familial mutations in Australian Familial Cancer Clinics. Questionnaires were sent before attendance at the familial cancer clinic and 2 weeks, 4 months, 1 year, and 3 years after receiving test results. Psychological measures were included each time, and preventive behaviors were assessed at baseline and 1 and 3 years. Psychological measures were adjusted for age, gender, and baseline score. The study included 19 carriers and 54 non-carriers. We previously reported an increase in mean cancer-specific distress in carriers at 2 weeks with a return to baseline levels by 12 months. This level was maintained until 3 years. Non-carriers showed sustained decreases after testing with a significantly lower level at 3 years compared with baseline (P depression and anxiety scores did not differ between carriers and non-carriers and, at 3 years, were similar to baseline. All carriers and 7% of non-carriers had had a colonoscopy by 3 years, and 69% of 13 female carriers had undergone gynecological screening in the previous 2 years. Prophylactic surgery was rare. This report of long-term data indicates appropriate screening and improved psychological measures for non-carriers with no evidence of undue psychological distress in carriers of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations.

  11. Distinct Mechanisms of Nuclease-Directed DNA-Structure-Induced Genetic Instability in Cancer Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junhua; Wang, Guliang; Del Mundo, Imee M; McKinney, Jennifer A; Lu, Xiuli; Bacolla, Albino; Boulware, Stephen B; Zhang, Changsheng; Zhang, Haihua; Ren, Pengyu; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Vasquez, Karen M

    2018-01-30

    Sequences with the capacity to adopt alternative DNA structures have been implicated in cancer etiology; however, the mechanisms are unclear. For example, H-DNA-forming sequences within oncogenes have been shown to stimulate genetic instability in mammals. Here, we report that H-DNA-forming sequences are enriched at translocation breakpoints in human cancer genomes, further implicating them in cancer etiology. H-DNA-induced mutations were suppressed in human cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair nucleases, ERCC1-XPF and XPG, but were stimulated in cells deficient in FEN1, a replication-related endonuclease. Further, we found that these nucleases cleaved H-DNA conformations, and the interactions of modeled H-DNA with ERCC1-XPF, XPG, and FEN1 proteins were explored at the sub-molecular level. The results suggest mechanisms of genetic instability triggered by H-DNA through distinct structure-specific, cleavage-based replication-independent and replication-dependent pathways, providing critical evidence for a role of the DNA structure itself in the etiology of cancer and other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inherited Disease Genetics Improves the Identification of Cancer-Associated Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyang Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of biologically significant variants in cancer genomes is critical to therapeutic discovery, but it is limited by the statistical power needed to discern driver from passenger. Independent biological data can be used to filter cancer exomes and increase statistical power. Large genetic databases for inherited diseases are uniquely suited to this task because they contain specific amino acid alterations with known pathogenicity and molecular mechanisms. However, no rigorous method to overlay this information onto the cancer exome exists. Here, we present a computational methodology that overlays any variant database onto the somatic mutations in all cancer exomes. We validate the computation experimentally and identify novel associations in a re-analysis of 7362 cancer exomes. This analysis identified activating SOS1 mutations associated with Noonan syndrome as significantly altered in melanoma and the first kinase-activating mutations in ACVR1 associated with adult tumors. Beyond a filter, significant variants found in both rare cancers and rare inherited diseases increase the unmet medical need for therapeutics that target these variants and may bootstrap drug discovery efforts in orphan indications.

  13. Targeted next generation sequencing of parotid gland cancer uncovers genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Inga; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Meinrath, Jeannine; Meyer, Moritz F; Heukamp, Lukas C; Drebber, Uta; Quaas, Alexander; Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Odenthal, Margarete; Stenner, Markus

    2015-07-20

    Salivary gland cancer represents a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors. Due to their low incidence and the existence of multiple morphologically defined subtypes, these tumors are still poorly understood with regard to their molecular pathogenesis and therapeutically relevant genetic alterations.Performing a systematic and comprehensive study covering 13 subtypes of salivary gland cancer, next generation sequencing was done on 84 tissue samples of parotid gland cancer using multiplex PCR for enrichment of cancer related gene loci covering hotspots of 46 cancer genes.Mutations were identified in 22 different genes. The most frequent alterations affected TP53, followed by RAS genes, PIK3CA, SMAD4 and members of the ERB family. HRAS mutations accounted for more than 90% of RAS mutations, occurring especially in epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas and salivary duct carcinomas. Additional mutations in PIK3CA also affected particularly epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas and salivary duct carcinomas, occurring simultaneously with HRAS mutations in almost all cases, pointing to an unknown and therapeutically relevant molecular constellation. Interestingly, 14% of tumors revealed mutations in surface growth factor receptor genes including ALK, HER2, ERBB4, FGFR, cMET and RET, which might prove to be targetable by new therapeutic agents. 6% of tumors revealed mutations in SMAD4.In summary, our data provide novel insight into the fundamental molecular heterogeneity of salivary gland cancer, relevant in terms of tumor classification and the establishment of targeted therapeutic concepts.

  14. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D suscept...

  15. Genetic Variation in GSTP1, Lung Function, Risk of Lung Cancer, and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marianne S.; Dahl, Morten; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    66,069 individuals from the white general population for two common functional variants in the glutathione S-transferase pi 1 gene (GSTP1)—amino acid isoleucine 105 changed to a valine (Ile105Val) and amino acid alanine 114 changed to a valine (Ala114Val)—and recorded lung function, lung cancer......Introduction Glutathione S-transferase pi 1 metabolizes carcinogens from tobacco smoke in the lung. We tested whether genetically altered glutathione S-transferase pi 1 activity affects lung function and risk for tobacco-related cancer and mortality in the general population. Methods We genotyped......, tobacco-related cancer, and death as outcomes. Results Lung function was increased stepwise with the Ile105Val genotype overall (p

  16. Functional and genetic deconstruction of the cellular origin in liver cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, research on primary liver cancers has particularly highlighted the uncommon plasticity of differentiated parenchymal liver cells (that is, hepatocytes and cholangiocytes (also known as biliary epithelial cells)), the role of liver progenitor cells in malignant transformation......, the importance of the tumour microenvironment and the molecular complexity of liver tumours. Whereas other reviews have focused on the landscape of genetic alterations that promote development and progression of primary liver cancers and the role of the tumour microenvironment, the crucial importance...... of the cellular origin of liver cancer has been much less explored. Therefore, in this Review, we emphasize the importance and complexity of the cellular origin in tumour initiation and progression, and attempt to integrate this aspect with recent discoveries in tumour genomics and the contribution...

  17. Genetic variation in selenoprotein genes, lifestyle, and risk of colon and rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L Slattery

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Associations between selenium and cancer have directed attention to role of selenoproteins in the carcinogenic process. METHODS: We used data from two population-based case-control studies of colon (n = 1555 cases, 1956 controls and rectal (n = 754 cases, 959 controls cancer. We evaluated the association between genetic variation in TXNRD1, TXNRD2, TXNRD3, C11orf31 (SelH, SelW, SelN1, SelS, SepX, and SeP15 with colorectal cancer risk. RESULTS: After adjustment for multiple comparisons, several associations were observed. Two SNPs in TXNRD3 were associated with rectal cancer (rs11718498 dominant OR 1.42 95% CI 1.16,1.74 pACT 0.0036 and rs9637365 recessive 0.70 95% CI 0.55,0.90 pACT 0.0208. Four SNPs in SepN1 were associated with rectal cancer (rs11247735 recessive OR 1.30 95% CI 1.04,1.63 pACT 0.0410; rs2072749 GGvsAA OR 0.53 95% CI 0.36,0.80 pACT 0.0159; rs4659382 recessive OR 0.58 95% CI 0.39,0.86 pACT 0.0247; rs718391 dominant OR 0.76 95% CI 0.62,0.94 pACT 0.0300. Interaction between these genes and exposures that could influence these genes showed numerous significant associations after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Two SNPs in TXNRD1 and four SNPs in TXNRD2 interacted with aspirin/NSAID to influence colon cancer; one SNP in TXNRD1, two SNPs in TXNRD2, and one SNP in TXNRD3 interacted with aspirin/NSAIDs to influence rectal cancer. Five SNPs in TXNRD2 and one in SelS, SeP15, and SelW1 interacted with estrogen to modify colon cancer risk; one SNP in SelW1 interacted with estrogen to alter rectal cancer risk. Several SNPs in this candidate pathway influenced survival after diagnosis with colon cancer (SeP15 and SepX1 increased HRR and rectal cancer (SepX1 increased HRR. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support an association between selenoprotein genes and colon and rectal cancer development and survival after diagnosis. Given the interactions observed, it is likely that the impact of cancer susceptibility from genotype is

  18. The impact of genetic counselling on risk perception and mental health in women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, M; Lloyd, S; Davidson, J; Meyer, L; Eeles, R; Ebbs, S; Murday, V

    1999-02-01

    The present study investigated: (1) perception of genetic risk and, (2) the psychological effects of genetic counselling in women with a family history of breast cancer. Using a prospective design, with assessment pre- and post-genetic counselling at clinics and by postal follow-up at 1, 6 and 12 months, attenders at four South London genetic clinics were assessed. Participants included 282 women with a family history of breast cancer. Outcome was measured in terms of mental health, cancer-specific distress and risk perception. High levels of cancer-specific distress were found pre-genetic counselling, with 28% of participants reporting that they worried about breast cancer 'frequently or constantly' and 18% that worry about breast cancer was 'a severe or definite problem'. Following genetic counselling, levels of cancer-specific distress were unchanged. General mental health remained unchanged over time (33% psychiatric cases detected pre-genetic counselling, 27% at 12 months after genetic counselling). Prior to their genetics consultation, participants showed poor knowledge of their lifetime risk of breast cancer since there was no association between their perceived lifetime risk (when they were asked to express this as a 1 in x odds ratio) and their actual risk, when the latter was calculated by the geneticist at the clinic using the CASH model. In contrast, women were more accurate about their risk of breast cancer pre-genetic counselling when this was assessed in broad categorical terms (i.e. very much lower/very much higher than the average woman) with a significant association between this rating and the subsequently calculated CASH risk figure (P = 0.001). Genetic counselling produced a modest shift in the accuracy of perceived lifetime risk, expressed as an odds ratio, which was maintained at 12 months' follow-up. A significant minority failed to benefit from genetic counselling; 77 women continued to over-estimate their risk and maintain high levels of

  19. Evolution and clinical impact of co-occurring genetic alterations in advanced-stage EGFR-mutant lung cancers. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A widespread approach to modern cancer therapy is to identify a single oncogenic driver gene and target its mutant-protein product (for example, EGFR-inhibitor treatment in EGFR-mutant lung cancers). However, genetically driven resistance to targeted therapy limits patient survival. Through genomic analysis of 1,122 EGFR-mutant lung cancer cell-free DNA samples and whole-exome analysis of seven longitudinally collected tumor samples from a patient with EGFR-mutant lung cancer, we identified critical co-occurring oncogenic events present in most advanced-stage EGFR-mutant lung cancers.

  20. HPV16 genetic variation and the development of cervical cancer worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, I; Gheit, T; Iannacone, M R; Vignat, J; Sylla, B S; Del Mistro, A; Franceschi, S; Tommasino, M; Clifford, G M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Factors that favour a small proportion of HPV16 infections to progress to cancer are still poorly understood, but several studies have implicated a role of HPV16 genetic variation. Methods: To evaluate the association between HPV16 genetic variants and cervical cancer risk, we designed a multicentre case–control study based on HPV16-positive cervical samples (1121 cervical cancer cases and 400 controls) from the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank. By sequencing the E6 gene, HPV16 isolates were classified into variant lineages and the European (EUR)-lineage isolates were subclassified by the common polymorphism T350G. Results: Incidence of variant lineages differed between cases and controls in Europe/Central Asia (P=0.006, driven by an underrepresentation of African lineages in cases), and South/Central America (P=0.056, driven by an overrepresentation of Asian American/North American lineages in cases). EUR-350G isolates were significantly underrepresented in cervical cancer in East Asia (odds ratio (OR)=0.02 vs EUR-350T; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.00–0.37) and Europe/Central Asia (OR=0.42; 95% CI=0.27–0.64), whereas the opposite was true in South/Central America (OR=4.69; 95% CI=2.07–10.66). Conclusion: We observed that the distribution of HPV16 variants worldwide, and their relative risks for cervical cancer appear to be population-dependent. PMID:23169278

  1. Molecular Genetics and Gene Therapy in Esophageal Cancer: a Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Noori Daloii Ph.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: With approximately 386,000 deaths per year, esophageal cancer is the 6th most common cause of death due to cancer in the world. This cancer, like any other cancer, is the outcome of genetic alterations or environmental factors such as tobacco smoke and gastro-esophageal reflux. Tobacco smoking is a major etiologic factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in western countries, and it increases the risk by approximately 3 to 5 folds. Chronic gastro-esophageal reflux usually leads to the replacement of squamous mucosa by intestinal-type Barrett’s metaplastic mucosa which is considered the most important factor causing esophageal adenocarcinoma. In contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma, different risk factors and mechanisms, such as mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, play an important role in causing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Molecular studies on esophageal cancers have revealed frequent genetic abnormalities in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, including altered expression of p53, p16, cyclin D1, EGFR, E-cadherin, COX-2, iNOS, RARs, Rb, hTERT, p21, APC, c-MYC, VEGF, TGT-α and NF-κB. Many studies have focused on the role of different polymorphisms such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 2 in causing esophageal cancer. Different agents including bestatin, curcumin, black raspberries, 5-lipoxygenase (LOX and COX-2 inhibitors have been found to play a role in inhibiting esophageal carcinogenesis. Different gene therapy approaches including p53 and p21WAF1 replacement gene therapies and therapy by suicide genes have also been experimented. Moreover, efforts have been made to use nanotechnology and aptamer technology in this regard.

  2. Is it acceptable to approach colorectal cancer patients at diagnosis to discuss genetic testing? A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Porteous, M; Dunckley, M; Appleton, S; Catt, S; Dunlop, M; Campbell, H; Cull, A

    2003-01-01

    In this pilot study, the acceptability of approaching 111 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients with the offer of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed. A total of 78% of participants found it highly acceptable to have the information about HNPCC brought to their attention at that time.

  3. Recurrent candidiasis and early-onset gastric cancer in a patient with a genetically defined partial MYD88 defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; van der Post, Rachel S.; de Voer, Richarda M.; Kets, C. Marleen; Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Vries, I. Jolanda M; Netea, Mihai G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Teodorczyk, Urszula; Schackert, Hans K.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Ranzani, Guglielmina N.; Molinaro, Valeria; van Hest, Liselotte P.; Hes, Frederik J.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Genuardi, Maurizio; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Wagner, Anja; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Pinheiro, Hugo; Oliveira, Carla; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Høberg Vetti, Hildegunn; Van Krieken, J. Han J M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. A woman who suffered from recurrent candidiasis throughout her life developed diffuse-type gastric cancer at the age of 23 years. Using whole-exome sequencing we identified a germline homozygous missense variant in MYD88.

  4. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic.

  5. Sending family history questionnaires to patients before a colonoscopy improves genetic counseling for hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Koen; Eisinger, Joey D; Letteboer, Tom G; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Siersema, Peter D; Moons, Leon M G

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether sending a family history questionnaire to patients prior to undergoing colonoscopy results in an increased availability of family history and better genetic counseling. A questionnaire was mailed to patients before they underwent outpatient colonoscopy at a university hospital in 2013. These patients' additional characteristics and referral for genetic evaluation were retrieved from the electronic medical records. Patients undergoing inpatient coloboscopy, with confirmed hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) or inflammatory bowel disease were excluded. All study patients from 2010 to 2013 were matched with the database of the genetics department to determine who consulted a geneticist. A total of 6163 patients underwent colonoscopy from 2010 to 2013. Of 1421 who underwent colonoscopy in 2013, 53 (3.7%) consulted a geneticist, while 75 (1.6%) of 4742 patients undergoing colonoscopy between 2010 and 2012 did so (P history was not recorded in the electronic medical records of 393 (40.3%). In 129 (32.8%), family history was obtained from the completed questionnaire. In 2013, 49 (60.5%) out of 81 patients referred for genetic counseling were referred based on their family history. Eight (9.9%) patients were referred based on the completed questionnaire. Screening for hereditary CRC in a population undergoing outpatient colonoscopy with a questionnaire sent by mail resulted in an increased availability of family histories and genetic counseling. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. [Genetic predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer: importance of test results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenetic consultations and predictive BRCA1/2 testing are intertwined processes and the specific impact of these genetic tests if performed alone through direct-to-consumer offers remains unknown. Noteworthy, the expectations of patients vary with their own status, whether they are affected or not by breast cancer at the time genetic testing is performed. The prescription of genetic tests for BCRA mutations has doubled in France between 2003 and 2009. There is a consensus on the fact that genetic results disclosure led to a significant increase in the knowledge and understanding that the patients have of the genetic risk and also changed the medical follow-up of these patients. Evaluating the psychological burden of tests disclosure did not reveal any major distress in patients who are followed by high-quality multidisciplinary teams. Longitudinal cohorts studies have now evaluated the perception and behaviour of these patients, and observed sociodemographic as well as geographic and psychosocial differences both in the acceptation of prophylactic strategies such as surgery, and time to surgery. © 2011 médecine/sciences - Inserm / SRMS.

  7. Genetic subclone architecture of tumor clone-initiating cells in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessler, Klara M; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Huebschmann, Daniel; Balasubramanian, Gnana Prakash; Dubash, Taronish D; Dieter, Sebastian M; Siegl, Christine; Herbst, Friederike; Weber, Sarah; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Fronza, Raffaele; Buchhalter, Ivo; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Eils, Roland; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Brors, Benedikt; Schlesner, Matthias; Ball, Claudia R; Glimm, Hanno

    2017-07-03

    A hierarchically organized cell compartment drives colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. Genetic barcoding allows monitoring of the clonal output of tumorigenic cells without prospective isolation. In this study, we asked whether tumor clone-initiating cells (TcICs) were genetically heterogeneous and whether differences in self-renewal and activation reflected differential kinetics among individual subclones or functional hierarchies within subclones. Monitoring genomic subclone kinetics in three patient tumors and corresponding serial xenografts and spheroids by high-coverage whole-genome sequencing, clustering of genetic aberrations, subclone combinatorics, and mutational signature analysis revealed at least two to four genetic subclones per sample. Long-term growth in serial xenografts and spheroids was driven by multiple genomic subclones with profoundly differing growth dynamics and hence different quantitative contributions over time. Strikingly, genetic barcoding demonstrated stable functional heterogeneity of CRC TcICs during serial xenografting despite near-complete changes in genomic subclone contribution. This demonstrates that functional heterogeneity is, at least frequently, present within genomic subclones and independent of mutational subclone differences. © 2017 Giessler et al.

  8. Molecular profiles of screen detected vs. symptomatic breast cancer and their impact on survival: results from a clinical series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crispo, Anna; Esposito, Emanuela; Amore, Alfonso; Di Bonito, Maurizio; Botti, Gerardo; Montella, Maurizio; Barba, Maddalena; D’Aiuto, Giuseppe; De Laurentiis, Michelino; Grimaldi, Maria; Rinaldo, Massimo; Caolo, Giuseppina; D’Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata

    2013-01-01

    Stage shift is widely considered a major determinant of the survival benefit conferred by breast cancer screening. However, factors and mechanisms underlying such a prognostic advantage need further clarification. We sought to compare the molecular characteristics of screen detected vs. symptomatic breast cancers and assess whether differences in tumour biology might translate into survival benefit. In a clinical series of 448 women with operable breast cancer, the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used to estimate the likelihood of cancer recurrence and death. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for the multivariate analyses including mode of detection, age at diagnosis, tumour size, and lymph node status. These same models were applied to subgroups defined by molecular subtypes. Screen detected breast cancers tended to show more favourable clinicopathological features and survival outcomes compared to symptomatic cancers. The luminal A subtype was more common in women with mammography detected tumours than in symptomatic patients (68.5 vs. 59.0%, p=0.04). Data analysis across categories of molecular subtypes revealed significantly longer disease free and overall survival for screen detected cancers with a luminal A subtype only (p=0.01 and 0.02, respectively). For women with a luminal A subtype, the independent prognostic role of mode of detection on recurrence was confirmed in Cox proportional hazard models (p=0.03). An independent role of modality of detection on survival was also suggested (p=0.05). Molecular subtypes did not substantially explain the differences in survival outcomes between screened and symptomatic patients. However, our results suggest that molecular profiles might play a role in interpreting such differences at least partially. Further studies are warranted to reinterpret the efficacy of screening programmes in the light of tumour biology

  9. Characterizing genetic risk at known prostate cancer susceptibility loci in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Haiman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available GWAS of prostate cancer have been remarkably successful in revealing common genetic variants and novel biological pathways that are linked with its etiology. A more complete understanding of inherited susceptibility to prostate cancer in the general population will come from continuing such discovery efforts and from testing known risk alleles in diverse racial and ethnic groups. In this large study of prostate cancer in African American men (3,425 prostate cancer cases and 3,290 controls, we tested 49 risk variants located in 28 genomic regions identified through GWAS in men of European and Asian descent, and we replicated associations (at p≤0.05 with roughly half of these markers. Through fine-mapping, we identified nearby markers in many regions that better define associations in African Americans. At 8q24, we found 9 variants (p≤6×10(-4 that best capture risk of prostate cancer in African Americans, many of which are more common in men of African than European descent. The markers found to be associated with risk at each locus improved risk modeling in African Americans (per allele OR = 1.17 over the alleles reported in the original GWAS (OR = 1.08. In summary, in this detailed analysis of the prostate cancer risk loci reported from GWAS, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk in some regions that better define the association with prostate cancer in African Americans. Our findings with variants at 8q24 also reinforce the importance of this region as a major risk locus for prostate cancer in men of African ancestry.

  10. Family history of cancer predicts endometrial cancer risk independently of Lynch Syndrome: Implications for genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Tan, Yen Y; Buchanan, Daniel D; Bowman, Michael; Walters, Rhiannon J; Obermair, Andreas; Quinn, Michael A; Blomfield, Penelope B; Brand, Alison; Leung, Yee; Oehler, Martin K; Kirk, Judy A; O'Mara, Tracy A; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2017-11-01

    To determine endometrial cancer (EC) risk according to family cancer history, including assessment by degree of relatedness, type of and age at cancer diagnosis of relatives. Self-reported family cancer history was available for 1353 EC patients and 628 controls. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association between EC and cancer diagnosis in ≥1 first or second degree relative, and to assess whether level of risk differed by degree of relationship and/or relative's age at diagnosis. Risk was also evaluated for family history of up to three cancers from known familial syndromes (Lynch, Cowden, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) overall, by histological subtype and, for a subset of 678 patients, by EC tumor mismatch repair (MMR) gene expression. Report of EC in ≥1 first- or second-degree relative was associated with significantly increased risk of EC (P=3.8×10 -7 ), independent of lifestyle risk factors. There was a trend in increasing EC risk with closer relatedness and younger age at EC diagnosis in relatives (P Trend =4.43×10 -6 ), and with increasing numbers of Lynch cancers in relatives (P Trend ≤0.0001). EC risk associated with family history did not differ by proband tumor MMR status, or histological subtype. Reported EC in first- or second-degree relatives remained associated with EC risk after conservative correction for potential misreported family history (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.24-3.37, P=0.004). The strongest predictor of EC risk was closer relatedness and younger EC diagnosis age in ≥1 relative. Associations remained significant irrespective of proband MMR status, and after excluding MMR pathogenic variant carriers, indicating that Lynch syndrome genes do not fully explain familial EC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Recurrent candidiasis and early-onset gastric cancer in a patient with a genetically defined partial MYD88 defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; van der Post, Rachel S; de Voer, Richarda M; Kets, C Marleen; Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Netea, Mihai G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. A woman who suffered from recurrent candidiasis throughout her life developed diffuse-type gastric cancer at the age of 23 years. Using whole-exome sequencing we identified a germline homozygous missense variant in MYD88. Immunological assays on peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed an impaired immune response upon stimulation with Candida albicans, characterized by a defective production of the cytokine interleukin-17. Our data suggest that a genetic defect in MYD88 results in an impaired immune response and may increase gastric cancer risk.

  12. Association of ATM and BMI-1 genetic variation with breast cancer risk in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Li-Ling; Wang, Fu-Chao; Zhang, Ming-Long; Liu, Dan; Chen, Ping; Mei, Qing-Bu; Li, Peng-Hui; Pan, Hong-Ming; Zheng, Li-Hong

    2018-04-24

    We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in ATM and BMI-1 genes can alter the risk of breast cancer through genotyping 6 variants among 524 breast cancer cases and 518 cancer-free controls of Han nationality. This was an observational, hospital-based, case-control association study. Analyses of single variant, linkage, haplotype, interaction and nomogram were performed. Risk was expressed as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). All studied variants were in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and were not linked. The mutant allele frequencies of rs1890637, rs3092856 and rs1801516 in ATM gene were significantly higher in cases than in controls (P = .005, ATM gene were significantly associated with 1.98-fold and 6.04-fold increased risk of breast cancer (95% CI: 1.36-2.90 and 1.65-22.08, respectively). Nomogram analysis estimated that the cumulative proportion of 3 significant variants in ATM gene was about 12.5%. Our findings collectively indicated that ATM gene was a candidate gene in susceptibility to breast cancer in Han Chinese. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  14. Genetic and genomic analysis modeling of germline c-MYC overexpression and cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Virginia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline genetic variation is associated with the differential expression of many human genes. The phenotypic effects of this type of variation may be important when considering susceptibility to common genetic diseases. Three regions at 8q24 have recently been identified to independently confer risk of prostate cancer. Variation at 8q24 has also recently been associated with risk of breast and colorectal cancer. However, none of the risk variants map at or relatively close to known genes, with c-MYC mapping a few hundred kilobases distally. Results This study identifies cis-regulators of germline c-MYC expression in immortalized lymphocytes of HapMap individuals. Quantitative analysis of c-MYC expression in normal prostate tissues suggests an association between overexpression and variants in Region 1 of prostate cancer risk. Somatic c-MYC overexpression correlates with prostate cancer progression and more aggressive tumor forms, which was also a pathological variable associated with Region 1. Expression profiling analysis and modeling of transcriptional regulatory networks predicts a functional association between MYC and the prostate tumor suppressor KLF6. Analysis of MYC/Myc-driven cell transformation and tumorigenesis substantiates a model in which MYC overexpression promotes transformation by down-regulating KLF6. In this model, a feedback loop through E-cadherin down-regulation causes further transactivation of c-MYC. Conclusion This study proposes that variation at putative 8q24 cis-regulator(s of transcription can significantly alter germline c-MYC expression levels and, thus, contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility by down-regulating the prostate tumor suppressor KLF6 gene.

  15. The OncoArray Consortium: a Network for Understanding the Genetic Architecture of Common Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Christopher I.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming; Byun, Jinyoung; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Gayther, Simon A.; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Dunning, Alison M.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Fachal, Laura; Doheny, Kimberly; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Romm, Jane; Pugh, Elizabeth; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Caga-Anan, Charlisse; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kamal, Ahsan; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Van Den Berg, David J.; Nelson, Stefanie; Demetriades, Stephen; Goldgar, David E.; Couch, Fergus J.; Forman, Judith L.; Giles, Graham G.; Conti, David V.; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Waldenberger, Melanie; Brüske, Irene; Hicks, Belynda D.; Ling, Hua; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Manz, Judith; Cunningham, Julie M.; Butterbach, Katja; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraft, Peter; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Lindström, Sara; Adams, Marcia; McKay, James D.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Benlloch, Sara; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brennan, Paul; Riggan, Marjorie; O’Mara, Tracy A.; Shen, Hongbin; Shi, Yongyong; Thompson, Deborah J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Laboissiere, Sylvie; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Shelford, Tameka; Edlund, Christopher K.; Taylor, Jack A.; Field, John K.; Park, Sue K.; Offit, Kenneth; Thomassen, Mads; Schmutzler, Rita; Ottini, Laura; Hung, Rayjean J.; Marchini, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Peters, Ulrike; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Seldin, Michael F.; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Seminara, Daniela; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wide backbone, comprising 230,000 SNPs tagging most common genetic variants, together with dense mapping of known susceptibility regions, rare variants from sequencing experiments, pharmacogenetic markers and cancer related traits. Methods The OncoArray can be genotyped using a novel technology developed by Illumina to facilitate efficient genotyping. The consortium developed standard approaches for selecting SNPs for study, for quality control of markers and for ancestry analysis. The array was genotyped at selected sites and with prespecified replicate samples to permit evaluation of genotyping accuracy among centers and by ethnic background. Results The OncoArray consortium genotyped 447,705 samples. A total of 494,763 SNPs passed quality control steps with a sample success rate of 97% of the samples. Participating sites performed ancestry analysis using a common set of markers and a scoring algorithm based on principal components analysis. Conclusions Results from these analyses will enable researchers to identify new susceptibility loci, perform fine mapping of new or known loci associated with either single or multiple cancers, assess the degree of overlap in cancer causation and pleiotropic effects of loci that have been identified for disease-specific risk, and jointly model genetic, environmental and lifestyle related exposures. Impact Ongoing analyses will shed light on etiology and risk assessment for many types of cancer. PMID:27697780

  16. EXPRESSION OF GENETIC LOCI IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR FRACTION FROM PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The early diagnosis and radical treatment of aggressive prostate cancers (PC is an effective way of improving survival and quality of life in patients. To develop mini-invasive tests is one of the ways of solving the problem. The cells of a peripheral blood mononuclear fraction in the expression patterns of their genetic loci reflect the presence or absence of cancers, including information on therapeutic effectiveness. RT-PRC was used to study the relative expression of 15 genetic loci in a chromosome and one locus of mitochondrial DNA in the cells of the peripheral blood mononuclear fraction in patients with PC or benign prostate hyperplasia and in healthy men. The genetic locus patterns whose change may be of informative value for differential diagnosis in patients with different stages of PC were revealed. The authors studied the relationship and showed the prognostic role and non-relationship of the altered transcriptional activity of loci in the TP53, GSTP1, and IL10 genes in PC to the changes in prostate-specific antigen the level with 90 % specificity and 93 % specificity.

  17. Molecular Detection of Bladder Cancer by Fluorescence Microsatellite Analysis and an Automated Genetic Analyzing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarel Halachmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the ability of an automated fluorescent analyzing system to detect microsatellite alterations, in patients with bladder cancer. We investigated 11 with pathology proven bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC for microsatellite alterations in blood, urine, and tumor biopsies. DNA was prepared by standard methods from blood, urine and resected tumor specimens, and was used for microsatellite analysis. After the primers were fluorescent labeled, amplification of the DNA was performed with PCR. The PCR products were placed into the automated genetic analyser (ABI Prism 310, Perkin Elmer, USA and were subjected to fluorescent scanning with argon ion laser beams. The fluorescent signal intensity measured by the genetic analyzer measured the product size in terms of base pairs. We found loss of heterozygocity (LOH or microsatellite alterations (a loss or gain of nucleotides, which alter the original normal locus size in all the patients by using fluorescent microsatellite analysis and an automated analyzing system. In each case the genetic changes found in urine samples were identical to those found in the resected tumor sample. The studies demonstrated the ability to detect bladder tumor non-invasively by fluorescent microsatellite analysis of urine samples. Our study supports the worldwide trend for the search of non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. We have overcome major obstacles that prevented the clinical use of an experimental system. With our new tested system microsatellite analysis can be done cheaper, faster, easier and with higher scientific accuracy.

  18. Implications of Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations of CDKN2A (p16INK4a in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant gene silencing is highly associated with altered cell cycle regulation during carcinogenesis. In particular, silencing of the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene, which encodes the p16INK4a protein, has a causal link with several different types of cancers. The p16INK4a protein plays an executional role in cell cycle and senescence through the regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK 4/6 and cyclin D complexes. Several genetic and epigenetic aberrations of CDKN2A lead to enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis with recurrence of cancer and poor prognosis. In these cases, the restoration of genetic and epigenetic reactivation of CDKN2A is a practical approach for the prevention and therapy of cancer. This review highlights the genetic status of CDKN2A as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in various cancers.

  19. Pre-test genetic counseling services for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer delivered by non-genetics professionals in the state of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadaparampil, S T; Scherr, C L; Cragun, D; Malo, T L; Pal, T

    2015-05-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer now includes practitioners from multiple healthcare professions, specialties, and settings. This study examined whether non-genetics professionals (NGPs) perform guideline-based patient intake and informed consent before genetic testing. NGPs offering BRCA testing services in Florida (n = 386) were surveyed about clinical practices. Among 81 respondents (response rate = 22%), approximately half reported: sometimes scheduling a separate session for pre-test counseling lasting 11-30 min prior to testing, discussing familial implications of testing, benefits and limitations of risk management options, and discussing the potential psychological impact and insurance-related issues. Few constructed a three-generation pedigree, discussed alternative hereditary cancer syndromes, or the meaning of a variant result. This lack of adherence to guideline-based practice may result in direct harm to patients and their family members. NGPs who are unable to deliver guideline adherent cancer genetics services should focus on identification and referral of at-risk patients to in person or telephone services provided by genetics professionals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Is early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer a hallmark of a genetic susceptibility syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kets, C M; van Krieken, J H J M; van Erp, P E J; Feuth, T; Jacobs, Y H A; Brunner, H G; Ligtenberg, M J L; Hoogerbrugge, N

    2008-02-15

    Most colorectal cancers show either microsatellite or chromosomal instability. A subset of colorectal cancers, especially those diagnosed at young age, is known to show neither of these forms of genetic instability and thus might have a distinct pathogenesis. Colorectal cancers diagnosed at young age are suggestive for hereditary predisposition. We investigate whether such early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancers are a hallmark of a genetic susceptibility syndrome. The ploidy status of microsatellite stable (familial) colorectal cancers of patients diagnosed before age 50 (n = 127) was analyzed in relation to the histopathological characteristics and family history. As a control the ploidy status of sporadic colorectal cancer, with normal staining of mismatch repair proteins, diagnosed at the age of 69 years or above (n = 70) was determined. A diploid DNA content was used as a marker for chromosomal stability. Within the group of patients with (familial) early onset microsatellite stable colorectal cancer the chromosomally stable tumors did not differ from chromosomally unstable tumors with respect to mean age at diagnosis, fulfillment of Amsterdam criteria or pathological characteristics. Segregation analysis did not reveal any family with microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer in 2 relatives. The prevalence of microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer was not significantly different for the early and late onset group (28 and 21%, respectively). We find no evidence that early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer is a hallmark of a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Cancer genetics meets biomolecular mechanism-bridging an age-old gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Raimondi, Francesco; Russell, Robert B

    2018-02-01

    Increasingly available genomic sequencing data are exploited to identify genes and variants contributing to diseases, particularly cancer. Traditionally, methods to find such variants have relied heavily on allele frequency and/or familial history, often neglecting to consider any mechanistic understanding of their functional consequences. Thus, while the set of known cancer-related genes has increased, for many, their mechanistic role in the disease is not completely understood. This issue highlights a wide gap between the disciplines of genetics, which largely aims to correlate genetic events with phenotype, and molecular biology, which ultimately aims at a mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Fortunately, new methods and several systematic studies have proved illuminating for many disease genes and variants by integrating sequencing with mechanistic data, including biomolecular structures and interactions. These have provided new interpretations for known mutations and suggested new disease-relevant variants and genes. Here, we review these approaches and discuss particular examples where these have had a profound impact on the understanding of human cancers. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, B; Collins, V; Warren, R; Gaff, C; St John, D J B; Young, M-A; Harrop, K; Brown, J; Halliday, J

    2004-12-01

    The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed in 114 individuals (32 carriers and 82 non-carriers) attending familial cancer clinics, using mailed self-administered questionnaires prior to, 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months after carrier status disclosure. Compared to baseline, carriers showed a significant increase in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer 2 weeks (t = 2.49; p = 0.014) and a significant decrease in mean depression scores 2 weeks post-notification of result (t = -3.98; p depression scores 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months post-notification. Significant decreases from baseline for mean state anxiety scores were also observed for non-carriers 2 weeks post-notification (t = -3.99; p < 0.001). These data indicate that predictive genetic testing for HNPCC leads to psychological benefits amongst non-carriers, and no adverse psychological outcomes were observed amongst carriers.

  3. Clinical and Genetic Aspects of Sporadic Non-Medullar Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Rumjanzeva

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of somatic mutations in sporadic thyroid cancer is unclear today. Probably they coming out as aetiological factors in carcinogenesis as well as, respectfully to many authors, can to participate in TC pathogenesis and to determine the clinical course and prognosis of the disease. For today as main oncogenes taking part in initiation of thyroid malignant tumors are considered: RET/PTC, TRK, PTEN, P53, RAS, MET, PPARγ. By means of genetic investigations scientists are trying to solve problems with thyroid cancer differentiated diagnostics (cytokeratin-19, cytokeratin-20, mesothelial cells antigen (Hector Battifora MEsotelial (cell or HBME-1, loss of heterozigitoty (LOH in short arm of 3 chromosome (gene VHL -von Hippel Lindau, 3р26. Recently in foreign literature appeared reports of activated mutations in gene BRAF which most frequently are occurred in melanoma and papillary TC. Prognosis of thyroid cancer may reflected by the LOH as a biological breakage as well as changes of tumor suppressive gene P53 which fraught with decrease of disease prognosis. Thus, both researchers and clinicians have many questions concerning the role of genome, particularly in order to precise of genetic abnormality influence on tumor growth and therefore for assessment of clinical prognosis and with aim to chose adequate treatment tactic in each case.

  4. Skin cancer concerns and genetic risk information-seeking in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, J; Kaphingst, K A; Baser, R; Li, Y; Hensley-Alford, S; McBride, C M

    2012-01-01

    Genomic testing for common genetic variants associated with skin cancer risk could enable personalized risk feedback to motivate skin cancer screening and sun protection. In a cross-sectional study, we investigated whether skin cancer cognitions and behavioral factors, sociodemographics, family factors, and health information-seeking were related to perceived importance of learning about how (a) genes and (b) health habits affect personal health risks using classification and regression trees (CART). The sample (n = 1,772) was collected in a large health maintenance organization as part of the Multiplex Initiative, ranged in age from 25-40, was 53% female, 41% Caucasian, and 59% African-American. Most reported that they placed somewhat to very high importance on learning about how genes (79%) and health habits (88%) affect their health risks. Social influence actors were associated with information-seeking about genes and health habits. Awareness of family history was associated with importance of health habit, but not genetic, information-seeking. The investment of family and friends in health promotion may be a primary motivator for prioritizing information-seeking about how genes and health habits affect personal health risks and may contribute to the personal value, or personal utility, of risk information. Individuals who seek such risk information may be receptive to interventions aimed to maximize the social implications of healthy lifestyle change to reduce their health risks. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of persons with cancer pain: A prospective case series

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    Senthil P Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mechanism-based classification (MBC was established with current evidence and physical therapy (PT management methods for both cancer and for noncancer pain. Aims: This study aims to describe the efficacy of MBC-based PT in persons with primary complaints of cancer pain. Settings and Design: A prospective case series of patients who attended the physiotherapy department of a multispecialty university-affiliated teaching hospital. Material and Methods: A total of 24 adults (18 female, 6 male aged 47.5 ± 10.6 years, with primary diagnosis of heterogeneous group of cancer, chief complaints of chronic disabling pain were included in the study on their consent for participation The patients were evaluated and classified on the basis of five predominant mechanisms for pain. Physical therapy interventions were recommended based on mechanisms identified and home program was prescribed with a patient log to ensure compliance. Treatments were given in five consecutive weekly sessions for five weeks each of 30 min duration. Statistical Analysis Used: Pre-post comparisons for pain severity (PS and pain interference (PI subscales of Brief pain inventory-Cancer pain (BPI-CP and, European organization for research and treatment in cancer-quality of life questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30 were done using Wilcoxon signed-rank test at 95% confidence interval using SPSS for Windows version 16.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL. Results: There were statistically significant ( P < 0.05 reduction in pain severity, pain interference and total BPI-CP scores, and the EORTC-QLQ-C30. Conclusion: MBC-PT was effective for improving BPI-CP and EORTC-QLQ-C30 scores in people with cancer pain.

  6. Kinetics of cancer: a method to test hypotheses of genetic causation

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    Lipkin Steven M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse studies have recently compared the age-onset patterns of cancer between different genotypes. Genes associated with earlier onset are tentatively assigned a causal role in carcinogenesis. These standard analyses ignore the great amount of information about kinetics contained in age-onset curves. We present a method for analyzing kinetics that measures quantitatively the causal role of candidate genes in cancer progression. We use our method to demonstrate a clear association between somatic mutation rates of different DNA mismatch repair (MMR genotypes and the kinetics of cancer progression. Methods Most experimental studies report age-onset curves as the fraction diagnosed with tumors at each age for each group. We use such data to estimate smoothed survival curves, then measure incidence rates at each age by the slope of the fitted curve divided by the fraction of mice that remain undiagnosed for tumors at that age. With the estimated incidence curves, we compare between different genotypes the median age of cancer onset and the acceleration of cancer, which is the rate of increase in incidence with age. Results The direction of change in somatic mutation rate between MMR genotypes predicts the direction of change in the acceleration of cancer onset in all 7 cases (p ˜ 0.008, with the same result for the association between mutation rate and the median age of onset. Conclusion Many animal experiments compare qualitatively the onset curves for different genotypes. If such experiments were designed to analyze kinetics, the research could move to the next stage in which the mechanistic consequences of particular genetic pathways are related to the dynamics of carcinogenesis. The data we analyzed here were not collected to test mechanistic and quantitative hypotheses about kinetics. Even so, a simple reanalysis revealed significant insights about how DNA repair genotypes affect separately the age of onset and the

  7. A practice guideline from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors: referral indications for cancer predisposition assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Heather; Bennett, Robin L; Buchanan, Adam; Pearlman, Rachel; Wiesner, Georgia L

    2015-01-01

    The practice guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) are developed by members of the ACMG and NSGC to assist medical geneticists, genetic counselors, and other health-care providers in making decisions about appropriate management of genetic concerns, including access to and/or delivery of services. Each practice guideline focuses on a clinical or practice-based issue and is the result of a review and analysis of current professional literature believed to be reliable. As such, information and recommendations within the ACMG and NSGC joint practice guidelines reflect the current scientific and clinical knowledge at the time of publication, are current only as of their publication date, and are subject to change without notice as advances emerge. In addition, variations in practice, which take into account the needs of the individual patient and the resources and limitations unique to the institution or type of practice, may warrant approaches, treatments, and/or procedures that differ from the recommendations outlined in this guideline. Therefore, these recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does the use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. Genetic counseling practice guidelines are never intended to displace a health-care provider's best medical judgment based on the clinical circumstances of a particular patient or patient population. Practice guidelines are published by the ACMG or the NSGC for educational and informational purposes only, and neither the ACMG nor the NSGC "approve" or "endorse" any specific methods, practices, or sources of information.Cancer genetic consultation is an important aspect of the care of individuals at increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Yet several patient, clinician, and system-level barriers hinder identification of individuals appropriate for cancer genetics

  8. Thyroid cancer post radioactive iodine treatment for hyperthyroidism - case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Eyadeh, Abdallah A; Al-Sarihin, Khaldon; Etewi, Suzan; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Al-Asa'd, Rania Atallah; Haddad, Fares Halim

    2017-01-01

    To assess the rate of thyroid cancer and mortality rate in a cohort of patients who received RAI¹³¹ treatment for hyperthyroidism and to report the index cases' characteristics and management MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cohort of 264 patients who received RAI¹³¹ treatment for different causes of thyrotoxicosis were followed up over a period of 18 years (1996-2014) by physical exam, radiological evaluation and serial thyroid function tests. During the follow up period, three cases of thyroid cancer were identified. The prevalence of thyroid cancer was 1.136% of cases who received RAI¹³¹. The relative risk was 378.79 (95% CI: 76.8 effect relationship between RAI and thyroid cancer could be established, these cases highlights the importance of life-long surveillance of patients who receive RAI¹³¹.

  9. Creation and Implementation of an Environmental Scan to Assess Cancer Genetics Services at Three Oncology Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Erica M; Walsh, Michael T; Baker, Ellen; Muse, Kimberly I; Oakley, Holly D; Krukenberg, Rebekah C; Dresbold, Cara S; Jenkinson, Sandra B; Eppolito, Amanda L; Teed, Kelly B; Klein, Molly H; Morman, Nichole A; Bowdish, Elizabeth C; Russ, Pauline; Wise, Emaline E; Cooper, Julia N; Method, Michael W; Henson, John W; Grainger, Andrew V; Arun, Banu K; Lu, Karen H

    2018-05-16

    An environmental scan (ES) is an efficient mixed-methods approach to collect and interpret relevant data for strategic planning and project design. To date, the ES has not been used nor evaluated in the clinical cancer genetics setting. We created and implemented an ES to inform the design of a quality improvement (QI) project to increase the rates of adherence to national guidelines for cancer genetic counseling and genetic testing at three unique oncology care settings (OCS). The ES collected qualitative and quantitative data from reviews of internal processes, past QI efforts, the literature, and each OCS. The ES used a data collection form and semi-structured interviews to aid in data collection. The ES was completed within 6 months, and sufficient data were captured to identify opportunities and threats to the QI project's success, as well as potential barriers to, and facilitators of guideline-based cancer genetics services at each OCS. Previously unreported barriers were identified, including inefficient genetic counseling appointment scheduling processes and the inability to track referrals, genetics appointments, and genetic test results within electronic medical record systems. The ES was a valuable process for QI project planning at three OCS and may be used to evaluate genetics services in other settings.

  10. Intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity and mortality in head and neck cancer: analysis of data from the Cancer Genome Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Edmund A; Tward, Aaron D; Tward, Aaron M; Hammon, Rebecca J; Ren, Yin; Rocco, James W

    2015-02-01

    Although the involvement of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in tumor progression, treatment resistance, and metastasis is established, genetic heterogeneity is seldom examined in clinical trials or practice. Many studies of heterogeneity have had prespecified markers for tumor subpopulations, limiting their generalizability, or have involved massive efforts such as separate analysis of hundreds of individual cells, limiting their clinical use. We recently developed a general measure of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity based on whole-exome sequencing (WES) of bulk tumor DNA, called mutant-allele tumor heterogeneity (MATH). Here, we examine data collected as part of a large, multi-institutional study to validate this measure and determine whether intra-tumor heterogeneity is itself related to mortality. Clinical and WES data were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas in October 2013 for 305 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), from 14 institutions. Initial pathologic diagnoses were between 1992 and 2011 (median, 2008). Median time to death for 131 deceased patients was 14 mo; median follow-up of living patients was 22 mo. Tumor MATH values were calculated from WES results. Despite the multiple head and neck tumor subsites and the variety of treatments, we found in this retrospective analysis a substantial relation of high MATH values to decreased overall survival (Cox proportional hazards analysis: hazard ratio for high/low heterogeneity, 2.2; 95% CI 1.4 to 3.3). This relation of intra-tumor heterogeneity to survival was not due to intra-tumor heterogeneity's associations with other clinical or molecular characteristics, including age, human papillomavirus status, tumor grade and TP53 mutation, and N classification. MATH improved prognostication over that provided by traditional clinical and molecular characteristics, maintained a significant relation to survival in multivariate analyses, and distinguished outcomes among patients having

  11. Radiotherapy and genetic susceptibility to cancer in a cohort of retinoblastoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinerman, R. A.; Abranson, D. H.; Seddon, J. M.; Stovall, M.; Tucker, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    High-dose radiotherapy for retinoblastoma, a rare childhood cancer of the eye caused by a germline mutation in the RB-1 gene, has been associated with an increased risk of sarcomas, predominantly in the head and neck region, in childhood and adolescence. Many RB patients are cured and survive into adulthood. It is important to quantify their risk of adult-onset cancers, because somatic mutations in the RB-1 gene are common in the pathways of several epithelial cancers that typically occur in adults. We have been studying a large cohort of 1601 RB survivors, who were diagnosed 1914-84 at two medical centers, to identify the risk of second cancers and evaluate the interaction between radiation and genetic factors that may modify these risks. Most of the RB patients were diagnosed at one year of age or younger, 80% of the hereditary patients and 20% of the sporadic patients received radiotherapy for RB. A typical radiation treatment in the 1970s consisted of 45 Gy to the entire retina delivered in 15 fractions over several weeks. At last follow up, 20% of the cohort was 40 years of age and older, an age at which cancer rates begin to rise in the general population. We ascertained the incidence of new cancers through 2001 and compared the observed number of cancers in the cohort to the expected number of cancers estimated from age, sex and calendar year-specific cancer incidence rates from the U. S. We calculated the excess risk (ER) of cancer per 1,000 person years (observed minus expected number of cancers/person years at risk time 1000). The excess risk of second cancers in 963 hereditary patients (ER=9.3) exceeded the risk in the 638 sporadic patients (Excess risk=0.06). Substantially higher risks of second cancers were noted for irradiated (ER=10.1) compared to non-irradiated, hereditary patients (ER=4.5). Increased risks likely related to radiation were observed for cancers of the bone, soft tissue, brain, nasal cavities, and eye and orbit. Newly identified

  12. Common genetic polymorphisms of microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Hyuna; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee; Jeon, Sujee; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Han, Sohee; Song, Minkyo; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young

    2012-01-01

    Although the role of microRNA’s (miRNA’s) biogenesis pathway genes in cancer development and progression has been well established, the association between genetic variants of this pathway genes and breast cancer survival is still unknown. We used genotype data available from a previously conducted case–control study to investigate association between common genetic variations in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival. We investigated the possible associations between 41 germ-line single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and both disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among 488 breast cancer patients. During the median follow-up of 6.24 years, 90 cases developed disease progression and 48 cases died. Seven SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer survival. Two SNPs in AGO2 (rs11786030 and rs2292779) and DICER1 rs1057035 were associated with both DFS and OS. Two SNPs in HIWI (rs4759659 and rs11060845) and DGCR8 rs9606250 were associated with DFS, while DROSHA rs874332 and GEMIN4 rs4968104 were associated with only OS. The most significant association was observed in variant allele of AGO2 rs11786030 with 2.62-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.41-4.88) and in minor allele homozygote of AGO2 rs2292779 with 2.94-fold increased risk of death (95% CI, 1.52-5.69). We also found cumulative effects of SNPs on DFS and OS. Compared to the subjects carrying 0 to 2 high-risk genotypes, those carrying 3 or 4–6 high-risk genotypes had an increased risk of disease progression with a hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% CI, 1.18- 3.93) and 4.47 (95% CI, 2.45- 8.14), respectively (P for trend, 6.11E-07). Our results suggest that genetic variants in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes may be associated with breast cancer survival. Further studies in larger sample size and functional characterizations are warranted to validate these results

  13. Genetic susceptibility markers for a breast-colorectal cancer phenotype: Exploratory results from genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joon, Aron; Brewster, Abenaa M.; Chen, Wei V.; Eng, Cathy; Shete, Sanjay; Casey, Graham; Schumacher, Fredrick; Lin, Yi; Harrison, Tabitha A.; White, Emily; Ahsan, Habibul; Andrulis, Irene L.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Ko Win, Aung; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Peters, Ulrike; Amos, Christopher I.; Lynch, Patrick M.

    2018-01-01

    Background Clustering of breast and colorectal cancer has been observed within some families and cannot be explained by chance or known high-risk mutations in major susceptibility genes. Potential shared genetic susceptibility between breast and colorectal cancer, not explained by high-penetrance genes, has been postulated. We hypothesized that yet undiscovered genetic variants predispose to a breast-colorectal cancer phenotype. Methods To identify variants associated with a breast-colorectal cancer phenotype, we analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from cases and controls that met the following criteria: cases (n = 985) were women with breast cancer who had one or more first- or second-degree relatives with colorectal cancer, men/women with colorectal cancer who had one or more first- or second-degree relatives with breast cancer, and women diagnosed with both breast and colorectal cancer. Controls (n = 1769), were unrelated, breast and colorectal cancer-free, and age- and sex- frequency-matched to cases. After imputation, 6,220,060 variants were analyzed using the discovery set and variants associated with the breast-colorectal cancer phenotype at Pcolorectal cancer phenotype in the discovery and replication data (most significant; rs7430339, Pdiscovery = 1.2E-04; rs7429100, Preplication = 2.8E-03). In meta-analysis of the discovery and replication data, the most significant association remained at rs7429100 (P = 1.84E-06). Conclusion The results of this exploratory analysis did not find clear evidence for a susceptibility locus with a pleiotropic effect on hereditary breast and colorectal cancer risk, although the suggestive association of genetic variation in the region of ROBO1, a potential tumor suppressor gene, merits further investigation. PMID:29698419

  14. Genetic variation in IL-16 miRNA target site and time to prostate cancer diagnosis in African American men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Lucinda; Ruth, Karen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Giri, Veda N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Men with a family history of prostate cancer and African American men are at high risk for prostate cancer and in need of personalized risk estimates to inform screening decisions. This study evaluated genetic variants in genes encoding microRNA (miRNA) binding sites for informing of time to prostate cancer diagnosis among ethnically-diverse, high-risk men undergoing prostate cancer screening. Methods The Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program (PRAP) is a longitudinal screening program for high-risk men. Eligibility includes men ages 35-69 with a family history of prostate cancer or African descent. Participants with ≥ 1 follow-up visit were included in the analyses (n=477). Genetic variants in regions encoding miRNA binding sites in four target genes (ALOX15, IL-16, IL-18, and RAF1) previously implicated in prostate cancer development were evaluated. Genotyping methods included Taqman® SNP Genotyping Assay (Applied Biosystems) or pyrosequencing. Cox models were used to assess time to prostate cancer diagnosis by risk genotype. Results Among 256 African Americans with ≥ one follow-up visit, the TT genotype at rs1131445 in IL-16 was significantly associated with earlier time to prostate cancer diagnosis vs. the CC/CT genotypes (p=0.013), with a suggestive association after correction for false-discovery (p=0.065). Hazard ratio after controlling for age and PSA for TT vs. CC/CT among African Americans was 3.0 (95% CI 1.26-7.12). No association to time to diagnosis was detected among Caucasians by IL-16 genotype. No association to time to prostate cancer diagnosis was found for the other miRNA target genotypes. Conclusions Genetic variation in IL-16 encoding miRNA target site may be informative of time to prostate cancer diagnosis among African American men enrolled in prostate cancer risk assessment, which may inform individualized prostate cancer screening strategies in the future. PMID:24061634

  15. Common genetic determinants of breast-cancer risk in East Asian women: a collaborative study of 23 637 breast cancer cases and 25 579 controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Qiuyin; Sung, Hyuna; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Shi, Jiajun; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Long, Jirong; Dennis, Joe; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Chun; Cai, Hui; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Dunning, Alison M.; Benitez, Javier; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Tessier, Daniel; Kim, Sung-Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Jong-Young; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Ying; Wang, Wenjin; Ji, Bu-Tian; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, In Nee; Wong, Tien Y.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lee, Soo Chin; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Kexin; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ren, Zefang; Haiman, Christopher A.; Sueta, Aiko; Kim, Mi Kyung; Khoo, Ui Soon; Iwasaki, Motoki; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Wen, Wanqing; Hall, Per; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Easton, Douglas F.; Kang, Daehee

    2013-01-01

    In a consortium including 23 637 breast cancer patients and 25 579 controls of East Asian ancestry, we investigated 70 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 67 independent breast cancer susceptibility loci recently identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) conducted primarily in European-ancestry populations. SNPs in 31 loci showed an association with breast cancer risk at P Asians and provided evidence for associations of breast cancer risk in the East Asian population with nearly half of the genetic risk variants initially reported in GWASs conducted in European descendants. Taken together, these common genetic risk variants explain ∼10% of excess familial risk of breast cancer in Asian populations. PMID:23535825

  16. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent: participation determinants, and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals.

    OpenAIRE

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, S. van; Veldhuizen, M.E. van; Riel, E. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients’ participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of healthcare professionals and patients. Questionnaire-based telephone interviews about awareness, perceptions, and reasons for (non-) participation in cancer genetic counseling were conducted with 78 ...

  17. Gaps in Incorporating Germline Genetic Testing Into Treatment Decision-Making for Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Allison W; Li, Yun; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Hawley, Sarah T; Morrow, Monica; McLeod, M Chandler; Jagsi, Reshma; Katz, Steven J

    2017-07-10

    Purpose Genetic testing for breast cancer risk is evolving rapidly, with growing use of multiple-gene panels that can yield uncertain results. However, little is known about the context of such testing or its impact on treatment. Methods A population-based sample of patients with breast cancer diagnosed in 2014 to 2015 and identified by two SEER registries (Georgia and Los Angeles) were surveyed about genetic testing experiences (N = 3,672; response rate, 68%). Responses were merged with SEER data. A patient subgroup at higher pretest risk of pathogenic mutation carriage was defined according to genetic testing guidelines. Patients' attending surgeons were surveyed about genetic testing and results management. We examined patterns and correlates of genetic counseling and testing and the impact of results on bilateral mastectomy (BLM) use. Results Six hundred sixty-six patients reported genetic testing. Although two thirds of patients were tested before surgical treatment, patients without private insurance more often experienced delays. Approximately half of patients (57% at higher pretest risk, 42% at average risk) discussed results with a genetic counselor. Patients with pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 or another gene had the highest rates of BLM (higher risk, 80%; average risk, 85%); however, BLM was also common among patients with genetic variants of uncertain significance (VUS; higher risk, 43%; average risk, 51%). Surgeons' confidence in discussing testing increased with volume of patients with breast cancer, but many surgeons (higher volume, 24%; lower volume, 50%) managed patients with BRCA1/2 VUS the same as patients with BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations. Conclusion Many patients with breast cancer are tested without ever seeing a genetic counselor. Half of average-risk patients with VUS undergo BLM, suggesting a limited understanding of results that some surgeons share. These findings emphasize the need to address challenges in personalized communication

  18. Association of Genetic Susceptibility Variants for Type 2 Diabetes with Breast Cancer Risk in Women of European Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Milne, Roger L.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G.; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E.; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S.; Winqvist, Robert; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. Methods We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. Results The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at P < 0.001), rs9939609 (FTO) (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92 – 0.95, P = 4.13E-13), rs7903146 (TCF7L2) (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02 – 1.06, P = 1.26E-05), and rs8042680 (PRC1) (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.95 – 0.99, P = 8.05E-04). Conclusions We have shown that several genetic risk variants were associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk. PMID:27053251

  19. Genetic variation in the HSD17B1 gene and risk of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kraft

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones are believed to play an important role in prostate carcinogenesis, but epidemiological evidence linking prostate cancer and steroid hormone genes has been inconclusive, in part due to small sample sizes or incomplete characterization of genetic variation at the locus of interest. Here we report on the results of a comprehensive study of the association between HSD17B1 and prostate cancer by the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, a large collaborative study. HSD17B1 encodes 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, an enzyme that converts dihydroepiandrosterone to the testosterone precursor Delta5-androsterone-3beta,17beta-diol and converts estrone to estradiol. The Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium researchers systematically characterized variation in HSD17B1 by targeted resequencing and dense genotyping; selected haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs that efficiently predict common variants in U.S. and European whites, Latinos, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians; and genotyped these htSNPs in 8,290 prostate cancer cases and 9,367 study-, age-, and ethnicity-matched controls. We found no evidence that HSD17B1 htSNPs (including the nonsynonymous coding SNP S312G or htSNP haplotypes were associated with risk of prostate cancer or tumor stage in the pooled multiethnic sample or in U.S. and European whites. Analyses stratified by age, body mass index, and family history of disease found no subgroup-specific associations between these HSD17B1 htSNPs and prostate cancer. We found significant evidence of heterogeneity in associations between HSD17B1 haplotypes and prostate cancer across ethnicity: one haplotype had a significant (p < 0.002 inverse association with risk of prostate cancer in Latinos and Japanese Americans but showed no evidence of association in African Americans, Native Hawaiians, or whites. However, the smaller numbers of Latinos and Japanese Americans in this study makes

  20. Potential genetic anticipation in hereditary leiomyomatosis-renal cell cancer (HLRCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mei Hua; Tan, Chuen Seng; Lee, Soo Chin; Yong, Yvonne; Ooi, Aik Seng; Ngeow, Joanne; Tan, Min Han

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis-renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by cutaneous leiomyomas, symptomatic uterine leiomyomas and aggressive type II papillary renal cell carcinoma. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene on chromosome 1q43. We present evidence of genetic anticipation in HLRCC syndrome. A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine the potential for genetic anticipation in HLRCC syndrome. The normal random effects model was used to evaluate for genetic anticipation to ensure reduction in bias. A total of 11 FH kindreds with available multi-generational data were identified for analysis. The mean difference in age at diagnosis of RCC between the first and second generation was -18.6 years (95 % CI -26.6 to -10.6, p anticipation for uterine leiomyomas was observed (p = 0.349). We report preliminary evidence of genetic anticipation of RCC in HLRCC syndrome. Additional clinical validation is important to confirm this observation, which may have practical implications on counseling and timing of surveillance initiation. Exploration of the underlying mechanisms of anticipation in HLRCC would be of considerable biological interest.

  1. [Hereditary colorectal cancer : An update on genetics and entities in terms of differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, T T; Dawson, H; Hartmann, A; Rüschoff, J

    2017-05-01

    The pathologist can contribute to recognizing hereditary causes of colorectal cancer via morphology. By identifying so-called index patients, it is possible to take preventive measures in affected families. The precise definition of the clinical presentation and the histopathological phenotype help to narrow the spectrum of expected genetic alterations. Novelties within Lynch syndrome include the recognition of EPCAM as a fifth gene locus, as well as the newly defined Lynch-like syndrome with evidence of somatic mismatch repair (MMR) mutations. With regard to polyposis-associated syndromes, the spectrum of polyps, whether serrated, hamartomatous or classic adenoma, is of crucial importance. The resulting differential diagnosis includes (attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis ([a]FAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and juvenile polyposis, each with a specific genetic background.

  2. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  3. Association study of genetic variants in estrogen metabolic pathway genes and colorectal cancer risk and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuwei; Xie, Lisheng; Du, Mulong; Xu, Kaili; Zhu, Lingjun; Chu, Haiyan; Chen, Jinfei; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gu, Dongying

    2018-05-16

    Although studies have investigated the association of genetic variants and the abnormal expression of estrogen-related genes with colorectal cancer risk, the evidence remains inconsistent. We clarified the relationship of genetic variants in estrogen metabolic pathway genes with colorectal cancer risk and survival. A case-control study was performed to assess the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ten candidate genes with colorectal cancer risk in a Chinese population. A logistic regression model and Cox regression model were used to calculate SNP effects on colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival, respectively. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis was conducted using the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project dataset. The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) was used to perform gene-set analysis. Colorectal cancer risk and rs3760806 in SULT2B1 were significantly associated in both genders [male: OR = 1.38 (1.15-1.66); female: OR = 1.38 (1.13-1.68)]. Two SNPs in SULT1E1 were related to progression-free survival (PFS) [rs1238574: HR = 1.24 (1.02-1.50), P = 2.79 × 10 -2 ; rs3822172: HR = 1.30 (1.07-1.57), P = 8.44 × 10 -3 ] and overall survival (OS) [rs1238574: HR = 1.51 (1.16-1.97), P = 2.30 × 10 -3 ; rs3822172: HR = 1.53 (1.67-2.00), P = 2.03 × 10 -3 ]. Moreover, rs3760806 was an eQTL for SULT2B1 in colon samples (transverse: P = 3.6 × 10 -3 ; sigmoid: P = 1.0 × 10 -3 ). SULT2B1 expression was significantly higher in colorectal tumor tissues than in normal tissues in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database (P colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

  4. Supernatural T cells: genetic modification of T cells for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Michael H; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K

    2005-12-01

    Immunotherapy is receiving much attention as a means of treating cancer, but complete, durable responses remain rare for most malignancies. The natural immune system seems to have limitations and deficiencies that might affect its ability to control malignant disease. An alternative to relying on endogenous components in the immune repertoire is to generate lymphocytes with abilities that are greater than those of natural T cells, through genetic modification to produce 'supernatural' T cells. This Review describes how such T cells can circumvent many of the barriers that are inherent in the tumour microenvironment while optimizing T-cell specificity, activation, homing and antitumour function.

  5. Stratification for smoking in case-cohort studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; López, Ana García; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2009-01-01

    and adjustment for smoking on the estimated effect of polymorphisms on lung cancer risk was explored in the case-cohort design. We used an empirical and a statistical simulation approach. The stratification strategies were: no smoking stratification, stratification for smoking status and stratification......The risk estimates obtained in studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer differ markedly between studies, which might be due to chance or differences in study design, in particular the stratification/match of comparison group. The effect of different strategies for stratification...... for smoking duration. The study base was a prospective follow-up study with 57,053 participants. In the simulation approach the glutathione S-transferase T1 null polymorphism, as a model of any polymorphism, was added to simulated data in two different ways, assuming either absence or presence of association...

  6. Measurement of psychological factors associated with genetic testing for hereditary breast, ovarian and colon cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Ropka, Mary; Stefanek, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Despite numerous individual studies of psychological factors (depression, anxiety, distress) related to genetic testing for inherited cancer syndromes (CGT), there has been no systematic review of the psychological factors are measured among individuals at increased risk for hereditary breast, ovarian, or colon cancer. Our review provides an analysis of psychological factors in studies of CGT and discusses the instruments most commonly used to measure them. We performed a literature search using three major OVID databases from 1993 to January 2003. In the 19 studies that met our inclusion criteria, the most commonly assessed psychological factors were distress, anxiety, and depression. These factors were most often measured by the impact of event scale (IES), the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI), and the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies and Depression scale (CES-D), respectively. Our results show deficits in the existing body of literature on psychological factors associated with CGT including limited documentation of psychometrics and variability in instrumentation.

  7. Retinoblastoma and the Genetic Theory of Cancer: An Old Paradigm Trying to Survive to the Evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangelo, D.; Lore, C.; Hadjistilianou, T.; De Francesco, S.

    2009-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is considered to represent the prototype of cancer linked to the sequential loss or inactivation of both alleles of a so-called “tumor suppressor gene”, the Rb1 gene. The pathogenetic mechanism behind this tumor was first hypothesized by Knudson in 1971 and further confirmed by others who identified the Rb1 gene whose loss or inactivation was claimed to be responsible for the disease. However, after about four decades of continuous research in the field of molecular biology, the evidence behind the role of the Rb1 gene in Rb appears to be seriously flawed in the light of epidemiological, biological, and clinical evidences. This editorial summarizes the inconsistencies on this subject. Nevertheless, the molecular biology establishment still adheres to the biased view of the genetic origin of Rb and other cancers, and hardly any alternative explanations are taken into account.

  8. Application of the nonlinear time series prediction method of genetic algorithm for forecasting surface wind of point station in the South China Sea with scatterometer observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Jian; Dong Gang; Sun Yimei; Zhang Zhaoyang; Wu Yuqin

    2016-01-01

    The present work reports the development of nonlinear time series prediction method of genetic algorithm (GA) with singular spectrum analysis (SSA) for forecasting the surface wind of a point station in the South China Sea (SCS) with scatterometer observations. Before the nonlinear technique GA is used for forecasting the time series of surface wind, the SSA is applied to reduce the noise. The surface wind speed and surface wind components from scatterometer observations at three locations in the SCS have been used to develop and test the technique. The predictions have been compared with persistence forecasts in terms of root mean square error. The predicted surface wind with GA and SSA made up to four days (longer for some point station) in advance have been found to be significantly superior to those made by persistence model. This method can serve as a cost-effective alternate prediction technique for forecasting surface wind of a point station in the SCS basin. (paper)

  9. Using genetics to explore whether the cholesterol-lowering drug ezetimibe may cause an increased risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobberø Lauridsen, Bo; Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Background: Results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have raised concern that the cholesterol-lowering drug ezetimibe might increase the risk of cancer. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in NPC1L1, mimicking treatment with ezetimibe, was associated with an increased risk...... of cancer. Methods: We included 67 257 individuals from the general population. Of these, 8333 developed cancer and 2057 died of cancer from 1968 to 2011. To mimic the effect of ezetimibe, we calculated weighted allele scores based on the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering(= NPC1L1......-inhibitory) effect of each variant. We tested the associations of the NPC1L1 allele scores with LDL cholesterol and with risk of any cancer, death from any cancer and 27 site-specific cancers. As a positive control, we tested the association of the NPC1L1 allele scores with risk of ischaemic vascular disease...

  10. Targeted molecular profiling of rare genetic alterations in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhri, Mayank; Bhatnagar, Akanksha; Gupta, Satish; Shokeen, Yogender; Minhas, Sachin; Aggarwal, Shyam

    2016-10-01

    Mutation frequencies of common genetic alterations in colorectal cancer have been in the spotlight for many years. This study highlights few rare somatic mutations, which possess the attributes of a potential CRC biomarker yet are often neglected. Next-generation sequencing was performed over 112 tumor samples to detect genetic alterations in 31 rare genes in colorectal cancer. Mutations were detected in 26/31 (83.9 %) uncommon genes, which together contributed toward 149 gene mutations in 67/112 (59.8 %) colorectal cancer patients. The most frequent mutations include KDR (19.6 %), PTEN (17 %), FBXW7 (10.7 %), SMAD4 (10.7 %), VHL (8 %), KIT (8 %), MET (7.1 %), ATM (6.3 %), CTNNB1 (4.5 %) and CDKN2A (4.5 %). RB1, ERBB4 and ERBB2 mutations were persistent in 3.6 % patients. GNAS, FGFR2 and FGFR3 mutations were persistent in 1.8 % patients. Ten genes (EGFR, NOTCH1, SMARCB1, ABL1, STK11, SMO, RET, GNAQ, CSF1R and FLT3) were found mutated in 0.9 % patients. Lastly, no mutations were observed in AKT, HRAS, MAP2K1, PDGFR and JAK2. Significant associations were observed between VHL with tumor site, ERBB4 and SMARCB1 with tumor invasion, CTNNB1 with lack of lymph node involvement and CTNNB1, FGFR2 and FGFR3 with TNM stage. Significantly coinciding mutation pairs include PTEN and SMAD4, PTEN and KDR, EGFR and RET, EGFR and RB1, FBXW7 and CTNNB1, KDR and FGFR2, FLT3 and CTNNB1, RET and RB1, ATM and SMAD4, ATM and CDKN2A, ERBB4 and SMARCB1. This study elucidates few potential colorectal cancer biomarkers, specifically KDR, PTEN, FBXW7 and SMAD4, which are found mutated in more than 10 % patients.

  11. Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Dunning, Alison M.; Milne, Roger L.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Andrulis, Irene; Brenner, Hermann; Behrens, Sabine; Orr, Nicholas; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Li, Jingmei; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Knight, Julia; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M.; Dumont, Martine; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Moisse, Matthieu; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Spurdle, Amanda; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Malats, Núria; Arias Perez, JoséI.; Benítez, Javier; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Truong, Théresè; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Braaf, Linde; Atsma, Femke; van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Simard, Jacques; Giles, Graham G.; Lambrechts, Diether; Mannermaa, Arto; Brauch, Hiltrud; Guénel, Pascal; Peto, Julian; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci. PMID:24248812

  12. Copy number variations of E2F1: a new genetic risk factor for testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Maria Santa; Di Nisio, Andrea; Marchiori, Arianna; Ghezzi, Marco; Opocher, Giuseppe; Foresta, Carlo; Ferlin, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is one of the most heritable forms of cancer. In last years, many evidence suggested that constitutional genetic factors, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms, can increase its risk. However, the possible contribution of copy number variations (CNVs) in TGCT susceptibility has not been substantially addressed. Indeed, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effect of CNVs on gene expression and on the role of these structural genetic variations as risk factors for different forms of cancer. E2F1 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and response to DNA damage. Therefore, deficiency or overexpression of this protein might significantly influence fundamental biological processes involved in cancer development and progression, including TGCT. We analyzed E2F1 CNVs in 261 cases with TGCT and 165 controls. We found no CNVs in controls, but 17/261 (6.5%) cases showed duplications in E2F1 Blot analysis demonstrated higher E2F1 expression in testicular samples of TGCT cases with three copies of the gene. Furthermore, we observed higher phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR in samples with E2F1 duplication. Interestingly, normal, non-tumoral testicular tissue in patient with E2F1 duplication showed lower expression of E2F1 and lower AKT/mTOR phosphorylation with respect to adjacent tumor tissue. Furthermore, increased expression of E2F1 obtained in vitro in NTERA-2 testicular cell line induced increased AKT/mTOR phosphorylation. This study suggests for the first time an involvement of E2F1 CNVs in TGCT susceptibility and supports previous preliminary data on the importance of AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in this cancer. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Gastrointestinal metastasis from primary lung cancer. Case series and systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Andrea; D Subiela, José; Bollo, Jesús; Martínez, Carmen; Rodriguez Luppi, Carlos; Hernández, Pilar; Pascual-González, Yuliana; Quaresima, Silvia; M Targarona, Eduard

    2018-04-01

    Aim of the present study is to report clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients treated in authors' hospital for GI metastasis from primary lung cancer, and to report and analyse the same data concerning patients retrieved from a systematic literature review. We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, and a systematic review using the Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Ninety-one patients were included, 5 patients from the authors' hospital and 86 through PubMed database using the keywords "intestinal metastasis" AND "lung cancer". The median time between primary lung cancer diagnosis and GI metastasis diagnosis was 2 months and the median overall survival was 4 months. This group of patients present a poor prognosis and the gold standard treatment is not defined. None of the reported treatments had a significant impact on survival. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja Kh; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Sieh, Weiva; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Vierkant, Robert A; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Thomsen, Lotte; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Schernhammer, Eva; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Amankwah, Ernest; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Kelemen, Linda E; Ramus, Susan J; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Goode, Ellen L; Narod, Steven A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovaries where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant association was rs117104877 in BMAL1 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68-0.90, p = 5.59 × 10 -4 ]. Functional analysis revealed a significant down regulation of BMAL1 expression following cMYC overexpression and increasing transformation in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells as well as alternative splicing of BMAL1 exons in ovarian and granulosa cells. These results suggest that variation in circadian genes, and specifically BMAL1 , may be associated with risk of ovarian cancer, likely through disruption of hormonal pathways.

  15. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeldin, Mona K; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5'UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer.

  16. Association of Environmental Arsenic Exposure, Genetic Polymorphisms of Susceptible Genes, and Skin Cancers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-I Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency in the capability of xenobiotic detoxification and arsenic methylation may be correlated with individual susceptibility to arsenic-related skin cancers. We hypothesized that glutathione S-transferase (GST M1, T1, and P1, reactive oxygen species (ROS related metabolic genes (NQO1, EPHX1, and HO-1, and DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XPD, hOGG1, and ATM together may play a role in arsenic-induced skin carcinogenesis. We conducted a case-control study consisting of 70 pathologically confirmed skin cancer patients and 210 age and gender matched participants with genotyping of 12 selected polymorphisms. The skin cancer risks were estimated by odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI using logistic regression. EPHX1 Tyr113His, XPD C156A, and GSTT1 null genotypes were associated with skin cancer risk (OR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.01–8.83; OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 0.99–4.27; OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.00–3.02, resp.. However, none of these polymorphisms showed significant association after considering arsenic exposure status. Individuals carrying three risk polymorphisms of EPHX1 Tyr113His, XPD C156A, and GSTs presented a 400% increased skin cancer risk when compared to those with less than or equal to one polymorphism. In conclusion, GSTs, EPHX1, and XPD are potential genetic factors for arsenic-induced skin cancers. The roles of these genes for arsenic-induced skin carcinogenesis need to be further evaluated.

  17. Human papillomavirus 33 worldwide genetic variation and associated risk of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Boon, Debby; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert D.; De Vuyst, Hugo; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 33, a member of the HPV16-related alpha-9 species group, is found in approximately 5% of cervical cancers worldwide. The current study aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of HPV33 and to explore the association of HPV33 variants with the risk for cervical cancer. Taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank, we sequenced the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 213 HPV33-positive cervical samples from 30 countries. We identified 28 HPV33 variants that formed 5 phylogenetic groups: the previously identified A1, A2, and B (sub) lineages and the novel A3 and C (sub)lineages. The A1 sublineage was strongly over-represented in cervical cases compared to controls in both Africa and Europe. In conclusion, we provide a classification system for HPV33 variants based on the sequence of E6 and E7 and suggest that the association of HPV33 with cervical cancer may differ by variant (sub)lineage. PMID:24314666

  18. Molecular characterization of circulating colorectal tumor cells defines genetic signatures for individualized cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Say Li; Liu, Xingliang; Suhaimi, Nur-Afidah Mohamed; Koh, Kenneth Jia Hao; Hu, Min; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Cima, Igor; Phyo, Wai Min; Lee, Esther Xing Wei; Tai, Joyce A.; Foong, Yu Miin; Vo, Jess Honganh; Koh, Poh Koon; Zhang, Tong; Ying, Jackie Y.; Lim, Bing; Tan, Min-Han; Hillmer, Axel M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies on circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have largely focused on platform development and CTC enumeration rather than on the genomic characterization of CTCs. To address this, we performed targeted sequencing of CTCs of colorectal cancer patients and compared the mutations with the matched primary tumors. We collected preoperative blood and matched primary tumor samples from 48 colorectal cancer patients. CTCs were isolated using a label-free microfiltration device on a silicon microsieve. Upon whole genome amplification, we performed amplicon-based targeted sequencing on a panel of 39 druggable and frequently mutated genes on both CTCs and fresh-frozen tumor samples. We developed an analysis pipeline to minimize false-positive detection of somatic mutations in amplified DNA. In 60% of the CTC-enriched blood samples, we detected primary tumor matching mutations. We found a significant positive correlation between the allele frequencies of somatic mutations detected in CTCs and abnormal CEA serum level. Strikingly, we found driver mutations and amplifications in cancer and druggable genes such as APC, KRAS, TP53, ERBB3, FBXW7 and ERBB2. In addition, we found that CTCs carried mutation signatures that resembled the signatures of their primary tumors. Cumulatively, our study defined genetic signatures and somatic mutation frequency of colorectal CTCs. The identification of druggable mutations in CTCs of preoperative colorectal cancer patients could lead to more timely and focused therapeutic interventions. PMID:28978093

  19. Emotional distress following genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: a meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jada G; Lobel, Marci; Moyer, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Meta-analysis was used to synthesize results of studies on emotional consequences of predictive genetic testing for BRCA1/2 mutations conferring increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Studies assessing anxiety or cancer-specific distress before and after provision of test results (k = 20) were analyzed using a random-effects model. Moderator variables included country of data collection and personal cancer history of study participants. Standardized mean gain effect sizes were calculated for mutation carriers, noncarriers, and those with inconclusive results over short (0-4 weeks), moderate (5-24 weeks), or long (25-52 weeks) periods of time after testing. Distress among carriers increased shortly after receiving results and returned to pretesting levels over time. Distress among noncarriers and those with inconclusive results decreased over time. Some distress patterns differed in studies conducted outside the United States and for individuals with varying cancer histories. Results underscore the importance of time; changes in distress observed shortly after test-result disclosure frequently differed from the pattern of distress seen subsequently. Although emotional consequences of this testing appear minimal, it remains possible that testing may affect cognitive and behavioral outcomes, which have rarely been examined through meta-analysis. Testing may also affect understudied subgroups differently.

  20. Characterization and noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer with serum surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoxin; Li, Linfang; Zeng, Qiuyao; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Jin, Mei; Su, Chengkang; Lin, Lin; Xu, Junfa; Liu, Songhao

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to characterize and classify serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra between bladder cancer patients and normal volunteers by genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA). Two group serum SERS spectra excited with nanoparticles are collected from healthy volunteers (n = 36) and bladder cancer patients (n = 55). Six diagnostic Raman bands in the regions of 481-486, 682-687, 1018-1034, 1313-1323, 1450-1459 and 1582-1587 cm-1 related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids are picked out with the GAs and LDA. By the diagnostic models built with the identified six Raman bands, the improved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% were acquired for classifying bladder cancer patients from normal serum SERS spectra. The results are superior to the sensitivity of 74.6% and specificity of 97.2% obtained with principal component analysis by the same serum SERS spectra dataset. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed the efficiency of diagnostic algorithm based on GA-LDA technique. This exploratory work demonstrates that the serum SERS associated with GA-LDA technique has enormous potential to characterize and non-invasively detect bladder cancer through peripheral blood.

  1. End-of-Life Care for Blood Cancers: A Series of Focus Groups With Hematologic Oncologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odejide, Oreofe O.; Salas Coronado, Diana Y.; Watts, Corey D.; Wright, Alexi A.; Abel, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Hematologic cancers are associated with aggressive cancer-directed care near death and underuse of hospice and palliative care services. We sought to explore hematologic oncologists' perspectives and decision-making processes regarding end-of-life (EOL) care. Methods: Between September 2013 and January 2014, 20 hematologic oncologists from the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center participated in four focus groups regarding EOL care for leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Focus groups employed a semistructured format with case vignettes and open-ended questions and were followed by thematic analysis. Results: Many participants felt that identifying the EOL phase for patients with hematologic cancers was challenging as a result of the continuing potential for cure with advanced disease and the often rapid pace of decline near death. This difficulty was reported to result in later initiation of EOL care. Barriers to high-quality EOL care were also reported to be multifactorial, including unrealistic expectations from both physicians and patients, long-term patient-physician relationships resulting in difficulty conducting EOL discussions, and inadequacy of existing home-based EOL services. Participants also expressed concern that some EOL quality measures developed for solid tumors may be unacceptable for patients with blood cancers given their unique needs at the EOL (eg, palliative transfusions). Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that hematologic oncologists need better clinical markers for when to initiate EOL care. In addition, current quality measures may be inappropriate for identifying overly aggressive care for patients with blood cancers. Further research is needed to develop effective interventions to improve EOL care for this patient population. PMID:25294393

  2. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  3. Genetic variants in FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and skin cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, Hongmei; Qureshi, Abrar A; Hunter, David J; Han, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    The human fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and its receptor (FGFR) play an important role in tumorigenesis. Deregulation of the FGFR2 gene has been identified in a number of cancer sites. Overexpression of the FGFR4 protein has been linked to cutaneous melanoma progression. Previous studies reported associations between genetic variants in the FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and development of various cancers. We evaluated the associations of four genetic variants in the FGFR2 gene highly related to breast cancer risk and the three common tag-SNPs in the FGFR4 gene with skin cancer risk in a nested case-control study of Caucasians within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) among 218 melanoma cases, 285 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases, 300 basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cases, and 870 controls. We found no evidence for associations between these seven genetic variants and the risks of melanoma and nonmelanocytic skin cancer. Given the power of this study, we did not detect any contribution of genetic variants in the FGFR2 or FGFR4 genes to inherited predisposition to skin cancer among Caucasian women

  4. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Annie TW

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. Methods - A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry to determine psychological outcomes after genetic testing. Self-completed questionnaires were administered immediately before (pre-disclosure baseline and 2 weeks, 4 months and 1 year after result disclosure. Using validated psychological inventories, the cognitive style of hope was measured at baseline, and the psychological distress of depression and anxiety was measured at all time points. Results - Of the 76 participating subjects, 71 individuals (43 men and 28 women; mean age 38.9 ± 9.2 years from nine FAP and 24 HNPCC families completed the study, including 39 mutated gene carriers. Four patterns of outcome trajectories were created using established norms for the specified outcome measures of depression and anxiety. These included chronic dysfunction (13% and 8.7%, recovery (0% and 4.3%, delayed dysfunction (13% and 15.9% and resilience (76.8% and 66.7%. Two logistic regression analyses were conducted using hope at baseline to predict resilience, with depression and anxiety employed as outcome indicators. Because of the small number of participants, the chronic dysfunction and delayed dysfunction groups were combined into a non-resilient group for comparison with the resilient group in all subsequent analysis. Because of low frequencies, participants exhibiting a recovery trajectory (n = 3 for anxiety and n = 0 for depression were excluded from further analysis. Both regression equations were significant. Baseline hope was a significant

  5. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Samuel M Y; Ho, Judy W C; Bonanno, George A; Chu, Annie T W; Chan, Emily M S

    2010-06-11

    Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry to determine psychological outcomes after genetic testing. Self-completed questionnaires were administered immediately before (pre-disclosure baseline) and 2 weeks, 4 months and 1 year after result disclosure. Using validated psychological inventories, the cognitive style of hope was measured at baseline, and the psychological distress of depression and anxiety was measured at all time points. Of the 76 participating subjects, 71 individuals (43 men and 28 women; mean age 38.9 +/- 9.2 years) from nine FAP and 24 HNPCC families completed the study, including 39 mutated gene carriers. Four patterns of outcome trajectories were created using established norms for the specified outcome measures of depression and anxiety. These included chronic dysfunction (13% and 8.7%), recovery (0% and 4.3%), delayed dysfunction (13% and 15.9%) and resilience (76.8% and 66.7%). Two logistic regression analyses were conducted using hope at baseline to predict resilience, with depression and anxiety employed as outcome indicators. Because of the small number of participants, the chronic dysfunction and delayed dysfunction groups were combined into a non-resilient group for comparison with the resilient group in all subsequent analysis. Because of low frequencies, participants exhibiting a recovery trajectory (n = 3 for anxiety and n = 0 for depression) were excluded from further analysis. Both regression equations were significant. Baseline hope was a significant predictor of a resilience outcome trajectory for depression

  6. How are multifactorial beliefs about the role of genetics and behavior in cancer causation associated with cancer risk cognitions and emotions in the US population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jada G; Waters, Erika A

    2018-02-01

    People who believe that cancer has both genetic and behavioral risk factors have more accurate mental models of cancer causation and may be more likely to engage in cancer screening behaviors than people who do not hold such multifactorial causal beliefs. This research explored possible health cognitions and emotions that might produce such differences. Using nationally representative cross-sectional data from the US Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 2719), we examined whether endorsing a multifactorial model of cancer causation was associated with perceptions of risk and other cancer-related cognitions and affect. Data were analyzed using linear regression with jackknife variance estimation and procedures to account for the complex survey design and weightings. Bivariate and multivariable analyses indicated that people who endorsed multifactorial beliefs about cancer had higher absolute risk perceptions, lower pessimism about cancer prevention, and higher worry about harm from environmental toxins that could be ingested or that emanate from consumer products (Ps feelings of risk, but multivariable analyses suggested that this effect was accounted for by the negative affect associated with reporting a family history of cancer. Multifactorial beliefs were not associated with believing that everything causes cancer or that there are too many cancer recommendations to follow (Ps > .05). Holding multifactorial causal beliefs about cancer are associated with a constellation of risk perceptions, health cognitions, and affect that may motivate cancer prevention and detection behavior. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Prostate cancer detection from model-free T1-weighted time series and diffusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Nandinee F.; Kozlowski, Piotr; Jones, Edward C.; Chang, Silvia D.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The combination of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) images with diffusion MRI has shown great potential in prostate cancer detection. The parameterization of DCE images to generate cancer markers is traditionally performed based on pharmacokinetic modeling. However, pharmacokinetic models make simplistic assumptions about the tissue perfusion process, require the knowledge of contrast agent concentration in a major artery, and the modeling process is sensitive to noise and fitting instabilities. We address this issue by extracting features directly from the DCE T1-weighted time course without modeling. In this work, we employed a set of data-driven features generated by mapping the DCE T1 time course to its principal component space, along with diffusion MRI features to detect prostate cancer. The optimal set of DCE features is extracted with sparse regularized regression through a Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) model. We show that when our proposed features are used within the multiparametric MRI protocol to replace the pharmacokinetic parameters, the area under ROC curve is 0.91 for peripheral zone classification and 0.87 for whole gland classification. We were able to correctly classify 32 out of 35 peripheral tumor areas identified in the data when the proposed features were used with support vector machine classification. The proposed feature set was used to generate cancer likelihood maps for the prostate gland.

  8. Annexin A1 expression in a pooled breast cancer series : Association with tumor subtypes and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobral-Leite, Marcelo; Wesseling, Jelle; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Sanders, Joyce; Hofland, Ingrid; Blows, Fiona M.; Coulson, Penny; Patrycja, Gazinska; Schellens, Jan H M; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Phillips, Kelly Anne; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Visscher, Daniel; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van de Water, Bob; Broeks, Annegien; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D P; García-Closas, Montserrat; de Graauw, Marjo; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Amor, David; Andrews, Lesley; Antill, Yoland; Armitage, Shane; Arnold, Leanne; Balleine, Rosemary; Bankier, Agnes; Bastick, Patti; Beesley, Jonathan; Beilby, John; Bennett, Barbara; Bennett, Ian; Berry, Geoffrey; Blackburn, Anneke; Bogwitz, Michael; Brennan, Meagan; Brown, Melissa; Buckley, Michael; Burgess, Matthew; Burke, Jo; Butow, Phyllis; Byron, Keith; Callen, David; Campbell, Ian; Chauhan, Deepa; Chauhan, Manisha; Christian, Alice; Clarke, Christine; Colley, Alison; Cotton, Dick; Crook, Ashley; Cui, James; Culling, Bronwyn; Cummings, Margaret; Dawson, Sarah Jane; deFazio, Anna; Delatycki, Martin; Dickson, Rebecca; Dixon, Joanne; Dobrovic, Alexander; Dudding, Tracy; Edkins, Ted; Edwards, Stacey; Eisenbruch, Maurice; Farshid, Gelareh; Fawcett, Susan; Fellows, Andrew; Fenton, Georgina; Field, Michael; Firgaira, Frank; Flanagan, James; Fleming, Jean; Fong, Peter; Forbes, John; Fox, Stephen; French, Juliet; Friedlander, Michael; Gaff, Clara; Gardner, Mac; Gattas, Mike; George, Peter; Giles, Graham; Gill, Grantley; Goldblatt, Jack; Greening, Sian; Grist, Scott; Haan, Eric; Hardie, Kate; Harris, Marion; Hart, Stewart; Hayward, Nick; Healey, Sue; Heiniger, Louise; Hopper, John; Humphrey, Evelyn; Hunt, Clare; James, Paul; Jenkins, Mark; Jones, Alison; Kefford, Rick; Kidd, Alexa; Kiely, Belinda; Kirk, Judy; Koehler, Jessica; Kollias, James; Kovalenko, Serguei; Lakhani, Sunil; Leaming, Amanda; Leary, Jennifer; Lim, Jacqueline; Lindeman, Geoff; Lipton, Lara; Lobb, Liz; Mann, Graham; Marsh, Deborah; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Meiser, Bettina; Meldrum, Cliff; Milne, Roger; Mitchell, Gillian; Newman, Beth; Niedermayr, Eveline; Nightingale, Sophie; O'Connell, Shona; O'Loughlin, Imelda; Osborne, Richard; Pachter, Nick; Patterson, Briony; Peters, Lester; Phillips, Kelly; Price, Melanie; Purser, Lynne; Reeve, Tony; Reeve, Jeanne; Richards, Robert; Rickard, Edwina; Robinson, Bridget; Rudzki, Barney; Saleh, Mona; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Sambrook, Joe; Saunders, Christobel; Saunus, Jodi; Sayer, Robyn; Scott, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney; Scott, Clare; Seshadri, Ram; Sexton, Adrienne; Sharma, Raghwa; Shelling, Andrew; Simpson, Peter; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda; Suthers, Graeme; Sykes, Pamela; Tassell, Margaret; Taylor, Donna; Taylor, Jessica; Thierry, Benjamin; Thomas, Susan; Thompson, Ella; Thorne, Heather; Townshend, Sharron; Trainer, Alison; Tran, Lan; Tucker, Kathy; Tyler, Janet; Visvader, Jane; Walker, Logan; Walpole, Ian; Ward, Robin; Waring, Paul; Warner, Bev; Warren, Graham; Williams, Rachael; Wilson, Judy; Winship, Ingrid; Wu, Kathy; Young, Mary Ann; Bowtell, D.; Green, A.; Webb, P.; de Fazio, A.; Gertig, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a protein related with the carcinogenesis process and metastasis formation in many tumors. However, little is known about the prognostic value of ANXA1 in breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between ANXA1 expression, BRCA1/2

  9. Cell Biology and Cancer. Grades 9-12. NIH Curriculum Supplement Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs.

    This curriculum supplement guide brings the latest medical discoveries to classrooms. This module focuses on the objectives of introducing students to major concepts related to the development of cancer and its impacts, and developing an understanding of the relationship between biomedical research and personal and public health. This module…

  10. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Understanding Cancer What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Understanding Cancer What Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview ...

  12. Risk-reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy in Women at Higher Risk of Ovarian and Breast Cancer: A Single Institution Prospective Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Enzo; Tomao, Federica; Aletti, Giovanni; Bazzurini, Luca; Bocciolone, Luca; Boveri, Sara; Landoni, Fabio; Lapresa, Maria Teresa; Maruccio, Matteo; Parma, Gabriella; Peccatori, Fedro; Petrella, Maria Cristina; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Colombo, Nicoletta; Maggioni, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    Occult cancers' reported rates vary from 2-12% and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs) have been identified in 3-12% of the prophylactically removed tubes of women carrying a BRCA mutation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of tubal minor epithelial atypia (STIL), STIC, and occult invasive cancer and to evaluate the cancer-specific mortality in a prospective series of women at higher risk of ovarian and breast cancer undergoing risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) n a tertiary cancer center. A series of RRSO specimens (including endometrial biopsy) from women carrying a BRCA mutation, BRCA-unknown and BRCA-negative were collected between January 1998 and April 2016 at the Division of Gynecology at the European Institute of Oncology. Inclusion criteria were: asymptomatic women who had a negative gynecologic screening within 3 months prior to RRSO. Exclusion criteria were: women with ovarian/tubal cancer prior to RRSO. A total of 411 women underwent RRSO. Median age at RRSO was 47.0 years (range=32-70 years); 75.2% had a history of breast cancer. Fifteen women were diagnosed with an occult cancer (7 STIC, 4 invasive cancers, 2 breast cancers metastatic to the adnexa, 2 endometrial cancer) (3.6%). Sixteen showed a STIL (3.9%). When excluding cases with preoperative positive markers, the occult invasive cancer rate drops to 1.5%. Our study, covering an 18-year period, shows a substantial low risk of occult cancer among a high-risk population of women undergoing RRSO. Our data still support the indication for RRSO in higher-risk patients. An endometrial biopsy should also be routinely obtained as it raises the chances of detecting occult endometrial cancers that may be otherwise missed. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Race/ethnicity, genetic ancestry, and breast cancer-related lymphedema in the Pathways Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Yao, Song; Lee, Valerie S; Roh, Janise M; Zhu, Qianqian; Ergas, Isaac J; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yali; Kutner, Susan E; Quesenberry, Charles P; Ambrosone, Christine B; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a serious chronic condition after breast cancer (BC) surgery and treatment. It is unclear if BCRL risk varies by race/ethnicity. In a multiethnic prospective cohort study of 2953 BC patients, we examined the association of self-reported BCRL status with self-reported race/ethnicity and estimated genetic ancestry. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, with follow-up starting 6 months post-BC diagnosis. Estimates were further stratified by body mass index (BMI). By 48 months of follow-up, 342 (11.6 %) women reported having BCRL. Younger age at